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From NBC News:

U.S. set to execute Black man for double murder committed at 19

Christopher Vialva, 40, was scheduled to be the first Black inmate put to death at the federal prison in Indiana this year.

Sept. 24, 2020, 12:56 PM PDT
By Daniella Silva

A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government Thursday for a crime he committed at age 19, even though his attorney said prosecutors used inflammatory racial stereotypes during the trial 20 years ago to land her client on death row.

The man, Christopher Vialva, 40, is scheduled to be executed Thursday evening at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. He would be the first Black inmate put to death since the Trump administration’s revival of federal executions this year.

Vialva was sentenced to death in the 1999 killing in Texas of Todd and Stacie Bagley, a white couple who were youth ministers. There were 11 white jurors and one Black juror in the 2000 federal trial, said Vialva’s attorney, Susan Otto.

Prosecutors portrayed Vialva “as if he were the leader of a violent and well-organized street gang,” Otto said.

“Of course, in the year 2000, the theme of the super predator, that there were these kids that just marauded through our communities wreaking havoc, was a very powerful and very convincing narrative,” she said.

Otto said there was no evidence that Vialva was a leader or a real member of the so-called 212 PIRU Bloods gang. She said that he and his friends encountered the couple after Vialva was kicked out of his mother’s home and that, having nowhere to go, the group made a plan to rob someone.

“This is a product of a person, a child, with very disorganized thinking, in a full-on panic, surrounded by a bunch of other kids whose ideas are just as bad as his,” she said.

Otto said it was a very convincing narrative to frame to the jury that Vialva and Brandon Bernard, his co-defendant, who is also Black, were part of a violent gang. Bernard was also sentenced to death; his execution date has not been set, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons. …

More than 46 percent of the 56 inmates on federal death row are Black. Black people make up about 13 percent of the U.S. population. …

According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

Vialva pulled out a gun and forced the couple into the trunk, and the group of teenagers drove around for a few hours, stopping to try to withdraw money from the Bagleys’ bank account and to pawn Stacie Bagley’s ring, according to the Justice Department. Vialva eventually parked at the site of the Fort Hood military reservation and shot the couple while another man set the car on fire, according to the Justice Department.

The death penalty serves to penalize rational witness-murdering, as in this case. The criminals first committed carjacking, robbery, kidnapping etc. Then they thought about it for a few hours and decided that in order to increase their chances of getting away with their crimes, they also needed to murder their victims.

 
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  1. Black people have Divine Right of Kangz to kill Whiteys. Thats Kings Dream and the inevitable outcome of the Civil Rights Act.

    • Agree: Gunga Din
  2. A 19-year-old is not a child. Then again, they’re all half devil, half child.

    • Replies: @Bartleby the Scrivner
    @Ian Smith

    They’re in a constant state of childhood. Just try to reason with one of them.

  3. So when do we start charging attorneys as accessories to the crimes their clients commit?

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Redneck farmer


    So when do we start charging attorneys as accessories to the crimes their clients commit?
     
    It's a dirty job, but somebody's gotta do it. Due process and all that.
  4. He gone.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Billy Shears

    Further details here (larded with the usual prog, virtue signalling BS): https://www.palmbeachpost.com/story/news/nation/2020/09/24/christopher-vialva-black-man-death-row-lawyer-argues-racial-bias/3519379001/

  5. Two feral thugs are a gang. Imagine the horror of being driven around in the trunk of your car awaiting your execution…oh, the Bagelys didn’t 20 extra years.

  6. Hopefully the beginning of a trend – although I wouldn’t count on it.

  7. The death penalty is the just reward for the perpetrator. To quote Adam Smith, “mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent.” The Left is all about injustice. And the Left prefers the criminals to the victims. The criminal advance their agenda.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    The death penalty is the just reward for the perpetrator. To quote Adam Smith, “mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent.”

    It predates Smith by almost a millenium. It appears in Midrash Tanhuma (circa 850)

    Replies: @International Jew

  8. Ah, one of those ‘upside-down’ articles (as Mr Sailer has noticed) where you have to read to the very very end to find out, yes, he is in fact a cold-blooded double-murderer (but only ‘according to’ the DoJ, so there.)

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Ano

    No, The article says he’s guilty in paragraphs six and seven.

    It’s the argument against killing him that is so weirdly delayed.

  9. Huh. Death sentence for that seems overkill. That’s a pretty calculated and rational decision. Rather thorough. They would be more useful working for the state.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Svevlad

    Forcible labor to repay their victims families would be ideal but is no longer permitted.

    Let allah sort him out.

  10. “This is a product of a person, a child…”

    She just called a black man “boy”.

    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?

    • Agree: Ben tillman, guest007
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Blacks have no agency, except when they do. Consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds.

    It's the job of his lawyer to keep delaying his execution. They've succeeded for 20 years. You have to give them credit. If this argument fails, they will try another and another.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Mr McKenna
    @Reg Cæsar


    “This is a product of a person, a child, with very disorganized thinking” she said.
     
    https://www.liveaction.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/baby-infant-African-American-black.jpg

    I can't even about how bloodthirsty you alt-right types are, that you would be celebrating the death of an innocent black baby body like this.
    , @Rosie
    @Reg Cæsar


    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?
     
    Well, it does appear that neurological adolescence lasts well into the twenties, so there's certainly an argument to be made that nineteen year olds shouldn't be voting.

    His age is certainly one mitigating factor, but not sufficient to outweigh the horrific nature of the crime, like Buffaloe Joe said, being driven around stuffed in the trunk of your car knowing you're likely to be killed at the end of your ordeal.

    I am always curious about the jurors' votes in cases like these. Are they unanimous? If so, imagine having twelve people agree that you need to be put to death for your crimes. It's hard to argue with that.

    Of course, if we had a country of our own, this wouldn't be happening.

  11. The sick attempt at poetry… “A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government…”

    Imagine describing the execution of a white guy, say Timothy McVeigh, like that.

    It really is the return of radical chic, with its fetishistic worship of Black bodies, only the adherents seem to have about 30 less IQ points.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Patrick in SC

    The death of a black man is a tragedy. The death of a White, merely a statistic.

    - Joseph Stalin (wait, I mean Biden)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @usNthem

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Patrick in SC


    The sick attempt at poetry… “A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government…”
     
    There once was a black man named Chris
    To avoid execution his only wish
    Black crimes on white
    Against the Feds he did fight
    But the evening's hamburger t'was his final dish
  12. “Of course, in the year 2000, the theme of the super predator, that there were these kids that just marauded through our communities wreaking havoc, was a very powerful and very convincing narrative,” she said.

    … certainly to his victims as they burned in the car.

  13. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    The death penalty is the just reward for the perpetrator. To quote Adam Smith, "mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent." The Left is all about injustice. And the Left prefers the criminals to the victims. The criminal advance their agenda.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    The death penalty is the just reward for the perpetrator. To quote Adam Smith, “mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent.”

    It predates Smith by almost a millenium. It appears in Midrash Tanhuma (circa 850)

    • LOL: 3g4me
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @kaganovitch

    Also Publilius Syrus: "Bonis nocet quisquis pepercit malis."
    (I had to toss that in just because the great sound and rhythm of it!)

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  14. In the first nine paragraphs (a) the killer’s lawyer admits he’s guilty of murder and (b) there is no reference to any alleged legal basis for overturning the death penalty.

    That means there is no argument, not even a bad one.

  15. @Reg Cæsar

    “This is a product of a person, a child..."
     
    She just called a black man "boy".

    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr McKenna, @Rosie

    Blacks have no agency, except when they do. Consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds.

    It’s the job of his lawyer to keep delaying his execution. They’ve succeeded for 20 years. You have to give them credit. If this argument fails, they will try another and another.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jack D

    Well, no more appeals in the earthly realm. He was executed at 7PM today.

    Replies: @bruce county, @usNthem, @AnotherDad

  16. A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government Thursday for a crime he committed at age 19, even though his attorney said prosecutors used inflammatory racial stereotypes during the trial 20 years ago to land her client on death row.

    The reverse of the approach where we are being told that some heinous Nazi Guardian of Treblinka finally gets his comeuppance at age 120, then the last sentence mentions that he was actually some accountant working in an administrative building 5 kms away or something.

    These are not writers doing random slip-ups.

    More than 46 percent of the 56 inmates on federal death row are Black. Black people make up about 13 percent of the U.S. population. …

    Why not spend some time in there undercover, dear Daniella Silva, to really get to the bottom of this injustice?

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @guest
    @El Dato

    Howcome everytime I compare incidence of crime amongst blacks in proportion to their share of population it’s hate speech?

  17. @Ano
    Ah, one of those 'upside-down' articles (as Mr Sailer has noticed) where you have to read to the very very end to find out, yes, he is in fact a cold-blooded double-murderer (but only 'according to' the DoJ, so there.)

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    No, The article says he’s guilty in paragraphs six and seven.

    It’s the argument against killing him that is so weirdly delayed.

  18. I remember being thrilled in 2016 when the Supreme Court reinstated the death sentence for the Carr brothers, the pair who committed the Wichita Massacre.

  19. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Blacks have no agency, except when they do. Consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds.

    It's the job of his lawyer to keep delaying his execution. They've succeeded for 20 years. You have to give them credit. If this argument fails, they will try another and another.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Well, no more appeals in the earthly realm. He was executed at 7PM today.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Jack D

    6.42 pm to be exact.

    https://media.giphy.com/media/A363LZlQaX0ZO/giphy.gif

    , @usNthem
    @Jack D

    Good. Next?

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D

    Good. Thanks for the update Jack.

  20. Another Jewish crime against innocent Christians:

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jack D

    His mother is white. He converted to messianic Judaism( whatever that means) in prison. He looks slightly blacker than talcum x.

    , @Father O'Hara
    @Jack D

    What? Me worry?

  21. @Jack D
    Another Jewish crime against innocent Christians:

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/09/25/00/wire-33594756-1600989612-373_634x422.jpg

    Replies: @Anon, @Father O'Hara

    His mother is white. He converted to messianic Judaism( whatever that means) in prison. He looks slightly blacker than talcum x.

  22. According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

    I feel sorry for the innocent persons of pigment or crackhead-looking white people who are stranded on the side of the road and I don’t help, but I would never EVER pick up three of them let alone one. Derbyshire’s talk really can save your kids’ lives but it should be expanded to anyone that might look like they’re a criminals. The only time I would feel comfortable letting three people hitch a ride are in a majority-white area and it would greatly depend on what they’re wearing. You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily. Female heroin addicts can be vicious and a car can be sold for a lot of drugs. If it’s a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types? No problem. Chances of being mass murdered are almost zero. White college-aged hippies are also typically OK, and you can differentiate them from the Antifa types by the amount of body piercings and tattoos. Fancy Asians are pretty much always OK, but again only if they’re well-dressed and well-groomed. Obviously gay men are typically fine as well, unless they look crackhead-ish.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @DextersLabRat

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ....

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”


    WTF???

    Replies: @polistra, @JerseyJeffersonian, @DextersLabRat, @Muggles

    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    @DextersLabRat

    Well, this Cunanan gay guy seems to have not looked too threatening, but...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan

    , @Anonymous
    @DextersLabRat


    If it’s a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types?
     
    You mean if they’re wearing Hawaiian shirts?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @DextersLabRat

    Don't ever pick up anybody, period. And do not give any money to those guys panhandling at the intersections holding up signs.

    These social parasites live off others' unreflective do-gooderism. There is no longer any justification for unreflective do-gooderism in this day and age. We have reached a point of moral population inversion where when it looks like a person needs help, 9 times out of 10 they are a grifter or worse.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

  23. @Reg Cæsar

    “This is a product of a person, a child..."
     
    She just called a black man "boy".

    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr McKenna, @Rosie

    “This is a product of a person, a child, with very disorganized thinking” she said.

    I can’t even about how bloodthirsty you alt-right types are, that you would be celebrating the death of an innocent black baby body like this.

    • LOL: Rosie
  24. Let’s see now, six White murderers have been executed for federal crimes this year. That’s fine and dandy. Now a black murderer is executed and it’s “Racist Racist Racist!”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @David In TN

    It was racist that Trump executed the whites first just to make a point that he wasn't racist. I read that in an article. Trump is so racist that even when he executes white people he is still racist.

  25. @DextersLabRat

    According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

     

    I feel sorry for the innocent persons of pigment or crackhead-looking white people who are stranded on the side of the road and I don't help, but I would never EVER pick up three of them let alone one. Derbyshire's talk really can save your kids' lives but it should be expanded to anyone that might look like they're a criminals. The only time I would feel comfortable letting three people hitch a ride are in a majority-white area and it would greatly depend on what they're wearing. You may say "women are fine" but not necessarily. Female heroin addicts can be vicious and a car can be sold for a lot of drugs. If it's a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types? No problem. Chances of being mass murdered are almost zero. White college-aged hippies are also typically OK, and you can differentiate them from the Antifa types by the amount of body piercings and tattoos. Fancy Asians are pretty much always OK, but again only if they're well-dressed and well-groomed. Obviously gay men are typically fine as well, unless they look crackhead-ish.

    Replies: @Polynikes, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Anonymous, @Intelligent Dasein

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ….

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”

    WTF???

    • Agree: Bill
    • Replies: @polistra
    @Polynikes

    Jesus dude. The man's just trying to get a date.

    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Polynikes

    Andrew Cunanan.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan

    , @DextersLabRat
    @Polynikes

    As in, three gays wearing rompers trying to hitch a ride to the ferry to Fire Island are probably not going to murder you.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Muggles
    @Polynikes

    50 years ago or so, when I didn't have a car or money, I did some long distance hitchhiking. Sometimes alone (when my ride broke down), sometimes with a friend.

    Hippie-ish looking. Got rides from all kinds. A nice black military couple saved us from a redneck beat-down (probably) in Van Horn TX. We did some driving and bought some gas and got 300 miles down the road. Jesus freaks, older white guys, all kinds. Even a Hispanic guy in Cali with a "Nixon" bumper sticker.

    I would also pick up hitchers sometimes. Once a very laconic, "Marlboro country" looking cowboy in west Texas. But when I picked up a guy outside of El Paso heading west, it was my last.

    He didn't want to get out at my turnoff to the north 150 miles later. He mumbled and I realized he sounded somewhat drugged up. As I drove off to the side at my turnoff, he started protesting about "where he needed to go." I lowered my voice and growled to him to get out now.

    I was reaching for my revolver under my seat but he finally opened the door and left. No more riders after that. I still wonder if I would have shot him had he violently resisted. Probably. What a mess...

  26. “Of course, in the year 2000, the theme of the super predator, that there were these kids that just marauded through our communities wreaking havoc, was a very powerful and very convincing narrative,” she said.

    Yeah it was pretty convincing to me…when (right around the year 2000) a Hispanic guy on drugs murdered an anonymous white woman just 60 or 70 yards outside our front door. He’d molested a 12 year old girl several blocks away just a few minutes earlier.

    A few years earlier, a very pleasant young white male patron of mine was carjacked (again, anonymously) and executed by a street gang in an old part of town. And I didn’t live in Detroit or St. Louis. This was in a largely rural state.

    So good riddance to the guy they just executed.

  27. @Jack D
    @Jack D

    Well, no more appeals in the earthly realm. He was executed at 7PM today.

    Replies: @bruce county, @usNthem, @AnotherDad

    6.42 pm to be exact.

  28. Very, very soon black people will be just like Steven Sagal. ABOVE THE LAW. Don’t laugh. Its coming.

    • LOL: Neoconned
  29. A federal murder case. Really.

    That the double-murder was committed on a military base is incidental. None of the parties involved were US Mil. The crime spree began next door in Killeen (and didn’t venture far away from there). The case should have been tried in TX (state) superior court.

    Did the USA ever even receive formal, TX legislative OK to create then-temp Camp (now perm Ft.) Hood? It looks that the War Department just commandeered (i.e. stole) it. From the Waco Tribune-Herald:

    Homesteads that had been patiently and laboriously tamed and brought into productivity in the mid-19th century were destroyed by the Army [at the start of WWII] in the name of patriotism and progress. Houses and barns were burned, wells filled with rocks, and all traces of the pioneers who had raised crops and reared children for generations were eradicated from the scene.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Abolish_public_education

    Hoda been whacked a decade ago by Texas.

    Dont accede to the Union if you dont want the feds setting up military bases in your state.

    , @Jack D
    @Abolish_public_education

    Boo hoo. It was largely empty space. 300 families were displaced from an area of 332 sq. miles of scrubland (and were allowed to retain grazing rights which they have to this day). The entire city of Philadelphia, with a population of over 1.5 million, only occupies 141 sq. miles. A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.

    Replies: @Alden, @Johann Ricke

  30. @Svevlad
    Huh. Death sentence for that seems overkill. That's a pretty calculated and rational decision. Rather thorough. They would be more useful working for the state.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Forcible labor to repay their victims families would be ideal but is no longer permitted.

    Let allah sort him out.

  31. @Abolish_public_education
    A federal murder case. Really.

    That the double-murder was committed on a military base is incidental. None of the parties involved were US Mil. The crime spree began next door in Killeen (and didn’t venture far away from there). The case should have been tried in TX (state) superior court.

    Did the USA ever even receive formal, TX legislative OK to create then-temp Camp (now perm Ft.) Hood? It looks that the War Department just commandeered (i.e. stole) it. From the Waco Tribune-Herald:

    Homesteads that had been patiently and laboriously tamed and brought into productivity in the mid-19th century were destroyed by the Army [at the start of WWII] in the name of patriotism and progress. Houses and barns were burned, wells filled with rocks, and all traces of the pioneers who had raised crops and reared children for generations were eradicated from the scene.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    Hoda been whacked a decade ago by Texas.

    Dont accede to the Union if you dont want the feds setting up military bases in your state.

  32. @Redneck farmer
    So when do we start charging attorneys as accessories to the crimes their clients commit?

    Replies: @Rosie

    So when do we start charging attorneys as accessories to the crimes their clients commit?

    It’s a dirty job, but somebody’s gotta do it. Due process and all that.

  33. @Reg Cæsar

    “This is a product of a person, a child..."
     
    She just called a black man "boy".

    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?

    Replies: @Jack D, @Mr McKenna, @Rosie

    If he was a child, why was he allowed to vote?

    Well, it does appear that neurological adolescence lasts well into the twenties, so there’s certainly an argument to be made that nineteen year olds shouldn’t be voting.

    His age is certainly one mitigating factor, but not sufficient to outweigh the horrific nature of the crime, like Buffaloe Joe said, being driven around stuffed in the trunk of your car knowing you’re likely to be killed at the end of your ordeal.

    I am always curious about the jurors’ votes in cases like these. Are they unanimous? If so, imagine having twelve people agree that you need to be put to death for your crimes. It’s hard to argue with that.

    Of course, if we had a country of our own, this wouldn’t be happening.

  34. @DextersLabRat

    According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

     

    I feel sorry for the innocent persons of pigment or crackhead-looking white people who are stranded on the side of the road and I don't help, but I would never EVER pick up three of them let alone one. Derbyshire's talk really can save your kids' lives but it should be expanded to anyone that might look like they're a criminals. The only time I would feel comfortable letting three people hitch a ride are in a majority-white area and it would greatly depend on what they're wearing. You may say "women are fine" but not necessarily. Female heroin addicts can be vicious and a car can be sold for a lot of drugs. If it's a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types? No problem. Chances of being mass murdered are almost zero. White college-aged hippies are also typically OK, and you can differentiate them from the Antifa types by the amount of body piercings and tattoos. Fancy Asians are pretty much always OK, but again only if they're well-dressed and well-groomed. Obviously gay men are typically fine as well, unless they look crackhead-ish.

    Replies: @Polynikes, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Anonymous, @Intelligent Dasein

    Well, this Cunanan gay guy seems to have not looked too threatening, but…

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan

  35. According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

    Well… that was stupid.

  36. @Polynikes
    @DextersLabRat

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ....

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”


    WTF???

    Replies: @polistra, @JerseyJeffersonian, @DextersLabRat, @Muggles

    Jesus dude. The man’s just trying to get a date.

  37. @Polynikes
    @DextersLabRat

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ....

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”


    WTF???

    Replies: @polistra, @JerseyJeffersonian, @DextersLabRat, @Muggles

  38. Trump and Mitch are the reason the US government has started federal executions again. First they rammed in all the judicial appointments, then Trump moved to end the death penalty moratorium once they knew they had enough judges in place that they could overrule the inevitable legal roadblocks the left would throw at them.

    There was a bit of fury when it happened but after a couple of injunctions from Obama judges failed, the left gave up and have kept quiet about it until now.

    The death penalty is going to come in very handy in Trump’s second term as leverage to work out plea deals with all the Democrats that committed criminal sedition the past four years.

    Trump is bringing back the rule of law…promises made…promises kept.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @Precious

    the leftists and media have been strangely silent as trump has executed more federal inmates in the last 3 months than The last 8 presidents executed over the last 60 years.

    Probably due to the fact that these executions are applauded by the majority of the American people. It is another winning issue for Trump against the democrats who are always trying to end capital punishment. Thus the media will not discuss Trump setting a new record for federal executions, executing more men this summer than any President in history. Some believe Trump wants to exceed the record established by FDR , as FDR executed a record 14 inmates during his 12 years in office. Trump can easily set the new record over the next 6 months, we have another 62 federal inmates on death row awaiting their execution. If Trump continues to execute 2 inmates each month they will all be executed well before the end of his second term.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  39. @DextersLabRat

    According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

     

    I feel sorry for the innocent persons of pigment or crackhead-looking white people who are stranded on the side of the road and I don't help, but I would never EVER pick up three of them let alone one. Derbyshire's talk really can save your kids' lives but it should be expanded to anyone that might look like they're a criminals. The only time I would feel comfortable letting three people hitch a ride are in a majority-white area and it would greatly depend on what they're wearing. You may say "women are fine" but not necessarily. Female heroin addicts can be vicious and a car can be sold for a lot of drugs. If it's a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types? No problem. Chances of being mass murdered are almost zero. White college-aged hippies are also typically OK, and you can differentiate them from the Antifa types by the amount of body piercings and tattoos. Fancy Asians are pretty much always OK, but again only if they're well-dressed and well-groomed. Obviously gay men are typically fine as well, unless they look crackhead-ish.

    Replies: @Polynikes, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Anonymous, @Intelligent Dasein

    If it’s a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types?

    You mean if they’re wearing Hawaiian shirts?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    You mean if they’re wearing Hawaiian shirts?
     
    On sunny days, our neighborhood charity will put out a table with surplus donated clothing that anyone can take, no questions asked. This summer I've obtained a few nice Hawaiian shirts that way. If anyone gives me poi about it, hey, I did go to primary school on Oahu.

    Wait a minute... just why did people feel a need to donate their new Hawaiian shirts this particular summer, anyway?

  40. @Jack D
    @Jack D

    Well, no more appeals in the earthly realm. He was executed at 7PM today.

    Replies: @bruce county, @usNthem, @AnotherDad

    Good. Next?

  41. An increasing number of blacks think they should be able to assault and kill whites without consequences because systemic racism.

  42. Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let’s get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By “fair” trials? Don’t make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly–you don’t really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let’s stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That’s how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don’t mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    • Thanks: Bumpkin
    • Troll: Jus' Sayin'...
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @obwandiyag

    1. The Innocence Project stops investigating if it looks like, whoops, this guy is guilty.
    2. If The Innocence Project finds out who did the crime, they don't turn that evidence over.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @David In TN

    , @brabantian
    @obwandiyag

    Indeed, regarding USA 'fair trials' - Guide for the Perplexed victims of US legal corruption

    For all their many flaws, Joe Biden & Kamala Harris promise to end the USA death penalty that has been horrifying us Europeans ever since America revived the practice after a nearly 10-year moratorium, between Ronald Reagan sending a man to the gas chamber in April 1967, and Gary Gilmore getting his wish to face a Utah firing squad in January 1977.

    The death penalty poisons people's minds and society much more than most realise. Racism in criminal justice is real. Over 1500 people have been executed in the USA since 1977, preponderantly brown and black people, with over 500 of those executions in Texas.

    Kamala Harris announced she would not allow executions by her office, as far back as her 2003 San Francisco Distinct Attorney campaign. For Biden, this is a reversal but he has come around, his tweet 25 July 2019 talking about the 160 people on death row since 1973 later proven innocent.

    The death penalty involves a psychopathic frame of mind. Its cold nature makes it different from killing in self-defence or fighting a bad guy. It isn't even a deterrent - criminals are often 'gamblers', so enjoy higher 'stakes'. Many other states with similar minority populations etc, have lower murder rates than Texas with its constantly-running death chamber.

    The sociopath mentality involved with executions, goes right up to the Supreme Court.
    https://i.ibb.co/T0H1mss/Leonel-Torres-Herrera.jpg
    But now
    https://twitter.com/JoeBiden/status/1154500277124251648

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @captflee

    , @nokangaroos
    @obwandiyag

    REASONABLE doubt is the standard - not "none whatsoever".

    In the case of mob violence (black-on-white by >300:1) as well as looting, arson etc. participation ought to constitute guilt ; the British lost their taste for executions after hanging an obviously - by our standards - innocent one but that´s what is needed: It was conspiracy (a botched burglary) in the commission of which a LEO was killed; never mind the accused was already in custody and trying to talk his partner into surrendering - he was guilty; the added irony being the actual shooter was underage and could not be executed.

    If they are accessory to a crime where there is a death, they are guilty (which would have the added benefit of ridding us of Mumia - you see the problem? If it cannot be ascertained who fired the fatal shot they all walk - I say hang them all).
    If they are old enough to rape and murder (meaning about 5) they are old enough to fry.
    Dito for stupid.
    And what have "slurs" got to do with it? I guess a reasonable case can be made against allowing blacks on juries, especially for black-on-white cases ... but I wouldn´t go there; it would run counter to the purpose of the jury - as protection from the System.
    And as criminality is strongly bimodal (there are more or less law-abiding and more or less career criminals with precious little in-between) "three strikes" laws are the way to go to separate the bucks from the sows (with apologies to Heinlein).

    , @iDeplorable
    @obwandiyag


    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent?
     
    By skin color. The black ones are guilty of something, of that we can be sure.

    Also, shut up Reg Caesar
    , @Genrick Yagoda
    @obwandiyag

    "Innocent blacks", huh?

    You mean like 100% guilty Hurricane Carter?

    Or 100% guilty Central Park 5?

    Yell me, where pray tell can you find an innocent Dindu?

  43. Elite Jews use doxxing and deplatforming instead of murder, so far, to silence the witnesses to their crimes.

  44. @Abolish_public_education
    A federal murder case. Really.

    That the double-murder was committed on a military base is incidental. None of the parties involved were US Mil. The crime spree began next door in Killeen (and didn’t venture far away from there). The case should have been tried in TX (state) superior court.

    Did the USA ever even receive formal, TX legislative OK to create then-temp Camp (now perm Ft.) Hood? It looks that the War Department just commandeered (i.e. stole) it. From the Waco Tribune-Herald:

    Homesteads that had been patiently and laboriously tamed and brought into productivity in the mid-19th century were destroyed by the Army [at the start of WWII] in the name of patriotism and progress. Houses and barns were burned, wells filled with rocks, and all traces of the pioneers who had raised crops and reared children for generations were eradicated from the scene.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    Boo hoo. It was largely empty space. 300 families were displaced from an area of 332 sq. miles of scrubland (and were allowed to retain grazing rights which they have to this day). The entire city of Philadelphia, with a population of over 1.5 million, only occupies 141 sq. miles. A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    Thanks for the information

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.
     
    There's also the fact that the nation was losing 200+ young men a day fighting in Europe. Still, the crummy thing is that while making an omelette requires that eggs be broken, it's always the poor and powerless who have those eggs broken. Note that it wasn't Martha's Vineyard that was converted into a firing range.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  45. @Ian Smith
    A 19-year-old is not a child. Then again, they’re all half devil, half child.

    Replies: @Bartleby the Scrivner

    They’re in a constant state of childhood. Just try to reason with one of them.

    • Agree: Richard B
  46. @David In TN
    Let's see now, six White murderers have been executed for federal crimes this year. That's fine and dandy. Now a black murderer is executed and it's "Racist Racist Racist!"

    Replies: @Jack D

    It was racist that Trump executed the whites first just to make a point that he wasn’t racist. I read that in an article. Trump is so racist that even when he executes white people he is still racist.

  47. @DextersLabRat

    According to the Justice Department, Todd and Stacie Bagley were killed in Fort Hood, Texas, in 1999 after having agreed to give Vialva and two of his friends a ride in their car.

     

    I feel sorry for the innocent persons of pigment or crackhead-looking white people who are stranded on the side of the road and I don't help, but I would never EVER pick up three of them let alone one. Derbyshire's talk really can save your kids' lives but it should be expanded to anyone that might look like they're a criminals. The only time I would feel comfortable letting three people hitch a ride are in a majority-white area and it would greatly depend on what they're wearing. You may say "women are fine" but not necessarily. Female heroin addicts can be vicious and a car can be sold for a lot of drugs. If it's a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types? No problem. Chances of being mass murdered are almost zero. White college-aged hippies are also typically OK, and you can differentiate them from the Antifa types by the amount of body piercings and tattoos. Fancy Asians are pretty much always OK, but again only if they're well-dressed and well-groomed. Obviously gay men are typically fine as well, unless they look crackhead-ish.

    Replies: @Polynikes, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Anonymous, @Intelligent Dasein

    Don’t ever pick up anybody, period. And do not give any money to those guys panhandling at the intersections holding up signs.

    These social parasites live off others’ unreflective do-gooderism. There is no longer any justification for unreflective do-gooderism in this day and age. We have reached a point of moral population inversion where when it looks like a person needs help, 9 times out of 10 they are a grifter or worse.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I spent significant parts of a decade of my life doing research on and consulting with law enforcement agencies on homicide, and in particular serial homicide. Before that I'd often hitchhiked and picked up hitchhikers; afterwards, never again. I was surprised at the number of homicide cases, which I studied, involved victims who were hitchhiking or gave a ride to their killer.

  48. @Patrick in SC
    The sick attempt at poetry... "A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government..."

    Imagine describing the execution of a white guy, say Timothy McVeigh, like that.

    It really is the return of radical chic, with its fetishistic worship of Black bodies, only the adherents seem to have about 30 less IQ points.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    The death of a black man is a tragedy. The death of a White, merely a statistic.

    – Joseph Stalin (wait, I mean Biden)

    • LOL: Kronos
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @BenKenobi

    That's pretty good.

    Replies: @David In TN

    , @usNthem
    @BenKenobi

    Yeah, and the more black deaths there are the greater the damn tragedy - they never just become statistics.

  49. @Jack D
    Another Jewish crime against innocent Christians:

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/09/25/00/wire-33594756-1600989612-373_634x422.jpg

    Replies: @Anon, @Father O'Hara

    What? Me worry?

  50. @Polynikes
    @DextersLabRat

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ....

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”


    WTF???

    Replies: @polistra, @JerseyJeffersonian, @DextersLabRat, @Muggles

    As in, three gays wearing rompers trying to hitch a ride to the ferry to Fire Island are probably not going to murder you.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @DextersLabRat

    Death by bunga-bunga!

  51. @Jack D
    @Abolish_public_education

    Boo hoo. It was largely empty space. 300 families were displaced from an area of 332 sq. miles of scrubland (and were allowed to retain grazing rights which they have to this day). The entire city of Philadelphia, with a population of over 1.5 million, only occupies 141 sq. miles. A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.

    Replies: @Alden, @Johann Ricke

    Thanks for the information

  52. @kaganovitch
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    The death penalty is the just reward for the perpetrator. To quote Adam Smith, “mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent.”

    It predates Smith by almost a millenium. It appears in Midrash Tanhuma (circa 850)

    Replies: @International Jew

    Also Publilius Syrus: “Bonis nocet quisquis pepercit malis.”
    (I had to toss that in just because the great sound and rhythm of it!)

    • Thanks: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @International Jew

    Bonis nocet quisquis pepercit malis

    Not that I know any Latin, but that should be "pepercerit".

  53. @Anonymous
    @DextersLabRat


    If it’s a group of preppy, well-dressed, well-groomed white frat boy types?
     
    You mean if they’re wearing Hawaiian shirts?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You mean if they’re wearing Hawaiian shirts?

    On sunny days, our neighborhood charity will put out a table with surplus donated clothing that anyone can take, no questions asked. This summer I’ve obtained a few nice Hawaiian shirts that way. If anyone gives me poi about it, hey, I did go to primary school on Oahu.

    Wait a minute… just why did people feel a need to donate their new Hawaiian shirts this particular summer, anyway?

  54. Trump’s Execution Spree Continues at Federal Killing Ground in Indiana
    More federal executions have been carried out in 2020 than in the past 60 years combined. Before Trump’s presidency, only three federal prisoners had been executed since the federal death penalty had been reinstated. This year was the first since 2003 that we had an execution of a federal inmate.

    This was the 7th Federal inmate executed this year, but the first Black man executed so it made the news. So far in 2020 five Whites have been executed, one Native American and now one Black federal inmate.

    Last year Barr announced that the Department of Justice were reestablishing protocols to resume executions. Three died in July. In the course of a single week, the Trump administration doubled the number of people who had been executed by the federal government in modern times.

    Should the administration follow through it will set a modern record. It will have executed more federal death row inmates than any other administration since Dwight D. Eisenhower’s.

    From the moment Attorney General William Barr first announced the federal execution dates, it was clear that the cases had been carefully chosen. One Indiana death penalty lawyer described the list of the condemned as “curated in a really cynical way,” to conceal the federal system’s stark racial disparities. If executions moved forward, she said at the time, eventually “it’s going to be black person after black person after black person.” There are currently 62 federal prisoners on death row. – https://theintercept.com/2020/09/09/federal-executions-keith-nelson-indiana-terre-haute/

    • Replies: @guest
    @Travis

    Is that “cynical” or simply practical? Because they were going to be called racist either way, why not kill the white ones first?

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Travis

    Thanks for providing one more good reason to vote for Trump in November.

    , @usNthem
    @Travis

    About time.

  55. This guy was a 19 year old child when he brutally double-murdered innocent saints–let him go, Nazis. Also, 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse, who committed self-defense against a serial-boy-rapist and other criminals, should burn, Nazis.

  56. @obwandiyag
    Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let's get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By "fair" trials? Don't make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly--you don't really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let's stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That's how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don't mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @brabantian, @nokangaroos, @iDeplorable, @Genrick Yagoda

    1. The Innocence Project stops investigating if it looks like, whoops, this guy is guilty.
    2. If The Innocence Project finds out who did the crime, they don’t turn that evidence over.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Redneck farmer

    Not to mention when they framed a Black guy to spring their Black client.

    , @David In TN
    @Redneck farmer

    Originally when DNA evidence came into being, Barry Scheck tried to have DNA testing outlawed completely. Why? It made winning an acquittal for a suspect with his DNA on a victim's body practically impossible.

    Scheck then realized if a suspect's DNA was absent he could be cleared. Thus, was born the Innocence Project. As mentioned when the DNA matches, Scheck quietly drops the case.

    Scheck and defense attorneys still takes the position: If a suspect's DNA doesn't match, he is innocent. If it does match, it doesn't prove guilt.

    This is the MSM's position. Last year the New York Times ran a story of a black male's DNA being matched to a 1999 double murder in Alabama. The victims were two White girls, Tracie Hawlett and J.B. Beasley.

    The NY Times story said something like, "There are hundreds of ways he could still be innocent despite the DNA. My answer is, Name 10 of them.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

  57. An increasing number of blacks think they should be able to assault and kill whites without consequences because systemic racism.

    I think the systemic racism is supplied as a rationale to sell it to whites. Good whites who don’t think it will affect them directly because blacks will know they are not the systemic racists. Somehow. Firing up blacks is perhaps secondary.

  58. This is of course a “robbery gone awry” in the time-honored Black tradition. And it poses the question: How many such “awry” outcomes are “rational witness-killing”.
    For instance take the present case of Wilma Hochstetler. The robbers had already run away, but then they stopped , turned and shot at Hochstetler and his wife. Looks like they had second thoughts about what was the proper way of acting – even if they didn’t need hours to figure it out, like the teenagers here.
    As we speak about Indiana, what’s with the killing of Claude Deeter , the rather forgotten victim in the Marion lynching case? The first account I read about this case indeed forgot to mention at all that there had been a white man killed – obviously nobody can imagine that the white people of Marion had reasons to fear the Blacks (and not only the other way round). As Deeter is nearly forgotten, I have not found out if his killing would qualify as “rational witness killing”, too.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Stogumber


    This is of course a “robbery gone awry” in the time-honored Black tradition.
     
    Yeah, I'd actually stop it right there. If you're a criminal threatening your victims with death unless they do something and you then carry out your threat, that's not an example of something that's "gone awry": It's one likely outcome of your stupid and vicious plan.
  59. @obwandiyag
    Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let's get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By "fair" trials? Don't make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly--you don't really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let's stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That's how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don't mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @brabantian, @nokangaroos, @iDeplorable, @Genrick Yagoda

    Indeed, regarding USA ‘fair trials’ – Guide for the Perplexed victims of US legal corruption

    For all their many flaws, Joe Biden & Kamala Harris promise to end the USA death penalty that has been horrifying us Europeans ever since America revived the practice after a nearly 10-year moratorium, between Ronald Reagan sending a man to the gas chamber in April 1967, and Gary Gilmore getting his wish to face a Utah firing squad in January 1977.

    The death penalty poisons people’s minds and society much more than most realise. Racism in criminal justice is real. Over 1500 people have been executed in the USA since 1977, preponderantly brown and black people, with over 500 of those executions in Texas.

    Kamala Harris announced she would not allow executions by her office, as far back as her 2003 San Francisco Distinct Attorney campaign. For Biden, this is a reversal but he has come around, his tweet 25 July 2019 talking about the 160 people on death row since 1973 later proven innocent.

    The death penalty involves a psychopathic frame of mind. Its cold nature makes it different from killing in self-defence or fighting a bad guy. It isn’t even a deterrent – criminals are often ‘gamblers’, so enjoy higher ‘stakes’. Many other states with similar minority populations etc, have lower murder rates than Texas with its constantly-running death chamber.

    The sociopath mentality involved with executions, goes right up to the Supreme Court.

    But now

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @brabantian


    It isn’t even a deterrent
     
    The number of executed criminals who have gone on--after their execution--to commit more crimes is, shall we say, vanishingly small.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @brabantian

    Your position is the definition of a sociopath mentality. It identifies with the murderers instead of the victims of murder.

    Your claim regarding POC executions, "If a greater proportion of POCs are executed then the system is racist" fails because the consequent does not follow from the antecedent. Your assumption is that murder rates are identical proportions of corresponding racial population proportions. There is no evidence supporting that assumption and a glut of data contradicting it. But even if it were true (which it isn't) it would not mean that the POCs executed were unjustly killed. You have to show that they were innocent, which you have not.

    Demanding that justice requires that reciprocity be violated is the antithesis of justice. You think murderers should be able to murder innocents, but those murderers should enjoy immunity from the reciprocity that justice demands.

    , @captflee
    @brabantian

    No deterrent effect? I dare say that I cannot recall hearing of any manner of recidivism from any of those actually executed, and I feel certain it would have been in the papers had that been the case. The same most certainly cannot be said regarding those sentenced to "life terms", whose post release slayings of others are barely even newsworthy, occurring so frequently.

  60. Anonymous[104] • Disclaimer says:

    Just why does it take Americans *so damned long* to capitally punish malefactors?

    In the UK, as recently as 1964, before the dirty f*cking Labour Party abolished capital punishment, typically, it took only three months from conviction to execution.
    In fact, the whole farago from arrest to execution was completed in under six months.

    Proper Tory hard men Home Secretaries had the final say on the appeal, more often than not, on the notorious and egregious murderer’s file notes, the words “The Law Must Takes Its Course” were scrawled across the cover by the Home Secretary.

    If it wasn’t for the Labour Party – and their century old mission to destroy England – then we wouldn’t be troubled by that tiresome bore, Jeremy Bamber, for a moment longer.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Anonymous

    Since governments have been known to prosecute maliciously, convict innocents, etc., it’s not unreasonable to demand that the government leave little doubt (> 99.4% certainty) that an execution is warranted.

    Government takes days to just deliver the mail. We shouldn’t be surprised that its lawyer-dominated, kangaroo-court legal processes take years.

  61. @obwandiyag
    Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let's get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By "fair" trials? Don't make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly--you don't really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let's stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That's how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don't mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @brabantian, @nokangaroos, @iDeplorable, @Genrick Yagoda

    REASONABLE doubt is the standard – not “none whatsoever”.

    In the case of mob violence (black-on-white by >300:1) as well as looting, arson etc. participation ought to constitute guilt ; the British lost their taste for executions after hanging an obviously – by our standards – innocent one but that´s what is needed: It was conspiracy (a botched burglary) in the commission of which a LEO was killed; never mind the accused was already in custody and trying to talk his partner into surrendering – he was guilty; the added irony being the actual shooter was underage and could not be executed.

    If they are accessory to a crime where there is a death, they are guilty (which would have the added benefit of ridding us of Mumia – you see the problem? If it cannot be ascertained who fired the fatal shot they all walk – I say hang them all).
    If they are old enough to rape and murder (meaning about 5) they are old enough to fry.
    Dito for stupid.
    And what have “slurs” got to do with it? I guess a reasonable case can be made against allowing blacks on juries, especially for black-on-white cases … but I wouldn´t go there; it would run counter to the purpose of the jury – as protection from the System.
    And as criminality is strongly bimodal (there are more or less law-abiding and more or less career criminals with precious little in-between) “three strikes” laws are the way to go to separate the bucks from the sows (with apologies to Heinlein).

  62. @Jack D
    @Jack D

    Well, no more appeals in the earthly realm. He was executed at 7PM today.

    Replies: @bruce county, @usNthem, @AnotherDad

    Good. Thanks for the update Jack.

  63. @BenKenobi
    @Patrick in SC

    The death of a black man is a tragedy. The death of a White, merely a statistic.

    - Joseph Stalin (wait, I mean Biden)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @usNthem

    That’s pretty good.

    • Thanks: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    Did you notice how a brutal double murder of two white people is turned into an anti-white diatribe?

  64. @brabantian
    @obwandiyag

    Indeed, regarding USA 'fair trials' - Guide for the Perplexed victims of US legal corruption

    For all their many flaws, Joe Biden & Kamala Harris promise to end the USA death penalty that has been horrifying us Europeans ever since America revived the practice after a nearly 10-year moratorium, between Ronald Reagan sending a man to the gas chamber in April 1967, and Gary Gilmore getting his wish to face a Utah firing squad in January 1977.

    The death penalty poisons people's minds and society much more than most realise. Racism in criminal justice is real. Over 1500 people have been executed in the USA since 1977, preponderantly brown and black people, with over 500 of those executions in Texas.

    Kamala Harris announced she would not allow executions by her office, as far back as her 2003 San Francisco Distinct Attorney campaign. For Biden, this is a reversal but he has come around, his tweet 25 July 2019 talking about the 160 people on death row since 1973 later proven innocent.

    The death penalty involves a psychopathic frame of mind. Its cold nature makes it different from killing in self-defence or fighting a bad guy. It isn't even a deterrent - criminals are often 'gamblers', so enjoy higher 'stakes'. Many other states with similar minority populations etc, have lower murder rates than Texas with its constantly-running death chamber.

    The sociopath mentality involved with executions, goes right up to the Supreme Court.
    https://i.ibb.co/T0H1mss/Leonel-Torres-Herrera.jpg
    But now
    https://twitter.com/JoeBiden/status/1154500277124251648

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @captflee

    It isn’t even a deterrent

    The number of executed criminals who have gone on–after their execution–to commit more crimes is, shall we say, vanishingly small.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don't want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented "crimes"

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Intelligent Dasein, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Mr McKenna

  65. @International Jew
    @kaganovitch

    Also Publilius Syrus: "Bonis nocet quisquis pepercit malis."
    (I had to toss that in just because the great sound and rhythm of it!)

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Bonis nocet quisquis pepercit malis

    Not that I know any Latin, but that should be “pepercerit”.

  66. @Jack D
    @Abolish_public_education

    Boo hoo. It was largely empty space. 300 families were displaced from an area of 332 sq. miles of scrubland (and were allowed to retain grazing rights which they have to this day). The entire city of Philadelphia, with a population of over 1.5 million, only occupies 141 sq. miles. A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.

    Replies: @Alden, @Johann Ricke

    A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.

    There’s also the fact that the nation was losing 200+ young men a day fighting in Europe. Still, the crummy thing is that while making an omelette requires that eggs be broken, it’s always the poor and powerless who have those eggs broken. Note that it wasn’t Martha’s Vineyard that was converted into a firing range.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Johann Ricke

    I don't know about Martha's Vineyard in particular, but old money resorts were frequently turned into military facilities during both World Wars. For example, the beautiful Ojai Valley Inn, where Frank Capra's "Lost Horizon" was filmed in 1937, was used as a military base throughout the war with much damage being done.

    When the famous George Thomas golf course was rebuilt after the war, two of the original holes were lost in the sagebrush. Ben Crenshaw showed up around 1990 with a photo from the 1920s of the original 6th hole in the 1920s but nobody working there had ever seen it. So Crenshaw went and looked around in the sagebrush and found the bones of a great par 3 that was finally restored about 50 years after it was torn up during the war.

    https://www.ojaivalleyinn.com/application/files/8415/7593/1025/GolfOjai_Hole16_2560x1096.jpg

    Replies: @Paleoconn

  67. The moral of the story is never have anything to do with any of them if you can possibly avoid it and do not repeat, do not ever give any of them a lift in your car.

    Mrs Bagley was alive when this savage set her fire to her and she likely burned to death.
    They should have done the same to this subhuman.

  68. @El Dato

    A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government Thursday for a crime he committed at age 19, even though his attorney said prosecutors used inflammatory racial stereotypes during the trial 20 years ago to land her client on death row.
     
    The reverse of the approach where we are being told that some heinous Nazi Guardian of Treblinka finally gets his comeuppance at age 120, then the last sentence mentions that he was actually some accountant working in an administrative building 5 kms away or something.

    These are not writers doing random slip-ups.


    More than 46 percent of the 56 inmates on federal death row are Black. Black people make up about 13 percent of the U.S. population. …
     
    Why not spend some time in there undercover, dear Daniella Silva, to really get to the bottom of this injustice?

    Replies: @guest

    Howcome everytime I compare incidence of crime amongst blacks in proportion to their share of population it’s hate speech?

  69. @Travis
    Trump’s Execution Spree Continues at Federal Killing Ground in Indiana
    More federal executions have been carried out in 2020 than in the past 60 years combined. Before Trump's presidency, only three federal prisoners had been executed since the federal death penalty had been reinstated. This year was the first since 2003 that we had an execution of a federal inmate.

    This was the 7th Federal inmate executed this year, but the first Black man executed so it made the news. So far in 2020 five Whites have been executed, one Native American and now one Black federal inmate.

    Last year Barr announced that the Department of Justice were reestablishing protocols to resume executions. Three died in July. In the course of a single week, the Trump administration doubled the number of people who had been executed by the federal government in modern times.

    Should the administration follow through it will set a modern record. It will have executed more federal death row inmates than any other administration since Dwight D. Eisenhower's.

    From the moment Attorney General William Barr first announced the federal execution dates, it was clear that the cases had been carefully chosen. One Indiana death penalty lawyer described the list of the condemned as “curated in a really cynical way,” to conceal the federal system’s stark racial disparities. If executions moved forward, she said at the time, eventually “it’s going to be black person after black person after black person.” There are currently 62 federal prisoners on death row. - https://theintercept.com/2020/09/09/federal-executions-keith-nelson-indiana-terre-haute/

    Replies: @guest, @Jus' Sayin'..., @usNthem

    Is that “cynical” or simply practical? Because they were going to be called racist either way, why not kill the white ones first?

    • Agree: Travis
  70. @Mr McKenna
    @brabantian


    It isn’t even a deterrent
     
    The number of executed criminals who have gone on--after their execution--to commit more crimes is, shall we say, vanishingly small.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don’t want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented “crimes”

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @AndrewR


    Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.
     
    You're ignoring the difference in propensity to commit future crime on the part of the perpetrator vs. the victims.

    Prison sentences prevent the convict from committing crimes against the general public during their time in prison. They can still commit them against guards and fellow prisoners. The longer the sentence, the longer the period in which the public is protected.

    Prevention is a fourth goal of punishment along with the more widely cited deterrence, retribution, and rehabilitation (the last obviously not applicable to capital punishment.)
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @AndrewR

    I understand your concern, but your argument proves too much. It delegitimizes any form of punishment whatsoever.

    The question of whether a sentence of death is justifiable in itself is independent of whether or not you can trust the government to carry out such sentences properly. No government ever has been or ever will be perfect in such regard. If the worst the government could do was to impose lifelong imprisonment, exile, or financial ruin, doing these things to an innocent man would still be an intolerable travesty scarcely better than putting him to death. Ought those to be abolished as well? What is the maximum sentence one can allow on the possibility that it might be inflicted on an underserving soul? That slippery slope ends only at zero.

    This is why the determination of punishment is oriented solely to the gravity of the crime. Certain crimes deserve death. A government which abjures the duty to carry out the sentence is not less illegitimate than one that carries it out carelessly or arbitrarily.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @AndrewR


    Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.
     
    He prevented no crime. The incident count is zero. Thank you for confirming your qualification as a member of the category of those who are so defective that your mental development never exceeded that of a normal child of about two years of age.
    , @Mr McKenna
    @AndrewR

    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We've really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity. Others have kindly applied a few ministrations in this case, though if history is any guide they will have been quite futile.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @William Badwhite

  71. Just a child. BTW, when does childhood end? James Alex Fields was 20 when he took a wrong turn in Charlottesville that landed him 400+ years in prison in this era of anti-Rightist hysteria.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
  72. @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    A large area was needed in order to test and train the troops on the use of tank destroyers which were crucial to winning WWII. There is no contest between the needs of a few hundred families (who were paid compensation for the land taken) and the national defense needs of the entire country in the midst of a war. Not even close.
     
    There's also the fact that the nation was losing 200+ young men a day fighting in Europe. Still, the crummy thing is that while making an omelette requires that eggs be broken, it's always the poor and powerless who have those eggs broken. Note that it wasn't Martha's Vineyard that was converted into a firing range.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I don’t know about Martha’s Vineyard in particular, but old money resorts were frequently turned into military facilities during both World Wars. For example, the beautiful Ojai Valley Inn, where Frank Capra’s “Lost Horizon” was filmed in 1937, was used as a military base throughout the war with much damage being done.

    When the famous George Thomas golf course was rebuilt after the war, two of the original holes were lost in the sagebrush. Ben Crenshaw showed up around 1990 with a photo from the 1920s of the original 6th hole in the 1920s but nobody working there had ever seen it. So Crenshaw went and looked around in the sagebrush and found the bones of a great par 3 that was finally restored about 50 years after it was torn up during the war.

    • Replies: @Paleoconn
    @Steve Sailer

    My word, how many bunkers can you squeeze into one hole. Beautiful place, though.

  73. Justice delayed is justice denied. On the other hand, better late than never.

  74. @Redneck farmer
    @obwandiyag

    1. The Innocence Project stops investigating if it looks like, whoops, this guy is guilty.
    2. If The Innocence Project finds out who did the crime, they don't turn that evidence over.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @David In TN

    Not to mention when they framed a Black guy to spring their Black client.

  75. @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don't want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented "crimes"

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Intelligent Dasein, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Mr McKenna

    Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    You’re ignoring the difference in propensity to commit future crime on the part of the perpetrator vs. the victims.

    Prison sentences prevent the convict from committing crimes against the general public during their time in prison. They can still commit them against guards and fellow prisoners. The longer the sentence, the longer the period in which the public is protected.

    Prevention is a fourth goal of punishment along with the more widely cited deterrence, retribution, and rehabilitation (the last obviously not applicable to capital punishment.)

    • Agree: HammerJack
  76. @Stogumber
    This is of course a "robbery gone awry" in the time-honored Black tradition. And it poses the question: How many such "awry" outcomes are "rational witness-killing".
    For instance take the present case of Wilma Hochstetler. The robbers had already run away, but then they stopped , turned and shot at Hochstetler and his wife. Looks like they had second thoughts about what was the proper way of acting - even if they didn't need hours to figure it out, like the teenagers here.
    As we speak about Indiana, what's with the killing of Claude Deeter , the rather forgotten victim in the Marion lynching case? The first account I read about this case indeed forgot to mention at all that there had been a white man killed - obviously nobody can imagine that the white people of Marion had reasons to fear the Blacks (and not only the other way round). As Deeter is nearly forgotten, I have not found out if his killing would qualify as "rational witness killing", too.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    This is of course a “robbery gone awry” in the time-honored Black tradition.

    Yeah, I’d actually stop it right there. If you’re a criminal threatening your victims with death unless they do something and you then carry out your threat, that’s not an example of something that’s “gone awry”: It’s one likely outcome of your stupid and vicious plan.

  77. @brabantian
    @obwandiyag

    Indeed, regarding USA 'fair trials' - Guide for the Perplexed victims of US legal corruption

    For all their many flaws, Joe Biden & Kamala Harris promise to end the USA death penalty that has been horrifying us Europeans ever since America revived the practice after a nearly 10-year moratorium, between Ronald Reagan sending a man to the gas chamber in April 1967, and Gary Gilmore getting his wish to face a Utah firing squad in January 1977.

    The death penalty poisons people's minds and society much more than most realise. Racism in criminal justice is real. Over 1500 people have been executed in the USA since 1977, preponderantly brown and black people, with over 500 of those executions in Texas.

    Kamala Harris announced she would not allow executions by her office, as far back as her 2003 San Francisco Distinct Attorney campaign. For Biden, this is a reversal but he has come around, his tweet 25 July 2019 talking about the 160 people on death row since 1973 later proven innocent.

    The death penalty involves a psychopathic frame of mind. Its cold nature makes it different from killing in self-defence or fighting a bad guy. It isn't even a deterrent - criminals are often 'gamblers', so enjoy higher 'stakes'. Many other states with similar minority populations etc, have lower murder rates than Texas with its constantly-running death chamber.

    The sociopath mentality involved with executions, goes right up to the Supreme Court.
    https://i.ibb.co/T0H1mss/Leonel-Torres-Herrera.jpg
    But now
    https://twitter.com/JoeBiden/status/1154500277124251648

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @captflee

    Your position is the definition of a sociopath mentality. It identifies with the murderers instead of the victims of murder.

    Your claim regarding POC executions, “If a greater proportion of POCs are executed then the system is racist” fails because the consequent does not follow from the antecedent. Your assumption is that murder rates are identical proportions of corresponding racial population proportions. There is no evidence supporting that assumption and a glut of data contradicting it. But even if it were true (which it isn’t) it would not mean that the POCs executed were unjustly killed. You have to show that they were innocent, which you have not.

    Demanding that justice requires that reciprocity be violated is the antithesis of justice. You think murderers should be able to murder innocents, but those murderers should enjoy immunity from the reciprocity that justice demands.

  78. @Precious
    Trump and Mitch are the reason the US government has started federal executions again. First they rammed in all the judicial appointments, then Trump moved to end the death penalty moratorium once they knew they had enough judges in place that they could overrule the inevitable legal roadblocks the left would throw at them.

    There was a bit of fury when it happened but after a couple of injunctions from Obama judges failed, the left gave up and have kept quiet about it until now.

    The death penalty is going to come in very handy in Trump's second term as leverage to work out plea deals with all the Democrats that committed criminal sedition the past four years.

    Trump is bringing back the rule of law...promises made...promises kept.

    Replies: @Travis

    the leftists and media have been strangely silent as trump has executed more federal inmates in the last 3 months than The last 8 presidents executed over the last 60 years.

    Probably due to the fact that these executions are applauded by the majority of the American people. It is another winning issue for Trump against the democrats who are always trying to end capital punishment. Thus the media will not discuss Trump setting a new record for federal executions, executing more men this summer than any President in history. Some believe Trump wants to exceed the record established by FDR , as FDR executed a record 14 inmates during his 12 years in office. Trump can easily set the new record over the next 6 months, we have another 62 federal inmates on death row awaiting their execution. If Trump continues to execute 2 inmates each month they will all be executed well before the end of his second term.

    • Agree: Precious, HammerJack
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Travis


    If Trump continues to execute 2 inmates each month they will all be executed well before the end of his second term.
     
    Let us hope your prediction is accurate.
  79. @Patrick in SC
    The sick attempt at poetry... "A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government..."

    Imagine describing the execution of a white guy, say Timothy McVeigh, like that.

    It really is the return of radical chic, with its fetishistic worship of Black bodies, only the adherents seem to have about 30 less IQ points.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    The sick attempt at poetry… “A Black man is set to be executed by the federal government…”

    There once was a black man named Chris
    To avoid execution his only wish
    Black crimes on white
    Against the Feds he did fight
    But the evening’s hamburger t’was his final dish

  80. @Intelligent Dasein
    @DextersLabRat

    Don't ever pick up anybody, period. And do not give any money to those guys panhandling at the intersections holding up signs.

    These social parasites live off others' unreflective do-gooderism. There is no longer any justification for unreflective do-gooderism in this day and age. We have reached a point of moral population inversion where when it looks like a person needs help, 9 times out of 10 they are a grifter or worse.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    I spent significant parts of a decade of my life doing research on and consulting with law enforcement agencies on homicide, and in particular serial homicide. Before that I’d often hitchhiked and picked up hitchhikers; afterwards, never again. I was surprised at the number of homicide cases, which I studied, involved victims who were hitchhiking or gave a ride to their killer.

  81. @Travis
    Trump’s Execution Spree Continues at Federal Killing Ground in Indiana
    More federal executions have been carried out in 2020 than in the past 60 years combined. Before Trump's presidency, only three federal prisoners had been executed since the federal death penalty had been reinstated. This year was the first since 2003 that we had an execution of a federal inmate.

    This was the 7th Federal inmate executed this year, but the first Black man executed so it made the news. So far in 2020 five Whites have been executed, one Native American and now one Black federal inmate.

    Last year Barr announced that the Department of Justice were reestablishing protocols to resume executions. Three died in July. In the course of a single week, the Trump administration doubled the number of people who had been executed by the federal government in modern times.

    Should the administration follow through it will set a modern record. It will have executed more federal death row inmates than any other administration since Dwight D. Eisenhower's.

    From the moment Attorney General William Barr first announced the federal execution dates, it was clear that the cases had been carefully chosen. One Indiana death penalty lawyer described the list of the condemned as “curated in a really cynical way,” to conceal the federal system’s stark racial disparities. If executions moved forward, she said at the time, eventually “it’s going to be black person after black person after black person.” There are currently 62 federal prisoners on death row. - https://theintercept.com/2020/09/09/federal-executions-keith-nelson-indiana-terre-haute/

    Replies: @guest, @Jus' Sayin'..., @usNthem

    Thanks for providing one more good reason to vote for Trump in November.

  82. @obwandiyag
    Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let's get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By "fair" trials? Don't make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly--you don't really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let's stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That's how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don't mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @brabantian, @nokangaroos, @iDeplorable, @Genrick Yagoda

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent?

    By skin color. The black ones are guilty of something, of that we can be sure.

    Also, shut up Reg Caesar

  83. @Steve Sailer
    @Johann Ricke

    I don't know about Martha's Vineyard in particular, but old money resorts were frequently turned into military facilities during both World Wars. For example, the beautiful Ojai Valley Inn, where Frank Capra's "Lost Horizon" was filmed in 1937, was used as a military base throughout the war with much damage being done.

    When the famous George Thomas golf course was rebuilt after the war, two of the original holes were lost in the sagebrush. Ben Crenshaw showed up around 1990 with a photo from the 1920s of the original 6th hole in the 1920s but nobody working there had ever seen it. So Crenshaw went and looked around in the sagebrush and found the bones of a great par 3 that was finally restored about 50 years after it was torn up during the war.

    https://www.ojaivalleyinn.com/application/files/8415/7593/1025/GolfOjai_Hole16_2560x1096.jpg

    Replies: @Paleoconn

    My word, how many bunkers can you squeeze into one hole. Beautiful place, though.

  84. @BenKenobi
    @Patrick in SC

    The death of a black man is a tragedy. The death of a White, merely a statistic.

    - Joseph Stalin (wait, I mean Biden)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @usNthem

    Yeah, and the more black deaths there are the greater the damn tragedy – they never just become statistics.

  85. @Travis
    Trump’s Execution Spree Continues at Federal Killing Ground in Indiana
    More federal executions have been carried out in 2020 than in the past 60 years combined. Before Trump's presidency, only three federal prisoners had been executed since the federal death penalty had been reinstated. This year was the first since 2003 that we had an execution of a federal inmate.

    This was the 7th Federal inmate executed this year, but the first Black man executed so it made the news. So far in 2020 five Whites have been executed, one Native American and now one Black federal inmate.

    Last year Barr announced that the Department of Justice were reestablishing protocols to resume executions. Three died in July. In the course of a single week, the Trump administration doubled the number of people who had been executed by the federal government in modern times.

    Should the administration follow through it will set a modern record. It will have executed more federal death row inmates than any other administration since Dwight D. Eisenhower's.

    From the moment Attorney General William Barr first announced the federal execution dates, it was clear that the cases had been carefully chosen. One Indiana death penalty lawyer described the list of the condemned as “curated in a really cynical way,” to conceal the federal system’s stark racial disparities. If executions moved forward, she said at the time, eventually “it’s going to be black person after black person after black person.” There are currently 62 federal prisoners on death row. - https://theintercept.com/2020/09/09/federal-executions-keith-nelson-indiana-terre-haute/

    Replies: @guest, @Jus' Sayin'..., @usNthem

    About time.

  86. i hope he died screaming.

    • Agree: JMcG
  87. @Anonymous
    Just why does it take Americans *so damned long* to capitally punish malefactors?

    In the UK, as recently as 1964, before the dirty f*cking Labour Party abolished capital punishment, typically, it took only three months from conviction to execution.
    In fact, the whole farago from arrest to execution was completed in under six months.

    Proper Tory hard men Home Secretaries had the final say on the appeal, more often than not, on the notorious and egregious murderer's file notes, the words "The Law Must Takes Its Course" were scrawled across the cover by the Home Secretary.

    If it wasn't for the Labour Party - and their century old mission to destroy England - then we wouldn't be troubled by that tiresome bore, Jeremy Bamber, for a moment longer.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Since governments have been known to prosecute maliciously, convict innocents, etc., it’s not unreasonable to demand that the government leave little doubt (> 99.4% certainty) that an execution is warranted.

    Government takes days to just deliver the mail. We shouldn’t be surprised that its lawyer-dominated, kangaroo-court legal processes take years.

  88. @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don't want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented "crimes"

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Intelligent Dasein, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Mr McKenna

    I understand your concern, but your argument proves too much. It delegitimizes any form of punishment whatsoever.

    The question of whether a sentence of death is justifiable in itself is independent of whether or not you can trust the government to carry out such sentences properly. No government ever has been or ever will be perfect in such regard. If the worst the government could do was to impose lifelong imprisonment, exile, or financial ruin, doing these things to an innocent man would still be an intolerable travesty scarcely better than putting him to death. Ought those to be abolished as well? What is the maximum sentence one can allow on the possibility that it might be inflicted on an underserving soul? That slippery slope ends only at zero.

    This is why the determination of punishment is oriented solely to the gravity of the crime. Certain crimes deserve death. A government which abjures the duty to carry out the sentence is not less illegitimate than one that carries it out carelessly or arbitrarily.

    • Agree: Dissident
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What? You think writing long posts proves you smart?

    Your basic argument is stupid. No different from the other illiterate cretins on here. Only maybe even stupider.

    Total false analogy: "If the worst the government could do was to impose lifelong imprisonment, exile, or financial ruin, doing these things to an innocent man would still be an intolerable travesty scarcely better than putting him to death."

    (If you actually believe that, you belong in jail, or more aptly, a psych ward.)

    Nope. Staying alive is infinitely better. (Not to mention that you can redress imprisonment, exile, and /or financial ruin. What, you think you can redress executing an innocent man? If you do, you are stupider than a worm.)

    Your "values" are up your ass. If you're a typical "Christian," then fuck Christianity.

  89. @brabantian
    @obwandiyag

    Indeed, regarding USA 'fair trials' - Guide for the Perplexed victims of US legal corruption

    For all their many flaws, Joe Biden & Kamala Harris promise to end the USA death penalty that has been horrifying us Europeans ever since America revived the practice after a nearly 10-year moratorium, between Ronald Reagan sending a man to the gas chamber in April 1967, and Gary Gilmore getting his wish to face a Utah firing squad in January 1977.

    The death penalty poisons people's minds and society much more than most realise. Racism in criminal justice is real. Over 1500 people have been executed in the USA since 1977, preponderantly brown and black people, with over 500 of those executions in Texas.

    Kamala Harris announced she would not allow executions by her office, as far back as her 2003 San Francisco Distinct Attorney campaign. For Biden, this is a reversal but he has come around, his tweet 25 July 2019 talking about the 160 people on death row since 1973 later proven innocent.

    The death penalty involves a psychopathic frame of mind. Its cold nature makes it different from killing in self-defence or fighting a bad guy. It isn't even a deterrent - criminals are often 'gamblers', so enjoy higher 'stakes'. Many other states with similar minority populations etc, have lower murder rates than Texas with its constantly-running death chamber.

    The sociopath mentality involved with executions, goes right up to the Supreme Court.
    https://i.ibb.co/T0H1mss/Leonel-Torres-Herrera.jpg
    But now
    https://twitter.com/JoeBiden/status/1154500277124251648

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @captflee

    No deterrent effect? I dare say that I cannot recall hearing of any manner of recidivism from any of those actually executed, and I feel certain it would have been in the papers had that been the case. The same most certainly cannot be said regarding those sentenced to “life terms”, whose post release slayings of others are barely even newsworthy, occurring so frequently.

  90. @Polynikes
    @DextersLabRat

    “You may say “women are fine” but not necessarily.

    ....

    Obviously gay men are typically fine”


    WTF???

    Replies: @polistra, @JerseyJeffersonian, @DextersLabRat, @Muggles

    50 years ago or so, when I didn’t have a car or money, I did some long distance hitchhiking. Sometimes alone (when my ride broke down), sometimes with a friend.

    Hippie-ish looking. Got rides from all kinds. A nice black military couple saved us from a redneck beat-down (probably) in Van Horn TX. We did some driving and bought some gas and got 300 miles down the road. Jesus freaks, older white guys, all kinds. Even a Hispanic guy in Cali with a “Nixon” bumper sticker.

    I would also pick up hitchers sometimes. Once a very laconic, “Marlboro country” looking cowboy in west Texas. But when I picked up a guy outside of El Paso heading west, it was my last.

    He didn’t want to get out at my turnoff to the north 150 miles later. He mumbled and I realized he sounded somewhat drugged up. As I drove off to the side at my turnoff, he started protesting about “where he needed to go.” I lowered my voice and growled to him to get out now.

    I was reaching for my revolver under my seat but he finally opened the door and left. No more riders after that. I still wonder if I would have shot him had he violently resisted. Probably. What a mess…

  91. @Redneck farmer
    @obwandiyag

    1. The Innocence Project stops investigating if it looks like, whoops, this guy is guilty.
    2. If The Innocence Project finds out who did the crime, they don't turn that evidence over.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @David In TN

    Originally when DNA evidence came into being, Barry Scheck tried to have DNA testing outlawed completely. Why? It made winning an acquittal for a suspect with his DNA on a victim’s body practically impossible.

    Scheck then realized if a suspect’s DNA was absent he could be cleared. Thus, was born the Innocence Project. As mentioned when the DNA matches, Scheck quietly drops the case.

    Scheck and defense attorneys still takes the position: If a suspect’s DNA doesn’t match, he is innocent. If it does match, it doesn’t prove guilt.

    This is the MSM’s position. Last year the New York Times ran a story of a black male’s DNA being matched to a 1999 double murder in Alabama. The victims were two White girls, Tracie Hawlett and J.B. Beasley.

    The NY Times story said something like, “There are hundreds of ways he could still be innocent despite the DNA. My answer is, Name 10 of them.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @David In TN

    There's a freelancer named 'Lauren Gill' who composed a story on the subject primarily composed of verbiage derived from the defense. The trouble is that the evidence against this McCraney fellow is so strong it's evident right there that she's just a conduit for BS from his lawyers.

    What's disconcerting about it is he seems like someone roughly normal - apart from the rape-murder in 1999. His only brush with the law during his first 45 years was a court filing against him courtesy his 1st wife, contending he'd been violent with her; he was 21 years old at the time.

    , @obwandiyag
    @David In TN

    Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred.

    You are so stupid you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    Whatever the Innocence Project does does not matter.

    If you execute guilty people, you execute innocent people, too. Period. Absolute, undeniable fact.

    According to you, you vile piece of shit, Kirk Bloodsworth deserves to die. I hope and pray that you are in the wrong place at the wrong time (reason number 9) sometime.

    You dirty rotten garbage.

    Replies: @Adamant

  92. @Steve Sailer
    @BenKenobi

    That's pretty good.

    Replies: @David In TN

    Steve,

    Did you notice how a brutal double murder of two white people is turned into an anti-white diatribe?

  93. @David In TN
    @Redneck farmer

    Originally when DNA evidence came into being, Barry Scheck tried to have DNA testing outlawed completely. Why? It made winning an acquittal for a suspect with his DNA on a victim's body practically impossible.

    Scheck then realized if a suspect's DNA was absent he could be cleared. Thus, was born the Innocence Project. As mentioned when the DNA matches, Scheck quietly drops the case.

    Scheck and defense attorneys still takes the position: If a suspect's DNA doesn't match, he is innocent. If it does match, it doesn't prove guilt.

    This is the MSM's position. Last year the New York Times ran a story of a black male's DNA being matched to a 1999 double murder in Alabama. The victims were two White girls, Tracie Hawlett and J.B. Beasley.

    The NY Times story said something like, "There are hundreds of ways he could still be innocent despite the DNA. My answer is, Name 10 of them.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    There’s a freelancer named ‘Lauren Gill’ who composed a story on the subject primarily composed of verbiage derived from the defense. The trouble is that the evidence against this McCraney fellow is so strong it’s evident right there that she’s just a conduit for BS from his lawyers.

    What’s disconcerting about it is he seems like someone roughly normal – apart from the rape-murder in 1999. His only brush with the law during his first 45 years was a court filing against him courtesy his 1st wife, contending he’d been violent with her; he was 21 years old at the time.

  94. @Travis
    @Precious

    the leftists and media have been strangely silent as trump has executed more federal inmates in the last 3 months than The last 8 presidents executed over the last 60 years.

    Probably due to the fact that these executions are applauded by the majority of the American people. It is another winning issue for Trump against the democrats who are always trying to end capital punishment. Thus the media will not discuss Trump setting a new record for federal executions, executing more men this summer than any President in history. Some believe Trump wants to exceed the record established by FDR , as FDR executed a record 14 inmates during his 12 years in office. Trump can easily set the new record over the next 6 months, we have another 62 federal inmates on death row awaiting their execution. If Trump continues to execute 2 inmates each month they will all be executed well before the end of his second term.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    If Trump continues to execute 2 inmates each month they will all be executed well before the end of his second term.

    Let us hope your prediction is accurate.

  95. @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don't want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented "crimes"

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Intelligent Dasein, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Mr McKenna

    Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    He prevented no crime. The incident count is zero. Thank you for confirming your qualification as a member of the category of those who are so defective that your mental development never exceeded that of a normal child of about two years of age.

  96. @David In TN
    @Redneck farmer

    Originally when DNA evidence came into being, Barry Scheck tried to have DNA testing outlawed completely. Why? It made winning an acquittal for a suspect with his DNA on a victim's body practically impossible.

    Scheck then realized if a suspect's DNA was absent he could be cleared. Thus, was born the Innocence Project. As mentioned when the DNA matches, Scheck quietly drops the case.

    Scheck and defense attorneys still takes the position: If a suspect's DNA doesn't match, he is innocent. If it does match, it doesn't prove guilt.

    This is the MSM's position. Last year the New York Times ran a story of a black male's DNA being matched to a 1999 double murder in Alabama. The victims were two White girls, Tracie Hawlett and J.B. Beasley.

    The NY Times story said something like, "There are hundreds of ways he could still be innocent despite the DNA. My answer is, Name 10 of them.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @obwandiyag

    Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred.

    You are so stupid you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    Whatever the Innocence Project does does not matter.

    If you execute guilty people, you execute innocent people, too. Period. Absolute, undeniable fact.

    According to you, you vile piece of shit, Kirk Bloodsworth deserves to die. I hope and pray that you are in the wrong place at the wrong time (reason number 9) sometime.

    You dirty rotten garbage.

    • Replies: @Adamant
    @obwandiyag

    "Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred."


    Nope. Those are all the same one. "He was framed." Because the scenario is the perp left DNA. So what is the innocent reason his DNA is at the scene?


    Also please name 3 innocent men executed in the United States. Just 3. There must be oodles so 3 shouldn't be a problem.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @obwandiyag

  97. @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    You mean killing someone keeps them from committing crime? So why was this man executed? Think about all the crime he prevented by killing his victims.

    Seriously though, as moronic as your comment would be under the best of circumstances, we increasingly live in a country run by a government that thinks white people have no right to defend ourselves, advocate for ourselves, be autonomous or, ultimately, exist except as tax fodder. So no I really don't want to promote a punishment that I can easily envision being used on me for invented "crimes"

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Intelligent Dasein, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Mr McKenna

    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We’ve really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity. Others have kindly applied a few ministrations in this case, though if history is any guide they will have been quite futile.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Mr McKenna

    I'm glad I'm back to break up the low-IQ kneejerk reactionary circlejerk that you are so proud of contributing to.

    , @William Badwhite
    @Mr McKenna


    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We’ve really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity.
     
    Remember, he's the guy that couldn't figure out why nobody at work liked him.
  98. @Mr McKenna
    @AndrewR

    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We've really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity. Others have kindly applied a few ministrations in this case, though if history is any guide they will have been quite futile.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @William Badwhite

    I’m glad I’m back to break up the low-IQ kneejerk reactionary circlejerk that you are so proud of contributing to.

  99. @obwandiyag
    @David In TN

    Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred.

    You are so stupid you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    Whatever the Innocence Project does does not matter.

    If you execute guilty people, you execute innocent people, too. Period. Absolute, undeniable fact.

    According to you, you vile piece of shit, Kirk Bloodsworth deserves to die. I hope and pray that you are in the wrong place at the wrong time (reason number 9) sometime.

    You dirty rotten garbage.

    Replies: @Adamant

    “Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred.”

    Nope. Those are all the same one. “He was framed.” Because the scenario is the perp left DNA. So what is the innocent reason his DNA is at the scene?

    Also please name 3 innocent men executed in the United States. Just 3. There must be oodles so 3 shouldn’t be a problem.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    Fucking asshole.

    Those are NOT all the same thing. You fucking assholian asshole. NOT. You think things that are different are the same. That is the true definition of retard.

    Add another one: false confession.

    I like how you fuckers say "Government is good for nothing," and then you trust it implicitly to faultlessly go executing people. Like I said, you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    And those are just talking point memos you are quoting to me. Did you ever have an original thought in your life?

    For you information (ignoring that you are incapable of taking any facts into your tiny little mouse brain):

    Logic insists that A. innocent men have been executed, and B. you won't know who they are, because a "fair trial" has deemed the innocent guilty.

    What logic? The huge number of those convicted of rape later exonerated, categorically exonerated, by DNA.

    But sometimes, quite often, there is no DNA at all. Those innocent without DNA on their side cannot be exonerated.

    "Every year since 1989, in about 25 percent of the sexual assault cases referred to the FBI where results could be obtained (primarily by State and local law enforcement), the primary suspect has been excluded by forensic DNA testing. Specifically, FBI officials report that out of roughly 10,000 sexual assault cases since 1989, about 2,000 tests have been inconclusive (usually insufficient high molecular weight DNA to do testing), about 2,000 tests have excluded the primary suspect, and about 6,000 have "matched" or included the primary suspect.1 The fact that these percentages have remained constant for 7 years, and that the National Institute of Justice's informal survey of private laboratories reveals a strikingly similar 26-percent exclusion rate, strongly suggests that postarrest and postconviction DNA exonerations are tied to some strong, underlying systemic problems that generate erroneous accusations and convictions."

    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?

    Answer: 100%

    But this is too hard for you. You're just a troll anyway. Go away.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Genrick Yagoda

    , @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    I got 8. There are 100s more. You are an asshole, and that's an incontrovertible fact.

    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Art Deco

  100. @Adamant
    @obwandiyag

    "Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred."


    Nope. Those are all the same one. "He was framed." Because the scenario is the perp left DNA. So what is the innocent reason his DNA is at the scene?


    Also please name 3 innocent men executed in the United States. Just 3. There must be oodles so 3 shouldn't be a problem.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @obwandiyag

    Fucking asshole.

    Those are NOT all the same thing. You fucking assholian asshole. NOT. You think things that are different are the same. That is the true definition of retard.

    Add another one: false confession.

    I like how you fuckers say “Government is good for nothing,” and then you trust it implicitly to faultlessly go executing people. Like I said, you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    And those are just talking point memos you are quoting to me. Did you ever have an original thought in your life?

    For you information (ignoring that you are incapable of taking any facts into your tiny little mouse brain):

    Logic insists that A. innocent men have been executed, and B. you won’t know who they are, because a “fair trial” has deemed the innocent guilty.

    What logic? The huge number of those convicted of rape later exonerated, categorically exonerated, by DNA.

    But sometimes, quite often, there is no DNA at all. Those innocent without DNA on their side cannot be exonerated.

    “Every year since 1989, in about 25 percent of the sexual assault cases referred to the FBI where results could be obtained (primarily by State and local law enforcement), the primary suspect has been excluded by forensic DNA testing. Specifically, FBI officials report that out of roughly 10,000 sexual assault cases since 1989, about 2,000 tests have been inconclusive (usually insufficient high molecular weight DNA to do testing), about 2,000 tests have excluded the primary suspect, and about 6,000 have “matched” or included the primary suspect.1 The fact that these percentages have remained constant for 7 years, and that the National Institute of Justice’s informal survey of private laboratories reveals a strikingly similar 26-percent exclusion rate, strongly suggests that postarrest and postconviction DNA exonerations are tied to some strong, underlying systemic problems that generate erroneous accusations and convictions.”

    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?

    Answer: 100%

    But this is too hard for you. You’re just a troll anyway. Go away.

    • LOL: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Adamant
    @obwandiyag

    No, when answering the question of how someone’s DNA got somewhere it shouldn’t be, those are all the same thing. It was planted. By the DA. By the CIA. By whoever. You simply have trouble with reading comprehension.

    , @Genrick Yagoda
    @obwandiyag


    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?
     
    Your quote refers only to primary suspects cleared by DNA results. It states absolutely NOTHING about rape convicts.

    Either you think people reading here at UNZ are stupid, or you are.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  101. @Adamant
    @obwandiyag

    "Railroading. Making a patsy of him. District Attorney needing re-election. CIA having it out for him. Having the wrong political opinions. Revealing state secrets. Being of the wrong race. Mistaken identity.

    Just some of the more than hundred."


    Nope. Those are all the same one. "He was framed." Because the scenario is the perp left DNA. So what is the innocent reason his DNA is at the scene?


    Also please name 3 innocent men executed in the United States. Just 3. There must be oodles so 3 shouldn't be a problem.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @obwandiyag

    I got 8. There are 100s more. You are an asshole, and that’s an incontrovertible fact.

    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.

    • Replies: @Adamant
    @obwandiyag

    Yawn.

    ‘I swears I din’ do it! It was this other guy, I can’t tell you his name.’

    Well, who can argue with that?

    , @Art Deco
    @obwandiyag

    The state forensics commission said there were alternative explanations for the fire that killed Willingham's children. They did not definitively rule that it was not a set fire. The local fire department remains adamant that it was a set fire.

    This sort of mischaracterization is common with discussion of Innocence Project 'exonerations'.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  102. @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    I got 8. There are 100s more. You are an asshole, and that's an incontrovertible fact.

    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Art Deco

    Yawn.

    ‘I swears I din’ do it! It was this other guy, I can’t tell you his name.’

    Well, who can argue with that?

  103. @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    Fucking asshole.

    Those are NOT all the same thing. You fucking assholian asshole. NOT. You think things that are different are the same. That is the true definition of retard.

    Add another one: false confession.

    I like how you fuckers say "Government is good for nothing," and then you trust it implicitly to faultlessly go executing people. Like I said, you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    And those are just talking point memos you are quoting to me. Did you ever have an original thought in your life?

    For you information (ignoring that you are incapable of taking any facts into your tiny little mouse brain):

    Logic insists that A. innocent men have been executed, and B. you won't know who they are, because a "fair trial" has deemed the innocent guilty.

    What logic? The huge number of those convicted of rape later exonerated, categorically exonerated, by DNA.

    But sometimes, quite often, there is no DNA at all. Those innocent without DNA on their side cannot be exonerated.

    "Every year since 1989, in about 25 percent of the sexual assault cases referred to the FBI where results could be obtained (primarily by State and local law enforcement), the primary suspect has been excluded by forensic DNA testing. Specifically, FBI officials report that out of roughly 10,000 sexual assault cases since 1989, about 2,000 tests have been inconclusive (usually insufficient high molecular weight DNA to do testing), about 2,000 tests have excluded the primary suspect, and about 6,000 have "matched" or included the primary suspect.1 The fact that these percentages have remained constant for 7 years, and that the National Institute of Justice's informal survey of private laboratories reveals a strikingly similar 26-percent exclusion rate, strongly suggests that postarrest and postconviction DNA exonerations are tied to some strong, underlying systemic problems that generate erroneous accusations and convictions."

    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?

    Answer: 100%

    But this is too hard for you. You're just a troll anyway. Go away.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Genrick Yagoda

    No, when answering the question of how someone’s DNA got somewhere it shouldn’t be, those are all the same thing. It was planted. By the DA. By the CIA. By whoever. You simply have trouble with reading comprehension.

  104. @Intelligent Dasein
    @AndrewR

    I understand your concern, but your argument proves too much. It delegitimizes any form of punishment whatsoever.

    The question of whether a sentence of death is justifiable in itself is independent of whether or not you can trust the government to carry out such sentences properly. No government ever has been or ever will be perfect in such regard. If the worst the government could do was to impose lifelong imprisonment, exile, or financial ruin, doing these things to an innocent man would still be an intolerable travesty scarcely better than putting him to death. Ought those to be abolished as well? What is the maximum sentence one can allow on the possibility that it might be inflicted on an underserving soul? That slippery slope ends only at zero.

    This is why the determination of punishment is oriented solely to the gravity of the crime. Certain crimes deserve death. A government which abjures the duty to carry out the sentence is not less illegitimate than one that carries it out carelessly or arbitrarily.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    What? You think writing long posts proves you smart?

    Your basic argument is stupid. No different from the other illiterate cretins on here. Only maybe even stupider.

    Total false analogy: “If the worst the government could do was to impose lifelong imprisonment, exile, or financial ruin, doing these things to an innocent man would still be an intolerable travesty scarcely better than putting him to death.”

    (If you actually believe that, you belong in jail, or more aptly, a psych ward.)

    Nope. Staying alive is infinitely better. (Not to mention that you can redress imprisonment, exile, and /or financial ruin. What, you think you can redress executing an innocent man? If you do, you are stupider than a worm.)

    Your “values” are up your ass. If you’re a typical “Christian,” then fuck Christianity.

  105. @DextersLabRat
    @Polynikes

    As in, three gays wearing rompers trying to hitch a ride to the ferry to Fire Island are probably not going to murder you.

    Replies: @JMcG

    Death by bunga-bunga!

  106. @obwandiyag
    Your little presentation here is a classic example of rhetorical bullshitting.

    The story is told as if there are no other convictions for murder anywhere in the world. As if the federal justice system is not a system, which, like a computer, has inflexible rules. As if there is no such thing as being railroaded or made a patsy.

    Let's get to the point. You do not mention the innocent people on death row.

    Fine, fine, kill a guilty one if you want.

    But how do you plan to sort out the guilty from the innocent? By "fair" trials? Don't make me laugh.

    Nope, sorry. In order for you to have such opportunities to kill the guilty (supposedly--you don't really know what happened, you just read some third-hand shit, but let's stipulate it happened the way you say), you have to kill the innocent along with them. That's how the whole thing works.

    Making you a murderer, or at least an accessory before the fact.

    I notice you don't mention the Innocence Project in any of your screeds. Wonder why?

    Could it be because their work invalidates any possible argument in favor of capital punishment you can cobble together?

    Why, yes it could.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @brabantian, @nokangaroos, @iDeplorable, @Genrick Yagoda

    “Innocent blacks”, huh?

    You mean like 100% guilty Hurricane Carter?

    Or 100% guilty Central Park 5?

    Yell me, where pray tell can you find an innocent Dindu?

  107. @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    Fucking asshole.

    Those are NOT all the same thing. You fucking assholian asshole. NOT. You think things that are different are the same. That is the true definition of retard.

    Add another one: false confession.

    I like how you fuckers say "Government is good for nothing," and then you trust it implicitly to faultlessly go executing people. Like I said, you must be cross-eyed and pigeon-toed.

    And those are just talking point memos you are quoting to me. Did you ever have an original thought in your life?

    For you information (ignoring that you are incapable of taking any facts into your tiny little mouse brain):

    Logic insists that A. innocent men have been executed, and B. you won't know who they are, because a "fair trial" has deemed the innocent guilty.

    What logic? The huge number of those convicted of rape later exonerated, categorically exonerated, by DNA.

    But sometimes, quite often, there is no DNA at all. Those innocent without DNA on their side cannot be exonerated.

    "Every year since 1989, in about 25 percent of the sexual assault cases referred to the FBI where results could be obtained (primarily by State and local law enforcement), the primary suspect has been excluded by forensic DNA testing. Specifically, FBI officials report that out of roughly 10,000 sexual assault cases since 1989, about 2,000 tests have been inconclusive (usually insufficient high molecular weight DNA to do testing), about 2,000 tests have excluded the primary suspect, and about 6,000 have "matched" or included the primary suspect.1 The fact that these percentages have remained constant for 7 years, and that the National Institute of Justice's informal survey of private laboratories reveals a strikingly similar 26-percent exclusion rate, strongly suggests that postarrest and postconviction DNA exonerations are tied to some strong, underlying systemic problems that generate erroneous accusations and convictions."

    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?

    Answer: 100%

    But this is too hard for you. You're just a troll anyway. Go away.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Genrick Yagoda

    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?

    Your quote refers only to primary suspects cleared by DNA results. It states absolutely NOTHING about rape convicts.

    Either you think people reading here at UNZ are stupid, or you are.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Genrick Yagoda

    Suspects convicts. A distinction without a difference. Innocent people get executed. Fact. Anybody who argues against it is for socialism, because they trust the government to always do right.

    You're just trolling. Or stupid. Or both.

  108. @obwandiyag
    @Adamant

    I got 8. There are 100s more. You are an asshole, and that's an incontrovertible fact.

    1. Cameron Todd Willingham—In 1992, Willingham was convicted of arson murder in Texas. He was believed to have intentionally set a fire that killed his three kids. In 2004, he was put to death. Unfortunately, the Texas Forensic Science Commission later found that the evidence was misinterpreted, and they concluded that none of the evidence used against Willingham was valid. As it turns out, the fire really was accidental.

    2. Ruben Cantu—Cantu was 17 at the time the crime he was alleged of committing took place. Cantu was convicted of capital murder, and in 1993, the Texas teen was executed. About 12 years after his death, investigations show that Cantu likely didn’t commit the murder. The lone eyewitness recanted his testimony, and Cantu’s co-defendant later admitted he allowed his friend to be falsely accused. He says Cantu wasn’t even there the night of the murder.

    3. Larry Griffin—Griffin was put to death in 1995 for the 1981 murder of Quintin Moss, a Missouri drug dealer. Griffin always maintained his innocence, and now, evidence seems to indicate he was telling the truth. The first police officer on the scene now says the eyewitness account was false, even though the officer supported the claims during the trial. Another eyewitness who was wounded during the attack was never contacted during the trial, and he says Griffin wasn’t present at the crime scene that night.

    4. Carlos DeLuna—In 1989, DeLuna was executed for the stabbing of a Texas convenience store clerk. Almost 20 years later, Chicago Tribune uncovered evidence that shows DeLuna was likely innocent. The evidence showed that Carlos Hernandez, a man who even confessed to the murder many times, actually did the crime.

    5. David Wayne Spence—Spence was put to death in 1997 for the murder of three teenagers in Texas. He was supposedly hired by a convenience store clerk to kill someone else, but he allegedly killed the wrong people by mistake. The supervising police lieutenant said “I do not think David Spence committed this crime.” The lead homicide detective agreed, saying “My opinion is that David Spence was innocent. Nothing from the investigation ever led us to any evidence that he was involved.”

    6. Jesse Tafero—In 1976, Tafero was convicted of murdering a state trooper. He and Sonia Jacobs were both sentenced to death for the crime. The main evidence used to convict them was testimony by someone else who was involved in the crime, ex-convict Walter Rhodes. Rhodes gave this testimony in exchange for a life sentence. In 1990, Tafero was put to death. Two years later, his companion Jacobs was released due to a lack of evidence…the same evidence used to put Tafero to death.

    7 & 8. Thomas Griffin and Meeks Griffin— The oldest case on this list dates back to 1915. The Griffin brothers, two black men, were convicted of the murder of a white man. The reason they were convicted is because Monk Stevenson, another black man suspected of committing the murder, pointed to the brothers as having been responsible. He later admitted the reason he blamed them is because they were wealthy, and he assumed they had the money to beat the charges. The Griffin brothers were completely innocent, but they were put to death nonetheless.

    Replies: @Adamant, @Art Deco

    The state forensics commission said there were alternative explanations for the fire that killed Willingham’s children. They did not definitively rule that it was not a set fire. The local fire department remains adamant that it was a set fire.

    This sort of mischaracterization is common with discussion of Innocence Project ‘exonerations’.

    • Thanks: JMcG
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Art Deco

    Typical cherry-picking. So there is a small chance that somebody started a fire.

    Well, just execute 'im anyway. Let God sort 'em out. (Attributed to Simon Montfort at Beziers. He killed them all. Just like you want to do, pervert.)

    And don't address all the other cases. Never do that.

    You fucking troll with your transparent fallacies, and I mean dick-heads like you.

  109. @Mr McKenna
    @AndrewR

    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We've really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity. Others have kindly applied a few ministrations in this case, though if history is any guide they will have been quite futile.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @William Badwhite

    Good to see you back here, Andrew. We’ve really missed your delightful combination of hostility and stupidity.

    Remember, he’s the guy that couldn’t figure out why nobody at work liked him.

  110. @Genrick Yagoda
    @obwandiyag


    An enthymeme: If 26% of rape convicts are innocent, what are the chances that 26% of murder convicts are innocent?
     
    Your quote refers only to primary suspects cleared by DNA results. It states absolutely NOTHING about rape convicts.

    Either you think people reading here at UNZ are stupid, or you are.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Suspects convicts. A distinction without a difference. Innocent people get executed. Fact. Anybody who argues against it is for socialism, because they trust the government to always do right.

    You’re just trolling. Or stupid. Or both.

  111. @Art Deco
    @obwandiyag

    The state forensics commission said there were alternative explanations for the fire that killed Willingham's children. They did not definitively rule that it was not a set fire. The local fire department remains adamant that it was a set fire.

    This sort of mischaracterization is common with discussion of Innocence Project 'exonerations'.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Typical cherry-picking. So there is a small chance that somebody started a fire.

    Well, just execute ‘im anyway. Let God sort ’em out. (Attributed to Simon Montfort at Beziers. He killed them all. Just like you want to do, pervert.)

    And don’t address all the other cases. Never do that.

    You fucking troll with your transparent fallacies, and I mean dick-heads like you.

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