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Lana Del Rey's New Album: Chemtrails Over the Country Club
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Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.

 
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  1. She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Thoughts


    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing.
     
    I gave them both a listen, Thoughts. It might be good music to fall asleep to, but I prefer Grateful Dead space jams and long versions of Dark Star for that. It could grow on me, but I gave them each 2 minutes.

    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That's the alternative right now, apparently. I don't expect Kasey Kasem to come on the radio this Sunday to introduce the next CCR or Led Zeppelin...

    ... or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhSjwU8gEsI

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius

    , @Anonymous
    @Thoughts

    I looked for photos by webzone search "lana del rey fat" but couldn't find them after about 5 minutes trying (figures she'd employ a good SEO firm, with all of Dad's money from domain names/buggy whips). Instead there were just a lot of old, pre-fat photos appended to references to her current size. Lotsa gay guys' blogs commenting on it, though-- was that how you learned about it?

    Her music is terrible IMO. The "playing video games" song was stand-out bad. She's going for that neo-Baez glamour without all the Joanna Newsom, post-riot-grrl lezfem baggage, which unfortunately is the only thing to distinguish '00s/'10s solipsistic girl music from the classic 1960s Joplin/Joni Mitchell/Cass Elliot period (blogs would have a lot of fun with Ma Cass). A melodically superior take on the genre is any recent output of Natalie Mering, but as a commie-adjacent PNW-bohemian act that might lack consistency in volk-rock signaling and be less to Steve's druthers.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_U2sKfs44k

    , @El Dato
    @Thoughts

    No, that's Aimée Mann.

    , @Verymuchalive
    @Thoughts


    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing
     
    I've vaguely heard of her, but never heard her songs. So I'll take your opinion as accurate. Sounds like a younger, female, American version of Nick Cave.
    , @BenKenobi
    @Thoughts

    Pro tip: if your wife is listening to the Born to Die album on repeat divorce is incoming.

    , @Anon
    @Thoughts

    Here are a few of her earlier songs I really like:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u89_AiQu9BQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORw5Sv0Ch-0

    This one has been widely covered on YouTube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdrL3QxjyVw

    Here's Miley Cyrus doing the song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZTznqH-lDE

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Thoughts

    Great tweet by the former "Dems R Real Racists" after the thick pic of Lana came out.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1366573256321495043?s=20

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  2. The true test of Steve’s influence will be if this post triggers the music press to start a campaign against her that gets picked up by the MSM.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Altai

    Steve's influence is limited to lucky happenstance because Tucker Carlson's show has become the most popular news show and the main people responsible for the content of the show are regular readers of this blog. Tucker, Mark Steyn, and the former top writer who Tucker fired are readers.

  3. Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she’s ‘gotten away with it’

    You can’t listen to her for a long time without wanting to off yourself and give up on life—the music video that made her famous is her being killed in car crash.

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase ‘He was a philosophy major’ as if that meant he was like…smart or something.

    He was very smart. But I still thought it was weird.

    • LOL: BB753, RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Thoughts

    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Morton's toes
    @Thoughts

    I classify chemtrails with flying saucers which are two things I have spent multiple 1000's hours looking for and never seen. I am 99% sure they are at the very least very uncommon.

    Today I learned this woman was a philosophy major from New York who is reported to have had a drinking problem at the age of 15. Special. The world definitely needs philosophy majors. But it's one of those things that you can only do if you have a safety net. Have you ever heard of an impoverished 20-year-old philosophy major? If you are borrowing money to go to college and you are worried about how you are going to pay it back you do not major in philosophy.

    Scott Alexander whose dad is boutique physician could major in philosophy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSJemA-eviU

    Jefferson Airplane Have You Seen the Saucers?

    (only on good acid!)

    Replies: @dimples

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Thoughts

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase ‘He was a philosophy major’ as if that meant he was like…smart or something.

    I heard a comedian say he was a philosophy major but when he graduated he found out the philosophy corporations weren't hiring.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @BB753
    @Thoughts

    "Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she’s ‘gotten away with it’"

    Suicide music for boomers, which is a weird niche, if I may say so.

  4. Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic? 😀

    Anyway, it’s a silly idea that “beautiful straight white women” are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The “Karen” slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those “beautiful straight white American” women.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    , @J.Ross
    @Dumbo

    They're not under the same constant lie-based genocidal hate but let them set one toe out of line.

    , @Charles St. Charles
    @Dumbo


    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?
     
    Her real name according to (((Wi)))kipedia is Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Scottish descent. Nice stage name - rolls off the tongue and conjures ‘30s Hollywood.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lana_Del_Rey

    I’ve never heard a single record of hers, or Billie Eilish, or any other pop from the past ten years or so. Not bragging - keeping up is just not an interest anymore. I’m going back rather than forward - my current listening consists mostly of Renaissance and Elizabethan guitar and lute music of the British Isles.

    I do appreciate this quote from the above page:


    “Whenever people bring up feminism ... I'm just not really that interested."
     
    I totally relate; one of the unwritten but liberating freedoms we have lost in the past couple of decades or more is the right to selective apathy - deciding for ourselves what we are NOT going to care about, in order to make space for what really matters to us. Apparently Miss Grant has not been informed (or maybe she has) that “Feminism” is on the list of required topics that “Everyone Must Be Interested In and Hold the Correct View On”.
    , @slumber_j
    @Dumbo

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn't obviously interesting, as "Hollywood Sadcore." Coming from the likes of her, it's an unsurprisingly good description.

    https://youtu.be/hUwqSCqbUz8

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Dumbo, @Alfa158, @Jonathan Mason

    , @TGGP
    @Dumbo

    Yeah, she was initially derided as a phony for renaming herself after her first album (under her real name) didn't make an impact. But the "poptimists" killed off the concern with authenticity associated with "rockism". As a die-hard rockist, I will not give an inch to Del Rey.
    https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/10/30/20853231/lana-del-rey-authenticity-career-norman-fucking-rockwell
    The end of that article states that Billie Eilish is similar, but Eilish actually does fit the rockist mold of authenticity surprisingly well for a zoomer whose work is in a different genre. Siblings writing & recording their own music at home and uploading it to SoundCloud without any record company input is what the Wright brothers of NoMeansNo would have done if SoundCloud had existed in 1980.

    Replies: @AShartIsBorn

  5. How many children does she have? Oh, zero. Not much of a white woman.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Ron Mexico

    Hard to argue with this.

  6. @Thoughts
    Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she's 'gotten away with it'

    You can't listen to her for a long time without wanting to off yourself and give up on life---the music video that made her famous is her being killed in car crash.

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase 'He was a philosophy major' as if that meant he was like...smart or something.

    He was very smart. But I still thought it was weird.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Redneck farmer

    Right because if you were so smart you'd be rich and conforming. How many financial specialists and corporate lawyers are described as goofy?

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Redneck farmer


    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times
     
    You are describing Ignatius J. Reilly, the great, American, literary hero.

    One of the values of art is that is makes us look hard at ourselves. It makes us feel things. Now, some of us should never be shaken from our comfort, because, in those cases, that will create upset and possible, as you say, "suicide."

    The trick, as always, is to find balance. Balance between mediocrity and the sublime.


    https://img.culturacolectiva.com/featured_image/2017/12/11/1513029964789/a-confederacy-of-dunces.jpg

  7. Steve Sailer:

    “Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.”

    Anthony Fantano, the internet’s busiest music nerd, actually likes Lana’s music quite a lot, and he is a hardcore liberal. See

    The criticism on Lana is not so much that she is a white or straight, but that she sings mostly about men, and often not in a condemning tone. If she sang about how oppressive and piggish men are, then there wouldn’t be a problem. The problem is that she sings about how she loves men, and how femininity is all about the chase of a man worth chasing. *That* is what pisses not only feminists, but all liberals and left-leaning people about her,

    The big theme of Lana’s music is that the biggest thrill of femininity is to chase a man that you are in love with while he ignores you, and conquering his attention and affection. Needless to say, this pisses the Woke crowd to no end. Fantano also gave her last album a very positive review of an 8 out of 10:

    On the other hand, Fantano despises Eminem, who is a liberal like him, because of Eminem’s atrocious treatment of critics. Evrybody remembers the emotional implosion Anthony had after Eminem dissed him in a feature he did. This is also reflected in his scores. He gave Em’s last record MTBMB a 4, while most other critics gave it 7-8.

  8. The spiritual connection between Lana and her fans is beautiful. It helped someone I know a lot.

  9. Chemtrails Over the Country Club

    What did she mean by that?

  10. @Dumbo

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.
     
    "Del Rey", isn't that hispanic? :D

    Anyway, it's a silly idea that "beautiful straight white women" are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The "Karen" slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those "beautiful straight white American" women.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Charles St. Charles, @slumber_j, @TGGP

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It’s Southern California 1920s glamor.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @Steve Sailer


    American English often ends words with –or where other varieties of English use ­-our—for example, labor–labour, humor–humour, and odor–odour—but this is not the case with glamour. While glamor does occasionally appear in American publications, glamour is about five times as common, and is considered the standard spelling.
     
    Think Dorothy Lamour.
    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    From Wikipedia:


    I was going to Miami quite a lot at the time, speaking a lot of Spanish with my friends from Cuba – Lana Del Rey reminded us of the glamour of the seaside. It sounded gorgeous coming off the tip of the tongue." The name was also inspired by actress Lana Turner and the Ford Del Rey sedan, produced and sold in Brazil in the 1980s. Initially she had chosen the alternate spelling of Lana Del Ray, the name under which her self-titled debut album was released in January 2010.
     
    How would she ever know of the Ford Del Rey??


    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMTM2NTg1NzQ4N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwOTgyNzM2._V1_UY1200_CR145,0,630,1200_AL_.jpg

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/-Yx4mydCdsk/maxresdefault.jpg

    https://img.favcars.com/ford/del-rey/ford_del_rey_1985_photos_1.jpg

     

    Replies: @Anon

    , @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    No wonder you like her. Her music takes you back to your youth in the Roaring '20s

    , @Killexia
    @Steve Sailer

    Lana Del Rey is her stage name anyway. Real name is Lizzie Grant. She chose the "Lana" name for Lana Turner and "Del Rey" for the Cubans in Florida and the Ford car (Vogue interview in 2011). Don't forget that she also accepts miscegenation and interracial relationships. In her music video "National Anthem" which was about the All American JFK and Jackie she is married to a negro and has mixed kids with him. In her short film "Tropico" she is Eve while a negro albino plays Adam.

    I sincerely enjoy her music, but she isn't some little pro white darling by any means. She simply embraces Americana as her personal image and downsized her nose via plastic surgery.

    , @Nodwink
    @Steve Sailer

    Lana is Elizabeth Grant -- daughter of wealthy, Republican-voting WASPs. There have been accusations of racism and attempted cancellations, but she is simply too good to be excluded from the pop world.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Del Rey means 'of the King'. In Spanish it is a typical hotel name.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer

    "I believe in the country America used to be"

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1104627738126766080?s=20

  11. @Redneck farmer
    @Thoughts

    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buzz Mohawk

    Right because if you were so smart you’d be rich and conforming. How many financial specialists and corporate lawyers are described as goofy?

  12. @Dumbo

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.
     
    "Del Rey", isn't that hispanic? :D

    Anyway, it's a silly idea that "beautiful straight white women" are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The "Karen" slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those "beautiful straight white American" women.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Charles St. Charles, @slumber_j, @TGGP

    They’re not under the same constant lie-based genocidal hate but let them set one toe out of line.

  13. Her music has an anesthetized quality. She seems to be a standard White liberal. I’m not sure she’s taking pride in being a beautiful straight White woman. I guess in the sense she enjoys the privileges it brings her. But not in the sense of supporting the rest of us.

    There’s nostalgia in her music. A sense of something lost. Maybe, like so many Yuppies, she thought she could have her Wonderful Old America while kicking the horrid rednecks to the curb.

    Well, Jim Neighbors, who wasn’t straight or female, can characterize that dream:

  14. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    American English often ends words with –or where other varieties of English use ­-our—for example, labor–labour, humor–humour, and odor–odour—but this is not the case with glamour. While glamor does occasionally appear in American publications, glamour is about five times as common, and is considered the standard spelling.

    Think Dorothy Lamour.

  15. So when is Elizabeth Woolridge Grant going to get, how you say in Eengleesh, Hilaria Baldwin’d, for appropriating Latinx culture?

  16. So when is Elizabeth Woolridge Grant going to get, how you say in Eengleesh, Hilaria Baldwin’d, for appropriating Latinx culture?

  17. Never mind her knowledge and abilities; we’re not supposed to discuss conspiracy theories like Chem Trails so publicly in popular culture, even if they are real.

    Calling Bill Gates: Cleanup needed in the Music aisle.

  18. Anonymous[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    From Wikipedia:

    I was going to Miami quite a lot at the time, speaking a lot of Spanish with my friends from Cuba – Lana Del Rey reminded us of the glamour of the seaside. It sounded gorgeous coming off the tip of the tongue.” The name was also inspired by actress Lana Turner and the Ford Del Rey sedan, produced and sold in Brazil in the 1980s. Initially she had chosen the alternate spelling of Lana Del Ray, the name under which her self-titled debut album was released in January 2010.

    How would she ever know of the Ford Del Rey??

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous


    How would she ever know of the Ford Del Rey??
     
    It's shown in one of her first two self-made videos from 2011 that went viral on YouTube before she signed a recording contract, or at least the camera pans across the chrome "Del Rey" nameplate on the car. So she was aware of it early on. Originally she spelled the name "Del Ray," so apparently at some point she became aware of the car and changed the spelling.

    I linked to these two first videos here if you want to search for the car. I can't remember which it's in, but I notice it while reviewing the videos before embedding them:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/lana-del-reys-new-album-chemtrails-over-the-country-club/#comment-4536906
  19. @Dumbo

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.
     
    "Del Rey", isn't that hispanic? :D

    Anyway, it's a silly idea that "beautiful straight white women" are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The "Karen" slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those "beautiful straight white American" women.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Charles St. Charles, @slumber_j, @TGGP

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    Her real name according to (((Wi)))kipedia is Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Scottish descent. Nice stage name – rolls off the tongue and conjures ‘30s Hollywood.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lana_Del_Rey

    I’ve never heard a single record of hers, or Billie Eilish, or any other pop from the past ten years or so. Not bragging – keeping up is just not an interest anymore. I’m going back rather than forward – my current listening consists mostly of Renaissance and Elizabethan guitar and lute music of the British Isles.

    I do appreciate this quote from the above page:

    “Whenever people bring up feminism … I’m just not really that interested.”

    I totally relate; one of the unwritten but liberating freedoms we have lost in the past couple of decades or more is the right to selective apathy – deciding for ourselves what we are NOT going to care about, in order to make space for what really matters to us. Apparently Miss Grant has not been informed (or maybe she has) that “Feminism” is on the list of required topics that “Everyone Must Be Interested In and Hold the Correct View On”.

  20. Bloody Hell!
    I’ve heard LDRay and it’s nothing that grown men should be concerned about. It’s more like a teenage-girl concern.
    I was just listening to some vintage Stranglers and early Fall before I looked up Unz for the evening. Having to give a toss about Lana DRay seems odd to me. Might put on the ol’ NMA next!
    Have a good one!
    AC

  21. Why Steve, it does appear and sound as though you’ve got a crush on a Millennial. And a very natural and normal human reaction.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Not everything reduces to that.

  22. Billie Eilish highly admires Del Rey. Eilish is another example of a musically gifted white female who writes somewhat depressive music. Her recent single, “my future”, opens with a series of jazz chords of the type you just don’t hear in current pop music.

    In an interview, Billie’s brother said she wants everyone to like her and that has turned her into a woke liberal. A lot of wokeism is just a desire to conform, be popular and follow the crowd. There is no group that worries more about being popular than teenage girls, of which Billie is one.

    This wokeism has mostly kept her out of trouble but not completely. Her last single, a Latin song sung in Spanish, caused her to be accused of engaging in cultural appropriation. There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Mark G.

    "There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper stripper."

    FIFY

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Mark G.


    There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.
     
    This is a yearly ritual at the Grammy's. Maclamore, Adel, now Eilish and her brother. If you don't want to win, just ask to have your name removed and say you won't accept the award. Simple.

    Or they could do a whole awards show just for black people. Oh, they already have that?

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Mark G.

    When are we going to hear a White who has achieved excellence tell envious, talentless, sore-loser black supremacists in his acceptance speech, "Go to hell!"?

  23. Thank you, Steve, for sharing this music.

    This commenter would not have known about it otherwise. Just the album title, Chemtrails Over the Country Club, is enough to show wit. This is good stuff.

    God bless smart women who also happen to be aesthetically gifted. They’re out there, boys! I will get this for my wife, as a belated International Women’s Day gift. (That’s a big deal where she came from.)

    And here’s to Elon Musk and Grimes, BTW. Say what you will…

    • Replies: @AShartIsBorn
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Grimes managed to snag him because she completes into his fantasy of having an AI waifu ala Joi from Blade Runner:

    https://youtu.be/m1o8nFLEkUw

    , @Bill P
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Smart, highly creative women are not usually very easy to handle. Guys who want a house in the suburbs, kids and a dog should probably avoid them in favor of "common-sense" women.

    But some of us can't help ourselves.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

  24. @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing.

    I gave them both a listen, Thoughts. It might be good music to fall asleep to, but I prefer Grateful Dead space jams and long versions of Dark Star for that. It could grow on me, but I gave them each 2 minutes.

    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That’s the alternative right now, apparently. I don’t expect Kasey Kasem to come on the radio this Sunday to introduce the next CCR or Led Zeppelin…

    … or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That’s the alternative right now, apparently...

    … or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:
     

    Sayer, ABBA, the Guess Who, and even David Bowie and Frank Zappa figured out that there was a market for non-disco alternatives for those who wanted dance music. (That two of those songs are titled "Dancin' Fool" suggests the effort wasn't entirely serious.)

    Blondie, on the other hand, was a non-disco act that made a better disco record than almost anyone else.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    , @Desiderius
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Doesn't everyone have a local 70s/80s station that plays Kasem countdowns on weekends?

  25. @Dumbo

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.
     
    "Del Rey", isn't that hispanic? :D

    Anyway, it's a silly idea that "beautiful straight white women" are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The "Karen" slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those "beautiful straight white American" women.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Charles St. Charles, @slumber_j, @TGGP

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn’t obviously interesting, as “Hollywood Sadcore.” Coming from the likes of her, it’s an unsurprisingly good description.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j


    Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut.
     
    The first time I entered the great state of Connecticut, I was on foot with my dog and a backpack. I was a high school dropout, and we had been living on the Appalachian Trail for a couple of weeks when we crossed the border from Massachusetts.

    Lana Del Rey hadn't been born yet.

    Well, in a couple of days, the trail took us right by the Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Out there in the woods. I still remember seeing that and thinking, "Here is a private high school, and here I am, an alien to this place." Nice enough place. I never dreamed I would come back years later and make my life here.

    It was there in Kent, while sitting on a rock, that I decided to go back to Colorado and go to college. My life changed. Kent must be good for education.

    As far as I am concerned, Elizabeth is a fine product of Connecticut's private schools, and Kent, minutes away from me by car now, will forever have a place in my heart.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @RichardTaylor, @hhsiii

    , @Dumbo
    @slumber_j


    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss.
     
    Yeah, I thought it was a stage name, it was just a (bad) joke.

    It worked.
     
    So somehow the "triggered music critics" failed in their attempt to bring her down...

    As I said, the idea that good-looking white women are somehow persecuted or discriminated in America is silly. No one has it easier. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
    , @Alfa158
    @slumber_j

    No kidding, I was half expecting her to finish the song, look at the camera, pause, and say; “ you know...sometimes I cut myself”.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.

    If you are going to sing songs in live performance that are heavy on 'meaningful' lyrics, then you need to learn to sing in a way with enhanced diction in which your listeners can understand the words at the first time of asking. This requires a tremendous amount of practice and rehearsing. See below.

    https://youtu.be/xrKBCuCxGyo

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Anon

  26. Come on, hands up everyone who thought this was going to be a ‘golfocaust’ post.

  27. @slumber_j
    @Dumbo

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn't obviously interesting, as "Hollywood Sadcore." Coming from the likes of her, it's an unsurprisingly good description.

    https://youtu.be/hUwqSCqbUz8

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Dumbo, @Alfa158, @Jonathan Mason

    Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut.

    The first time I entered the great state of Connecticut, I was on foot with my dog and a backpack. I was a high school dropout, and we had been living on the Appalachian Trail for a couple of weeks when we crossed the border from Massachusetts.

    Lana Del Rey hadn’t been born yet.

    Well, in a couple of days, the trail took us right by the Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Out there in the woods. I still remember seeing that and thinking, “Here is a private high school, and here I am, an alien to this place.” Nice enough place. I never dreamed I would come back years later and make my life here.

    It was there in Kent, while sitting on a rock, that I decided to go back to Colorado and go to college. My life changed. Kent must be good for education.

    As far as I am concerned, Elizabeth is a fine product of Connecticut’s private schools, and Kent, minutes away from me by car now, will forever have a place in my heart.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, the Appalachian Trail is right there. And the campus is indeed a nice and very pretty place, nestled between an abrupt Berkshire Hill and the right bank of the mighty Housatonic.

    We drive through Kent all the time on the way from NYC to a house we own in Litchfield County. Funny that you live nearby, as I do too sometimes.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @RichardTaylor
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.

    She supported Obama and criticized those who liked Trump. I'm afraid she's the standard old type of White liberal who lives in a protected enclave and has no loyalty to other Whites.

    (It'll take hours to days for this comment to be approved so we can make room for ducks and anagrams. But my point is, why are we idolizing those who work against just us because they look really White? It's like Southerners who love Lindsey Graham due to his darling accent)

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @hhsiii
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I interviewed at Kent and almost went there. It is a pretty spot. I had no idea she went there.

  28. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    No wonder you like her. Her music takes you back to your youth in the Roaring ’20s

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j


    Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut.
     
    The first time I entered the great state of Connecticut, I was on foot with my dog and a backpack. I was a high school dropout, and we had been living on the Appalachian Trail for a couple of weeks when we crossed the border from Massachusetts.

    Lana Del Rey hadn't been born yet.

    Well, in a couple of days, the trail took us right by the Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Out there in the woods. I still remember seeing that and thinking, "Here is a private high school, and here I am, an alien to this place." Nice enough place. I never dreamed I would come back years later and make my life here.

    It was there in Kent, while sitting on a rock, that I decided to go back to Colorado and go to college. My life changed. Kent must be good for education.

    As far as I am concerned, Elizabeth is a fine product of Connecticut's private schools, and Kent, minutes away from me by car now, will forever have a place in my heart.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @RichardTaylor, @hhsiii

    Yeah, the Appalachian Trail is right there. And the campus is indeed a nice and very pretty place, nestled between an abrupt Berkshire Hill and the right bank of the mighty Housatonic.

    We drive through Kent all the time on the way from NYC to a house we own in Litchfield County. Funny that you live nearby, as I do too sometimes.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    Good to hear back from you! My dog and I slept that night on the side of what I think you are calling Berkshire Hill, or that geologic formation to which you refer. I remember it was a bivouac situation, on a slope near the town, and I was basically squished between the ground and a huge boulder. Not a normal campsite.

    Then I took a bath in the Housatonic. It had been more than a week, you understand. When I told a friend in college from Westport that I'd taken a bath in the Housatonic River, he thought I was crazy. It was nice and clean there though. I would not trade those experiences for anything, even though I was young, directionless, and afraid.

    Frankly, looking back on it all after a career and all the trappings of a, thankfully, solid life afterward, I have to say that some of my very best travels and "vacations" occurred before I ever gained any kind of security. Even today, I can't find that kind of freedom.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  30. @slumber_j
    @Dumbo

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn't obviously interesting, as "Hollywood Sadcore." Coming from the likes of her, it's an unsurprisingly good description.

    https://youtu.be/hUwqSCqbUz8

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Dumbo, @Alfa158, @Jonathan Mason

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss.

    Yeah, I thought it was a stage name, it was just a (bad) joke.

    It worked.

    So somehow the “triggered music critics” failed in their attempt to bring her down…

    As I said, the idea that good-looking white women are somehow persecuted or discriminated in America is silly. No one has it easier. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  31. In good vocal music, there is concordance between the lyrical phrase and the vocal melody sung with the lyrical phrase. Rhythm of the melody fits that of the lyric.

    lana del rey is singing conversational fragments, not lyrics, and the vocal melodies are just notes strung together long enuf to fit the number of syllables in the conversational fragments.

    Not aesthetically inspired music.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @John Shade

    Oh, my god. Somebody who understands music!

    You've hit the nail on the head. Kudos!

    You've actually described correctly, concisely, and trenchantly what is wrong with such music.

    Rather than just saying it sucks. Which it does.

    Replies: @slumber_j

  32. Anonymous[302] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    I looked for photos by webzone search “lana del rey fat” but couldn’t find them after about 5 minutes trying (figures she’d employ a good SEO firm, with all of Dad’s money from domain names/buggy whips). Instead there were just a lot of old, pre-fat photos appended to references to her current size. Lotsa gay guys’ blogs commenting on it, though– was that how you learned about it?

    Her music is terrible IMO. The “playing video games” song was stand-out bad. She’s going for that neo-Baez glamour without all the Joanna Newsom, post-riot-grrl lezfem baggage, which unfortunately is the only thing to distinguish ’00s/’10s solipsistic girl music from the classic 1960s Joplin/Joni Mitchell/Cass Elliot period (blogs would have a lot of fun with Ma Cass). A melodically superior take on the genre is any recent output of Natalie Mering, but as a commie-adjacent PNW-bohemian act that might lack consistency in volk-rock signaling and be less to Steve’s druthers.

  33. @slumber_j
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, the Appalachian Trail is right there. And the campus is indeed a nice and very pretty place, nestled between an abrupt Berkshire Hill and the right bank of the mighty Housatonic.

    We drive through Kent all the time on the way from NYC to a house we own in Litchfield County. Funny that you live nearby, as I do too sometimes.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Good to hear back from you! My dog and I slept that night on the side of what I think you are calling Berkshire Hill, or that geologic formation to which you refer. I remember it was a bivouac situation, on a slope near the town, and I was basically squished between the ground and a huge boulder. Not a normal campsite.

    Then I took a bath in the Housatonic. It had been more than a week, you understand. When I told a friend in college from Westport that I’d taken a bath in the Housatonic River, he thought I was crazy. It was nice and clean there though. I would not trade those experiences for anything, even though I was young, directionless, and afraid.

    Frankly, looking back on it all after a career and all the trappings of a, thankfully, solid life afterward, I have to say that some of my very best travels and “vacations” occurred before I ever gained any kind of security. Even today, I can’t find that kind of freedom.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I was once on the Appalachian Trail too - footloose and fancy-free with a lightweight tent on my back I had bought in the lower east side in NYC in a shop, that was narrow, long, and dark but maybe 5 meters high. The clerks climbed up the walls with ladders. I was a bit scared of the copperhead snakes in the tall grass in North Carolina. A potter invited me to stay with him and we jogged in the mornings, but not without a dog running in front of us, to clear the scene. The potter was maybe thirty and had already lost some teeth due to snakebites (don't know if that was true, but it did impress me). I had been at the university before, in a casual way and thought about going back, but wasn't yet decided whether to do it in the US or - - - Konstanz.

    I still get lost in the woods like I did then. It's just that I'm even more than then following my eyes. Years of practice (and inspirations I got - not least from American photographers and artists - Paul Strand and Ansel Adams foremost). I haven't had a Paul Strand book on my desk for months, but I do think of his photographs every once in a while - not least those he took in France towards the end of his life - gloomy, often (slightly) underexposed, twilighty, but quotidien at the same time - (down to earth, common)).

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  34. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    Lana Del Rey is her stage name anyway. Real name is Lizzie Grant. She chose the “Lana” name for Lana Turner and “Del Rey” for the Cubans in Florida and the Ford car (Vogue interview in 2011). Don’t forget that she also accepts miscegenation and interracial relationships. In her music video “National Anthem” which was about the All American JFK and Jackie she is married to a negro and has mixed kids with him. In her short film “Tropico” she is Eve while a negro albino plays Adam.

    I sincerely enjoy her music, but she isn’t some little pro white darling by any means. She simply embraces Americana as her personal image and downsized her nose via plastic surgery.

  35. Reminds me of a combo of Kate Bush and Mazzy Star. I wanted to hate it but it’s not bad at all, she’s got a certain something.

    • Agree: Trelane
  36. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j


    Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut.
     
    The first time I entered the great state of Connecticut, I was on foot with my dog and a backpack. I was a high school dropout, and we had been living on the Appalachian Trail for a couple of weeks when we crossed the border from Massachusetts.

    Lana Del Rey hadn't been born yet.

    Well, in a couple of days, the trail took us right by the Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Out there in the woods. I still remember seeing that and thinking, "Here is a private high school, and here I am, an alien to this place." Nice enough place. I never dreamed I would come back years later and make my life here.

    It was there in Kent, while sitting on a rock, that I decided to go back to Colorado and go to college. My life changed. Kent must be good for education.

    As far as I am concerned, Elizabeth is a fine product of Connecticut's private schools, and Kent, minutes away from me by car now, will forever have a place in my heart.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @RichardTaylor, @hhsiii

    I don’t know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.

    She supported Obama and criticized those who liked Trump. I’m afraid she’s the standard old type of White liberal who lives in a protected enclave and has no loyalty to other Whites.

    (It’ll take hours to days for this comment to be approved so we can make room for ducks and anagrams. But my point is, why are we idolizing those who work against just us because they look really White? It’s like Southerners who love Lindsey Graham due to his darling accent)

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @RichardTaylor


    I don’t know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.
     
    I don't think of her as a symbol. Can we PLEASE stop objectifying womyn?

    Kidding. Anyway, Litchfield Co. went for Trump in 2016. You're right about the fancy New Yorkers up there, but the working people are pretty solid.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    Lana is Elizabeth Grant — daughter of wealthy, Republican-voting WASPs. There have been accusations of racism and attempted cancellations, but she is simply too good to be excluded from the pop world.

  38. Is the author of the article aware of the existence of her black rapper boyfriend? ” Proud White Women”

  39. @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    No, that’s Aimée Mann.

  40. One can enjoy everything about Lana Del Rey except for her tiresome music.

  41. P J Harvey trumps Lana Del Rey in her contretemps

    I prefer the latter to the former

    • Replies: @Zoos
    @Pat Hannagan


    P J Harvey trumps Lana Del Rey in her contretemps
     
    PJ Harvey made a career out of singing about vaginal itch.
  42. ‘Harvey’s in the sky with diamonds / And it’s making me crazy / All he wants to do is party with his pretty baby,’ Del Ray’s lyrics to her 2012 song ‘Cola’.

    Del Rey was later hired by Weinstein Company to pen two songs for the 2014 film Big Eyes, which earned her a Golden Globe nomination

    Del Rey created a promo for “Video Games” using film of a drunken Paz de la Huerta falling over. Yup, that Paz, the original complainant about Harvey Weinstein, who the NYPD refused to charge. Paz also made a memorable appearance in Louis Theroux’s documentary about Ron (L. Hubbard) and as he put it she hijacked his film and took him “down the rabbit hole” She was incredible in Boardwalk Empire but could not get over the trauma of having Harvey “this hairy pig inside me”. That is the paradox of glamour.

    • LOL: Trelane
  43. Impressive, as I’ve always believed the field of Philosophy to be a cerebral sausagefest.

  44. @Redneck farmer
    @Thoughts

    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buzz Mohawk

    How many times have you heard someone described as smart but: lazy, crazy, weird, goofy, etc.? Lots of times

    You are describing Ignatius J. Reilly, the great, American, literary hero.

    One of the values of art is that is makes us look hard at ourselves. It makes us feel things. Now, some of us should never be shaken from our comfort, because, in those cases, that will create upset and possible, as you say, “suicide.”

    The trick, as always, is to find balance. Balance between mediocrity and the sublime.

  45. I’d really like to see the two old autistes go up against each other

    >lana del rey

  46. Wow, even I have a Kent School story. What can this mean? Won’t bore you with the details but I found it a magical place [this was in the 1990s] and I was mighty impressed with the level of social trust in evidence.

    Pretty much the sort of place that the MSM now paint as filled with hidden horrors. It wasn’t.

  47. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    I always thought this was her best song and video.

  48. New World Happiness Ratings are out. There’s some kind of pattern here but danged if I can figure it out.

    Finland is world’s happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list
    https://mol.im/a/9379935 [Daily Mail]

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @HammerJack

    OOPS!...Taiwan is about to fall off the list ,president potato sold it for a box of cracker jacks

    , @Muggles
    @HammerJack


    Finland is world’s happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list
     
    One of the characteristics of Finland, it is claimed, is that the people there are very reserved and depressed.

    Some claim it is due to the high northern latitude, horrible winter darkness.

    So they boil themselves in scalding water (sauna) and drink a lot (but it's heavily taxed!).

    The hate the Russians but rarely say that publicly. Not crazy about Swedes either.

    The Finnish restaurant craze never caught on. Reindeer tastes too much like venison.

    Finns settled in northern Upper Peninsula Michigan, parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin. Many were actual communists for a time, perhaps due to the influence of Russians who controlled their former country for a long time.

    I have never heard of the "happy Finn" though I was raised with a lot of Scandinavians (who aren't Finnish by ethicity). I think this survey result is a result of Finns playing a joke on the survey takers.

    "They always say we are gloomy and sad, this will teach them!"
    , @Yngvar
    @HammerJack

    6 in the Top 10 have a cross in their national flag.

  49. Who are all those women and where are their masks?

  50. The tail end of the list. They only measured 95 countries because there was too much Disparate Impact.

  51. As numerous people have repeatedly noticed, a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy – basically Sailer’s Law of Female Journalism applied to all of white society.

    Most women don’t look at the aesthetic of Cardi B/Megan Thee Stallion and aspire to live that out, they look at the stuff like Del Rey’s album cover and imagine themselves in that picture, and the implied financial and relationship security behind it. But going full bore feminist doesn’t lend itself to that outcome – instead women are told they need to act like men in their approach to career and sex lives, and it makes them miserable, which they reframe as being ’empowered’.

    As for men, our culture cannot admit that the white guy with the suburban house, wife, kids and dog is still the archetype of success, and a huge percentage of society has no shot of getting there, thus those that do or at least check most of these boxes are hated.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Arclight


    ... a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy...
     
    It is this commenter's conclusion that envy is the root of most of our problems.

    Think about it.

    Immigration: People who envy us come here any way they can. Business and politics facilitates this because it means cheap labor and votes.

    Current Day Marxism (Call it whatever you will): Envy is the wedge that allows you to drive yourself between people that would normally be fellow Americans. That's right, we were "fellows" working it all out, before you ever were able to dig your fucking, Bolshevik claws into us!

    Envy.

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong...

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Neuday, @Peterike

  52. This is surely miles better than anything I heard at the Grammys last week. Thanks for sharing Steve

  53. My ears are old, and I can’t understand a word she is singing. Still I give her major kudos for bringing attention to chemtrails. The best thing about the pandemic was the sky was free from planes of all stripes, but especially the chemtrail spewing ones. The sunrises and sunsets were gorgeous, and it seems the sky is still blue. Now we have diapered Joe at the helm, and America is back. Now my sky looks like dusty white crap. So go for it Lana.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Keypusher
    @Old and Grumpy

    Uh, where do you live? LaGuardia Terminal B?

  54. @Arclight
    As numerous people have repeatedly noticed, a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy - basically Sailer's Law of Female Journalism applied to all of white society.

    Most women don't look at the aesthetic of Cardi B/Megan Thee Stallion and aspire to live that out, they look at the stuff like Del Rey's album cover and imagine themselves in that picture, and the implied financial and relationship security behind it. But going full bore feminist doesn't lend itself to that outcome - instead women are told they need to act like men in their approach to career and sex lives, and it makes them miserable, which they reframe as being 'empowered'.

    As for men, our culture cannot admit that the white guy with the suburban house, wife, kids and dog is still the archetype of success, and a huge percentage of society has no shot of getting there, thus those that do or at least check most of these boxes are hated.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    … a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy…

    It is this commenter’s conclusion that envy is the root of most of our problems.

    Think about it.

    Immigration: People who envy us come here any way they can. Business and politics facilitates this because it means cheap labor and votes.

    Current Day Marxism (Call it whatever you will): Envy is the wedge that allows you to drive yourself between people that would normally be fellow Americans. That’s right, we were “fellows” working it all out, before you ever were able to dig your fucking, Bolshevik claws into us!

    Envy.

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong…

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For a while at least. First, those bugmen will have to figure out how to deal with the elephant in the room, the explosion of a couple of billion Africans who want to live somewhere better, so those Asians will have to develop some thoughts so they can deal with it. Secondly, humanity and civilizations evolve and change. Throw in the possibility of directed genetic engineering and/or genuinely sentient artificial intelligence becoming real, and there’s no telling what the world will look like in a couple of centuries.
    I will make a prediction: It’s not going to look like the series The Expansee where the solar system is settled but almost all the Asians are weirdly missing.

    , @Neuday
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.
     
    Yeah, that's why Western Christianity considered Envy one of the seven deadly sins. Now that the Christian church has been so fully infiltrated and subverted by (((the enemies of Christianity))), it's no wonder stoking envy is the primary tool of members of the synagogue of Satan.

    From wikipedia:
    According to St. Thomas Aquinas, the struggle aroused by envy has three stages: during the first stage, the envious person attempts to lower another's reputation; in the middle stage, the envious person receives either "joy at another's misfortune" (if he succeeds in defaming the other person) or "grief at another's prosper
    In accordance with the most widely accepted views, only pride weighs down the soul more than envy among the capital sins. Just like pride, envy has been associated directly with the devil, for Wisdom 2:24 states: "the envy of the devil brought death to the world"

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Peterike
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “ Envy is destroying Civilization.”

    You might enjoy this:

    https://www.amazon.com/ENVY-Theory-Behaviour-Helmut-Schoeck/dp/0865970645/ref=nodl_

  55. I can’t really get into her music – although her cover of Doin’ Time (by Sublime) was pretty sexy. I may be wrong because I don’t follow that close but she seems to avoid gratuitous media attention seeking and has carved out a nice little.. dare I say.. alternative genre for herself.

    I’ll take her over any one of the bubble gum pop sluts currently disgracing the term “recording artist” these days: Gaga, Cyrus, Perry, the “wet ass pussy” animal.. all hideous and of questionable talent. But I’m sure the record producers enjoyed them when they “sang into the microphone” if you know what I mean.

  56. I love any singer who has not been affected by the black yodel, AKA melisma.

  57. Music to cut yourself by

  58. Anon[291] • Disclaimer says:

    She’s enormously talented musically and in her evocation of a nostalgic Americana.

    I’m unsure where she’s going with the nostalgia. Is it a futile, defeated nostalgia for “an America that never existed”, or for an America that existed but is now dead?

    Many of the young women she depicts are on the nihilistic life path of finding the world bland and without anything to believe in, partying and sensation seeking to escape the bland world, being hurt or mutilated or killed by glamorous but callous men, but wallowing in the hurt, because it’s the only thing that’s real and there’s nothing else to believe in.

    I was listening to her for a long time before I watched her videos, which then reinforced my feeling of unease. She doesn’t look like a healthy or happy young woman. And if you think she’s conveying a countercultural pro-white message, you should have look at her video for “National Anthem” (and maybe just listen to it first, because it’s musically beautiful), with a gangster rapper playing JFK and Lana playing Jackie. What do you make of that?

  59. Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.

    As she sort of humblebrag acknowledged in that little Instagram tiff she had last year, Lana has got a fairly wide open lane for her shtick since the median point of performative femininity in music today has settled somewhere between Billie Eilish’s schizoid asexuality and “WAP.” There’s an unmet demand for a woman who is actually reasonably pleasant to look at singing songs that are reasonably pleasant to listen to. Props to her for coming out of her attempted canceling last year though by refusing to back down or apologize. Props also to her for her productivity over the last decade. I appreciate musicians who can keep working consistently rather than getting burned out and/or lazy with success.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    Wow, that's a mouthful, but probably right.

    Here is Grimes, Earth's #1 SpaceWife herself, summing up women in one, concise statement (just because I want to post a music video):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG_4vJ4qNA

    Replies: @anon, @Mr. Anon, @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @AShartIsBorn
    @Thomas

    Taylor Swift, now that she’s rebranded as a wandering poetess in the woods circa 1930s New England, has taken up a big chunk of that lane too.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Thomas

    "Billie Eilish’s schizoid asexuality"

    If The Paper Of Record is correct, Billie has been hiding her lights under a bushel.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/03/17/18/40597756-9373075-_Pinch_me_The_other_big_change_for_Billie_was_that_fact_that_she-a-8_1616004310662.jpg

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

  60. If I am sucked in (first Drudge, now Steve) and want to obtain this product (is it still known as an “album”?), how do I get it? Do they sell CDs these days? Serious question. I don’t have Spotify or Shopify or iTunes or whatever.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @EdwardM

    CDs are easily obtained via Barnes & Noble, Amazon (boo!) and some local music stores (depending on area). Many other sellers on the web too.

    Or were you just gaslighting us?

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @EdwardM

    Just keep reloading this page and mashing that triangle in the middle of her picture. Do you know where the F5 key is, old man?

    ;-}

  61. @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    I’ve vaguely heard of her, but never heard her songs. So I’ll take your opinion as accurate. Sounds like a younger, female, American version of Nick Cave.

  62. I find her recorded output to be musical wallpaper. It’s better than Muzak by a little but then my tastes run to Insect Warfare and The Dillinger Escape Plan. What I appreciate about her public persona is that she, at least in the past, has been an unrepentant smoker.

    When my doctor back in Illinois would recommend I put down the habit I maintained it might become an act of political and social defiance so, no thanks.

  63. I went on a Lana Del Rey kick a couple of years ago after discovering her on You Tube. She is definitely not everyone’s cup of tea but I enjoyed a lot of her work.

    I reached two conclusions, She is a very creative and talented artist and I am very glad she’s not my daughter.

  64. Steve-O that’s 11 trannies, C’mon.

    Anyway, your two favorite subjects come to confluence today; The Great White Defendant and Man Bites Dog.

    https://worldstarhiphop.com/videos/video-c.php?v=wshhMnC35QulP64679AY#comments-arena

  65. The only thing I’ll give her- her music is tedious to my tastes – is Lana del Ray is a hilarious stage name. It just steers straight into Hollywood regency era kitsch exoticism. It’s the name dashiell Hammett would give a studio bosses vaguely ethnic mistress whose real name would turn out to be Debrorah Westlake.

  66. hey, look who else is “triggering” the woke these days – back to that sprinting thing again…

    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kg6VUieshIo)

  67. People who believe in chemtrails are definitely nuts. Most of them are also in the antivax crowd. It’s not obvious whether she really believes. She could be just throwing it out as provocative imagery.

  68. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Arclight


    ... a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy...
     
    It is this commenter's conclusion that envy is the root of most of our problems.

    Think about it.

    Immigration: People who envy us come here any way they can. Business and politics facilitates this because it means cheap labor and votes.

    Current Day Marxism (Call it whatever you will): Envy is the wedge that allows you to drive yourself between people that would normally be fellow Americans. That's right, we were "fellows" working it all out, before you ever were able to dig your fucking, Bolshevik claws into us!

    Envy.

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong...

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Neuday, @Peterike

    For a while at least. First, those bugmen will have to figure out how to deal with the elephant in the room, the explosion of a couple of billion Africans who want to live somewhere better, so those Asians will have to develop some thoughts so they can deal with it. Secondly, humanity and civilizations evolve and change. Throw in the possibility of directed genetic engineering and/or genuinely sentient artificial intelligence becoming real, and there’s no telling what the world will look like in a couple of centuries.
    I will make a prediction: It’s not going to look like the series The Expansee where the solar system is settled but almost all the Asians are weirdly missing.

    • Agree: BB753
  69. Well, Lana Del Rey’s music is not really my cup of tea — plodding and melancholic — and her voice, though soft, manages to grate and grind on my eardrums.

    But I’ll take the opportunity to play a well-known John Denver song by a group I’ve just recently discovered – The Petersens – a singing family from Branson, Missouri, just about 30 miles south of Springfield, home to the Great Clips hair salon of anti-COVID-19 masking fame.

    The band was originally siblings Katie (on fiddle), Ellen (on banjo), their brother Matt (on bass), and their youngest sister Julianne (sings and dance), accompanied by their mother Karen (on mandolin) and father Jon (on guitar). But over time, Julianne took the mandolin part and Karen switched to bass. Matt took the guitar part and their father, Jon, played the piano on some of the gospel songs. These early performances were mostly held initially in local festivals, churches and cafes.– Wikipedia

    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Sparkon

    Would love to hear their take on Powderfinger.

    https://youtu.be/-yzOpjQsXvk

    , @Anon
    @Sparkon


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:
     
    Oh man, can I now come out of the closet as a Petersen's bluegrass superfan? It's my deepest, darkest secret.

    By the way, after Dolly was dumped by her major label when she got old and out of style, she did three consecutive excellent bluegrass albums for a small label. She covered the classics, wrote some new stuff ("Mountain Angel" is deliciously creepy when listened to alone on a dark, rainy night), and threw in some off-the-wall stuff like a cover of "Staircase to Heaven" (not a great cover, but Dolly doing Led Zeppelin is worth one listen).

    Ellen Petersen was on a televised American Idol way back playing banjo and singing and yodeling "Cowboy Sweetheart." Jennifer Lopez was like, Who is this hick?, but then Harry Connick, Jr., and Keith Urban (Australian husband of Nicole Kidman) joined her in the theme from the Beverly Hillbillies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ezK1Ew7fI

    All three of the Petersen sisters have distinctive, very different, and very good voices, and the brother and the dobro guy are both not bad either. Here's the youngest doing "Gentle on My Mind":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3hXYININJw

    This is a cover of bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle's cover of the Glen Campbell hit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzeKM_lyQI4

    Tuttle spun out of yet another family bluegrass group based in Berkeley, attended Berklee [sic, the East Coast one], and ended up in Nashville.

    During the lockdown Tuttle has done an album of non-bluegrass covers, and I like her de-punked version of Rancid's "Olympia, WA":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ5hWXLpjxQ

    Going further down the rabbit hole, Glen Campbell's daughter Ashley has a nice version of Townes Van Zandt's "Poncho and Lefty":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpNrcAmmTxE

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt's "White Freightliner Blues," but I've already over-embedded ...

    Replies: @Zoos, @Clyde, @Sparkon

  70. @Thomas

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.
     
    As she sort of humblebrag acknowledged in that little Instagram tiff she had last year, Lana has got a fairly wide open lane for her shtick since the median point of performative femininity in music today has settled somewhere between Billie Eilish's schizoid asexuality and "WAP." There's an unmet demand for a woman who is actually reasonably pleasant to look at singing songs that are reasonably pleasant to listen to. Props to her for coming out of her attempted canceling last year though by refusing to back down or apologize. Props also to her for her productivity over the last decade. I appreciate musicians who can keep working consistently rather than getting burned out and/or lazy with success.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AShartIsBorn, @YetAnotherAnon

    Wow, that’s a mouthful, but probably right.

    Here is Grimes, Earth’s #1 SpaceWife herself, summing up women in one, concise statement (just because I want to post a music video):

    • Replies: @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Grimes vid is good. This one by Lana del Rey has a bit more depth.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdQ_X2j9bHg

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "We appreciate power". Is that statement about women, or the billionaire class into which "Grimes" has grafted herself. And, honestly, for all the money Musk has, couldn't he have found himself a better looking squeeze? She's ugly.

    Lana Del Rey is pretty, or at least she was before the tattoos and collagen injections. Yes, she was pretty - like a lot of the girls who get used up and spit out by the pop music industry, which has become increasingly perverse and evil. It's only real purpose anymore is to serve as a funnel with which to force-feed filth to America's youth.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Heh, Grimes is definitely living true to the title of this song.

  71. Anonymous[332] • Disclaimer says:

    Why would they give Lana a pass? Probably because of this music video where she reimagines herself as Jackie Kennedy to a black JFK (played by rapper ASAP Rocky):

  72. “During the first year of Donald Trump’s presidency, Del Rey confirmed that she used witchcraft against Trump.” – Wikipedia

  73. @slumber_j
    @Dumbo

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn't obviously interesting, as "Hollywood Sadcore." Coming from the likes of her, it's an unsurprisingly good description.

    https://youtu.be/hUwqSCqbUz8

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Dumbo, @Alfa158, @Jonathan Mason

    No kidding, I was half expecting her to finish the song, look at the camera, pause, and say; “ you know…sometimes I cut myself”.

  74. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    Wow, that's a mouthful, but probably right.

    Here is Grimes, Earth's #1 SpaceWife herself, summing up women in one, concise statement (just because I want to post a music video):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG_4vJ4qNA

    Replies: @anon, @Mr. Anon, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Grimes vid is good. This one by Lana del Rey has a bit more depth.

  75. For people my age who grew up during the (pre-autotune) era of the great vocalists, Lana does not compare. There are many YouTube videos, both individual songs and compilations, of the great singers from the 60s. In the comments below videos, I have been happy to see that listeners consist not only of oldsters like me, but also young people who have discovered these singers. However, I guess most young people disagree. Recently I played for my niece a video of The Seekers (“I’ll Never Find Another You”), and my young niece dismissively gave Judith the meh.

  76. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m familiar with the name, but have never actually heard a Lana Del Rey song. Just like I’ve never heard a Taylor Swift song. At least not consciously. I’ve probably been exposed to their songs unconsciously via the ambient music they play in stores, on TV programs and ads, etc.

    I thought Steve stopped listening to pop music in the 80s. We know he closely follows Hollywood movies, which is understandable, but it’s hard to imagine him listening to contemporary pop music. I’m guessing he just hears about it indirectly through his kids or younger relatives?

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Anonymous

    Well, here's a very sweet song Taylor Swift wrote for a high school talent show...when she was a freshman:

    https://youtu.be/i1gcO0q7kXc

  77. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    Good to hear back from you! My dog and I slept that night on the side of what I think you are calling Berkshire Hill, or that geologic formation to which you refer. I remember it was a bivouac situation, on a slope near the town, and I was basically squished between the ground and a huge boulder. Not a normal campsite.

    Then I took a bath in the Housatonic. It had been more than a week, you understand. When I told a friend in college from Westport that I'd taken a bath in the Housatonic River, he thought I was crazy. It was nice and clean there though. I would not trade those experiences for anything, even though I was young, directionless, and afraid.

    Frankly, looking back on it all after a career and all the trappings of a, thankfully, solid life afterward, I have to say that some of my very best travels and "vacations" occurred before I ever gained any kind of security. Even today, I can't find that kind of freedom.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I was once on the Appalachian Trail too – footloose and fancy-free with a lightweight tent on my back I had bought in the lower east side in NYC in a shop, that was narrow, long, and dark but maybe 5 meters high. The clerks climbed up the walls with ladders. I was a bit scared of the copperhead snakes in the tall grass in North Carolina. A potter invited me to stay with him and we jogged in the mornings, but not without a dog running in front of us, to clear the scene. The potter was maybe thirty and had already lost some teeth due to snakebites (don’t know if that was true, but it did impress me). I had been at the university before, in a casual way and thought about going back, but wasn’t yet decided whether to do it in the US or – – – Konstanz.

    I still get lost in the woods like I did then. It’s just that I’m even more than then following my eyes. Years of practice (and inspirations I got – not least from American photographers and artists – Paul Strand and Ansel Adams foremost). I haven’t had a Paul Strand book on my desk for months, but I do think of his photographs every once in a while – not least those he took in France towards the end of his life – gloomy, often (slightly) underexposed, twilighty, but quotidien at the same time – (down to earth, common)).

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Dieter Kief

    I mentioned this once before, but I owned and held for a few years a print by Ansel Adams that he had signed. It was one of over a thousand he had produced of that image, but still very valuable.

    I found it in a gallery in Boulder, Colorado, and I paid every last dollar I had for it. A few years later, I sold it, at a substantial profit, because I needed cash, but it was beautiful.


    https://www.phaidon.com/resource/moonriselead.jpg


    I took many road trips right there in that area. I love it. Georgia O'Keeffe lived just up north in Abiquiu then. My girlfriend, an art student, and I rented a horse from Georgia's neighbor, Eddie, one day. The horse was named Dagger. Eddie gave me a rope, I gave him twenty dollars, and he told me to go out and get Dagger. Well, you can imagine: That horse would not come anywhere near me. I think Eddie was just having fun with us. We went back to him, and Eddie got the horse, and my girl and I road around the desert around Georgia's property for a few hours.

    We camped out there that night. That girl then transferred to the Rhode Island School of Design, and I never saw her again.

  78. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    Del Rey means ‘of the King’. In Spanish it is a typical hotel name.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    I'm gonna speak for our blogger here, Jonathan:

    I know that!

    He lives in Los Angeles, you know? Marina del Rey has something like 4,500 boat slips. Then there's Playa del Rey. Then there's the El Camino Real, "The King's Highway", which seems to go all over California. No, it's not named after one of the coolest Chevies ever made (competitor to the Ford Ranchero, and IMO the Subaru Brat - even cooler because it had those 2 seats in the back).

    California is full of Spanish names, and if you live there long enough, you figure a few words out.

  79. @Thoughts
    Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she's 'gotten away with it'

    You can't listen to her for a long time without wanting to off yourself and give up on life---the music video that made her famous is her being killed in car crash.

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase 'He was a philosophy major' as if that meant he was like...smart or something.

    He was very smart. But I still thought it was weird.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    I classify chemtrails with flying saucers which are two things I have spent multiple 1000’s hours looking for and never seen. I am 99% sure they are at the very least very uncommon.

    Today I learned this woman was a philosophy major from New York who is reported to have had a drinking problem at the age of 15. Special. The world definitely needs philosophy majors. But it’s one of those things that you can only do if you have a safety net. Have you ever heard of an impoverished 20-year-old philosophy major? If you are borrowing money to go to college and you are worried about how you are going to pay it back you do not major in philosophy.

    Scott Alexander whose dad is boutique physician could major in philosophy.

    Jefferson Airplane Have You Seen the Saucers?

    (only on good acid!)

    • Replies: @dimples
    @Morton's toes

    If you haven't already, try going out into the country to seek the mysterious UFO. There's too many lights and other distractions in the city. Take a camera and photograph aerial objects, such as planes, helicopters etc so that you know what these objects look like in your images.

    The UFO is like any scientific phenomenon, it will come to those who look. The aliens, or rather, the supernatural beings, know you are looking and will maybe grant you a blessing. But it will be when you least expect it and appear in a form you least expect. Having seen one or two, I know. It's an unusual feeling, KNOWING that all the physicists and big men of science are complete dopes when it comes to the actual universe.

  80. Another mutation.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "mutation ... variant ... escapes detection by standard PCR test"

    After the meltdown I'm Chuck Heston cruising apocalypse city in the red convertible, clearing out the mutants mutated by the vaccines with my M3 grease gun.

  81. She can trigger conservatives too!

  82. @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you, Steve, for sharing this music.

    This commenter would not have known about it otherwise. Just the album title, Chemtrails Over the Country Club, is enough to show wit. This is good stuff.

    God bless smart women who also happen to be aesthetically gifted. They're out there, boys! I will get this for my wife, as a belated International Women's Day gift. (That's a big deal where she came from.)

    And here's to Elon Musk and Grimes, BTW. Say what you will...

    Replies: @AShartIsBorn, @Bill P

    Grimes managed to snag him because she completes into his fantasy of having an AI waifu ala Joi from Blade Runner:

  83. @Dieter Kief
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I was once on the Appalachian Trail too - footloose and fancy-free with a lightweight tent on my back I had bought in the lower east side in NYC in a shop, that was narrow, long, and dark but maybe 5 meters high. The clerks climbed up the walls with ladders. I was a bit scared of the copperhead snakes in the tall grass in North Carolina. A potter invited me to stay with him and we jogged in the mornings, but not without a dog running in front of us, to clear the scene. The potter was maybe thirty and had already lost some teeth due to snakebites (don't know if that was true, but it did impress me). I had been at the university before, in a casual way and thought about going back, but wasn't yet decided whether to do it in the US or - - - Konstanz.

    I still get lost in the woods like I did then. It's just that I'm even more than then following my eyes. Years of practice (and inspirations I got - not least from American photographers and artists - Paul Strand and Ansel Adams foremost). I haven't had a Paul Strand book on my desk for months, but I do think of his photographs every once in a while - not least those he took in France towards the end of his life - gloomy, often (slightly) underexposed, twilighty, but quotidien at the same time - (down to earth, common)).

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I mentioned this once before, but I owned and held for a few years a print by Ansel Adams that he had signed. It was one of over a thousand he had produced of that image, but still very valuable.

    [MORE]

    I found it in a gallery in Boulder, Colorado, and I paid every last dollar I had for it. A few years later, I sold it, at a substantial profit, because I needed cash, but it was beautiful.

    I took many road trips right there in that area. I love it. Georgia O’Keeffe lived just up north in Abiquiu then. My girlfriend, an art student, and I rented a horse from Georgia’s neighbor, Eddie, one day. The horse was named Dagger. Eddie gave me a rope, I gave him twenty dollars, and he told me to go out and get Dagger. Well, you can imagine: That horse would not come anywhere near me. I think Eddie was just having fun with us. We went back to him, and Eddie got the horse, and my girl and I road around the desert around Georgia’s property for a few hours.

    We camped out there that night. That girl then transferred to the Rhode Island School of Design, and I never saw her again.

  84. anon[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.

    Most of the negative and hostile commentary I see about Lana Del Rey comes from the right wing and alt-right types on Twitter. While most of the mainstream commentary about her is generally positive. She has the nerdy and quirky vibe that music critics and journalists, being nerdy and geeky themselves, tend to identify with.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @anon

    Greil Marcus is a huge Lana fan. I haven’t listened to her yet but Greil was also a big Chris Isaak fan and I got the impression he goes for the atmospherics.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  85. @Thomas

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.
     
    As she sort of humblebrag acknowledged in that little Instagram tiff she had last year, Lana has got a fairly wide open lane for her shtick since the median point of performative femininity in music today has settled somewhere between Billie Eilish's schizoid asexuality and "WAP." There's an unmet demand for a woman who is actually reasonably pleasant to look at singing songs that are reasonably pleasant to listen to. Props to her for coming out of her attempted canceling last year though by refusing to back down or apologize. Props also to her for her productivity over the last decade. I appreciate musicians who can keep working consistently rather than getting burned out and/or lazy with success.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AShartIsBorn, @YetAnotherAnon

    Taylor Swift, now that she’s rebranded as a wandering poetess in the woods circa 1930s New England, has taken up a big chunk of that lane too.

  86. anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    Lana is gonna be like… “thanks… for bringing it up, Steve…”

    For woke people, Steve’s the kind of guy who, on a hot Friday afternoon, reminds your teacher she forgot to give out the homework assignments.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  87. @slumber_j
    @Dumbo

    Real name: Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut. Hard to be whiter than that.

    As Steve Sailer comments, the stage name is an effort at remaking herself into an old-school LA glamour puss. It worked.

    She herself has described her music, which I find unusually interesting for something that isn't obviously interesting, as "Hollywood Sadcore." Coming from the likes of her, it's an unsurprisingly good description.

    https://youtu.be/hUwqSCqbUz8

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Dumbo, @Alfa158, @Jonathan Mason

    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.

    If you are going to sing songs in live performance that are heavy on ‘meaningful’ lyrics, then you need to learn to sing in a way with enhanced diction in which your listeners can understand the words at the first time of asking. This requires a tremendous amount of practice and rehearsing. See below.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Jonathan Mason

    David Letterman is mistaken there: Born to Die is her second album, although the first one had some kind of weird abortive distribution issue. But she was already very Internet-famous before she appeared on his show.

    A lot of famously lyric-heavy singers are way less precise in the diction department than Lana Del Rey: Tom Petty and Bob Dylan come to mind. In any case I think it highly unlikely that she stinted on rehearsal for that appearance as you imply. It's a stylized delivery over unusual instrumentation that's a departure from the studio recording, and I the whole thing strikes me as pretty carefully considered. And as you suggest, it was a really big deal to be on that show, so the pressure was on... I gather you don't like it, but that's a separate question.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Anon
    @Jonathan Mason


    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.
     
    She made a big splash before she even released a record. I remember it well, because it was right after the big earthquake here in Japan, and among Twitter exchanges about tsunamis and microsieverts and the like among us expats, the music critic for the Japan Times posted links to her first YouTube release, which was "Video Games," this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE6wxDqdOV0

    She quickly followed up with "Blue Jeans," which was even better, and was promptly signed to a label:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhnHpq3BDHw

    All I can say is that it was different and very atmospheric, and I and many others loved it. Tastes differ. At any rate, successful people tend to polarize, some love 'em, some hate 'em. Can't really think of anything of any quality that is universally loved.

    The Letterman appearance was panned because "she didn't move." All I could think of was Marianne Faithful "not moving," or [fill in the blank seductive French ye-ye girl] "not moving" (and no, I'm not that old, but I know my pop music history).

  88. anon[151] • Disclaimer says:

    Reading the positive boomercomments regarding this trash is very eye-opening. I grasped it intuitively but didn’t realize how absolutely boring you guys are when it gets down to brass tacks.

    Not every somewhat reasonable white person in pop culture needs to be simped or celebrated as an icon of bravery of love. Jesus fucking Christ.

  89. O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don’t do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @ScarletNumber


    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One.
     
    I, for one, think Chevy Chase's Joe Biden routine is awesome...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bvxZgCryUE
    , @Mr. Anon
    @ScarletNumber


    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One.
     
    When he assumed office, they told Joe that the little thing they gave him contained his passcodes for the Nuclear Football. But really it's just a Life Alert monitor.
    , @Muggles
    @ScarletNumber


    If they don’t do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.
     
    SNL? Yes, the "fix" has been in for a very long time. Decades.
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @ScarletNumber

    If SNL doesn't bring back Chevy Chase to reprise his clumsy, stumbling President act, then you know the fix is in. (On the other hand, as Muggles points out, at SNL, the fix has been in for decades.)

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @Colin Wright
    @ScarletNumber

    'If they don’t do a sketch...'

    Wake me up if they do.

  90. anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai
    The true test of Steve's influence will be if this post triggers the music press to start a campaign against her that gets picked up by the MSM.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Steve’s influence is limited to lucky happenstance because Tucker Carlson’s show has become the most popular news show and the main people responsible for the content of the show are regular readers of this blog. Tucker, Mark Steyn, and the former top writer who Tucker fired are readers.

  91. @Thomas

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.
     
    As she sort of humblebrag acknowledged in that little Instagram tiff she had last year, Lana has got a fairly wide open lane for her shtick since the median point of performative femininity in music today has settled somewhere between Billie Eilish's schizoid asexuality and "WAP." There's an unmet demand for a woman who is actually reasonably pleasant to look at singing songs that are reasonably pleasant to listen to. Props to her for coming out of her attempted canceling last year though by refusing to back down or apologize. Props also to her for her productivity over the last decade. I appreciate musicians who can keep working consistently rather than getting burned out and/or lazy with success.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @AShartIsBorn, @YetAnotherAnon

    “Billie Eilish’s schizoid asexuality”

    If The Paper Of Record is correct, Billie has been hiding her lights under a bushel.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Billie also seems to have a weird incest vibe thing going on with her creepy older brother, who wrote lyrics for her in which she says she’s a “might seduce your dad type” (she was 17 at the time). In addition, his current girlfriend looks disturbingly like her.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  92. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Arclight


    ... a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy...
     
    It is this commenter's conclusion that envy is the root of most of our problems.

    Think about it.

    Immigration: People who envy us come here any way they can. Business and politics facilitates this because it means cheap labor and votes.

    Current Day Marxism (Call it whatever you will): Envy is the wedge that allows you to drive yourself between people that would normally be fellow Americans. That's right, we were "fellows" working it all out, before you ever were able to dig your fucking, Bolshevik claws into us!

    Envy.

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong...

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Neuday, @Peterike

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Yeah, that’s why Western Christianity considered Envy one of the seven deadly sins. Now that the Christian church has been so fully infiltrated and subverted by (((the enemies of Christianity))), it’s no wonder stoking envy is the primary tool of members of the synagogue of Satan.

    From wikipedia:
    According to St. Thomas Aquinas, the struggle aroused by envy has three stages: during the first stage, the envious person attempts to lower another’s reputation; in the middle stage, the envious person receives either “joy at another’s misfortune” (if he succeeds in defaming the other person) or “grief at another’s prosper
    In accordance with the most widely accepted views, only pride weighs down the soul more than envy among the capital sins. Just like pride, envy has been associated directly with the devil, for Wisdom 2:24 states: “the envy of the devil brought death to the world”

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Neuday

    Something the devil does is not necessarily a part of him - not even necessarily something that originated in him. - I think of Jesus now who became human and - therefore had to die at the cross.

    - The best devil-analyst I've come across so far in Western thinking is Nuremberg 19th century philosopher Johann Benjamin Erhard. Erhard wrote a sparkling essay about the devil in order to defend him. But his argument is rather sublime. Freedom - in order to be possible, craves for the contrasting = dark 'n' sinful - sphere. So - respect the devil for showing you (for impersonating for you) a principle that is unsustainable in itself: Namely: Being absolutely evil.

    Id est: There is a somehow demonstrative quality to the devil which can only be negated by ignoring the basic human capacity: To be free (by God's will) to decide which way to choose.

    I have not come across an essay yet on how these thoughts - spring from (or are rooted in) medieval thinking (the struggle between realists and nominalists - I might want to write it someday)). Your hint at Thomas von Aquinas is quite telling in this context.
    And this idea of him too:

    "So that the saints may better please the bliss and thank God even more for it, they may fully see the punishments of the wicked."

    Thomas von Aquin, Scriptum Super Sententiis lib. 4 d. 50 q. 2a. 4 qc. 1 co. - This is the proto-version of Erhard's above-mentioned essay.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

  93. TGGP says: • Website
    @Dumbo

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman.
     
    "Del Rey", isn't that hispanic? :D

    Anyway, it's a silly idea that "beautiful straight white women" are somehow under attack (except occasionally by blacks or other non-white rapists).

    They are still the top prize/higher status, and they know it.

    (The "Karen" slur is only against middle-aged or less attractive women)

    The hate is strictly against poor or low-status white males. And, unfortunately, still with support of many of those "beautiful straight white American" women.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross, @Charles St. Charles, @slumber_j, @TGGP

    Yeah, she was initially derided as a phony for renaming herself after her first album (under her real name) didn’t make an impact. But the “poptimists” killed off the concern with authenticity associated with “rockism”. As a die-hard rockist, I will not give an inch to Del Rey.
    https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/10/30/20853231/lana-del-rey-authenticity-career-norman-fucking-rockwell
    The end of that article states that Billie Eilish is similar, but Eilish actually does fit the rockist mold of authenticity surprisingly well for a zoomer whose work is in a different genre. Siblings writing & recording their own music at home and uploading it to SoundCloud without any record company input is what the Wright brothers of NoMeansNo would have done if SoundCloud had existed in 1980.

    • Replies: @AShartIsBorn
    @TGGP

    You fell for the Billie Eilish marketing pitch, I see.

  94. @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.

    If you are going to sing songs in live performance that are heavy on 'meaningful' lyrics, then you need to learn to sing in a way with enhanced diction in which your listeners can understand the words at the first time of asking. This requires a tremendous amount of practice and rehearsing. See below.

    https://youtu.be/xrKBCuCxGyo

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Anon

    David Letterman is mistaken there: Born to Die is her second album, although the first one had some kind of weird abortive distribution issue. But she was already very Internet-famous before she appeared on his show.

    A lot of famously lyric-heavy singers are way less precise in the diction department than Lana Del Rey: Tom Petty and Bob Dylan come to mind. In any case I think it highly unlikely that she stinted on rehearsal for that appearance as you imply. It’s a stylized delivery over unusual instrumentation that’s a departure from the studio recording, and I the whole thing strikes me as pretty carefully considered. And as you suggest, it was a really big deal to be on that show, so the pressure was on… I gather you don’t like it, but that’s a separate question.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    Mick Jagger comes to mind. I happen to think he is great, and there are still things he has sung that I'm not sure of. Jonathan Mason is mistaken. Your video selection is wonderful, and I enjoyed it. Thank you.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  95. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    Wow, that's a mouthful, but probably right.

    Here is Grimes, Earth's #1 SpaceWife herself, summing up women in one, concise statement (just because I want to post a music video):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG_4vJ4qNA

    Replies: @anon, @Mr. Anon, @The Wild Geese Howard

    “We appreciate power”. Is that statement about women, or the billionaire class into which “Grimes” has grafted herself. And, honestly, for all the money Musk has, couldn’t he have found himself a better looking squeeze? She’s ugly.

    Lana Del Rey is pretty, or at least she was before the tattoos and collagen injections. Yes, she was pretty – like a lot of the girls who get used up and spit out by the pop music industry, which has become increasingly perverse and evil. It’s only real purpose anymore is to serve as a funnel with which to force-feed filth to America’s youth.

  96. They are CONTRAILS not “chemtrails.” Water vapor. She has apparently drunk deeply the Green New Deal kool-aid.

  97. She changed her name from something incredibly WASP to something Hispanic. So isn’t she part of the Flight from White? Or is that meant to be ironic or meta?

  98. (Q) How do you know that someone is a Philosophy major?

    (A) They’ll tell you.

    When the book-burners begin to cancel the ancient academics, our credentialed philosophers need to rise in strong opposition.

  99. @slumber_j
    @Jonathan Mason

    David Letterman is mistaken there: Born to Die is her second album, although the first one had some kind of weird abortive distribution issue. But she was already very Internet-famous before she appeared on his show.

    A lot of famously lyric-heavy singers are way less precise in the diction department than Lana Del Rey: Tom Petty and Bob Dylan come to mind. In any case I think it highly unlikely that she stinted on rehearsal for that appearance as you imply. It's a stylized delivery over unusual instrumentation that's a departure from the studio recording, and I the whole thing strikes me as pretty carefully considered. And as you suggest, it was a really big deal to be on that show, so the pressure was on... I gather you don't like it, but that's a separate question.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Mick Jagger comes to mind. I happen to think he is great, and there are still things he has sung that I’m not sure of. Jonathan Mason is mistaken. Your video selection is wonderful, and I enjoyed it. Thank you.

    • Thanks: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    Incidentally Jagger's father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50's. Mick Jagger's first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father's TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    I am predominantly a jazz fan, minors in blues, reggae, church music, and stage and screen musicals, so Lana del Rey is not really my cup of tea. From the little I have heard her of her, she does not seem to be musically interesting, nor does she have anything particular inspiring to say. But then I am not a fan of Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen either. This lady is more my cup of tea..

    https://youtu.be/2Gn9A-kdsRo

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk, @R.G. Camara

  100. Steve Sailer:

    “Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.”

    Anthony Fantano, the internet’s busiest music nerd, actually likes Lana’s music quite a lot, and he is a hardcore liberal. See

    The criticism on Lana is not so much that she is a white or straight, but that she sings mostly about men, and often not in a condemning tone. If she sang about how oppressive and piggish men are, then there wouldn’t be a problem. The problem is that she sings about how she loves men, and how femininity is all about the chase of a man worth chasing. *That* is what pisses not only feminists, but all liberals and left-leaning people about her,

    The big theme of Lana’s music is that the biggest thrill of femininity is to chase a man that you are in love with while he ignores you, and conquering his attention and affection. Needless to say, this pisses the Woke crowd to no end. Fantano also gave her last album a very positive review of an 8 out of 10:

    On the other hand, Fantano despises Eminem, who is a liberal like him, because of Eminem’s atrocious treatment of critics. Evrybody remembers the emotional implosion Anthony had after Eminem dissed him in a feature he did. This is also reflected in his scores. He gave Em’s last record MTBMB a 4, while most other critics gave it 7-8.

    • Replies: @Prosa123
    @Rockford Tyson

    So you call Anthony Fantano by his last name because he's a man but Lana Del Rey by her first name because she's a woman. That utterly disgusts me.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

  101. @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    Pro tip: if your wife is listening to the Born to Die album on repeat divorce is incoming.

    • LOL: Cato
  102. I had not heard any song of LDR until last summer and it was her record before this, Norman Fucking Rockwell. I am long out of the pop music game, decades since I discovered “a new band” – but that last album was one of the finest I ever heard. It is really, really good.

    Then this shows up on iSteve.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Cowboy Shaw
    @Hodag

    Agree. I was just listening to NFR two weeks ago when I realised just how good it was and have been raving to otherwise nonplussed fellow middle aged men, then this thread turns up. She is definitely on to something. A lament for a world in which everything doesn't completely suck I guess.

  103. anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber
    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don't do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Mr. Anon, @Muggles, @Gary in Gramercy, @Colin Wright

    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One.

    I, for one, think Chevy Chase’s Joe Biden routine is awesome…

  104. Ages of the six “girls” who died in the Atlanta massage parlor shootings: 44, 49, 51, 63, 69, 74.

    • Replies: @Jasper Been
    @prosa123

    Wow. Who would want..... ehhhh.

  105. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    Here are a few of her earlier songs I really like:

    This one has been widely covered on YouTube:

    Here’s Miley Cyrus doing the song:

    • Thanks: Cato
  106. @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you, Steve, for sharing this music.

    This commenter would not have known about it otherwise. Just the album title, Chemtrails Over the Country Club, is enough to show wit. This is good stuff.

    God bless smart women who also happen to be aesthetically gifted. They're out there, boys! I will get this for my wife, as a belated International Women's Day gift. (That's a big deal where she came from.)

    And here's to Elon Musk and Grimes, BTW. Say what you will...

    Replies: @AShartIsBorn, @Bill P

    Smart, highly creative women are not usually very easy to handle. Guys who want a house in the suburbs, kids and a dog should probably avoid them in favor of “common-sense” women.

    But some of us can’t help ourselves.

    • LOL: mc23
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Bill P

    One of those was the big mistake of my life.

  107. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Thoughts


    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing.
     
    I gave them both a listen, Thoughts. It might be good music to fall asleep to, but I prefer Grateful Dead space jams and long versions of Dark Star for that. It could grow on me, but I gave them each 2 minutes.

    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That's the alternative right now, apparently. I don't expect Kasey Kasem to come on the radio this Sunday to introduce the next CCR or Led Zeppelin...

    ... or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhSjwU8gEsI

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius

    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That’s the alternative right now, apparently…

    … or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:

    Sayer, ABBA, the Guess Who, and even David Bowie and Frank Zappa figured out that there was a market for non-disco alternatives for those who wanted dance music. (That two of those songs are titled “Dancin’ Fool” suggests the effort wasn’t entirely serious.)

    Blondie, on the other hand, was a non-disco act that made a better disco record than almost anyone else.

    • Agree: hhsiii
    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Reg Cæsar

    Other non-disco acts who released songs with “dance” in the title in the late seventies:
    Van Halen, “Dance the Night Away” (1979);
    Nils Lofgren, “I Came to Dance” (1977);
    The Ramones, “Do You Wanna Dance?” (1977).

  108. @TGGP
    @Dumbo

    Yeah, she was initially derided as a phony for renaming herself after her first album (under her real name) didn't make an impact. But the "poptimists" killed off the concern with authenticity associated with "rockism". As a die-hard rockist, I will not give an inch to Del Rey.
    https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/10/30/20853231/lana-del-rey-authenticity-career-norman-fucking-rockwell
    The end of that article states that Billie Eilish is similar, but Eilish actually does fit the rockist mold of authenticity surprisingly well for a zoomer whose work is in a different genre. Siblings writing & recording their own music at home and uploading it to SoundCloud without any record company input is what the Wright brothers of NoMeansNo would have done if SoundCloud had existed in 1980.

    Replies: @AShartIsBorn

    You fell for the Billie Eilish marketing pitch, I see.

  109. @ScarletNumber
    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don't do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Mr. Anon, @Muggles, @Gary in Gramercy, @Colin Wright

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One.

    When he assumed office, they told Joe that the little thing they gave him contained his passcodes for the Nuclear Football. But really it’s just a Life Alert monitor.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  110. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j

    Mick Jagger comes to mind. I happen to think he is great, and there are still things he has sung that I'm not sure of. Jonathan Mason is mistaken. Your video selection is wonderful, and I enjoyed it. Thank you.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    I am predominantly a jazz fan, minors in blues, reggae, church music, and stage and screen musicals, so Lana del Rey is not really my cup of tea. From the little I have heard her of her, she does not seem to be musically interesting, nor does she have anything particular inspiring to say. But then I am not a fan of Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen either. This lady is more my cup of tea..

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.
     
    After biting off part of his tongue. Oh, and...


    https://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-mick-jagger-s-lips-so-big-black-people-be-going-you-got-some-big-ass-lips-eddie-murphy-82-74-82.jpg
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason


    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show...
     
    Yes, yes, J.M., I have known this for a very long time. So have millions of other fans.

    One reason Mick has stayed in such good shape is because he has maintained his physical fitness program his entire life. I knew, through business, a man who worked with him on concerts in the New York area, and he told me the man was electric, not an ounce of fat on him, extremely charismatic and very smart and involved in the business.

    You may be trying to diminish him with your comment, but I actually hold him in higher regard.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Jonathan Mason


    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..
     
    As I've written before, Jagger's entire persona has been one big long con. He's an ugly middle-class LSE nerd who realized that if he became a rock star and made sure his band showed up to gigs he could not only make zillions but also bang hot tail forever despite being an ugly dork. So he faked being an uber-cool, tough, rebellious dude and sang songs like one and the rest is history.

    Kudos to him for making the front work so long----and better than his friend, David Bowie, who's 5-7 year shifts in persona were, while interesting and attention-grabbing, so obviously marketing ploys in retrospect it makes all of his work seem cheaper.

    Replies: @black sea

  111. Yeah, I had a little crush on her too, Steve. Ain’t no shame. Her music strikes me as very good, but redundant. I do love her attitude, though. One of my favorite Lana moments came when she told world-renowned crazy shit-talker Azealia Banks to STF or she’d kick her ass.

    Banks won the actual argument, but gangsta-Lana won the exchange. Pretty funny:

    https://people.com/music/azealia-banks-lana-del-rey-get-into-heated-twitter-feud/

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @JimDandy

    "crazy shit-talker Azealia Banks ... gangsta-Lana won"

    I prefer the Gore Vidal-Norman Mailer kerfuffle. Mailer was a supreme writer but a massive dick. Gore's the guy I'd have lunch with though I'd decline the invitation to spend the weekend at his house in Ravello.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  112. Blondie, on the other hand, was a non-disco act that made a better disco record than almost anyone else.

    And the Rolling Stones “Miss You” was better than what the real disco outfits put out. Lots more listenable. It is still played at all Stones concerts.

    • Disagree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Arthur Biggs
    @Clyde

    Only boomers think the Rolling Stones were any good past 1972.

  113. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thomas

    Wow, that's a mouthful, but probably right.

    Here is Grimes, Earth's #1 SpaceWife herself, summing up women in one, concise statement (just because I want to post a music video):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG_4vJ4qNA

    Replies: @anon, @Mr. Anon, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Heh, Grimes is definitely living true to the title of this song.

  114. OT iSteve bait:

    Colleges Dump The SAT; The New Admission Standard Is ‘Intellectual Curiosity’

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/colleges-dump-sat-new-admission-standard-intellectual-curiosity

    Remind me not to drive on any bridges these grads build.

  115. @ScarletNumber
    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don't do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Mr. Anon, @Muggles, @Gary in Gramercy, @Colin Wright

    If they don’t do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    SNL? Yes, the “fix” has been in for a very long time. Decades.

  116. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    Incidentally Jagger's father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50's. Mick Jagger's first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father's TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    I am predominantly a jazz fan, minors in blues, reggae, church music, and stage and screen musicals, so Lana del Rey is not really my cup of tea. From the little I have heard her of her, she does not seem to be musically interesting, nor does she have anything particular inspiring to say. But then I am not a fan of Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen either. This lady is more my cup of tea..

    https://youtu.be/2Gn9A-kdsRo

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk, @R.G. Camara

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    After biting off part of his tongue. Oh, and…

  117. @ScarletNumber
    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don't do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Mr. Anon, @Muggles, @Gary in Gramercy, @Colin Wright

    If SNL doesn’t bring back Chevy Chase to reprise his clumsy, stumbling President act, then you know the fix is in. (On the other hand, as Muggles points out, at SNL, the fix has been in for decades.)

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Amazingly the president is only less than a year older than Chevy.

  118. I’ve been a fan since the very clever and twisted and seductive National Anthem in 2012:

  119. Lana Del Rey’s music has “massive hooks”?

    Could be, but for me the definition of “hooks” will always be Talking Heads.

  120. Former girlfriend of Sean ‘Sticks’ Larkin of Live PD fame and the Tulsa OK Police Department.

  121. @prosa123
    Ages of the six "girls" who died in the Atlanta massage parlor shootings: 44, 49, 51, 63, 69, 74.

    Replies: @Jasper Been

    Wow. Who would want….. ehhhh.

  122. I’ll tell you what.

  123. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college)

    She should explore collaboration with those other philosophy majors, Ethan Coen and Steve Martin.

    a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart… and aesthetically gifted…

    Another of those is the Manitoba-born (she can’t run for president), Rapid City-reared Haley (Bonar) McCallum, who changed her name to avoid the inevitable jokes. South Dakota’s top popular music act, according to some social-media count, is still Shawn Colvin after all these years, so Haley has something to shoot for. (Shawn’s brother Geoff‘s books might be of interest to some iStevers.)

    I can’t speak for Haley’s (or Lana’s) œuvre in general, but she can write a crack children’s song:

  124. @Pat Hannagan
    P J Harvey trumps Lana Del Rey in her contretemps

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lS5jTedHBg

    I prefer the latter to the former

    Replies: @Zoos

    P J Harvey trumps Lana Del Rey in her contretemps

    PJ Harvey made a career out of singing about vaginal itch.

  125. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That’s the alternative right now, apparently...

    … or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:
     

    Sayer, ABBA, the Guess Who, and even David Bowie and Frank Zappa figured out that there was a market for non-disco alternatives for those who wanted dance music. (That two of those songs are titled "Dancin' Fool" suggests the effort wasn't entirely serious.)

    Blondie, on the other hand, was a non-disco act that made a better disco record than almost anyone else.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    Other non-disco acts who released songs with “dance” in the title in the late seventies:
    Van Halen, “Dance the Night Away” (1979);
    Nils Lofgren, “I Came to Dance” (1977);
    The Ramones, “Do You Wanna Dance?” (1977).

  126. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    Incidentally Jagger's father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50's. Mick Jagger's first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father's TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    I am predominantly a jazz fan, minors in blues, reggae, church music, and stage and screen musicals, so Lana del Rey is not really my cup of tea. From the little I have heard her of her, she does not seem to be musically interesting, nor does she have anything particular inspiring to say. But then I am not a fan of Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen either. This lady is more my cup of tea..

    https://youtu.be/2Gn9A-kdsRo

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk, @R.G. Camara

    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show…

    Yes, yes, J.M., I have known this for a very long time. So have millions of other fans.

    One reason Mick has stayed in such good shape is because he has maintained his physical fitness program his entire life. I knew, through business, a man who worked with him on concerts in the New York area, and he told me the man was electric, not an ounce of fat on him, extremely charismatic and very smart and involved in the business.

    You may be trying to diminish him with your comment, but I actually hold him in higher regard.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No, I wouldn't want to diminish Mick Jagger. I'm just pointing out that there was a lot of hard work and discipline behind his success, and that the rebellious front is a little bit misleading.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  127. @Old and Grumpy
    My ears are old, and I can't understand a word she is singing. Still I give her major kudos for bringing attention to chemtrails. The best thing about the pandemic was the sky was free from planes of all stripes, but especially the chemtrail spewing ones. The sunrises and sunsets were gorgeous, and it seems the sky is still blue. Now we have diapered Joe at the helm, and America is back. Now my sky looks like dusty white crap. So go for it Lana.

    Replies: @Keypusher

    Uh, where do you live? LaGuardia Terminal B?

  128. Lana del Rey sucks

  129. @HammerJack
    New World Happiness Ratings are out. There's some kind of pattern here but danged if I can figure it out.


    https://i.ibb.co/zrr0Fxh/Screenshot-20210319-093304-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Finland is world's happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list
    https://mol.im/a/9379935 [Daily Mail]

    Replies: @tyrone, @Muggles, @Yngvar

    OOPS!…Taiwan is about to fall off the list ,president potato sold it for a box of cracker jacks

  130. @Thoughts
    She was so smart that she messed up her face (and as of recently got fat)

    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @El Dato, @Verymuchalive, @BenKenobi, @Anon, @Dave Pinsen

    Great tweet by the former “Dems R Real Racists” after the thick pic of Lana came out.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Dave Pinsen

    It reminds me of people who make elaborate statistical analyses of - mud-wrestling. - I mean. Ok. It might be fun somehow. Maybe even more fun if you're heavily into statistics than it would be if you'd be very interested in mud-wrestling. But anyhow: It is still mud-wrestling. Oh - and here it's PoP, PoP too, of course! I think I get that. Ok. I don't say the tweet is not fun. I don't; I don't.

  131. @Neuday
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.
     
    Yeah, that's why Western Christianity considered Envy one of the seven deadly sins. Now that the Christian church has been so fully infiltrated and subverted by (((the enemies of Christianity))), it's no wonder stoking envy is the primary tool of members of the synagogue of Satan.

    From wikipedia:
    According to St. Thomas Aquinas, the struggle aroused by envy has three stages: during the first stage, the envious person attempts to lower another's reputation; in the middle stage, the envious person receives either "joy at another's misfortune" (if he succeeds in defaming the other person) or "grief at another's prosper
    In accordance with the most widely accepted views, only pride weighs down the soul more than envy among the capital sins. Just like pride, envy has been associated directly with the devil, for Wisdom 2:24 states: "the envy of the devil brought death to the world"

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Something the devil does is not necessarily a part of him – not even necessarily something that originated in him. – I think of Jesus now who became human and – therefore had to die at the cross.

    – The best devil-analyst I’ve come across so far in Western thinking is Nuremberg 19th century philosopher Johann Benjamin Erhard. Erhard wrote a sparkling essay about the devil in order to defend him. But his argument is rather sublime. Freedom – in order to be possible, craves for the contrasting = dark ‘n’ sinful – sphere. So – respect the devil for showing you (for impersonating for you) a principle that is unsustainable in itself: Namely: Being absolutely evil.

    Id est: There is a somehow demonstrative quality to the devil which can only be negated by ignoring the basic human capacity: To be free (by God’s will) to decide which way to choose.

    I have not come across an essay yet on how these thoughts – spring from (or are rooted in) medieval thinking (the struggle between realists and nominalists – I might want to write it someday)). Your hint at Thomas von Aquinas is quite telling in this context.
    And this idea of him too:

    “So that the saints may better please the bliss and thank God even more for it, they may fully see the punishments of the wicked.”

    Thomas von Aquin, Scriptum Super Sententiis lib. 4 d. 50 q. 2a. 4 qc. 1 co. – This is the proto-version of Erhard’s above-mentioned essay.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Dieter Kief

    "I think of Jesus now who became human and ... therefore had to die [on] the cross"

    What kind of god would do that to his son? I believe he goes by the name Yahweh the psychopath.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

  132. No time to scroll through the comments, but I’m sure you’ve been hit with multiple “ya know she said ___”; “ya know she’s associated with Harvey Weinsten right?”, etc ad nauseum.

    I’ve decided the reason the right can’t win is everyone is exacting and comprehensive, whereas the monstrous coalition of the left can agree on one Big Thing, which is taking down everything. They’ll do their sorting out after they’ve leveled the ground.

  133. @HammerJack
    New World Happiness Ratings are out. There's some kind of pattern here but danged if I can figure it out.


    https://i.ibb.co/zrr0Fxh/Screenshot-20210319-093304-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Finland is world's happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list
    https://mol.im/a/9379935 [Daily Mail]

    Replies: @tyrone, @Muggles, @Yngvar

    Finland is world’s happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list

    One of the characteristics of Finland, it is claimed, is that the people there are very reserved and depressed.

    Some claim it is due to the high northern latitude, horrible winter darkness.

    So they boil themselves in scalding water (sauna) and drink a lot (but it’s heavily taxed!).

    The hate the Russians but rarely say that publicly. Not crazy about Swedes either.

    The Finnish restaurant craze never caught on. Reindeer tastes too much like venison.

    Finns settled in northern Upper Peninsula Michigan, parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin. Many were actual communists for a time, perhaps due to the influence of Russians who controlled their former country for a long time.

    I have never heard of the “happy Finn” though I was raised with a lot of Scandinavians (who aren’t Finnish by ethicity). I think this survey result is a result of Finns playing a joke on the survey takers.

    “They always say we are gloomy and sad, this will teach them!”

  134. @EdwardM
    If I am sucked in (first Drudge, now Steve) and want to obtain this product (is it still known as an "album"?), how do I get it? Do they sell CDs these days? Serious question. I don't have Spotify or Shopify or iTunes or whatever.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Achmed E. Newman

    CDs are easily obtained via Barnes & Noble, Amazon (boo!) and some local music stores (depending on area). Many other sellers on the web too.

    Or were you just gaslighting us?

  135. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    “Del Rey”, isn’t that hispanic?

    It's Southern California 1920s glamor.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat, @Anonymous, @AndrewR, @Killexia, @Nodwink, @Jonathan Mason, @Dave Pinsen

    “I believe in the country America used to be”

  136. @Dave Pinsen
    @Thoughts

    Great tweet by the former "Dems R Real Racists" after the thick pic of Lana came out.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1366573256321495043?s=20

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    It reminds me of people who make elaborate statistical analyses of – mud-wrestling. – I mean. Ok. It might be fun somehow. Maybe even more fun if you’re heavily into statistics than it would be if you’d be very interested in mud-wrestling. But anyhow: It is still mud-wrestling. Oh – and here it’s PoP, PoP too, of course! I think I get that. Ok. I don’t say the tweet is not fun. I don’t; I don’t.

  137. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Arclight


    ... a lot (most) of the current woke hatred is just envy...
     
    It is this commenter's conclusion that envy is the root of most of our problems.

    Think about it.

    Immigration: People who envy us come here any way they can. Business and politics facilitates this because it means cheap labor and votes.

    Current Day Marxism (Call it whatever you will): Envy is the wedge that allows you to drive yourself between people that would normally be fellow Americans. That's right, we were "fellows" working it all out, before you ever were able to dig your fucking, Bolshevik claws into us!

    Envy.

    Envy is destroying Civilization. It is the biggest reason Earth will become a fucking beehive of Asian bugmen with no thoughts whatsoever.

    Of course, I could be completely wrong...

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Neuday, @Peterike

    “ Envy is destroying Civilization.”

    You might enjoy this:

  138. @Ron Mexico
    How many children does she have? Oh, zero. Not much of a white woman.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    Hard to argue with this.

  139. @Thoughts
    Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she's 'gotten away with it'

    You can't listen to her for a long time without wanting to off yourself and give up on life---the music video that made her famous is her being killed in car crash.

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase 'He was a philosophy major' as if that meant he was like...smart or something.

    He was very smart. But I still thought it was weird.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase ‘He was a philosophy major’ as if that meant he was like…smart or something.

    I heard a comedian say he was a philosophy major but when he graduated he found out the philosophy corporations weren’t hiring.

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Harry Baldwin


    I heard a comedian say he was a philosophy major but when he graduated he found out the philosophy corporations weren’t hiring.

     

    They don't even exist, these companies, haha. But that does not necessarily mean that they'd not be hiring. Hahahaha. On the other hand, it might sound quite reasonable, that a non-existing company could well not hire somebody because you don't have to really exist to be able to not hire somebody. For example: Whether you don't hire somebody in reality or in virtual reality has the same consequences: Nil. You can't effectively fire somebody though unless you have an existing company. Here we are on solid ground. - I guess.
  140. @EdwardM
    If I am sucked in (first Drudge, now Steve) and want to obtain this product (is it still known as an "album"?), how do I get it? Do they sell CDs these days? Serious question. I don't have Spotify or Shopify or iTunes or whatever.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Achmed E. Newman

    Just keep reloading this page and mashing that triangle in the middle of her picture. Do you know where the F5 key is, old man?

    ;-}

  141. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Del Rey means 'of the King'. In Spanish it is a typical hotel name.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m gonna speak for our blogger here, Jonathan:

    I know that!

    He lives in Los Angeles, you know? Marina del Rey has something like 4,500 boat slips. Then there’s Playa del Rey. Then there’s the El Camino Real, “The King’s Highway”, which seems to go all over California. No, it’s not named after one of the coolest Chevies ever made (competitor to the Ford Ranchero, and IMO the Subaru Brat – even cooler because it had those 2 seats in the back).

    California is full of Spanish names, and if you live there long enough, you figure a few words out.

  142. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    “Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.”

    Anthony Fantano, the internet’s busiest music nerd, actually likes Lana’s music quite a lot, and he is a hardcore liberal. See https://youtu.be/KJjINv39qHY

    The criticism on Lana is not so much that she is a white or straight, but that she sings mostly about men, and often not in a condemning tone. If she sang about how oppressive and piggish men are, then there wouldn’t be a problem. The problem is that she sings about how she loves men, and how femininity is all about the chase of a man worth chasing. *That* is what pisses not only feminists, but all liberals and left-leaning people about her,

    The big theme of Lana’s music is that the biggest thrill of femininity is to chase a man that you are in love with while he ignores you, and conquering his attention and affection. Needless to say, this pisses the Woke crowd to no end. Fantano also gave her last album a very positive review of an 8 out of 10: https://youtu.be/9fewwAkSrCw

    On the other hand, Fantano despises Eminem, who is a liberal like him, because of Eminem’s atrocious treatment of critics. Evrybody remembers the emotional implosion Anthony had after Eminem dissed him in a feature he did. This is also reflected in his scores. He gave Em’s last record MTBMB a 4, while most other critics gave it 7-8. https://youtu.be/FhUHk4DecOg

    Replies: @Prosa123

    So you call Anthony Fantano by his last name because he’s a man but Lana Del Rey by her first name because she’s a woman. That utterly disgusts me.

    • Replies: @Rockford Tyson
    @Prosa123

    Cam't tell if troll or not. I mean, with how insane things are today, you might actually be serious with this comment.

    Replies: @Prosa123

  143. Nowhere near as good as Vitas:

  144. Anon[564] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.

    If you are going to sing songs in live performance that are heavy on 'meaningful' lyrics, then you need to learn to sing in a way with enhanced diction in which your listeners can understand the words at the first time of asking. This requires a tremendous amount of practice and rehearsing. See below.

    https://youtu.be/xrKBCuCxGyo

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Anon

    She must be extremely well connected if she gets to perform a song from her very first album on the David Letterman show.

    She made a big splash before she even released a record. I remember it well, because it was right after the big earthquake here in Japan, and among Twitter exchanges about tsunamis and microsieverts and the like among us expats, the music critic for the Japan Times posted links to her first YouTube release, which was “Video Games,” this:

    She quickly followed up with “Blue Jeans,” which was even better, and was promptly signed to a label:

    All I can say is that it was different and very atmospheric, and I and many others loved it. Tastes differ. At any rate, successful people tend to polarize, some love ’em, some hate ’em. Can’t really think of anything of any quality that is universally loved.

    The Letterman appearance was panned because “she didn’t move.” All I could think of was Marianne Faithful “not moving,” or [fill in the blank seductive French ye-ye girl] “not moving” (and no, I’m not that old, but I know my pop music history).

  145. @Gary in Gramercy
    @ScarletNumber

    If SNL doesn't bring back Chevy Chase to reprise his clumsy, stumbling President act, then you know the fix is in. (On the other hand, as Muggles points out, at SNL, the fix has been in for decades.)

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Amazingly the president is only less than a year older than Chevy.

  146. According to the my sources, the ADL is troubled by Del Rey’s problematic references to country clubs.

  147. Her philosophy BA may be real, but her boobs are still fake

  148. @Harry Baldwin
    @Thoughts

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase ‘He was a philosophy major’ as if that meant he was like…smart or something.

    I heard a comedian say he was a philosophy major but when he graduated he found out the philosophy corporations weren't hiring.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I heard a comedian say he was a philosophy major but when he graduated he found out the philosophy corporations weren’t hiring.

    They don’t even exist, these companies, haha. But that does not necessarily mean that they’d not be hiring. Hahahaha. On the other hand, it might sound quite reasonable, that a non-existing company could well not hire somebody because you don’t have to really exist to be able to not hire somebody. For example: Whether you don’t hire somebody in reality or in virtual reality has the same consequences: Nil. You can’t effectively fire somebody though unless you have an existing company. Here we are on solid ground. – I guess.

  149. Pelagaya (with help from Elmira Kalimullina, Maria Goya and Anri Gogniashvili) kicks her butt big-time.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
  150. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Thomas

    "Billie Eilish’s schizoid asexuality"

    If The Paper Of Record is correct, Billie has been hiding her lights under a bushel.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/03/17/18/40597756-9373075-_Pinch_me_The_other_big_change_for_Billie_was_that_fact_that_she-a-8_1616004310662.jpg

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    Billie also seems to have a weird incest vibe thing going on with her creepy older brother, who wrote lyrics for her in which she says she’s a “might seduce your dad type” (she was 17 at the time). In addition, his current girlfriend looks disturbingly like her.

    • Disagree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Eh, the tubby Ellish let it slip once that her "might seduce your dad" comment, her lyrics, and her overall persona are just an artificial front to sell her songs to emo teen girls and "sensitive" teen boys and maybe some older folks who like that sort of thing. Her brother wrote lyrics for her because, well, she really isn't the "seduce your dad" type or all that mysterious, just a plain faced gal with a good voice who needed some better, more seductive lyrics.

    And Ellish's entire "I cover my body to fight objectification of women" nonsense is merely because she's a bit hefty and physically underwhelming for a female teen pop star and, unlike that chick who sang the "body positive" "All About the Bass" a few years ago or the gargantuan monster Lizzo, she doesn't want to get pigeonholed as the fat pop chick. SO she wears loose, covering clothes to keep her heft hidden.

  151. @RichardTaylor
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.

    She supported Obama and criticized those who liked Trump. I'm afraid she's the standard old type of White liberal who lives in a protected enclave and has no loyalty to other Whites.

    (It'll take hours to days for this comment to be approved so we can make room for ducks and anagrams. But my point is, why are we idolizing those who work against just us because they look really White? It's like Southerners who love Lindsey Graham due to his darling accent)

    Replies: @slumber_j

    I don’t know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.

    I don’t think of her as a symbol. Can we PLEASE stop objectifying womyn?

    Kidding. Anyway, Litchfield Co. went for Trump in 2016. You’re right about the fancy New Yorkers up there, but the working people are pretty solid.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    @slumber_j

    Hahaha, but what great objects the womynfolk make. I wonder if we brought back some old fashioned "women are beautiful look at their curves" in the safe White way that used to exist, we might get girls to stop wanting to transition.

    If you're only avenues are "womyn are weak versions of men" or to be a cheap hoochie twerking for gangtas, it might make life hard for an awkward girl.

    And yeah, there are tons of solid people in the New York area, especially the rural parts, and especially among the working class.

  152. @Thoughts
    Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she's 'gotten away with it'

    You can't listen to her for a long time without wanting to off yourself and give up on life---the music video that made her famous is her being killed in car crash.

    I had a professor who introduced me to a fellow grad student with the phrase 'He was a philosophy major' as if that meant he was like...smart or something.

    He was very smart. But I still thought it was weird.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @Harry Baldwin, @BB753

    “Lana Del Rey is classic suicide music, which explains a bit more of why she’s ‘gotten away with it’”

    Suicide music for boomers, which is a weird niche, if I may say so.

  153. @Anonymous
    I'm familiar with the name, but have never actually heard a Lana Del Rey song. Just like I've never heard a Taylor Swift song. At least not consciously. I've probably been exposed to their songs unconsciously via the ambient music they play in stores, on TV programs and ads, etc.

    I thought Steve stopped listening to pop music in the 80s. We know he closely follows Hollywood movies, which is understandable, but it's hard to imagine him listening to contemporary pop music. I'm guessing he just hears about it indirectly through his kids or younger relatives?

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Well, here’s a very sweet song Taylor Swift wrote for a high school talent show…when she was a freshman:

  154. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jonathan Mason


    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show...
     
    Yes, yes, J.M., I have known this for a very long time. So have millions of other fans.

    One reason Mick has stayed in such good shape is because he has maintained his physical fitness program his entire life. I knew, through business, a man who worked with him on concerts in the New York area, and he told me the man was electric, not an ounce of fat on him, extremely charismatic and very smart and involved in the business.

    You may be trying to diminish him with your comment, but I actually hold him in higher regard.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    No, I wouldn’t want to diminish Mick Jagger. I’m just pointing out that there was a lot of hard work and discipline behind his success, and that the rebellious front is a little bit misleading.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    ...and that the rebellious front is a little bit misleading.
     
    From John Strausbaugh's Rock Til You Drop:

    Given the bad-boy, tough-guy image they would be cultivating, it's hard to think what nice young lads the Stones were when [original manager Giorgio] Gomelsky met them. [Brian] Jones was the most posh of the group-- Gomelsky remembers the rest of them, London boys, making fun of his accent, as well as his lisp... When the band moved in together on Edith Grove, Gomelsky recalls, Keith's mother used to drop by periodically with gifts of cash and a stack of clean, pressed shirts...

    It was their next manager, Andrew Loog Oldham, who invented the Stones' bad-boy image. He "made sure we were as vile and nasty as possible," Mick would later say. "Andrew pitched it so that we were very much the antithesis of the Beatles..." In reality, "they were just as cynical as us, but they'd been pitched as clean-scrubbed, they'd got the suits. We were sort of billed as this black version of them. And of course when you look at the pictures now you can see how really clean and sweet we were."

    (p.38-9; no index!)
     
  155. @Dieter Kief
    @Neuday

    Something the devil does is not necessarily a part of him - not even necessarily something that originated in him. - I think of Jesus now who became human and - therefore had to die at the cross.

    - The best devil-analyst I've come across so far in Western thinking is Nuremberg 19th century philosopher Johann Benjamin Erhard. Erhard wrote a sparkling essay about the devil in order to defend him. But his argument is rather sublime. Freedom - in order to be possible, craves for the contrasting = dark 'n' sinful - sphere. So - respect the devil for showing you (for impersonating for you) a principle that is unsustainable in itself: Namely: Being absolutely evil.

    Id est: There is a somehow demonstrative quality to the devil which can only be negated by ignoring the basic human capacity: To be free (by God's will) to decide which way to choose.

    I have not come across an essay yet on how these thoughts - spring from (or are rooted in) medieval thinking (the struggle between realists and nominalists - I might want to write it someday)). Your hint at Thomas von Aquinas is quite telling in this context.
    And this idea of him too:

    "So that the saints may better please the bliss and thank God even more for it, they may fully see the punishments of the wicked."

    Thomas von Aquin, Scriptum Super Sententiis lib. 4 d. 50 q. 2a. 4 qc. 1 co. - This is the proto-version of Erhard's above-mentioned essay.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “I think of Jesus now who became human and … therefore had to die [on] the cross”

    What kind of god would do that to his son? I believe he goes by the name Yahweh the psychopath.

    • LOL: James Speaks
    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @SunBakedSuburb

    YHWH TH PSCHPTH

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SunBakedSuburb


    What kind of god would do that to his son?
     
    Don't ask your children to endure anything you wouldn't be willing to endure yourself.

    Oh, wait...

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Dieter Kief
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Myths/religions are not about logic or rationality in the first place. They are about social coherence and the will to make sacrifices for that goal. A trade-off, of course. It did work though, and noticeably better than other trade-offs. Obviously. But myths/religion and reason/logic did co-develop. Seen from a historical perspective, you would not be able to make your distinctions (sane/insane) and conclusions without the Biblical God.

  156. @Mark G.
    Billie Eilish highly admires Del Rey. Eilish is another example of a musically gifted white female who writes somewhat depressive music. Her recent single, "my future", opens with a series of jazz chords of the type you just don't hear in current pop music.

    In an interview, Billie's brother said she wants everyone to like her and that has turned her into a woke liberal. A lot of wokeism is just a desire to conform, be popular and follow the crowd. There is no group that worries more about being popular than teenage girls, of which Billie is one.

    This wokeism has mostly kept her out of trouble but not completely. Her last single, a Latin song sung in Spanish, caused her to be accused of engaging in cultural appropriation. There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Nicholas Stix

    “There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper stripper.”

    FIFY

  157. @JimDandy
    Yeah, I had a little crush on her too, Steve. Ain't no shame. Her music strikes me as very good, but redundant. I do love her attitude, though. One of my favorite Lana moments came when she told world-renowned crazy shit-talker Azealia Banks to STF or she'd kick her ass.

    Banks won the actual argument, but gangsta-Lana won the exchange. Pretty funny:

    https://people.com/music/azealia-banks-lana-del-rey-get-into-heated-twitter-feud/

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “crazy shit-talker Azealia Banks … gangsta-Lana won”

    I prefer the Gore Vidal-Norman Mailer kerfuffle. Mailer was a supreme writer but a massive dick. Gore’s the guy I’d have lunch with though I’d decline the invitation to spend the weekend at his house in Ravello.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Vidal-Mailer? Missed that one, and I will immediately check it out. I love the “Listen to me you queer, stop calling me a crypto-Nazi or I’ll sock you in the goddamn face and you’ll stay plastered.” battle with Buckley. Buckley and Mailer were both repulsive cocks in their own way, and, I agree, I'd rather hang out with Gore. In a public place.

  158. @Sparkon
    Well, Lana Del Rey's music is not really my cup of tea -- plodding and melancholic -- and her voice, though soft, manages to grate and grind on my eardrums.

    But I'll take the opportunity to play a well-known John Denver song by a group I've just recently discovered - The Petersens - a singing family from Branson, Missouri, just about 30 miles south of Springfield, home to the Great Clips hair salon of anti-COVID-19 masking fame.


    The band was originally siblings Katie (on fiddle), Ellen (on banjo), their brother Matt (on bass), and their youngest sister Julianne (sings and dance), accompanied by their mother Karen (on mandolin) and father Jon (on guitar). But over time, Julianne took the mandolin part and Karen switched to bass. Matt took the guitar part and their father, Jon, played the piano on some of the gospel songs. These early performances were mostly held initially in local festivals, churches and cafes.-- Wikipedia
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qap9Qm-Q894


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with "Jolene" by Dolly Parton:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viQx4KDivPY

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Anon

    Would love to hear their take on Powderfinger.

  159. @JohnnyWalker123
    Another mutation.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1371856224329871361

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “mutation … variant … escapes detection by standard PCR test”

    After the meltdown I’m Chuck Heston cruising apocalypse city in the red convertible, clearing out the mutants mutated by the vaccines with my M3 grease gun.

  160. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Dieter Kief

    "I think of Jesus now who became human and ... therefore had to die [on] the cross"

    What kind of god would do that to his son? I believe he goes by the name Yahweh the psychopath.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

    YHWH TH PSCHPTH

  161. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No, I wouldn't want to diminish Mick Jagger. I'm just pointing out that there was a lot of hard work and discipline behind his success, and that the rebellious front is a little bit misleading.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …and that the rebellious front is a little bit misleading.

    From John Strausbaugh’s Rock Til You Drop:

    Given the bad-boy, tough-guy image they would be cultivating, it’s hard to think what nice young lads the Stones were when [original manager Giorgio] Gomelsky met them. [Brian] Jones was the most posh of the group– Gomelsky remembers the rest of them, London boys, making fun of his accent, as well as his lisp… When the band moved in together on Edith Grove, Gomelsky recalls, Keith’s mother used to drop by periodically with gifts of cash and a stack of clean, pressed shirts…

    It was their next manager, Andrew Loog Oldham, who invented the Stones’ bad-boy image. He “made sure we were as vile and nasty as possible,” Mick would later say. “Andrew pitched it so that we were very much the antithesis of the Beatles…” In reality, “they were just as cynical as us, but they’d been pitched as clean-scrubbed, they’d got the suits. We were sort of billed as this black version of them. And of course when you look at the pictures now you can see how really clean and sweet we were.”

    (p.38-9; no index!)

  162. @slumber_j
    @RichardTaylor


    I don’t know that she deserves to be such a great symbol nor is that region of Connecticut a hotbed of pro-White sentiment.
     
    I don't think of her as a symbol. Can we PLEASE stop objectifying womyn?

    Kidding. Anyway, Litchfield Co. went for Trump in 2016. You're right about the fancy New Yorkers up there, but the working people are pretty solid.

    Replies: @RichardTaylor

    Hahaha, but what great objects the womynfolk make. I wonder if we brought back some old fashioned “women are beautiful look at their curves” in the safe White way that used to exist, we might get girls to stop wanting to transition.

    If you’re only avenues are “womyn are weak versions of men” or to be a cheap hoochie twerking for gangtas, it might make life hard for an awkward girl.

    And yeah, there are tons of solid people in the New York area, especially the rural parts, and especially among the working class.

  163. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Dieter Kief

    "I think of Jesus now who became human and ... therefore had to die [on] the cross"

    What kind of god would do that to his son? I believe he goes by the name Yahweh the psychopath.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

    What kind of god would do that to his son?

    Don’t ask your children to endure anything you wouldn’t be willing to endure yourself.

    Oh, wait

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Don’t ask your children to endure anything you wouldn’t be willing to endure yourself.
     
    God sure ain’t no pacifist! He/They likes to get His/Their war/gore on.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KOCkjEjFhw
  164. Chemtrails = Calmer 💩.

    • Troll: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nice one. Haven't seen that one before. Kind of definitive, ne?

    Where did you find it? if I may be so bold.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  165. @SunBakedSuburb
    @JimDandy

    "crazy shit-talker Azealia Banks ... gangsta-Lana won"

    I prefer the Gore Vidal-Norman Mailer kerfuffle. Mailer was a supreme writer but a massive dick. Gore's the guy I'd have lunch with though I'd decline the invitation to spend the weekend at his house in Ravello.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Vidal-Mailer? Missed that one, and I will immediately check it out. I love the “Listen to me you queer, stop calling me a crypto-Nazi or I’ll sock you in the goddamn face and you’ll stay plastered.” battle with Buckley. Buckley and Mailer were both repulsive cocks in their own way, and, I agree, I’d rather hang out with Gore. In a public place.

  166. @Prosa123
    @Rockford Tyson

    So you call Anthony Fantano by his last name because he's a man but Lana Del Rey by her first name because she's a woman. That utterly disgusts me.

    Replies: @Rockford Tyson

    Cam’t tell if troll or not. I mean, with how insane things are today, you might actually be serious with this comment.

    • Replies: @Prosa123
    @Rockford Tyson

    I'm dead serious. Last naming men, when women get first named, dehumanizes men. And infantilizes women.

  167. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Billie also seems to have a weird incest vibe thing going on with her creepy older brother, who wrote lyrics for her in which she says she’s a “might seduce your dad type” (she was 17 at the time). In addition, his current girlfriend looks disturbingly like her.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Eh, the tubby Ellish let it slip once that her “might seduce your dad” comment, her lyrics, and her overall persona are just an artificial front to sell her songs to emo teen girls and “sensitive” teen boys and maybe some older folks who like that sort of thing. Her brother wrote lyrics for her because, well, she really isn’t the “seduce your dad” type or all that mysterious, just a plain faced gal with a good voice who needed some better, more seductive lyrics.

    And Ellish’s entire “I cover my body to fight objectification of women” nonsense is merely because she’s a bit hefty and physically underwhelming for a female teen pop star and, unlike that chick who sang the “body positive” “All About the Bass” a few years ago or the gargantuan monster Lizzo, she doesn’t want to get pigeonholed as the fat pop chick. SO she wears loose, covering clothes to keep her heft hidden.

  168. @Reg Cæsar
    Chemtrails = Calmer 💩.



    https://thumbs.gfycat.com/UnhealthyWideeyedIsabellinewheatear-max-1mb.gif

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Nice one. Haven’t seen that one before. Kind of definitive, ne?

    Where did you find it? if I may be so bold.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @obwandiyag


    Where did you find it? if I may be so bold.

     

    Under Mr Taylor's "Troll" button.

    Or a GIF-Google. I forget. Clicking on it gives the site. Emojis come either from Emojipedia, or built into the Kindle.
  169. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, Mick Jagger is the middle class English son of a school teacher who decided to impersonate a Delta bluesman in his singing. Not surprising that some of his lyrics are tough to follow.

    Incidentally Jagger's father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50's. Mick Jagger's first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father's TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    I am predominantly a jazz fan, minors in blues, reggae, church music, and stage and screen musicals, so Lana del Rey is not really my cup of tea. From the little I have heard her of her, she does not seem to be musically interesting, nor does she have anything particular inspiring to say. But then I am not a fan of Bob Dylan or Leonard Cohen either. This lady is more my cup of tea..

    https://youtu.be/2Gn9A-kdsRo

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk, @R.G. Camara

    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..

    As I’ve written before, Jagger’s entire persona has been one big long con. He’s an ugly middle-class LSE nerd who realized that if he became a rock star and made sure his band showed up to gigs he could not only make zillions but also bang hot tail forever despite being an ugly dork. So he faked being an uber-cool, tough, rebellious dude and sang songs like one and the rest is history.

    Kudos to him for making the front work so long—-and better than his friend, David Bowie, who’s 5-7 year shifts in persona were, while interesting and attention-grabbing, so obviously marketing ploys in retrospect it makes all of his work seem cheaper.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @R.G. Camara

    In an interview, Bowie conceded that he thought of himself more as a performer than musician, and that in fact he was't a particularly good musician. He was, however, a talented lyricist.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  170. @Reg Cæsar
    @SunBakedSuburb


    What kind of god would do that to his son?
     
    Don't ask your children to endure anything you wouldn't be willing to endure yourself.

    Oh, wait...

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Don’t ask your children to endure anything you wouldn’t be willing to endure yourself.

    God sure ain’t no pacifist! He/They likes to get His/Their war/gore on.

  171. How can anyone in their right mind think that vague faint aimless moony muttering is music, much less good music?

    Before hearing it, I thought it was just the usual computer-generated, hipster-chick, minor-key, repetitive melody thing so poplar amongst the moony teenaged set in the latter day.

    But then I listened to it. It ain’t even that.

    You want moony–where’s Geeshie Wiley when you need her?

  172. @John Shade
    In good vocal music, there is concordance between the lyrical phrase and the vocal melody sung with the lyrical phrase. Rhythm of the melody fits that of the lyric.

    lana del rey is singing conversational fragments, not lyrics, and the vocal melodies are just notes strung together long enuf to fit the number of syllables in the conversational fragments.

    Not aesthetically inspired music.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Oh, my god. Somebody who understands music!

    You’ve hit the nail on the head. Kudos!

    You’ve actually described correctly, concisely, and trenchantly what is wrong with such music.

    Rather than just saying it sucks. Which it does.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @obwandiyag

    True in general, but not for those who have ears to hear in this case. You're both wrong about her work. Listen to what I posted above, or to this:

    https://youtu.be/LrSX_OcpeJg?t=260

    Please feel free to get back to me.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  173. @Mark G.
    Billie Eilish highly admires Del Rey. Eilish is another example of a musically gifted white female who writes somewhat depressive music. Her recent single, "my future", opens with a series of jazz chords of the type you just don't hear in current pop music.

    In an interview, Billie's brother said she wants everyone to like her and that has turned her into a woke liberal. A lot of wokeism is just a desire to conform, be popular and follow the crowd. There is no group that worries more about being popular than teenage girls, of which Billie is one.

    This wokeism has mostly kept her out of trouble but not completely. Her last single, a Latin song sung in Spanish, caused her to be accused of engaging in cultural appropriation. There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Nicholas Stix

    There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.

    This is a yearly ritual at the Grammy’s. Maclamore, Adel, now Eilish and her brother. If you don’t want to win, just ask to have your name removed and say you won’t accept the award. Simple.

    Or they could do a whole awards show just for black people. Oh, they already have that?

  174. @Bill P
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Smart, highly creative women are not usually very easy to handle. Guys who want a house in the suburbs, kids and a dog should probably avoid them in favor of "common-sense" women.

    But some of us can't help ourselves.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    One of those was the big mistake of my life.

  175. @ScarletNumber
    O/T

    Joe Biden fell three times while climbing the stairs to Air Force One. Maya Rudolph is hosting the next episode of SNL in 8 days. If they don't do a sketch with her as the VP licking her chops at the thought of becoming president, then you know the fix is in.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Mr. Anon, @Muggles, @Gary in Gramercy, @Colin Wright

    ‘If they don’t do a sketch…’

    Wake me up if they do.

  176. @Rockford Tyson
    @Prosa123

    Cam't tell if troll or not. I mean, with how insane things are today, you might actually be serious with this comment.

    Replies: @Prosa123

    I’m dead serious. Last naming men, when women get first named, dehumanizes men. And infantilizes women.

  177. @obwandiyag
    @John Shade

    Oh, my god. Somebody who understands music!

    You've hit the nail on the head. Kudos!

    You've actually described correctly, concisely, and trenchantly what is wrong with such music.

    Rather than just saying it sucks. Which it does.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    True in general, but not for those who have ears to hear in this case. You’re both wrong about her work. Listen to what I posted above, or to this:

    Please feel free to get back to me.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @slumber_j

    You obviously don't understand music.

    I can't believe you suckered me into listening to that crap. (And tangentially she is not half so beautiful as you clucks seem to think. Model rock. Really authentic. Models are so, creative!)

    But anyhow, the contention is that "lana del rey is singing conversational fragments, not lyrics, and the vocal melodies are just notes strung together long enuf to fit the number of syllables in the conversational fragments." Such a stringing together of fragments is especially evident in the redundant 4-note repeating uniform 16th note blabbermouth section. Besides the fact that it's a redundant 4-note repeating 16th note blabbermouth section.

    On the same topic, it is a known fact that popular songs today have twice as many words in them as they did 50 years ago. Thus, "blabbermouth songs." Some idiot told me it's because they have "more to say." Hardehar. Idiots will be idiots. Blabbermouth songs reveal a childish, tyro, dilletantish understanding of song form. Blabbermouthedness, coupled with redundant uniform note repetition over and over, one would think that a drunk coder apped a computer to write it in its sleep.

    So show us another video that does the same thing and tell us that that one proves that this chick writes actual songs instead of blabbermouth babbling.

    Replies: @Billy Shears

  178. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Why Steve, it does appear and sound as though you've got a crush on a Millennial. And a very natural and normal human reaction.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Not everything reduces to that.

  179. Anon[740] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    From Wikipedia:


    I was going to Miami quite a lot at the time, speaking a lot of Spanish with my friends from Cuba – Lana Del Rey reminded us of the glamour of the seaside. It sounded gorgeous coming off the tip of the tongue." The name was also inspired by actress Lana Turner and the Ford Del Rey sedan, produced and sold in Brazil in the 1980s. Initially she had chosen the alternate spelling of Lana Del Ray, the name under which her self-titled debut album was released in January 2010.
     
    How would she ever know of the Ford Del Rey??


    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMTM2NTg1NzQ4N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwOTgyNzM2._V1_UY1200_CR145,0,630,1200_AL_.jpg

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/-Yx4mydCdsk/maxresdefault.jpg

    https://img.favcars.com/ford/del-rey/ford_del_rey_1985_photos_1.jpg

     

    Replies: @Anon

    How would she ever know of the Ford Del Rey??

    It’s shown in one of her first two self-made videos from 2011 that went viral on YouTube before she signed a recording contract, or at least the camera pans across the chrome “Del Rey” nameplate on the car. So she was aware of it early on. Originally she spelled the name “Del Ray,” so apparently at some point she became aware of the car and changed the spelling.

    I linked to these two first videos here if you want to search for the car. I can’t remember which it’s in, but I notice it while reviewing the videos before embedding them:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/lana-del-reys-new-album-chemtrails-over-the-country-club/#comment-4536906

  180. Anon[740] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sparkon
    Well, Lana Del Rey's music is not really my cup of tea -- plodding and melancholic -- and her voice, though soft, manages to grate and grind on my eardrums.

    But I'll take the opportunity to play a well-known John Denver song by a group I've just recently discovered - The Petersens - a singing family from Branson, Missouri, just about 30 miles south of Springfield, home to the Great Clips hair salon of anti-COVID-19 masking fame.


    The band was originally siblings Katie (on fiddle), Ellen (on banjo), their brother Matt (on bass), and their youngest sister Julianne (sings and dance), accompanied by their mother Karen (on mandolin) and father Jon (on guitar). But over time, Julianne took the mandolin part and Karen switched to bass. Matt took the guitar part and their father, Jon, played the piano on some of the gospel songs. These early performances were mostly held initially in local festivals, churches and cafes.-- Wikipedia
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qap9Qm-Q894


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with "Jolene" by Dolly Parton:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viQx4KDivPY

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Anon

    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:

    Oh man, can I now come out of the closet as a Petersen’s bluegrass superfan? It’s my deepest, darkest secret.

    By the way, after Dolly was dumped by her major label when she got old and out of style, she did three consecutive excellent bluegrass albums for a small label. She covered the classics, wrote some new stuff (“Mountain Angel” is deliciously creepy when listened to alone on a dark, rainy night), and threw in some off-the-wall stuff like a cover of “Staircase to Heaven” (not a great cover, but Dolly doing Led Zeppelin is worth one listen).

    Ellen Petersen was on a televised American Idol way back playing banjo and singing and yodeling “Cowboy Sweetheart.” Jennifer Lopez was like, Who is this hick?, but then Harry Connick, Jr., and Keith Urban (Australian husband of Nicole Kidman) joined her in the theme from the Beverly Hillbillies.

    All three of the Petersen sisters have distinctive, very different, and very good voices, and the brother and the dobro guy are both not bad either. Here’s the youngest doing “Gentle on My Mind”:

    This is a cover of bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle’s cover of the Glen Campbell hit:

    Tuttle spun out of yet another family bluegrass group based in Berkeley, attended Berklee [sic, the East Coast one], and ended up in Nashville.

    During the lockdown Tuttle has done an album of non-bluegrass covers, and I like her de-punked version of Rancid’s “Olympia, WA”:

    Going further down the rabbit hole, Glen Campbell’s daughter Ashley has a nice version of Townes Van Zandt’s “Poncho and Lefty”:

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt’s “White Freightliner Blues,” but I’ve already over-embedded …

    • Replies: @Zoos
    @Anon


    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt’s “White Freightliner Blues,” but I’ve already over-embedded …
     
    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.

    I’ll stick with the singer-songwriter creative artists.

    https://youtu.be/h3XwWDcorf0

    Also, nihilism is easy. Carrying on is hard. So Miss Del Ray is not very attractive. Her songs carry a fake countenance, much like her reconstructed face. With her music, like her face, you’re not quite sure what’s going on, but you feel it’s not right, and she strangely resembles other popular girls who have found lazy comfort to the same fad sound. It’s different, yet the same. But her nihilism gives her license to be perverse because, what does it ultimately matter?

    Again, I’ll stick with creative artists who may feel defeated, but struggle to find a way out of hell, rather than luxuriate in it. It better reflects the human condition, sans narcissism.

    https://youtu.be/pOKESEtmhis

    Replies: @Anon, @HammerJack

    , @Clyde
    @Anon


    Glen Campbell’s daughter Ashley
     
    ....What a lovely voice. I liked her the best.
    , @Sparkon
    @Anon

    Ashley Campbell!

  181. @HammerJack
    New World Happiness Ratings are out. There's some kind of pattern here but danged if I can figure it out.


    https://i.ibb.co/zrr0Fxh/Screenshot-20210319-093304-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Finland is world's happiest country: Nordic nations dominate list
    https://mol.im/a/9379935 [Daily Mail]

    Replies: @tyrone, @Muggles, @Yngvar

    6 in the Top 10 have a cross in their national flag.

    • LOL: HammerJack
  182. @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nice one. Haven't seen that one before. Kind of definitive, ne?

    Where did you find it? if I may be so bold.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Where did you find it? if I may be so bold.

    Under Mr Taylor’s “Troll” button.

    Or a GIF-Google. I forget. Clicking on it gives the site. Emojis come either from Emojipedia, or built into the Kindle.

  183. @Anon
    @Sparkon


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:
     
    Oh man, can I now come out of the closet as a Petersen's bluegrass superfan? It's my deepest, darkest secret.

    By the way, after Dolly was dumped by her major label when she got old and out of style, she did three consecutive excellent bluegrass albums for a small label. She covered the classics, wrote some new stuff ("Mountain Angel" is deliciously creepy when listened to alone on a dark, rainy night), and threw in some off-the-wall stuff like a cover of "Staircase to Heaven" (not a great cover, but Dolly doing Led Zeppelin is worth one listen).

    Ellen Petersen was on a televised American Idol way back playing banjo and singing and yodeling "Cowboy Sweetheart." Jennifer Lopez was like, Who is this hick?, but then Harry Connick, Jr., and Keith Urban (Australian husband of Nicole Kidman) joined her in the theme from the Beverly Hillbillies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ezK1Ew7fI

    All three of the Petersen sisters have distinctive, very different, and very good voices, and the brother and the dobro guy are both not bad either. Here's the youngest doing "Gentle on My Mind":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3hXYININJw

    This is a cover of bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle's cover of the Glen Campbell hit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzeKM_lyQI4

    Tuttle spun out of yet another family bluegrass group based in Berkeley, attended Berklee [sic, the East Coast one], and ended up in Nashville.

    During the lockdown Tuttle has done an album of non-bluegrass covers, and I like her de-punked version of Rancid's "Olympia, WA":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ5hWXLpjxQ

    Going further down the rabbit hole, Glen Campbell's daughter Ashley has a nice version of Townes Van Zandt's "Poncho and Lefty":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpNrcAmmTxE

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt's "White Freightliner Blues," but I've already over-embedded ...

    Replies: @Zoos, @Clyde, @Sparkon

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt’s “White Freightliner Blues,” but I’ve already over-embedded …

    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.

    I’ll stick with the singer-songwriter creative artists.

    Also, nihilism is easy. Carrying on is hard. So Miss Del Ray is not very attractive. Her songs carry a fake countenance, much like her reconstructed face. With her music, like her face, you’re not quite sure what’s going on, but you feel it’s not right, and she strangely resembles other popular girls who have found lazy comfort to the same fad sound. It’s different, yet the same. But her nihilism gives her license to be perverse because, what does it ultimately matter?

    Again, I’ll stick with creative artists who may feel defeated, but struggle to find a way out of hell, rather than luxuriate in it. It better reflects the human condition, sans narcissism.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Zoos


    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.
     
    Townes Van Zandt is more of a songwriter than a singer-songwriter, although he did do versions of his own songs and released albums. He just wasn't as talented on the performance side. Poncho and Lefty is a good example. It's hard to even pick out the melody in some places in his versions, and you'll notice that different cover versions have different notes in those ambiguous sections. Ashley Campbell's version is very clear.

    Also, the nature of cover versions varies by genre. In bluegrass most performances are covers of songs that date back a century or so. That's the tradition. The "original" versions are lost; we may have Harry Smith's curated version on the Anthology of American Folk Music, and those are charming, but pretty minimalistic for modern ears. The originality comes through in the instrumental arrangements, which vary tremendously. Molly Tuttle's White Freightliner uses banjo-style clawhammer picking in some places, which she owns.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @HammerJack
    @Zoos

    Wow, you really take this stuff seriously.

  184. @Anon
    @Sparkon


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:
     
    Oh man, can I now come out of the closet as a Petersen's bluegrass superfan? It's my deepest, darkest secret.

    By the way, after Dolly was dumped by her major label when she got old and out of style, she did three consecutive excellent bluegrass albums for a small label. She covered the classics, wrote some new stuff ("Mountain Angel" is deliciously creepy when listened to alone on a dark, rainy night), and threw in some off-the-wall stuff like a cover of "Staircase to Heaven" (not a great cover, but Dolly doing Led Zeppelin is worth one listen).

    Ellen Petersen was on a televised American Idol way back playing banjo and singing and yodeling "Cowboy Sweetheart." Jennifer Lopez was like, Who is this hick?, but then Harry Connick, Jr., and Keith Urban (Australian husband of Nicole Kidman) joined her in the theme from the Beverly Hillbillies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ezK1Ew7fI

    All three of the Petersen sisters have distinctive, very different, and very good voices, and the brother and the dobro guy are both not bad either. Here's the youngest doing "Gentle on My Mind":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3hXYININJw

    This is a cover of bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle's cover of the Glen Campbell hit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzeKM_lyQI4

    Tuttle spun out of yet another family bluegrass group based in Berkeley, attended Berklee [sic, the East Coast one], and ended up in Nashville.

    During the lockdown Tuttle has done an album of non-bluegrass covers, and I like her de-punked version of Rancid's "Olympia, WA":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ5hWXLpjxQ

    Going further down the rabbit hole, Glen Campbell's daughter Ashley has a nice version of Townes Van Zandt's "Poncho and Lefty":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpNrcAmmTxE

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt's "White Freightliner Blues," but I've already over-embedded ...

    Replies: @Zoos, @Clyde, @Sparkon

    Glen Campbell’s daughter Ashley

    ….What a lovely voice. I liked her the best.

  185. @R.G. Camara
    @Jonathan Mason


    Incidentally Jagger’s father wrote an important textbook on physical education, and had his own TV show on physical education for children way back in the 50’s. Mick Jagger’s first TV appearance was as an 11-year-old on his father’s TV show, and I suspect that the experience of hanging around TV studios with his father probably inspired him to seek work as an entertainer. Not that he would ever admit it..
     
    As I've written before, Jagger's entire persona has been one big long con. He's an ugly middle-class LSE nerd who realized that if he became a rock star and made sure his band showed up to gigs he could not only make zillions but also bang hot tail forever despite being an ugly dork. So he faked being an uber-cool, tough, rebellious dude and sang songs like one and the rest is history.

    Kudos to him for making the front work so long----and better than his friend, David Bowie, who's 5-7 year shifts in persona were, while interesting and attention-grabbing, so obviously marketing ploys in retrospect it makes all of his work seem cheaper.

    Replies: @black sea

    In an interview, Bowie conceded that he thought of himself more as a performer than musician, and that in fact he was’t a particularly good musician. He was, however, a talented lyricist.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @black sea

    Yeah, part of the fun with Bowie is riding the highs and lows. There was an awful lot of unlistenable dross. His highs were pretty high, though. The legit Bowie fans are the ones who kept at it longer than I did, I guess.

  186. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Dieter Kief

    "I think of Jesus now who became human and ... therefore had to die [on] the cross"

    What kind of god would do that to his son? I believe he goes by the name Yahweh the psychopath.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

    Myths/religions are not about logic or rationality in the first place. They are about social coherence and the will to make sacrifices for that goal. A trade-off, of course. It did work though, and noticeably better than other trade-offs. Obviously. But myths/religion and reason/logic did co-develop. Seen from a historical perspective, you would not be able to make your distinctions (sane/insane) and conclusions without the Biblical God.

  187. Anon[740] • Disclaimer says:
    @Zoos
    @Anon


    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt’s “White Freightliner Blues,” but I’ve already over-embedded …
     
    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.

    I’ll stick with the singer-songwriter creative artists.

    https://youtu.be/h3XwWDcorf0

    Also, nihilism is easy. Carrying on is hard. So Miss Del Ray is not very attractive. Her songs carry a fake countenance, much like her reconstructed face. With her music, like her face, you’re not quite sure what’s going on, but you feel it’s not right, and she strangely resembles other popular girls who have found lazy comfort to the same fad sound. It’s different, yet the same. But her nihilism gives her license to be perverse because, what does it ultimately matter?

    Again, I’ll stick with creative artists who may feel defeated, but struggle to find a way out of hell, rather than luxuriate in it. It better reflects the human condition, sans narcissism.

    https://youtu.be/pOKESEtmhis

    Replies: @Anon, @HammerJack

    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.

    Townes Van Zandt is more of a songwriter than a singer-songwriter, although he did do versions of his own songs and released albums. He just wasn’t as talented on the performance side. Poncho and Lefty is a good example. It’s hard to even pick out the melody in some places in his versions, and you’ll notice that different cover versions have different notes in those ambiguous sections. Ashley Campbell’s version is very clear.

    Also, the nature of cover versions varies by genre. In bluegrass most performances are covers of songs that date back a century or so. That’s the tradition. The “original” versions are lost; we may have Harry Smith’s curated version on the Anthology of American Folk Music, and those are charming, but pretty minimalistic for modern ears. The originality comes through in the instrumental arrangements, which vary tremendously. Molly Tuttle’s White Freightliner uses banjo-style clawhammer picking in some places, which she owns.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Bluegrass might outlast jazz.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  188. @Anon
    @Zoos


    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.
     
    Townes Van Zandt is more of a songwriter than a singer-songwriter, although he did do versions of his own songs and released albums. He just wasn't as talented on the performance side. Poncho and Lefty is a good example. It's hard to even pick out the melody in some places in his versions, and you'll notice that different cover versions have different notes in those ambiguous sections. Ashley Campbell's version is very clear.

    Also, the nature of cover versions varies by genre. In bluegrass most performances are covers of songs that date back a century or so. That's the tradition. The "original" versions are lost; we may have Harry Smith's curated version on the Anthology of American Folk Music, and those are charming, but pretty minimalistic for modern ears. The originality comes through in the instrumental arrangements, which vary tremendously. Molly Tuttle's White Freightliner uses banjo-style clawhammer picking in some places, which she owns.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Bluegrass might outlast jazz.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Steve Sailer


    Bluegrass might outlast jazz.

     

    It might; or mightn't. - The Milky Way might outlast the The Sombrero Galaxy or the The Whirlpool Galaxy. Whirlpool Galaxy sounds more like Bluegrass than Sombrero Galaxy though, so I personally would rather go here with The Whirlpool Galaxy. In the end, it all depends on the Eternal Laws of Cosmic Harmony - that's at least what Plato had been holding dear in The Days of Old.
    For Plato, intelligence and life are universals, just as the ‘numbers’ discerned in the music of the spheres are universals.
  189. @anon

    Singer Lana Del Rey has been triggering music critics for a decade for her pride in being a beautiful straight white American woman. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college) and aesthetically gifted (both in terms of her overall shtick and, on this new album, in massive melodic hooks) that she’s gotten away with it so far.
     
    Most of the negative and hostile commentary I see about Lana Del Rey comes from the right wing and alt-right types on Twitter. While most of the mainstream commentary about her is generally positive. She has the nerdy and quirky vibe that music critics and journalists, being nerdy and geeky themselves, tend to identify with.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    Greil Marcus is a huge Lana fan. I haven’t listened to her yet but Greil was also a big Chris Isaak fan and I got the impression he goes for the atmospherics.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @hhsiii

    Greil Marcus is tone-deaf and subtleties (dark double talk subtleties) fixated. - An oh, even a pause at the right place is enough to get him started and after about a dozen or so paragraphs, he'll for sure land anywhere between the legacy of Stax Recors or some such and Of Mice and men or Cannery Row etc.

    Replies: @hhsiii

  190. @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j


    Elizabeth Woolridge Grant. Alumna of Kent School, a prep school in Connecticut.
     
    The first time I entered the great state of Connecticut, I was on foot with my dog and a backpack. I was a high school dropout, and we had been living on the Appalachian Trail for a couple of weeks when we crossed the border from Massachusetts.

    Lana Del Rey hadn't been born yet.

    Well, in a couple of days, the trail took us right by the Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Out there in the woods. I still remember seeing that and thinking, "Here is a private high school, and here I am, an alien to this place." Nice enough place. I never dreamed I would come back years later and make my life here.

    It was there in Kent, while sitting on a rock, that I decided to go back to Colorado and go to college. My life changed. Kent must be good for education.

    As far as I am concerned, Elizabeth is a fine product of Connecticut's private schools, and Kent, minutes away from me by car now, will forever have a place in my heart.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @RichardTaylor, @hhsiii

    I interviewed at Kent and almost went there. It is a pretty spot. I had no idea she went there.

  191. @hhsiii
    @anon

    Greil Marcus is a huge Lana fan. I haven’t listened to her yet but Greil was also a big Chris Isaak fan and I got the impression he goes for the atmospherics.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Greil Marcus is tone-deaf and subtleties (dark double talk subtleties) fixated. – An oh, even a pause at the right place is enough to get him started and after about a dozen or so paragraphs, he’ll for sure land anywhere between the legacy of Stax Recors or some such and Of Mice and men or Cannery Row etc.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Dieter Kief

    Spot on about old Greil. He tends to go on and on about a minor connection. He has some irrational loves and hates. He has this weird hatred of Lucinda Williams. I can see not liking her music. De Gustibus and all that. But it’s like she kicked his dog.

    Fascinating story: Greil’s natural father, Greil Gerstley, was second in command of the USS Hull, which sank in Typhoon Cobra during WWII. He refused to replace the ship’s commander. The Caine Mutiny was in part inspired by the incident.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  192. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Bluegrass might outlast jazz.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Bluegrass might outlast jazz.

    It might; or mightn’t. – The Milky Way might outlast the The Sombrero Galaxy or the The Whirlpool Galaxy. Whirlpool Galaxy sounds more like Bluegrass than Sombrero Galaxy though, so I personally would rather go here with The Whirlpool Galaxy. In the end, it all depends on the Eternal Laws of Cosmic Harmony – that’s at least what Plato had been holding dear in The Days of Old.
    For Plato, intelligence and life are universals, just as the ‘numbers’ discerned in the music of the spheres are universals.

  193. @Morton's toes
    @Thoughts

    I classify chemtrails with flying saucers which are two things I have spent multiple 1000's hours looking for and never seen. I am 99% sure they are at the very least very uncommon.

    Today I learned this woman was a philosophy major from New York who is reported to have had a drinking problem at the age of 15. Special. The world definitely needs philosophy majors. But it's one of those things that you can only do if you have a safety net. Have you ever heard of an impoverished 20-year-old philosophy major? If you are borrowing money to go to college and you are worried about how you are going to pay it back you do not major in philosophy.

    Scott Alexander whose dad is boutique physician could major in philosophy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSJemA-eviU

    Jefferson Airplane Have You Seen the Saucers?

    (only on good acid!)

    Replies: @dimples

    If you haven’t already, try going out into the country to seek the mysterious UFO. There’s too many lights and other distractions in the city. Take a camera and photograph aerial objects, such as planes, helicopters etc so that you know what these objects look like in your images.

    The UFO is like any scientific phenomenon, it will come to those who look. The aliens, or rather, the supernatural beings, know you are looking and will maybe grant you a blessing. But it will be when you least expect it and appear in a form you least expect. Having seen one or two, I know. It’s an unusual feeling, KNOWING that all the physicists and big men of science are complete dopes when it comes to the actual universe.

  194. @Dieter Kief
    @hhsiii

    Greil Marcus is tone-deaf and subtleties (dark double talk subtleties) fixated. - An oh, even a pause at the right place is enough to get him started and after about a dozen or so paragraphs, he'll for sure land anywhere between the legacy of Stax Recors or some such and Of Mice and men or Cannery Row etc.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    Spot on about old Greil. He tends to go on and on about a minor connection. He has some irrational loves and hates. He has this weird hatred of Lucinda Williams. I can see not liking her music. De Gustibus and all that. But it’s like she kicked his dog.

    Fascinating story: Greil’s natural father, Greil Gerstley, was second in command of the USS Hull, which sank in Typhoon Cobra during WWII. He refused to replace the ship’s commander. The Caine Mutiny was in part inspired by the incident.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @hhsiii

    Lucinda Williams is well-rooted in her past (her childhood) - this might make him uneasy (for reasons that could have to do with what you mention about him):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tUzhodl_rw

    I once met him and talked to him in the empty Club Voltaire on a grey Saturday afternoon in Frankfurt, when he was on a promo tour for Lipstick Traces. He had organized the keys for that leftwing club which usually opened in the evening and it was a perfect place to sit down and talk. I made a nice photograph of him there - handheld about 1/4 of a second. I used to tell people to stand still - it worked - under a half-dead light bulb, going striktly with the natural light. I had read in Hegel's Phenomenology of the Spirit on the train to Frankfurt. I made some references and he got interested and asked whether he could have a look at my book. I said, yes he could, and he read in it - in German. I still don't know if he understood a single word of it.

    Replies: @hhsiii

  195. @black sea
    @R.G. Camara

    In an interview, Bowie conceded that he thought of himself more as a performer than musician, and that in fact he was't a particularly good musician. He was, however, a talented lyricist.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Yeah, part of the fun with Bowie is riding the highs and lows. There was an awful lot of unlistenable dross. His highs were pretty high, though. The legit Bowie fans are the ones who kept at it longer than I did, I guess.

  196. @Zoos
    @Anon


    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt’s “White Freightliner Blues,” but I’ve already over-embedded …
     
    Interpretive artists are a dime a dozen these days, and they prey on your sense of nostalgia, getting a free ride.

    I’ll stick with the singer-songwriter creative artists.

    https://youtu.be/h3XwWDcorf0

    Also, nihilism is easy. Carrying on is hard. So Miss Del Ray is not very attractive. Her songs carry a fake countenance, much like her reconstructed face. With her music, like her face, you’re not quite sure what’s going on, but you feel it’s not right, and she strangely resembles other popular girls who have found lazy comfort to the same fad sound. It’s different, yet the same. But her nihilism gives her license to be perverse because, what does it ultimately matter?

    Again, I’ll stick with creative artists who may feel defeated, but struggle to find a way out of hell, rather than luxuriate in it. It better reflects the human condition, sans narcissism.

    https://youtu.be/pOKESEtmhis

    Replies: @Anon, @HammerJack

    Wow, you really take this stuff seriously.

  197. @Hodag
    I had not heard any song of LDR until last summer and it was her record before this, Norman Fucking Rockwell. I am long out of the pop music game, decades since I discovered "a new band" - but that last album was one of the finest I ever heard. It is really, really good.

    Then this shows up on iSteve.

    Replies: @Cowboy Shaw

    Agree. I was just listening to NFR two weeks ago when I realised just how good it was and have been raving to otherwise nonplussed fellow middle aged men, then this thread turns up. She is definitely on to something. A lament for a world in which everything doesn’t completely suck I guess.

  198. @slumber_j
    @obwandiyag

    True in general, but not for those who have ears to hear in this case. You're both wrong about her work. Listen to what I posted above, or to this:

    https://youtu.be/LrSX_OcpeJg?t=260

    Please feel free to get back to me.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    You obviously don’t understand music.

    I can’t believe you suckered me into listening to that crap. (And tangentially she is not half so beautiful as you clucks seem to think. Model rock. Really authentic. Models are so, creative!)

    But anyhow, the contention is that “lana del rey is singing conversational fragments, not lyrics, and the vocal melodies are just notes strung together long enuf to fit the number of syllables in the conversational fragments.” Such a stringing together of fragments is especially evident in the redundant 4-note repeating uniform 16th note blabbermouth section. Besides the fact that it’s a redundant 4-note repeating 16th note blabbermouth section.

    On the same topic, it is a known fact that popular songs today have twice as many words in them as they did 50 years ago. Thus, “blabbermouth songs.” Some idiot told me it’s because they have “more to say.” Hardehar. Idiots will be idiots. Blabbermouth songs reveal a childish, tyro, dilletantish understanding of song form. Blabbermouthedness, coupled with redundant uniform note repetition over and over, one would think that a drunk coder apped a computer to write it in its sleep.

    So show us another video that does the same thing and tell us that that one proves that this chick writes actual songs instead of blabbermouth babbling.

    • Replies: @Billy Shears
    @obwandiyag

    Your comment is blabbermouth babbling. It is.

  199. @hhsiii
    @Dieter Kief

    Spot on about old Greil. He tends to go on and on about a minor connection. He has some irrational loves and hates. He has this weird hatred of Lucinda Williams. I can see not liking her music. De Gustibus and all that. But it’s like she kicked his dog.

    Fascinating story: Greil’s natural father, Greil Gerstley, was second in command of the USS Hull, which sank in Typhoon Cobra during WWII. He refused to replace the ship’s commander. The Caine Mutiny was in part inspired by the incident.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Lucinda Williams is well-rooted in her past (her childhood) – this might make him uneasy (for reasons that could have to do with what you mention about him):

    I once met him and talked to him in the empty Club Voltaire on a grey Saturday afternoon in Frankfurt, when he was on a promo tour for Lipstick Traces. He had organized the keys for that leftwing club which usually opened in the evening and it was a perfect place to sit down and talk. I made a nice photograph of him there – handheld about 1/4 of a second. I used to tell people to stand still – it worked – under a half-dead light bulb, going striktly with the natural light. I had read in Hegel’s Phenomenology of the Spirit on the train to Frankfurt. I made some references and he got interested and asked whether he could have a look at my book. I said, yes he could, and he read in it – in German. I still don’t know if he understood a single word of it.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Dieter Kief

    Cool story. Yeah, Marcus is his step-father’s name. He was 3 months old when his father died in the war. He knew that, but didn’t know the details until he was in his 70s.

    Apropos of Lucinda, whose music that I have heard I like, funny you mention her childhood. Marcus made fun of her claiming “I ain’t no intellectual.” He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction. It was a funny line, but gratuitously nasty. And sarcastic from a guy who claims to be opposed to pretensions and ironic poseurs.

    Replies: @black sea, @Arthur Biggs

  200. @Mark G.
    Billie Eilish highly admires Del Rey. Eilish is another example of a musically gifted white female who writes somewhat depressive music. Her recent single, "my future", opens with a series of jazz chords of the type you just don't hear in current pop music.

    In an interview, Billie's brother said she wants everyone to like her and that has turned her into a woke liberal. A lot of wokeism is just a desire to conform, be popular and follow the crowd. There is no group that worries more about being popular than teenage girls, of which Billie is one.

    This wokeism has mostly kept her out of trouble but not completely. Her last single, a Latin song sung in Spanish, caused her to be accused of engaging in cultural appropriation. There was a controversy after the just concluded Grammy awards about her winning Record of the Year over a black female rapper. The underlying premise of these complaints was that the black female rapper had a better song but lost because of racism. Billie is intelligent enough to realize this was going to happen and spent most of her acceptance speech profusely apologizing for winning.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Nicholas Stix

    When are we going to hear a White who has achieved excellence tell envious, talentless, sore-loser black supremacists in his acceptance speech, “Go to hell!”?

  201. @Dieter Kief
    @hhsiii

    Lucinda Williams is well-rooted in her past (her childhood) - this might make him uneasy (for reasons that could have to do with what you mention about him):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tUzhodl_rw

    I once met him and talked to him in the empty Club Voltaire on a grey Saturday afternoon in Frankfurt, when he was on a promo tour for Lipstick Traces. He had organized the keys for that leftwing club which usually opened in the evening and it was a perfect place to sit down and talk. I made a nice photograph of him there - handheld about 1/4 of a second. I used to tell people to stand still - it worked - under a half-dead light bulb, going striktly with the natural light. I had read in Hegel's Phenomenology of the Spirit on the train to Frankfurt. I made some references and he got interested and asked whether he could have a look at my book. I said, yes he could, and he read in it - in German. I still don't know if he understood a single word of it.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    Cool story. Yeah, Marcus is his step-father’s name. He was 3 months old when his father died in the war. He knew that, but didn’t know the details until he was in his 70s.

    Apropos of Lucinda, whose music that I have heard I like, funny you mention her childhood. Marcus made fun of her claiming “I ain’t no intellectual.” He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction. It was a funny line, but gratuitously nasty. And sarcastic from a guy who claims to be opposed to pretensions and ironic poseurs.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @hhsiii


    He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction.
     
    Williams' father, Miller Williams, started the creative writing program at the University of Arkansas and was known primarily as a poet, not an academician. Lucinda herself was both a high school and college drop out. Whether or not she was an intellectual has a lot to do with how you choose to define "intellectual." I don't doubt that she's smart, but "intellectual" can have certain negative connotations that have little to do with intelligence or creative talent.

    As far as her slurred singing goes, music is a performance and musicians take on various personas in their performance. There's not much surprise here, and as long as it's done well, it generally adds to the overall effect.

    BTW: Townes Van Zandt, who was discussed earlier in this thread, took on the role of vagabond cowboy/poet who'd lived a life of jumping boxcars and losing himself in a bottle of Jack Daniels. Apart from the alcoholism, which was sadly all too real, the rest was mostly fantasy. Van Zandt grew up the son of a well-to-do oil executive, attended private schools, and is reputed to have achieved an impressively high IQ score as a high school student. On the other hand, he was also bi-polar, which did lend a certain pathos to his life.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Arthur Biggs
    @hhsiii

    Yet he loved Dylan who sang with a fake drawl. I wonder why?

  202. Just a day after releasing her latest album, Chemtrails Over the Country Club, Lana Del Rey has decided not to let her fans rest for even a second with the announcement of her second album of 2021, Rock Candy Sweet. The singer announced the new album with a post on Instagram, alongside a selfie and a release date of June 1.

  203. @hhsiii
    @Dieter Kief

    Cool story. Yeah, Marcus is his step-father’s name. He was 3 months old when his father died in the war. He knew that, but didn’t know the details until he was in his 70s.

    Apropos of Lucinda, whose music that I have heard I like, funny you mention her childhood. Marcus made fun of her claiming “I ain’t no intellectual.” He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction. It was a funny line, but gratuitously nasty. And sarcastic from a guy who claims to be opposed to pretensions and ironic poseurs.

    Replies: @black sea, @Arthur Biggs

    He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction.

    Williams’ father, Miller Williams, started the creative writing program at the University of Arkansas and was known primarily as a poet, not an academician. Lucinda herself was both a high school and college drop out. Whether or not she was an intellectual has a lot to do with how you choose to define “intellectual.” I don’t doubt that she’s smart, but “intellectual” can have certain negative connotations that have little to do with intelligence or creative talent.

    As far as her slurred singing goes, music is a performance and musicians take on various personas in their performance. There’s not much surprise here, and as long as it’s done well, it generally adds to the overall effect.

    BTW: Townes Van Zandt, who was discussed earlier in this thread, took on the role of vagabond cowboy/poet who’d lived a life of jumping boxcars and losing himself in a bottle of Jack Daniels. Apart from the alcoholism, which was sadly all too real, the rest was mostly fantasy. Van Zandt grew up the son of a well-to-do oil executive, attended private schools, and is reputed to have achieved an impressively high IQ score as a high school student. On the other hand, he was also bi-polar, which did lend a certain pathos to his life.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @black sea


    On the other hand, he was also bi-polar, which did lend a certain pathos to his life.
     
    Diamonds & Rust // Breakdownss & Lust

    Rock 'n' Roll - / Takes it's toll / From those who stroll / Down Misfit Lane / Again & again // At the same time / It makes some of 'em / Shine - /// - on like a crzy diamond
  204. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Thoughts


    I personally find her songs nightmarish, disturbing and best case, deeply depressing.
     
    I gave them both a listen, Thoughts. It might be good music to fall asleep to, but I prefer Grateful Dead space jams and long versions of Dark Star for that. It could grow on me, but I gave them each 2 minutes.

    Still, it beats the hell out of a group of black thugs yelling at me. That's the alternative right now, apparently. I don't expect Kasey Kasem to come on the radio this Sunday to introduce the next CCR or Led Zeppelin...

    ... or even Leo Sayer, for that matter:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhSjwU8gEsI

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Desiderius

    Doesn’t everyone have a local 70s/80s station that plays Kasem countdowns on weekends?

  205. @black sea
    @hhsiii


    He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction.
     
    Williams' father, Miller Williams, started the creative writing program at the University of Arkansas and was known primarily as a poet, not an academician. Lucinda herself was both a high school and college drop out. Whether or not she was an intellectual has a lot to do with how you choose to define "intellectual." I don't doubt that she's smart, but "intellectual" can have certain negative connotations that have little to do with intelligence or creative talent.

    As far as her slurred singing goes, music is a performance and musicians take on various personas in their performance. There's not much surprise here, and as long as it's done well, it generally adds to the overall effect.

    BTW: Townes Van Zandt, who was discussed earlier in this thread, took on the role of vagabond cowboy/poet who'd lived a life of jumping boxcars and losing himself in a bottle of Jack Daniels. Apart from the alcoholism, which was sadly all too real, the rest was mostly fantasy. Van Zandt grew up the son of a well-to-do oil executive, attended private schools, and is reputed to have achieved an impressively high IQ score as a high school student. On the other hand, he was also bi-polar, which did lend a certain pathos to his life.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    On the other hand, he was also bi-polar, which did lend a certain pathos to his life.

    Diamonds & Rust // Breakdownss & Lust

    Rock ‘n’ Roll – / Takes it’s toll / From those who stroll / Down Misfit Lane / Again & again // At the same time / It makes some of ’em / Shine – /// – on like a crzy diamond

  206. @obwandiyag
    @slumber_j

    You obviously don't understand music.

    I can't believe you suckered me into listening to that crap. (And tangentially she is not half so beautiful as you clucks seem to think. Model rock. Really authentic. Models are so, creative!)

    But anyhow, the contention is that "lana del rey is singing conversational fragments, not lyrics, and the vocal melodies are just notes strung together long enuf to fit the number of syllables in the conversational fragments." Such a stringing together of fragments is especially evident in the redundant 4-note repeating uniform 16th note blabbermouth section. Besides the fact that it's a redundant 4-note repeating 16th note blabbermouth section.

    On the same topic, it is a known fact that popular songs today have twice as many words in them as they did 50 years ago. Thus, "blabbermouth songs." Some idiot told me it's because they have "more to say." Hardehar. Idiots will be idiots. Blabbermouth songs reveal a childish, tyro, dilletantish understanding of song form. Blabbermouthedness, coupled with redundant uniform note repetition over and over, one would think that a drunk coder apped a computer to write it in its sleep.

    So show us another video that does the same thing and tell us that that one proves that this chick writes actual songs instead of blabbermouth babbling.

    Replies: @Billy Shears

    Your comment is blabbermouth babbling. It is.

  207. @Clyde

    Blondie, on the other hand, was a non-disco act that made a better disco record than almost anyone else.
     
    And the Rolling Stones "Miss You" was better than what the real disco outfits put out. Lots more listenable. It is still played at all Stones concerts.

    Replies: @Arthur Biggs

    Only boomers think the Rolling Stones were any good past 1972.

  208. @hhsiii
    @Dieter Kief

    Cool story. Yeah, Marcus is his step-father’s name. He was 3 months old when his father died in the war. He knew that, but didn’t know the details until he was in his 70s.

    Apropos of Lucinda, whose music that I have heard I like, funny you mention her childhood. Marcus made fun of her claiming “I ain’t no intellectual.” He pointed out her father was a college professor, and made some crack about her growing up eating dirt in the back yard, and mocked her slurred singing diction. It was a funny line, but gratuitously nasty. And sarcastic from a guy who claims to be opposed to pretensions and ironic poseurs.

    Replies: @black sea, @Arthur Biggs

    Yet he loved Dylan who sang with a fake drawl. I wonder why?

  209. @Anon
    @Sparkon


    The blonde in the background playing the banjo is Ellen Petersen. Here she is with “Jolene” by Dolly Parton:
     
    Oh man, can I now come out of the closet as a Petersen's bluegrass superfan? It's my deepest, darkest secret.

    By the way, after Dolly was dumped by her major label when she got old and out of style, she did three consecutive excellent bluegrass albums for a small label. She covered the classics, wrote some new stuff ("Mountain Angel" is deliciously creepy when listened to alone on a dark, rainy night), and threw in some off-the-wall stuff like a cover of "Staircase to Heaven" (not a great cover, but Dolly doing Led Zeppelin is worth one listen).

    Ellen Petersen was on a televised American Idol way back playing banjo and singing and yodeling "Cowboy Sweetheart." Jennifer Lopez was like, Who is this hick?, but then Harry Connick, Jr., and Keith Urban (Australian husband of Nicole Kidman) joined her in the theme from the Beverly Hillbillies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ezK1Ew7fI

    All three of the Petersen sisters have distinctive, very different, and very good voices, and the brother and the dobro guy are both not bad either. Here's the youngest doing "Gentle on My Mind":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3hXYININJw

    This is a cover of bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle's cover of the Glen Campbell hit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzeKM_lyQI4

    Tuttle spun out of yet another family bluegrass group based in Berkeley, attended Berklee [sic, the East Coast one], and ended up in Nashville.

    During the lockdown Tuttle has done an album of non-bluegrass covers, and I like her de-punked version of Rancid's "Olympia, WA":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ5hWXLpjxQ

    Going further down the rabbit hole, Glen Campbell's daughter Ashley has a nice version of Townes Van Zandt's "Poncho and Lefty":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpNrcAmmTxE

    Molly Tuttle does a great version of Van Zandt's "White Freightliner Blues," but I've already over-embedded ...

    Replies: @Zoos, @Clyde, @Sparkon

    Ashley Campbell!

  210. But she’s so smart (philosophy major in college)

    Quite a few very smart people go into music, because very smart people can see that it’s a great way to make enormous amounts of money. Keisha’s music is sh*t, but two years of being Kei$ha paid her more than a lifetime of working in geology would have.

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