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One of the more absurd woke neologisms is “Latinx” as a gender neutral version of “Latino.” But its institutional momentum is formidable. The New York Times never used “Latinx” up through 2015. It used “Latinx” for the first time in 2016, in a slightly mocking way. Then ten times in 2017, 45 times in 2018, and 112 times so far this year.

Of course, the people who are described by the New York Times as Latinx seldom pay much attention to the New York Times. Mario Carrasca, founder of a market research firm, reports that in a poll of 500 people whom the NYT would call Latinx, 98% preferred a different term:

 
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  1. No Hispanic/Latino/Chicano wants to be referred to as Latinx, but they will be, because white busybodies said so.

    No American Indian gives a shit about team names like the Washington Redskins or the Atlanta Braves, but the names will be changed, because white busybodies said so.

    Sounds like white privilege to me.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Let's be more precise: very serious academics came up with it while feasting on your tax money.
  2. In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?

    • Replies: @Anon

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?
     
    No, because "latinx" is meant to solve the problem of "latino" being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don't have that problem.

    What's funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use "[email protected]" when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But "latinx" took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.
  3. Anon[826] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer
    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?

    No, because “latinx” is meant to solve the problem of “latino” being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don’t have that problem.

    What’s funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use “[email protected]” when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But “latinx” took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.

    • Replies: @Hail

    “latinx” took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish
     
    As of a few months ago, the term 'Latinx' didn't even appear on Spanish wikipedia. It is an English-only Spanish word. Maybe it's made it by now.

    But they still have the Lah-TINKS, vs. Lah-TEENKS vs. Latin-X problem.

    Spanish: Lah-teen-Equis? Problematic.

    , @Brobert
    Aside from certain academics and activists not many people feel the need to be overtly neutral. Native speakers of languages using grammatical gender, generally don't share the woke anglo obsession with gender. Or at least they used to, wokeness is spreading, but constructions like [email protected] or French "inclusive" language are clunky-looking and hard to sell to average folks.
    , @Mycale
    I don't think anyone who "latinx" speaks Spanish - it's just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.

    The first time I read "latinx" was on Everyday Feminism, which would be a hilariously insane website if it wasn't quickly becoming mainstream leftism. It was in an article where an angry Latina who thought it was racist to assume she spoke Spanish.
    , @syonredux

    What’s funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use “[email protected]” when they want to be overtly gender-neutral.
     
    How is that pronounced? "Latin-at?"
  4. “Latinx” will only come into general use if people use it. I would never utter that term, not just out of resistance, but because I would feel like an idiot uttering it.

    BTW, I’m kinda with the 5-percenters, if only for nostalgic reasons, but then the real good guys are the 6-percenters (“just call me an American” – Bravo! oops, ¡Brav-x!)

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    It may not percolate down into the barrio, but now that it is approved academic usage, it will be taken up by journalists, NGOs, and gov’t bureaucrats. It won’t be going away.
  5. @VoiceOf(T)reason
    No Hispanic/Latino/Chicano wants to be referred to as Latinx, but they will be, because white busybodies said so.

    No American Indian gives a shit about team names like the Washington Redskins or the Atlanta Braves, but the names will be changed, because white busybodies said so.

    Sounds like white privilege to me.

    Let’s be more precise: very serious academics came up with it while feasting on your tax money.

  6. There is one Hispanic who will never ever in a million years be described as Latinx by the NYT:

    George Zimmerman

    Mr Sailer (of course) noticed…

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/new-york-times-2017-george-zimmerman-the-white-man-who-shot-the-black-teenager/

  7. More telling is 94% of them would rather be called something other than “American”.

  8. More likely, instead of Blax and Asiax it will be POX.

    “POX diversity rates rise in California” 🙂

  9. I now call “Latinos” “Latinx”;
    I see their race, but I don’t see sex.
    Michael Jackson wore v-necks,
    Poly Styrene ate Kleenex,
    And I’m just a jeepster for T. Rex.

  10. One of the more absurd woke neologisms is “Latinx” as a gender neutral version of “Latino.”

    So, if they hail from the mother-country, Spain, are they Spanx? If Hispanic, Hispanx? Are either of those actually gender neutral?

  11. @Anon

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?
     
    No, because "latinx" is meant to solve the problem of "latino" being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don't have that problem.

    What's funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use "[email protected]" when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But "latinx" took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.

    “latinx” took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish

    As of a few months ago, the term ‘Latinx’ didn’t even appear on Spanish wikipedia. It is an English-only Spanish word. Maybe it’s made it by now.

    But they still have the Lah-TINKS, vs. Lah-TEENKS vs. Latin-X problem.

    Spanish: Lah-teen-Equis? Problematic.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    I just checked and the word is neither on Spanish Wikipedia nor Spanish Wiktionary. From what I understand, their major objection to the word is that it isn't pronounceable using traditional Spanish customs. Being white I pronounce it la-TEEN-ex, but what do I know?
  12. Well, 98% of people would have been against transgenders using women’s locker rooms 10 years ago, and then look what happened.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Good point, FB. In fifty years, the Left have imposed norms that would have been unthinkable to my parents.
  13. Is Elizabeth Warren Injunx? Well, apart from the fact that she’s not, of course.

  14. People of The Bean works fine for me.

  15. @Anon

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?
     
    No, because "latinx" is meant to solve the problem of "latino" being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don't have that problem.

    What's funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use "[email protected]" when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But "latinx" took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.

    Aside from certain academics and activists not many people feel the need to be overtly neutral. Native speakers of languages using grammatical gender, generally don’t share the woke anglo obsession with gender. Or at least they used to, wokeness is spreading, but constructions like [email protected] or French “inclusive” language are clunky-looking and hard to sell to average folks.

  16. This term was invented solely for white SJWs down with ‘gender is on a spectrum’ crowd to virtue signal to other woke whites.

    I have most often seen it used on The Atlantic and CityLab’s sites.

    Basically, white people imposing their cultural preferences on minorities – the horror!

  17. A dozen or so years ago the municipal utility I worked for brought in a fat female diversity hustler to explain to us who all these short, black haired, brown skinned people popping up all over the place were. She said they were Latinos and that ‘Hispanic’ was not to be used because, in her opinion, it reminded the Latinos of the Spanish Conquistadors. I held my tongue so as to not prolong the ordeal but felt ‘mestizo’ was the more accurate name for people who had little connection to either Spain and none at all to Rome save for the Catholic Church. Of course no one ever called Catholics, even Italian ones, Latinos and in California these mestizo immigrants called themselves Chicano or Chicana.

    When did Chicano go out of fashion?

  18. They probably think ‘Latinx’ means gay or trans. I know I did.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    'They probably think ‘Latinx’ means gay or trans. I know I did.'

    I would assume that in practice it usually does. It certainly at least markedly increases the odds.

    , @IC
    Because of wackos like this.

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2017/01/leftistqueerlatino_activist_in_custody_in_berkeley_murder_case_.html
    , @Random Smartaleck

    They probably think ‘Latinx’ means gay or trans.
     
    That would be "Latwinks."
  19. My Spanish grandmother would have laughed at the silly English speakers who invented latinx. She would have been disgusted by the degeneracy of her homeland California. She always warned us Mexicans would coarsen the culture. I guess she was right.

  20. Latinos don’t particularly care about these sort of things, they actually don’t really care about participating in popular culture and politics much either.
    A hypothesis I had back then was that Hispanics were chastened by their horrific failures in their own countries, so they just decided to lay low and make money, instead of agitating for people to make them the leaders.
    This apparently has worked out quite well for them, so this will probably continue for the next few years, even after they become a sizeable share of the potential electorate.
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/hispanic-household-income-climbs-1536792308#comments_sector

  21. You may be jumping the gun here.

    I’m sure our advance into broad, sunlit uplands will continue, but ‘Latinx’ doesn’t seem to have superseded ‘Hispanic’ just yet.

    I went to the ever-forward looking University of California’s website and did searches on the two terms. There were 598 hits for ‘Hispanic’ but only 71 for ‘Latinx.’

  22. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    They probably think 'Latinx' means gay or trans. I know I did.

    ‘They probably think ‘Latinx’ means gay or trans. I know I did.’

    I would assume that in practice it usually does. It certainly at least markedly increases the odds.

  23. @Anon

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?
     
    No, because "latinx" is meant to solve the problem of "latino" being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don't have that problem.

    What's funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use "[email protected]" when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But "latinx" took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.

    I don’t think anyone who “latinx” speaks Spanish – it’s just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.

    The first time I read “latinx” was on Everyday Feminism, which would be a hilariously insane website if it wasn’t quickly becoming mainstream leftism. It was in an article where an angry Latina who thought it was racist to assume she spoke Spanish.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I don’t think anyone who “latinx” speaks Spanish – it’s just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.
     
    That's why I love it. I get to be uber-WOKE and insult foreigners at the same time. I was at an academic conference a while back and just went all out: "Latinx language," "Latinx literature," "Latinx author Carlos Fuentes," "Latinxity," "Latinxness," etc. It was glorious, the most fun that I've ever had at an academic gathering.
  24. The most alarming and disturbing number on this chart is the minuscule 6% who want to go with “American.”
    So much for assimilation.
    They have to go back.

  25. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    They probably think 'Latinx' means gay or trans. I know I did.

    They probably think ‘Latinx’ means gay or trans.

    That would be “Latwinks.”

  26. @Anon

    In a couple of years, will the the NYT write about Blax, Whitx, and Asiax?
     
    No, because "latinx" is meant to solve the problem of "latino" being overtly masculine. Black, white, and Asian, being English words, don't have that problem.

    What's funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use "[email protected]" when they want to be overtly gender-neutral. But "latinx" took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish.

    What’s funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use “[email protected]” when they want to be overtly gender-neutral.

    How is that pronounced? “Latin-at?”

    • Replies: @Anon
    [email protected] is pronounced "latino" just as [email protected] is pronounced "latinos"; it's a writing-only form.
  27. @syonredux

    What’s funny about this is that the Spanish speakers noticed the problem first and have their own well-established solution: they use “[email protected]” when they want to be overtly gender-neutral.
     
    How is that pronounced? "Latin-at?"

    [email protected] is pronounced “latino” just as [email protected] is pronounced “latinos”; it’s a writing-only form.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    [email protected] is pronounced “latino” just as [email protected] is pronounced “latinos”; it’s a writing-only form.
     
    Which means that, unlike "Latinx," it can't be used as a WOKE-signal while speaking.So, "Latinx" trumps "[email protected]" in the PC War.
  28. @Mycale
    I don't think anyone who "latinx" speaks Spanish - it's just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.

    The first time I read "latinx" was on Everyday Feminism, which would be a hilariously insane website if it wasn't quickly becoming mainstream leftism. It was in an article where an angry Latina who thought it was racist to assume she spoke Spanish.

    I don’t think anyone who “latinx” speaks Spanish – it’s just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.

    That’s why I love it. I get to be uber-WOKE and insult foreigners at the same time. I was at an academic conference a while back and just went all out: “Latinx language,” “Latinx literature,” “Latinx author Carlos Fuentes,” “Latinxity,” “Latinxness,” etc. It was glorious, the most fun that I’ve ever had at an academic gathering.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    If one eats too much queso, should one consider a latinxative...?
  29. How is it supposed to be pronounced? ‘Lateenks’ seems likely, but that triple final consonant cluster doesn’t seem very Spanish. And ‘Latin-eks’ seems even less likely, and I seriously doubt anyone is going around saying ‘Latin-equis’, least of all Spanish speakers.

  30. @Anon
    [email protected] is pronounced "latino" just as [email protected] is pronounced "latinos"; it's a writing-only form.

    [email protected] is pronounced “latino” just as [email protected] is pronounced “latinos”; it’s a writing-only form.

    Which means that, unlike “Latinx,” it can’t be used as a WOKE-signal while speaking.So, “Latinx” trumps “[email protected]” in the PC War.

  31. @Hail

    “latinx” took off anyway, obviously without any input from anyone who spoke Spanish
     
    As of a few months ago, the term 'Latinx' didn't even appear on Spanish wikipedia. It is an English-only Spanish word. Maybe it's made it by now.

    But they still have the Lah-TINKS, vs. Lah-TEENKS vs. Latin-X problem.

    Spanish: Lah-teen-Equis? Problematic.

    I just checked and the word is neither on Spanish Wikipedia nor Spanish Wiktionary. From what I understand, their major objection to the word is that it isn’t pronounceable using traditional Spanish customs. Being white I pronounce it la-TEEN-ex, but what do I know?

    • Replies: @Hail
    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it "Latin-X" (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.

    "Lah-TINKS" just sounds weird, and disturbing.

  32. @ScarletNumber
    I just checked and the word is neither on Spanish Wikipedia nor Spanish Wiktionary. From what I understand, their major objection to the word is that it isn't pronounceable using traditional Spanish customs. Being white I pronounce it la-TEEN-ex, but what do I know?

    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it “Latin-X” (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.

    “Lah-TINKS” just sounds weird, and disturbing.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    “Lah-TINKS” just sounds weird, and disturbing.
     
    That's precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it “Latin-X” (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.
     
    In my experience, that's most popular pronunciation. I think that the Latinx like it because it makes them sound like the X-Men.
    , @ScarletNumber
    That goes against the pronunciation of Latino and Latina. We don't say Latin-O and Latin-uh. Latin-O sounds like the name of a cereal.
  33. @Hail
    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it "Latin-X" (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.

    "Lah-TINKS" just sounds weird, and disturbing.

    “Lah-TINKS” just sounds weird, and disturbing.

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it “Latin-X” (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.

    In my experience, that’s most popular pronunciation. I think that the Latinx like it because it makes them sound like the X-Men.

    • Replies: @Hail

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.
     
    Hah.

    Are you saying you've had occasion to use 'Latinx' (in lah-TINKS form) in conversation? With the other party presuming you were using it unironically? In what company?

    , @Anon
    I pronounce any variation on LGBT as “lah TICK wah.” When someone asks me what I mean, I explain, and then I am corrected, and I act slightly flustered ... on the outside. On the inside I am chuckling. I am getting across the message that I don’t care enough to even take a close look at the letters and get it even half right.
  34. @syonredux

    “Lah-TINKS” just sounds weird, and disturbing.
     
    That's precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it “Latin-X” (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.
     
    In my experience, that's most popular pronunciation. I think that the Latinx like it because it makes them sound like the X-Men.

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    Hah.

    Are you saying you’ve had occasion to use ‘Latinx’ (in lah-TINKS form) in conversation? With the other party presuming you were using it unironically? In what company?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    Hah.

    Are you saying you’ve had occasion to use ‘Latinx’ (in lah-TINKS form) in conversation? With the other party presuming you were using it unironically? In what company?
     
    I'm an academic (English lit). Hence, I have to use all the PC terminology.But Latinx is my favorite, as it lets me insult foreigners while simultaneously looking uber-WOKE . As I noted upthread, I really went all out with the term at an academic conference I attended last year: “Latinx language,” “Latinx literature,” “Latinx author Carlos Fuentes,” “Latinxity,” “Latinxness,” etc. You gotta take your victories where you can get 'em.....And getting a chance to call a HATE-YT Mexican prof Latinx to his face was a definite win....
  35. @Hail
    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it "Latin-X" (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.

    "Lah-TINKS" just sounds weird, and disturbing.

    That goes against the pronunciation of Latino and Latina. We don’t say Latin-O and Latin-uh. Latin-O sounds like the name of a cereal.

  36. @Hail

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.
     
    Hah.

    Are you saying you've had occasion to use 'Latinx' (in lah-TINKS form) in conversation? With the other party presuming you were using it unironically? In what company?

    That’s precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    Hah.

    Are you saying you’ve had occasion to use ‘Latinx’ (in lah-TINKS form) in conversation? With the other party presuming you were using it unironically? In what company?

    I’m an academic (English lit). Hence, I have to use all the PC terminology.But Latinx is my favorite, as it lets me insult foreigners while simultaneously looking uber-WOKE . As I noted upthread, I really went all out with the term at an academic conference I attended last year: “Latinx language,” “Latinx literature,” “Latinx author Carlos Fuentes,” “Latinxity,” “Latinxness,” etc. You gotta take your victories where you can get ’em…..And getting a chance to call a HATE-YT Mexican prof Latinx to his face was a definite win….

  37. the special interest groups at my university were using Latinx in the early 90s. it’s been around for a while. probably before that, into the 80s. Poder Latino, one of the groups around back then, used this verbiage in their communications.

    that some of the organizations themselves were using this term puts to rest the notion it is some English version of the Spanish gender system.

    it may just be appearing now at the national level, but it’s been in use for 25 years at least. why would it just be appearing now, if they’ve been using it for decades? because nobody pays attention to what latin americans are doing. cultural marxism has been black, black, blackity black for 60 years. only now, that the US is about to tip, and it’s all hands on deck against YT, are any national newspapers or magazines paying attention to anything the brown people are doing.

    • Replies: @Hail

    the special interest groups at my university were using Latinx in the early 90s. it’s been around for a while.
     
    If that is the case, why does tthe term "Latinx' not appear, at all, on Spanish wikipedia?

    (the handful of appearances are all inorganic and from English (i.e., in footnote-citations to English sources)

  38. @Achmed E. Newman
    "Latinx" will only come into general use if people use it. I would never utter that term, not just out of resistance, but because I would feel like an idiot uttering it.

    BTW, I'm kinda with the 5-percenters, if only for nostalgic reasons, but then the real good guys are the 6-percenters ("just call me an American" - Bravo! oops, ¡Brav-x!)

    It may not percolate down into the barrio, but now that it is approved academic usage, it will be taken up by journalists, NGOs, and gov’t bureaucrats. It won’t be going away.

  39. @Faraday's Bobcat
    Well, 98% of people would have been against transgenders using women's locker rooms 10 years ago, and then look what happened.

    Good point, FB. In fifty years, the Left have imposed norms that would have been unthinkable to my parents.

  40. @prime noticer
    the special interest groups at my university were using Latinx in the early 90s. it's been around for a while. probably before that, into the 80s. Poder Latino, one of the groups around back then, used this verbiage in their communications.

    that some of the organizations themselves were using this term puts to rest the notion it is some English version of the Spanish gender system.

    it may just be appearing now at the national level, but it's been in use for 25 years at least. why would it just be appearing now, if they've been using it for decades? because nobody pays attention to what latin americans are doing. cultural marxism has been black, black, blackity black for 60 years. only now, that the US is about to tip, and it's all hands on deck against YT, are any national newspapers or magazines paying attention to anything the brown people are doing.

    the special interest groups at my university were using Latinx in the early 90s. it’s been around for a while.

    If that is the case, why does tthe term “Latinx’ not appear, at all, on Spanish wikipedia?

    (the handful of appearances are all inorganic and from English (i.e., in footnote-citations to English sources)

  41. Anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    “Lah-TINKS” just sounds weird, and disturbing.
     
    That's precisely why I use that pronunciation.

    I notice Elizabeth Warren pronounced it “Latin-X” (ex) (like American History X; Malcom X) at a debate, I think it was, a few weeks ago.
     
    In my experience, that's most popular pronunciation. I think that the Latinx like it because it makes them sound like the X-Men.

    I pronounce any variation on LGBT as “lah TICK wah.” When someone asks me what I mean, I explain, and then I am corrected, and I act slightly flustered … on the outside. On the inside I am chuckling. I am getting across the message that I don’t care enough to even take a close look at the letters and get it even half right.

  42. @syonredux

    I don’t think anyone who “latinx” speaks Spanish – it’s just wrong and ugly in the language, like nails on a chalkboard.
     
    That's why I love it. I get to be uber-WOKE and insult foreigners at the same time. I was at an academic conference a while back and just went all out: "Latinx language," "Latinx literature," "Latinx author Carlos Fuentes," "Latinxity," "Latinxness," etc. It was glorious, the most fun that I've ever had at an academic gathering.

    If one eats too much queso, should one consider a latinxative…?

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