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Paul Krugman: the GOP's National Security Stance "Serves the Tribe"
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One of the great things about NYT columnist Paul Krugman is that for a (quasi-)Nobel Laureate, he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island. Krugman is kind of the Donald Trump of the Democrats the way Trump is an Elton John fan from Queens. Thus:

Who Loves America?

Paul Krugman JULY 29, 2016

… That love of country doesn’t have to be, and shouldn’t be, uncritical. But the faults you find, the critiques you offer, should be about the ways in which we don’t yet live up to our own ideals. If what bothers you about America is, instead, the fact that it doesn’t look exactly the way it did in the past (or the way you imagine it looked in the past), then you don’t love your country — you care only about your tribe.

And all too many influential figures on the right are tribalists, not patriots. …

This same tribal urge surely underlies a lot of the right’s rhetoric about national security. Why are Republicans so fixated on the notion that the president must use the phrase “Islamic terrorism,” when actual experts on terrorism agree that this would actually hurt national security, by helping to alienate peaceful Muslims?

The answer, I’d argue, is that the alienation isn’t a side effect they’re disregarding; it’s actually the point — it’s all about drawing a line between us (white Christians) and them (everyone else), and national security has nothing to do with it. …

What this tells you, I think, is that all the flag-waving and hawkish posturing had nothing to do with patriotism. It was, instead, about using alleged Democratic weakness on national security as a club with which to beat down domestic opponents, and serve the interests of the tribe.

Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.

So I really don’t think Krugman gets why this column of his is so funny.

Krugman’s column about how the GOP “serves the tribe” is like Trump’s retweet of the Crooked Hillary image that drove pundits nuts in early July with conspiracy theorizing: What sinister master plan is Trump implying by retweeting a picture of Hillary that includes a six-pointed star?

But in truth, neither Trump’s nor Krugman’s brains work that way.

Krugman’s brain:

Trump’s brain:

Decision: Trump

 
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  1. The non-kosher tribe, he means.
    Always assume “kosher” to be implicitly there, and most of it will turn understandable.

    • Replies: @JimB
    Krugman the loony lefty likes just about the only openly Republican hair band while Trump favors globalist gay boy piano man. Opposites can admire each other I suppose.

    I think Krugman's piece about Republicans serving the tribe is just another example of Steves conjecture that Jewish intellectuals tend to project Jewish intramural conflicts onto the gentile world. I can't imagine any of Krugman's relations being happy that he married a schvartze, lopping off a branch of his own family tree and in effect refusing to serve his own tribe.
  2. Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he’s up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

    • Agree: Sam Shama
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    , @Anonymous
    My training is in economics and finance. Krugman's work as an economist is highly overrated. His NYT columns are dissected every week in an entertaining podcast by Robert Murphy and Tom Woods at contrakrugman.com.
    , @Prof. Woland
    It is a bit like Chomsky in but in reverse. Chompers built his impressive reputation in linguistics and then thought it was transferable to economics.
    , @Karl
    > For working economists like my brother-in-law


    Actuaries are the main example of an economist doing real work.

    All other "macro-economics" is apologism for re-directing wealth towards the wealthy ( about which, I will never claim to be holier-than-them); I just want ricebowls to be recognized as such)

    Economics was originally called "political arithmetic"; that is still the best description.
    , @JamesG
    However , he was good at evolution.

    https://jasoncollins.org/2012/12/14/krugman-on-gould-and-maynard-smith/
  3. Krugman used to be reasonable 20 years ago or so. IMO.

    Now, he seems to spout propaganda, much of it obviously false.

    What happened? Was it just his wife?

    • Replies: @Barnard
    Krugman used to write college Economics textbooks. I think he determined being a left wing pundit paid a lot better and was a lot less work than that. A couple of columnists have pointed out several times when he has directly contradicted something from one of his textbooks in one of his NY Times columns.
    , @Desiderius

    Was it just his wife?
     
    Pretty much.

    The change tracks closely to the time of marriage, and she's a radical feminist who "helps" him write his Times articles.

    We're the dog that Krugman kicks after his wife kicks him.
  4. There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it’s head and claim that it “those people” who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    • Replies: @artichoke
    You love America because it's better than what you progressives could have built for yourselves. But by including yourselves in it, you weaken it. Diversity is your strength (attachment to us strengthens you) but not ours (attachment to you weakens us.)
    , @Amasius
    @Tiny Duck

    Tiny, have you thought of becoming an accredited writer?

    https://accredited-times.com/

    It's right up your alley. (You could use an editor, though.)
    , @Grandpa Jack
    "There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country."

    -You should be a Hillary or Obama speechwriter, that's the sort of vacuous nonsense that rolls from their lips daily.

    What you say is far away from and even the opposite of, patriotism. Devotion and support for one's country would make one desire less, not more foreigners to come on board, particularly those who massively change the fabric of the country itself, and want to turn it into New Mecca, or New Aztlán. Not to mention the crime, disease, violence, loss of social capital they bring or cause, or how adding more people who are 'on the public dole' brings us down.

    What is the 'celebration of diversity', but just a round about way of saying less whites? Whites built this country. "Treasonous white nationals"? It would be like saying the Japanese are committing treason by not importing millions upon millions of African guest workers to become Japanese citizens, and take over Japan. As usual, you completely flip reality on its head.


    "We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it’s head and claim that it “those people” who are failing America."

    - Why should the goal be how it 'fails people of color"? Are people of color the majority of Americans? If we're talking 'love and devotion to one's country' (i.e. patriotism), then why do we give two sh*ts about doing more for a million illegal Guatemalans here? "People of Color" are the ones who are failing America. They commit more crime, they take more public assistance in net than they contribute, they are more likely to engage in politics that rip the country apart. Not to mention how an increasing percentage of them are in groups that literally want to make America into New Mecca, or New Aztlán. How is it 'positive change' to take away from the descendants of those who built the country, those who contribute the most still, and give it to those who take away from the country and who literally seek to make it into an extension of their homeland?

    "The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all."
    - You just said, prior to this how the goal was to do better for "People of Color"- so how does focusing on a minority of the people promote equality or justice for all?

    "To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism."
    -"War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength."
    , @Anonym
    My kingdom's rising, your world is dying
    Within a blink of an eye.
    , @Lorax
    Pay attention to this man, he is a dangerous "progressive." What he really wants to do is
    expropriate from the wealthy class and redistribute to the poor, with a generous fee
    to the revolutionaries who will facilitate this transfer. Just the way Lenin, Stalin, Fidel,
    Chavez, Mao and others have tried, leading to dictatorships or failed elected socialist
    states.
    The writer (?) is holding on to the fallacious belief in an egalitarian "human race"
    whereas Evolutionary Biology has revealed that in nature there are only competing
    groups who sometimes cooperate but are just as likely to indulge in genocidal warfare.
    Sorry to tell you this but life really is a bitch.
    And if "people of color are failing" could the problem not lie therein?
    , @Prof. Woland
    Treason is a word we typically use for people like you who side with the out group such as immigrants / invaders. Inclusive patriotism is a meaningless contrivance that only exists in your tiny mind.
    , @iffen
    We progressives love America

    I think you love your conception of America.

    To paraphrase a great American politician, people of little or no color is people too.
    , @Kyle
    Patriotism is irrelevant. We care about continuing our line, nothing more and nothing less.
  5. @PiltdownMan
    Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he's up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

    “Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.”

    Sometimes Krugman’s lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor’s New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can’t we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can’t go there, he just c-a-n-‘-t.

    • Replies: @Blah
    Steve:

    Maybe you mentioned it once or twice, but how much do you think Krugman's wife edits or influences these columns?
    , @Vinay
    "I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can’t we go back to that kind of America?"

    Krugman was talking about the rise of income inequality over the past 50 years. To him, "that kind of America" means a broadly middle class America where the CEOs make 40x the bottom, rather than 500x.

    What's the unsophisticated part? That he doesn't understand that income inequality is a result of immigration? He'd probably post graphs comparing income inequality to the level of immigration and note that the rise of inequality is a worldwide phenomenon, though immigration could certainly play a part.

    Or, is it that he doesn't understand that inequality is mostly a result of nonwhites failing to catch up to whites? His response is likely to be a graph showing the rise in income inequality *within* white America.

    For that matter, he doesn't take it for granted that inequality leads to lower economic growth or anything of the sort. These are mostly empirical questions to be studied, not sacred dogma.
    , @Corvinus
    Krugman is representing his tribe, that's why you are correct in saying it's funny. Other than that, Krugman is accurate in pointing out that, like his tribe, Trump as the showman is saying the things to his adopted tribe that will get him elected, like ANY other politician. Except what Trump has going for him, like Jesse Ventura, is that he can effectively play the "outsider" card.

    "Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can’t go there, he just c-a-n-’-t."

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those "old neighborhoods" were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.
    , @syonredux

    Back in 2006, when he was writing The Conscience of a Liberal, Krugman found himself searching for a way to describe his own political Eden, his vision of America before the Fall. He knew the moment that he wanted to describe: the fifties and early sixties, when prosperity was not only broad but broadly shared. Wells, looking over a draft, thought his account was too numerical, too cold. She suggested that he describe his own childhood, in the ­middle-class suburb of Merrick, Long Island. And so Krugman began writing with an almost choking nostalgia, the sort of feeling that he usually despises: “The political and economic environment of my youth stands revealed as a paradise lost, an exceptional moment in our nation’s history …”
    Krugman remembers Merrick in these terms, as a place that provoked in him “amazingly little alienation.” “All the mothers waiting to pick up the fathers at the train station in the evening,” he says, remembering. “You were in an area where there were a lot of quiet streets, and it was possible to take bike rides all over Long Island. We used to ride up to Sagamore Hill, the old Teddy Roosevelt estate.”
    The Krugmans lived in a less lush part of Merrick, full of small ranch ­houses each containing the promise of social ascent. “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/04/aspie-economists.html
    , @jb
    Steve -- There is a Krugman blog post from 2013 where he reminisces about the way that public expression of racism became "utterly taboo" in his old neighborhood. I find really interesting; maybe you could do something with it? Here is the key paragraph:

    And while it didn’t literally happen overnight, it did happen fast. My personal memory: I grew up on Long Island in the 60s, and at the time many of the fancier houses (split-level ranches!) had little statues of coachmen in front. In my memory, at least, there was one summer — maybe 1965? — when, suddenly, everyone had the faces on their coachmen repainted; all of a sudden they were white. The message had gotten through: pretending that you were living in antebellum Tara was not OK.
     
    I find it kind of hard to reconcile assertions that America is a racist society with the fact that it's been 50 years since it's been possible for respectable members of society to risk the appearance of racism.
    , @Hacienda
    I can't go back to my teenage years, whether I want to or not, because I'm 50+.

    Now, consider this statement. It looks trolly. But it's deceptively deep. There's been 30 years of world change, you can't just roll it back like a carpet. The world is NOT a carpet.
    , @eggheadshadhisnumber
    Krugman's political musings, or at least the ones published by the NYT, have been cautiously oriented toward regaining his former White House advisorship under an unsympathetic Obama, and now Clinton administration. I imagine that plenty of other individuals have noticed this unfortunate trend in his work as well.
    , @Sam Shama
    Couldn't agree more on Krugman's relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    , @jtxuk
    He's expressed some degree of immigration skepticism in the past, for example:

    "[O]pen immigration can’t coexist with a strong social safety net; if you’re going to assure health care and a decent income to everyone, you can’t make that offer global."

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/26/the-curious-politics-of-immigration

    He softens the statement by attributing it to unnamed Democrats. I'm not extremely well-read, but this is the only time I've seen someone on the left express this view.
  6. anon • Disclaimer says:

    ‘Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.’

    So when one ((tribe)) was colluding with Russia(The USSR), that was OK, but when another tribe is allegedly colluding with Russia, that’s not OK.

    OK.

  7. What is a nation? According to google it’s “a large aggregate of people united by common descent, history, culture, or language, inhabiting a particular country or territory.” I didn’t definition-shop, but I would argue the part about “particular country or territory” is weaker than the first part. A distributed people is often referred to as a nation e.g. Elijah Muhammad’s “Nation of Islam”. Or since I’d suppose Krugman is Jewish, that diaspora.

    So yeah it’s OK to be loyal to your tribe. What’s the better patriotism — protecting your people, or protecting a specific area of dirt? They are both important, but to me the idealistic view of patriotism has more to do with the people than the land.

    It’s hard for me to believe Krugman is missing this out of ignorance. He’s got an agenda and can’t think of good arguments for it, so he uses bad ones.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I continues to strike me that Etymology of the word Nation is never even wondered at... And now Krugmab wants to bring up the Latin word for Fatherland?
    Aristotle talks about the need for clarity in the meaning of words. And I believe Confucius also discusses the need for consensus on the meaning of words before reasoned argument can begin....
    Maybe one day there will be a great philosopher of Muh FEELZ that will make sense of all this nonsense
  8. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    You love America because it’s better than what you progressives could have built for yourselves. But by including yourselves in it, you weaken it. Diversity is your strength (attachment to us strengthens you) but not ours (attachment to you weakens us.)

  9. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    Tiny, have you thought of becoming an accredited writer?

    https://accredited-times.com/

    It’s right up your alley. (You could use an editor, though.)

  10. All you need to know about Krugman is that when Dubya was president fiscal deficits were ruinous. When Obama was elected fiscal deficits were not just OK they needed to be larger. The man is an partisan ideologue whose theories have failed.

    • Replies: @Lot

    All you need to know about Krugman is that when Dubya was president fiscal deficits were ruinous. When Obama was elected fiscal deficits were not just OK they needed to be larger.
     
    This is not Krugman, but macroeconomics 102. When the economy overheats you run surpluses, when it is depressed you run deficits.
    , @EdwardM
    A common thread in Krugman's economic analysis is that he wants our government to essentially inflate the debt away. This wouldn't devastate the very rich, who could weather it in various ways, or the very poor, who live paycheck-to-paycheck and on the government dole anyway, but of course would be ruinous to everyone else. It's the logical path of top-down government control of the economy, with no downside according to his ideology.
  11. Lot says:

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.

    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush’s estimates for the war’s cost were absurdly low.

    And “his brainy technical specialties” is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan’s economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan’s economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    • Replies: @EriK
    Maybe if you had a listen at Contra Krugman once in awhile you'd be a little less enthusiastic about Krugtron. http://contrakrugman.com/
    , @Skinnyhoops
    And he was wrong that much more fiscal stimulus was needed to lift the US out of the 2009 recession.
    , @AnotherDad

    And “his brainy technical specialties” is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.
     
    Lot, i'll grant the point that Krugman is not an idiot--and in fact pretty sharp--when he's sticking to economic matters (especially ones divorced from "Republicans are evil" politicking).

    However ... I told people the Euro would be a disaster and I have all of two semesters of econ. But ... i'm sentient. Even in the US we have regional recessions and we mitigate them by throwing around some cash *and* because people move. When I graduated and headed down for an internship at Johnson Space Center outside Houston, the "Great Lakes State" license plates were thick on the ground. Nonetheless times were tough in Michigan\the Midwest for a while--everyone isn't going to move around and seamlessly smooth things out. And this is without a language barrier or what Krugman is now mocking as false patriotism.

    It was obvious that Europe was not--I think the economists call it--an "optimum currency area". And then on top of that you have a currency that no actual government is responsible for. So the Euro:
    -- whacked away exchange rate adjustment
    -- made everyone's national debts "hard"--essentially in a foreign currency; governments can't freely money print
    Hence you constricted anti-cyclical ability, steepened recession\depression risk, and radically enlarged default risk. (And made national fiscal problems into Europe wide problems creating a brand new source of intra-European political friction and crisis.)

    All this was obvious to ... me. A non-economist, physics guy, working in IT. It was therefore obvious not just to Krugman but to any economist who wasn't a complete bozo and actually wanted to consider the problem. And yet--as always seems to be the case (e.g. mass immigration)--there were rafts of economists ready to sign off and sing the praises of the Euro ... because that's what the political establishment wants.

    What Krugman has never quite said, is the people who did this are *his* people. Not, not the Jews, but more generically the globalists, the great and the good, who are pushing the immigration disaster there and here; the anti-Trumpers now. Nationalists want to have sovereignty and their own currency and are willing to live with the results.

    Anyway, my point is that Krugman being right about the Euro, says more about the willingness of economists to be whores than it does about Krugman being a genius.
    , @Unladen Swallow
    He was hardly alone in thinking the Euro would be a disaster, I remember Martin Feldstein penning a series of articles attacking the Euro in the Economist magazine and Feldstein is considered pretty non-partisan by standards of academic economists. I think most economists in the UK and Germany were also opposed as well, one country's leaders listened, the other didn't.

    Regarding the recession, he also predicted or implied that the UK's economic policy ( which was Non-Keynesian ) towards it wouldn't work, but here we are in 2016 and the UK's unemployment rate is pretty much the same as ours is, so obviously his Keynesian recommendations were not necessary to get the economy where it is now. I don't think it is particularly strong, but he does, although that will probably change if the Democrats lose the election.
    , @Neoconned
    Was he right when he confidently predicted the internet would have the economic impact of the fax machine?
  12. Lot says:
    @unit472
    All you need to know about Krugman is that when Dubya was president fiscal deficits were ruinous. When Obama was elected fiscal deficits were not just OK they needed to be larger. The man is an partisan ideologue whose theories have failed.

    All you need to know about Krugman is that when Dubya was president fiscal deficits were ruinous. When Obama was elected fiscal deficits were not just OK they needed to be larger.

    This is not Krugman, but macroeconomics 102. When the economy overheats you run surpluses, when it is depressed you run deficits.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  13. Hilarious. I only wish it were true that conservatives had been loyal to their tribe.

    Notice that anti-Whites are always talking about WHAT they are loyal to but never WHO?

    They are loyal to words, institutions, dreams, visions, utopias, constitutions, etc, etc.

    But they are NEVER loyal to an actual people. Start asking people WHO are you loyal to, not WHAT.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Hilarious. I only wish it were true that conservatives had been loyal to their tribe.

    Notice that anti-Whites are always talking about WHAT they are loyal to but never WHO?

    They are loyal to words, institutions, dreams, visions, utopias, constitutions, etc, etc.

    But they are NEVER loyal to an actual people. Start asking people WHO are you loyal to, not WHAT.
     
    Also, look at what they're fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can't win that way.
  14. Steve cannot really comment on this because he honors his old confidentiality agreement, but I think he said a long time ago that Krugman was on his old HBD listserv.

    I wonder if Krugman, who lacks social graces, got into some heated disagreements with Steve who still has a mild grudge over it. I also think after reading him for years that Krugman is not an IQ egalitarian but feels conflicted but its implications.

    • Replies: @Roman Frege
    The SPLC and other usual suspects outted everyone on the server a few years ago.

    Krugman was on it, as was Gary Becker (Chicago econ nobelist), James Heckman (Chicago econ nobelist who works on education and racial difference issues among others), Steve Pinker, and George Borjas (Harvard econ prof).

    http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/TS/BaileyAssociates/HumanBiodiversityGroup.htm
  15. If the GOP serves the white tribe (and I assume Krugman is unhappy with that), why doesn’t he just open a Likud franchise in the US just for Jews?

    • Replies: @Karl
    > why doesn’t he just open a Likud franchise in the US just for Jews?

    the number of pigs ALREADY trying to feed off of THAT rice bowl is immense. Stiff competition.

    Abe Foxman was sleight-of-hand'ing the better part of a million dollars a year (from American Jews) by being a mainstay of Defense-Against-AntiSemitism Dinner Theater; you can admire him or hate him - but you can't argue with success.

    Most of Jewish Parasitism, targets other Jews. After all, they are the ones with money.

  16. Going with the pop culture thing, I had the impression that Krugman was Crazy Tom Cruise badgering me until I exploded: You’re God Damn right I did.

  17. We’re achieving levels of projection that shouldn’t even be possible!

    • Replies: @Guillaume Durocher
    The thing is, the entire profession of elite academic economics, the Federal Reserve, and the financing of the Democratic Party are virtual Tribal monopolies at this point. None of this bothers Paul Krugman. I wonder why?
  18. I also like how he subverts ‘the Tribe’.
    And when he talks about us ‘White Christians’. That is some seventh Dan black belt trickery right there. He makes you think it’s some kind of mea culpa, but as soon as you nod your head, he says: Youa culpa.

  19. ,

    This is not Krugman, but macroeconomics 102. When the economy overheats you run surpluses, when it is depressed you run deficits.

    This is actually Keynesian Economics. Some other schools of thought advocate doing nothing. They tend not to work well in economic disasters.

    • Replies: @mukat

    This is actually Keynesian Economics. Some other schools of thought advocate doing nothing. They tend not to work well in economic disasters.
     
    Doing nothing in a crash (or better yet, having the central bank tighten its collateral standards rather than loosen them) makes for a sharp depression and a hard unemployment spike followed quickly by a sharp recovery.

    See Jim Grant, "The Forgotten Depression: 1921: The Crash That Cured Itself"

    Now if you prefer shallow depressions that last for a decade or more with elevated unemployment and massive output gaps that accumulate and are never recovered --> feel free to continue with bipartisan Keynesianism.
  20. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I had read a fair number of Paul’s books and enjoyed them, but as for me, I lost my faith when he came out on the side of Wall St. during the breakdown. Krugman provided cover for Paulson when Paulson was asking for special powers to deal with the crisis and Krugman said (in effect) Yeah, we’d better give Paulson all the leeway he needs to keep the banks solvent and thereby, the system up and running, or else all hell will break loose.

    The upshot was that the banks got a free ride and were never held accountable as were the savings and loans under Reagan. So in the end, Krugman showed himself to be a solid member of the Tribe after all. He was a Jew first, aiding and abetting his cronies and and economist second.

    And now he has the gall to throw this Trumpian tribal stuff in our face.

    Shameless, Paul, shameless.

  21. “(quasi-)Nobel”: allow me to recommend my own usage; he was awarded the counterfeit Nobel Prize.

  22. We shouldn’t serve the big tribe. Therefore, let’s put dozens of little tribes on stage.

  23. Looks like K-thug is just flat out engaging in psychological projection of his own belief system. Amazing how he could be so blind to it as to publish it in a major news outlet, but such is the state of modern day American MSM. And to wag his finger at white Christians who are probably the group in the US showing the least tendency to act “for their tribe” while his own shows the most. Loved how he tried to put the ‘us’ in there, to try and fool anyone who might be reading into thinking he was a ‘white Christian’. Lotta work, this guy.

  24. According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don’t think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words “global security” instead of “national security” to argue for conflict somewhere.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    "America's Navy: a vague calling that is indescribable though global"

    https://youtu.be/h3wtUCPWmeI
  25. I don’t think what’s going on is that simple, Krugman. Maybe this black gentleman, who was a Bernie supporter, now a Trump supporter, can add some depth for you:

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That black guy was good talking to a typical gelded white liberal reporter. Trump would probably agree that we are now at a point where blacks are the great white hope.
  26. Why are Republicans so fixated on the notion that the president must use the phrase “Islamic terrorism,” when actual experts on terrorism agree that this would actually hurt national security, by helping to alienate peaceful Muslims?

    Liberals think if they just keep saying this that it will become true.

    From my perspective, I don’t care if Muslims feel alienated. I want them to assimilate or leave.

  27. The left has been going on like this for decades: “The only true patriot is the one who wants to dismantle his country and turn it into something completely different.”

    False patriotism really is the last refuge of a scoundrel.

  28. What a big load of thoughtless partisanship!

    What does it mean to love America? Surely it means loving the country we actually have.

    Doesn’t Paul Krugman realize that loving the country we actually have implies an opposition to the quasi-open borders policy that his beloved Democratic party supports?

    So much for the Swedish Central Bank Prize in Economics in Honor of Alfred Nobel winner’s ability to reason on non-econotechnical issues.

    Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.

    • Replies: @Flinders Petrie

    Doesn’t Paul Krugman realize that loving the country we actually have implies an opposition to the quasi-open borders policy that his beloved Democratic party supports?

     

    His sanctimonious lecturing about loving the country we already have also betrays the tendency for the left to openly salivate about how old, conservative whites dying-off can will fundamentally change America for the better.
  29. @Guillaume Durocher
    We're achieving levels of projection that shouldn't even be possible!

    The thing is, the entire profession of elite academic economics, the Federal Reserve, and the financing of the Democratic Party are virtual Tribal monopolies at this point. None of this bothers Paul Krugman. I wonder why?

    • Replies: @Flinders Petrie

    None of this bothers Paul Krugman. I wonder why?

     

    I think that to his mind, to notice Jewish tribalism is racist, therefore, it does not exist.
  30. (quasi-)Nobel Laureate

    I like the subtle acknowledgment that the Swedish Central Bank Prize is only sort of kind of a Nobel Prize.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Dismal "science", dismal award.
  31. Decision: Turmp

    While I sincerely dig the orthographic innovation, I dunno: each song is pretty great in its own way.

    Look: if you’re gonna put Kiss head-to-head with Elton John, in the interest of justice you at least have to attempt an apples-to-apples comparison. I mean, don’t you?

    “Tiny Dancer”: great song, tough to beat. But is the closest Kiss equivalent really “Rn’RAN”?

    Obviously not. Right off the bat, I was thinking “Black Diamond”. But then it hit me like an 8 lb. maul, splitting my skull wide open.

    “Beth”:

    Well, decision still Turmp, clearly. Nevertheless, there’s a lot more in common here.

    But then things get interesting. What’s the Eltonian “Rock’n Roll All Night”?

    Trick question. No: it isn’t “Crocodile Rock”, Einstein…which the Kiss tune would anyway stomp into a pulp. It’s the way more similar “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting”:

    And that’s pretty hard-rocking, especially for a gap-toothed marabou-trimmed homosexual fella in glasses. It’s a closer-run thing, but I’m sorry: I still just don’t see how “SNAfF” wins vs. “R’nRAN”.

    So: much more of a fifty-fifty proposition. Maybe Turmp still wins on points, but only very narrowly…

    QED

    • Replies: @European-American
    I love all that music and the movie, but I'm baffled about what on earth this has to do with Krugman and Trump, or Trugman and Krump. But it's all right.
    , @Brutusale
    If you're talking about big, sludgy, power chord rock, yeah, Elton John doesn't rock like KISS.

    On the other hand, Gene Simmons, nee Chaim Witz in Haifa, can only dream about playing the bass riffs in SNAFF. KISS knew their limitations, so they wrote and played accordingly.

    Krugman, on the other hand, is one of those guys who doubts he has ANY limitations.
    , @cthulhu
    You should listen to the Who's balls-to-the-wall cover of SNAfF on the "Two Rooms" Elton John / Bernie Taupin tribute album, from the early '90s I think. Very kick-ass.
    , @Steve Sailer
    I remember reading in the magazines in 1977 about this unprecedented new style of music, punk rock. And then when finally hearing it, thinking, "Didn't Elton John do this exact same thing back in 1973 on "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting?"
  32. @Lot

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.
     
    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush's estimates for the war's cost were absurdly low.

    And "his brainy technical specialties" is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan's economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan's economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    Maybe if you had a listen at Contra Krugman once in awhile you’d be a little less enthusiastic about Krugtron. http://contrakrugman.com/

  33. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    “There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country.”

    -You should be a Hillary or Obama speechwriter, that’s the sort of vacuous nonsense that rolls from their lips daily.

    What you say is far away from and even the opposite of, patriotism. Devotion and support for one’s country would make one desire less, not more foreigners to come on board, particularly those who massively change the fabric of the country itself, and want to turn it into New Mecca, or New Aztlán. Not to mention the crime, disease, violence, loss of social capital they bring or cause, or how adding more people who are ‘on the public dole’ brings us down.

    What is the ‘celebration of diversity’, but just a round about way of saying less whites? Whites built this country. “Treasonous white nationals”? It would be like saying the Japanese are committing treason by not importing millions upon millions of African guest workers to become Japanese citizens, and take over Japan. As usual, you completely flip reality on its head.

    “We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it’s head and claim that it “those people” who are failing America.”

    – Why should the goal be how it ‘fails people of color”? Are people of color the majority of Americans? If we’re talking ‘love and devotion to one’s country’ (i.e. patriotism), then why do we give two sh*ts about doing more for a million illegal Guatemalans here? “People of Color” are the ones who are failing America. They commit more crime, they take more public assistance in net than they contribute, they are more likely to engage in politics that rip the country apart. Not to mention how an increasing percentage of them are in groups that literally want to make America into New Mecca, or New Aztlán. How is it ‘positive change’ to take away from the descendants of those who built the country, those who contribute the most still, and give it to those who take away from the country and who literally seek to make it into an extension of their homeland?

    “The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all.”
    – You just said, prior to this how the goal was to do better for “People of Color”- so how does focusing on a minority of the people promote equality or justice for all?

    “To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.”
    -“War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength.”

  34. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    My kingdom’s rising, your world is dying
    Within a blink of an eye.

  35. Professor CrazyBeard muttering his nonsense again? Must be sweeps week for the aliens watching this shitshow on their TVs.

    Seriously, if he should take a trip, along with his America-hating black wife, and the plane “unexpectedly” disappear over the ocean, the country would have a huge improvement overnight.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Not really.

    There are hundreds of thousands of other semi-intelligent, neoleftist sophists out there who could take his place and write identical articles every week in an effort to brainwash people into supporting the globalist agenda. There probably arent enough jumbojets in the world to free us from the shitlob scourge.
  36. Ot, but related: Greg Mankiw writes about why people oppose trade deals, and support Brexit. You might guess his reasons, but they’re brilliantly summarized by one commenter:

    My thanks to Profs. Mankiw, Mansfield and Mutz for pointing out that anyone who questions free trade is a bigot, xenophobe and isolationist. I had thought that this heresy might spring from the life experience of Americans, unhappily not tenured at Ivy League schools, who have lost their jobs to trade or out-sourcing, or who have see their towns and cities devastated by these economic tsunamis, or who suspect that the benefits of unrestricted markets have bypassed them on the way to the 1%. Clearly, I was wrong. With so much else to worry about these days, I’m relieved that I no longer have to fret about these unwashed, unenlightened and uneducated losers who, in their ignorance and narrow-mindedness, deserve what they get. Unfortunately, as Mankiw points out, they have been left with nothing but their votes, and may get the last word.

    Read the whole thing at the NYT:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/31/upshot/why-voters-dont-buy-it-when-economists-say-global-trade-is-good.html#permid=19323617

  37. @PiltdownMan
    Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he's up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

    My training is in economics and finance. Krugman’s work as an economist is highly overrated. His NYT columns are dissected every week in an entertaining podcast by Robert Murphy and Tom Woods at contrakrugman.com.

    • Replies: @Mark Caplan
    The eminently sensible Cullen Roche of Pragmatic Capitalism has also shown Krugman to have a fundamental misunderstanding of how the economy and money supply work.
    , @tbraton
    I think a distinction should be made between Krugman's academic work, for which he received a "Nobel Prize," and his column in the NY Times. (For the record, I have never read Krugman's blog, which another poster mentioned earlier, so I have no opinion there.) As far as his NY Times column is concerned, I posted a number of messages on TAC four years ago which pointed out that Krugman was agitating for a "housing bubble" to replace the "NASDAQ bubble" back in 2001 and 2002 and then turned around and blamed GWB for the bursting of the housing bubble in 2008 and accepted no responsibility himself for promoting that mess. A totally intellectually dishonest columnist imo. And invariably his solution to every economic problem is more government spending, so I don't waste a lot of time reading him any more.

    BTW I took him as a negative indicator back in mid 2002 when he said in one of his columns that he was out of the stock market and fully invested in bonds. That was after the market had declined for more than two years, longer than the average stock market decline. I got in a bit early but still did quite well.
  38. You mentioned Krugman’s Nobel Prize

    Prize motivation: “for his analysis of trade patterns and location of economic activity”
    Field: international and regional economics
    Contribution: Integrated the previously disparate research fields into a new, international trade and economic geography.

    Undoubtedly a paean to the glories of the free trade that has ruined our economy, so I dismiss it as know nothingism BS. _____ DJTrump should get a Nobel Economic Prize for being outspoken about the downside of free trade for America. This would be justice.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital. He recetly wrote against Brexit exonomic scaremongering.
  39. Sir Elton John had long been declared “Kosher gay” for calling Jesus “a super intelligent gay man”, in 2010. Elton John married Canadian David James Furnish, a gay film and TV producer in 2005. Both have adopted (not so gay yet) a child.

    https://rehmat1.com/2010/12/28/hideseek-exhibition-insults-jesus/

  40. @Lot

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.
     
    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush's estimates for the war's cost were absurdly low.

    And "his brainy technical specialties" is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan's economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan's economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    And he was wrong that much more fiscal stimulus was needed to lift the US out of the 2009 recession.

    • Replies: @Roman Frege
    As someone who was "close to the action" on the stimulus package, it is not obvious that he was wrong. The unemployment rate was stubbornly high from 2011 to 2014ish and more stimulus in 2010 would have helped with that.
  41. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Steve:

    Maybe you mentioned it once or twice, but how much do you think Krugman’s wife edits or influences these columns?

  42. I actually think Krugman gets it, in some flawed way (and with an unwillingness to do the electoral math), in a way that Mrs. Clinton and most of the Democratic mainstream does not.

    This election is about identity and interests, not ideology and principles. Krugman may be unhappy that White America has returned to seeing itself as a nation worthy of inhabiting and preserving it’s own nation-state, but I’ll give him credit for figuring it out.

    Of course, Trump also gets it, and has done the electoral math, and has no moral qualms with the idea of an American nation-state, which is why he stands a good chance of being the next President, and all Krugman gets is a column in the NYTimes op-ed page.

    https://benkurtzblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/14/hillary-clinton-doesnt-get-it/

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "This election is about identity and interests, not ideology and principles."

    The identity and interests come directly from ideology and principles. They are mutually inclusive.

    "Krugman may be unhappy that White America has returned to seeing itself as a nation worthy of inhabiting and preserving it’s own nation-state, but I’ll give him credit for figuring it out."

    Some whites, increasing numbers of whites, are toying with this notion. But only if Trump is elected AND reelected, until his policies become law, until other politicians like Trump tout his ideals on a regular basis, then and only then are we able to state that "White America has returned...to preserving it's own nation-state".
  43. Those stupid Others, always Othering people.

    • Replies: @Flinders Petrie

    Those stupid Others, always Othering people.

     

    Well done...perfect summary.
  44. The GOP in the past was not much better than the Democrats. But now that seems not all that relevant, now that Trump is an option. It would seem now to spend time and effort to make sure the elections are not rigged.

  45. @wren
    Krugman used to be reasonable 20 years ago or so. IMO.

    Now, he seems to spout propaganda, much of it obviously false.

    What happened? Was it just his wife?

    Krugman used to write college Economics textbooks. I think he determined being a left wing pundit paid a lot better and was a lot less work than that. A couple of columnists have pointed out several times when he has directly contradicted something from one of his textbooks in one of his NY Times columns.

  46. Why did you refer to Krugman as only a “quasi” Nobel Laureate?

    • Replies: @Johan Schmidt
    There is no "Nobel Prize in Economics" awarded by the Nobel committee. There is a "Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics" awarded by the Swedish Riksbank.
    , @Erik L
    I assume it's because it is not one of the original Nobels and is given out by a different country
    , @Bill Jones
    Nobel did not establish a prize in economics.

    The Swedish Central Bank established it and stole Nobel's name. Like all central bankers they are liars and thieves.
    , @Glaivester
    Because there is no Nobel Prize in Economics, in the sense of a prize established in Alfred Nobel's will. There is the Swedish National Bank's Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel that was established in 1968 from a donation by the Swedish Central Bank. In other words, a Central Bank decided to give an award in economics and to attach it to an already existing prestigious award organization.
  47. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    “I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can’t we go back to that kind of America?”

    Krugman was talking about the rise of income inequality over the past 50 years. To him, “that kind of America” means a broadly middle class America where the CEOs make 40x the bottom, rather than 500x.

    What’s the unsophisticated part? That he doesn’t understand that income inequality is a result of immigration? He’d probably post graphs comparing income inequality to the level of immigration and note that the rise of inequality is a worldwide phenomenon, though immigration could certainly play a part.

    Or, is it that he doesn’t understand that inequality is mostly a result of nonwhites failing to catch up to whites? His response is likely to be a graph showing the rise in income inequality *within* white America.

    For that matter, he doesn’t take it for granted that inequality leads to lower economic growth or anything of the sort. These are mostly empirical questions to be studied, not sacred dogma.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable.
  48. @wren
    Krugman used to be reasonable 20 years ago or so. IMO.

    Now, he seems to spout propaganda, much of it obviously false.

    What happened? Was it just his wife?

    Was it just his wife?

    Pretty much.

    The change tracks closely to the time of marriage, and she’s a radical feminist who “helps” him write his Times articles.

    We’re the dog that Krugman kicks after his wife kicks him.

    • Replies: @attilathehen
    His wife is a negress.
  49. “then you don’t love your country — you care only about your tribe.”

    I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)

    Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)"

    You do realize that the Irish weren't welcome here. Now, why was that?

    "Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?"

    Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?
  50. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Krugman is representing his tribe, that’s why you are correct in saying it’s funny. Other than that, Krugman is accurate in pointing out that, like his tribe, Trump as the showman is saying the things to his adopted tribe that will get him elected, like ANY other politician. Except what Trump has going for him, like Jesse Ventura, is that he can effectively play the “outsider” card.

    “Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can’t go there, he just c-a-n-’-t.”

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those “old neighborhoods” were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.

    • Replies: @Paul Yarbles

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those “old neighborhoods” were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.
     
    Assimilation is not instantaneous. In fact, assimilation won't occur at all if the inflows are sufficiently high for sufficiently long. My view is that the immigration rates are too high now and that this has been going on for too long. Support for my view is the very existence of wide-spread backlash. We do not owe the rest of the world a place at our table and so I can see no reason to cause such discord in our country.

    Now add to this the high levels of cynicism and hatred of our existing society and it's traditions and history expressed by our cultural elites who mold opinion to a large degree. We get a formula that leads not to assimilation, but of an acceptance that it is America that must change.
  51. @Carl
    "then you don’t love your country — you care only about your tribe."

    I'm Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I'm just using his terms here.)

    Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?

    “I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)”

    You do realize that the Irish weren’t welcome here. Now, why was that?

    “Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?”

    Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    "Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?"

    Your Marxist crocodile tears are not appreciated.
    , @utu
    "Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?" - But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish? Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better. Perhaps even in Ireland. Instead of emigrating they would stay and would be force to fix what was wrong with Ireland.
    , @Brutusale
    Why do you use the past tense?
  52. @Ben Kurtz
    I actually think Krugman gets it, in some flawed way (and with an unwillingness to do the electoral math), in a way that Mrs. Clinton and most of the Democratic mainstream does not.

    This election is about identity and interests, not ideology and principles. Krugman may be unhappy that White America has returned to seeing itself as a nation worthy of inhabiting and preserving it's own nation-state, but I'll give him credit for figuring it out.

    Of course, Trump also gets it, and has done the electoral math, and has no moral qualms with the idea of an American nation-state, which is why he stands a good chance of being the next President, and all Krugman gets is a column in the NYTimes op-ed page.

    https://benkurtzblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/14/hillary-clinton-doesnt-get-it/

    “This election is about identity and interests, not ideology and principles.”

    The identity and interests come directly from ideology and principles. They are mutually inclusive.

    “Krugman may be unhappy that White America has returned to seeing itself as a nation worthy of inhabiting and preserving it’s own nation-state, but I’ll give him credit for figuring it out.”

    Some whites, increasing numbers of whites, are toying with this notion. But only if Trump is elected AND reelected, until his policies become law, until other politicians like Trump tout his ideals on a regular basis, then and only then are we able to state that “White America has returned…to preserving it’s own nation-state”.

  53. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    Pay attention to this man, he is a dangerous “progressive.” What he really wants to do is
    expropriate from the wealthy class and redistribute to the poor, with a generous fee
    to the revolutionaries who will facilitate this transfer. Just the way Lenin, Stalin, Fidel,
    Chavez, Mao and others have tried, leading to dictatorships or failed elected socialist
    states.
    The writer (?) is holding on to the fallacious belief in an egalitarian “human race”
    whereas Evolutionary Biology has revealed that in nature there are only competing
    groups who sometimes cooperate but are just as likely to indulge in genocidal warfare.
    Sorry to tell you this but life really is a bitch.
    And if “people of color are failing” could the problem not lie therein?

  54. @Vinay
    "I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can’t we go back to that kind of America?"

    Krugman was talking about the rise of income inequality over the past 50 years. To him, "that kind of America" means a broadly middle class America where the CEOs make 40x the bottom, rather than 500x.

    What's the unsophisticated part? That he doesn't understand that income inequality is a result of immigration? He'd probably post graphs comparing income inequality to the level of immigration and note that the rise of inequality is a worldwide phenomenon, though immigration could certainly play a part.

    Or, is it that he doesn't understand that inequality is mostly a result of nonwhites failing to catch up to whites? His response is likely to be a graph showing the rise in income inequality *within* white America.

    For that matter, he doesn't take it for granted that inequality leads to lower economic growth or anything of the sort. These are mostly empirical questions to be studied, not sacred dogma.

    The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable.

    • Replies: @Vinay
    "The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable."

    Krugman would typically view your implicit assertion as a testable hypothesis. For example, are the suburbs less safe? There's an empirical answer to that - No! Crime has gone down hugely over the past few decades. Are they less nice? More unaffordable? Why, due to immigration? Increasing population doesn't necessarily make things more unaffordable. Due to restrictive zoning limiting the housing stock? Or does increasing inequality result in a rising gap between median housing prices and median income?

    The thing about Krugman is, anybody who reads his blog would understand that there are multiple factors which can play a role in something like housing affordability and they'd expect any assertion about causes to be backed up by a bunch of tables and graphs. Some similarities with iSteve there!
  55. Since Steve can’t be bothered to explain to unsophisticates like me exactly what’s funny about Krugman’s column, let me take a guess. Is it that Krugman suggests the GOP is tribal but it’s Democrats who are the *real* tribal party?

    The Democrats are certainly a coalition of different interest groups, including tribal interests. But there’s no symmetry between the two parties. EVERY group in American society, with the possible exception of evangelicals, has significant representation within the Democratic Party, including white men, rich men, professionals, labor, big business, small business, you name it.

    The Republican insistence on viewing the Democrats as a Coalition of the Fringes repeatedly leads them astray, like seeing Wasilla as more American than New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston and San Francisco. Or sneering at “California values” or New York or Massachusetts values, as if these were minor fringes of America. Or assuming that the 50% Democratic vote must include 47% “takers” and only a tiny fraction of the “makers”.

    A party advancing the interests of white Americans isn’t inherently tribal, it could easily be a fairly representative coalition. I’m sure the state GOP in red states, especially states like Texas, is broadly representative. But the national GOP has chosen to be tribal by writing off vast swathes of the US and pretending they’re just fringes.

    • Replies: @Jean Cocteausten
    The trouble with the national GOP isn't that it doesn't appeal to nonwhites; the trouble with the national GOP is that it doesn't appeal to much of anyone. They put up the best what, 15 candidates they could come up with, and whites rejected them all.
  56. Gentlemen and Ladies,
    have mercy to the poor guy. At age 63, two wives and no children.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Gentlemen and Ladies,
    have mercy to the poor guy. At age 63, two wives and no children."

    Nope. No mercy. But profound gratitude for small favors.
  57. @PiltdownMan
    Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he's up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

    It is a bit like Chomsky in but in reverse. Chompers built his impressive reputation in linguistics and then thought it was transferable to economics.

  58. @yowza
    I don't think what's going on is that simple, Krugman. Maybe this black gentleman, who was a Bernie supporter, now a Trump supporter, can add some depth for you:

    https://youtu.be/ed9VsJlveGE

    That black guy was good talking to a typical gelded white liberal reporter. Trump would probably agree that we are now at a point where blacks are the great white hope.

  59. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    You just know he is congratulating himself for taking a dog whistle and turning it into a more secret dog whistle.

  60. Every time an economists gets a lot prizes and is amplified by the press you know he works for the P2B. That’s all you need to know about Paul Krugman.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    "P2B"?
  61. @Dave Pinsen
    The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable.

    “The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable.”

    Krugman would typically view your implicit assertion as a testable hypothesis. For example, are the suburbs less safe? There’s an empirical answer to that – No! Crime has gone down hugely over the past few decades. Are they less nice? More unaffordable? Why, due to immigration? Increasing population doesn’t necessarily make things more unaffordable. Due to restrictive zoning limiting the housing stock? Or does increasing inequality result in a rising gap between median housing prices and median income?

    The thing about Krugman is, anybody who reads his blog would understand that there are multiple factors which can play a role in something like housing affordability and they’d expect any assertion about causes to be backed up by a bunch of tables and graphs. Some similarities with iSteve there!

    • Replies: @Flinders Petrie

    There’s an empirical answer to that – No! Crime has gone down hugely over the past few decades.

     

    Crime in non-black suburbs has always been the same - extremely low.
  62. @Corvinus
    "I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)"

    You do realize that the Irish weren't welcome here. Now, why was that?

    "Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?"

    Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?

    “Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?”

    Your Marxist crocodile tears are not appreciated.

  63. @Wade
    Why did you refer to Krugman as only a "quasi" Nobel Laureate?

    There is no “Nobel Prize in Economics” awarded by the Nobel committee. There is a “Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics” awarded by the Swedish Riksbank.

  64. @Wade
    Why did you refer to Krugman as only a "quasi" Nobel Laureate?

    I assume it’s because it is not one of the original Nobels and is given out by a different country

  65. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Back in 2006, when he was writing The Conscience of a Liberal, Krugman found himself searching for a way to describe his own political Eden, his vision of America before the Fall. He knew the moment that he wanted to describe: the fifties and early sixties, when prosperity was not only broad but broadly shared. Wells, looking over a draft, thought his account was too numerical, too cold. She suggested that he describe his own childhood, in the ­middle-class suburb of Merrick, Long Island. And so Krugman began writing with an almost choking nostalgia, the sort of feeling that he usually despises: “The political and economic environment of my youth stands revealed as a paradise lost, an exceptional moment in our nation’s history …”
    Krugman remembers Merrick in these terms, as a place that provoked in him “amazingly little alienation.” “All the mothers waiting to pick up the fathers at the train station in the evening,” he says, remembering. “You were in an area where there were a lot of quiet streets, and it was possible to take bike rides all over Long Island. We used to ride up to Sagamore Hill, the old Teddy Roosevelt estate.”
    The Krugmans lived in a less lush part of Merrick, full of small ranch ­houses each containing the promise of social ascent. “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/04/aspie-economists.html

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Yeah, Steve (and I) pretty much agree that America peaked in 1964, when Brian Wilson was writing so many songs that he basically gave some to Jan and Dean to perform.

    Also, that was the year a cover of Road and Track ((or Car and Driver) featured the newly-minted, space-aged styled StingRay head to head with a 427 Cobra--it just doesn't get any better than that. Skateboarding, aka sidewalk surfing was blossoming nation-wide and everyone was trim and well tanned. Men wore shortsleeve dress shirts and women wore sun dresses or pedal pusher pants along with nice blouses. Metrecal was the dieting craze and Japanese motorcycles were showing up on streets everywhere (a 250 was a big bike)…..

    Obviously, if we want to return to our glory days we need to encourage Wilson to take up music again.
    , @Forbes

    “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”
     
    A recollection that reeks of magical thinking. Plumbers--blue collar occupations--and how well they were doing versus white-collar middle managers wouldn't have been a topic of (or typical) conversation in the '50s and '60s. White-collar middle managers were the emerging (and exploding) occupational category leading to a middle class life in the post-war era. The GI Bill and a college education was the route to a white-collar job and the middle class--not a plumbing apprenticeship or vocational trade school.

    Perhaps Krugman's father was an inept middle manager.
  66. If what bothers you about America is, instead, the fact that it doesn’t look exactly the way it did in the past…

    This idea that the past was nothing but unabashed evil (by whites) and endless suffering (by everyone else) is becoming increasingly absurd. This narrative requires obsessing over the past when it involves real or perceived discrimination (but only by whites), while completely dismissing nostalgic remeniscing, because, you know, their happiness came at the expense of others.

    The newest crops of college students are shockingly ignorant of history…even recent history (past 20 years). They seem to be incapable of understanding that life before today wasn’t some absurd caraciture of good vs evil. The white villain twisting his mustache and tying everyone else to the railroad tracks.

    To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?

    Cicero

  67. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    Treason is a word we typically use for people like you who side with the out group such as immigrants / invaders. Inclusive patriotism is a meaningless contrivance that only exists in your tiny mind.

  68. What’s your source for Krugman being a Kiss fan?
    When I google Krugman + Kiss, all I get is this:
    “Paul Krugman’s sloppy, wet kiss”.

    http://www.salon.com/2014/10/19/thomas_frank_paul_krugmans_sloppy_wet_kiss/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Don't quote me on KISS. I went with KISS because it's geographically appropriate and funny.

    There used to be a lot of stuff on the Internet about Krugman's love of 1970s rock bands, but he appears to have made a concerted effort starting in 2011 to bury the uncool stuff way down on Google by writing all the time about newer bands like Arcade Fire he loves loves loves.

    I can't remember exactly which 1970s bands I've read him discuss his abiding love for ... Doobie Brothers? Blue Oyster Cult? But they definitely weren't of the Velvet Underground / Roxy Music status elite.

    Also, I'm not sure that Trump deep down loves Tiny Dancer or if he plays it at his rallies because Sir Elton owns a condo in one of his buildings. Trump also plays Phantom of the Opera because Sir Andrew is a tenant.

  69. @slumber_j

    Decision: Turmp
     
    While I sincerely dig the orthographic innovation, I dunno: each song is pretty great in its own way.

    Look: if you're gonna put Kiss head-to-head with Elton John, in the interest of justice you at least have to attempt an apples-to-apples comparison. I mean, don't you?

    "Tiny Dancer": great song, tough to beat. But is the closest Kiss equivalent really "Rn'RAN"?

    Obviously not. Right off the bat, I was thinking "Black Diamond". But then it hit me like an 8 lb. maul, splitting my skull wide open.

    "Beth":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHkojuUSDO8

    Well, decision still Turmp, clearly. Nevertheless, there's a lot more in common here.

    But then things get interesting. What's the Eltonian "Rock'n Roll All Night"?

    Trick question. No: it isn't "Crocodile Rock", Einstein...which the Kiss tune would anyway stomp into a pulp. It's the way more similar "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26wEWSUUsUc

    And that's pretty hard-rocking, especially for a gap-toothed marabou-trimmed homosexual fella in glasses. It's a closer-run thing, but I'm sorry: I still just don't see how "SNAfF" wins vs. "R'nRAN".

    So: much more of a fifty-fifty proposition. Maybe Turmp still wins on points, but only very narrowly...

    QED

    I love all that music and the movie, but I’m baffled about what on earth this has to do with Krugman and Trump, or Trugman and Krump. But it’s all right.

  70. @Wade
    Why did you refer to Krugman as only a "quasi" Nobel Laureate?

    Nobel did not establish a prize in economics.

    The Swedish Central Bank established it and stole Nobel’s name. Like all central bankers they are liars and thieves.

  71. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    We progressives love America

    I think you love your conception of America.

    To paraphrase a great American politician, people of little or no color is people too.

  72. @Skinnyhoops
    And he was wrong that much more fiscal stimulus was needed to lift the US out of the 2009 recession.

    As someone who was “close to the action” on the stimulus package, it is not obvious that he was wrong. The unemployment rate was stubbornly high from 2011 to 2014ish and more stimulus in 2010 would have helped with that.

  73. If nothing else, the Trump candidacy has been a stalking horse outing the pseudo-conservatives in the Republican party as well as the anti-white elements on the left. He is yelling Little Marco, and everyone else has to yell Polo. The people are not realigning so much as the parties are. But there are a number of impostors who would have preferred to remain where they were, well hidden and well employed behind enemy lines ( i think i used every metaphor i could).

  74. @whorefinder
    Professor CrazyBeard muttering his nonsense again? Must be sweeps week for the aliens watching this shitshow on their TVs.

    Seriously, if he should take a trip, along with his America-hating black wife, and the plane "unexpectedly" disappear over the ocean, the country would have a huge improvement overnight.

    Not really.

    There are hundreds of thousands of other semi-intelligent, neoleftist sophists out there who could take his place and write identical articles every week in an effort to brainwash people into supporting the globalist agenda. There probably arent enough jumbojets in the world to free us from the shitlob scourge.

  75. @Lot
    Steve cannot really comment on this because he honors his old confidentiality agreement, but I think he said a long time ago that Krugman was on his old HBD listserv.

    I wonder if Krugman, who lacks social graces, got into some heated disagreements with Steve who still has a mild grudge over it. I also think after reading him for years that Krugman is not an IQ egalitarian but feels conflicted but its implications.

    The SPLC and other usual suspects outted everyone on the server a few years ago.

    Krugman was on it, as was Gary Becker (Chicago econ nobelist), James Heckman (Chicago econ nobelist who works on education and racial difference issues among others), Steve Pinker, and George Borjas (Harvard econ prof).

    http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/TS/BaileyAssociates/HumanBiodiversityGroup.htm

  76. @Clyde
    You mentioned Krugman's Nobel Prize

    Prize motivation: "for his analysis of trade patterns and location of economic activity"
    Field: international and regional economics
    Contribution: Integrated the previously disparate research fields into a new, international trade and economic geography.
     
    Undoubtedly a paean to the glories of the free trade that has ruined our economy, so I dismiss it as know nothingism BS. _____ DJTrump should get a Nobel Economic Prize for being outspoken about the downside of free trade for America. This would be justice.

    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital. He recetly wrote against Brexit exonomic scaremongering.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    I will bet that when Krug got his Nobel he was a free trader. You think this prize would ever be given to a free trade skeptic? Thanks...I was not aware of his current position on free trade
    , @Argosy Jones

    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital.
     
    Another episode of Krugman then vs Krugman now.Slate-era Krugman then was a proponent of free trade deals 200%. Krugman after the free trade deals were voted in is highly skeptical and interested in real world consequences.

    Be prepared when he flips again and supports TPP after the election. If Clinton wins, it will be because ->SHE<- has improved the deal in some pragmatic manner. If Trump wins, it will be an emotional appeal to the new world free of intolerance and hate which we could all enjoy if only the Racist Nationalists could reduce tariffs on artisinal soaps.
    , @Clyde
    You are forcing me to see if I can find the specifics on why Krugman got the Nobel Prize. What kind of trade was he advocating back then that got him the Nobel.
  77. Once upon a time, Krugman made a big deal out of the harmonious and prosperous days of The Great Compression — which, I think, he was right to do.

    But what was immigration like during The Great Compression?

    Slim to none, of course.

    As best I can make out, he hasn’t been talking much about The Great Compression in a good while.

  78. Basically the left doesn’t love their country in any meaningful way. These are the people who like to claim they’re above nations and borders and wish for an internationalist utopia. Their dissent is not heroic, it’s just whining. Honest, constructive dissent can only come from the right. Leftist dissent, even if useful, is purely coincidental.

  79. Is there a more sinister agenda than mere projection?

    ‘The conservative right are un-American. They’re, in fact, guilty of treason, when you think of it.’

  80. @Corvinus
    Krugman is representing his tribe, that's why you are correct in saying it's funny. Other than that, Krugman is accurate in pointing out that, like his tribe, Trump as the showman is saying the things to his adopted tribe that will get him elected, like ANY other politician. Except what Trump has going for him, like Jesse Ventura, is that he can effectively play the "outsider" card.

    "Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can’t go there, he just c-a-n-’-t."

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those "old neighborhoods" were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those “old neighborhoods” were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.

    Assimilation is not instantaneous. In fact, assimilation won’t occur at all if the inflows are sufficiently high for sufficiently long. My view is that the immigration rates are too high now and that this has been going on for too long. Support for my view is the very existence of wide-spread backlash. We do not owe the rest of the world a place at our table and so I can see no reason to cause such discord in our country.

    Now add to this the high levels of cynicism and hatred of our existing society and it’s traditions and history expressed by our cultural elites who mold opinion to a large degree. We get a formula that leads not to assimilation, but of an acceptance that it is America that must change.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "We do not owe the rest of the world a place at our table and so I can see no reason to cause such discord in our country."

    How was that table created by the way?

    "Now add to this the high levels of cynicism and hatred of our existing society and it’s traditions and history expressed by our cultural elites who mold opinion to a large degree. We get a formula that leads not to assimilation, but of an acceptance that it is America that must change."

    Who has hatred of our existing society?

    Who are these cultural elites you speak of?
  81. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Back in 2006, when he was writing The Conscience of a Liberal, Krugman found himself searching for a way to describe his own political Eden, his vision of America before the Fall. He knew the moment that he wanted to describe: the fifties and early sixties, when prosperity was not only broad but broadly shared. Wells, looking over a draft, thought his account was too numerical, too cold. She suggested that he describe his own childhood, in the ­middle-class suburb of Merrick, Long Island. And so Krugman began writing with an almost choking nostalgia, the sort of feeling that he usually despises: “The political and economic environment of my youth stands revealed as a paradise lost, an exceptional moment in our nation’s history …”
    Krugman remembers Merrick in these terms, as a place that provoked in him “amazingly little alienation.” “All the mothers waiting to pick up the fathers at the train station in the evening,” he says, remembering. “You were in an area where there were a lot of quiet streets, and it was possible to take bike rides all over Long Island. We used to ride up to Sagamore Hill, the old Teddy Roosevelt estate.”
    The Krugmans lived in a less lush part of Merrick, full of small ranch ­houses each containing the promise of social ascent. “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/04/aspie-economists.html

    Yeah, Steve (and I) pretty much agree that America peaked in 1964, when Brian Wilson was writing so many songs that he basically gave some to Jan and Dean to perform.

    Also, that was the year a cover of Road and Track ((or Car and Driver) featured the newly-minted, space-aged styled StingRay head to head with a 427 Cobra–it just doesn’t get any better than that. Skateboarding, aka sidewalk surfing was blossoming nation-wide and everyone was trim and well tanned. Men wore shortsleeve dress shirts and women wore sun dresses or pedal pusher pants along with nice blouses. Metrecal was the dieting craze and Japanese motorcycles were showing up on streets everywhere (a 250 was a big bike)…..

    Obviously, if we want to return to our glory days we need to encourage Wilson to take up music again.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    1964 was the year that Dino knocked those floppy-haired weirdos from Liverpool clean off the charts with his recording of "Everybody Loves Somebody."
  82. utu says:
    @Corvinus
    "I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)"

    You do realize that the Irish weren't welcome here. Now, why was that?

    "Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?"

    Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?

    “Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?” – But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish? Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better. Perhaps even in Ireland. Instead of emigrating they would stay and would be force to fix what was wrong with Ireland.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish?"

    Worse off, are you kidding me, lad. The Irish are white. A pot of gold.

    "Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better."

    Perhaps. In other words, you're only speculating.
    , @Former Darfur
    The Irish who visit America, particularly the East Coast, quite often remark that they consider Irish-Americans a bunch of hooligans and drunken fools.
  83. This is a whole new dimension of chutzpah.

  84. @Immigrant from former USSR
    Gentlemen and Ladies,
    have mercy to the poor guy. At age 63, two wives and no children.

    “Gentlemen and Ladies,
    have mercy to the poor guy. At age 63, two wives and no children.”

    Nope. No mercy. But profound gratitude for small favors.

    • Replies: @Pagoda
    His stupidity will die with him. May he burn in hell.
  85. For an Austrian alternative, Tom Woods does a great rebuttal of Krug’s nonsense on his contra-Krugman podcast.

  86. jb says:
    @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Steve — There is a Krugman blog post from 2013 where he reminisces about the way that public expression of racism became “utterly taboo” in his old neighborhood. I find really interesting; maybe you could do something with it? Here is the key paragraph:

    And while it didn’t literally happen overnight, it did happen fast. My personal memory: I grew up on Long Island in the 60s, and at the time many of the fancier houses (split-level ranches!) had little statues of coachmen in front. In my memory, at least, there was one summer — maybe 1965? — when, suddenly, everyone had the faces on their coachmen repainted; all of a sudden they were white. The message had gotten through: pretending that you were living in antebellum Tara was not OK.

    I find it kind of hard to reconcile assertions that America is a racist society with the fact that it’s been 50 years since it’s been possible for respectable members of society to risk the appearance of racism.

  87. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    I can’t go back to my teenage years, whether I want to or not, because I’m 50+.

    Now, consider this statement. It looks trolly. But it’s deceptively deep. There’s been 30 years of world change, you can’t just roll it back like a carpet. The world is NOT a carpet.

  88. @Glaivester
    (quasi-)Nobel Laureate

    I like the subtle acknowledgment that the Swedish Central Bank Prize is only sort of kind of a Nobel Prize.

    Dismal “science”, dismal award.

  89. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Krugman’s political musings, or at least the ones published by the NYT, have been cautiously oriented toward regaining his former White House advisorship under an unsympathetic Obama, and now Clinton administration. I imagine that plenty of other individuals have noticed this unfortunate trend in his work as well.

  90. @slumber_j

    Decision: Turmp
     
    While I sincerely dig the orthographic innovation, I dunno: each song is pretty great in its own way.

    Look: if you're gonna put Kiss head-to-head with Elton John, in the interest of justice you at least have to attempt an apples-to-apples comparison. I mean, don't you?

    "Tiny Dancer": great song, tough to beat. But is the closest Kiss equivalent really "Rn'RAN"?

    Obviously not. Right off the bat, I was thinking "Black Diamond". But then it hit me like an 8 lb. maul, splitting my skull wide open.

    "Beth":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHkojuUSDO8

    Well, decision still Turmp, clearly. Nevertheless, there's a lot more in common here.

    But then things get interesting. What's the Eltonian "Rock'n Roll All Night"?

    Trick question. No: it isn't "Crocodile Rock", Einstein...which the Kiss tune would anyway stomp into a pulp. It's the way more similar "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26wEWSUUsUc

    And that's pretty hard-rocking, especially for a gap-toothed marabou-trimmed homosexual fella in glasses. It's a closer-run thing, but I'm sorry: I still just don't see how "SNAfF" wins vs. "R'nRAN".

    So: much more of a fifty-fifty proposition. Maybe Turmp still wins on points, but only very narrowly...

    QED

    If you’re talking about big, sludgy, power chord rock, yeah, Elton John doesn’t rock like KISS.

    On the other hand, Gene Simmons, nee Chaim Witz in Haifa, can only dream about playing the bass riffs in SNAFF. KISS knew their limitations, so they wrote and played accordingly.

    Krugman, on the other hand, is one of those guys who doubts he has ANY limitations.

    • Agree: EriK
  91. @Kylie
    "Gentlemen and Ladies,
    have mercy to the poor guy. At age 63, two wives and no children."

    Nope. No mercy. But profound gratitude for small favors.

    His stupidity will die with him. May he burn in hell.

  92. OT: Did anyone notice how Tim Kaine repeated a phrase at the convention: “Faith, Family and Work” a translation of the Vichy France slogan “Travail, Famille, Patrie”?
    Someone call the ADL

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    Then they need to call out Rob Halford of Judas Priest for closing his eulogy for Lemmy with "Faith, Family, Friends, Fans."
  93. @Corvinus
    "I’m Irish and my country is my tribe, more or less. (I’m just using his terms here.)"

    You do realize that the Irish weren't welcome here. Now, why was that?

    "Can Krugman explain why we should replace our cohesion with diversity?"

    Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?

    Why do you use the past tense?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Why do you use the past tense?"

    So do you truly believe the Irish today threaten American cohesion? That would be decidedly anti-white by white nationalists. Turn in your white card at the door, please.
  94. @Brutusale
    Why do you use the past tense?

    “Why do you use the past tense?”

    So do you truly believe the Irish today threaten American cohesion? That would be decidedly anti-white by white nationalists. Turn in your white card at the door, please.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in "earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans". They've turned in THEIR white card.
  95. @Desiderius

    Was it just his wife?
     
    Pretty much.

    The change tracks closely to the time of marriage, and she's a radical feminist who "helps" him write his Times articles.

    We're the dog that Krugman kicks after his wife kicks him.

    His wife is a negress.

    • Replies: @Jean Cocteausten

    His wife is a negress.
     
    A what now?
    , @reiner Tor
    Krugman's wife? She looks 100% white.
  96. @AndyBoy
    Hilarious. I only wish it were true that conservatives had been loyal to their tribe.

    Notice that anti-Whites are always talking about WHAT they are loyal to but never WHO?

    They are loyal to words, institutions, dreams, visions, utopias, constitutions, etc, etc.

    But they are NEVER loyal to an actual people. Start asking people WHO are you loyal to, not WHAT.

    Hilarious. I only wish it were true that conservatives had been loyal to their tribe.

    Notice that anti-Whites are always talking about WHAT they are loyal to but never WHO?

    They are loyal to words, institutions, dreams, visions, utopias, constitutions, etc, etc.

    But they are NEVER loyal to an actual people. Start asking people WHO are you loyal to, not WHAT.

    Also, look at what they’re fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can’t win that way.

    • Replies: @iffen
    The 8th Ohio Infantry wasn't all that abstract, how did that go?
  97. @slumber_j

    Decision: Turmp
     
    While I sincerely dig the orthographic innovation, I dunno: each song is pretty great in its own way.

    Look: if you're gonna put Kiss head-to-head with Elton John, in the interest of justice you at least have to attempt an apples-to-apples comparison. I mean, don't you?

    "Tiny Dancer": great song, tough to beat. But is the closest Kiss equivalent really "Rn'RAN"?

    Obviously not. Right off the bat, I was thinking "Black Diamond". But then it hit me like an 8 lb. maul, splitting my skull wide open.

    "Beth":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHkojuUSDO8

    Well, decision still Turmp, clearly. Nevertheless, there's a lot more in common here.

    But then things get interesting. What's the Eltonian "Rock'n Roll All Night"?

    Trick question. No: it isn't "Crocodile Rock", Einstein...which the Kiss tune would anyway stomp into a pulp. It's the way more similar "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26wEWSUUsUc

    And that's pretty hard-rocking, especially for a gap-toothed marabou-trimmed homosexual fella in glasses. It's a closer-run thing, but I'm sorry: I still just don't see how "SNAfF" wins vs. "R'nRAN".

    So: much more of a fifty-fifty proposition. Maybe Turmp still wins on points, but only very narrowly...

    QED

    You should listen to the Who’s balls-to-the-wall cover of SNAfF on the “Two Rooms” Elton John / Bernie Taupin tribute album, from the early ’90s I think. Very kick-ass.

    • Replies: @jJay
    cthulhu,

    You are the only one thus far who mentioned Bernie Taupin. Kudos for that. Taupin's ethereal lyrics were a big part of Elton John's pop success. Taupin's lyrics had a venue and were about something that happened there, but the listener could never pinpoint either.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=come+down+in+time+lyrics&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS561US561&oq=come+down+in+time+l&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j0l4.6946j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    The use of the pronoun 'her' was, of course, from another era.
    , @slumber_j
    I hadn't known about that: thanks. It's really good and seems to be an absolutely perfect song for The Who to cover, entailing as it does the line, "I'm a juvenile product of the working class."

    Two big problems with their version: the failure of Daltrey et al. to sing the "Whooooooah" lead-in to the chorus, and the lack of actual Keith Moon drumming. Not that Moon was ever a better technical drummer, only that as he put it (as quoted in a really good New Yorker appreciation some years ago): "“I’m the best Keith Moon-style drummer in the world.”

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/11/29/the-fun-stuff

    Anyway, here's the Who version on YouTube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpk_V8mnoP8
  98. @syonredux

    Back in 2006, when he was writing The Conscience of a Liberal, Krugman found himself searching for a way to describe his own political Eden, his vision of America before the Fall. He knew the moment that he wanted to describe: the fifties and early sixties, when prosperity was not only broad but broadly shared. Wells, looking over a draft, thought his account was too numerical, too cold. She suggested that he describe his own childhood, in the ­middle-class suburb of Merrick, Long Island. And so Krugman began writing with an almost choking nostalgia, the sort of feeling that he usually despises: “The political and economic environment of my youth stands revealed as a paradise lost, an exceptional moment in our nation’s history …”
    Krugman remembers Merrick in these terms, as a place that provoked in him “amazingly little alienation.” “All the mothers waiting to pick up the fathers at the train station in the evening,” he says, remembering. “You were in an area where there were a lot of quiet streets, and it was possible to take bike rides all over Long Island. We used to ride up to Sagamore Hill, the old Teddy Roosevelt estate.”
    The Krugmans lived in a less lush part of Merrick, full of small ranch ­houses each containing the promise of social ascent. “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/04/aspie-economists.html

    “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”

    A recollection that reeks of magical thinking. Plumbers–blue collar occupations–and how well they were doing versus white-collar middle managers wouldn’t have been a topic of (or typical) conversation in the ’50s and ’60s. White-collar middle managers were the emerging (and exploding) occupational category leading to a middle class life in the post-war era. The GI Bill and a college education was the route to a white-collar job and the middle class–not a plumbing apprenticeship or vocational trade school.

    Perhaps Krugman’s father was an inept middle manager.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    I think that Krugman is attempting to convey that Eisenhower-Kennedy America was less dog-eat-dog than it is today. Hence, middle management types wanted to make sure that plumbers were doing OK.
  99. @ben tillman

    Hilarious. I only wish it were true that conservatives had been loyal to their tribe.

    Notice that anti-Whites are always talking about WHAT they are loyal to but never WHO?

    They are loyal to words, institutions, dreams, visions, utopias, constitutions, etc, etc.

    But they are NEVER loyal to an actual people. Start asking people WHO are you loyal to, not WHAT.
     
    Also, look at what they're fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can't win that way.

    The 8th Ohio Infantry wasn’t all that abstract, how did that go?

  100. http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2015/07/paul-krugman-on-the-glorious-coming-demise-of-white-political-power/
    In this 2014 interview (beginning ~6:00) Paul Krugman, commenting on the “craziness” of American politics, says (more or less verbatim): A lot of the craziness comes from cultural/ethnic issues—rural White Americans who feel they are losing their country, and they are right. They are losing their country. In the end, the power they now have will go away, but it’s a very difficult and dangerous time until then. The future is represented by Mayor Bill DeBlasio of New York, “but Ted Cruz of Texas is still out there.”

    It is a useful index of Klugman’s method (lead with your strength, and don’t waste time defending your position, but attack ceaselessly) to realise that he hurled the same accusation at Cruz, and with the same lack of any sense of proportion. Now he turns his racial and religious invective on Trump.

  101. @Anonymous
    @Lot,

    This is not Krugman, but macroeconomics 102. When the economy overheats you run surpluses, when it is depressed you run deficits.
     
    This is actually Keynesian Economics. Some other schools of thought advocate doing nothing. They tend not to work well in economic disasters.

    This is actually Keynesian Economics. Some other schools of thought advocate doing nothing. They tend not to work well in economic disasters.

    Doing nothing in a crash (or better yet, having the central bank tighten its collateral standards rather than loosen them) makes for a sharp depression and a hard unemployment spike followed quickly by a sharp recovery.

    See Jim Grant, “The Forgotten Depression: 1921: The Crash That Cured Itself”

    Now if you prefer shallow depressions that last for a decade or more with elevated unemployment and massive output gaps that accumulate and are never recovered –> feel free to continue with bipartisan Keynesianism.

  102. Krugman telling white Americans they should get over being dispossessed from the patrimony their forefathers built is like Mark Zuckerberg telling kids who lost their house in a fire they shouldn’t be so materialistic, it’s only stuff. Before slamming shut the door to his 50k square foot mansion. He shouldn’t be surprised to find one of them in his garage, playing with matches.

    It’s easy for Jews to lecture whites – they’ve already got their homeland.

    So when one ((tribe)) was colluding with Russia(The USSR), that was OK, but when another tribe is allegedly colluding with Russia, that’s not OK.

    Hey, (((giving the Soviets our nuclear secrets was one thing))), but an attack on Hillary’s illegal email server, where she stored all the evidence of her corruption, that’s an attack on all of us.

    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster.

    I was right about Iraq Attaq 2, as well. So were like 99% of White Nationalists, who mostly hated the man.

    According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don’t think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words “global security” instead of “national security” to argue for conflict somewhere.

    This is exactly right: the only true American patriotism is phony Jewish Ellis Island Propositional Nation “patriotism.” Only cucks are true patriots. EJ whatshisface (a phony liberal) from WaPo and David Brooks (a phony conservative) from NYT gave us this “bipartisan” Jewish consensus a couple days ago. I guess that is what a couple of Zionists would say…to the goyim, anyway.

    False patriotism really is the last refuge of a scoundrel.

    Yeah, I really loved the patriotic pantomime EJ whatshisface did while calling Trump a traitor because Hillary’s missing criminal evidence. He’s a very glib liar.

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.

    Krugman (Jewish) will have to wait, because Brooks (Jewish) is still working on his next spin-session with EJ whatshisface (Jewish), for the next time they’re interviewed by the NPR lady (Jewish).

    Also, look at what they’re fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can’t win that way.

    Depends on what you’re fighting for; cuckservatives are fighting for media access and donor class money. They were winning just fine until Trump came along.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    "Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island."

    , @syonredux
    It's pretty clear that Israel is the only nation that David Brooks feels patriotic about:

    Having acknowledged that, I nevertheless understand the complaints of those readers who are bothered by something they have recently learned about David Brooks: his son is a member of the Israel Defense Forces. In a recent Hebrew-language interview in Haaretz magazine, Mr. Brooks was asked about his worries as a father. The article noted that the columnist’s “connection to Israel was always strong.” It continued:

    “He has visited Israel almost every year since 1991, and over the past months the connection has grown even stronger, after his oldest son, aged 23, decided to join the Israel Defense Forces as a ‘lone soldier.’ ” (The reference is to a soldier whose family is not living in Israel.)


    Mr. Brooks described the situation as “worrying.” He added: “But every Israeli parent understands this is what the circumstances require. Beyond that, I think children need to take risks after they leave university, and that they need to do something difficult that involves going beyond their personal limits. Serving in the I.D.F. embodies all of these elements. I couldn’t advise others to do it without acknowledging it’s true for my own family.'”
     
    http://publiceditor.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/08/david-brooks-son-idf-times-public-editor/?_r=0


    As far as I'm concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason, and David Brooks' son should be stripped of his American citizenship.
    , @syonredux
    Interesting to note how touchy John Podhoretz is about people noticing that David Brooks' son serves in the IDF:

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    Everybody who thinks David Brooks has to "reveal" his son, who's 23, has joined the Israeli army can go f[***]himself.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz not trying to be antagonist. Don't you think having your son in a military would at least unconsciously effect your beliefs?
     

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    @William_Stokes his son is an adult and it's nobody's fu[***** business. And he's a writer, not a politician. It's naked anti-Semitism.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz for me, if someone was a writing a piece on Afghanistan and Iraq and had a son serving there, I'd want to know.
     

    John PodhoretzVerified account
    ‏@jpodhoretz
    @William_Stokes it's none of your business. NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.
     
  103. @Wade
    Why did you refer to Krugman as only a "quasi" Nobel Laureate?

    Because there is no Nobel Prize in Economics, in the sense of a prize established in Alfred Nobel’s will. There is the Swedish National Bank’s Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel that was established in 1968 from a donation by the Swedish Central Bank. In other words, a Central Bank decided to give an award in economics and to attach it to an already existing prestigious award organization.

  104. Dee says:

    Krugman and the other heb Robert Reiiiicccchhhh, both are sure if we could return to the 30 year post WW2 boom, everything would be OK. Both of them want 35% or more workers in labor unions, and those workers voting 80% for the dems, plus the millions in union dues sent to the dems. The dems control both houses of Congress and the Supreme Court; elect a president or 3. Wages steadily going up with hardly any inflation. Management making maybe 20% more than the rank and file. It was paradise.

    Of course we would have to bomb Europe and Japan and China back into the stone age so they wouldn’t be competing with us. They would be using our foreign aid money to buy raw materials, machinery, and everything else they can’t make themselves from the US. It was a great run while it lasted; I grew up during it and had the bad luck to hit the job market just as it ended in ’73. And it took most of the next 10 years to get the world’s economies back to something other than rampant stagflation.

  105. @slumber_j

    Decision: Turmp
     
    While I sincerely dig the orthographic innovation, I dunno: each song is pretty great in its own way.

    Look: if you're gonna put Kiss head-to-head with Elton John, in the interest of justice you at least have to attempt an apples-to-apples comparison. I mean, don't you?

    "Tiny Dancer": great song, tough to beat. But is the closest Kiss equivalent really "Rn'RAN"?

    Obviously not. Right off the bat, I was thinking "Black Diamond". But then it hit me like an 8 lb. maul, splitting my skull wide open.

    "Beth":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHkojuUSDO8

    Well, decision still Turmp, clearly. Nevertheless, there's a lot more in common here.

    But then things get interesting. What's the Eltonian "Rock'n Roll All Night"?

    Trick question. No: it isn't "Crocodile Rock", Einstein...which the Kiss tune would anyway stomp into a pulp. It's the way more similar "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26wEWSUUsUc

    And that's pretty hard-rocking, especially for a gap-toothed marabou-trimmed homosexual fella in glasses. It's a closer-run thing, but I'm sorry: I still just don't see how "SNAfF" wins vs. "R'nRAN".

    So: much more of a fifty-fifty proposition. Maybe Turmp still wins on points, but only very narrowly...

    QED

    I remember reading in the magazines in 1977 about this unprecedented new style of music, punk rock. And then when finally hearing it, thinking, “Didn’t Elton John do this exact same thing back in 1973 on “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting?”

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.
  106. @attilathehen
    His wife is a negress.

    His wife is a negress.

    A what now?

  107. @BB753
    What's your source for Krugman being a Kiss fan?
    When I google Krugman + Kiss, all I get is this:
    "Paul Krugman's sloppy, wet kiss".

    http://www.salon.com/2014/10/19/thomas_frank_paul_krugmans_sloppy_wet_kiss/

    Don’t quote me on KISS. I went with KISS because it’s geographically appropriate and funny.

    There used to be a lot of stuff on the Internet about Krugman’s love of 1970s rock bands, but he appears to have made a concerted effort starting in 2011 to bury the uncool stuff way down on Google by writing all the time about newer bands like Arcade Fire he loves loves loves.

    I can’t remember exactly which 1970s bands I’ve read him discuss his abiding love for … Doobie Brothers? Blue Oyster Cult? But they definitely weren’t of the Velvet Underground / Roxy Music status elite.

    Also, I’m not sure that Trump deep down loves Tiny Dancer or if he plays it at his rallies because Sir Elton owns a condo in one of his buildings. Trump also plays Phantom of the Opera because Sir Andrew is a tenant.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @syonredux

    PLAYBOY:It’s fascinating. You write about these things on your blog. Is this a sort of midlife crisis for a baby boomer discovering new bands?

    KRUGMAN: I was pretty much listening to the golden oldies station with 1960s and 1970s music, Fleetwood Mac being about as modern as I got. And then for some reason after Arcade Fire won the Grammys, I said, “Gee, what is this?” I was shocked. Oh my God, there’s music being made now that is really good. It didn’t all go away around the time I turned 35. And so that opened me up a lot. Arcade Fire is just the one that provides the most solace. It’s gorgeous stuff.
     
    http://www.businessinsider.com/paul-krugman-has-a-crush-on-this-cute-indie-rock-singer-2012-2
    , @Cagey Beast
    Trump is a man of the '80s through and through. This song would be fantastic for his rallies, if it weren't for the whole irony problem:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5HfOipwvts

    Trump's in favour of finally bringing down the old Iron Curtain mentality between the US & Russia but he has fresh walls in mind too ... not that there's anything wrong with it.
    , @Anon
    Trump was born in 1946, so he's got Baby Boomer tastes. He may genuinely like those songs, since he lived through the 70s. Putin is an ABBA fan, by the way.
  108. @Forbes

    “I remember there was often a typical conversational thing about how well the plumbers—basically the unionized blue-collar occupations—were doing, as opposed to white-collar middle managers like my father.”
     
    A recollection that reeks of magical thinking. Plumbers--blue collar occupations--and how well they were doing versus white-collar middle managers wouldn't have been a topic of (or typical) conversation in the '50s and '60s. White-collar middle managers were the emerging (and exploding) occupational category leading to a middle class life in the post-war era. The GI Bill and a college education was the route to a white-collar job and the middle class--not a plumbing apprenticeship or vocational trade school.

    Perhaps Krugman's father was an inept middle manager.

    I think that Krugman is attempting to convey that Eisenhower-Kennedy America was less dog-eat-dog than it is today. Hence, middle management types wanted to make sure that plumbers were doing OK.

  109. @anonymous
    Yeah, Steve (and I) pretty much agree that America peaked in 1964, when Brian Wilson was writing so many songs that he basically gave some to Jan and Dean to perform.

    Also, that was the year a cover of Road and Track ((or Car and Driver) featured the newly-minted, space-aged styled StingRay head to head with a 427 Cobra--it just doesn't get any better than that. Skateboarding, aka sidewalk surfing was blossoming nation-wide and everyone was trim and well tanned. Men wore shortsleeve dress shirts and women wore sun dresses or pedal pusher pants along with nice blouses. Metrecal was the dieting craze and Japanese motorcycles were showing up on streets everywhere (a 250 was a big bike)…..

    Obviously, if we want to return to our glory days we need to encourage Wilson to take up music again.

    1964 was the year that Dino knocked those floppy-haired weirdos from Liverpool clean off the charts with his recording of “Everybody Loves Somebody.”

  110. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    Couldn’t agree more on Krugman’s relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I don't criticize Krugman's macroeconomics; I don't support them either.

    I just realize that despite a fair amount of effort I put in during the 1970s and 1980s, macro is not a subject I'm equipped to deal with, so I don't pretend I have much worthwhile to say on the subject (although I have some meta-views that might or might not be fairly important).

    , @Johan Schmidt
    Nice of you to sneak the woman-beating, work-fabricating charlatan "Piketty" in there in case anyone was tempted to believe you know what the hell you're talking about.
    , @Stebbing Heuer

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]
     
    This is a joke, right?

    (With apologies to J.R. Hicks).
    , @Pericles
    Conventional macroeconomics has stimulated the hell out of the economy for 8 years now, and growth has been anemic in the US as well as the EU. For example, Obama will apparently be the sole president who has not had a single year of 3%+ growth in his reign. EU meanwhile lurches from crisis to crisis (looks like we'll have another banking crisis sometime soon). As far as I'm aware, Krugman's only response would be "double the stimulus!" OK, thanks guru.
  111. @Svigor
    Krugman telling white Americans they should get over being dispossessed from the patrimony their forefathers built is like Mark Zuckerberg telling kids who lost their house in a fire they shouldn't be so materialistic, it's only stuff. Before slamming shut the door to his 50k square foot mansion. He shouldn't be surprised to find one of them in his garage, playing with matches.

    It's easy for Jews to lecture whites - they've already got their homeland.

    So when one ((tribe)) was colluding with Russia(The USSR), that was OK, but when another tribe is allegedly colluding with Russia, that’s not OK.
     
    Hey, (((giving the Soviets our nuclear secrets was one thing))), but an attack on Hillary's illegal email server, where she stored all the evidence of her corruption, that's an attack on all of us.

    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster.
     
    I was right about Iraq Attaq 2, as well. So were like 99% of White Nationalists, who mostly hated the man.

    According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don’t think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words “global security” instead of “national security” to argue for conflict somewhere.
     
    This is exactly right: the only true American patriotism is phony Jewish Ellis Island Propositional Nation "patriotism." Only cucks are true patriots. EJ whatshisface (a phony liberal) from WaPo and David Brooks (a phony conservative) from NYT gave us this "bipartisan" Jewish consensus a couple days ago. I guess that is what a couple of Zionists would say...to the goyim, anyway.

    False patriotism really is the last refuge of a scoundrel.
     
    Yeah, I really loved the patriotic pantomime EJ whatshisface did while calling Trump a traitor because Hillary's missing criminal evidence. He's a very glib liar.

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.
     
    Krugman (Jewish) will have to wait, because Brooks (Jewish) is still working on his next spin-session with EJ whatshisface (Jewish), for the next time they're interviewed by the NPR lady (Jewish).

    Also, look at what they’re fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can’t win that way.
     
    Depends on what you're fighting for; cuckservatives are fighting for media access and donor class money. They were winning just fine until Trump came along.

    E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    “Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.”

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    , @BenjaminL
    Don't the French-Canadians generally have some sort of chip on their shoulder about Anglo-Saxon Protestants? Much like the Irish (i.e. James Michael Curley). For historical reasons...
  112. @Steve Sailer
    Don't quote me on KISS. I went with KISS because it's geographically appropriate and funny.

    There used to be a lot of stuff on the Internet about Krugman's love of 1970s rock bands, but he appears to have made a concerted effort starting in 2011 to bury the uncool stuff way down on Google by writing all the time about newer bands like Arcade Fire he loves loves loves.

    I can't remember exactly which 1970s bands I've read him discuss his abiding love for ... Doobie Brothers? Blue Oyster Cult? But they definitely weren't of the Velvet Underground / Roxy Music status elite.

    Also, I'm not sure that Trump deep down loves Tiny Dancer or if he plays it at his rallies because Sir Elton owns a condo in one of his buildings. Trump also plays Phantom of the Opera because Sir Andrew is a tenant.

    PLAYBOY:It’s fascinating. You write about these things on your blog. Is this a sort of midlife crisis for a baby boomer discovering new bands?

    KRUGMAN: I was pretty much listening to the golden oldies station with 1960s and 1970s music, Fleetwood Mac being about as modern as I got. And then for some reason after Arcade Fire won the Grammys, I said, “Gee, what is this?” I was shocked. Oh my God, there’s music being made now that is really good. It didn’t all go away around the time I turned 35. And so that opened me up a lot. Arcade Fire is just the one that provides the most solace. It’s gorgeous stuff.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/paul-krugman-has-a-crush-on-this-cute-indie-rock-singer-2012-2

  113. @artichoke
    What is a nation? According to google it's "a large aggregate of people united by common descent, history, culture, or language, inhabiting a particular country or territory." I didn't definition-shop, but I would argue the part about "particular country or territory" is weaker than the first part. A distributed people is often referred to as a nation e.g. Elijah Muhammad's "Nation of Islam". Or since I'd suppose Krugman is Jewish, that diaspora.

    So yeah it's OK to be loyal to your tribe. What's the better patriotism -- protecting your people, or protecting a specific area of dirt? They are both important, but to me the idealistic view of patriotism has more to do with the people than the land.

    It's hard for me to believe Krugman is missing this out of ignorance. He's got an agenda and can't think of good arguments for it, so he uses bad ones.

    I continues to strike me that Etymology of the word Nation is never even wondered at… And now Krugmab wants to bring up the Latin word for Fatherland?
    Aristotle talks about the need for clarity in the meaning of words. And I believe Confucius also discusses the need for consensus on the meaning of words before reasoned argument can begin….
    Maybe one day there will be a great philosopher of Muh FEELZ that will make sense of all this nonsense

  114. @Guillaume Durocher
    The thing is, the entire profession of elite academic economics, the Federal Reserve, and the financing of the Democratic Party are virtual Tribal monopolies at this point. None of this bothers Paul Krugman. I wonder why?

    None of this bothers Paul Krugman. I wonder why?

    I think that to his mind, to notice Jewish tribalism is racist, therefore, it does not exist.

  115. @Sam Shama
    Couldn't agree more on Krugman's relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    I don’t criticize Krugman’s macroeconomics; I don’t support them either.

    I just realize that despite a fair amount of effort I put in during the 1970s and 1980s, macro is not a subject I’m equipped to deal with, so I don’t pretend I have much worthwhile to say on the subject (although I have some meta-views that might or might not be fairly important).

    • Replies: @Sam Shama
    It wasn't you I was thinking of, re: the bit about criticisms of P.K's macroecon.
    , @Kyle
    That's because macroeconomics is a bullshit science, like psychology. Micro economics is valid on any scale.
    , @Brutusale
    Yes, hit us with that immutable expertise!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkCwFkOZoOY
  116. @Paul Yarbles
    What a big load of thoughtless partisanship!

    What does it mean to love America? Surely it means loving the country we actually have.
     
    Doesn't Paul Krugman realize that loving the country we actually have implies an opposition to the quasi-open borders policy that his beloved Democratic party supports?

    So much for the Swedish Central Bank Prize in Economics in Honor of Alfred Nobel winner's ability to reason on non-econotechnical issues.

    Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.

     

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.

    Doesn’t Paul Krugman realize that loving the country we actually have implies an opposition to the quasi-open borders policy that his beloved Democratic party supports?

    His sanctimonious lecturing about loving the country we already have also betrays the tendency for the left to openly salivate about how old, conservative whites dying-off can will fundamentally change America for the better.

  117. @Paco Wové
    Those stupid Others, always Othering people.

    Those stupid Others, always Othering people.

    Well done…perfect summary.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    Don't quote me on KISS. I went with KISS because it's geographically appropriate and funny.

    There used to be a lot of stuff on the Internet about Krugman's love of 1970s rock bands, but he appears to have made a concerted effort starting in 2011 to bury the uncool stuff way down on Google by writing all the time about newer bands like Arcade Fire he loves loves loves.

    I can't remember exactly which 1970s bands I've read him discuss his abiding love for ... Doobie Brothers? Blue Oyster Cult? But they definitely weren't of the Velvet Underground / Roxy Music status elite.

    Also, I'm not sure that Trump deep down loves Tiny Dancer or if he plays it at his rallies because Sir Elton owns a condo in one of his buildings. Trump also plays Phantom of the Opera because Sir Andrew is a tenant.

    Trump is a man of the ’80s through and through. This song would be fantastic for his rallies, if it weren’t for the whole irony problem:

    Trump’s in favour of finally bringing down the old Iron Curtain mentality between the US & Russia but he has fresh walls in mind too … not that there’s anything wrong with it.

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    If Mr. Trump promised to build a bridge over the Bering Strait he could kill off a Dem rhetorical slogan. He might even get Mr. Putin to agree to pay for it.
  119. @cthulhu
    You should listen to the Who's balls-to-the-wall cover of SNAfF on the "Two Rooms" Elton John / Bernie Taupin tribute album, from the early '90s I think. Very kick-ass.

    cthulhu,

    You are the only one thus far who mentioned Bernie Taupin. Kudos for that. Taupin’s ethereal lyrics were a big part of Elton John’s pop success. Taupin’s lyrics had a venue and were about something that happened there, but the listener could never pinpoint either.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=come+down+in+time+lyrics&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS561US561&oq=come+down+in+time+l&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j0l4.6946j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    The use of the pronoun ‘her’ was, of course, from another era.

  120. @Vinay
    "The unsophisticated part was ignoring what made nice, safe suburbs affordable."

    Krugman would typically view your implicit assertion as a testable hypothesis. For example, are the suburbs less safe? There's an empirical answer to that - No! Crime has gone down hugely over the past few decades. Are they less nice? More unaffordable? Why, due to immigration? Increasing population doesn't necessarily make things more unaffordable. Due to restrictive zoning limiting the housing stock? Or does increasing inequality result in a rising gap between median housing prices and median income?

    The thing about Krugman is, anybody who reads his blog would understand that there are multiple factors which can play a role in something like housing affordability and they'd expect any assertion about causes to be backed up by a bunch of tables and graphs. Some similarities with iSteve there!

    There’s an empirical answer to that – No! Crime has gone down hugely over the past few decades.

    Crime in non-black suburbs has always been the same – extremely low.

  121. @Svigor
    Krugman telling white Americans they should get over being dispossessed from the patrimony their forefathers built is like Mark Zuckerberg telling kids who lost their house in a fire they shouldn't be so materialistic, it's only stuff. Before slamming shut the door to his 50k square foot mansion. He shouldn't be surprised to find one of them in his garage, playing with matches.

    It's easy for Jews to lecture whites - they've already got their homeland.

    So when one ((tribe)) was colluding with Russia(The USSR), that was OK, but when another tribe is allegedly colluding with Russia, that’s not OK.
     
    Hey, (((giving the Soviets our nuclear secrets was one thing))), but an attack on Hillary's illegal email server, where she stored all the evidence of her corruption, that's an attack on all of us.

    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster.
     
    I was right about Iraq Attaq 2, as well. So were like 99% of White Nationalists, who mostly hated the man.

    According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don’t think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words “global security” instead of “national security” to argue for conflict somewhere.
     
    This is exactly right: the only true American patriotism is phony Jewish Ellis Island Propositional Nation "patriotism." Only cucks are true patriots. EJ whatshisface (a phony liberal) from WaPo and David Brooks (a phony conservative) from NYT gave us this "bipartisan" Jewish consensus a couple days ago. I guess that is what a couple of Zionists would say...to the goyim, anyway.

    False patriotism really is the last refuge of a scoundrel.
     
    Yeah, I really loved the patriotic pantomime EJ whatshisface did while calling Trump a traitor because Hillary's missing criminal evidence. He's a very glib liar.

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.
     
    Krugman (Jewish) will have to wait, because Brooks (Jewish) is still working on his next spin-session with EJ whatshisface (Jewish), for the next time they're interviewed by the NPR lady (Jewish).

    Also, look at what they’re fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can’t win that way.
     
    Depends on what you're fighting for; cuckservatives are fighting for media access and donor class money. They were winning just fine until Trump came along.

    It’s pretty clear that Israel is the only nation that David Brooks feels patriotic about:

    Having acknowledged that, I nevertheless understand the complaints of those readers who are bothered by something they have recently learned about David Brooks: his son is a member of the Israel Defense Forces. In a recent Hebrew-language interview in Haaretz magazine, Mr. Brooks was asked about his worries as a father. The article noted that the columnist’s “connection to Israel was always strong.” It continued:

    “He has visited Israel almost every year since 1991, and over the past months the connection has grown even stronger, after his oldest son, aged 23, decided to join the Israel Defense Forces as a ‘lone soldier.’ ” (The reference is to a soldier whose family is not living in Israel.)

    Mr. Brooks described the situation as “worrying.” He added: “But every Israeli parent understands this is what the circumstances require. Beyond that, I think children need to take risks after they leave university, and that they need to do something difficult that involves going beyond their personal limits. Serving in the I.D.F. embodies all of these elements. I couldn’t advise others to do it without acknowledging it’s true for my own family.’”

    http://publiceditor.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/08/david-brooks-son-idf-times-public-editor/?_r=0

    As far as I’m concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason, and David Brooks’ son should be stripped of his American citizenship.

    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue

    "As far as I’m concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason...."
     
    My dear syonredux, how do you feel about these Americans (below) who served in a foreign military?

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution's Continental Army?

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral's commission in the Tsarina's navy to fight the Turks?
  122. @Svigor
    Krugman telling white Americans they should get over being dispossessed from the patrimony their forefathers built is like Mark Zuckerberg telling kids who lost their house in a fire they shouldn't be so materialistic, it's only stuff. Before slamming shut the door to his 50k square foot mansion. He shouldn't be surprised to find one of them in his garage, playing with matches.

    It's easy for Jews to lecture whites - they've already got their homeland.

    So when one ((tribe)) was colluding with Russia(The USSR), that was OK, but when another tribe is allegedly colluding with Russia, that’s not OK.
     
    Hey, (((giving the Soviets our nuclear secrets was one thing))), but an attack on Hillary's illegal email server, where she stored all the evidence of her corruption, that's an attack on all of us.

    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster.
     
    I was right about Iraq Attaq 2, as well. So were like 99% of White Nationalists, who mostly hated the man.

    According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don’t think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words “global security” instead of “national security” to argue for conflict somewhere.
     
    This is exactly right: the only true American patriotism is phony Jewish Ellis Island Propositional Nation "patriotism." Only cucks are true patriots. EJ whatshisface (a phony liberal) from WaPo and David Brooks (a phony conservative) from NYT gave us this "bipartisan" Jewish consensus a couple days ago. I guess that is what a couple of Zionists would say...to the goyim, anyway.

    False patriotism really is the last refuge of a scoundrel.
     
    Yeah, I really loved the patriotic pantomime EJ whatshisface did while calling Trump a traitor because Hillary's missing criminal evidence. He's a very glib liar.

    Maybe Krugman should go down the hall (so to speak) and ask his fellow Trump-hater David Brooks his views on intervening foreign powers and serving the tribe.
     
    Krugman (Jewish) will have to wait, because Brooks (Jewish) is still working on his next spin-session with EJ whatshisface (Jewish), for the next time they're interviewed by the NPR lady (Jewish).

    Also, look at what they’re fighting against. Always abstractions, like liberalism. You can’t win that way.
     
    Depends on what you're fighting for; cuckservatives are fighting for media access and donor class money. They were winning just fine until Trump came along.

    Interesting to note how touchy John Podhoretz is about people noticing that David Brooks’ son serves in the IDF:

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    Everybody who thinks David Brooks has to “reveal” his son, who’s 23, has joined the Israeli army can go f[***]himself.

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz not trying to be antagonist. Don’t you think having your son in a military would at least unconsciously effect your beliefs?

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    @William_Stokes his son is an adult and it’s nobody’s fu[***** business. And he’s a writer, not a politician. It’s naked anti-Semitism.

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz for me, if someone was a writing a piece on Afghanistan and Iraq and had a son serving there, I’d want to know.

    John PodhoretzVerified account
    ‏@jpodhoretz
    @William_Stokes it’s none of your business. NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Bill Kristol's son served in the US Marines ( http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/weddings/delia-pais-and-joseph-kristol.html ). I don't know that there's much daylight between him and David Brooks when it comes to politics.
    , @EriK
    jpod seems touchy in general.
  123. @Steve Sailer
    I don't criticize Krugman's macroeconomics; I don't support them either.

    I just realize that despite a fair amount of effort I put in during the 1970s and 1980s, macro is not a subject I'm equipped to deal with, so I don't pretend I have much worthwhile to say on the subject (although I have some meta-views that might or might not be fairly important).

    It wasn’t you I was thinking of, re: the bit about criticisms of P.K’s macroecon.

  124. Of course Kiss is multicultural-friendly:

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Kiss are to a considerable extent nice jewish boys, aren't they? Except for the couple of black sheep who are anti-semites.
  125. @Anonymous
    The non-kosher tribe, he means.
    Always assume "kosher" to be implicitly there, and most of it will turn understandable.

    Krugman the loony lefty likes just about the only openly Republican hair band while Trump favors globalist gay boy piano man. Opposites can admire each other I suppose.

    I think Krugman’s piece about Republicans serving the tribe is just another example of Steves conjecture that Jewish intellectuals tend to project Jewish intramural conflicts onto the gentile world. I can’t imagine any of Krugman’s relations being happy that he married a schvartze, lopping off a branch of his own family tree and in effect refusing to serve his own tribe.

  126. @Sam Shama
    Couldn't agree more on Krugman's relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    Nice of you to sneak the woman-beating, work-fabricating charlatan “Piketty” in there in case anyone was tempted to believe you know what the hell you’re talking about.

    • Replies: @Sam Shama
    Men who do not beat women -there are some - are not endowed with a divine exclusivity on important insights. Nor those that comment free of context.
  127. @Steve Sailer
    E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    "Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island."

    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I’m hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne’s old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Bert Yaffe:

    Mr. Yaffe was a native of Sparta, Georgia. He graduated Emory University and was attending Emory Law School until joining the United States Marine Corps in 1941. He served in the Pacific theatre for twenty-seven months and was awarded the Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars during the battles of Bougainville, Guam and Iwo Jima. He achieved the rank of Major. His memoir, Fragments of War: A Marine's Personal Journey, was published by the Naval Institute Press in 1999.

    He was a Democratic candidate for Congress in 1970, running as a progressive in opposition to the Vietnam Nam war. He founded and chaired the New England Coalition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, one of the first multistate efforts to coordinate regional health policy and programs. The World Health Organization recognized his efforts as a model of regional collaboration in 1988. He was President of the Erna Yaffe Foundation, an organization he founded in honor of his first wife Erna to promote health efficacy. Mr. Yaffe was appointed to the Massachusetts Public Health Council in 1979 and served through five administrations becoming the longest serving member in the Council's history. He also served as President of both the Massachusetts Public Health Association and the Massachusetts Health Council.
     
    http://www.hathawayfunerals.com/obits/obituaries.php/obitID/153472
    , @syonredux

    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish.
     
    I actually took that literally until I read the article. It would be more accurate to say that Yaffe served as a father-figure to the teenage Dionne after his much beloved father passed away.
    , @syonredux

    Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I’m hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

     

    All the stuff that I find online indicates that Dionne is a "progressive"/"liberal" Catholic:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/im-not-quitting-the-church/2012/05/13/gIQAw3vMNU_story.html

    ww.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2012/06/ej-dionne-and-the-contradiction-of-progressive-catholicism
    , @syonredux
    Here Dionne speaks of Yaffe and his uncle Ray as his second fathers after his own father died.

    Two people can’t be here. My late dad taught me to love politics and he taught me how to argue, and to love argument. You could say that without realizing it, he trained me for the life I have been lucky enough to live, and maybe that’s what he had in mind, even though to this day, I don’t know exactly what he’d make of my views, except that he’s enjoy arguing with me. Probably my very favorite column was the one I wrote was on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of dad’s death – he died in 1968 – and I spoke of how much my dad and I loved to talk and argue about everything having to do with politics and everything about why the Red Sox, in those days, were losing. There are few greater blessings than having a dad who is warm, loving, ebullient and full of life. He would be 100 years old on May 2, and I miss him still. I noted in that column that 1968 was a year in which our country lost three truly great and good Americans, Martin Luther Kind, Bobby Kennedy and my dear, dear dad. And I was lucky to have two second fathers after my dad died, my uncle Ray, with whom I argued about politics constantly but joyfully on both our parts, and my dear, dear friend Bert Yaffe, a progressive Marine veteran who has been a real guide to me all my life. He’s still with us at 90 years old and still fighting for the right as he sees it (and I happen to agree with him). All kids should be as lucky as I was back then to have such great people step into the breach in their lives. Again, I felt the support of a whole community.
     
    http://www.hillmanfoundation.org/slideshow/ej-dionne-receives-hilllman-award-career-achievement


    It seems pretty clear that Yaffe did not adopt Dionne.
    , @PV van der Byl
    If Dionne is Jewish by adoption--whatever that might mean--Portsmouth Abbey would have been a very odd place to send him to. It's a very Catholic boarding school (WF Buckley sent his son there) with many Benedictine priests.
  128. @syonredux
    Interesting to note how touchy John Podhoretz is about people noticing that David Brooks' son serves in the IDF:

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    Everybody who thinks David Brooks has to "reveal" his son, who's 23, has joined the Israeli army can go f[***]himself.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz not trying to be antagonist. Don't you think having your son in a military would at least unconsciously effect your beliefs?
     

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    @William_Stokes his son is an adult and it's nobody's fu[***** business. And he's a writer, not a politician. It's naked anti-Semitism.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz for me, if someone was a writing a piece on Afghanistan and Iraq and had a son serving there, I'd want to know.
     

    John PodhoretzVerified account
    ‏@jpodhoretz
    @William_Stokes it's none of your business. NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.
     

    Bill Kristol’s son served in the US Marines ( http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/weddings/delia-pais-and-joseph-kristol.html ). I don’t know that there’s much daylight between him and David Brooks when it comes to politics.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Bill Kristol’s son served in the US Marines ( http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/weddings/delia-pais-and-joseph-kristol.html ). I don’t know that there’s much daylight between him and David Brooks when it comes to politics.
     
    Probably not. On the other hand, I have a lot more respect (as an American) for Kristol's kid.
  129. E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    “Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.”

    I stand corrected. My most spectacular Jewdar failure, ever. That hilarious NYC lisp (and his super-Kosher positions) fooled me. I never even bothered to check, or even look up his photo (I’ve only ever heard his voice, he came onto NPR long after I stopped watching TV).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Actually, the Dionne story is more complicated than I had thought.
  130. @Svigor

    E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    “Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.”
     
    I stand corrected. My most spectacular Jewdar failure, ever. That hilarious NYC lisp (and his super-Kosher positions) fooled me. I never even bothered to check, or even look up his photo (I've only ever heard his voice, he came onto NPR long after I stopped watching TV).

    Actually, the Dionne story is more complicated than I had thought.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    I have taught my children that whenever you read something by someone who's promoting something decidedly disastrous for our people, something counter-intuitive turning nature inside-out and upside down, just google their name and add "Jew". 9 times out of 10 it's a Jew. I call it Jew bingo.

    My eldest came home one day and said "You know how you said to google someone's name and add Jew whenever you read something nasty and anti-White? Well, I did it all day and guess what? You were right!" It was a great moment in family bonding.

    That night we went through the history of feminism and the bingos were going off like you wouldn't believe. If I can turn this into a board game I reckon I could retire on it.
  131. @attilathehen
    His wife is a negress.

    Krugman’s wife? She looks 100% white.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    But it turns out she's part-black. Maybe I should have looked harder.
    , @attilathehen
    She's light-skinned so a quick glance at her she looks white. But look again and you can see she's black.

    Here's a youtube about her http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/robin-wells-on-universal-cover/

  132. @Steve Sailer
    Actually, the Dionne story is more complicated than I had thought.

    I have taught my children that whenever you read something by someone who’s promoting something decidedly disastrous for our people, something counter-intuitive turning nature inside-out and upside down, just google their name and add “Jew”. 9 times out of 10 it’s a Jew. I call it Jew bingo.

    My eldest came home one day and said “You know how you said to google someone’s name and add Jew whenever you read something nasty and anti-White? Well, I did it all day and guess what? You were right!” It was a great moment in family bonding.

    That night we went through the history of feminism and the bingos were going off like you wouldn’t believe. If I can turn this into a board game I reckon I could retire on it.

    • Replies: @Luke Ford
    White cohesion is inversely related to Jewish strength. I wish that wasn't true, but history indicates the two peoples have opposite fortunes (when one is rising, the other is falling).
  133. @reiner Tor
    Krugman's wife? She looks 100% white.

    But it turns out she’s part-black. Maybe I should have looked harder.

  134. @Tiny Duck
    There is no more patriotic act than to celebrate the diversity and inclusion if our country. Conservatives are basically treasonous white nationalists.

    We progressives love America enough to point out the ways in which she is failing People of Color and to try for positive change, while the Republicans stand that premise on it's head and claim that it "those people" who are failing America.

    The left defines patriotism as equality and justice for all. To us America is no longer a symbol not of conservative right or wrong intolerance, but a banner of inclusive patriotism.

    Patriotism is irrelevant. We care about continuing our line, nothing more and nothing less.

  135. @Steve Sailer
    I don't criticize Krugman's macroeconomics; I don't support them either.

    I just realize that despite a fair amount of effort I put in during the 1970s and 1980s, macro is not a subject I'm equipped to deal with, so I don't pretend I have much worthwhile to say on the subject (although I have some meta-views that might or might not be fairly important).

    That’s because macroeconomics is a bullshit science, like psychology. Micro economics is valid on any scale.

  136. @Dave Pinsen
    Bill Kristol's son served in the US Marines ( http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/weddings/delia-pais-and-joseph-kristol.html ). I don't know that there's much daylight between him and David Brooks when it comes to politics.

    Bill Kristol’s son served in the US Marines ( http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/weddings/delia-pais-and-joseph-kristol.html ). I don’t know that there’s much daylight between him and David Brooks when it comes to politics.

    Probably not. On the other hand, I have a lot more respect (as an American) for Kristol’s kid.

  137. @PiltdownMan
    Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he's up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

    > For working economists like my brother-in-law

    Actuaries are the main example of an economist doing real work.

    All other “macro-economics” is apologism for re-directing wealth towards the wealthy ( about which, I will never claim to be holier-than-them); I just want ricebowls to be recognized as such)

    Economics was originally called “political arithmetic”; that is still the best description.

  138. @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    Bert Yaffe:

    Mr. Yaffe was a native of Sparta, Georgia. He graduated Emory University and was attending Emory Law School until joining the United States Marine Corps in 1941. He served in the Pacific theatre for twenty-seven months and was awarded the Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars during the battles of Bougainville, Guam and Iwo Jima. He achieved the rank of Major. His memoir, Fragments of War: A Marine’s Personal Journey, was published by the Naval Institute Press in 1999.

    He was a Democratic candidate for Congress in 1970, running as a progressive in opposition to the Vietnam Nam war. He founded and chaired the New England Coalition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, one of the first multistate efforts to coordinate regional health policy and programs. The World Health Organization recognized his efforts as a model of regional collaboration in 1988. He was President of the Erna Yaffe Foundation, an organization he founded in honor of his first wife Erna to promote health efficacy. Mr. Yaffe was appointed to the Massachusetts Public Health Council in 1979 and served through five administrations becoming the longest serving member in the Council’s history. He also served as President of both the Massachusetts Public Health Association and the Massachusetts Health Council.

    http://www.hathawayfunerals.com/obits/obituaries.php/obitID/153472

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    God Bless 'im:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwS6OkgUXKE

    What a guy!

  139. @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish.

    I actually took that literally until I read the article. It would be more accurate to say that Yaffe served as a father-figure to the teenage Dionne after his much beloved father passed away.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    It is my onerous duty to inform you that what *you* think is irrelevant. Show the man some respect and just accept what Dionne himself says:

    He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    What, you need a certificate of adoption? Sheesh.

    , @Kylie
    Completely OT. Did you know the wonderful interview Kate Hepburn did with Dick Cavett in 1973 is on YouTube?

    Here's Part 1:


    https://youtu.be/gZlHcrzKEUE
  140. @syonredux
    Bert Yaffe:

    Mr. Yaffe was a native of Sparta, Georgia. He graduated Emory University and was attending Emory Law School until joining the United States Marine Corps in 1941. He served in the Pacific theatre for twenty-seven months and was awarded the Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars during the battles of Bougainville, Guam and Iwo Jima. He achieved the rank of Major. His memoir, Fragments of War: A Marine's Personal Journey, was published by the Naval Institute Press in 1999.

    He was a Democratic candidate for Congress in 1970, running as a progressive in opposition to the Vietnam Nam war. He founded and chaired the New England Coalition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, one of the first multistate efforts to coordinate regional health policy and programs. The World Health Organization recognized his efforts as a model of regional collaboration in 1988. He was President of the Erna Yaffe Foundation, an organization he founded in honor of his first wife Erna to promote health efficacy. Mr. Yaffe was appointed to the Massachusetts Public Health Council in 1979 and served through five administrations becoming the longest serving member in the Council's history. He also served as President of both the Massachusetts Public Health Association and the Massachusetts Health Council.
     
    http://www.hathawayfunerals.com/obits/obituaries.php/obitID/153472

    God Bless ‘im:

    What a guy!

  141. @syonredux

    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish.
     
    I actually took that literally until I read the article. It would be more accurate to say that Yaffe served as a father-figure to the teenage Dionne after his much beloved father passed away.

    It is my onerous duty to inform you that what *you* think is irrelevant. Show the man some respect and just accept what Dionne himself says:

    He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    What, you need a certificate of adoption? Sheesh.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    It is my onerous duty to inform you that what *you* think is irrelevant. Show the man some respect and just accept what Dionne himself says:

    He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    What, you need a certificate of adoption? Sheesh.
     
    Yeah, that would be nice.

    Plus, according to Dionne, he had two quasi-fathers:

    I noted in that column that 1968 was a year in which our country lost three truly great and good Americans, Martin Luther Kind, Bobby Kennedy and my dear, dear dad. And I was lucky to have two second fathers after my dad died, my uncle Ray, with whom I argued about politics constantly but joyfully on both our parts, and my dear, dear friend Bert Yaffe, a progressive Marine veteran who has been a real guide to me all my life. He’s still with us at 90 years old and still fighting for the right as he sees it (and I happen to agree with him). All kids should be as lucky as I was back then to have such great people step into the breach in their lives. Again, I felt the support of a whole community.
     
    http://www.hillmanfoundation.org/slideshow/ej-dionne-receives-hilllman-award-career-achievement
  142. Is that the best you could do Sailer ?

  143. @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I’m hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    All the stuff that I find online indicates that Dionne is a “progressive”/”liberal” Catholic:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/im-not-quitting-the-church/2012/05/13/gIQAw3vMNU_story.html

    ww.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2012/06/ej-dionne-and-the-contradiction-of-progressive-catholicism

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won't refute what Dionne himself says, but, hopefully it'll make you feel better about yourself.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Liberal Catholicism used to be a big deal.
  144. @syonredux

    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish.
     
    I actually took that literally until I read the article. It would be more accurate to say that Yaffe served as a father-figure to the teenage Dionne after his much beloved father passed away.

    Completely OT. Did you know the wonderful interview Kate Hepburn did with Dick Cavett in 1973 is on YouTube?

    Here’s Part 1:

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Thanks, I'll check it out. Those old Cavett interviews can be a real hoot.
  145. @Big Bill
    If the GOP serves the white tribe (and I assume Krugman is unhappy with that), why doesn't he just open a Likud franchise in the US just for Jews?

    > why doesn’t he just open a Likud franchise in the US just for Jews?

    the number of pigs ALREADY trying to feed off of THAT rice bowl is immense. Stiff competition.

    Abe Foxman was sleight-of-hand’ing the better part of a million dollars a year (from American Jews) by being a mainstay of Defense-Against-AntiSemitism Dinner Theater; you can admire him or hate him – but you can’t argue with success.

    Most of Jewish Parasitism, targets other Jews. After all, they are the ones with money.

  146. @Lot

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.
     
    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush's estimates for the war's cost were absurdly low.

    And "his brainy technical specialties" is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan's economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan's economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    And “his brainy technical specialties” is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    Lot, i’ll grant the point that Krugman is not an idiot–and in fact pretty sharp–when he’s sticking to economic matters (especially ones divorced from “Republicans are evil” politicking).

    However … I told people the Euro would be a disaster and I have all of two semesters of econ. But … i’m sentient. Even in the US we have regional recessions and we mitigate them by throwing around some cash *and* because people move. When I graduated and headed down for an internship at Johnson Space Center outside Houston, the “Great Lakes State” license plates were thick on the ground. Nonetheless times were tough in Michigan\the Midwest for a while–everyone isn’t going to move around and seamlessly smooth things out. And this is without a language barrier or what Krugman is now mocking as false patriotism.

    It was obvious that Europe was not–I think the economists call it–an “optimum currency area”. And then on top of that you have a currency that no actual government is responsible for. So the Euro:
    — whacked away exchange rate adjustment
    — made everyone’s national debts “hard”–essentially in a foreign currency; governments can’t freely money print
    Hence you constricted anti-cyclical ability, steepened recession\depression risk, and radically enlarged default risk. (And made national fiscal problems into Europe wide problems creating a brand new source of intra-European political friction and crisis.)

    All this was obvious to … me. A non-economist, physics guy, working in IT. It was therefore obvious not just to Krugman but to any economist who wasn’t a complete bozo and actually wanted to consider the problem. And yet–as always seems to be the case (e.g. mass immigration)–there were rafts of economists ready to sign off and sing the praises of the Euro … because that’s what the political establishment wants.

    What Krugman has never quite said, is the people who did this are *his* people. Not, not the Jews, but more generically the globalists, the great and the good, who are pushing the immigration disaster there and here; the anti-Trumpers now. Nationalists want to have sovereignty and their own currency and are willing to live with the results.

    Anyway, my point is that Krugman being right about the Euro, says more about the willingness of economists to be whores than it does about Krugman being a genius.

  147. @syonredux

    Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I’m hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

     

    All the stuff that I find online indicates that Dionne is a "progressive"/"liberal" Catholic:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/im-not-quitting-the-church/2012/05/13/gIQAw3vMNU_story.html

    ww.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2012/06/ej-dionne-and-the-contradiction-of-progressive-catholicism

    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won’t refute what Dionne himself says, but, hopefully it’ll make you feel better about yourself.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won’t refute what Dionne himself says,
     
    Actually, it confirms what Dionne said. His Dad died when he was in his teens, and this Yaffe fellow became a mentor figure to him.

    but, hopefully it’ll make you feel better about yourself.
     
    Far too Last Man for my tastes. I always try to despise myself as much as possible.
  148. @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    Here Dionne speaks of Yaffe and his uncle Ray as his second fathers after his own father died.

    Two people can’t be here. My late dad taught me to love politics and he taught me how to argue, and to love argument. You could say that without realizing it, he trained me for the life I have been lucky enough to live, and maybe that’s what he had in mind, even though to this day, I don’t know exactly what he’d make of my views, except that he’s enjoy arguing with me. Probably my very favorite column was the one I wrote was on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of dad’s death – he died in 1968 – and I spoke of how much my dad and I loved to talk and argue about everything having to do with politics and everything about why the Red Sox, in those days, were losing. There are few greater blessings than having a dad who is warm, loving, ebullient and full of life. He would be 100 years old on May 2, and I miss him still. I noted in that column that 1968 was a year in which our country lost three truly great and good Americans, Martin Luther Kind, Bobby Kennedy and my dear, dear dad. And I was lucky to have two second fathers after my dad died, my uncle Ray, with whom I argued about politics constantly but joyfully on both our parts, and my dear, dear friend Bert Yaffe, a progressive Marine veteran who has been a real guide to me all my life. He’s still with us at 90 years old and still fighting for the right as he sees it (and I happen to agree with him). All kids should be as lucky as I was back then to have such great people step into the breach in their lives. Again, I felt the support of a whole community.

    http://www.hillmanfoundation.org/slideshow/ej-dionne-receives-hilllman-award-career-achievement

    It seems pretty clear that Yaffe did not adopt Dionne.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    Good Lord, are you stuck in some sort of autistic loop, or do you think you can just bluster your way through?

    Note my hilarious witticism "A type of judeo-janissary." Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn't get the joke.

    Are you in law perchance? If not you should.

    As Swift said of the law and lawyers:

    “In pleading, they studiously avoid entering into the merits of the cause; but are loud, violent, and tedious, in dwelling upon all circumstances which are not to the purpose. For instance, in the case already mentioned; they never desire to know what claim or title my adversary has to my cow; but whether the said cow were red or black; her horns long or short; whether the field I graze her in be round or square; whether she was milked at home or abroad; what diseases she is subject to, and the like; after which they consult precedents, adjourn the cause from time to time, and in ten, twenty, or thirty years, come to an issue."
  149. @syonredux
    It's pretty clear that Israel is the only nation that David Brooks feels patriotic about:

    Having acknowledged that, I nevertheless understand the complaints of those readers who are bothered by something they have recently learned about David Brooks: his son is a member of the Israel Defense Forces. In a recent Hebrew-language interview in Haaretz magazine, Mr. Brooks was asked about his worries as a father. The article noted that the columnist’s “connection to Israel was always strong.” It continued:

    “He has visited Israel almost every year since 1991, and over the past months the connection has grown even stronger, after his oldest son, aged 23, decided to join the Israel Defense Forces as a ‘lone soldier.’ ” (The reference is to a soldier whose family is not living in Israel.)


    Mr. Brooks described the situation as “worrying.” He added: “But every Israeli parent understands this is what the circumstances require. Beyond that, I think children need to take risks after they leave university, and that they need to do something difficult that involves going beyond their personal limits. Serving in the I.D.F. embodies all of these elements. I couldn’t advise others to do it without acknowledging it’s true for my own family.'”
     
    http://publiceditor.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/08/david-brooks-son-idf-times-public-editor/?_r=0


    As far as I'm concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason, and David Brooks' son should be stripped of his American citizenship.

    “As far as I’m concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason….”

    My dear syonredux, how do you feel about these Americans (below) who served in a foreign military?

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution’s Continental Army?

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral’s commission in the Tsarina’s navy to fight the Turks?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution’s Continental Army?
     
    I'm grateful for the services that they rendered to the American cause.

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons
     
    I think that they should have renounced their citizenship. I feel quite seriously about this.

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral’s commission in the Tsarina’s navy to fight the Turks?
     
    Ditto.
    , @SPMoore8
    I think Syonredux is overstating the case but there is a problem here.

    As I said, I once had an argument with someone who wanted to punish American mercenaries who were fighting for the Sandinistas (or something) back in the early '80's. I pointed out the examples you mentioned as well as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, as well as mercenaries in South Africa and Rhodesia during the 1970's. And let's not forget the Foreign Legion.

    The historical examples you cite during revolutionary times don't really cut it because the notion of citizenship was not as deeply rooted as now. Mercenaries or borrowed troops were common in the 18th Century, and later, think of the King's German Legion that held the farm at Waterloo or the Hessians that Washington crossed the Delaware to subdue.

    I do think it is odd that any American citizen would serve in another nation's army. I would consider that grounds for forfeiting citizenship. (I think some of those early 20th Century idealists were willing to do so, and/or otherwise break the law.) However, the SCOTUS determined in 1967 that service in a foreign army is not incompatible with citizenship, and that definitely creates a gray area in the War on Terror where we do not have any clearcut national entity that we have declared war on. (Supposedly you forfeit citizenship if you serve in the army of a nation we are at war with.)

    The problem with making these kinds of exceptions, even when your heart is in the right place, is that you open the door to dual citizenship of all kinds. I object to this. Right now, apparently, there are millions of American citizens in the Southwest who also have Mexican citizenship (because Mexicans who become American citizenship do not lose their Mexican citizenship). I think that is insane.

    I think holding David Brooks' son to account for serving in the IDF rather than the armed services of the United States is valid, and not anti-semitic, because the US is de facto at war (something not applicable in your contrary examples) and thus failure to serve, but to serve a foreign country, suggests that the loyalties of Brooks' son lie more with Israel with the United States. I wouldn't call it treason but I wouldn't mind having Brooks, Jr. called to account.

    For all that, the sins of the son should not be visited on the father, either.
  150. @Kylie
    Completely OT. Did you know the wonderful interview Kate Hepburn did with Dick Cavett in 1973 is on YouTube?

    Here's Part 1:


    https://youtu.be/gZlHcrzKEUE

    Thanks, I’ll check it out. Those old Cavett interviews can be a real hoot.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    Kate is absolutely, utterly and completely mesmerizing.
  151. @Auntie Analogue

    "As far as I’m concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason...."
     
    My dear syonredux, how do you feel about these Americans (below) who served in a foreign military?

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution's Continental Army?

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral's commission in the Tsarina's navy to fight the Turks?

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution’s Continental Army?

    I’m grateful for the services that they rendered to the American cause.

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons

    I think that they should have renounced their citizenship. I feel quite seriously about this.

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral’s commission in the Tsarina’s navy to fight the Turks?

    Ditto.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  152. @Vinay
    Since Steve can't be bothered to explain to unsophisticates like me exactly what's funny about Krugman's column, let me take a guess. Is it that Krugman suggests the GOP is tribal but it's Democrats who are the *real* tribal party?

    The Democrats are certainly a coalition of different interest groups, including tribal interests. But there's no symmetry between the two parties. EVERY group in American society, with the possible exception of evangelicals, has significant representation within the Democratic Party, including white men, rich men, professionals, labor, big business, small business, you name it.

    The Republican insistence on viewing the Democrats as a Coalition of the Fringes repeatedly leads them astray, like seeing Wasilla as more American than New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston and San Francisco. Or sneering at "California values" or New York or Massachusetts values, as if these were minor fringes of America. Or assuming that the 50% Democratic vote must include 47% "takers" and only a tiny fraction of the "makers".

    A party advancing the interests of white Americans isn't inherently tribal, it could easily be a fairly representative coalition. I'm sure the state GOP in red states, especially states like Texas, is broadly representative. But the national GOP has chosen to be tribal by writing off vast swathes of the US and pretending they're just fringes.

    The trouble with the national GOP isn’t that it doesn’t appeal to nonwhites; the trouble with the national GOP is that it doesn’t appeal to much of anyone. They put up the best what, 15 candidates they could come up with, and whites rejected them all.

  153. @syonredux
    Thanks, I'll check it out. Those old Cavett interviews can be a real hoot.

    Kate is absolutely, utterly and completely mesmerizing.

  154. @syonredux
    Here Dionne speaks of Yaffe and his uncle Ray as his second fathers after his own father died.

    Two people can’t be here. My late dad taught me to love politics and he taught me how to argue, and to love argument. You could say that without realizing it, he trained me for the life I have been lucky enough to live, and maybe that’s what he had in mind, even though to this day, I don’t know exactly what he’d make of my views, except that he’s enjoy arguing with me. Probably my very favorite column was the one I wrote was on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of dad’s death – he died in 1968 – and I spoke of how much my dad and I loved to talk and argue about everything having to do with politics and everything about why the Red Sox, in those days, were losing. There are few greater blessings than having a dad who is warm, loving, ebullient and full of life. He would be 100 years old on May 2, and I miss him still. I noted in that column that 1968 was a year in which our country lost three truly great and good Americans, Martin Luther Kind, Bobby Kennedy and my dear, dear dad. And I was lucky to have two second fathers after my dad died, my uncle Ray, with whom I argued about politics constantly but joyfully on both our parts, and my dear, dear friend Bert Yaffe, a progressive Marine veteran who has been a real guide to me all my life. He’s still with us at 90 years old and still fighting for the right as he sees it (and I happen to agree with him). All kids should be as lucky as I was back then to have such great people step into the breach in their lives. Again, I felt the support of a whole community.
     
    http://www.hillmanfoundation.org/slideshow/ej-dionne-receives-hilllman-award-career-achievement


    It seems pretty clear that Yaffe did not adopt Dionne.

    Good Lord, are you stuck in some sort of autistic loop, or do you think you can just bluster your way through?

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.

    Are you in law perchance? If not you should.

    As Swift said of the law and lawyers:

    “In pleading, they studiously avoid entering into the merits of the cause; but are loud, violent, and tedious, in dwelling upon all circumstances which are not to the purpose. For instance, in the case already mentioned; they never desire to know what claim or title my adversary has to my cow; but whether the said cow were red or black; her horns long or short; whether the field I graze her in be round or square; whether she was milked at home or abroad; what diseases she is subject to, and the like; after which they consult precedents, adjourn the cause from time to time, and in ten, twenty, or thirty years, come to an issue.”

  155. @syonredux

    Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I’m hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

     

    All the stuff that I find online indicates that Dionne is a "progressive"/"liberal" Catholic:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/im-not-quitting-the-church/2012/05/13/gIQAw3vMNU_story.html

    ww.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2012/06/ej-dionne-and-the-contradiction-of-progressive-catholicism

    Liberal Catholicism used to be a big deal.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    Graham Greene used to describe himself as Catholic agnostic, or even at times a "Catholic atheist".

    He also coined the expression "carnal chivalry"* which he employed to describe the primary motivation of Americans in Vietnam and their other other theatres of war. It's perfect, when you think about it.

    *From the The Quiet American.
    , @stillCARealist
    You mean that now they're ALL liberals and so it's redundant?
    , @Desiderius
    In practice it still is. Just because your average SJW Beavis and Buttheads haven't heard about it doesn't make it less pervasive.
  156. @Auntie Analogue

    "As far as I’m concerned, serving in a foreign military is an act of treason...."
     
    My dear syonredux, how do you feel about these Americans (below) who served in a foreign military?

    1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lafayette_Escadrille

    2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Squadrons

    How do you regard Lafayette, von Steuben, and Kościuszko having served in our Revolution's Continental Army?

    How about John Paul Jones who took from Catherine the Great an admiral's commission in the Tsarina's navy to fight the Turks?

    I think Syonredux is overstating the case but there is a problem here.

    As I said, I once had an argument with someone who wanted to punish American mercenaries who were fighting for the Sandinistas (or something) back in the early ’80’s. I pointed out the examples you mentioned as well as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, as well as mercenaries in South Africa and Rhodesia during the 1970’s. And let’s not forget the Foreign Legion.

    The historical examples you cite during revolutionary times don’t really cut it because the notion of citizenship was not as deeply rooted as now. Mercenaries or borrowed troops were common in the 18th Century, and later, think of the King’s German Legion that held the farm at Waterloo or the Hessians that Washington crossed the Delaware to subdue.

    I do think it is odd that any American citizen would serve in another nation’s army. I would consider that grounds for forfeiting citizenship. (I think some of those early 20th Century idealists were willing to do so, and/or otherwise break the law.) However, the SCOTUS determined in 1967 that service in a foreign army is not incompatible with citizenship, and that definitely creates a gray area in the War on Terror where we do not have any clearcut national entity that we have declared war on. (Supposedly you forfeit citizenship if you serve in the army of a nation we are at war with.)

    The problem with making these kinds of exceptions, even when your heart is in the right place, is that you open the door to dual citizenship of all kinds. I object to this. Right now, apparently, there are millions of American citizens in the Southwest who also have Mexican citizenship (because Mexicans who become American citizenship do not lose their Mexican citizenship). I think that is insane.

    I think holding David Brooks’ son to account for serving in the IDF rather than the armed services of the United States is valid, and not anti-semitic, because the US is de facto at war (something not applicable in your contrary examples) and thus failure to serve, but to serve a foreign country, suggests that the loyalties of Brooks’ son lie more with Israel with the United States. I wouldn’t call it treason but I wouldn’t mind having Brooks, Jr. called to account.

    For all that, the sins of the son should not be visited on the father, either.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    None of this quibbling about Brooks' son etc. should even be up for debate.

    Until the a960's Americans could not hold dual citizenship. At the behest of the Jewish lobby this was overturned. Stanley Fischer of the Federal Reserve holds Israeli citizenship. Prior to his current job he was director of the central bank of Israel. It is preposterous to assert that his loyalties don't lay with Israel.

    Today the Fishers, Krugmans and Foxmans wage war on WASP America. They follow in the footsteps of fellow Jews Henry Morgenthau and Harry Dexter White (Weit). First Germany, now the U.S.

    Einstein warned them not to do to the U.S. what they did to the Germans, but they can't help themselves. It's in their nature. Hell, it's built into the intellectual models with which they construct their Game Theory.

    For the Jews, every actor seeks his pecuniary self interest. That's why they find the actions of men who are motivated by loyalty or honor, unintelligible. A young Muslim man who gives his life to oppose the oppressor of his people is a phenomenon that Jews can't fathom. What's to gain for himself? He must be crazy. Insane. A Terrorist.

    Jews will never understand what motivates good people to do that which benefits the larger whole in which they live, irrespective of how they personally benefit. No matter to what lengths they torture their own logic or rack their brains, they can't wrap their heads around "altruistic behavior". It is a closed book to them and their impoverished culture reflects this. No monuments, no great literature, art etc. except what they piggybacked on European culture--and that by half Jew/half European hybrids which is fortunate for them because without that cross breeding, Jews would amount to nothing.
    , @iffen
    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.
    , @Lot

    because the US is de facto at war
     
    The de facto war we are in is with the global third world who would like to colonize, Islamify and brownify the West. Israel is fighting that war more effectively than our heavily-compromised government and military, which currently is led by an enemy of us as commander in chief.
  157. Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.

    Again with the Russia thing.

    The thing that gets me most about how Democrats are all in a dither over Russia is just how petty and immature their attitude toward Russia is, given that it is still by far the most fearsome nuclear power in the world, ourselves excepted.

    We’re supposed to worry about Trump bringing us to nuclear war when Obama and Hillary did just about everything they could to gin up tensions with Russia? And over what, for God’s sake? Because Russia made Obama look weak and rather stupid in his idiot program to oppose Assad (which program, rather embarrassingly, enabled the rise of ISIS)? Because Russia and the Ukraine (a former republic in the Soviet Union)– were trying to smack each other around over territory? Because Russia gave the gay rights movement, for Christ’s sake, some disrespect?

    I’m sure Obama’s feelings, the feelings of a black man, were hurt, and Hillary’s feelings, the feelings of a woman, were hurt as well, and those are some very important feelings. But are those feelings of such awesome significance that we should be antagonizing the one power in the world that could actually blow us to kingdom come if it had a desire to?

    Again, is there anything more petty, more childish, or more foolhardy than the Democrats’ attitude toward Russia?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Waging World War G against Russia didn't hurt Lockheed's stock price, did it?
  158. @Steve Sailer
    Liberal Catholicism used to be a big deal.

    Graham Greene used to describe himself as Catholic agnostic, or even at times a “Catholic atheist”.

    He also coined the expression “carnal chivalry”* which he employed to describe the primary motivation of Americans in Vietnam and their other other theatres of war. It’s perfect, when you think about it.

    *From the The Quiet American.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Greene's politics were rather..... unpleasant.He was, for example, something of an apologist for the USSR:

    If I had to choose between life in the Soviet Union and life in the United States of America, I would certainly choose the Soviet Union, just as I would choose life in Cuba to life in those southern American republics, like Bolivia, dominated by their northern neighbor, or life in North Vietnam to life in South Vietnam."
     
    And he was on friendly terms with the traitor Kim Philby, of whom he wrote:

    "He betrayed his country—yes, perhaps he did, but who among us has not committed treason to something or someone more important than a country?"
     
  159. @Pat Hannagan
    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won't refute what Dionne himself says, but, hopefully it'll make you feel better about yourself.

    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won’t refute what Dionne himself says,

    Actually, it confirms what Dionne said. His Dad died when he was in his teens, and this Yaffe fellow became a mentor figure to him.

    but, hopefully it’ll make you feel better about yourself.

    Far too Last Man for my tastes. I always try to despise myself as much as possible.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    Steve's censoring often kills my narrative flow.

    Sometimes that's a good thing, when drinking and blogging is the order of the day, other times it's not so good. I take the good with the bad, so here's an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it's way through to day's light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.

    Note, I may soon begin drinking, in which case Steve will no doubt let the comments through in order to demonstrate what a fool I ultimately am.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.
  160. @neutral
    According to the new narrative to be a patriot one must be an adherent of globalism, which is essentially supporting global government. I don't think it will be too long before these tough guy acts will be using the words "global security" instead of "national security" to argue for conflict somewhere.

    “America’s Navy: a vague calling that is indescribable though global”

  161. @candid_observer

    Now comes Mr. Trump, doing the bidding of a foreign power and inviting it to intervene in our politics — and that’s O.K., because it also serves the tribe.
     
    Again with the Russia thing.

    The thing that gets me most about how Democrats are all in a dither over Russia is just how petty and immature their attitude toward Russia is, given that it is still by far the most fearsome nuclear power in the world, ourselves excepted.

    We're supposed to worry about Trump bringing us to nuclear war when Obama and Hillary did just about everything they could to gin up tensions with Russia? And over what, for God's sake? Because Russia made Obama look weak and rather stupid in his idiot program to oppose Assad (which program, rather embarrassingly, enabled the rise of ISIS)? Because Russia and the Ukraine (a former republic in the Soviet Union)-- were trying to smack each other around over territory? Because Russia gave the gay rights movement, for Christ's sake, some disrespect?

    I'm sure Obama's feelings, the feelings of a black man, were hurt, and Hillary's feelings, the feelings of a woman, were hurt as well, and those are some very important feelings. But are those feelings of such awesome significance that we should be antagonizing the one power in the world that could actually blow us to kingdom come if it had a desire to?

    Again, is there anything more petty, more childish, or more foolhardy than the Democrats' attitude toward Russia?

    Waging World War G against Russia didn’t hurt Lockheed’s stock price, did it?

  162. @Pat Hannagan
    It is my onerous duty to inform you that what *you* think is irrelevant. Show the man some respect and just accept what Dionne himself says:

    He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    What, you need a certificate of adoption? Sheesh.

    It is my onerous duty to inform you that what *you* think is irrelevant. Show the man some respect and just accept what Dionne himself says:

    He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    What, you need a certificate of adoption? Sheesh.

    Yeah, that would be nice.

    Plus, according to Dionne, he had two quasi-fathers:

    I noted in that column that 1968 was a year in which our country lost three truly great and good Americans, Martin Luther Kind, Bobby Kennedy and my dear, dear dad. And I was lucky to have two second fathers after my dad died, my uncle Ray, with whom I argued about politics constantly but joyfully on both our parts, and my dear, dear friend Bert Yaffe, a progressive Marine veteran who has been a real guide to me all my life. He’s still with us at 90 years old and still fighting for the right as he sees it (and I happen to agree with him). All kids should be as lucky as I was back then to have such great people step into the breach in their lives. Again, I felt the support of a whole community.

    http://www.hillmanfoundation.org/slideshow/ej-dionne-receives-hilllman-award-career-achievement

  163. @Pat Hannagan
    Graham Greene used to describe himself as Catholic agnostic, or even at times a "Catholic atheist".

    He also coined the expression "carnal chivalry"* which he employed to describe the primary motivation of Americans in Vietnam and their other other theatres of war. It's perfect, when you think about it.

    *From the The Quiet American.

    Greene’s politics were rather….. unpleasant.He was, for example, something of an apologist for the USSR:

    If I had to choose between life in the Soviet Union and life in the United States of America, I would certainly choose the Soviet Union, just as I would choose life in Cuba to life in those southern American republics, like Bolivia, dominated by their northern neighbor, or life in North Vietnam to life in South Vietnam.”

    And he was on friendly terms with the traitor Kim Philby, of whom he wrote:

    “He betrayed his country—yes, perhaps he did, but who among us has not committed treason to something or someone more important than a country?”

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it's a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.
  164. @syonredux

    Good luck with all your googling, mate. It won’t refute what Dionne himself says,
     
    Actually, it confirms what Dionne said. His Dad died when he was in his teens, and this Yaffe fellow became a mentor figure to him.

    but, hopefully it’ll make you feel better about yourself.
     
    Far too Last Man for my tastes. I always try to despise myself as much as possible.

    Steve’s censoring often kills my narrative flow.

    Sometimes that’s a good thing, when drinking and blogging is the order of the day, other times it’s not so good. I take the good with the bad, so here’s an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it’s way through to day’s light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.

    Note, I may soon begin drinking, in which case Steve will no doubt let the comments through in order to demonstrate what a fool I ultimately am.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    . I take the good with the bad, so here’s an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it’s way through to day’s light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.
     
    I did. Except the joke doesn't really work, seeing as how Dionne wasn't adopted by a Jewish man. And he never converted to Judaism.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.
     
    But I do take Dionne at his word. His father died when he was 16, and this Yaffe guy (along with Dionne's uncle Ray) assumed a fatherly role in his life.
  165. @syonredux
    Greene's politics were rather..... unpleasant.He was, for example, something of an apologist for the USSR:

    If I had to choose between life in the Soviet Union and life in the United States of America, I would certainly choose the Soviet Union, just as I would choose life in Cuba to life in those southern American republics, like Bolivia, dominated by their northern neighbor, or life in North Vietnam to life in South Vietnam."
     
    And he was on friendly terms with the traitor Kim Philby, of whom he wrote:

    "He betrayed his country—yes, perhaps he did, but who among us has not committed treason to something or someone more important than a country?"
     

    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it’s a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it’s a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.
     
    I have read it. Proof that a loathsome man (and Soviet apologist) can write a good novel.
    , @syonredux
    Another quote from Graham Greene:

    There is no division in our thoughts between Catholics—Roman Catholics—and Communists.
     
  166. @Pat Hannagan
    Steve's censoring often kills my narrative flow.

    Sometimes that's a good thing, when drinking and blogging is the order of the day, other times it's not so good. I take the good with the bad, so here's an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it's way through to day's light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.

    Note, I may soon begin drinking, in which case Steve will no doubt let the comments through in order to demonstrate what a fool I ultimately am.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.

    . I take the good with the bad, so here’s an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it’s way through to day’s light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.

    I did. Except the joke doesn’t really work, seeing as how Dionne wasn’t adopted by a Jewish man. And he never converted to Judaism.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.

    But I do take Dionne at his word. His father died when he was 16, and this Yaffe guy (along with Dionne’s uncle Ray) assumed a fatherly role in his life.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    Sigh. One thing positive has come out of this exchange: you've driven me to drink.
  167. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @SPMoore8
    I think Syonredux is overstating the case but there is a problem here.

    As I said, I once had an argument with someone who wanted to punish American mercenaries who were fighting for the Sandinistas (or something) back in the early '80's. I pointed out the examples you mentioned as well as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, as well as mercenaries in South Africa and Rhodesia during the 1970's. And let's not forget the Foreign Legion.

    The historical examples you cite during revolutionary times don't really cut it because the notion of citizenship was not as deeply rooted as now. Mercenaries or borrowed troops were common in the 18th Century, and later, think of the King's German Legion that held the farm at Waterloo or the Hessians that Washington crossed the Delaware to subdue.

    I do think it is odd that any American citizen would serve in another nation's army. I would consider that grounds for forfeiting citizenship. (I think some of those early 20th Century idealists were willing to do so, and/or otherwise break the law.) However, the SCOTUS determined in 1967 that service in a foreign army is not incompatible with citizenship, and that definitely creates a gray area in the War on Terror where we do not have any clearcut national entity that we have declared war on. (Supposedly you forfeit citizenship if you serve in the army of a nation we are at war with.)

    The problem with making these kinds of exceptions, even when your heart is in the right place, is that you open the door to dual citizenship of all kinds. I object to this. Right now, apparently, there are millions of American citizens in the Southwest who also have Mexican citizenship (because Mexicans who become American citizenship do not lose their Mexican citizenship). I think that is insane.

    I think holding David Brooks' son to account for serving in the IDF rather than the armed services of the United States is valid, and not anti-semitic, because the US is de facto at war (something not applicable in your contrary examples) and thus failure to serve, but to serve a foreign country, suggests that the loyalties of Brooks' son lie more with Israel with the United States. I wouldn't call it treason but I wouldn't mind having Brooks, Jr. called to account.

    For all that, the sins of the son should not be visited on the father, either.

    None of this quibbling about Brooks’ son etc. should even be up for debate.

    Until the a960’s Americans could not hold dual citizenship. At the behest of the Jewish lobby this was overturned. Stanley Fischer of the Federal Reserve holds Israeli citizenship. Prior to his current job he was director of the central bank of Israel. It is preposterous to assert that his loyalties don’t lay with Israel.

    Today the Fishers, Krugmans and Foxmans wage war on WASP America. They follow in the footsteps of fellow Jews Henry Morgenthau and Harry Dexter White (Weit). First Germany, now the U.S.

    Einstein warned them not to do to the U.S. what they did to the Germans, but they can’t help themselves. It’s in their nature. Hell, it’s built into the intellectual models with which they construct their Game Theory.

    For the Jews, every actor seeks his pecuniary self interest. That’s why they find the actions of men who are motivated by loyalty or honor, unintelligible. A young Muslim man who gives his life to oppose the oppressor of his people is a phenomenon that Jews can’t fathom. What’s to gain for himself? He must be crazy. Insane. A Terrorist.

    Jews will never understand what motivates good people to do that which benefits the larger whole in which they live, irrespective of how they personally benefit. No matter to what lengths they torture their own logic or rack their brains, they can’t wrap their heads around “altruistic behavior”. It is a closed book to them and their impoverished culture reflects this. No monuments, no great literature, art etc. except what they piggybacked on European culture–and that by half Jew/half European hybrids which is fortunate for them because without that cross breeding, Jews would amount to nothing.

  168. @Pat Hannagan
    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it's a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.

    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it’s a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.

    I have read it. Proof that a loathsome man (and Soviet apologist) can write a good novel.

  169. @Pat Hannagan
    My favourite Greene novel is The Power and the Glory. I recommend it to you, at the very least to understand his politics. But it's a great story anyway and gives the likes of me much hope.

    Another quote from Graham Greene:

    There is no division in our thoughts between Catholics—Roman Catholics—and Communists.

  170. @syonredux

    . I take the good with the bad, so here’s an excerpt of a previous comment not yet found it’s way through to day’s light:

    Note my hilarious witticism “A type of judeo-janissary.” Well, I thought it was funny, even if you didn’t get the joke.
     
    I did. Except the joke doesn't really work, seeing as how Dionne wasn't adopted by a Jewish man. And he never converted to Judaism.

    Till then I reiterate: take Dionne at his word. He knows more about himself than you do about him, no matter how much your googling proves otherwise.
     
    But I do take Dionne at his word. His father died when he was 16, and this Yaffe guy (along with Dionne's uncle Ray) assumed a fatherly role in his life.

    Sigh. One thing positive has come out of this exchange: you’ve driven me to drink.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Sigh. One thing positive has come out of this exchange: you’ve driven me to drink.
     
    Whatever helps you cope with ennui, dear fellow.

    Personally, I just pick up a volume of James Thurber's stuff. A good dose of Thurber makes just about anything this side of intestinal cancer bearable.

  171. @SPMoore8
    I think Syonredux is overstating the case but there is a problem here.

    As I said, I once had an argument with someone who wanted to punish American mercenaries who were fighting for the Sandinistas (or something) back in the early '80's. I pointed out the examples you mentioned as well as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, as well as mercenaries in South Africa and Rhodesia during the 1970's. And let's not forget the Foreign Legion.

    The historical examples you cite during revolutionary times don't really cut it because the notion of citizenship was not as deeply rooted as now. Mercenaries or borrowed troops were common in the 18th Century, and later, think of the King's German Legion that held the farm at Waterloo or the Hessians that Washington crossed the Delaware to subdue.

    I do think it is odd that any American citizen would serve in another nation's army. I would consider that grounds for forfeiting citizenship. (I think some of those early 20th Century idealists were willing to do so, and/or otherwise break the law.) However, the SCOTUS determined in 1967 that service in a foreign army is not incompatible with citizenship, and that definitely creates a gray area in the War on Terror where we do not have any clearcut national entity that we have declared war on. (Supposedly you forfeit citizenship if you serve in the army of a nation we are at war with.)

    The problem with making these kinds of exceptions, even when your heart is in the right place, is that you open the door to dual citizenship of all kinds. I object to this. Right now, apparently, there are millions of American citizens in the Southwest who also have Mexican citizenship (because Mexicans who become American citizenship do not lose their Mexican citizenship). I think that is insane.

    I think holding David Brooks' son to account for serving in the IDF rather than the armed services of the United States is valid, and not anti-semitic, because the US is de facto at war (something not applicable in your contrary examples) and thus failure to serve, but to serve a foreign country, suggests that the loyalties of Brooks' son lie more with Israel with the United States. I wouldn't call it treason but I wouldn't mind having Brooks, Jr. called to account.

    For all that, the sins of the son should not be visited on the father, either.

    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.
     
    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor
  172. @unit472
    All you need to know about Krugman is that when Dubya was president fiscal deficits were ruinous. When Obama was elected fiscal deficits were not just OK they needed to be larger. The man is an partisan ideologue whose theories have failed.

    A common thread in Krugman’s economic analysis is that he wants our government to essentially inflate the debt away. This wouldn’t devastate the very rich, who could weather it in various ways, or the very poor, who live paycheck-to-paycheck and on the government dole anyway, but of course would be ruinous to everyone else. It’s the logical path of top-down government control of the economy, with no downside according to his ideology.

    • Replies: @Roman Frege
    This is a particularly stupid narrative in 2016 because the middle third of the United States of America is in debt so the first order effects of "inflating the debt away" would be to help their balance sheets. This was something Milton Friedman said in the 1970s and 1980s (when the balance sheets of the middle third of America were stronger) and my guess is that's where you heard it from. The power of intellectuals indeed.
  173. @Pat Hannagan
    E.J. Dionne is by adoption Jewish. Sort of the quintessential Judeo-American (a term I'm hoping to get into the Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries). A type of judeo-janissary.

    Short story, Dionne's old man died when he was 16 and subsequently he was adopted by Captain Civil Rights Bert Yaffe:

    We met when I interviewed him for a high school project on the reform movement in the Democratic Party, and it happened almost instantly: He decided to take me on as an extra son — and, bless them, his own children, Eric, Cheryl and Rob, welcomed me as part of the family.

    If Dionne is Jewish by adoption–whatever that might mean–Portsmouth Abbey would have been a very odd place to send him to. It’s a very Catholic boarding school (WF Buckley sent his son there) with many Benedictine priests.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    milieu.

    16 is a rather formative age, don't you think? One has embarked upon the age of manhood yet not yet fully being a man, so to speak.

    What is manhood, anyway? A father is a formative figure who instructs his boy in his own conception of manhood, ie. what it means to be a "man".

    Each man has his own conceptions of manhood, and when men are gathered in a collective of kith and kin we call that a society, a culture, and in large enough number a nation.

    When I was at school the Brothers and Lay teachers went to great lengths to impress upon us boys what it is to be a man. That milieu of education was formative of all of us who went there. That milieu was worldwide, much like the Latin Mass was a reinforcement of our catholicism, our universal milieu.

    The Jesuit motto was "Give me a child until he is seven and I will give you the man", like so, father a boy at 16 and you too will produce a man of similar tastes and aspirations. It would be a refinement if the boy were already established in first principles, as we have here in the matter of Dionne.

    You guys don't do anthropology much, hey?

    For example, were I converted to Islam, then this would be my theme song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZPECFQ4NhE

    This introductory lecture has been brought to you by Spitfire (the bottle of Britain), the Christian Brothers, and the poems of Robert Browning.

  174. @iffen
    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.

    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    • Replies: @iffen
    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don't know for sure.
    , @PiltdownMan

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor
     
    Except the Gurkhas. But no one thinks of them as mercenaries, which is what they are in the British Army, as well as in the modern Indian Army.
  175. @Pat Hannagan
    Sigh. One thing positive has come out of this exchange: you've driven me to drink.

    Sigh. One thing positive has come out of this exchange: you’ve driven me to drink.

    Whatever helps you cope with ennui, dear fellow.

    Personally, I just pick up a volume of James Thurber’s stuff. A good dose of Thurber makes just about anything this side of intestinal cancer bearable.

    • Agree: Kylie
  176. @Steve Sailer
    I remember reading in the magazines in 1977 about this unprecedented new style of music, punk rock. And then when finally hearing it, thinking, "Didn't Elton John do this exact same thing back in 1973 on "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting?"

    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.

    • Replies: @slumber_j

    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.
     
    Not to be combative, but I find pretty much everything on Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols to be hugely memorable and enjoyable, employing at least some of the qualities you mention. One thinks e.g. of "Holidays in the Sun":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ah1JM9mf60
  177. @reiner Tor
    Krugman's wife? She looks 100% white.

    She’s light-skinned so a quick glance at her she looks white. But look again and you can see she’s black.

    Here’s a youtube about her http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/robin-wells-on-universal-cover/

    • Replies: @BB753
    In the interview she says she's part black, indian and white.
  178. @syonredux

    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.
     
    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don’t know for sure.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.
     
    Which points to the imperial function of such units.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.
     
    Hardly surprising, given the feudal nature of the regime.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don’t know for sure.
     
    If they are private contractors, they count as mercenaries. Further evidence that the US nation-state is in decay
    , @Brutusale
    They're almost all ex-Special Forces, and serve as the "deniable" contract arm of the US military.

    Read Jeremy Scahill's Blackwater or pretty much anything by Sean McFate, especially his The Modern Mercenary.
  179. @Steve Sailer
    Liberal Catholicism used to be a big deal.

    You mean that now they’re ALL liberals and so it’s redundant?

  180. @PV van der Byl
    If Dionne is Jewish by adoption--whatever that might mean--Portsmouth Abbey would have been a very odd place to send him to. It's a very Catholic boarding school (WF Buckley sent his son there) with many Benedictine priests.

    milieu.

    16 is a rather formative age, don’t you think? One has embarked upon the age of manhood yet not yet fully being a man, so to speak.

    What is manhood, anyway? A father is a formative figure who instructs his boy in his own conception of manhood, ie. what it means to be a “man”.

    Each man has his own conceptions of manhood, and when men are gathered in a collective of kith and kin we call that a society, a culture, and in large enough number a nation.

    When I was at school the Brothers and Lay teachers went to great lengths to impress upon us boys what it is to be a man. That milieu of education was formative of all of us who went there. That milieu was worldwide, much like the Latin Mass was a reinforcement of our catholicism, our universal milieu.

    The Jesuit motto was “Give me a child until he is seven and I will give you the man”, like so, father a boy at 16 and you too will produce a man of similar tastes and aspirations. It would be a refinement if the boy were already established in first principles, as we have here in the matter of Dionne.

    You guys don’t do anthropology much, hey?

    For example, were I converted to Islam, then this would be my theme song:

    This introductory lecture has been brought to you by Spitfire (the bottle of Britain), the Christian Brothers, and the poems of Robert Browning.

  181. I followed Krugman’s NYT blog for several years and only stopped when I realized that he was intellectually dishonest in his analysis of economic issues. Krugman is an establishment/DNC hack even in his commentary upon purely economic issues.

    I’ll list two examples.

    1. Krugman did a great number of blog posts earlier in the Obama adminsitration concerning the ‘invisible bond vigilantes’. These phantasmal bond vigilantes were, per Krugman, posited by right-wing critics of the Obama administration, who said that Obama’s deficit spending would inevitably lead to a devaluation of US Treasury Bonds, implying an increase in the interest rate, leading to recession. Contrary to rightwing pundits and economists, this persistently failed to occur, and has not occurred since then. On the face of it, Krugman’s mockery of the right wing economists seems quite apt. However, if you dig back farther into Krugman’s history, it becomes evident that it is he who was calling for ‘invisible bond vigilantes’ to drive up interest rates by selling off US bonds. But that was during the Bush administration. Krugman’s analysis changed according to the party in the whitehouse.

    2. Krugman had for years posited a puzzle that he couldn’t understand. Interest rates on Japanese government bonds had failed to rise in response to government deficit spending. At the same time there was a trolling operation going on by adherents of the Modern Monetary Theory(MMT) school of thought. The MMT adherents trolled Krugman’s blog incessantly with their own explanation of his puzzle. Their explanation was that, in the specific case of a country that issues debt denominated only in the currency issued by its own central bank, interest rates are controlled entirely by the decisions made by that country’s central bank.

    After months or years of being trolled by MMT adherents, Krugman suddenly realized that they were correct. But he did not acknowledge that they were the impetus for his realization. Instead, he found justification for their views in the writings of a mainstream economist who had never been interpreted in that manner previously. Krugman absorbed the arguments of his non-mainstream critics without giving credit where credit was due.

    So, in the end, when it comes to analysis of the economy, Krugman is a hack who supports the status quo in economic thought, and the DNC as far as possible within defense of status quo economic thought.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I got into a discussion with Krugman a long time ago over how companies could exist that buy up rock concert tickets at face value and consistently resell them at above face value. I suggested that insiders at the firms that sell tickets to the general public were setting aside the best tickets for their own use and then selling them to resellers. I cited a friend who camped on the street for 36 hours to be first in line to buy Springsteen tickets at the LA Forum in 1980 only to find when the window open that all the best seats were already gone.

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn't surprised that he was irritable, but I didn't expect him to be so unworldly

    , @Anonymous
    Contra #1, Krugman has acknowledged this change of position. The key is the liquidity trap he talks so much about; there is so much money sitting around looking for safe assets right now that there is room for spending financed by Treasury bills.

    I wasn't paying attention back then, but the argument goes that normal economic conditions prevailed during the Bush years, so the mechanism you described could have occurred. Normal economic conditions means we're not in a recession big enough to qualify as a liquidity trap, so the only non-mainstream part of any of these arguments was the proposition that the bond vigilantes would not actually strike this time. And Krugman was right about that.

    And somewhat contra #2, Simon Wren-Lewis has written about how his understanding of MMT is that it's either false or trivial, depending on how you interpret it. You didn't convince me you were being fair on point one, and you did the same on point two.
  182. @argosy Jones
    I followed Krugman's NYT blog for several years and only stopped when I realized that he was intellectually dishonest in his analysis of economic issues. Krugman is an establishment/DNC hack even in his commentary upon purely economic issues.

    I'll list two examples.

    1. Krugman did a great number of blog posts earlier in the Obama adminsitration concerning the 'invisible bond vigilantes'. These phantasmal bond vigilantes were, per Krugman, posited by right-wing critics of the Obama administration, who said that Obama's deficit spending would inevitably lead to a devaluation of US Treasury Bonds, implying an increase in the interest rate, leading to recession. Contrary to rightwing pundits and economists, this persistently failed to occur, and has not occurred since then. On the face of it, Krugman's mockery of the right wing economists seems quite apt. However, if you dig back farther into Krugman's history, it becomes evident that it is he who was calling for 'invisible bond vigilantes' to drive up interest rates by selling off US bonds. But that was during the Bush administration. Krugman's analysis changed according to the party in the whitehouse.

    2. Krugman had for years posited a puzzle that he couldn't understand. Interest rates on Japanese government bonds had failed to rise in response to government deficit spending. At the same time there was a trolling operation going on by adherents of the Modern Monetary Theory(MMT) school of thought. The MMT adherents trolled Krugman's blog incessantly with their own explanation of his puzzle. Their explanation was that, in the specific case of a country that issues debt denominated only in the currency issued by its own central bank, interest rates are controlled entirely by the decisions made by that country's central bank.

    After months or years of being trolled by MMT adherents, Krugman suddenly realized that they were correct. But he did not acknowledge that they were the impetus for his realization. Instead, he found justification for their views in the writings of a mainstream economist who had never been interpreted in that manner previously. Krugman absorbed the arguments of his non-mainstream critics without giving credit where credit was due.

    So, in the end, when it comes to analysis of the economy, Krugman is a hack who supports the status quo in economic thought, and the DNC as far as possible within defense of status quo economic thought.

    I got into a discussion with Krugman a long time ago over how companies could exist that buy up rock concert tickets at face value and consistently resell them at above face value. I suggested that insiders at the firms that sell tickets to the general public were setting aside the best tickets for their own use and then selling them to resellers. I cited a friend who camped on the street for 36 hours to be first in line to buy Springsteen tickets at the LA Forum in 1980 only to find when the window open that all the best seats were already gone.

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn’t surprised that he was irritable, but I didn’t expect him to be so unworldly

    • Replies: @syonredux

    . I wasn’t surprised that he was irritable, but I didn’t expect him to be so unworldly
     
    I'm not surprised. The worldly philosophy tends to attract unworldly men. E.g., the old joke about a physicist, a chemist, and an economist who are all stuck on a deserted island. Fortunately for them, they have thousands of cans of tuna. The physicist says that opening the cans is a simple matter of applied force (i.e., hit them hard enough with a rock). The chemist scoffs at the waste of muscle power, says that applied heat will cause the cans to rupture, no muss, no fuss. The economist, voice dripping with contempt, says that the solution is quite simple. First, assume that we have a can opener....
    , @Argosy Jones

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn’t surprised that he was irritable, but I didn’t expect him to be so unworldly
     
    Not at all. Krugman and his ilk are quite worldly. They know their strong suit: to defend their political preferences by claiming the high ground of economic "science'. To be drug down into a debate on the muddy terrain of pedestrian facts and events would be to compromise his sole advantage.

    This has been a successful strategy for economic ideologues for a long time. The case for protectionism and industrial strategy has always been based on facts and historical experience, since Alexander Hamilton's 1792 'Report on Manufactures and Trade". 'liberal' economists, since David Recardo in 1817 have universally relied upon highly abstracted 'models' which rely upon false assumptions to do most of their intellectual work.
    , @Daniel H
    Really good street scalpers - those without inside connections - often have the tickets sold before they buy them from someone else. I have seen them in action many times at Madison Square Garden. They find a buyer, set a price, and say wait here, I'll be back in 10 minutes. They then go out and find the seller, buy it with an acceptable margin and close the sale with the other party. Pure market makers, yet they are made out to be villains and are persecuted by the police and harangued by the political class and commentariat.
  183. @Steve Sailer
    Don't quote me on KISS. I went with KISS because it's geographically appropriate and funny.

    There used to be a lot of stuff on the Internet about Krugman's love of 1970s rock bands, but he appears to have made a concerted effort starting in 2011 to bury the uncool stuff way down on Google by writing all the time about newer bands like Arcade Fire he loves loves loves.

    I can't remember exactly which 1970s bands I've read him discuss his abiding love for ... Doobie Brothers? Blue Oyster Cult? But they definitely weren't of the Velvet Underground / Roxy Music status elite.

    Also, I'm not sure that Trump deep down loves Tiny Dancer or if he plays it at his rallies because Sir Elton owns a condo in one of his buildings. Trump also plays Phantom of the Opera because Sir Andrew is a tenant.

    Trump was born in 1946, so he’s got Baby Boomer tastes. He may genuinely like those songs, since he lived through the 70s. Putin is an ABBA fan, by the way.

  184. @Sam Shama
    Couldn't agree more on Krugman's relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    This is a joke, right?

    (With apologies to J.R. Hicks).

    • Replies: @Sam Shama
    Not a bit.

    To be clear, I don't set exclusive store by the economics advanced by any single individual on that list [well, with one exception perhaps and it isn't Krugman], convinced as I am, in the notion that I should be best served by taking the various works of each writer in discrete servings, subjecting them to my own analysis and empirical filter, upon which, they either stand or fall of their own merit. The difficulty - even a fatal flaw in my reckoning - with subscribing to the entirety of a work, modeling, thought or philosophy, is that it inevitably draws one into a vortex of barely defensible, often internally inconsistent positions. Simply put, hardly anyone has a monopoly in the immaculate truth. Not even close. A case in point is this recent whim in certain circles, that Western civilisation is in imminent danger, or more charitably in the early grips of being subsumed by Islam. The more one looks carefully into population and economic dynamics, especially as successful civilisations adapted to external threats, [from the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the fall of the Republic under Octavian, all the way to 476 AD when Romulus Augustulus was exiled; stretching all the forward to 1453 when the Turks were pounding the Theodocian walls, there were perhaps as many as a hundred incidents when contemporary historians called the end of the Roman imperium. Yet that civilisation adapted and persisted.]

    On the present discussion of Krugman, I find him a very sharp economist, an opportunist hack on occasion, but distinctly insightful nonetheless on some subjects. But rely on him for social or political trends, I do not.
  185. @utu
    "Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?" - But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish? Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better. Perhaps even in Ireland. Instead of emigrating they would stay and would be force to fix what was wrong with Ireland.

    “But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish?”

    Worse off, are you kidding me, lad. The Irish are white. A pot of gold.

    “Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better.”

    Perhaps. In other words, you’re only speculating.

  186. @Anonymous
    My training is in economics and finance. Krugman's work as an economist is highly overrated. His NYT columns are dissected every week in an entertaining podcast by Robert Murphy and Tom Woods at contrakrugman.com.

    The eminently sensible Cullen Roche of Pragmatic Capitalism has also shown Krugman to have a fundamental misunderstanding of how the economy and money supply work.

  187. @Paul Yarbles

    Actually, he can go there. Remember, those “old neighborhoods” were also suspicious of people other than them. No, not white people, but groups not of their own ethnic group. Then those neighborhoods assimilated the newcomers, just like clockwork.
     
    Assimilation is not instantaneous. In fact, assimilation won't occur at all if the inflows are sufficiently high for sufficiently long. My view is that the immigration rates are too high now and that this has been going on for too long. Support for my view is the very existence of wide-spread backlash. We do not owe the rest of the world a place at our table and so I can see no reason to cause such discord in our country.

    Now add to this the high levels of cynicism and hatred of our existing society and it's traditions and history expressed by our cultural elites who mold opinion to a large degree. We get a formula that leads not to assimilation, but of an acceptance that it is America that must change.

    “We do not owe the rest of the world a place at our table and so I can see no reason to cause such discord in our country.”

    How was that table created by the way?

    “Now add to this the high levels of cynicism and hatred of our existing society and it’s traditions and history expressed by our cultural elites who mold opinion to a large degree. We get a formula that leads not to assimilation, but of an acceptance that it is America that must change.”

    Who has hatred of our existing society?

    Who are these cultural elites you speak of?

  188. @Lot
    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital. He recetly wrote against Brexit exonomic scaremongering.

    I will bet that when Krug got his Nobel he was a free trader. You think this prize would ever be given to a free trade skeptic? Thanks…I was not aware of his current position on free trade

    • Replies: @Lot
    One of his specific innovations was noting that one of the assumptions in the "mutual gains from trade/comparative advantage" model was not realistic: a country can use trade barriers to protect an un-competitive industry until it becomes globally competitive, in other words the comparative advantage is not static.

    That was something that people believed for a long time, and Krugman did the math to show that they could be right.

    I never said he was a protectionist. Just that he has many times worked to undermine or critique the free traders' arguments.
  189. @attilathehen
    She's light-skinned so a quick glance at her she looks white. But look again and you can see she's black.

    Here's a youtube about her http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/robin-wells-on-universal-cover/

    In the interview she says she’s part black, indian and white.

    • Replies: @attilathehen
    She's black. Indians don't accept her. neither do whites. Only Jews, hence her husband.
    , @Dissident
    "A glorious mosaic"
  190. @Cagey Beast
    Trump is a man of the '80s through and through. This song would be fantastic for his rallies, if it weren't for the whole irony problem:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5HfOipwvts

    Trump's in favour of finally bringing down the old Iron Curtain mentality between the US & Russia but he has fresh walls in mind too ... not that there's anything wrong with it.

    If Mr. Trump promised to build a bridge over the Bering Strait he could kill off a Dem rhetorical slogan. He might even get Mr. Putin to agree to pay for it.

  191. Elton John’s 1980 Central Park performance was interesting to say the least…

  192. @cthulhu
    You should listen to the Who's balls-to-the-wall cover of SNAfF on the "Two Rooms" Elton John / Bernie Taupin tribute album, from the early '90s I think. Very kick-ass.

    I hadn’t known about that: thanks. It’s really good and seems to be an absolutely perfect song for The Who to cover, entailing as it does the line, “I’m a juvenile product of the working class.”

    Two big problems with their version: the failure of Daltrey et al. to sing the “Whooooooah” lead-in to the chorus, and the lack of actual Keith Moon drumming. Not that Moon was ever a better technical drummer, only that as he put it (as quoted in a really good New Yorker appreciation some years ago): ““I’m the best Keith Moon-style drummer in the world.”

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/11/29/the-fun-stuff

    Anyway, here’s the Who version on YouTube:

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Clem Burke is a better Keith Moon than Moon ever was.
    , @Brutusale
    The Who's version is surprisingly wimpy compared to the original.
  193. @Anonymous
    My training is in economics and finance. Krugman's work as an economist is highly overrated. His NYT columns are dissected every week in an entertaining podcast by Robert Murphy and Tom Woods at contrakrugman.com.

    I think a distinction should be made between Krugman’s academic work, for which he received a “Nobel Prize,” and his column in the NY Times. (For the record, I have never read Krugman’s blog, which another poster mentioned earlier, so I have no opinion there.) As far as his NY Times column is concerned, I posted a number of messages on TAC four years ago which pointed out that Krugman was agitating for a “housing bubble” to replace the “NASDAQ bubble” back in 2001 and 2002 and then turned around and blamed GWB for the bursting of the housing bubble in 2008 and accepted no responsibility himself for promoting that mess. A totally intellectually dishonest columnist imo. And invariably his solution to every economic problem is more government spending, so I don’t waste a lot of time reading him any more.

    BTW I took him as a negative indicator back in mid 2002 when he said in one of his columns that he was out of the stock market and fully invested in bonds. That was after the market had declined for more than two years, longer than the average stock market decline. I got in a bit early but still did quite well.

  194. @stillCARealist
    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.

    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.

    Not to be combative, but I find pretty much everything on Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s The Sex Pistols to be hugely memorable and enjoyable, employing at least some of the qualities you mention. One thinks e.g. of “Holidays in the Sun”:

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    That was pretty funny, actually. I realize I'd heard that song sometime back in my youth and probably enjoyed the rebellious feeling it gave me. You know how jumping from a big rock into a cold river makes you feel courageous? Parallel.

    Saturday Night's All Right For Fighting gave me that feeling too, but it also made me want to sing and play the guitar. Punk doesn't inspire to music and singing, it inspires to drugs and screaming and general mayhem.
  195. @iffen
    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don't know for sure.

    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.

    Which points to the imperial function of such units.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.

    Hardly surprising, given the feudal nature of the regime.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don’t know for sure.

    If they are private contractors, they count as mercenaries. Further evidence that the US nation-state is in decay

  196. @syonredux

    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.
     
    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    Except the Gurkhas. But no one thinks of them as mercenaries, which is what they are in the British Army, as well as in the modern Indian Army.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    Except the Gurkhas. But no one thinks of them as mercenaries, which is what they are in the British Army, as well as in the modern Indian Army.
     
    As with the French Foreign Legion, another example of the link between Empire and Mercenary.
  197. @Steve Sailer
    I got into a discussion with Krugman a long time ago over how companies could exist that buy up rock concert tickets at face value and consistently resell them at above face value. I suggested that insiders at the firms that sell tickets to the general public were setting aside the best tickets for their own use and then selling them to resellers. I cited a friend who camped on the street for 36 hours to be first in line to buy Springsteen tickets at the LA Forum in 1980 only to find when the window open that all the best seats were already gone.

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn't surprised that he was irritable, but I didn't expect him to be so unworldly

    . I wasn’t surprised that he was irritable, but I didn’t expect him to be so unworldly

    I’m not surprised. The worldly philosophy tends to attract unworldly men. E.g., the old joke about a physicist, a chemist, and an economist who are all stuck on a deserted island. Fortunately for them, they have thousands of cans of tuna. The physicist says that opening the cans is a simple matter of applied force (i.e., hit them hard enough with a rock). The chemist scoffs at the waste of muscle power, says that applied heat will cause the cans to rupture, no muss, no fuss. The economist, voice dripping with contempt, says that the solution is quite simple. First, assume that we have a can opener….

  198. @PiltdownMan

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor
     
    Except the Gurkhas. But no one thinks of them as mercenaries, which is what they are in the British Army, as well as in the modern Indian Army.

    The development of the nation-state and the citizen army put mercenaries in a bad odor

    Except the Gurkhas. But no one thinks of them as mercenaries, which is what they are in the British Army, as well as in the modern Indian Army.

    As with the French Foreign Legion, another example of the link between Empire and Mercenary.

  199. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @argosy Jones
    I followed Krugman's NYT blog for several years and only stopped when I realized that he was intellectually dishonest in his analysis of economic issues. Krugman is an establishment/DNC hack even in his commentary upon purely economic issues.

    I'll list two examples.

    1. Krugman did a great number of blog posts earlier in the Obama adminsitration concerning the 'invisible bond vigilantes'. These phantasmal bond vigilantes were, per Krugman, posited by right-wing critics of the Obama administration, who said that Obama's deficit spending would inevitably lead to a devaluation of US Treasury Bonds, implying an increase in the interest rate, leading to recession. Contrary to rightwing pundits and economists, this persistently failed to occur, and has not occurred since then. On the face of it, Krugman's mockery of the right wing economists seems quite apt. However, if you dig back farther into Krugman's history, it becomes evident that it is he who was calling for 'invisible bond vigilantes' to drive up interest rates by selling off US bonds. But that was during the Bush administration. Krugman's analysis changed according to the party in the whitehouse.

    2. Krugman had for years posited a puzzle that he couldn't understand. Interest rates on Japanese government bonds had failed to rise in response to government deficit spending. At the same time there was a trolling operation going on by adherents of the Modern Monetary Theory(MMT) school of thought. The MMT adherents trolled Krugman's blog incessantly with their own explanation of his puzzle. Their explanation was that, in the specific case of a country that issues debt denominated only in the currency issued by its own central bank, interest rates are controlled entirely by the decisions made by that country's central bank.

    After months or years of being trolled by MMT adherents, Krugman suddenly realized that they were correct. But he did not acknowledge that they were the impetus for his realization. Instead, he found justification for their views in the writings of a mainstream economist who had never been interpreted in that manner previously. Krugman absorbed the arguments of his non-mainstream critics without giving credit where credit was due.

    So, in the end, when it comes to analysis of the economy, Krugman is a hack who supports the status quo in economic thought, and the DNC as far as possible within defense of status quo economic thought.

    Contra #1, Krugman has acknowledged this change of position. The key is the liquidity trap he talks so much about; there is so much money sitting around looking for safe assets right now that there is room for spending financed by Treasury bills.

    I wasn’t paying attention back then, but the argument goes that normal economic conditions prevailed during the Bush years, so the mechanism you described could have occurred. Normal economic conditions means we’re not in a recession big enough to qualify as a liquidity trap, so the only non-mainstream part of any of these arguments was the proposition that the bond vigilantes would not actually strike this time. And Krugman was right about that.

    And somewhat contra #2, Simon Wren-Lewis has written about how his understanding of MMT is that it’s either false or trivial, depending on how you interpret it. You didn’t convince me you were being fair on point one, and you did the same on point two.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Argosy Jones
    Okay, you're missing the point entirely.

    Contra #1, Krugman has acknowledged this change of position.
     
    I understand that Krugman acknowledges this. The point is that after Obama entered office, he required a new system of analysis to reach the conclusion that stimulus and deficit spending were now needed and not dangerous. Before Obama was elected, Liquidity Traps played no significant role in Krugman's analysis.

    normal economic conditions prevailed during the Bush years, so the mechanism you described could have occurred. Normal economic conditions means we’re not in a recession big enough to qualify as a liquidity trap, so the only non-mainstream part of any of these arguments was the proposition that the bond vigilantes would not actually strike this time.
     
    So why didn't the bond vigilantes strike during the eight years of the Bush Administration? When will 'normal conditions' return? Krugman still says we're in a Liquidity Trap, now. and maybe for the indefinite future.

    contra #2, Simon Wren-Lewis has written about how his understanding of MMT is that it’s either false or trivial, depending on how you interpret it.
     
    His understanding is apparently great enough to adopt their precise argument on one issue. -an argument that appeared time and again in the comment threads of his blog.

    Oh, Bonus. Last Night I remembered that Krugman is *also* dishonest in his treatment of the determination of interest rates, as follows.

    A: When Krugman is trying to argue that deficit spending and increased debt is necessary, he treats interest rates as if they were the product of a market process that provides information about the real economy. So he might say:

    'low interest rates tell us that the market is hungry for government debt. we should take advantage of this and spend a bunch of money now on stimulus programs'

     

    B: When Krugman talks about Federal Reserve policy, he treats interest rates as a simple product of Federal Reserve bureaucratic decisions about the appropriate price of US Treasury Bills.
    So, depending on the circumstance, interest rates are determined by market forces, or the result of a bureacratic decision.
  200. @Lot
    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital. He recetly wrote against Brexit exonomic scaremongering.

    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital.

    Another episode of Krugman then vs Krugman now.Slate-era Krugman then was a proponent of free trade deals 200%. Krugman after the free trade deals were voted in is highly skeptical and interested in real world consequences.

    Be prepared when he flips again and supports TPP after the election. If Clinton wins, it will be because ->SHE<- has improved the deal in some pragmatic manner. If Trump wins, it will be an emotional appeal to the new world free of intolerance and hate which we could all enjoy if only the Racist Nationalists could reduce tariffs on artisinal soaps.

    • Replies: @Lot

    Slate-era Krugman then was a proponent of free trade deals 200%.
     
    It is not that he is opposed to trade deals. He thinks they produce a small net positive.

    TPP really is not a trade deal in the classic sense of reducing or eliminating tariffs or trade barriers. It is basically a conspiracy of the elites in multiple countries against the non-elites. Poor people in Vietnam will have to pay high prices from American IP while unskilled workers in the USA will have to compete even more directly with people making under 50 cents an hour in Vietnam.
  201. @Steve Sailer
    I got into a discussion with Krugman a long time ago over how companies could exist that buy up rock concert tickets at face value and consistently resell them at above face value. I suggested that insiders at the firms that sell tickets to the general public were setting aside the best tickets for their own use and then selling them to resellers. I cited a friend who camped on the street for 36 hours to be first in line to buy Springsteen tickets at the LA Forum in 1980 only to find when the window open that all the best seats were already gone.

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn't surprised that he was irritable, but I didn't expect him to be so unworldly

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn’t surprised that he was irritable, but I didn’t expect him to be so unworldly

    Not at all. Krugman and his ilk are quite worldly. They know their strong suit: to defend their political preferences by claiming the high ground of economic “science’. To be drug down into a debate on the muddy terrain of pedestrian facts and events would be to compromise his sole advantage.

    This has been a successful strategy for economic ideologues for a long time. The case for protectionism and industrial strategy has always been based on facts and historical experience, since Alexander Hamilton’s 1792 ‘Report on Manufactures and Trade”. ‘liberal’ economists, since David Recardo in 1817 have universally relied upon highly abstracted ‘models’ which rely upon false assumptions to do most of their intellectual work.

  202. @Steve Sailer
    Liberal Catholicism used to be a big deal.

    In practice it still is. Just because your average SJW Beavis and Buttheads haven’t heard about it doesn’t make it less pervasive.

    • Agree: Kylie
  203. @utu
    "Were not the Irish as an ethnic group at one point in time considered to be a group that threatened American cohesion?" - But how do you know that American did not get worse off because of Irish? Perhaps w/o the Irish things would be much better. Perhaps even in Ireland. Instead of emigrating they would stay and would be force to fix what was wrong with Ireland.

    The Irish who visit America, particularly the East Coast, quite often remark that they consider Irish-Americans a bunch of hooligans and drunken fools.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The Irish who visit America, particularly the East Coast, quite often remark that they consider Irish-Americans a bunch of hooligans and drunken fools."

    Yet, they are white. So for you white nationalists out there, you have to get it straight. ALL white people are desirable, even those "lowly Irish". Otherwise, your entire philosophy falls like a house of cards. How are you going to win this upcoming race war by denigrating one of your key allies?
  204. @slumber_j
    I hadn't known about that: thanks. It's really good and seems to be an absolutely perfect song for The Who to cover, entailing as it does the line, "I'm a juvenile product of the working class."

    Two big problems with their version: the failure of Daltrey et al. to sing the "Whooooooah" lead-in to the chorus, and the lack of actual Keith Moon drumming. Not that Moon was ever a better technical drummer, only that as he put it (as quoted in a really good New Yorker appreciation some years ago): "“I’m the best Keith Moon-style drummer in the world.”

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/11/29/the-fun-stuff

    Anyway, here's the Who version on YouTube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpk_V8mnoP8

    Clem Burke is a better Keith Moon than Moon ever was.

    • Replies: @breedslikejagger
    No, he isn't.

    Moon the Loon was utterly over the top. Burke is competent and energetic, and the best musician in his band, (all also true of Martin Chambers since the other two original males in his outfit died) but he is not revolutionary or groundbreaking.

    Burke's reputation is based on one track-the intro to "Dreaming"-which was the idea of Mike Chapman, who is probably the best pop-rock record producer of his generation.

    Rolling Stone put Burke at #61 on its greatest drummers list, bracketed by Tony Thompson (Chic) and Mick Fleetwood (!). It put Moon at #2, between John Bonham and Ginger Baker.

    Within a first order of approximation that is about right.
  205. Lot says:
    @Argosy Jones

    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital.
     
    Another episode of Krugman then vs Krugman now.Slate-era Krugman then was a proponent of free trade deals 200%. Krugman after the free trade deals were voted in is highly skeptical and interested in real world consequences.

    Be prepared when he flips again and supports TPP after the election. If Clinton wins, it will be because ->SHE<- has improved the deal in some pragmatic manner. If Trump wins, it will be an emotional appeal to the new world free of intolerance and hate which we could all enjoy if only the Racist Nationalists could reduce tariffs on artisinal soaps.

    Slate-era Krugman then was a proponent of free trade deals 200%.

    It is not that he is opposed to trade deals. He thinks they produce a small net positive.

    TPP really is not a trade deal in the classic sense of reducing or eliminating tariffs or trade barriers. It is basically a conspiracy of the elites in multiple countries against the non-elites. Poor people in Vietnam will have to pay high prices from American IP while unskilled workers in the USA will have to compete even more directly with people making under 50 cents an hour in Vietnam.

  206. Lot says:
    @Clyde
    I will bet that when Krug got his Nobel he was a free trader. You think this prize would ever be given to a free trade skeptic? Thanks...I was not aware of his current position on free trade

    One of his specific innovations was noting that one of the assumptions in the “mutual gains from trade/comparative advantage” model was not realistic: a country can use trade barriers to protect an un-competitive industry until it becomes globally competitive, in other words the comparative advantage is not static.

    That was something that people believed for a long time, and Krugman did the math to show that they could be right.

    I never said he was a protectionist. Just that he has many times worked to undermine or critique the free traders’ arguments.

  207. Lot says:
    @SPMoore8
    I think Syonredux is overstating the case but there is a problem here.

    As I said, I once had an argument with someone who wanted to punish American mercenaries who were fighting for the Sandinistas (or something) back in the early '80's. I pointed out the examples you mentioned as well as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, as well as mercenaries in South Africa and Rhodesia during the 1970's. And let's not forget the Foreign Legion.

    The historical examples you cite during revolutionary times don't really cut it because the notion of citizenship was not as deeply rooted as now. Mercenaries or borrowed troops were common in the 18th Century, and later, think of the King's German Legion that held the farm at Waterloo or the Hessians that Washington crossed the Delaware to subdue.

    I do think it is odd that any American citizen would serve in another nation's army. I would consider that grounds for forfeiting citizenship. (I think some of those early 20th Century idealists were willing to do so, and/or otherwise break the law.) However, the SCOTUS determined in 1967 that service in a foreign army is not incompatible with citizenship, and that definitely creates a gray area in the War on Terror where we do not have any clearcut national entity that we have declared war on. (Supposedly you forfeit citizenship if you serve in the army of a nation we are at war with.)

    The problem with making these kinds of exceptions, even when your heart is in the right place, is that you open the door to dual citizenship of all kinds. I object to this. Right now, apparently, there are millions of American citizens in the Southwest who also have Mexican citizenship (because Mexicans who become American citizenship do not lose their Mexican citizenship). I think that is insane.

    I think holding David Brooks' son to account for serving in the IDF rather than the armed services of the United States is valid, and not anti-semitic, because the US is de facto at war (something not applicable in your contrary examples) and thus failure to serve, but to serve a foreign country, suggests that the loyalties of Brooks' son lie more with Israel with the United States. I wouldn't call it treason but I wouldn't mind having Brooks, Jr. called to account.

    For all that, the sins of the son should not be visited on the father, either.

    because the US is de facto at war

    The de facto war we are in is with the global third world who would like to colonize, Islamify and brownify the West. Israel is fighting that war more effectively than our heavily-compromised government and military, which currently is led by an enemy of us as commander in chief.

  208. @Steve Sailer
    I got into a discussion with Krugman a long time ago over how companies could exist that buy up rock concert tickets at face value and consistently resell them at above face value. I suggested that insiders at the firms that sell tickets to the general public were setting aside the best tickets for their own use and then selling them to resellers. I cited a friend who camped on the street for 36 hours to be first in line to buy Springsteen tickets at the LA Forum in 1980 only to find when the window open that all the best seats were already gone.

    To my surprise, Krugman was highly offended by my suggestion that entertainment businesses might have agent-principal problems and/or were compensating employees with untaxable income or were running some other scam and broke off the discussion. I wasn't surprised that he was irritable, but I didn't expect him to be so unworldly

    Really good street scalpers – those without inside connections – often have the tickets sold before they buy them from someone else. I have seen them in action many times at Madison Square Garden. They find a buyer, set a price, and say wait here, I’ll be back in 10 minutes. They then go out and find the seller, buy it with an acceptable margin and close the sale with the other party. Pure market makers, yet they are made out to be villains and are persecuted by the police and harangued by the political class and commentariat.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    The existence of a secondary market has been good for pro sports clubs, even though they fiercely resisted the trend, just as they had with radio and TV. Clubs often mistake complimentary goods for substitute goods.
  209. @Steve Sailer
    "Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst."

    Sometimes Krugman's lack of sophistication has kind of a Trump-like little boy in Emperor's New Clothes quality to it. I remember one of his columns about a decade ago about how he liked growing up in a middle class suburb on Long Island and why can't we go back to that kind of America? Somebody must have gotten it through to him that because of Diversity and Immigration, he can't go there, he just c-a-n-'-t.

    He’s expressed some degree of immigration skepticism in the past, for example:

    “[O]pen immigration can’t coexist with a strong social safety net; if you’re going to assure health care and a decent income to everyone, you can’t make that offer global.”

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/26/the-curious-politics-of-immigration

    He softens the statement by attributing it to unnamed Democrats. I’m not extremely well-read, but this is the only time I’ve seen someone on the left express this view.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Krugman has expressed some sensibly moderate views on immigration policy in the past, but seemingly has dropped the whole topic in the last half decade or so except as a blue tribe marker of whom to hate.

    Even if you have a Nobel Prize, the Overton Window at Carlos Slim's newspaper is pretty slim.

  210. @jtxuk
    He's expressed some degree of immigration skepticism in the past, for example:

    "[O]pen immigration can’t coexist with a strong social safety net; if you’re going to assure health care and a decent income to everyone, you can’t make that offer global."

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/26/the-curious-politics-of-immigration

    He softens the statement by attributing it to unnamed Democrats. I'm not extremely well-read, but this is the only time I've seen someone on the left express this view.

    Krugman has expressed some sensibly moderate views on immigration policy in the past, but seemingly has dropped the whole topic in the last half decade or so except as a blue tribe marker of whom to hate.

    Even if you have a Nobel Prize, the Overton Window at Carlos Slim’s newspaper is pretty slim.

  211. @Lot

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.
     
    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush's estimates for the war's cost were absurdly low.

    And "his brainy technical specialties" is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan's economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan's economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    He was hardly alone in thinking the Euro would be a disaster, I remember Martin Feldstein penning a series of articles attacking the Euro in the Economist magazine and Feldstein is considered pretty non-partisan by standards of academic economists. I think most economists in the UK and Germany were also opposed as well, one country’s leaders listened, the other didn’t.

    Regarding the recession, he also predicted or implied that the UK’s economic policy ( which was Non-Keynesian ) towards it wouldn’t work, but here we are in 2016 and the UK’s unemployment rate is pretty much the same as ours is, so obviously his Keynesian recommendations were not necessary to get the economy where it is now. I don’t think it is particularly strong, but he does, although that will probably change if the Democrats lose the election.

  212. @Lot
    Krugman frequently writes the benefits to free trade are greatly overrated by globalists amd accrue to elite and capital. He recetly wrote against Brexit exonomic scaremongering.

    You are forcing me to see if I can find the specifics on why Krugman got the Nobel Prize. What kind of trade was he advocating back then that got him the Nobel.

  213. I’m guessing Gene Simmons is as likely as any rocker to be pro-Trump and alt rightish, so let’s not make fun too much.

  214. @Daniel H
    Really good street scalpers - those without inside connections - often have the tickets sold before they buy them from someone else. I have seen them in action many times at Madison Square Garden. They find a buyer, set a price, and say wait here, I'll be back in 10 minutes. They then go out and find the seller, buy it with an acceptable margin and close the sale with the other party. Pure market makers, yet they are made out to be villains and are persecuted by the police and harangued by the political class and commentariat.

    The existence of a secondary market has been good for pro sports clubs, even though they fiercely resisted the trend, just as they had with radio and TV. Clubs often mistake complimentary goods for substitute goods.

  215. @Corvinus
    "Why do you use the past tense?"

    So do you truly believe the Irish today threaten American cohesion? That would be decidedly anti-white by white nationalists. Turn in your white card at the door, please.

    Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in “earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans”. They’ve turned in THEIR white card.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in “earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans”. They’ve turned in THEIR white card."

    Since when?

    Have the Irish in general pulled a Michael Jackson and universally and unilaterally changed their skin tone?

    Must all whites think and act in a prescribed manner according to "the tribe"?
  216. @Steve Sailer
    I don't criticize Krugman's macroeconomics; I don't support them either.

    I just realize that despite a fair amount of effort I put in during the 1970s and 1980s, macro is not a subject I'm equipped to deal with, so I don't pretend I have much worthwhile to say on the subject (although I have some meta-views that might or might not be fairly important).

    Yes, hit us with that immutable expertise!

  217. @Former Darfur
    The Irish who visit America, particularly the East Coast, quite often remark that they consider Irish-Americans a bunch of hooligans and drunken fools.

    “The Irish who visit America, particularly the East Coast, quite often remark that they consider Irish-Americans a bunch of hooligans and drunken fools.”

    Yet, they are white. So for you white nationalists out there, you have to get it straight. ALL white people are desirable, even those “lowly Irish”. Otherwise, your entire philosophy falls like a house of cards. How are you going to win this upcoming race war by denigrating one of your key allies?

  218. @Brutusale
    Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in "earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans". They've turned in THEIR white card.

    “Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in “earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans”. They’ve turned in THEIR white card.”

    Since when?

    Have the Irish in general pulled a Michael Jackson and universally and unilaterally changed their skin tone?

    Must all whites think and act in a prescribed manner according to “the tribe”?

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Come to Boston and find out. It's the Irish who've created the ultra-liberal political climate here, so you'd probably enjoy the Hell out of it.

    As another comment correctly points out, real residents of the Auld Sod can't stand the Boston "professional Irishman".

  219. @iffen
    Maybe, but France has been around a while and the Legion was an important component in Indo-China, plus they had quite a few colonial units from around the world.

    Seems I recently read that the Saudis are using mercenaries.

    Are the contract military personnel that the US employs around the world mercenaries? I generally think of them as ex-US military, but I don't know for sure.

    They’re almost all ex-Special Forces, and serve as the “deniable” contract arm of the US military.

    Read Jeremy Scahill’s Blackwater or pretty much anything by Sean McFate, especially his The Modern Mercenary.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Thanks. I will put it on my ever growing reading list. Even if God blesses me with a long life I will not get to the end of it.

    Does anyone try to keep up with whether they are working for the US or some other entity?
  220. @slumber_j
    I hadn't known about that: thanks. It's really good and seems to be an absolutely perfect song for The Who to cover, entailing as it does the line, "I'm a juvenile product of the working class."

    Two big problems with their version: the failure of Daltrey et al. to sing the "Whooooooah" lead-in to the chorus, and the lack of actual Keith Moon drumming. Not that Moon was ever a better technical drummer, only that as he put it (as quoted in a really good New Yorker appreciation some years ago): "“I’m the best Keith Moon-style drummer in the world.”

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/11/29/the-fun-stuff

    Anyway, here's the Who version on YouTube:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpk_V8mnoP8

    The Who’s version is surprisingly wimpy compared to the original.

  221. @Stebbing Heuer

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]
     
    This is a joke, right?

    (With apologies to J.R. Hicks).

    Not a bit.

    To be clear, I don’t set exclusive store by the economics advanced by any single individual on that list [well, with one exception perhaps and it isn’t Krugman], convinced as I am, in the notion that I should be best served by taking the various works of each writer in discrete servings, subjecting them to my own analysis and empirical filter, upon which, they either stand or fall of their own merit. The difficulty – even a fatal flaw in my reckoning – with subscribing to the entirety of a work, modeling, thought or philosophy, is that it inevitably draws one into a vortex of barely defensible, often internally inconsistent positions. Simply put, hardly anyone has a monopoly in the immaculate truth. Not even close. A case in point is this recent whim in certain circles, that Western civilisation is in imminent danger, or more charitably in the early grips of being subsumed by Islam. The more one looks carefully into population and economic dynamics, especially as successful civilisations adapted to external threats, [from the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the fall of the Republic under Octavian, all the way to 476 AD when Romulus Augustulus was exiled; stretching all the forward to 1453 when the Turks were pounding the Theodocian walls, there were perhaps as many as a hundred incidents when contemporary historians called the end of the Roman imperium. Yet that civilisation adapted and persisted.]

    On the present discussion of Krugman, I find him a very sharp economist, an opportunist hack on occasion, but distinctly insightful nonetheless on some subjects. But rely on him for social or political trends, I do not.

  222. @Anonymous
    OT: Did anyone notice how Tim Kaine repeated a phrase at the convention: "Faith, Family and Work" a translation of the Vichy France slogan "Travail, Famille, Patrie"?
    Someone call the ADL

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ndSlRc0GI0

    Then they need to call out Rob Halford of Judas Priest for closing his eulogy for Lemmy with “Faith, Family, Friends, Fans.”

  223. @BB753
    In the interview she says she's part black, indian and white.

    She’s black. Indians don’t accept her. neither do whites. Only Jews, hence her husband.

    • Replies: @BB753
    I don't know about that. I doubt Krugman's parents were happy with their son marrying a "black" woman, even one who scarcely looks black at all, instead of a "nice" Jewish woman.
  224. @Pat Hannagan
    I have taught my children that whenever you read something by someone who's promoting something decidedly disastrous for our people, something counter-intuitive turning nature inside-out and upside down, just google their name and add "Jew". 9 times out of 10 it's a Jew. I call it Jew bingo.

    My eldest came home one day and said "You know how you said to google someone's name and add Jew whenever you read something nasty and anti-White? Well, I did it all day and guess what? You were right!" It was a great moment in family bonding.

    That night we went through the history of feminism and the bingos were going off like you wouldn't believe. If I can turn this into a board game I reckon I could retire on it.

    White cohesion is inversely related to Jewish strength. I wish that wasn’t true, but history indicates the two peoples have opposite fortunes (when one is rising, the other is falling).

  225. Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.

    It was probably the revolutionary French rhetoric during the time of Napoleon I: the French army was La Nation Aux Arms, pardon my French, the entire nation at war for revolutionary nationalistic reasons, versus ideologically archaic opponents led by ethnically English, Prussian, or Russian officers with hereditary entitlements and, in the British Army, mercenary components.

    There was no French Foreign Legion at Waterloo, at least in the official sense.
    La Legion Etrange was created later in the 19th century, during the colonial expansion era.

    All officers in the Legion were and are supposed to be ethnically French. I suppose one might describe Foreign Legion enlisted men as “contractors.”

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    All officers in the Legion were and are supposed to be ethnically French. I suppose one might describe Foreign Legion enlisted men as “contractors.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUAQh3OqiWw
  226. @EdwardM
    A common thread in Krugman's economic analysis is that he wants our government to essentially inflate the debt away. This wouldn't devastate the very rich, who could weather it in various ways, or the very poor, who live paycheck-to-paycheck and on the government dole anyway, but of course would be ruinous to everyone else. It's the logical path of top-down government control of the economy, with no downside according to his ideology.

    This is a particularly stupid narrative in 2016 because the middle third of the United States of America is in debt so the first order effects of “inflating the debt away” would be to help their balance sheets. This was something Milton Friedman said in the 1970s and 1980s (when the balance sheets of the middle third of America were stronger) and my guess is that’s where you heard it from. The power of intellectuals indeed.

  227. @syonredux
    Interesting to note how touchy John Podhoretz is about people noticing that David Brooks' son serves in the IDF:

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    Everybody who thinks David Brooks has to "reveal" his son, who's 23, has joined the Israeli army can go f[***]himself.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz not trying to be antagonist. Don't you think having your son in a military would at least unconsciously effect your beliefs?
     

    John Podhoretz ‏@jpodhoretz 8 Oct 2014
    @William_Stokes his son is an adult and it's nobody's fu[***** business. And he's a writer, not a politician. It's naked anti-Semitism.
     

    Will Stokes ‏@William_Stokes 8 Oct 2014
    @jpodhoretz for me, if someone was a writing a piece on Afghanistan and Iraq and had a son serving there, I'd want to know.
     

    John PodhoretzVerified account
    ‏@jpodhoretz
    @William_Stokes it's none of your business. NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.
     

    jpod seems touchy in general.

  228. @Steve Sailer
    E.J. Dionne is a Catholic of French-Canadian ancestry:

    "Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 23, 1952, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is the son of the late Lucienne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist.[1][2] He is of French-Canadian descent.[3] He attended Portsmouth Abbey School (then known as Portsmouth Priory), a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island."

    Don’t the French-Canadians generally have some sort of chip on their shoulder about Anglo-Saxon Protestants? Much like the Irish (i.e. James Michael Curley). For historical reasons…

  229. Marxist economist Doug Henwood provides examples of what he claims is Krugman’s regularly regurgitating his (Henwood’s) writing without credit:
    http://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/KrugmanAd.html

    Does this reach the level of actual plagiarism? Perhaps not (if it did, I suppose that one would think that Henwood would have sued). But it certainly doesn’t reflect favorably on Krugman.

  230. @slumber_j

    No. Elton John employed melody, harmony, musicality, intriguing (and sort of bizarre) lyrics to form memorable and enjoyable songs. Punk did none of that.
     
    Not to be combative, but I find pretty much everything on Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols to be hugely memorable and enjoyable, employing at least some of the qualities you mention. One thinks e.g. of "Holidays in the Sun":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ah1JM9mf60

    That was pretty funny, actually. I realize I’d heard that song sometime back in my youth and probably enjoyed the rebellious feeling it gave me. You know how jumping from a big rock into a cold river makes you feel courageous? Parallel.

    Saturday Night’s All Right For Fighting gave me that feeling too, but it also made me want to sing and play the guitar. Punk doesn’t inspire to music and singing, it inspires to drugs and screaming and general mayhem.

  231. @RS
    Every time an economists gets a lot prizes and is amplified by the press you know he works for the P2B. That's all you need to know about Paul Krugman.

    “P2B”?

  232. @Sam Shama
    Couldn't agree more on Krugman's relative lack of depth and nuance when it comes to pontificating on social and race related matters.

    On the economics front, he is unusually sharp and insightful for a technical economist [leave aside the Nobel credentials], and I very much doubt anyone commenting otherwise here, has the foggiest regarding economics or finance, particularly as it practiced in institutions, including major central banks.

    [Keynes, Hicks, Samuelson, Solow, Krugman, Bernanke, Summers, Draghi, Stiglitz, Piketty, Fisher Black, Myron Scholes]

    that is the set one should be looking to, for anything that matters in economics.

    Conventional macroeconomics has stimulated the hell out of the economy for 8 years now, and growth has been anemic in the US as well as the EU. For example, Obama will apparently be the sole president who has not had a single year of 3%+ growth in his reign. EU meanwhile lurches from crisis to crisis (looks like we’ll have another banking crisis sometime soon). As far as I’m aware, Krugman’s only response would be “double the stimulus!” OK, thanks guru.

  233. @AnonNJ
    Of course Kiss is multicultural-friendly:

    https://youtu.be/wXxwbBQB5oA

    Kiss are to a considerable extent nice jewish boys, aren’t they? Except for the couple of black sheep who are anti-semites.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    It was the opposite of anti-Semitism.

    I've read all four of the original members' whiny, bitchy autobiographies. The two crazy goy boys liked their booze and drugs, the nice Jewish boys only liked shiksa girls. The nice Jewish boys kicked the goys out for various and sundry reasons, but it boiled down to the lead guitarist being an undependable substance abuser and the drummer having been the writer/singer of their biggest hit, which the nice Jewish boys, the band's "singers", couldn't abide.
  234. @BB753
    In the interview she says she's part black, indian and white.

    “A glorious mosaic”

  235. @Brutusale
    They're almost all ex-Special Forces, and serve as the "deniable" contract arm of the US military.

    Read Jeremy Scahill's Blackwater or pretty much anything by Sean McFate, especially his The Modern Mercenary.

    Thanks. I will put it on my ever growing reading list. Even if God blesses me with a long life I will not get to the end of it.

    Does anyone try to keep up with whether they are working for the US or some other entity?

  236. @Pericles
    Kiss are to a considerable extent nice jewish boys, aren't they? Except for the couple of black sheep who are anti-semites.

    It was the opposite of anti-Semitism.

    I’ve read all four of the original members’ whiny, bitchy autobiographies. The two crazy goy boys liked their booze and drugs, the nice Jewish boys only liked shiksa girls. The nice Jewish boys kicked the goys out for various and sundry reasons, but it boiled down to the lead guitarist being an undependable substance abuser and the drummer having been the writer/singer of their biggest hit, which the nice Jewish boys, the band’s “singers”, couldn’t abide.

  237. @attilathehen
    She's black. Indians don't accept her. neither do whites. Only Jews, hence her husband.

    I don’t know about that. I doubt Krugman’s parents were happy with their son marrying a “black” woman, even one who scarcely looks black at all, instead of a “nice” Jewish woman.

    • Replies: @attilathehen
    Jews love blacks/Asians. They marry them alot.
  238. @Former Darfur
    Clem Burke is a better Keith Moon than Moon ever was.

    No, he isn’t.

    Moon the Loon was utterly over the top. Burke is competent and energetic, and the best musician in his band, (all also true of Martin Chambers since the other two original males in his outfit died) but he is not revolutionary or groundbreaking.

    Burke’s reputation is based on one track-the intro to “Dreaming”-which was the idea of Mike Chapman, who is probably the best pop-rock record producer of his generation.

    Rolling Stone put Burke at #61 on its greatest drummers list, bracketed by Tony Thompson (Chic) and Mick Fleetwood (!). It put Moon at #2, between John Bonham and Ginger Baker.

    Within a first order of approximation that is about right.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    And just to contuthis a little further...

    Saw the Who on their recent US tour (yes, I know that in many ways it's not really the Who anymore, but live in concert, half-the-Who beats the shit out of most other rock bands), and Zak Starkey was a revelation - the best Keith Moon style drummer since, well, Keith Moon. Tickles me to no end that sane-and-solid Ringo's son turned out to be the new Moonie...
    , @Former Darfur
    Well , if Rolling Stone says so, it must be so, right?

    The list is a crock. It has no rhyme or reason besides the whims of Rolling Stone's idiot critics.
    For instance, Buddy Rich-a child vaudevillian who famously hated rock and country music and was one of the last jazzmen to tour with a big band-is listed at #15. Is this a list of jazz drummers (on which he is somewhere between 1 and 4 or 5 no matter how one looks at it), rock drummers (he shouldn't be on the list at all), drummers who were famous or notorious, or ??
  239. @Johan Schmidt
    Nice of you to sneak the woman-beating, work-fabricating charlatan "Piketty" in there in case anyone was tempted to believe you know what the hell you're talking about.

    Men who do not beat women -there are some – are not endowed with a divine exclusivity on important insights. Nor those that comment free of context.

  240. @BB753
    I don't know about that. I doubt Krugman's parents were happy with their son marrying a "black" woman, even one who scarcely looks black at all, instead of a "nice" Jewish woman.

    Jews love blacks/Asians. They marry them alot.

    • Replies: @BB753
    What do Jewish families think of these mixed marriages? Also, I believe Jewish guy / Asian chick is the most common pairing. Black women rarely marry outside of their race or even at all.
  241. @breedslikejagger
    No, he isn't.

    Moon the Loon was utterly over the top. Burke is competent and energetic, and the best musician in his band, (all also true of Martin Chambers since the other two original males in his outfit died) but he is not revolutionary or groundbreaking.

    Burke's reputation is based on one track-the intro to "Dreaming"-which was the idea of Mike Chapman, who is probably the best pop-rock record producer of his generation.

    Rolling Stone put Burke at #61 on its greatest drummers list, bracketed by Tony Thompson (Chic) and Mick Fleetwood (!). It put Moon at #2, between John Bonham and Ginger Baker.

    Within a first order of approximation that is about right.

    And just to contuthis a little further…

    Saw the Who on their recent US tour (yes, I know that in many ways it’s not really the Who anymore, but live in concert, half-the-Who beats the shit out of most other rock bands), and Zak Starkey was a revelation – the best Keith Moon style drummer since, well, Keith Moon. Tickles me to no end that sane-and-solid Ringo’s son turned out to be the new Moonie…

  242. @Anonymous
    Contra #1, Krugman has acknowledged this change of position. The key is the liquidity trap he talks so much about; there is so much money sitting around looking for safe assets right now that there is room for spending financed by Treasury bills.

    I wasn't paying attention back then, but the argument goes that normal economic conditions prevailed during the Bush years, so the mechanism you described could have occurred. Normal economic conditions means we're not in a recession big enough to qualify as a liquidity trap, so the only non-mainstream part of any of these arguments was the proposition that the bond vigilantes would not actually strike this time. And Krugman was right about that.

    And somewhat contra #2, Simon Wren-Lewis has written about how his understanding of MMT is that it's either false or trivial, depending on how you interpret it. You didn't convince me you were being fair on point one, and you did the same on point two.

    Okay, you’re missing the point entirely.

    Contra #1, Krugman has acknowledged this change of position.

    I understand that Krugman acknowledges this. The point is that after Obama entered office, he required a new system of analysis to reach the conclusion that stimulus and deficit spending were now needed and not dangerous. Before Obama was elected, Liquidity Traps played no significant role in Krugman’s analysis.

    normal economic conditions prevailed during the Bush years, so the mechanism you described could have occurred. Normal economic conditions means we’re not in a recession big enough to qualify as a liquidity trap, so the only non-mainstream part of any of these arguments was the proposition that the bond vigilantes would not actually strike this time.

    So why didn’t the bond vigilantes strike during the eight years of the Bush Administration? When will ‘normal conditions’ return? Krugman still says we’re in a Liquidity Trap, now. and maybe for the indefinite future.

    contra #2, Simon Wren-Lewis has written about how his understanding of MMT is that it’s either false or trivial, depending on how you interpret it.

    His understanding is apparently great enough to adopt their precise argument on one issue. -an argument that appeared time and again in the comment threads of his blog.

    Oh, Bonus. Last Night I remembered that Krugman is *also* dishonest in his treatment of the determination of interest rates, as follows.

    A: When Krugman is trying to argue that deficit spending and increased debt is necessary, he treats interest rates as if they were the product of a market process that provides information about the real economy. So he might say:

    ‘low interest rates tell us that the market is hungry for government debt. we should take advantage of this and spend a bunch of money now on stimulus programs’

    B: When Krugman talks about Federal Reserve policy, he treats interest rates as a simple product of Federal Reserve bureaucratic decisions about the appropriate price of US Treasury Bills.
    So, depending on the circumstance, interest rates are determined by market forces, or the result of a bureacratic decision.

  243. @Corvinus
    "Nah, the Boston Irish have replaced the Jews in “earning like Episcopalians, voting like Puerto Ricans”. They’ve turned in THEIR white card."

    Since when?

    Have the Irish in general pulled a Michael Jackson and universally and unilaterally changed their skin tone?

    Must all whites think and act in a prescribed manner according to "the tribe"?

    Come to Boston and find out. It’s the Irish who’ve created the ultra-liberal political climate here, so you’d probably enjoy the Hell out of it.

    As another comment correctly points out, real residents of the Auld Sod can’t stand the Boston “professional Irishman”.

  244. @attilathehen
    Jews love blacks/Asians. They marry them alot.

    What do Jewish families think of these mixed marriages? Also, I believe Jewish guy / Asian chick is the most common pairing. Black women rarely marry outside of their race or even at all.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    They think they're "kosher." No "shiksa" jokes about black/Asian women. Those were only for gentile women.
  245. @BB753
    What do Jewish families think of these mixed marriages? Also, I believe Jewish guy / Asian chick is the most common pairing. Black women rarely marry outside of their race or even at all.

    They think they’re “kosher.” No “shiksa” jokes about black/Asian women. Those were only for gentile women.

  246. @breedslikejagger
    No, he isn't.

    Moon the Loon was utterly over the top. Burke is competent and energetic, and the best musician in his band, (all also true of Martin Chambers since the other two original males in his outfit died) but he is not revolutionary or groundbreaking.

    Burke's reputation is based on one track-the intro to "Dreaming"-which was the idea of Mike Chapman, who is probably the best pop-rock record producer of his generation.

    Rolling Stone put Burke at #61 on its greatest drummers list, bracketed by Tony Thompson (Chic) and Mick Fleetwood (!). It put Moon at #2, between John Bonham and Ginger Baker.

    Within a first order of approximation that is about right.

    Well , if Rolling Stone says so, it must be so, right?

    The list is a crock. It has no rhyme or reason besides the whims of Rolling Stone’s idiot critics.
    For instance, Buddy Rich-a child vaudevillian who famously hated rock and country music and was one of the last jazzmen to tour with a big band-is listed at #15. Is this a list of jazz drummers (on which he is somewhere between 1 and 4 or 5 no matter how one looks at it), rock drummers (he shouldn’t be on the list at all), drummers who were famous or notorious, or ??

  247. @David Davenport
    Somewhere along the line, mercenaries picked up a bad image. As you pointed out, historically it was considered an honorable profession.

    It was probably the revolutionary French rhetoric during the time of Napoleon I: the French army was La Nation Aux Arms, pardon my French, the entire nation at war for revolutionary nationalistic reasons, versus ideologically archaic opponents led by ethnically English, Prussian, or Russian officers with hereditary entitlements and, in the British Army, mercenary components.


    There was no French Foreign Legion at Waterloo, at least in the official sense.
    La Legion Etrange was created later in the 19th century, during the colonial expansion era.

    All officers in the Legion were and are supposed to be ethnically French. I suppose one might describe Foreign Legion enlisted men as "contractors."

    All officers in the Legion were and are supposed to be ethnically French. I suppose one might describe Foreign Legion enlisted men as “contractors.”

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Officers of La Legion Etrange are French citizens, but not necessarily ethnically French. In fact most are not.

    When one completes a five year enlistment as a Legionnaire, he receives a French passport and citizenship in the name he enlisted and served under or his "real name", if different, as he desires. He then may be selected for officer training if he and the Legion feel he would be suitable.

    The Legion is tough and often boring: legionnaires do a lot of marching, scrubbing, washing and so forth. The food may be by turns excellent and disgusting, at least to the American palate.

    A few, but quite few Americans have joined the Legion. Those who have served in both it and the US Army or Marines generally regard the Legion as more professional, more physically demanding, but not necessarily better trained due to budgetary and facilities issues, and there is little off-post life. Legionnaires are not, at least for their first five years, allowed to own a car or motorcycle and do not have passports, meaning they are stuck in country for the duration of their posting. The desertion rate is high, and needless to say deserters had better never set foot in France or French territory again.
  248. @Former Darfur
    All officers in the Legion were and are supposed to be ethnically French. I suppose one might describe Foreign Legion enlisted men as “contractors.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUAQh3OqiWw

    Officers of La Legion Etrange are French citizens, but not necessarily ethnically French. In fact most are not.

    When one completes a five year enlistment as a Legionnaire, he receives a French passport and citizenship in the name he enlisted and served under or his “real name”, if different, as he desires. He then may be selected for officer training if he and the Legion feel he would be suitable.

    The Legion is tough and often boring: legionnaires do a lot of marching, scrubbing, washing and so forth. The food may be by turns excellent and disgusting, at least to the American palate.

    A few, but quite few Americans have joined the Legion. Those who have served in both it and the US Army or Marines generally regard the Legion as more professional, more physically demanding, but not necessarily better trained due to budgetary and facilities issues, and there is little off-post life. Legionnaires are not, at least for their first five years, allowed to own a car or motorcycle and do not have passports, meaning they are stuck in country for the duration of their posting. The desertion rate is high, and needless to say deserters had better never set foot in France or French territory again.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "there is little off-post life. Legionnaires are not, at least for their first five years, allowed to own a car or motorcycle"

    Isn't there a joke involving the French Foreign Legion and the advice to a new enlistee to "take a camel"?

  249. @Former Darfur
    Officers of La Legion Etrange are French citizens, but not necessarily ethnically French. In fact most are not.

    When one completes a five year enlistment as a Legionnaire, he receives a French passport and citizenship in the name he enlisted and served under or his "real name", if different, as he desires. He then may be selected for officer training if he and the Legion feel he would be suitable.

    The Legion is tough and often boring: legionnaires do a lot of marching, scrubbing, washing and so forth. The food may be by turns excellent and disgusting, at least to the American palate.

    A few, but quite few Americans have joined the Legion. Those who have served in both it and the US Army or Marines generally regard the Legion as more professional, more physically demanding, but not necessarily better trained due to budgetary and facilities issues, and there is little off-post life. Legionnaires are not, at least for their first five years, allowed to own a car or motorcycle and do not have passports, meaning they are stuck in country for the duration of their posting. The desertion rate is high, and needless to say deserters had better never set foot in France or French territory again.

    “there is little off-post life. Legionnaires are not, at least for their first five years, allowed to own a car or motorcycle”

    Isn’t there a joke involving the French Foreign Legion and the advice to a new enlistee to “take a camel”?

  250. @PiltdownMan
    Krugman is embarrassingly weak as a sociological or political analyst.

    If you know macroeconomics, his personal blog is way better (on wonkish Economics) than his columns for the NYT op-ed page. For working economists like my brother-in-law, apparently those posts of his are quite interesting—akin to racing car mechanics reading a blog about the merits of various superchargers and engine compression ratios. For some reason, he also wants to show that he's up to speed on music of the next generation, so he intersperses the posts with videos of bands fronted by young, blonde women.

  251. @Lot

    he’s not very sophisticated. Outside of his brainy technical specialties, he’s mostly a KISS fan from Long Island.
     
    He was right that Bush would be a disaster of a president and that the Iraq War would also be a disaster. He noted, before the war started, that it was exactly what Al Qaeda wanted us to do, and that Bush's estimates for the war's cost were absurdly low.

    And "his brainy technical specialties" is a pretty broad area. He was right, in advance, that the Euro would be a disaster, and he was right for the right reasons: monetary union without fiscal union and labor mobility (like we have in the USA) does not work.

    He was also correct that the monetary policy of 2008-2011 of greatly increasing the monetary supply and fiscal deficit would not lead to high interest rates or inflation, which was very widely predicted and is the normal result of such policies.

    He has studied Japan's economy closely and is notable for being someone who writes on the topic without advocating Japan engage in mass immigration, very much contrary to the global elite and how The Economics, Foreign Affairs, etc. cover it. He also defends Japan's economic performance by noting that it is not too bad if you adjust for the fact its working age population is declining.

    Was he right when he confidently predicted the internet would have the economic impact of the fax machine?

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