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Kirkegaard Reviews the State of Science on Race Differences
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From Mankind Quarterly, a calm depiction of where the science stands in 2019 (compare to more popular summaries such as the recent Pseudoscience Explainer) :

MANKIND QUARTERLY 2019

Race Differences: A Very Brief Review

Emil O. W. Kirkegaard
Ulster Institute for Social Research, London, UK

The nature of race differences, and even the mere “existence” of human races, continues to be a major source of controversy and confusion. This brief review summarizes the empirical evidence about race differences and the conceptual issues related to taxonomy, as well as practical implications for medicine and the social sciences. The review shows that human races are distinctive phenotypically and genotypically, the latter with regard to the frequencies of a very large number (millions) of alleles. Distributions of these traits are clinal rather than discrete, and human races are subject to continuous change across evolutionary time.

Key Words: Human races, Skin color, Allele frequencies, Genome-wide association studies, Admixture, Evolution

 
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  1. I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he’s a real dude?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Achmed E. Newman

    LOL

    Søren Kierkegaard, born around the same time as mathematician Abel in the early 1800s, when Denmark-Norway didn't have much more than a million people.

    Rather astonishing, the brilliant people wandering around Europe at that time: Galois, Gauss, others. Could well have been the peak of human intelligence.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He got an extra /e/.

    , @Peter Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Soren Kierkegaard (Christian existentialist philospher) has no relationship, familial or otherwise, to Emil Kirkegaard (human biodiversity expert). The name Kirkegaard is fairly common in Denmark. Sort of like how Tom Jones the Welsh singer has no relationship with Robert Trent Jones the golf course designer.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Indeed, the full title is "Fear and Trembling-Race Differences: A Very Brief Review".

    , @al-Gharaniq
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Just like Watson, it turns out Kierkegaard was a racist too and only decided to talk about it in his old, oldage.

    , @anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    a quick tour of European names .....

    Kierkegaard - means Church Yard in Danish, could be translated as Warden, Sexton, or ....

    as Churchill, because Churchill derives from Church Hill.

    French equivalents include Curie and Pasteur,
    in Slavic languages we get
    Ponomarev (son of a sexton) as in the former world chess champion

    and in Spanish we get

    Des Iglesias ....

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I thought this was a sequel to "Christ opposes the SAT."

    Next up: "Cicero on golf course design," and it'll be some guy from Vermont, Bobby Cicero.

  2. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    LOL

    Søren Kierkegaard, born around the same time as mathematician Abel in the early 1800s, when Denmark-Norway didn’t have much more than a million people.

    Rather astonishing, the brilliant people wandering around Europe at that time: Galois, Gauss, others. Could well have been the peak of human intelligence.

  3. The review’s abstract is entirely consistent with the first 260 pages of David Reich’s excellent 2018 book “Who We Are And How We Got Here.” At that point, Reich ends his discussion of ancient and modern DNA, changing course to throw Nicholas Wade and others under the bus for thoughtcrime.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @ic1000


    Reich ends his discussion of ancient and modern DNA, changing course to throw Nicholas Wade and others under the bus for thoughtcrime.
     
    Not very surprising given his ethnic/religious background.
  4. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    He got an extra /e/.

  5. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    Soren Kierkegaard (Christian existentialist philospher) has no relationship, familial or otherwise, to Emil Kirkegaard (human biodiversity expert). The name Kirkegaard is fairly common in Denmark. Sort of like how Tom Jones the Welsh singer has no relationship with Robert Trent Jones the golf course designer.

  6. Can’t wait to tune into ‘Inside Science’ on BBC Radio 4 and listen to presenter Dr Adam Rutherford, a co-author of Pseudoscience Explainer, impartially discuss this academic review and dispassionately interview its author.

    Oh wait, sorry Emil, his science programme covers real science only- such as the pressing issue of how dare men win all the Nobel Prizes, thus proving science is sexist.

  7. Measured enough and amply caveatted … it´s hard to see how anyone but a religious psycho could object to that;
    indeed there are loads of objective psychometric proxies missing – “self-reported”, HA! 😛

  8. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    Indeed, the full title is “Fear and Trembling-Race Differences: A Very Brief Review”.

  9. The other Kierkegaard reviews the state of life:

    People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.

    How absurd men are! They never use the liberties they have, they demand those they do not have. They have freedom of thought, they demand freedom of speech.

    Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.

    Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.

    Once you label me you negate me.

    Anxiety is the dizziness of freedom.

    People understand me so poorly that they don’t even understand my complaint about them not understanding me.

    Take away paradox from the thinker and you have a professor.

    At the bottom of enmity between strangers lies indifference.

    I feel as if I were a piece in a game of chess, when my opponent says of it: That piece cannot be moved.

    The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.

    • Replies: @Bacsi
    @Reg Cæsar

    I suppose I’m going to have to read Soren Kierkegaard. It’s definitely not the first time I’ve heard of him.

    I don’t really have anything intelligent to add or say to the actual article in question other than it’s a bit mediocre and objective. It’s just a fair scientific article without polarization which is probably where science belongs. However, I do think there’s greater evidence for race realism even if it’s technically in the minority as a polled consensus.

    I was listening to this song yesterday though, and some of the quotes you posted immediately made me think of it. Awesome ballad:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MtWJoIUifQI

  10. @ic1000
    The review’s abstract is entirely consistent with the first 260 pages of David Reich’s excellent 2018 book “Who We Are And How We Got Here.” At that point, Reich ends his discussion of ancient and modern DNA, changing course to throw Nicholas Wade and others under the bus for thoughtcrime.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Reich ends his discussion of ancient and modern DNA, changing course to throw Nicholas Wade and others under the bus for thoughtcrime.

    Not very surprising given his ethnic/religious background.

  11. Anon[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Tangentially related, but there is a tendency within the private equity community (which is more Jewish than venture capital) to buy up companies, then acquihire random Israeli tech firms. It always stuck out, since few of the companies seemed innovative or value adding in any regard — more so, since there are so many better startups located in nearby Silicon Valley (which savvier VC’s strongly prefer), as opposed to the GMT+2 timezone.

    The only Israeli companies that seemed halfway legit were security firms, which was probably part of a bigger pattern of technology and intelligence transfer. My operating assumption was that any private technically unsavvy company, which felt the sudden need to acquire a random Tel Aviv-based company, probably saw sensitive customer data leaked into the hands of Israeli intelligence, much as if a Chinese company were acquired. Or at the very least, said Israeli company played both sides of the field, providing value to the acquiring company while simultaneously providing information about internal security weak points that state intelligence could exploit.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Anon

    It's easy enough to explain: most PE uses significant leverage, and it's easier to raise debt to buy a hollow log when the acquisition target has a slick deck but due diligence is almost impossible.

    It's also a function of the corporate side of the economy being awash with liquidity: every IB is funding things without doing the sort of scrutiny that would happen if interest rates were 500bps higher.

    And the acquiree firms are always in a sector that is media-popular, where finance journalists can be bamboozled. For the last few years it was cybersecurity; over the next little while it will be AI and/or Quantum Computing.

    Quite a bit of the "raise debt to acquire a hollow log in a sexy 'space'" is deliberate; scratch the surface and you'll often find that there's a non-arm's-length relationship between the principals of the acquirer and acquiree.

    It's similar to the 'X Capital' model:
    • take a company private;
    • raise debt on its assets;
    • pay yourself a special dividend using the debt;
    • sell the assets;
    • pay for some positive media coverage about how your expertise in 'turnarounds' has borne fruit yet again;
    • re-list the hollowed-out shell at a higher multiple;
    • express dismay when the new management fails to keep up with its debt schedule.

    PMs are happy to allocate 0.5% of a portfolio to the output of these folks in order to continue to receive invites to the Hamptons. Its a very small price o pay, since the hollow log's contribution to the portfolio will be quantitatively meaningless even if you hold it until it dies: it won't even affect Tracking Error for an index-style fund.

    X might be 'Bain'; it might not.

  12. How absurd men are! They never use the liberties they have, they demand those they do not have. They have freedom of thought, they demand freedom of speech.

    Quality of desire, followed by quality of argument. No weight, no censure applicable. One step further, censure should be based on quality of argument. That erases about as much science as there is output.

    The God responsibility of man, trading religion for rational and logic, relaying the ambition of critical thinking to the ambition of educating as far as public intellectuals. The world of scientists, as produced by our universities needs serious culling.

  13. I just finished a read of Kirkegaard’s 16-page review. It’s excellent, and accessible to the interested layperson. The author is very fair in presenting the arguments of the science-denial side of the nature-&-nurture versus nurture-only debate (I don’t have to be fair).

  14. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    Just like Watson, it turns out Kierkegaard was a racist too and only decided to talk about it in his old, oldage.

  15. For instance, northern Indians are related to Europeans, and indeed speak related languages from the Indo-European family (Reich et al., 2009). In general, language relatedness reflects earlier migrations and thus genetic relatedness as well.

    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.

    Say, certain racial groups have an increased (or decreased) average distance between their tongue and the top of their mouth or between tongue and teeth—not a large difference, just a small one that wouldn’t be relevant in any medical context. It’s plausible to imagine that this might make certain vowels and consonants slightly easier to pronounce and others slightly more difficult but. The path of least resistance though leads racial groups to create languages with a phonology that’s easiest for them to pronounce, even if the difficulty in pronunciation is incredibly small.

    Mapping grammar to genetic differences would be a lot more difficult, though I don’t think that’s entirely out of the realm of possibility.

    • Replies: @Emil O. W. Kirkegaard
    @al-Gharaniq


    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.
     
    Quite a lot of them! E.g. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01837-7 Ignoring the spin on race denialism, it is a quite nice study. Also cited in the review.

    Replies: @al-Gharaniq

    , @obwandiyag
    @al-Gharaniq

    Bullshit. Japanese Americans and African-Americans and Arab-Americans and British Picts and Scots speak English. Turks speak Turk and not Lycian or Phrygian or Galatian. Tuscans and Gauls and Visigoths and Sabines speak Latinate. Vandals speak Berber and Arabic. Wends speak German.

  16. THIS IS AWFUL!
    DONALD TRUMP HAS KILLED EVERYONE!!!
    NO DOUBT ON ORDERS FROM PUTIN!
    Chamber of Commerce: “The United States has run out of people.”

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @J.Ross


    Who in their right mind would say such a thing?
     
    The guy who wants to raise $250m to build his organisation a new palace, and who realises that furnishing woke-adjacent soundbites will help reduce the WACC of doing so.

    Also - not for nothin' ... but he's right on the numbers.

    The 'natural increase' part of US demography is solidly negative - especially once you 'back out' the TFR of zeroth- and first-generation immigrants... whose offspring count in 'natural increase', but are not what most folks here would consider 'American' (and are certainly not likely to have views congruent with the US Chamber of Commerce).

  17. Fantastic review by Emil. This reads more like a magazine article than a science piece but it was a nice simple article that provides one with a refreshing overview.

  18. @Anon
    Tangentially related, but there is a tendency within the private equity community (which is more Jewish than venture capital) to buy up companies, then acquihire random Israeli tech firms. It always stuck out, since few of the companies seemed innovative or value adding in any regard -- more so, since there are so many better startups located in nearby Silicon Valley (which savvier VC's strongly prefer), as opposed to the GMT+2 timezone.

    The only Israeli companies that seemed halfway legit were security firms, which was probably part of a bigger pattern of technology and intelligence transfer. My operating assumption was that any private technically unsavvy company, which felt the sudden need to acquire a random Tel Aviv-based company, probably saw sensitive customer data leaked into the hands of Israeli intelligence, much as if a Chinese company were acquired. Or at the very least, said Israeli company played both sides of the field, providing value to the acquiring company while simultaneously providing information about internal security weak points that state intelligence could exploit.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    It’s easy enough to explain: most PE uses significant leverage, and it’s easier to raise debt to buy a hollow log when the acquisition target has a slick deck but due diligence is almost impossible.

    It’s also a function of the corporate side of the economy being awash with liquidity: every IB is funding things without doing the sort of scrutiny that would happen if interest rates were 500bps higher.

    And the acquiree firms are always in a sector that is media-popular, where finance journalists can be bamboozled. For the last few years it was cybersecurity; over the next little while it will be AI and/or Quantum Computing.

    Quite a bit of the “raise debt to acquire a hollow log in a sexy ‘space’” is deliberate; scratch the surface and you’ll often find that there’s a non-arm’s-length relationship between the principals of the acquirer and acquiree.

    It’s similar to the ‘X Capital‘ model:
    • take a company private;
    • raise debt on its assets;
    • pay yourself a special dividend using the debt;
    • sell the assets;
    • pay for some positive media coverage about how your expertise in ‘turnarounds’ has borne fruit yet again;
    • re-list the hollowed-out shell at a higher multiple;
    • express dismay when the new management fails to keep up with its debt schedule.

    PMs are happy to allocate 0.5% of a portfolio to the output of these folks in order to continue to receive invites to the Hamptons. Its a very small price o pay, since the hollow log’s contribution to the portfolio will be quantitatively meaningless even if you hold it until it dies: it won’t even affect Tracking Error for an index-style fund.

    X might be ‘Bain‘; it might not.

  19. @J.Ross
    THIS IS AWFUL!
    DONALD TRUMP HAS KILLED EVERYONE!!!
    NO DOUBT ON ORDERS FROM PUTIN!
    Chamber of Commerce: "The United States has run out of people."
    https://twitter.com/NumbersUSA/status/1121556053198540800

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    Who in their right mind would say such a thing?

    The guy who wants to raise $250m to build his organisation a new palace, and who realises that furnishing woke-adjacent soundbites will help reduce the WACC of doing so.

    Also – not for nothin’ … but he’s right on the numbers.

    The ‘natural increase’ part of US demography is solidly negative – especially once you ‘back out’ the TFR of zeroth- and first-generation immigrants… whose offspring count in ‘natural increase’, but are not what most folks here would consider ‘American’ (and are certainly not likely to have views congruent with the US Chamber of Commerce).

  20. 52% of rapists in France are not French.

    https://summit.news/2019/11/25/paris-feminists-attack-other-protesters-for-highlighting-study-showing-52-of-male-rapists-are-migrants/

    French feminists attack the ones that say it, call them “Fascist.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    52% of rapists in France are not French.
     
    The 30th anniversary of the Montréal Massacre by one }}}Marc Lépine{{{ is coming up, a week from Friday, on what used to be la fête de Saint Nicolas in Canada, but is now Journée nationale de commémoration et d'action contre la violence faite aux femmes.

    Lépine's paternal ancestry and religion was kept out of the news for decades. Probably his atheism as likely virginity as well.

    December 6 – National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada

    Less talk, more action: National Day of Remembrance on Violence Against Women

    Just don't mention that Murderous Marc was un homme de couleur.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Prester John

    , @Elli
    @J.Ross

    And the other 48%? How many indigenous French, how many of immigrant origin, how many of non-European origin?

  21. Here’s some useless knowledge from grad school, where I studied Kierkegaard not under some random professor, but an expert who knew Danish and everything. (Imagine learning Danish to get a Phd).

    The first name, with the funny line through the ‘o’ is surren, no “sore-en”
    The last name (here we go) is not Keerkyguard but more like kurkurgah. Danish has no vowels, just grunts.

    Of course, 100 years of “sore-en keerkyguard” can’t be changed. Like Nabokov trying to insist its Vla-DEE-meer (like redeemer) Na-BOK-ov (sorry, Sting).

    BTW, I mention Kierkegaard today in my essay on Richard Spencer’s latest pratfall:

    https://www.counter-currents.com/2019/11/the-second-time-as-farce/

  22. anonymous[684] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    a quick tour of European names …..

    Kierkegaard – means Church Yard in Danish, could be translated as Warden, Sexton, or ….

    as Churchill, because Churchill derives from Church Hill.

    French equivalents include Curie and Pasteur,
    in Slavic languages we get
    Ponomarev (son of a sexton) as in the former world chess champion

    and in Spanish we get

    Des Iglesias ….

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anonymous


    Kierkegaard – means Church Yard in Danish, could be translated as Warden, Sexton, or ….
     
    Today, kirkegård is most often used in the sense of "cemetery" or "graveyard". That's about the only part of the church Danes use anymore, after baptism.
  23. @Reg Cæsar
    The other Kierkegaard reviews the state of life:

    People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.

    How absurd men are! They never use the liberties they have, they demand those they do not have. They have freedom of thought, they demand freedom of speech.

    Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.

    Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.

    Once you label me you negate me.

    Anxiety is the dizziness of freedom.

    People understand me so poorly that they don't even understand my complaint about them not understanding me.

    Take away paradox from the thinker and you have a professor.

    At the bottom of enmity between strangers lies indifference.

    I feel as if I were a piece in a game of chess, when my opponent says of it: That piece cannot be moved.

    The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.
     

    Replies: @Bacsi

    I suppose I’m going to have to read Soren Kierkegaard. It’s definitely not the first time I’ve heard of him.

    I don’t really have anything intelligent to add or say to the actual article in question other than it’s a bit mediocre and objective. It’s just a fair scientific article without polarization which is probably where science belongs. However, I do think there’s greater evidence for race realism even if it’s technically in the minority as a polled consensus.

    I was listening to this song yesterday though, and some of the quotes you posted immediately made me think of it. Awesome ballad:

  24. @J.Ross
    52% of rapists in France are not French.

    https://summit.news/2019/11/25/paris-feminists-attack-other-protesters-for-highlighting-study-showing-52-of-male-rapists-are-migrants/

    French feminists attack the ones that say it, call them "Fascist."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Elli

    52% of rapists in France are not French.

    The 30th anniversary of the Montréal Massacre by one }}}Marc Lépine{{{ is coming up, a week from Friday, on what used to be la fête de Saint Nicolas in Canada, but is now Journée nationale de commémoration et d’action contre la violence faite aux femmes.

    Lépine’s paternal ancestry and religion was kept out of the news for decades. Probably his atheism as likely virginity as well.

    December 6 – National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada

    Less talk, more action: National Day of Remembrance on Violence Against Women

    Just don’t mention that Murderous Marc was un homme de couleur.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    There was just a brutal rape story out of Spain (the woman lived) -- the judge noted that the attackers probably didn't understand how consent worked, and their "background" was kept out of the press to prevent reprisals against minorities. The newspaper story actually pointed this out. I felt like HAL reading lips for a moment: "we won't tell you who they were because we don't want any Islamophobia." Okaaaaaay ...

    , @Prester John
    @Reg Cæsar

    un homme de couleur.

    Quelle surprise!

  25. @anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    a quick tour of European names .....

    Kierkegaard - means Church Yard in Danish, could be translated as Warden, Sexton, or ....

    as Churchill, because Churchill derives from Church Hill.

    French equivalents include Curie and Pasteur,
    in Slavic languages we get
    Ponomarev (son of a sexton) as in the former world chess champion

    and in Spanish we get

    Des Iglesias ....

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Kierkegaard – means Church Yard in Danish, could be translated as Warden, Sexton, or ….

    Today, kirkegård is most often used in the sense of “cemetery” or “graveyard”. That’s about the only part of the church Danes use anymore, after baptism.

  26. @J.Ross
    52% of rapists in France are not French.

    https://summit.news/2019/11/25/paris-feminists-attack-other-protesters-for-highlighting-study-showing-52-of-male-rapists-are-migrants/

    French feminists attack the ones that say it, call them "Fascist."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Elli

    And the other 48%? How many indigenous French, how many of immigrant origin, how many of non-European origin?

  27. Is this basically what Charles Murray’s upcoming book will be?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anon

    This, plus disapproval of people like Sailer, with whom Charles would never hobnob.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  28. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought Kirkegaard was some kind of old-timey philosopher that goatee-wearing guys with man-buns discuss at the coffee shops. WTH? You mean he's a real dude?

    Replies: @bomag, @Bardon Kaldian, @Peter Johnson, @kaganovitch, @al-Gharaniq, @anonymous, @Anon

    I thought this was a sequel to “Christ opposes the SAT.”

    Next up: “Cicero on golf course design,” and it’ll be some guy from Vermont, Bobby Cicero.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  29. @Anon
    Is this basically what Charles Murray's upcoming book will be?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    This, plus disapproval of people like Sailer, with whom Charles would never hobnob.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @J.Ross

    fwiw, Mark Steyn had a shout out to Steve today

    Replies: @J.Ross

  30. @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    52% of rapists in France are not French.
     
    The 30th anniversary of the Montréal Massacre by one }}}Marc Lépine{{{ is coming up, a week from Friday, on what used to be la fête de Saint Nicolas in Canada, but is now Journée nationale de commémoration et d'action contre la violence faite aux femmes.

    Lépine's paternal ancestry and religion was kept out of the news for decades. Probably his atheism as likely virginity as well.

    December 6 – National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada

    Less talk, more action: National Day of Remembrance on Violence Against Women

    Just don't mention that Murderous Marc was un homme de couleur.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Prester John

    There was just a brutal rape story out of Spain (the woman lived) — the judge noted that the attackers probably didn’t understand how consent worked, and their “background” was kept out of the press to prevent reprisals against minorities. The newspaper story actually pointed this out. I felt like HAL reading lips for a moment: “we won’t tell you who they were because we don’t want any Islamophobia.” Okaaaaaay …

    • Agree: jim jones
  31. @J.Ross
    @Anon

    This, plus disapproval of people like Sailer, with whom Charles would never hobnob.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    fwiw, Mark Steyn had a shout out to Steve today

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @kaganovitch

    That's good because it guarantees that he will re-shout-out several times in the near future as he reprints older columns which cannot be improved on.

  32. @kaganovitch
    @J.Ross

    fwiw, Mark Steyn had a shout out to Steve today

    Replies: @J.Ross

    That’s good because it guarantees that he will re-shout-out several times in the near future as he reprints older columns which cannot be improved on.

  33. Even by the standards of the unhinged domains of the internet, Emil Kirkegaard’s rationalwiki entry is a doozy. Clearly, they hate, hate, hate, him.

    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Emil_Kirkegaard

  34. @al-Gharaniq

    For instance, northern Indians are related to Europeans, and indeed speak related languages from the Indo-European family (Reich et al., 2009). In general, language relatedness reflects earlier migrations and thus genetic relatedness as well.
     
    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.

    Say, certain racial groups have an increased (or decreased) average distance between their tongue and the top of their mouth or between tongue and teeth—not a large difference, just a small one that wouldn't be relevant in any medical context. It's plausible to imagine that this might make certain vowels and consonants slightly easier to pronounce and others slightly more difficult but. The path of least resistance though leads racial groups to create languages with a phonology that's easiest for them to pronounce, even if the difficulty in pronunciation is incredibly small.

    Mapping grammar to genetic differences would be a lot more difficult, though I don't think that's entirely out of the realm of possibility.

    Replies: @Emil O. W. Kirkegaard, @obwandiyag

    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.

    Quite a lot of them! E.g. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01837-7 Ignoring the spin on race denialism, it is a quite nice study. Also cited in the review.

    • Replies: @al-Gharaniq
    @Emil O. W. Kirkegaard

    The author ofthe study? I'm humbled! Kudos on the excellent review.

    Thanks for pointing out the cites, good to know people are researching this.

  35. @al-Gharaniq

    For instance, northern Indians are related to Europeans, and indeed speak related languages from the Indo-European family (Reich et al., 2009). In general, language relatedness reflects earlier migrations and thus genetic relatedness as well.
     
    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.

    Say, certain racial groups have an increased (or decreased) average distance between their tongue and the top of their mouth or between tongue and teeth—not a large difference, just a small one that wouldn't be relevant in any medical context. It's plausible to imagine that this might make certain vowels and consonants slightly easier to pronounce and others slightly more difficult but. The path of least resistance though leads racial groups to create languages with a phonology that's easiest for them to pronounce, even if the difficulty in pronunciation is incredibly small.

    Mapping grammar to genetic differences would be a lot more difficult, though I don't think that's entirely out of the realm of possibility.

    Replies: @Emil O. W. Kirkegaard, @obwandiyag

    Bullshit. Japanese Americans and African-Americans and Arab-Americans and British Picts and Scots speak English. Turks speak Turk and not Lycian or Phrygian or Galatian. Tuscans and Gauls and Visigoths and Sabines speak Latinate. Vandals speak Berber and Arabic. Wends speak German.

  36. @Reg Cæsar
    @J.Ross


    52% of rapists in France are not French.
     
    The 30th anniversary of the Montréal Massacre by one }}}Marc Lépine{{{ is coming up, a week from Friday, on what used to be la fête de Saint Nicolas in Canada, but is now Journée nationale de commémoration et d'action contre la violence faite aux femmes.

    Lépine's paternal ancestry and religion was kept out of the news for decades. Probably his atheism as likely virginity as well.

    December 6 – National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada

    Less talk, more action: National Day of Remembrance on Violence Against Women

    Just don't mention that Murderous Marc was un homme de couleur.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Prester John

    un homme de couleur.

    Quelle surprise!

  37. @Emil O. W. Kirkegaard
    @al-Gharaniq


    Are there any studies on the relationship between genetics differences and language differences? It does make me wonder if language could partially be mapped to specific genetic clusters/patterns found in different racial groups. This would probably be easier to prove on the phonology of languages rather than the grammar of them.
     
    Quite a lot of them! E.g. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01837-7 Ignoring the spin on race denialism, it is a quite nice study. Also cited in the review.

    Replies: @al-Gharaniq

    The author ofthe study? I’m humbled! Kudos on the excellent review.

    Thanks for pointing out the cites, good to know people are researching this.

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