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From KUSI:

Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating toys by gender
Posted: February 26, 2021

SACRAMENTO (KUSI) – A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

Ever since the return of feminism in 1969, it has been dogma among liberals without children that children don’t have strong opinions about what kind of toys they prefer, or at least not until society malignantly socially constructs their preferences for them. Periodically, when feminism falls out of fashion, for example, between about 1998 and 2012, society quietly reverts back to believing our own lying eyes: in truth, children tend to have extraordinarily strongly gendered tastes in toys.

But empiricism is no match for a priori logic these days, so we are headed back to the bad old days of making children cry on Christmas morning in the name of gender critical theory.

 
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  1. A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

     

    George was a softie compared to today's "crown". He didn't even institute gun control over here until faced with open rebellion-- and then only in two towns.

    At home, he's considered one of the better monarchs.

    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.

    Replies: @Charles St. Charles, @Captain Tripps

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad


    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

     

    Little did they know that an even more tyrannical group of people would rule over their descendants.

    You wish George III was still in charge.
    , @Gordo
    @AnotherDad

    Even old Triple George wasn't mad enough for this kind of nonsense.

    , @AndrewR
    @AnotherDad

    Don't you dare disrespect my boy.

    , @martin_2
    @AnotherDad

    How can one describe George III as a tyrant? A tyrant is someone like Hitler, Stalin or Pol Pot. I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that's all.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Joe Walker
    @AnotherDad

    I didn't know George III was woke.

  2. But empiricism is no match for a priori logic dogmatic blind faith these days, so we are headed back to the bad old days of making children cry on Christmas morning in the name of gender critical theory.

    FIFY.

    Eppur si muove.

  3. A nation, a civilization that can’t figure out that there is male and female is not going to be around very long.

    And the weird thing: male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @AnotherDad

    "And the weird thing: male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!"
    AnotherMom, I wish to apologize to you for telling your husband about certain Japanese porn sites.
    Especially if he pulls a Bruce Jenner on you.

    , @kaganovitch
    @AnotherDad

    male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!

    You say that like it's a good thing.

  4. Toys R. US is bankrupt. Most other large toy sellers are as well, no matter how “woke” they are.

    So this is, again, the Left smacking down small business.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @R.G. Camara


    Toys R. US is bankrupt...

    So this is, again, the Left smacking down small business.
     
    Toys Я Us wasn't "small business". (Well, maybe at the end...)

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  5. Ever since the return of feminism in 1969, it has been dogma among liberals without children that children don’t have strong opinions about what kind of toys they prefer, or at least not until society malignantly socially constructs their preferences for them.

    That’s true…..I used to love playing with my sisters Barbie’s. Because they can totally be bent into the shape of a handgun and if you wing Barbie’s head hard enough you’re can really raise a welt.

    • LOL: Hibernian, Cortes
  6. Liberals were making kids cry on Christmas morning long before 1969. See Saki’s “The Toys of Peace” –

    “Harvey,” said Eleanor Bope, handing her brother a cutting from a London morning paper of the 19th of March, “just read this about children’s toys, please; it exactly carries out some of our ideas about influence and upbringing.”

    “In the view of the National Peace Council,” ran the extract, “there are grave objections to presenting our boys with regiments of fighting men, batteries of guns, and squadrons of ‘Dreadnoughts.’ Boys, the Council admits, naturally love fighting and all the panoply of war . . . but that is no reason for encouraging, and perhaps giving permanent form to, their primitive instincts. At the Children’s Welfare Exhibition, which opens at Olympia in three weeks’ time, the Peace Council will make an alternative suggestion to parents in the shape of an exhibition of ‘peace toys.’ In front of a specially-painted representation of the Peace Palace at The Hague will be grouped, not miniature soldiers but miniature civilians, not guns but ploughs and the tools of industry . . . It is hoped that manufacturers may take a hint from the exhibit, which will bear fruit in the toy shops.”

    “The idea is certainly an interesting and very well-meaning one,” said Harvey; “whether it would succeed well in practice –”

    “We must try,” interrupted his sister (…)

    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ToysPeac.shtml

    • Replies: @Herp McDerp
    @Crawfurdmuir

    My wife's sister and her husband, good Minneapolis progressives, decided that their children would be raised without corrupting influences. One rule was "No war toys!"

    They realized the cause was lost when they found their four-year-old son playing with a solid jigsaw puzzle map of the United States, each state a separate wooden block. He was holding the Florida piece and running through the house shouting "BANG! BANG!" while shooting imaginary targets.

    (This was the same boy who put a peanut butter and jelly sandwich into the cassette slot of a VCR to "play" it.)

  7. Never mind all the hot air about “boomer-X-Y-Z-XX-XY-malarial”. The real divide is in how dangerous your toys were.

    We started to go downhill when Mr Potato Head went from sticky points in real potatoes to a plastic mock-up. I was shocked to learn that his happened as early as 1964. Mine was the real thing!

    The degeneration has become degenderation:

    Mr. Potato Head drops the mister, sort of

    The iconic Mr. Potato Head gets a 21st-century rebrand

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Reg Cæsar

    Kids used to use potato guns!

    https://www.tintoyarcade.com/image/cache/data/product/main/tta2964_metal_potato_gun_red__76175-1000x1000.jpg

    , @Rohirrimborn
    @Reg Cæsar

    , @Muggles
    @Reg Cæsar

    My potato toy was non binary.

    The top was fried, the bottom boiled and inside was kind of mashed.

    Playing with those made me the Them I am today...

  8. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    George was a softie compared to today’s “crown”. He didn’t even institute gun control over here until faced with open rebellion– and then only in two towns.

    At home, he’s considered one of the better monarchs.

    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.

    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
    @Reg Cæsar


    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.
     
    Genius.
    , @Captain Tripps
    @Reg Cæsar

    I thought the initial meeting between John Adams (1st Ambassador to Great Britain) and George III as depicted in the HBO miniseries "John Adams" was well done. Whether it occurred that way or not is anyone's guess, but Paul Giamatti (as Adams) and Tom Hollander (as George III) really acted that scene superbly. Don't have Youtube at work (it's now forbidden) otherwise I'd post a link...

  9. @R.G. Camara
    Toys R. US is bankrupt. Most other large toy sellers are as well, no matter how "woke" they are.

    So this is, again, the Left smacking down small business.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Toys R. US is bankrupt…

    So this is, again, the Left smacking down small business.

    Toys Я Us wasn’t “small business”. (Well, maybe at the end…)

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Reg Cæsar

    My point was this kind of genderless nonsense will only fall on small, independent toy stores. Toys R US and any other larger chains are long gone and won't be forced to suffer.

    Target and Walmart have toy sections, but only toy sections. Those can be more easily de-gendered by physically moving the aisles to mix together. Most Target and Walmart aisles are movable. Plus the sections aren't huge if physically moving each item needs to happen.

  10. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Steve, I seem to remember you writing somewhere that Barack Obama had read or was photographed with a copy of Jon Entine’s book Taboo. For the life of me I cannot find any record of Obama having read the book on Google. Do I have a false memory, or am I undergoing a Google brain fart, or has this been memoryholed?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Close, but not quite: Obama fell in love not with Jon Entine's 2000 book Taboo, but with David Epstein's 2012 book The Sports Gene:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/obama-is-a-genetic-determinist-when-it-comes-to-sports-talent/

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/obama-on-human-biodiversity-once-again/

  11. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Little did they know that an even more tyrannical group of people would rule over their descendants.

    You wish George III was still in charge.

  12. https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1365738514202189834

    Also, he hopped on pop.

    I hope they charge him with assault and battery.

    • LOL: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    When I hear things like that--though I appreciate Dr Seuss in theory--I give thanks that my house includes a wood-panelled library with fireplace and wet bar. And a firm prohibition against women and children ever crossing its threshold.

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Has Jesse Jackson been consulted about this? I remember him reading "Green Eggs and Ham" out loud on Saturday Night Live decades ago, in his preacher's cadences, as if it were a sermon, with the emphasis in idiosyncratic places ("I will not eat green eggs and ham/I will not eat them, SAM I AM!"). Very funny.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  13. They’re gonna cry anyway when their Cheap China-made Crap breaks by the end of Christmas day.

    The latest thing, a rock tumbler, went for 3 weeks of its month cycle (4 stages) to make gems out of rough rocks. Then the motor would quit after 15 seconds with all LEDs blinking. We returned it to Whole Foods (pretty convenient compared to boxing it up for UPS), and got a 2nd one. It went only 5 days before we got the same problem. Amazon will not replace it – we hope to see the $70 soon.

    This brings up a point that all this stupidity put on retailers just sends more people on-line. They can’t screw with your searches too bad, can they? Even if they force the on-line retailers to not distinguish boys/girls items, the reviews will tell you.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "cheap made china crap"

    The 90's called and they want their complaint back. Things have progressed and at this point you can get whatever level of quality you want to pay for among your Chinese made stuff and for the cheapest of stuff China is getting too expensive so that manufacturing is moving on.

    This is not a comment on the wisdom of off-shoring all our manufacturing or the range of impacts on our society and culture, but the "chinese made stuff is crap" meme is passe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @YetAnotherAnon

  14. The forever virus.

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The decline has bottomed out, and I expect a new surge, even with the vaccine slowly rolling out. Too many people lack the self discipline to take proper precautions.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  15. @Anon
    OT

    Steve, I seem to remember you writing somewhere that Barack Obama had read or was photographed with a copy of Jon Entine's book Taboo. For the life of me I cannot find any record of Obama having read the book on Google. Do I have a false memory, or am I undergoing a Google brain fart, or has this been memoryholed?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Close, but not quite: Obama fell in love not with Jon Entine’s 2000 book Taboo, but with David Epstein’s 2012 book The Sports Gene:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/obama-is-a-genetic-determinist-when-it-comes-to-sports-talent/

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/obama-on-human-biodiversity-once-again/

  16. Toxic masculinity must be nipped in the bud.

  17. This would never survive a first amendment challenge.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Half Canadian

    The United States has a 1st Amendment? This is news to me!

    , @Wilkey
    @Half Canadian


    This would never survive a first amendment challenge.
     
    LOL. The First Amendment...

    Basically where the courts now stand is that government can outlaw any business behavior (and sometimes even individual behavior) which leads to discrimination (unless it’s against whites) or even hurt feelings. The government can even mandate discrimination against you, if you are white.

    Some jurisdictions (California and New Jersey, iirc) have even outlawed conversion therapy, which is arguably nothing more than an exercise of free speech. The Supreme Court has refused the opportunity to overturn these bans.

    Freedom of speech, assembly, religion, and the press are all protected by the Constitution. But anti-discrimination laws have superceded these explicit Constitutional rights. That’s the country we now live in.

  18. I was born in 1962. My father was not wealthy; he operated gigantic cranes at an East Coast naval shipyard and took various odd jobs on weekends. My mother took care of me and my brother. I can fondly recall receiving all these items during the first 10 or so Christmases I can remember:

    * a Daisy BB Gun
    * a drum Set
    * a fire truck that I actually could sit in and pedal down the sidewalk
    * a chemistry set
    * a woodburning kit
    * an erector set
    * an electric racetrack as big as our living room
    * a cowboy guitar
    * countless cap guns
    * GI Joes
    * an electric football game that moved the tiny plastic players by vibrating a painted thin metal “field”
    * another BB gun that held even more BBs and had more power
    * a dartboard
    * the game “Operation”
    * a bunch of board and card games
    * an archery set
    * slingshot launched miniature airplanes
    * various balls, gloves and bats – football, baseball, tennis, bowling – no soccer, no one in my neighborhood even heard of soccer
    * sets of what seemed to be hundreds of little green plastic army men in every conceivable firing position
    * Hot Wheels and Matchbox miniature cars
    * a Radio Shack 50-in-1 electrical projects kit
    * a couple of transistor radios
    * all manner of toy guns
    * a few genuine working rockets
    * several bicycles of increasing size, but no helmets, ever.
    * a pocket knife or two or three
    * a Big Wheel trike
    * at least a few dozen toys I can’t recall that are no longer available because of safety

    I truly lived in a Golden Age.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Charles St. Charles

    @Super70sSports could get a lot of jokes out of your album of Christmas pictures:

    https://twitter.com/Super70sSports?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

    , @Lagertha
    @Charles St. Charles

    you are a lovely person. I just copied this to send to young people who do not understand that OUR COUNTRY TIS OF THEE is under!

    , @TWS
    @Charles St. Charles

    It was a golden age and now we are like the classical age people lamenting a lost past. The future, those who remember will hate us for what we squandered.

    , @njguy73
    @Charles St. Charles

    Yes, you lived in a golden age.

    You do realize that every Gen-Xer, Millennial, and Gen-Zer hates your guts, right?

    And that any one of us would trade lives with you in a New York minute.

  19. @Charles St. Charles
    I was born in 1962. My father was not wealthy; he operated gigantic cranes at an East Coast naval shipyard and took various odd jobs on weekends. My mother took care of me and my brother. I can fondly recall receiving all these items during the first 10 or so Christmases I can remember:

    * a Daisy BB Gun
    * a drum Set
    * a fire truck that I actually could sit in and pedal down the sidewalk
    * a chemistry set
    * a woodburning kit
    * an erector set
    * an electric racetrack as big as our living room
    * a cowboy guitar
    * countless cap guns
    * GI Joes
    * an electric football game that moved the tiny plastic players by vibrating a painted thin metal “field”
    * another BB gun that held even more BBs and had more power
    * a dartboard
    * the game “Operation”
    * a bunch of board and card games
    * an archery set
    * slingshot launched miniature airplanes
    * various balls, gloves and bats - football, baseball, tennis, bowling - no soccer, no one in my neighborhood even heard of soccer
    * sets of what seemed to be hundreds of little green plastic army men in every conceivable firing position
    * Hot Wheels and Matchbox miniature cars
    * a Radio Shack 50-in-1 electrical projects kit
    * a couple of transistor radios
    * all manner of toy guns
    * a few genuine working rockets
    * several bicycles of increasing size, but no helmets, ever.
    * a pocket knife or two or three
    * a Big Wheel trike
    * at least a few dozen toys I can’t recall that are no longer available because of safety

    I truly lived in a Golden Age.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lagertha, @TWS, @njguy73

    @Super70sSports could get a lot of jokes out of your album of Christmas pictures:

    https://twitter.com/Super70sSports?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

  20. @Reg Cæsar
    @R.G. Camara


    Toys R. US is bankrupt...

    So this is, again, the Left smacking down small business.
     
    Toys Я Us wasn't "small business". (Well, maybe at the end...)

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    My point was this kind of genderless nonsense will only fall on small, independent toy stores. Toys R US and any other larger chains are long gone and won’t be forced to suffer.

    Target and Walmart have toy sections, but only toy sections. Those can be more easily de-gendered by physically moving the aisles to mix together. Most Target and Walmart aisles are movable. Plus the sections aren’t huge if physically moving each item needs to happen.

  21. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

     

    George was a softie compared to today's "crown". He didn't even institute gun control over here until faced with open rebellion-- and then only in two towns.

    At home, he's considered one of the better monarchs.

    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.

    Replies: @Charles St. Charles, @Captain Tripps

    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.

    Genius.

  22. With some leftist policies, I can understand how some people will think that some people will benefit from them. But this will not benefit anyone in any way.

  23. :
    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    However, being a tomboy, many of my toys were not the typical ones for a girl in that era. The few dolls I owned languished at the back of my closet, but I loved my Super Spirograph, building and painting model cars, my Schwinn Stingray bike (although the white wicker basket with blue plastic flowers around the rim was the first thing to come off), a magnetic sculpture set with rods, ball bearings and flat pieces that I could arrange in any form I liked, a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters, wooden blocks when I was very young and so on. I had – and still have – an artistic bent, so my parents didn’t hesitate to buy me all kinds of art supplies and in many ways, they were better than any toy. Since the girls in my neighborhood were older than I was, I played baseball with the boys who were my age. I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @PatriotGal2257

    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Ganderson, @PatriotGal2257

    , @Charles St. Charles
    @PatriotGal2257


    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.
     
    I didn’t have a sister, but I’ll bet you’re right about boy toys being more exciting, though I will confess I was covetous of my cousins Easy Bake Oven...

    I forgot about Spirograph!

    Replies: @PatriotGal2257

    , @ThreeCranes
    @PatriotGal2257

    "I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl."

    Um, do you have any plans for this coming Saturday afternoon?

    (Just kidding, just kidding. But you are/were the kind of gal I would have said that to forty years ago.)

    Replies: @PatriotGal2257

    , @MEH 0910
    @PatriotGal2257


    a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thingmaker

    Thingmaker, also called Creepy Crawlers, is an activity toy made by Mattel, beginning in 1964. The toy consists of a series of die-cast metal moulds resembling various bug-like creatures, into which is poured a liquid chemical substance called "Plastigoop", which comes in assorted colours. The mould is then heated to about 390 °F (199 °C) in an open-face electric hot plate oven. The Plastigoop is cured by the heat, and when cooled forms semi-solid, rubbery replicas which can be removed from the mould.

    The concept of the Thingmaker was introduced in 1963, as part of Mattel's Vac-U-Maker set. This omnibus toy combined the new moulds and Plastigoop technology with the existing Vac-U-Form machine, which molded simple sculptures by heating thin sheets of plastic, then using a vacuum pump to form the softened plastic over hard plastic forms. Following this introduction period, the Thingmaker portion was spun off as a separate set, and launched as the "Creepy Crawlers" line.

    Mattel packaged moulds from various sets to be sold separately, and also combined moulds into larger omnibus editions, encompassing several themes into one set, under names such as "Triple Thingmaker", "Super Thingmaker" and "Every Thingmaker". Mattel produced many Thingmaker sets as follow-ups to the original "Creepy Crawlers" throughout the 1960s, utilising a variety of themes, aimed at both boys and girls. There were also several exclusive single mould sets, such as Superman and Tarzan, and original Mattel concepts including Squirtles and Gangly Danglies.
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thingmaker#Varieties_of_Thingmaker_mould_sets

    Varieties of Thingmaker mould sets
    • Giant Creepy Crawlers (1965) — This set featured nine moulds (as did the original "Creepy Crawlers"), but these new moulds featured just one giant creature apiece.
    • Fighting Men (1965) — This set of six moulds could be used to create mini soldier figures, using an innovative two-part mould to give the Fighting Men a front and a back. The set also included pieces of wire to place in the figure, making it bendable with the bottom wire protrusions being able to stand on a styrofoam base. Other moulds in the set created weaponry and equipment for the Fighting Men to carry into battle.
    • Creeple Peeple (1965) — This five-mould set formed strange heads, arms and feet. When assembled onto a pencil, they formed weird, Troll-like creatures.
    • Fun Flowers (1966) — Seven moulds full of different styles and shapes of flowers and leaves, for use in decorating and design.
    • Fright Factory (1966) — Five of this set's seven moulds were dedicated to creepy disguises, making pieces such as fake scars, snaggled teeth, or a third eye for one's forehead. Another mould (with a special insert) made a shrunken head, and the last made a dangly skeleton that one built from parts.
    • Incredible Edibles (1967) - A Thingmaker that made edible pieces. It used a special goop called Gobble De-goop which was placed in molds and cooked like regular Plasti-goop.
    • Picadoos (1967) — A Thingmaker for artists. This one featured moulds with 10x10-space numbered grids. By carefully placing coloured Plastigoop in the grid, one could create decorative artwork in either beads, mosaic tile, or cross-stitch varieties.
    • Mini-Dragons (1967) — The eight moulds in this set formed wings, horns, claws, tails, and other body parts, which could be combined into various fantasy creatures.
    • Eeeeks! (1968) — In the same vein as Mini-Dragons, this set of eight moulds formed several varieties of mix-and-match legs, bodies, heads, wings, antennae, etc., to create large, bizarre insects.
    • Zoofie-Goofies (1968) — Seven moulds form heads, bodies and feet of various animals, from cats and dogs to elephants and lions.
    • Hot Wheels Factory (1969) Moulds made two piece bodies that fit together with wheels embedded into the bottom mould so you could make your own Hot Wheels cars.
    • DollyMaker (1969) — Five two-sided moulds are used to create two styles of little dolls, and a wardrobe of late '60s fashions and accessories for them.
    • Super Cartoon Maker (1969) — A licensed Thingmaker, the eight moulds in this set form replicas of Charles Schulz's Peanuts characters, such as Snoopy, Charlie Brown and Lucy.
    • Jillions of Jewels (1970) — The last of the classic Mattel Thingmakers. The set had five moulds, but instead of the liquid Plastigoop, these formed solid plastic "gemstones" and jewelry frames from two kinds of powdered "Jewel Dust" compounds.
     
    https://www.patti-goop.com/creeple-peeple.html
    https://www.patti-goop.com/uploads/1/3/0/3/13032746/769543_orig.jpg
    https://www.patti-goop.com/uploads/1/3/0/3/13032746/edited/1451421.jpeg

    https://www.patti-goop.com/mini-dragons.html
    https://www.patti-goop.com/uploads/1/3/0/3/13032746/6037776_orig.jpg
    https://www.patti-goop.com/uploads/1/3/0/3/13032746/9136701_orig.jpg
  24. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1365738514202189834

    Also, he hopped on pop.

    I hope they charge him with assault and battery.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPxN4iFN9Go

    Replies: @Polistra, @Gary in Gramercy

    When I hear things like that–though I appreciate Dr Seuss in theory–I give thanks that my house includes a wood-panelled library with fireplace and wet bar. And a firm prohibition against women and children ever crossing its threshold.

  25. @Charles St. Charles
    I was born in 1962. My father was not wealthy; he operated gigantic cranes at an East Coast naval shipyard and took various odd jobs on weekends. My mother took care of me and my brother. I can fondly recall receiving all these items during the first 10 or so Christmases I can remember:

    * a Daisy BB Gun
    * a drum Set
    * a fire truck that I actually could sit in and pedal down the sidewalk
    * a chemistry set
    * a woodburning kit
    * an erector set
    * an electric racetrack as big as our living room
    * a cowboy guitar
    * countless cap guns
    * GI Joes
    * an electric football game that moved the tiny plastic players by vibrating a painted thin metal “field”
    * another BB gun that held even more BBs and had more power
    * a dartboard
    * the game “Operation”
    * a bunch of board and card games
    * an archery set
    * slingshot launched miniature airplanes
    * various balls, gloves and bats - football, baseball, tennis, bowling - no soccer, no one in my neighborhood even heard of soccer
    * sets of what seemed to be hundreds of little green plastic army men in every conceivable firing position
    * Hot Wheels and Matchbox miniature cars
    * a Radio Shack 50-in-1 electrical projects kit
    * a couple of transistor radios
    * all manner of toy guns
    * a few genuine working rockets
    * several bicycles of increasing size, but no helmets, ever.
    * a pocket knife or two or three
    * a Big Wheel trike
    * at least a few dozen toys I can’t recall that are no longer available because of safety

    I truly lived in a Golden Age.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lagertha, @TWS, @njguy73

    you are a lovely person. I just copied this to send to young people who do not understand that OUR COUNTRY TIS OF THEE is under!

  26. @PatriotGal2257
    @Charles St. Charles:
    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    However, being a tomboy, many of my toys were not the typical ones for a girl in that era. The few dolls I owned languished at the back of my closet, but I loved my Super Spirograph, building and painting model cars, my Schwinn Stingray bike (although the white wicker basket with blue plastic flowers around the rim was the first thing to come off), a magnetic sculpture set with rods, ball bearings and flat pieces that I could arrange in any form I liked, a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters, wooden blocks when I was very young and so on. I had - and still have - an artistic bent, so my parents didn't hesitate to buy me all kinds of art supplies and in many ways, they were better than any toy. Since the girls in my neighborhood were older than I was, I played baseball with the boys who were my age. I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Charles St. Charles, @ThreeCranes, @MEH 0910

    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    What does Shawn Michaels have to do with this?

    , @Ganderson
    @Steve Sailer

    “ Woody Wagon, just broke out
    They’re Micro Mighty Moe’s Look out!”

    , @PatriotGal2257
    @Steve Sailer

    @Steve Sailer
    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    LOLOLOL!

  27. Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating toys by gender

    Why just children’s toys? I think it would be cool if every twenty feet or so at Home Depot, they had lingerie. (C cups and below please.)

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @International Jew



    Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating toys by gender
     
    Why just children’s toys?
     
    Good point. Boutiques should be fined for just selling women's clothing. Men's clothing stores should be fined for not selling dresses. Shoe stores should not be allowed to market high-heel shoes just to women.
  28. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/Breaking911/status/1365738514202189834

    Also, he hopped on pop.

    I hope they charge him with assault and battery.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPxN4iFN9Go

    Replies: @Polistra, @Gary in Gramercy

    Has Jesse Jackson been consulted about this? I remember him reading “Green Eggs and Ham” out loud on Saturday Night Live decades ago, in his preacher’s cadences, as if it were a sermon, with the emphasis in idiosyncratic places (“I will not eat green eggs and ham/I will not eat them, SAM I AM!”). Very funny.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Gary in Gramercy

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1mqg4C0awA

  29. @PatriotGal2257
    @Charles St. Charles:
    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    However, being a tomboy, many of my toys were not the typical ones for a girl in that era. The few dolls I owned languished at the back of my closet, but I loved my Super Spirograph, building and painting model cars, my Schwinn Stingray bike (although the white wicker basket with blue plastic flowers around the rim was the first thing to come off), a magnetic sculpture set with rods, ball bearings and flat pieces that I could arrange in any form I liked, a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters, wooden blocks when I was very young and so on. I had - and still have - an artistic bent, so my parents didn't hesitate to buy me all kinds of art supplies and in many ways, they were better than any toy. Since the girls in my neighborhood were older than I was, I played baseball with the boys who were my age. I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Charles St. Charles, @ThreeCranes, @MEH 0910

    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    I didn’t have a sister, but I’ll bet you’re right about boy toys being more exciting, though I will confess I was covetous of my cousins Easy Bake Oven…

    I forgot about Spirograph!

    • Replies: @PatriotGal2257
    @Charles St. Charles

    @Charles St. Charles

    I did have an Easy Bake Oven which I used every so often. But I also had a mother and two aunts who were excellent cooks and bakers and it wasn't long before I was helping them and getting to use real kitchen appliances. The Easy Bake Oven got relegated to the closet.

    On the other hand, I begged one of my uncles to buy me a cap gun because one of my male playmates had one. He obliged.

  30. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/BNODesk/status/1365465268760285192

    https://twitter.com/BNODesk/status/1365576974312308738

    https://twitter.com/NBCNews/status/1364448973717561344

    The forever virus.

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    The decline has bottomed out, and I expect a new surge, even with the vaccine slowly rolling out. Too many people lack the self discipline to take proper precautions.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Mike_from_SGV

    "The decline has bottomed out, and I expect a new surge, even with the vaccine slowly rolling out. Too many people lack the self discipline to take proper precautions."

    Absolutely!

  31. Not separating boys’ and girls’ clothing by gender?! Also implies abolishing boys’ and girls’ sizes. Must apply to shoes too. Imagine the joys of preschool shopping under that regime. I presume that clerks would be forbidden to answer questions about how to find gender-favored styles amidst the chaos.

    Should apply to mens’ and women’s clothing too, right? High heels must be readily available in formerly-male size 14, else lawsuit. And, no more gender-exclusive shops! Victoria’s Secret, Gentleman’s Wearhouse: trans-formed or shut down.

    I hope they pass it, would reduce the number of woke lawmakers in the next California election.

  32. @AnotherDad
    A nation, a civilization that can't figure out that there is male and female is not going to be around very long.

    And the weird thing: male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @kaganovitch

    “And the weird thing: male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!”
    AnotherMom, I wish to apologize to you for telling your husband about certain Japanese porn sites.
    Especially if he pulls a Bruce Jenner on you.

  33. Steve Sailer:

    “Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969.”

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it “makes them happy”? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won’t have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    • Troll: TWS
    • Replies: @Spud Boy
    @Rockford Tyson

    "...I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing."

    From what I can tell from a brief search, the popularity of toy guns has been declining for some time.

    Liberals mistakenly assume that society will never improve without their government-imposed "progressive" agenda.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Rockford Tyson


    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives.

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing.
     
    I find the lack of kids running around with toy guns a sad commentary on what the multi-generational attack of the "School Marms" (thanks AnotherDad!) have done to US society.

    America used to consider risk taking an integral part of the greatness of the nation. America's airwaves used to be filled with toy guns and chemistry sets; remember the Evil Lawn Darts?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8fU3_VMeL8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYNeRsKyweI

    Toy guns are a proxy for risk taking, indeed, venturing forth in the face of danger. What TPTB want is for Americans to be unarmed and helpless in the presence of danger. You can see the "End Game" as to what they want us to become in PRC; listen to Winston here:

    https://youtu.be/iMfpyixvuTo?t=150

    [2:30]

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    , @JMcG
    @Rockford Tyson

    Each of my children received a real gun at age six, as soon as they could recite the four rules and demonstrate what they meant.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    , @anon
    @Rockford Tyson

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/2d39096182c9086cd6c585f345816863/tumblr_inline_oqlvwePiiU1tr11bp_540.gif

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    , @Possumman
    @Rockford Tyson

    Big boys love guns too-hence the current ammo shortage.

  34. @Gary in Gramercy
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Has Jesse Jackson been consulted about this? I remember him reading "Green Eggs and Ham" out loud on Saturday Night Live decades ago, in his preacher's cadences, as if it were a sermon, with the emphasis in idiosyncratic places ("I will not eat green eggs and ham/I will not eat them, SAM I AM!"). Very funny.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  35. @AnotherDad
    A nation, a civilization that can't figure out that there is male and female is not going to be around very long.

    And the weird thing: male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @kaganovitch

    male and female is just a heck of a lot more fun!

    You say that like it’s a good thing.

  36. @Achmed E. Newman
    They're gonna cry anyway when their Cheap China-made Crap breaks by the end of Christmas day.

    The latest thing, a rock tumbler, went for 3 weeks of its month cycle (4 stages) to make gems out of rough rocks. Then the motor would quit after 15 seconds with all LEDs blinking. We returned it to Whole Foods (pretty convenient compared to boxing it up for UPS), and got a 2nd one. It went only 5 days before we got the same problem. Amazon will not replace it - we hope to see the $70 soon.

    This brings up a point that all this stupidity put on retailers just sends more people on-line. They can't screw with your searches too bad, can they? Even if they force the on-line retailers to not distinguish boys/girls items, the reviews will tell you.

    Replies: @vhrm

    “cheap made china crap”

    The 90’s called and they want their complaint back. Things have progressed and at this point you can get whatever level of quality you want to pay for among your Chinese made stuff and for the cheapest of stuff China is getting too expensive so that manufacturing is moving on.

    This is not a comment on the wisdom of off-shoring all our manufacturing or the range of impacts on our society and culture, but the “chinese made stuff is crap” meme is passe.

    • Troll: TWS
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @vhrm

    I'm sorry, but from what I see, it's just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s. I've got flannel shirts from Wal-Mart bought in 2000 or so that lasted for 15 years (yes, they need to go now). Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    For bicycles, toys, auto parts, camping gear, shoes, even super glue, it'a ALL CRAP now. Oh, and BTW, also face masks, in which you'll get bad batches (I do have to wear them for periods at work) in which always the same corner strap pops off where it was spot-joined with heat (these are the non-woven material). I take 'em off and do a 2-minute field repair if I can find a knife.

    Maybe there are big-ticket items that you've gotten that work well. I really doubt it'll be their cars, which I don't see over here yet anyway. I've been to China 11 times, and been at one of the factories making, yeah, this is coincidental, face masks. The boss was known to save money by leaving out the filtering material itself. Well, quality is not Job 1 over there, so, you know ...

    Here's the gist of what I wrote in "Cheap China-made crap in a throw-away country", "Inflation and Chinese Imports and Exports" and "Cheap China-Made Crap - who's responsible?": In the 1990s and up through early 00s, American manufacturing companies were saving money by getting the much cheaper labor in China alone. Then since profits needed to keep increasing, once that savings had been accomplished, the next was to save by cutting on quality. Now, the cheap Chinese labor is a thing of the past, so there is automation and outsourcing of labor from China to Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, etc. I also don't put all the blame on the Chinese, at least for products that are still designed in the US.

    I used to be shy about returning things to Target, Wal-Mart etc, especially if I'd gotten a little bit of use out of the item. Now, I go straight back, as many times as it takes. For a $300 exercise bike (in 2010 $$) we ended up on our 3rd one (I got much quicker with the assembly process!) and the 3rd one amazingly had really solid caged ball bearings rather than the Huffy bicycle style ones in the 1st two. See "The Softer Noisier Side of Sears".

    I usually agree with you, Vhrm, but I don't on this topic. I've seen it all and written lots about it.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @vhrm

    "the “chinese made stuff is crap” meme is passe"

    Try finding a car footpump that doesn't give up after a couple of years, where my English-made 1970s one is still going strong.

    In the UK there's actually a market in old restored footpumps.

    https://vintagepumps.co.uk/

    Talking about poor quality imports ....

    A number of boxes had false bottoms stuffed with compressed blocks of cocaine powder, which had a purity of 61 to 68 per cent after being cut with deworming agent Levamisole.


    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/juan-lopez-cocaine-smuggled-yam-shipment-essex-b921443.html

    https://www.healtheuropa.eu/cocaine-contaminant-levamisole/88825/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levamisole#Adulterant_in_illegal_drugs

    "Individuals who regularly take the cocaine contaminant, levamisole, demonstrate impaired cognitive performance & a thinned prefrontal cortex."

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

  37. Date?

    Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating clothes by gender

  38. Mercifully, the proposed law says nothing about color so the girls will still easily find the pink ones.

  39. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    Even old Triple George wasn’t mad enough for this kind of nonsense.

  40. @vhrm
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "cheap made china crap"

    The 90's called and they want their complaint back. Things have progressed and at this point you can get whatever level of quality you want to pay for among your Chinese made stuff and for the cheapest of stuff China is getting too expensive so that manufacturing is moving on.

    This is not a comment on the wisdom of off-shoring all our manufacturing or the range of impacts on our society and culture, but the "chinese made stuff is crap" meme is passe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @YetAnotherAnon

    I’m sorry, but from what I see, it’s just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s. I’ve got flannel shirts from Wal-Mart bought in 2000 or so that lasted for 15 years (yes, they need to go now). Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    For bicycles, toys, auto parts, camping gear, shoes, even super glue, it’a ALL CRAP now. Oh, and BTW, also face masks, in which you’ll get bad batches (I do have to wear them for periods at work) in which always the same corner strap pops off where it was spot-joined with heat (these are the non-woven material). I take ’em off and do a 2-minute field repair if I can find a knife.

    Maybe there are big-ticket items that you’ve gotten that work well. I really doubt it’ll be their cars, which I don’t see over here yet anyway. I’ve been to China 11 times, and been at one of the factories making, yeah, this is coincidental, face masks. The boss was known to save money by leaving out the filtering material itself. Well, quality is not Job 1 over there, so, you know …

    Here’s the gist of what I wrote in “Cheap China-made crap in a throw-away country”, “Inflation and Chinese Imports and Exports” and “Cheap China-Made Crap – who’s responsible?”: In the 1990s and up through early 00s, American manufacturing companies were saving money by getting the much cheaper labor in China alone. Then since profits needed to keep increasing, once that savings had been accomplished, the next was to save by cutting on quality. Now, the cheap Chinese labor is a thing of the past, so there is automation and outsourcing of labor from China to Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, etc. I also don’t put all the blame on the Chinese, at least for products that are still designed in the US.

    I used to be shy about returning things to Target, Wal-Mart etc, especially if I’d gotten a little bit of use out of the item. Now, I go straight back, as many times as it takes. For a $300 exercise bike (in 2010 $$) we ended up on our 3rd one (I got much quicker with the assembly process!) and the 3rd one amazingly had really solid caged ball bearings rather than the Huffy bicycle style ones in the 1st two. See “The Softer Noisier Side of Sears”.

    I usually agree with you, Vhrm, but I don’t on this topic. I’ve seen it all and written lots about it.

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I’m sorry, but from what I see, it’s just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s.
     
    I agree, and I don't think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make. It's not just Walmart that has gone cheap. I have old shirts and pants from Izod, Levi's, Gap, and others that are clearly made from different materials than the old equivalent models. Bicycles and washing machines seem to be made worse, too. It seems that anywhere plastic can replace metal, it's done. Unfortunately, prices have gone up, and often by a fair amount.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    Pants, shirts, underwear. They're all in tatters in a couple of years.

    We had a twenty-five year old percolator which finally gave out a couple of years ago. The replacement is already non-functional.

    , @obwandiyag
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a Honeywell space heater I got at Walmart that lasted 20 years, and I ran the hell out of it. They discontinued the item of course. And for some reason there are no used ones on Ebay. People must be loathe to part with them.

    Wonder how long the new one will last.

    I also got these wonderful all-wool socks at Walmart. Soft, warm, not scratchy or too tight at all. Now they all have synthetic fibers in them and they're all scratchy, too hot, and too tight.

    This brings up another favorite topic of mine. The young people say, "Everything's on the internet." My god, what kind of deluded fool thinks that? I guess deluded fools who have never read anything but the internet. "Almost everything's not on the internet" is the proper formulation.

    For instance, trying to look up where those all-wool socks came from, or my flannel shirts, or my jeans, or where to get more of the same design. You can't research clothes at all. It is also, interestingly enough, difficult to impossible to find the sources of most of your food. It just comes from the can, that's all you're allowed to know. Of course, the ingredients in the can probably come from 300 different sources, just like a McD's hamburger comes from 300 different cows. But still. Don't ask. They don't want you to know.

    Not to mention more esoteric things, like I found this reference to an Etruscan tomb inscription, and two other predecessors of it. Couldn't find a picture of the inscription. Couldn't find anything about the predecessors. And my research skills are better than a young person's, at the very least, for young people, the same young people who think everything is on the internet, look at the first hit, and then, if it's not what they're looking for, they whine, "I can't find it."

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman

  41. @Half Canadian
    This would never survive a first amendment challenge.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Wilkey

    The United States has a 1st Amendment? This is news to me!

    • Agree: Ian Smith
  42. @Steve Sailer
    @PatriotGal2257

    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Ganderson, @PatriotGal2257

    What does Shawn Michaels have to do with this?

  43. What about Amazon? If I search, “toys for girls” will they return a mix of toys for boys and girls? Or perhaps you’ll receive a message,

    “Search Error. Your account has been closed, your credit card has been disabled. You have been referred to the U.S. Department of Justice for re-education.”

  44. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969."

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it "makes them happy"? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won't have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @Joe Stalin, @JMcG, @anon, @Possumman

    “…I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing.”

    From what I can tell from a brief search, the popularity of toy guns has been declining for some time.

    Liberals mistakenly assume that society will never improve without their government-imposed “progressive” agenda.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  45. @PatriotGal2257
    @Charles St. Charles:
    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    However, being a tomboy, many of my toys were not the typical ones for a girl in that era. The few dolls I owned languished at the back of my closet, but I loved my Super Spirograph, building and painting model cars, my Schwinn Stingray bike (although the white wicker basket with blue plastic flowers around the rim was the first thing to come off), a magnetic sculpture set with rods, ball bearings and flat pieces that I could arrange in any form I liked, a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters, wooden blocks when I was very young and so on. I had - and still have - an artistic bent, so my parents didn't hesitate to buy me all kinds of art supplies and in many ways, they were better than any toy. Since the girls in my neighborhood were older than I was, I played baseball with the boys who were my age. I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Charles St. Charles, @ThreeCranes, @MEH 0910

    “I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.”

    Um, do you have any plans for this coming Saturday afternoon?

    (Just kidding, just kidding. But you are/were the kind of gal I would have said that to forty years ago.)

    • Replies: @PatriotGal2257
    @ThreeCranes

    Hahaha! Well, thanks. [blush]

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

  46. It’s another indication, in case you needed one, that the Democratic Party is the electoral vehicle for the worst sort of elementary schoolteacher.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Art Deco

    Still waiting for the Houseman pix. Do you wear lederhosen whilst in your den? If so, please send pix of you lounging in your den whilst wearing your Bavarian costume with the Houseman pix.

  47. @vhrm
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "cheap made china crap"

    The 90's called and they want their complaint back. Things have progressed and at this point you can get whatever level of quality you want to pay for among your Chinese made stuff and for the cheapest of stuff China is getting too expensive so that manufacturing is moving on.

    This is not a comment on the wisdom of off-shoring all our manufacturing or the range of impacts on our society and culture, but the "chinese made stuff is crap" meme is passe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @YetAnotherAnon

    “the “chinese made stuff is crap” meme is passe”

    Try finding a car footpump that doesn’t give up after a couple of years, where my English-made 1970s one is still going strong.

    In the UK there’s actually a market in old restored footpumps.

    https://vintagepumps.co.uk/

    Talking about poor quality imports ….

    A number of boxes had false bottoms stuffed with compressed blocks of cocaine powder, which had a purity of 61 to 68 per cent after being cut with deworming agent Levamisole.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/juan-lopez-cocaine-smuggled-yam-shipment-essex-b921443.html

    https://www.healtheuropa.eu/cocaine-contaminant-levamisole/88825/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levamisole#Adulterant_in_illegal_drugs

    “Individuals who regularly take the cocaine contaminant, levamisole, demonstrate impaired cognitive performance & a thinned prefrontal cortex.”

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Chinese made foot pump for my high-end inflatable kayak came with an internal return spring that was made out of ordinary, not stainless, steel. Of course, after a couple years use in saltwater, the spring was so corroded that the pump became unusable. I took it all apart, sandblasted and then coated the spring with three coats of boat-builder's epoxy. Reassembled it and it works still.

    The point being, that there's always some crucial part that is just not right. As often as not, it's one you can't see. This wasn't a cheap pump either. Everything else was fine. I hate throwing away a perfectly good piece of equipment just because of one flaw.

  48. It will be illegal for a shop to label a toy as for boys. Obviously menswear and womenswear are next. I can see why slightly unstable people project out that there is a grand plan with a determined end, but really it is just the impulse to control and make people conform to your abstract ideas run wild. Interesting that the people in charge think of themselves as “the resistance” and eternally fighting the man. It allows them to try to control everything without even realising it. Their fear and loathing is palpable.

  49. @Charles St. Charles
    I was born in 1962. My father was not wealthy; he operated gigantic cranes at an East Coast naval shipyard and took various odd jobs on weekends. My mother took care of me and my brother. I can fondly recall receiving all these items during the first 10 or so Christmases I can remember:

    * a Daisy BB Gun
    * a drum Set
    * a fire truck that I actually could sit in and pedal down the sidewalk
    * a chemistry set
    * a woodburning kit
    * an erector set
    * an electric racetrack as big as our living room
    * a cowboy guitar
    * countless cap guns
    * GI Joes
    * an electric football game that moved the tiny plastic players by vibrating a painted thin metal “field”
    * another BB gun that held even more BBs and had more power
    * a dartboard
    * the game “Operation”
    * a bunch of board and card games
    * an archery set
    * slingshot launched miniature airplanes
    * various balls, gloves and bats - football, baseball, tennis, bowling - no soccer, no one in my neighborhood even heard of soccer
    * sets of what seemed to be hundreds of little green plastic army men in every conceivable firing position
    * Hot Wheels and Matchbox miniature cars
    * a Radio Shack 50-in-1 electrical projects kit
    * a couple of transistor radios
    * all manner of toy guns
    * a few genuine working rockets
    * several bicycles of increasing size, but no helmets, ever.
    * a pocket knife or two or three
    * a Big Wheel trike
    * at least a few dozen toys I can’t recall that are no longer available because of safety

    I truly lived in a Golden Age.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lagertha, @TWS, @njguy73

    It was a golden age and now we are like the classical age people lamenting a lost past. The future, those who remember will hate us for what we squandered.

  50. Anyone, woman, man or child, that defines themselves as feminist are shit. Big, steamy, self-destructive shit. There’s a bright side. The people they bring in hate feminism. And so feminism will be rendered dead. Finally!
    .

  51. @Achmed E. Newman
    @vhrm

    I'm sorry, but from what I see, it's just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s. I've got flannel shirts from Wal-Mart bought in 2000 or so that lasted for 15 years (yes, they need to go now). Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    For bicycles, toys, auto parts, camping gear, shoes, even super glue, it'a ALL CRAP now. Oh, and BTW, also face masks, in which you'll get bad batches (I do have to wear them for periods at work) in which always the same corner strap pops off where it was spot-joined with heat (these are the non-woven material). I take 'em off and do a 2-minute field repair if I can find a knife.

    Maybe there are big-ticket items that you've gotten that work well. I really doubt it'll be their cars, which I don't see over here yet anyway. I've been to China 11 times, and been at one of the factories making, yeah, this is coincidental, face masks. The boss was known to save money by leaving out the filtering material itself. Well, quality is not Job 1 over there, so, you know ...

    Here's the gist of what I wrote in "Cheap China-made crap in a throw-away country", "Inflation and Chinese Imports and Exports" and "Cheap China-Made Crap - who's responsible?": In the 1990s and up through early 00s, American manufacturing companies were saving money by getting the much cheaper labor in China alone. Then since profits needed to keep increasing, once that savings had been accomplished, the next was to save by cutting on quality. Now, the cheap Chinese labor is a thing of the past, so there is automation and outsourcing of labor from China to Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, etc. I also don't put all the blame on the Chinese, at least for products that are still designed in the US.

    I used to be shy about returning things to Target, Wal-Mart etc, especially if I'd gotten a little bit of use out of the item. Now, I go straight back, as many times as it takes. For a $300 exercise bike (in 2010 $$) we ended up on our 3rd one (I got much quicker with the assembly process!) and the 3rd one amazingly had really solid caged ball bearings rather than the Huffy bicycle style ones in the 1st two. See "The Softer Noisier Side of Sears".

    I usually agree with you, Vhrm, but I don't on this topic. I've seen it all and written lots about it.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    I’m sorry, but from what I see, it’s just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s.

    I agree, and I don’t think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make. It’s not just Walmart that has gone cheap. I have old shirts and pants from Izod, Levi’s, Gap, and others that are clearly made from different materials than the old equivalent models. Bicycles and washing machines seem to be made worse, too. It seems that anywhere plastic can replace metal, it’s done. Unfortunately, prices have gone up, and often by a fair amount.

    • Replies: @anon
    @OilcanFloyd

    I don’t think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make.

    You've never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

  52. Liberals also give their children special books to read.

    Like Gay BCs.

    I’m going to include a warning with this post; you may want to skip watching the video. It’s sickening. But this is exactly what liberal Left Democrats really are.

    Why does a child this young need to know the Gay BC’s? pic.twitter.com/6rdTqDIJHC— Angela Stanton King 🇺🇸 (@theangiestanton) February 28, 2021

  53. Authentic reaction…

  54. @Art Deco
    It's another indication, in case you needed one, that the Democratic Party is the electoral vehicle for the worst sort of elementary schoolteacher.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    Still waiting for the Houseman pix. Do you wear lederhosen whilst in your den? If so, please send pix of you lounging in your den whilst wearing your Bavarian costume with the Houseman pix.

  55. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    Don’t you dare disrespect my boy.

  56. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969."

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it "makes them happy"? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won't have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @Joe Stalin, @JMcG, @anon, @Possumman

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives.

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing.

    I find the lack of kids running around with toy guns a sad commentary on what the multi-generational attack of the “School Marms” (thanks AnotherDad!) have done to US society.

    America used to consider risk taking an integral part of the greatness of the nation. America’s airwaves used to be filled with toy guns and chemistry sets; remember the Evil Lawn Darts?

    Toy guns are a proxy for risk taking, indeed, venturing forth in the face of danger. What TPTB want is for Americans to be unarmed and helpless in the presence of danger. You can see the “End Game” as to what they want us to become in PRC; listen to Winston here:

    [2:30]

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Joe Stalin

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors' mailboxes?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin, @Adam Smith

  57. Actually I think the title should be Jews Have Been Making Christian Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969.

  58. Shopping for grandkid toys, I found that big retailers have toy sections with no labels but toy dump trucks are not grouped with dolls.
    When I was young, I did not play with dolls or dump trucks. My sisters and I read, put together puzzles, roller-skated, played jacks, hopscotch, built snow “people”. . . . I learned to crochet at age 7 because I really thought learning to read the patterns and making intricate doilies was intriguing. Mrs. S next door taught me to do that because she had no daughters. Is that the same skill as carpentry? I was not taught that but my dad did teach us to play chess.
    My sisters and I did not wrestle with each other or our friends. I notice that my young grandsons like doing that. At our house, they are told not to wrestle in the livingroom.
    Legislating toy desegregation is ridiculous. Kids sort things out on their own.

  59. This one never gets old. Watch Women in High Places trying to explain away an inconvenient truth, when Norwegian comedian and sociologist, Harald Eia, serve it to them on a platter:

  60. @Reg Cæsar
    Never mind all the hot air about "boomer-X-Y-Z-XX-XY-malarial". The real divide is in how dangerous your toys were.


    We started to go downhill when Mr Potato Head went from sticky points in real potatoes to a plastic mock-up. I was shocked to learn that his happened as early as 1964. Mine was the real thing!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICGrjmJouWA


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pTswfOn_DM

    The degeneration has become degenderation:

    Mr. Potato Head drops the mister, sort of

    The iconic Mr. Potato Head gets a 21st-century rebrand

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Rohirrimborn, @Muggles

    Kids used to use potato guns!

  61. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969."

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it "makes them happy"? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won't have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @Joe Stalin, @JMcG, @anon, @Possumman

    Each of my children received a real gun at age six, as soon as they could recite the four rules and demonstrate what they meant.

    • Replies: @Rockford Tyson
    @JMcG

    Spoken like a true psychopath. People like you are the best argument for anti-gun laws. In a civilized country like Denmark or Holland, your children would be taken from you and given for adoption to be raised by responsible parents, and you would be committed to a judicial mental hospital for treatment and reeducation. Americna Society is way too tolerant of these gun-loving nutters.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  62. @Half Canadian
    This would never survive a first amendment challenge.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Wilkey

    This would never survive a first amendment challenge.

    LOL. The First Amendment…

    Basically where the courts now stand is that government can outlaw any business behavior (and sometimes even individual behavior) which leads to discrimination (unless it’s against whites) or even hurt feelings. The government can even mandate discrimination against you, if you are white.

    Some jurisdictions (California and New Jersey, iirc) have even outlawed conversion therapy, which is arguably nothing more than an exercise of free speech. The Supreme Court has refused the opportunity to overturn these bans.

    Freedom of speech, assembly, religion, and the press are all protected by the Constitution. But anti-discrimination laws have superceded these explicit Constitutional rights. That’s the country we now live in.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  63. @Reg Cæsar
    Never mind all the hot air about "boomer-X-Y-Z-XX-XY-malarial". The real divide is in how dangerous your toys were.


    We started to go downhill when Mr Potato Head went from sticky points in real potatoes to a plastic mock-up. I was shocked to learn that his happened as early as 1964. Mine was the real thing!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICGrjmJouWA


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pTswfOn_DM

    The degeneration has become degenderation:

    Mr. Potato Head drops the mister, sort of

    The iconic Mr. Potato Head gets a 21st-century rebrand

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Rohirrimborn, @Muggles

  64. @Steve Sailer
    @PatriotGal2257

    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Ganderson, @PatriotGal2257

    “ Woody Wagon, just broke out
    They’re Micro Mighty Moe’s Look out!”

  65. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969."

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it "makes them happy"? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won't have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @Joe Stalin, @JMcG, @anon, @Possumman

    • Replies: @Rockford Tyson
    @anon

    Fighting with guns is really manly, huh, you idiot? I would love to box your face in, but I doubt you would take that challenge.

    Replies: @anon

  66. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "Liberals Have Been Making Children Cry on Christmas Morning Since 1969."

    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives. Should we really be giving plastic copies of life-ending devices to children even if it "makes them happy"? What does it say about human nature that proxies of murderous devices are so popular with male children?

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing. Must be those demonic male genes that Richard Wrangham talks about. In an age of thermonuclear weapons, encouraging this stereotypical male behavior might be catastrophic, because we won't have a second chance.

    Liberals are irrational in denying facts when they contradict their egalitarian beliefs; conservatives are irrational in thinking that there is nothing wrong with everything out there that is dysfunctional, archaic and sociopathic, so long as we inherited it from the distant past and have been dealing with it for millenia.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @Joe Stalin, @JMcG, @anon, @Possumman

    Big boys love guns too-hence the current ammo shortage.

  67. @anon
    @Rockford Tyson

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/2d39096182c9086cd6c585f345816863/tumblr_inline_oqlvwePiiU1tr11bp_540.gif

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    Fighting with guns is really manly, huh, you idiot? I would love to box your face in, but I doubt you would take that challenge.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Rockford Tyson

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7b/The_Little_Troll_Prince_title_screen.png

  68. @JMcG
    @Rockford Tyson

    Each of my children received a real gun at age six, as soon as they could recite the four rules and demonstrate what they meant.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    Spoken like a true psychopath. People like you are the best argument for anti-gun laws. In a civilized country like Denmark or Holland, your children would be taken from you and given for adoption to be raised by responsible parents, and you would be committed to a judicial mental hospital for treatment and reeducation. Americna Society is way too tolerant of these gun-loving nutters.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rockford Tyson


    In a civilized country like Denmark or Holland, your children would be taken from you and given for adoption to be raised by responsible parents, and you would be committed to a judicial mental hospital for treatment and reeducation. Americna Society is way too tolerant of these gun-loving nutters.
     
    Automatic weapons were legal in Denmark far longer than in the US. The Danes didn't go around mowing people down. Neither do Americans who look like Danes.

    Go to Rockford, Tyson, and see who is doing all the shooting. They're not "nutters". They do not look like Danes or Dutch, either.



    https://quincy-network.s3.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2019/12/JAIL-MINISTRY-RETREAT-PKG.jpg
  69. @Steve Sailer
    @PatriotGal2257

    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Ganderson, @PatriotGal2257


    It was a golden age of boy toys.

    LOLOLOL!

  70. @OilcanFloyd
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I’m sorry, but from what I see, it’s just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s.
     
    I agree, and I don't think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make. It's not just Walmart that has gone cheap. I have old shirts and pants from Izod, Levi's, Gap, and others that are clearly made from different materials than the old equivalent models. Bicycles and washing machines seem to be made worse, too. It seems that anywhere plastic can replace metal, it's done. Unfortunately, prices have gone up, and often by a fair amount.

    Replies: @anon

    I don’t think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make.

    You’ve never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @anon


    You’ve never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?
     
    Nope. But when I look at how newer products that are the same model use lesser materials, and are not as well made, I'm pretty sure that the designers in the U.S. are making that decision. Would companies like Levi's or Schwinn keep manufacturing their products in China if the Chinese just ignored their instructions and made what they wanted? Am I wrong to assume that is not what is happening?

    I guess you mean the addition of melamine to baby formula, which is not the same as what I'm getting at. One is criminal, and the other is lowering the quality to squeeze out every penny from a sale.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  71. @Charles St. Charles
    @PatriotGal2257


    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.
     
    I didn’t have a sister, but I’ll bet you’re right about boy toys being more exciting, though I will confess I was covetous of my cousins Easy Bake Oven...

    I forgot about Spirograph!

    Replies: @PatriotGal2257

    I did have an Easy Bake Oven which I used every so often. But I also had a mother and two aunts who were excellent cooks and bakers and it wasn’t long before I was helping them and getting to use real kitchen appliances. The Easy Bake Oven got relegated to the closet.

    On the other hand, I begged one of my uncles to buy me a cap gun because one of my male playmates had one. He obliged.

  72. @ThreeCranes
    @PatriotGal2257

    "I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl."

    Um, do you have any plans for this coming Saturday afternoon?

    (Just kidding, just kidding. But you are/were the kind of gal I would have said that to forty years ago.)

    Replies: @PatriotGal2257

    Hahaha! Well, thanks. [blush]

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @PatriotGal2257

    So not only are you outdoorsy, but gracious as well. My oh my.

  73. @Achmed E. Newman
    @vhrm

    I'm sorry, but from what I see, it's just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s. I've got flannel shirts from Wal-Mart bought in 2000 or so that lasted for 15 years (yes, they need to go now). Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    For bicycles, toys, auto parts, camping gear, shoes, even super glue, it'a ALL CRAP now. Oh, and BTW, also face masks, in which you'll get bad batches (I do have to wear them for periods at work) in which always the same corner strap pops off where it was spot-joined with heat (these are the non-woven material). I take 'em off and do a 2-minute field repair if I can find a knife.

    Maybe there are big-ticket items that you've gotten that work well. I really doubt it'll be their cars, which I don't see over here yet anyway. I've been to China 11 times, and been at one of the factories making, yeah, this is coincidental, face masks. The boss was known to save money by leaving out the filtering material itself. Well, quality is not Job 1 over there, so, you know ...

    Here's the gist of what I wrote in "Cheap China-made crap in a throw-away country", "Inflation and Chinese Imports and Exports" and "Cheap China-Made Crap - who's responsible?": In the 1990s and up through early 00s, American manufacturing companies were saving money by getting the much cheaper labor in China alone. Then since profits needed to keep increasing, once that savings had been accomplished, the next was to save by cutting on quality. Now, the cheap Chinese labor is a thing of the past, so there is automation and outsourcing of labor from China to Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, etc. I also don't put all the blame on the Chinese, at least for products that are still designed in the US.

    I used to be shy about returning things to Target, Wal-Mart etc, especially if I'd gotten a little bit of use out of the item. Now, I go straight back, as many times as it takes. For a $300 exercise bike (in 2010 $$) we ended up on our 3rd one (I got much quicker with the assembly process!) and the 3rd one amazingly had really solid caged ball bearings rather than the Huffy bicycle style ones in the 1st two. See "The Softer Noisier Side of Sears".

    I usually agree with you, Vhrm, but I don't on this topic. I've seen it all and written lots about it.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    Pants, shirts, underwear. They’re all in tatters in a couple of years.

    We had a twenty-five year old percolator which finally gave out a couple of years ago. The replacement is already non-functional.

  74. @Crawfurdmuir
    Liberals were making kids cry on Christmas morning long before 1969. See Saki's "The Toys of Peace" -

    "Harvey," said Eleanor Bope, handing her brother a cutting from a London morning paper of the 19th of March, "just read this about children's toys, please; it exactly carries out some of our ideas about influence and upbringing."

    "In the view of the National Peace Council," ran the extract, "there are grave objections to presenting our boys with regiments of fighting men, batteries of guns, and squadrons of 'Dreadnoughts.' Boys, the Council admits, naturally love fighting and all the panoply of war . . . but that is no reason for encouraging, and perhaps giving permanent form to, their primitive instincts. At the Children's Welfare Exhibition, which opens at Olympia in three weeks' time, the Peace Council will make an alternative suggestion to parents in the shape of an exhibition of 'peace toys.' In front of a specially-painted representation of the Peace Palace at The Hague will be grouped, not miniature soldiers but miniature civilians, not guns but ploughs and the tools of industry . . . It is hoped that manufacturers may take a hint from the exhibit, which will bear fruit in the toy shops."

    "The idea is certainly an interesting and very well-meaning one," said Harvey; "whether it would succeed well in practice --"

    "We must try," interrupted his sister (...)
     
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ToysPeac.shtml

    Replies: @Herp McDerp

    My wife’s sister and her husband, good Minneapolis progressives, decided that their children would be raised without corrupting influences. One rule was “No war toys!”

    They realized the cause was lost when they found their four-year-old son playing with a solid jigsaw puzzle map of the United States, each state a separate wooden block. He was holding the Florida piece and running through the house shouting “BANG! BANG!” while shooting imaginary targets.

    (This was the same boy who put a peanut butter and jelly sandwich into the cassette slot of a VCR to “play” it.)

  75. @Reg Cæsar
    Never mind all the hot air about "boomer-X-Y-Z-XX-XY-malarial". The real divide is in how dangerous your toys were.


    We started to go downhill when Mr Potato Head went from sticky points in real potatoes to a plastic mock-up. I was shocked to learn that his happened as early as 1964. Mine was the real thing!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICGrjmJouWA


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pTswfOn_DM

    The degeneration has become degenderation:

    Mr. Potato Head drops the mister, sort of

    The iconic Mr. Potato Head gets a 21st-century rebrand

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Rohirrimborn, @Muggles

    My potato toy was non binary.

    The top was fried, the bottom boiled and inside was kind of mashed.

    Playing with those made me the Them I am today…

  76. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:

    So I tried this experiment with my two little girls, at Christmas I would always drop something from the boys section into their present selection – a train set, toy dinosaur, laser gun – just to see if they played with it the same as the girly stuff – plastic jewellery, dolls, toy kitchen gadgets etc.

    Result: they got bored with the boys toys quickly and instead spent hours playing with the girl gifts. This meant that I could play with the train set uninterrupted, so it all worked out.

    I wonder if there is a correlation between believing that boys and girls are the same and having children very late. No one with actual children could ever take that nonsense seriously.

  77. @anon
    @OilcanFloyd

    I don’t think it has much to do with the Chinese, since they are told what to make.

    You've never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    You’ve never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?

    Nope. But when I look at how newer products that are the same model use lesser materials, and are not as well made, I’m pretty sure that the designers in the U.S. are making that decision. Would companies like Levi’s or Schwinn keep manufacturing their products in China if the Chinese just ignored their instructions and made what they wanted? Am I wrong to assume that is not what is happening?

    I guess you mean the addition of melamine to baby formula, which is not the same as what I’m getting at. One is criminal, and the other is lowering the quality to squeeze out every penny from a sale.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @OilcanFloyd

    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I'm at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about "who's responsible?"

    1) Early on, from the mid-1990s to probably about a decade back, indeed the products were engineered in America. One can try to blame the engineers, but it really comes down to the management and marketing on whether the stuff will be purposely build NOT to last.

    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I've got the stories myself from my Chinese sources. I am not trying to get political here, but Ron Unz and the big Chinaphiles/Hate-all-things-American people notwithstanding, the Chinese society has corruption down to a much lower level than we have had - right down to just above the family level. They will pull all kinds of scams, one example being the selling of eggs on the street that are actually made of concrete**. It happens at the industrial level too.

    2) I really don't think that much of the China-made Crap is engineered in the US anymore. They've got way more engineers than we do. I doubt they'd see any reason to pay for that. Most industrial infrastructure/capital is over there too.



    .

    * I can't seem to think "Mr. Floyd" in my head without "collect call for Mrs. Floyd, are we reaching?" I would have thought the Summer of George would have put an end to that. ;-}

    ** That one really floored me. I mean, how can it be cheaper to make those than to simply have enough chickens? It must be, or they wouldn't have done it.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @OilcanFloyd

  78. @YetAnotherAnon
    @vhrm

    "the “chinese made stuff is crap” meme is passe"

    Try finding a car footpump that doesn't give up after a couple of years, where my English-made 1970s one is still going strong.

    In the UK there's actually a market in old restored footpumps.

    https://vintagepumps.co.uk/

    Talking about poor quality imports ....

    A number of boxes had false bottoms stuffed with compressed blocks of cocaine powder, which had a purity of 61 to 68 per cent after being cut with deworming agent Levamisole.


    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/juan-lopez-cocaine-smuggled-yam-shipment-essex-b921443.html

    https://www.healtheuropa.eu/cocaine-contaminant-levamisole/88825/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levamisole#Adulterant_in_illegal_drugs

    "Individuals who regularly take the cocaine contaminant, levamisole, demonstrate impaired cognitive performance & a thinned prefrontal cortex."

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    Chinese made foot pump for my high-end inflatable kayak came with an internal return spring that was made out of ordinary, not stainless, steel. Of course, after a couple years use in saltwater, the spring was so corroded that the pump became unusable. I took it all apart, sandblasted and then coated the spring with three coats of boat-builder’s epoxy. Reassembled it and it works still.

    The point being, that there’s always some crucial part that is just not right. As often as not, it’s one you can’t see. This wasn’t a cheap pump either. Everything else was fine. I hate throwing away a perfectly good piece of equipment just because of one flaw.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  79. @Charles St. Charles
    I was born in 1962. My father was not wealthy; he operated gigantic cranes at an East Coast naval shipyard and took various odd jobs on weekends. My mother took care of me and my brother. I can fondly recall receiving all these items during the first 10 or so Christmases I can remember:

    * a Daisy BB Gun
    * a drum Set
    * a fire truck that I actually could sit in and pedal down the sidewalk
    * a chemistry set
    * a woodburning kit
    * an erector set
    * an electric racetrack as big as our living room
    * a cowboy guitar
    * countless cap guns
    * GI Joes
    * an electric football game that moved the tiny plastic players by vibrating a painted thin metal “field”
    * another BB gun that held even more BBs and had more power
    * a dartboard
    * the game “Operation”
    * a bunch of board and card games
    * an archery set
    * slingshot launched miniature airplanes
    * various balls, gloves and bats - football, baseball, tennis, bowling - no soccer, no one in my neighborhood even heard of soccer
    * sets of what seemed to be hundreds of little green plastic army men in every conceivable firing position
    * Hot Wheels and Matchbox miniature cars
    * a Radio Shack 50-in-1 electrical projects kit
    * a couple of transistor radios
    * all manner of toy guns
    * a few genuine working rockets
    * several bicycles of increasing size, but no helmets, ever.
    * a pocket knife or two or three
    * a Big Wheel trike
    * at least a few dozen toys I can’t recall that are no longer available because of safety

    I truly lived in a Golden Age.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lagertha, @TWS, @njguy73

    Yes, you lived in a golden age.

    You do realize that every Gen-Xer, Millennial, and Gen-Zer hates your guts, right?

    And that any one of us would trade lives with you in a New York minute.

  80. @PatriotGal2257
    @ThreeCranes

    Hahaha! Well, thanks. [blush]

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    So not only are you outdoorsy, but gracious as well. My oh my.

  81. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    How can one describe George III as a tyrant? A tyrant is someone like Hitler, Stalin or Pol Pot. I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @martin_2


    How can one describe George III as a tyrant?
     
    As tyrants go he was pretty innocuous. There's a reason why when people are trying to smear someone as a tyrant they don't describe him as Literally George III.

    I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.
     
    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @Corvinus

  82. @Joe Stalin
    @Rockford Tyson


    Steve, little boys love to play with toy guns. Those are proxies of devices created for the specific purpose of taking human lives.

    Persoanlly, I find that boys love toy guns so much extremely depressing.
     
    I find the lack of kids running around with toy guns a sad commentary on what the multi-generational attack of the "School Marms" (thanks AnotherDad!) have done to US society.

    America used to consider risk taking an integral part of the greatness of the nation. America's airwaves used to be filled with toy guns and chemistry sets; remember the Evil Lawn Darts?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8fU3_VMeL8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYNeRsKyweI

    Toy guns are a proxy for risk taking, indeed, venturing forth in the face of danger. What TPTB want is for Americans to be unarmed and helpless in the presence of danger. You can see the "End Game" as to what they want us to become in PRC; listen to Winston here:

    https://youtu.be/iMfpyixvuTo?t=150

    [2:30]

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors’ mailboxes?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I never blew up any mailboxes, but my buddies and I once got hold of what were called quarter-stick rockets. They were like giant bottle rockets. We lit the fuse on the first and it sailed maybe 100 feet in the air before detonating.
    It was terrifying. The loudest sound I’ve ever heard and a concussion you could feel in your chest. I pretty much immediately lost interest in being around explosives ever again.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I remember an M-80 blowing up part of the wall in a dorm room downstairs.

    It wasn't me. You've got no proof, luckily, cause we blew up the Statue of Limitations too.

    How about blowing up fire ant hills? They didn't even know what him 'em.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I was too poor to buy M-80s (Chicagoans have to travel to Indiana to get them), so we ended up making the equivalent using brown wrapping paper around a dowel, loading it up with match heads cut off from paper matches, and lit with cannon fuze purchased from the classified ads.

    The thing blew up with a straight line starting at the cannon fuze, which was in the center of the case; the incandescent match heads exited the case in a fan shaped pattern.

    Science!

    , @Adam Smith
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I do.

  83. @International Jew

    Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating toys by gender
     
    Why just children's toys? I think it would be cool if every twenty feet or so at Home Depot, they had lingerie. (C cups and below please.)

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Proposed California law would fine department stores for separating toys by gender

    Why just children’s toys?

    Good point. Boutiques should be fined for just selling women’s clothing. Men’s clothing stores should be fined for not selling dresses. Shoe stores should not be allowed to market high-heel shoes just to women.

  84. @Rockford Tyson
    @anon

    Fighting with guns is really manly, huh, you idiot? I would love to box your face in, but I doubt you would take that challenge.

    Replies: @anon

    • LOL: JMcG
  85. @AnotherDad

    A group of Democrat California lawmakers are considering a bill (AB 2826) that would fine department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other products by gender.

     

    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123, @Gordo, @AndrewR, @martin_2, @Joe Walker

    I didn’t know George III was woke.

  86. @Achmed E. Newman
    @vhrm

    I'm sorry, but from what I see, it's just the opposite, Vhrm. The quality was BETTER in the 1990s. I've got flannel shirts from Wal-Mart bought in 2000 or so that lasted for 15 years (yes, they need to go now). Nowadays, the buttons will fall off and the the shirt will be shredded up at the collar long before that.

    For bicycles, toys, auto parts, camping gear, shoes, even super glue, it'a ALL CRAP now. Oh, and BTW, also face masks, in which you'll get bad batches (I do have to wear them for periods at work) in which always the same corner strap pops off where it was spot-joined with heat (these are the non-woven material). I take 'em off and do a 2-minute field repair if I can find a knife.

    Maybe there are big-ticket items that you've gotten that work well. I really doubt it'll be their cars, which I don't see over here yet anyway. I've been to China 11 times, and been at one of the factories making, yeah, this is coincidental, face masks. The boss was known to save money by leaving out the filtering material itself. Well, quality is not Job 1 over there, so, you know ...

    Here's the gist of what I wrote in "Cheap China-made crap in a throw-away country", "Inflation and Chinese Imports and Exports" and "Cheap China-Made Crap - who's responsible?": In the 1990s and up through early 00s, American manufacturing companies were saving money by getting the much cheaper labor in China alone. Then since profits needed to keep increasing, once that savings had been accomplished, the next was to save by cutting on quality. Now, the cheap Chinese labor is a thing of the past, so there is automation and outsourcing of labor from China to Bangladesh, Indonesia, Vietnam, etc. I also don't put all the blame on the Chinese, at least for products that are still designed in the US.

    I used to be shy about returning things to Target, Wal-Mart etc, especially if I'd gotten a little bit of use out of the item. Now, I go straight back, as many times as it takes. For a $300 exercise bike (in 2010 $$) we ended up on our 3rd one (I got much quicker with the assembly process!) and the 3rd one amazingly had really solid caged ball bearings rather than the Huffy bicycle style ones in the 1st two. See "The Softer Noisier Side of Sears".

    I usually agree with you, Vhrm, but I don't on this topic. I've seen it all and written lots about it.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    I had a Honeywell space heater I got at Walmart that lasted 20 years, and I ran the hell out of it. They discontinued the item of course. And for some reason there are no used ones on Ebay. People must be loathe to part with them.

    Wonder how long the new one will last.

    I also got these wonderful all-wool socks at Walmart. Soft, warm, not scratchy or too tight at all. Now they all have synthetic fibers in them and they’re all scratchy, too hot, and too tight.

    This brings up another favorite topic of mine. The young people say, “Everything’s on the internet.” My god, what kind of deluded fool thinks that? I guess deluded fools who have never read anything but the internet. “Almost everything’s not on the internet” is the proper formulation.

    For instance, trying to look up where those all-wool socks came from, or my flannel shirts, or my jeans, or where to get more of the same design. You can’t research clothes at all. It is also, interestingly enough, difficult to impossible to find the sources of most of your food. It just comes from the can, that’s all you’re allowed to know. Of course, the ingredients in the can probably come from 300 different sources, just like a McD’s hamburger comes from 300 different cows. But still. Don’t ask. They don’t want you to know.

    Not to mention more esoteric things, like I found this reference to an Etruscan tomb inscription, and two other predecessors of it. Couldn’t find a picture of the inscription. Couldn’t find anything about the predecessors. And my research skills are better than a young person’s, at the very least, for young people, the same young people who think everything is on the internet, look at the first hit, and then, if it’s not what they’re looking for, they whine, “I can’t find it.”

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @obwandiyag

    Try Coleman’s Surplus. They carry all kinds of wool socks at really good prices. They have four packs of Italian military wool socks that are really excellent. They’re pretty much all I wear from November through March. They have a printed catalog as well as an online one.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @obwandiyag

    I don't know what has happened, OB-Wan, but the percentage of posts of yours that I agree with has gone up from 0.000[error, out of memory space]% to damn near 25%, and now we can talk socks!

    It's not wool ones that I wanted, but regular white athletic socks, from Target. I won't be sure about the quality for a while because I got them to stock up, but here's what I noticed: The way things are going, I find less and less selection*. There was one kind, period. They have that gray area under the heel - might be helpful, might not, I dunno. That's just what you get.

    I just know that things are going to where us proles who don't shop on Rodeo Drive or 5th Avenue, hell I don't like shopping, PERIOD, are going to wear simply what the Chinese manufacturer determines we are going to wear. "Athletic socks? Athletic socks come from the People's Sock Plant #2 in Shenzhen." "But I really like the ... any other selection?" "You have selected, Citizen. You said you want athletic socks. We have athletic socks. They come from the People's Sock Plant # 2. I don't understand your questions."

    Anyway, thanks to Mr. McG (and a friend of mine who turned me on to "Sierra Trading Post" for shoes). I have finally turned to on-line for some clothes, but my wife's example shows me that for some items of clothes, it can involve a lot of UPS packages going back and forth.

    .

    * With women's wear, I don't know how the Soviets and Mao-era Chinese did it. That must have been the cruelest thing about Communism for women. "I was so embarrassed! 3 other women at work had the same blue Mao jackets, and there's only 4 of us that work there!" For the guys, "yeah, I just got paid, and my socks, shoes, underwear, pants and shirts are all worn out. I'll take replacements please. Wheeww! That was easy!" [Hits that big red Staples button.]

    Replies: @JMcG, @Adam Smith

  87. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Joe Stalin

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors' mailboxes?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin, @Adam Smith

    I never blew up any mailboxes, but my buddies and I once got hold of what were called quarter-stick rockets. They were like giant bottle rockets. We lit the fuse on the first and it sailed maybe 100 feet in the air before detonating.
    It was terrifying. The loudest sound I’ve ever heard and a concussion you could feel in your chest. I pretty much immediately lost interest in being around explosives ever again.

  88. @obwandiyag
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a Honeywell space heater I got at Walmart that lasted 20 years, and I ran the hell out of it. They discontinued the item of course. And for some reason there are no used ones on Ebay. People must be loathe to part with them.

    Wonder how long the new one will last.

    I also got these wonderful all-wool socks at Walmart. Soft, warm, not scratchy or too tight at all. Now they all have synthetic fibers in them and they're all scratchy, too hot, and too tight.

    This brings up another favorite topic of mine. The young people say, "Everything's on the internet." My god, what kind of deluded fool thinks that? I guess deluded fools who have never read anything but the internet. "Almost everything's not on the internet" is the proper formulation.

    For instance, trying to look up where those all-wool socks came from, or my flannel shirts, or my jeans, or where to get more of the same design. You can't research clothes at all. It is also, interestingly enough, difficult to impossible to find the sources of most of your food. It just comes from the can, that's all you're allowed to know. Of course, the ingredients in the can probably come from 300 different sources, just like a McD's hamburger comes from 300 different cows. But still. Don't ask. They don't want you to know.

    Not to mention more esoteric things, like I found this reference to an Etruscan tomb inscription, and two other predecessors of it. Couldn't find a picture of the inscription. Couldn't find anything about the predecessors. And my research skills are better than a young person's, at the very least, for young people, the same young people who think everything is on the internet, look at the first hit, and then, if it's not what they're looking for, they whine, "I can't find it."

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman

    Try Coleman’s Surplus. They carry all kinds of wool socks at really good prices. They have four packs of Italian military wool socks that are really excellent. They’re pretty much all I wear from November through March. They have a printed catalog as well as an online one.

  89. @martin_2
    @AnotherDad

    How can one describe George III as a tyrant? A tyrant is someone like Hitler, Stalin or Pol Pot. I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that's all.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    How can one describe George III as a tyrant?

    As tyrants go he was pretty innocuous. There’s a reason why when people are trying to smear someone as a tyrant they don’t describe him as Literally George III.

    I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.

    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @dfordoom

    Well, there’d have been no Civil War, but the French would likely have kept the mid-continent. Plus, we’d have been in the Great War for the whole stretch. On the other hand, there might not have been a Great War. On the other hand...

    , @Joe Stalin
    @dfordoom


    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.
     

    The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made it clear that, if forced to choose, he would use English troops and equipment to defend England itself, rather than helping to protect Australia against the Japanese in the Pacific. The Australian Prime Minister John Curtin then called on America for help. Many older Australians who retained the traditional loyalty to England were shocked by this new allegiance.

    America responded, and from early 1942, thousands of American troops began arriving in Australia, preparing to fight the Pacific war. By 1943, there were 250,000 Americans stationed in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. This was a time when very few Australians travelled overseas, and they got their ideas about Americans from the Hollywood movies which were extremely popular in Australia.


    http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/australia-wwii/home-wii/americans-australia
     
    , @Corvinus
    @dfordoom

    "but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism."

    Except that's what makes whites...white. It's a fundamental tenet. Next time, think.

    Replies: @Malla

  90. Maybe it’s getting older, but some classic toys seemed to have a mind off their own:

  91. @dfordoom
    @martin_2


    How can one describe George III as a tyrant?
     
    As tyrants go he was pretty innocuous. There's a reason why when people are trying to smear someone as a tyrant they don't describe him as Literally George III.

    I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.
     
    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @Corvinus

    Well, there’d have been no Civil War, but the French would likely have kept the mid-continent. Plus, we’d have been in the Great War for the whole stretch. On the other hand, there might not have been a Great War. On the other hand…

  92. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    This is why my ancestors dumped that tyrant George III.

     

    George was a softie compared to today's "crown". He didn't even institute gun control over here until faced with open rebellion-- and then only in two towns.

    At home, he's considered one of the better monarchs.

    They asked Joe Sobran if Bill Clinton made him miss George Bush. Sobran replied Clinton made him miss George III.

    Replies: @Charles St. Charles, @Captain Tripps

    I thought the initial meeting between John Adams (1st Ambassador to Great Britain) and George III as depicted in the HBO miniseries “John Adams” was well done. Whether it occurred that way or not is anyone’s guess, but Paul Giamatti (as Adams) and Tom Hollander (as George III) really acted that scene superbly. Don’t have Youtube at work (it’s now forbidden) otherwise I’d post a link…

  93. @OilcanFloyd
    @anon


    You’ve never had any involvement with Chinese manufacturing.

    For example, what is melamine?
     
    Nope. But when I look at how newer products that are the same model use lesser materials, and are not as well made, I'm pretty sure that the designers in the U.S. are making that decision. Would companies like Levi's or Schwinn keep manufacturing their products in China if the Chinese just ignored their instructions and made what they wanted? Am I wrong to assume that is not what is happening?

    I guess you mean the addition of melamine to baby formula, which is not the same as what I'm getting at. One is criminal, and the other is lowering the quality to squeeze out every penny from a sale.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I’m at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about “who’s responsible?”

    1) Early on, from the mid-1990s to probably about a decade back, indeed the products were engineered in America. One can try to blame the engineers, but it really comes down to the management and marketing on whether the stuff will be purposely build NOT to last.

    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I’ve got the stories myself from my Chinese sources. I am not trying to get political here, but Ron Unz and the big Chinaphiles/Hate-all-things-American people notwithstanding, the Chinese society has corruption down to a much lower level than we have had – right down to just above the family level. They will pull all kinds of scams, one example being the selling of eggs on the street that are actually made of concrete**. It happens at the industrial level too.

    2) I really don’t think that much of the China-made Crap is engineered in the US anymore. They’ve got way more engineers than we do. I doubt they’d see any reason to pay for that. Most industrial infrastructure/capital is over there too.

    .

    * I can’t seem to think “Mr. Floyd” in my head without “collect call for Mrs. Floyd, are we reaching?” I would have thought the Summer of George would have put an end to that. ;-}

    ** That one really floored me. I mean, how can it be cheaper to make those than to simply have enough chickens? It must be, or they wouldn’t have done it.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Achmed E. Newman


    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I’ve got the stories myself from my Chinese sources.
     
    I remember purchasing a dish rack from Wal-Mart, stainless steel stated the label. Only thing is it is constantly rusting on the areas where the water constantly beads up. A product of China. Amazing.
    , @OilcanFloyd
    @Achmed E. Newman


    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I’m at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about “who’s responsible?”
     
    I'm talking about clothing where the cloth is obviously cheaper than older examples of the same shirt or pair of pants, or of a bicycle or washing machine that us obviously not as well made as before. Schwinn and Maytag are examples that I have direct experience with, along with Levi's, Gap and others. It's obvious that the decision to go cheap was made, and I don't think that the Chinese made the decision.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  94. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Joe Stalin

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors' mailboxes?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin, @Adam Smith

    I remember an M-80 blowing up part of the wall in a dorm room downstairs.

    It wasn’t me. You’ve got no proof, luckily, cause we blew up the Statue of Limitations too.

    How about blowing up fire ant hills? They didn’t even know what him ’em.

  95. @obwandiyag
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a Honeywell space heater I got at Walmart that lasted 20 years, and I ran the hell out of it. They discontinued the item of course. And for some reason there are no used ones on Ebay. People must be loathe to part with them.

    Wonder how long the new one will last.

    I also got these wonderful all-wool socks at Walmart. Soft, warm, not scratchy or too tight at all. Now they all have synthetic fibers in them and they're all scratchy, too hot, and too tight.

    This brings up another favorite topic of mine. The young people say, "Everything's on the internet." My god, what kind of deluded fool thinks that? I guess deluded fools who have never read anything but the internet. "Almost everything's not on the internet" is the proper formulation.

    For instance, trying to look up where those all-wool socks came from, or my flannel shirts, or my jeans, or where to get more of the same design. You can't research clothes at all. It is also, interestingly enough, difficult to impossible to find the sources of most of your food. It just comes from the can, that's all you're allowed to know. Of course, the ingredients in the can probably come from 300 different sources, just like a McD's hamburger comes from 300 different cows. But still. Don't ask. They don't want you to know.

    Not to mention more esoteric things, like I found this reference to an Etruscan tomb inscription, and two other predecessors of it. Couldn't find a picture of the inscription. Couldn't find anything about the predecessors. And my research skills are better than a young person's, at the very least, for young people, the same young people who think everything is on the internet, look at the first hit, and then, if it's not what they're looking for, they whine, "I can't find it."

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t know what has happened, OB-Wan, but the percentage of posts of yours that I agree with has gone up from 0.000[error, out of memory space]% to damn near 25%, and now we can talk socks!

    It’s not wool ones that I wanted, but regular white athletic socks, from Target. I won’t be sure about the quality for a while because I got them to stock up, but here’s what I noticed: The way things are going, I find less and less selection*. There was one kind, period. They have that gray area under the heel – might be helpful, might not, I dunno. That’s just what you get.

    I just know that things are going to where us proles who don’t shop on Rodeo Drive or 5th Avenue, hell I don’t like shopping, PERIOD, are going to wear simply what the Chinese manufacturer determines we are going to wear. “Athletic socks? Athletic socks come from the People’s Sock Plant #2 in Shenzhen.” “But I really like the … any other selection?” “You have selected, Citizen. You said you want athletic socks. We have athletic socks. They come from the People’s Sock Plant # 2. I don’t understand your questions.”

    Anyway, thanks to Mr. McG (and a friend of mine who turned me on to “Sierra Trading Post” for shoes). I have finally turned to on-line for some clothes, but my wife’s example shows me that for some items of clothes, it can involve a lot of UPS packages going back and forth.

    .

    * With women’s wear, I don’t know how the Soviets and Mao-era Chinese did it. That must have been the cruelest thing about Communism for women. “I was so embarrassed! 3 other women at work had the same blue Mao jackets, and there’s only 4 of us that work there!” For the guys, “yeah, I just got paid, and my socks, shoes, underwear, pants and shirts are all worn out. I’ll take replacements please. Wheeww! That was easy!” [Hits that big red Staples button.]

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Socks? Wigwam makes socks in the USA. All kinds from inexpensive but durable cotton crew socks for work up to high end wool for mountaineering. I buy 10 pairs at a time for work. They almost last too long. Very good value for the money.
    I believe it was someone here who put me on to them, maybe Abe? Thanks to whoever that might have been!

    , @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I've had pretty good luck with wool socks from costco...

    https://hip2save.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/kirkland-outdoor-trail-socks2.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  96. @Achmed E. Newman
    @obwandiyag

    I don't know what has happened, OB-Wan, but the percentage of posts of yours that I agree with has gone up from 0.000[error, out of memory space]% to damn near 25%, and now we can talk socks!

    It's not wool ones that I wanted, but regular white athletic socks, from Target. I won't be sure about the quality for a while because I got them to stock up, but here's what I noticed: The way things are going, I find less and less selection*. There was one kind, period. They have that gray area under the heel - might be helpful, might not, I dunno. That's just what you get.

    I just know that things are going to where us proles who don't shop on Rodeo Drive or 5th Avenue, hell I don't like shopping, PERIOD, are going to wear simply what the Chinese manufacturer determines we are going to wear. "Athletic socks? Athletic socks come from the People's Sock Plant #2 in Shenzhen." "But I really like the ... any other selection?" "You have selected, Citizen. You said you want athletic socks. We have athletic socks. They come from the People's Sock Plant # 2. I don't understand your questions."

    Anyway, thanks to Mr. McG (and a friend of mine who turned me on to "Sierra Trading Post" for shoes). I have finally turned to on-line for some clothes, but my wife's example shows me that for some items of clothes, it can involve a lot of UPS packages going back and forth.

    .

    * With women's wear, I don't know how the Soviets and Mao-era Chinese did it. That must have been the cruelest thing about Communism for women. "I was so embarrassed! 3 other women at work had the same blue Mao jackets, and there's only 4 of us that work there!" For the guys, "yeah, I just got paid, and my socks, shoes, underwear, pants and shirts are all worn out. I'll take replacements please. Wheeww! That was easy!" [Hits that big red Staples button.]

    Replies: @JMcG, @Adam Smith

    Socks? Wigwam makes socks in the USA. All kinds from inexpensive but durable cotton crew socks for work up to high end wool for mountaineering. I buy 10 pairs at a time for work. They almost last too long. Very good value for the money.
    I believe it was someone here who put me on to them, maybe Abe? Thanks to whoever that might have been!

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  97. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Joe Stalin

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors' mailboxes?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin, @Adam Smith

    I was too poor to buy M-80s (Chicagoans have to travel to Indiana to get them), so we ended up making the equivalent using brown wrapping paper around a dowel, loading it up with match heads cut off from paper matches, and lit with cannon fuze purchased from the classified ads.

    The thing blew up with a straight line starting at the cannon fuze, which was in the center of the case; the incandescent match heads exited the case in a fan shaped pattern.

    Science!

  98. @Achmed E. Newman
    @OilcanFloyd

    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I'm at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about "who's responsible?"

    1) Early on, from the mid-1990s to probably about a decade back, indeed the products were engineered in America. One can try to blame the engineers, but it really comes down to the management and marketing on whether the stuff will be purposely build NOT to last.

    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I've got the stories myself from my Chinese sources. I am not trying to get political here, but Ron Unz and the big Chinaphiles/Hate-all-things-American people notwithstanding, the Chinese society has corruption down to a much lower level than we have had - right down to just above the family level. They will pull all kinds of scams, one example being the selling of eggs on the street that are actually made of concrete**. It happens at the industrial level too.

    2) I really don't think that much of the China-made Crap is engineered in the US anymore. They've got way more engineers than we do. I doubt they'd see any reason to pay for that. Most industrial infrastructure/capital is over there too.



    .

    * I can't seem to think "Mr. Floyd" in my head without "collect call for Mrs. Floyd, are we reaching?" I would have thought the Summer of George would have put an end to that. ;-}

    ** That one really floored me. I mean, how can it be cheaper to make those than to simply have enough chickens? It must be, or they wouldn't have done it.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @OilcanFloyd

    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I’ve got the stories myself from my Chinese sources.

    I remember purchasing a dish rack from Wal-Mart, stainless steel stated the label. Only thing is it is constantly rusting on the areas where the water constantly beads up. A product of China. Amazing.

  99. @dfordoom
    @martin_2


    How can one describe George III as a tyrant?
     
    As tyrants go he was pretty innocuous. There's a reason why when people are trying to smear someone as a tyrant they don't describe him as Literally George III.

    I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.
     
    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @Corvinus

    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made it clear that, if forced to choose, he would use English troops and equipment to defend England itself, rather than helping to protect Australia against the Japanese in the Pacific. The Australian Prime Minister John Curtin then called on America for help. Many older Australians who retained the traditional loyalty to England were shocked by this new allegiance.

    America responded, and from early 1942, thousands of American troops began arriving in Australia, preparing to fight the Pacific war. By 1943, there were 250,000 Americans stationed in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. This was a time when very few Australians travelled overseas, and they got their ideas about Americans from the Hollywood movies which were extremely popular in Australia.

    http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/australia-wwii/home-wii/americans-australia

  100. @Achmed E. Newman
    @obwandiyag

    I don't know what has happened, OB-Wan, but the percentage of posts of yours that I agree with has gone up from 0.000[error, out of memory space]% to damn near 25%, and now we can talk socks!

    It's not wool ones that I wanted, but regular white athletic socks, from Target. I won't be sure about the quality for a while because I got them to stock up, but here's what I noticed: The way things are going, I find less and less selection*. There was one kind, period. They have that gray area under the heel - might be helpful, might not, I dunno. That's just what you get.

    I just know that things are going to where us proles who don't shop on Rodeo Drive or 5th Avenue, hell I don't like shopping, PERIOD, are going to wear simply what the Chinese manufacturer determines we are going to wear. "Athletic socks? Athletic socks come from the People's Sock Plant #2 in Shenzhen." "But I really like the ... any other selection?" "You have selected, Citizen. You said you want athletic socks. We have athletic socks. They come from the People's Sock Plant # 2. I don't understand your questions."

    Anyway, thanks to Mr. McG (and a friend of mine who turned me on to "Sierra Trading Post" for shoes). I have finally turned to on-line for some clothes, but my wife's example shows me that for some items of clothes, it can involve a lot of UPS packages going back and forth.

    .

    * With women's wear, I don't know how the Soviets and Mao-era Chinese did it. That must have been the cruelest thing about Communism for women. "I was so embarrassed! 3 other women at work had the same blue Mao jackets, and there's only 4 of us that work there!" For the guys, "yeah, I just got paid, and my socks, shoes, underwear, pants and shirts are all worn out. I'll take replacements please. Wheeww! That was easy!" [Hits that big red Staples button.]

    Replies: @JMcG, @Adam Smith

    I’ve had pretty good luck with wool socks from costco…

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Adam Smith

    Thanks, Adam.

  101. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Joe Stalin

    Who remembers playing with REAL M-80s and blowing up the neighbors' mailboxes?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin, @Adam Smith

    I do.

  102. Anonymous[116] • Disclaimer says:

    in truth, children tend to have extraordinarily strongly gendered tastes in toys.

    Not just children:

  103. @PatriotGal2257
    @Charles St. Charles:
    Your list of Christmas gifts illustrate something that I tell my husband all the time: boys had much more interesting toys than did girls in the 60s and 70s.

    However, being a tomboy, many of my toys were not the typical ones for a girl in that era. The few dolls I owned languished at the back of my closet, but I loved my Super Spirograph, building and painting model cars, my Schwinn Stingray bike (although the white wicker basket with blue plastic flowers around the rim was the first thing to come off), a magnetic sculpture set with rods, ball bearings and flat pieces that I could arrange in any form I liked, a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters, wooden blocks when I was very young and so on. I had - and still have - an artistic bent, so my parents didn't hesitate to buy me all kinds of art supplies and in many ways, they were better than any toy. Since the girls in my neighborhood were older than I was, I played baseball with the boys who were my age. I enjoyed being athletic and being outdoors and even though I had lots of male playmates, I was never confused about the fact that I was a girl.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Charles St. Charles, @ThreeCranes, @MEH 0910

    a Creeple Peeple set, where I poured liquid plastic into molds, which I could then assemble into dragon-like characters

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thingmaker

    Thingmaker, also called Creepy Crawlers, is an activity toy made by Mattel, beginning in 1964. The toy consists of a series of die-cast metal moulds resembling various bug-like creatures, into which is poured a liquid chemical substance called “Plastigoop”, which comes in assorted colours. The mould is then heated to about 390 °F (199 °C) in an open-face electric hot plate oven. The Plastigoop is cured by the heat, and when cooled forms semi-solid, rubbery replicas which can be removed from the mould.

    The concept of the Thingmaker was introduced in 1963, as part of Mattel’s Vac-U-Maker set. This omnibus toy combined the new moulds and Plastigoop technology with the existing Vac-U-Form machine, which molded simple sculptures by heating thin sheets of plastic, then using a vacuum pump to form the softened plastic over hard plastic forms. Following this introduction period, the Thingmaker portion was spun off as a separate set, and launched as the “Creepy Crawlers” line.

    Mattel packaged moulds from various sets to be sold separately, and also combined moulds into larger omnibus editions, encompassing several themes into one set, under names such as “Triple Thingmaker”, “Super Thingmaker” and “Every Thingmaker”. Mattel produced many Thingmaker sets as follow-ups to the original “Creepy Crawlers” throughout the 1960s, utilising a variety of themes, aimed at both boys and girls. There were also several exclusive single mould sets, such as Superman and Tarzan, and original Mattel concepts including Squirtles and Gangly Danglies.

    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thingmaker#Varieties_of_Thingmaker_mould_sets

    Varieties of Thingmaker mould sets
    • Giant Creepy Crawlers (1965) — This set featured nine moulds (as did the original “Creepy Crawlers”), but these new moulds featured just one giant creature apiece.
    • Fighting Men (1965) — This set of six moulds could be used to create mini soldier figures, using an innovative two-part mould to give the Fighting Men a front and a back. The set also included pieces of wire to place in the figure, making it bendable with the bottom wire protrusions being able to stand on a styrofoam base. Other moulds in the set created weaponry and equipment for the Fighting Men to carry into battle.
    • Creeple Peeple (1965) — This five-mould set formed strange heads, arms and feet. When assembled onto a pencil, they formed weird, Troll-like creatures.
    • Fun Flowers (1966) — Seven moulds full of different styles and shapes of flowers and leaves, for use in decorating and design.
    • Fright Factory (1966) — Five of this set’s seven moulds were dedicated to creepy disguises, making pieces such as fake scars, snaggled teeth, or a third eye for one’s forehead. Another mould (with a special insert) made a shrunken head, and the last made a dangly skeleton that one built from parts.
    • Incredible Edibles (1967) – A Thingmaker that made edible pieces. It used a special goop called Gobble De-goop which was placed in molds and cooked like regular Plasti-goop.
    • Picadoos (1967) — A Thingmaker for artists. This one featured moulds with 10×10-space numbered grids. By carefully placing coloured Plastigoop in the grid, one could create decorative artwork in either beads, mosaic tile, or cross-stitch varieties.
    • Mini-Dragons (1967) — The eight moulds in this set formed wings, horns, claws, tails, and other body parts, which could be combined into various fantasy creatures.
    • Eeeeks! (1968) — In the same vein as Mini-Dragons, this set of eight moulds formed several varieties of mix-and-match legs, bodies, heads, wings, antennae, etc., to create large, bizarre insects.
    • Zoofie-Goofies (1968) — Seven moulds form heads, bodies and feet of various animals, from cats and dogs to elephants and lions.
    • Hot Wheels Factory (1969) Moulds made two piece bodies that fit together with wheels embedded into the bottom mould so you could make your own Hot Wheels cars.
    • DollyMaker (1969) — Five two-sided moulds are used to create two styles of little dolls, and a wardrobe of late ’60s fashions and accessories for them.
    • Super Cartoon Maker (1969) — A licensed Thingmaker, the eight moulds in this set form replicas of Charles Schulz’s Peanuts characters, such as Snoopy, Charlie Brown and Lucy.
    • Jillions of Jewels (1970) — The last of the classic Mattel Thingmakers. The set had five moulds, but instead of the liquid Plastigoop, these formed solid plastic “gemstones” and jewelry frames from two kinds of powdered “Jewel Dust” compounds.

    https://www.patti-goop.com/creeple-peeple.html

    https://www.patti-goop.com/mini-dragons.html

  104. @Mike_from_SGV
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The decline has bottomed out, and I expect a new surge, even with the vaccine slowly rolling out. Too many people lack the self discipline to take proper precautions.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “The decline has bottomed out, and I expect a new surge, even with the vaccine slowly rolling out. Too many people lack the self discipline to take proper precautions.”

    Absolutely!

  105. @dfordoom
    @martin_2


    How can one describe George III as a tyrant?
     
    As tyrants go he was pretty innocuous. There's a reason why when people are trying to smear someone as a tyrant they don't describe him as Literally George III.

    I dare say that if the Americans had not won the War of Independence the world would be a better place. The USA would just be more like Canada, Australia or New Zealand, that’s all.
     
    To some extent. American Puritanism would still have resulted in a lot of craziness and misery, but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism. That would have been a blessing.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @Corvinus

    “but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism.”

    Except that’s what makes whites…white. It’s a fundamental tenet. Next time, think.

    • Replies: @Malla
    @Corvinus

    Cornballious and his hate YT idiotic comments. I have written about this virulent "Hate YT" mental disease. Exhibit A for symptoms--Cornballious and his idiotic comments.

  106. @Achmed E. Newman
    @OilcanFloyd

    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I'm at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about "who's responsible?"

    1) Early on, from the mid-1990s to probably about a decade back, indeed the products were engineered in America. One can try to blame the engineers, but it really comes down to the management and marketing on whether the stuff will be purposely build NOT to last.

    However, even during those times, I know that the Chinese will substitute cheaper parts and material out of the eye of the foreign corporate people. I've got the stories myself from my Chinese sources. I am not trying to get political here, but Ron Unz and the big Chinaphiles/Hate-all-things-American people notwithstanding, the Chinese society has corruption down to a much lower level than we have had - right down to just above the family level. They will pull all kinds of scams, one example being the selling of eggs on the street that are actually made of concrete**. It happens at the industrial level too.

    2) I really don't think that much of the China-made Crap is engineered in the US anymore. They've got way more engineers than we do. I doubt they'd see any reason to pay for that. Most industrial infrastructure/capital is over there too.



    .

    * I can't seem to think "Mr. Floyd" in my head without "collect call for Mrs. Floyd, are we reaching?" I would have thought the Summer of George would have put an end to that. ;-}

    ** That one really floored me. I mean, how can it be cheaper to make those than to simply have enough chickens? It must be, or they wouldn't have done it.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @OilcanFloyd

    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I’m at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about “who’s responsible?”

    I’m talking about clothing where the cloth is obviously cheaper than older examples of the same shirt or pair of pants, or of a bicycle or washing machine that us obviously not as well made as before. Schwinn and Maytag are examples that I have direct experience with, along with Levi’s, Gap and others. It’s obvious that the decision to go cheap was made, and I don’t think that the Chinese made the decision.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @OilcanFloyd


    It’s obvious that the decision to go cheap was made, and I don’t think that the Chinese made the decision.
     
    Yes, for the clothing, if the cloth itself is worse, I agree with you.

    For washers, per your example, if the whole thing is just made more cheaply (thinner sheet metal that comes off easier, junkier plastic parts, stuff like that), sure, but then do you know whether the things were even designed in America? Having the American name may just mean that marketing and sales is done here. Secondly, you didn't say what broke. Machines break at their weakest part first, of course, and I wrote that sometimes non-specified and cheaper parts are substituted in over in China.

    You put in a half-priced drive belt for a dryer, to save a buck or 2 and the dryer may fail in a year (most people don't fix their own stuff anymore, because Cheap China-made crap). You put in some electronics that was "flashed" or what-have-you by a cheaper vendor, and you get what I think was the problem with both our rock tumblers (they seemed solid otherwise - the little round x-section drive belts and the pulleys held up fine.)

  107. @Rockford Tyson
    @JMcG

    Spoken like a true psychopath. People like you are the best argument for anti-gun laws. In a civilized country like Denmark or Holland, your children would be taken from you and given for adoption to be raised by responsible parents, and you would be committed to a judicial mental hospital for treatment and reeducation. Americna Society is way too tolerant of these gun-loving nutters.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In a civilized country like Denmark or Holland, your children would be taken from you and given for adoption to be raised by responsible parents, and you would be committed to a judicial mental hospital for treatment and reeducation. Americna Society is way too tolerant of these gun-loving nutters.

    Automatic weapons were legal in Denmark far longer than in the US. The Danes didn’t go around mowing people down. Neither do Americans who look like Danes.

    Go to Rockford, Tyson, and see who is doing all the shooting. They’re not “nutters”. They do not look like Danes or Dutch, either.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  108. Liberal parents will cry a lot more when they have to explain that Joe & Horrible (Kamala in Finnish) were just cgi for months and months.

    Cat’s outta the bag! Joe was executed in 2019 – execution is very dif to tell your kids or grandkids what execution really means. What it really means: TREASON. Oh shit!

  109. @Corvinus
    @dfordoom

    "but the world might have been spared American Exceptionalism."

    Except that's what makes whites...white. It's a fundamental tenet. Next time, think.

    Replies: @Malla

    Cornballious and his hate YT idiotic comments. I have written about this virulent “Hate YT” mental disease. Exhibit A for symptoms–Cornballious and his idiotic comments.

  110. @OilcanFloyd
    @Achmed E. Newman


    (This is a reply to your earlier reply to me, while I’m at it.) Mr. Floyd*, you bring up a point that I made in one of the Peak Stupidity posts I linked you to, the about “who’s responsible?”
     
    I'm talking about clothing where the cloth is obviously cheaper than older examples of the same shirt or pair of pants, or of a bicycle or washing machine that us obviously not as well made as before. Schwinn and Maytag are examples that I have direct experience with, along with Levi's, Gap and others. It's obvious that the decision to go cheap was made, and I don't think that the Chinese made the decision.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s obvious that the decision to go cheap was made, and I don’t think that the Chinese made the decision.

    Yes, for the clothing, if the cloth itself is worse, I agree with you.

    For washers, per your example, if the whole thing is just made more cheaply (thinner sheet metal that comes off easier, junkier plastic parts, stuff like that), sure, but then do you know whether the things were even designed in America? Having the American name may just mean that marketing and sales is done here. Secondly, you didn’t say what broke. Machines break at their weakest part first, of course, and I wrote that sometimes non-specified and cheaper parts are substituted in over in China.

    You put in a half-priced drive belt for a dryer, to save a buck or 2 and the dryer may fail in a year (most people don’t fix their own stuff anymore, because Cheap China-made crap). You put in some electronics that was “flashed” or what-have-you by a cheaper vendor, and you get what I think was the problem with both our rock tumblers (they seemed solid otherwise – the little round x-section drive belts and the pulleys held up fine.)

  111. @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I've had pretty good luck with wool socks from costco...

    https://hip2save.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/kirkland-outdoor-trail-socks2.jpg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks, Adam.

  112. For washers, per your example, if the whole thing is just made more cheaply (thinner sheet metal that comes off easier, junkier plastic parts, stuff like that), sure, but then do you know whether the things were even designed in America? Having the American name may just mean that marketing and sales is done here. Secondly, you didn’t say what broke. Machines break at their weakest part first, of course, and I wrote that sometimes non-specified and cheaper parts are substituted in over in China.

    The motor actually went out after 5 years. My previous (much cheaper) washer laster 18 years. I pretty much took the washer apart looking at the weak links before admitting that the thing was lost, and it was full of plastic parts.

    I have no idea where the thing was designed, but I doubt that American companies allow the Chinese to design and make junk in their names with no input at all.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @OilcanFloyd

    Maytag Commercial models are US made, or were two years ago, anyway. Speed Queen are as well. They don’t have lcd panels, but they’re carved out of billet.

  113. @OilcanFloyd

    For washers, per your example, if the whole thing is just made more cheaply (thinner sheet metal that comes off easier, junkier plastic parts, stuff like that), sure, but then do you know whether the things were even designed in America? Having the American name may just mean that marketing and sales is done here. Secondly, you didn’t say what broke. Machines break at their weakest part first, of course, and I wrote that sometimes non-specified and cheaper parts are substituted in over in China.
     
    The motor actually went out after 5 years. My previous (much cheaper) washer laster 18 years. I pretty much took the washer apart looking at the weak links before admitting that the thing was lost, and it was full of plastic parts.

    I have no idea where the thing was designed, but I doubt that American companies allow the Chinese to design and make junk in their names with no input at all.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Maytag Commercial models are US made, or were two years ago, anyway. Speed Queen are as well. They don’t have lcd panels, but they’re carved out of billet.

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