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A statement issued by the Kenosha Professional Police Association:

PRESS STATEMENT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 28, 2020

Kenosha Professional Police Association Releases Details on Blake Shooting

Details released by the association and involved Kenosha police officers.

Senator Steve Nass (R-Whitewater) is sharing vital new information on the officer-involved shooting of Jacob Blake released by the Kenosha Professional Police Association (KPPA) and the officers involved in the shooting. The release of information was issued through the KPPA’s attorney Brendan Matthews.

Senator Nass believes it is important that the public have a more complete presentation of the facts relating to the incident involving Jacob Blake.

The following is the release of information from the KPPA and the officers involved:

“The recent officer-involved shooting in Kenosha has produced a variety of feelings and narratives; most of which are wholly inaccurate. The purely fictional depiction of events coming from those without direct knowledge of what actually occurred is incredibly harmful, and provides no benefit to anyone whatsoever, other than to perpetuate a misleading narrative. The lawyers for Mr. Blake, among others, have continued to provide false and misleading “facts” to the public, in what can only be considered a ploy for attention and sympathy. Unfortunately, even the incident update from the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Division of Criminal Investigation (“DCI”) — the agency charged with investigating the incident independently — is riddled with incomplete information, and omits important details that would help to paint a more complete picture of the incident. While DCI updated that release earlier today (8/28/20), it is still lacking.

The Kenosha Professional Police Association, including the officers involved, believe the public deserves to know the truth.

Here are the actual and undisputed facts:

• The officers were dispatched to the location due to a complaint that Mr. Blake was attempting to steal the caller’s keys/vehicle.

The caller was Blake’s ex-girlfriend, the mother of 3 of his children.

A question that hasn’t been answered yet is whether the three children in the back of the SUV were the children of the ex-girlfriend who called the cops on Blake. If so, did she have legal custody of them and not Blake? Was he attempting to, legally, abduct them?

Keep in mind that he might have felt his intentions were wholly benign — perhaps he intended to take his children on an outing that he had promised them. But a lot of very nasty domestic disputes start exactly like that: the dad shows up to take his kids, the mom objects, the cops are called, and things go even further downhill from there.

• Officers were aware of Mr. Blake’s open warrant for felony sexual assault (3rd degree) before they arrived on scene.

The ex-girlfriend had filed a complaint against Blake’s visit to her home in May.

• Mr. Blake was not breaking up a fight between two females when officers arrived on scene.

This was alleged by at least one neighbor and widely circulated in the national press that Blake was being a peacemaker.

• The silver SUV seen in the widely circulated video was not Mr. Blake’s vehicle.

The ex-girlfriend would sometimes let him borrow her car, but he was supposed to ask.

• Mr. Blake was not unarmed. He was armed with a knife. The officers did not see the knife initially. The officers first saw him holding the knife while they were on the passenger side of the vehicle. The “main” video circulating on the internet shows Mr. Blake with the knife in his left hand when he rounds the front of the car. The officers issued repeated commands for Mr. Blake to drop the knife. He did not comply.

It looks like a karambit knife, but the video is very fuzzy. It still might be something else.

One interesting implication of the argument that he already had a knife in his hand while outside the car is that the argument that he was going for the car to get his knife doesn’t work. He already had the knife and apparently didn’t slash any cops with it. Apparently, he dropped the knife onto his floorboard when he got shot.

Maybe the cops thought Blake was being a reasonable man who understood “Don’t bring a knife to a gunfight,” so … he was going for a gun in the SUV to shoot it out with the police.

But he wasn’t being a reasonable man.

Which was the problem in the first place.

My guess is Blake’s plan was to get in the car (presumably his ex-girlfriend’s) and drive away with the kids and hope the cops just forget about the resisting arrest and the felony warrant and the (perhaps) child abduction charges.

iSteve commenter TontoBubbaGoldstein suggests:

Blake probably realized that getting arrested with the knife on his person would have resulted in additional charges and was trying to hide it in the car. Since the cops weren’t mind readers, they assumed he was attempting to retrieve a weapon from the car.

Back to the Kenosha cops press release:

• The officers initially tried to speak with Mr. Blake, but he was uncooperative.

• The officers then began issuing verbal commands to Mr. Blake, but he was non-compliant.

• The officers next went “hands-on” with Mr. Blake, so as to gain compliance and control.

• Mr. Blake actively resisted the officers’ attempt to gain compliance.

• The officers then disengaged and drew their tasers, issuing commands to Mr. Blake that he would be tased if he did not comply.

• Based on his non-compliance, one officer tased Mr. Blake. The taser did not incapacitate Mr. Blake.

• The officers once more went “hands-on” with Mr. Blake; again, trying to gain control of the escalating situation.

• Mr. Blake forcefully fought with the officers, including putting one of the officers in a headlock.

• A second taser (from a different officer than had deployed the initial taser) was then deployed on Mr. Blake. It did not appear to have any impact on him.

New Marvel Superhero: Jacob Floyd, a.k.a., Go Tase Me Bro.

• Based on the inability to gain compliance and control after using verbal, physical and less-lethal means, the officers drew their firearms.

• Mr. Blake continued to ignore the officers’ commands, even with the threat of lethal force now present.

The foregoing facts need to be added to the story to correct what is currently out there. As the uncontested facts above demonstrate, the officers involved gave Mr. Blake numerous opportunities to comply. He chose not to. None of the officers involved wished for things to transpire the way it did. It is my hope that truth and transparency will help begin and aid in the healing process.”

Domestic disputes like this are just about the most likely to turn deadly because passions are high and people won’t behave reasonably.

Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.

 
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  1. Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Yancey Ward

    According to commenters vhrm and J.Ross, yes.

    https://www.apmreports.org/episode/2019/05/09/when-tasers-fail

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Yancey Ward

    Score another kill for Taser Chick! Several years ago, police in Warren, Ohio tasered a drunk/drugged female 5 times. A few of those times were after she kicked out a window of the cruiser she was put in. The media used her as exhibit A as why something must be done about these Tasers cops use. She received an out of court settlement from the city.
    18 months later, Taser Chick makes the news again. This time the cops Taser her twice. But the national media stop reporting on this incident within a day. This time, the witnesses to her assaulting someone aren't drunk twentysomethings pissed at the cops for breaking up the night's entertainment. It's a bunch of people horrified at a drunk attacking a stranger at a late night restaurant.

    , @El Dato
    @Yancey Ward

    Lamarckism in action.

    , @Rob McX
    @Yancey Ward

    I know a lot of these shootings occur after a a failed tasing. But apparently an old model taser failed to subdue Rodney King 29 years ago. It seems blacks have evolved to be taser-proof.

    Replies: @Escher

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Yancey Ward

    Were you wasted high out of your senses on PCP when you did it, though?

    , @Henry's Cat
    @Yancey Ward

    I'm still waiting for Star Trek phasers to become a reality. What's the hold up?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Bill P
    @Yancey Ward

    They probably shifted production to China.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Yancey Ward

    Time was, the cops were allowed to beat a perp into submission with their batons. That didn't look good so they had to use choke holds. A couple people didn't wake up, and so they went to tasers.

    A couple speedfreaks had heart attacks, so they have to turn the voltage down to "mildly anoying" instead of incapacitating.

    But once you've taken away all non-lethal means to subdue a dangerous criminal it can't surprise anyone that cops have no choice left but to use deadly force when its life or death reaction time.

    , @Jiminy
    @Yancey Ward

    A couple of years ago in a small town here, the cops killed a raging druggo by tasering him. After examining the guns, it was determined that he was tasered a total of 28 times. Man, he must have had smoke coming out of his ears!

  2. Social workers would have disarmed him easily.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @JimDandy


    Social workers would have disarmed him easily.
     
    Hey, girls with BAs are strong, independent women. They are the ones who make it happen. Without their efforts--their reports, their memos--our society could not function. Their careers are critical and they don't need any man to take care of them ... at least until they turn 30.

    And besides, how else are they going to pay off those student loans?

  3. Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.

    “Systemic racism”, which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of “systemic racism”. Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant “systemic racism” a validity it does not possess.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Almost Missouri


    “Systemic racism”, which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of “systemic racism”. Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant “systemic racism” a validity it does not possess.
     
    There is absolutely zero "good faith" involved.

    It's 200 proof minoritarianism--minorities virtuous and oppressed, majorities evil and oppressive. Same line of b.s. that has been propagandized at us--relentless--for 50+ years. Just jacked up another level in intensity and ridiculousness.

    But the bottom line is the same: you--mr. white gentile--didn't build that; you have no right to your nation.

    And if we don't stand up, say we've had enough and take the fight to them ... they'll be effectively right. Everything they say will still be utter b.s. historically, socially, biologically, logically. But they'll be right that the nation isn't ours anymore.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Almost Missouri


    “Systemic racism”, which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith.
     
    This sentence would be just as true without the extraneous word "systemic".
    , @SMK
    @Almost Missouri

    "Systemic racism" -whatever that means exactly?- doesn't exist objectively, unlike systematic reverse discrimination against whites, preferential treatment, double standards, "affirmative-action," and quotas that favor blacks and penalize whites in education and the workplace, hiring and promotions, college admissions, grading, criminal justice (one should say injustice that favors blacks and penalizes whites in regard to arrests, indictments, prosecutions, convictions, and sentencing), etc.

    As for "racism": what does that mean, exactly? Irrational, obsessive, hysterical, psychotic, murderous,, genocidal hatred of a race that often results in violence and destruction, individual and collective:: assaults, rapes and gang-rapes, muggings, armed robbery, torture, kidnapping,, murder, riots, arson, looting, etc. If so, blacks are the worst "racists," by far. For example, blacks are 25-20 times more likely to murder whites than vice-versa and I'm sure the disparities in respect to assaults, robbery, rape and gang-rape are even more damning, enormous, startling, and revelatory.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Almost Missouri

    System Racism is a form of alchemy that turns the lead of black dysfunction into the gold of white guilt.

    For example, all of these BLM incidents simply involve black criminal violently resisting lawful arrest. Instead of reforming the police, it would more logical to think about reforming black people.

    But since that is an impermissible idea, the burden of blacks' bad behavior somehow lands on white people. It's quite amazing, actually.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  4. anon[999] • Disclaimer says:

    But a lot of very nasty domestic disputes start exactly like that: the dad shows up to take his kids, the mom objects, the cops are called, and things go even further downhill from there.

    This is also how some Amber alerts happen if the dad gets his vehicle moving fast enough. Then the party starts onto the freeway in some cases.

    Now then, I wonder how many of the internet experts from previous threads will show up in this one and admit that, gosh, they didn’t know as much about “hands on” / arrests / law / etc. as they claimed? My guess is “zero”.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @anon

    Anon999! The Last Anon.

    As to the subject at hand, I'm glad the police union found its collective balls. Perhaps the Kenosha Kid showed many that yes they can be defeated.

    Keep your powder dry. Over the top. Oh my fair cousin, and all that jazz.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  5. Someone has admitted the fact Mr Sailer!

    The headline in my local newspaper is:

    Brave Police Intervention saves the Lives of 3 Kids from Violent Criminal Father armed with a Combat Knife

    If you’re interested, the name of the paper is:

    The Daily Just-the-facts-Ma’am Bugle

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Ano

    Philip K. Dick's writings are terrific.

  6. “Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades?”

    Yancey Ward, at least some are:

    “Cops in three major cities report their current Tasers aren’t as effective as previous models:

    Police departments in New York, Los Angeles and Houston each switched from older models to newer ones in recent years. Those newer models, called the X2 and the X26P, were designed to be safer for suspects, because they put out less electrical charge than the older X26.”

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @danand

    Can you still buy the older models for civilian use? Not as impressive as a classic “Browning High Power” but still effectively useful.

    Replies: @danand

    , @HA
    @danand

    "Those newer models, called the X2 and the X26P, were designed to be safer for suspects, because they put out less electrical charge than the older X26."

    If the only alternative to a tasering that doesn't incapacitate is shooting someone, then the next generation of tasers will probably provide a higher charge with each successive shock -- in other words, the first shock will be some relatively milder X2-level, while the second or third will be comparable to the X26.

    You'd need some finessing for the cases where there are two or more people that get tasered (so that the second person would be able to receive a starter shock instead of whatever happens to be the second-setting) and that may already be too complicated in the heat of the moment, but it's worth a shot (so to speak).

  7. The first step on my moving away from the leftism of my youth was watching Democrats abandon concerns about sexual harassment as soon as the Monica Lewinsky story broke. I still believe Democrats should have stood their ground and forced Clinton to resign. They would have had Al Gore as president, who would then have easily gone on to beat W. The world would have been spared W’s disastrous 8 years and the radicalization of politics that has occurred since then.

    Conservatives are also hypocritical, to be sure, but not to the shocking degree of progressives. Less than a year ago, the world was tearing itself apart over MeToo. And now it’s tearing itself apart because police defended a woman from a violent, armed man alleged to have committed sexual assault against her.

    The best way I have to comprehend the current state of the world is remember Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    The best way I have to comprehend the current state of the world is remember Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

     

    Me too. I read it for the first time earlier this year. There is no better to time to get to know this work than right now.

    Replies: @res

  8. maybe he was going to try to kill the kids next. or maybe like Steve said he was trying to make his escape with the kids.

    years ago i had a girlfriend from California who had 3 sisters, and one of them had a crazy african boyfriend from Tennessee. and one day he did abduct their 2 kids from LA and drove them to Tennessee without telling anybody, and it took the authorities to get the kids back and impose a restraining order on him. needless to say that was the last time he was around.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @prime noticer


    maybe he was going to try to kill the kids next. or maybe like Steve said he was trying to make his escape with the kids.
     
    At some point the proper procedure for police, upon being called to intervene in a black-on-black domestic dispute, is going to be to shrug and keep driving.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  9. When did he pull the knife out? Did he have it out before the cops got there (and if so, was he threatening his ex with it?), or did he pull the knife on the cops? Either way, it should be extremely damaging to the BLM narrative that he was armed (just like it should have been extremely damaging to the BLM St George narrative that Floyd had a “fatal” amount of fentanyl in his system…).

  10. My mom has never voted GOP, and would never, but it took me about three minutes to “redpill” her on how this incident wasn’t exactly like how The Narrative painted it to be. The ongoing BLM “unrest,” to use MSM’s favorite term for it, is really turning out to be a whopping loser of an issue for the Dhimmicrats, even with the 400-point lead their simpatico status with The Cathedral gives them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ADL Pyramid of Hate


    ...even with the 400-point lead their simpatico status with The Cathedral gives them.
     
    Those aren't "points", they're called "Electors".

    It's not inconceivable that this could be flipped. Not to 469-69 (snicker, snicker), but a healthy 400 is within reach.

    Start with DJT retaining his 306 from 2016. Should he carry the states he lost by five points (rounded), i.e., VA, ME, NH, MN, CO and NV, that's another 45. (He won one Maine elector in 2016.) Make the number 12, and that's 15 more, albeit including his opponent's state; a 17-pt. swing nets 57 more. Nixon pulled off a 17-pt rise between 1968 and 1972.

    Candidates who survive squeakers, "inversions", recounts, recalls, etc, often win comfortably the next time around.

    This is not a prediction, by the way. I gave that up decades ago. Biden could win 400 electors should the majority at the polls be as mad as the minority in the street.

    Don't write off this possibility. This Australian analysis attributes Trump's 2016 inversion to educated whites packed into large states:

    US 2016 election final results: how Trump won

    Biden's hope is that the same types in swing states will go for him. I suppose that depends on how close they live to the riot zones.

  11. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    • Thanks: Charlotte, vhrm
  12. Police officials should make clear that in any “defund the police” policies are implemented, they will immediately stop responding to domestic violence calls. Had Blake simply slashed this white baby momma’s throat then there would be no problems, life in Kenosha would be normal, and the NBA would have continued as planned.

    If Lebron, Kaep, or any other black sports stars want to make a difference, they should make public service videos showing the black Lumpen-proletariat how to comply while being arrested by white police officers. A clever slogan like, “Black Lives That Comply Don’t Die” could accompany all the Big Sport events. That way corporate athleticism could make an actual contribution to society instead of just parasitically stripping it of resources.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Torn and Frayed


    this white baby momma
     
    Was the ex-girlfriend white? I watched both videos of the shooting, didn't look like there were any white people (other than the cops) in that neighborhood.
  13. anon[193] • Disclaimer says:

    What’s ironic about all this is that, if he had a knife all along, and he was getting close enough to the cops to put one of them in a headlock, they could have shot him a lot earlier with total justification. If a guy gets you in a headlock and has a knife in his hand, you’re about a second away, or less, from getting your throat cut. The fact that they didn’t shoot him right away, and waited until he was trying to get away, is the only thing that makes this sort of questionable.

    I mean, the blacks still would have rioted, but sensible people wouldn’t have any problem with it.

    But I still say that an armed man trying to drive away with some kids that he doesn’t have custody of, still trumps everything.

    • Replies: @I Have Scinde
    @anon

    “Instead of standing there and teaching a cop when there’s an unarmed person coming at ‘em with a knife or something, shoot ‘em in the leg instead of in the heart.”

    -Joseph Robinette Biden

    , @I Have Scinde
    @anon

    "Instead of standing there and teaching a cop, when there's an unarmed person coming at 'em with a knife or something, you shoot them in the leg instead of in the heart is a very different thing. There's a lot of different things that could change."

    -Joseph Robinette Biden

  14. @JimDandy
    Social workers would have disarmed him easily.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Social workers would have disarmed him easily.

    Hey, girls with BAs are strong, independent women. They are the ones who make it happen. Without their efforts–their reports, their memos–our society could not function. Their careers are critical and they don’t need any man to take care of them … at least until they turn 30.

    And besides, how else are they going to pay off those student loans?

    • LOL: Voltarde, JimDandy
  15. The officer who was forced to immobilize Mr. Blake was prior to joining the Kenosha Police Department, with the University of Wisconsin-Parkside Police Department:

    “While on duty at the college, in February 2012, Sheskey investigated three alleged hate crimes, The Journal Times reported; after “a noose was found in a campus dorm, then a second noose and a note that threatened the student who reported the noose, and fliers that named about a dozen African-American students and said they would die in two days.””

  16. @NJ Transit Commuter
    The first step on my moving away from the leftism of my youth was watching Democrats abandon concerns about sexual harassment as soon as the Monica Lewinsky story broke. I still believe Democrats should have stood their ground and forced Clinton to resign. They would have had Al Gore as president, who would then have easily gone on to beat W. The world would have been spared W’s disastrous 8 years and the radicalization of politics that has occurred since then.

    Conservatives are also hypocritical, to be sure, but not to the shocking degree of progressives. Less than a year ago, the world was tearing itself apart over MeToo. And now it’s tearing itself apart because police defended a woman from a violent, armed man alleged to have committed sexual assault against her.

    The best way I have to comprehend the current state of the world is remember Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    The best way I have to comprehend the current state of the world is remember Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

    Me too. I read it for the first time earlier this year. There is no better to time to get to know this work than right now.

    • Replies: @res
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thanks to both of you for the recommendation. There is also a version entitled Demons.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  17. We haven’t heard much about the white woman who called the police on Blake. For example what is her first name? Because there may now need to be a name like Karen, but for white women who called the police on their black exes. Brenda perhaps?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Torn and Frayed

    Was the ex-girlfriend white?

    Replies: @Altai

    , @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    The girl friend is black, a typical Ebonics speaking ghetto black.

    Another MAN OF UNZ who spends so much time jacking off to black man White woman open he doesn’t realize the real world isn’t full of black man White woman couples. Go back to your porn sites.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SkylertheWeird, @ThreeCranes

  18. @Torn and Frayed
    We haven't heard much about the white woman who called the police on Blake. For example what is her first name? Because there may now need to be a name like Karen, but for white women who called the police on their black exes. Brenda perhaps?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden

    Was the ex-girlfriend white?

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Steve Sailer

    Not sure, but based on the appearance of the children, probably not. Here is a complaint against him from May of a similar incident at the same residence I think. I think that was the one he bad a warrant out for.

    https://archive.is/YcYRU

    He entered the home at night and confronted a sleeping subject to get the keys to the white van. She alledges that she was sleeping next to her youngest son when he entered drunk and stuck his finger in her and stole the van. It isn't stated clearly to my understanding in the complaint that he subsequently raped her (It's vague if the 'assault' part refers to a subsequent rape or just his sexual assault, it seems odd that it wouldn't be stated explicitly) but the charge is one there unless what he did would be chargeable under rape and not sexual assault? Though I suppose penetration against somebodies will with anything would probably all be the same charge, it would be difficult to define a lesser crime.

  19. @anon
    But a lot of very nasty domestic disputes start exactly like that: the dad shows up to take his kids, the mom objects, the cops are called, and things go even further downhill from there.

    This is also how some Amber alerts happen if the dad gets his vehicle moving fast enough. Then the party starts onto the freeway in some cases.

    Now then, I wonder how many of the internet experts from previous threads will show up in this one and admit that, gosh, they didn't know as much about "hands on" / arrests / law / etc. as they claimed? My guess is "zero".

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    Anon999! The Last Anon.

    As to the subject at hand, I’m glad the police union found its collective balls. Perhaps the Kenosha Kid showed many that yes they can be defeated.

    Keep your powder dry. Over the top. Oh my fair cousin, and all that jazz.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @BenKenobi

    It's funny how many in the media are saying "Where were his parents?"

    Because he's white.

    But is he white?

  20. @Almost Missouri

    Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    "Systemic racism", which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of "systemic racism". Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant "systemic racism" a validity it does not possess.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @SMK, @Hypnotoad666

    “Systemic racism”, which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of “systemic racism”. Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant “systemic racism” a validity it does not possess.

    There is absolutely zero “good faith” involved.

    It’s 200 proof minoritarianism–minorities virtuous and oppressed, majorities evil and oppressive. Same line of b.s. that has been propagandized at us–relentless–for 50+ years. Just jacked up another level in intensity and ridiculousness.

    But the bottom line is the same: you–mr. white gentile–didn’t build that; you have no right to your nation.

    And if we don’t stand up, say we’ve had enough and take the fight to them … they’ll be effectively right. Everything they say will still be utter b.s. historically, socially, biologically, logically. But they’ll be right that the nation isn’t ours anymore.

  21. There is video that shows the ex girlfriend being more than half black and talking with an uneducated ghetto accent. She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SF

    Thanks.

    , @Mr McKenna
    @SF


    She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.
     
    John Geer's ex was sympathetic with him, too--after he was shot to death.

    But she's the one who called the cops on him and she's the one who got to share in the eventual $$$ judgment.

    And at no time was Geer even alleged to have broken the law.
    , @Lurker
    @SF

    I'm not clear on something. The kids are hers - agreed. But are they also the progeny of Blessed St. Jacob?

    Replies: @danand

  22. BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
    https://twitter.com/BrandonStraka/status/1299355762507087872

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @J.Ross

    For once, whiny homosexuals serve a useful purpose! Will wonders never cease?

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @J.Ross

    This incident is interesting because it demonstrates how far gays have fallen down the DIE-versity totem pole.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @J.Ross


    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
     
    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day "occupation" of DC?

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about "boogaloo boy" conspiracies, perhaps one of our "journalists" could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @prosa123

  23. Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it’s in the context of a Black uprising like the one we’re living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that’s a part of it that doesn’t really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.

    Vicky’s clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here’s a publicity photo of Vicky:

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Does NPR still receive public funding? If so, why?

    She looks and sounds exactly like every single thing that is wrong with the Current Year, and it's telling that she enjoys use of the megaphone while we're relegated to an obscure corner of the internet.

    BTW: Vicky Osterweil interview at, um, Jewish Currents.
    https://jewishcurrents.org/stealing-away-in-america/

    , @Kronos
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Yeah, she likely watched “Game of Thrones” too many times... So now she’s a self-identified emancipator.

    http://www.geekbinge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/GoT-3.10-Dany.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    , @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Replies: @anon, @Kolya Krassotkin

    , @black sea
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    So, looting is about the thrill of destruction and getting stuff for free.

    Who knew?

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Finally, the Age of Aquarius is upon us.

    Hippies seemed a lot more entertaining than this little flock of harpies.

    , @Alden
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Hopefully she’ll get involved with a Jacob Blake and learn what blacks are really like when he loots everything she has.

    , @Henry's Cat
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The sequel, 'In Defence of Shooting'.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories.
     
    But, none dare call them Commies.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @SkylertheWeird, @TomSchmidt

    , @ChrisZ
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Vicky's a guy.

    , @anon
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is Vicky short for Victor/Victoria?

    Replies: @anon

    , @Ed
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Vicky is Victor. Empower crazy people, hear them say crazy things.

    , @Dr. X
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is that an M to F tranny???

    , @Possumman
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well she lives in Philadelphia--maybe someone can stop by her place and take her stuff!

    , @William Badwhite
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I think "she" once was a he

    https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d5/bb/f1/d5bbf1babe8e61fcec8dd69412420dc2.jpg

    , @Ben tillman
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.
     
    Only in the very short term. A morality of aggression is pure misanthropy.
     
    , @ic1000
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    > Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting. Some key quotations:


    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property... So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.
     
    Sounds like a great book! How much will it cost for me to buy?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @J.Ross, @Kolya Krassotkin

    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    M to F tranny. Look closely at the jawline; there is a discontinuity where the heavier, square jaw suddenly becomes an attempt to replicate the gracile female chin. Flipping the hair over one side of the jawline is an attempt to obscure this.

    , @Servant of Gla'aki
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I have oddball tastes, so in the event that person were actually a woman, I just might find her strangely attractive.

    But that, my friends, is a dude.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  24. @danand

    “Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades?”
     
    Yancey Ward, at least some are:

    “Cops in three major cities report their current Tasers aren't as effective as previous models:

    Police departments in New York, Los Angeles and Houston each switched from older models to newer ones in recent years. Those newer models, called the X2 and the X26P, were designed to be safer for suspects, because they put out less electrical charge than the older X26.”

    Replies: @Kronos, @HA

    Can you still buy the older models for civilian use? Not as impressive as a classic “Browning High Power” but still effectively useful.

    • Replies: @danand
    @Kronos


    “Can you still buy the older models for civilian use?”
     
    You got me to thinking, so I quick checked EBay. While I did not come across any vintage models on offer, there was this listing:

    https://flic.kr/p/2jB6BB6
  25. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Does NPR still receive public funding? If so, why?

    She looks and sounds exactly like every single thing that is wrong with the Current Year, and it’s telling that she enjoys use of the megaphone while we’re relegated to an obscure corner of the internet.

    BTW: Vicky Osterweil interview at, um, Jewish Currents.
    https://jewishcurrents.org/stealing-away-in-america/

  26. @SF
    There is video that shows the ex girlfriend being more than half black and talking with an uneducated ghetto accent. She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr McKenna, @Lurker

    Thanks.

  27. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Yeah, she likely watched “Game of Thrones” too many times… So now she’s a self-identified emancipator.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Kronos

    Vicky in the Jewish Currents interview:


    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street. Obviously, riots are not the revolution in and of themselves. But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.
     

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

  28. @Kronos
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Yeah, she likely watched “Game of Thrones” too many times... So now she’s a self-identified emancipator.

    http://www.geekbinge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/GoT-3.10-Dany.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Vicky in the Jewish Currents interview:

    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street. Obviously, riots are not the revolution in and of themselves. But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The millenarian longing is right out there on a platter in this one. This is almost purely religious, utopian language, with only the barest veil of political cover.


    You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street.

     

    And the number of the Beast was Adam-12?

    Replies: @Charon

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder


    But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.
     
    So, basically when Cthulu awakens from his slumber in R'lyeh.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder


    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible . . .
     
    This could be a quote from Mein Kampf, or a rationalization for Kristallnacht.

    Maybe the sequel to In Defense of Looting will be In Defense of Lynching.
  29. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    Score another kill for Taser Chick! Several years ago, police in Warren, Ohio tasered a drunk/drugged female 5 times. A few of those times were after she kicked out a window of the cruiser she was put in. The media used her as exhibit A as why something must be done about these Tasers cops use. She received an out of court settlement from the city.
    18 months later, Taser Chick makes the news again. This time the cops Taser her twice. But the national media stop reporting on this incident within a day. This time, the witnesses to her assaulting someone aren’t drunk twentysomethings pissed at the cops for breaking up the night’s entertainment. It’s a bunch of people horrified at a drunk attacking a stranger at a late night restaurant.

  30. @SF
    There is video that shows the ex girlfriend being more than half black and talking with an uneducated ghetto accent. She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr McKenna, @Lurker

    She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.

    John Geer’s ex was sympathetic with him, too–after he was shot to death.

    But she’s the one who called the cops on him and she’s the one who got to share in the eventual $$$ judgment.

    And at no time was Geer even alleged to have broken the law.

  31. Black Panther actor is dead, official statement is that he had colon cancer for 4 years, I call bullshit on that.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @indocon


    Black Panther actor is dead, official statement is that he had colon cancer for 4 years, I call bullshit on that.
     
    Why? Was he a poofter?
  32. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    Lamarckism in action.

  33. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Kronos

    Vicky in the Jewish Currents interview:


    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street. Obviously, riots are not the revolution in and of themselves. But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.
     

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    The millenarian longing is right out there on a platter in this one. This is almost purely religious, utopian language, with only the barest veil of political cover.

    You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street.

    And the number of the Beast was Adam-12?

    • Replies: @Charon
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street.
     
    1) Police and Property are two things, not one, but never mind.

    2) Taking property and "getting rid of property" are likewise also two very different things.

    3) "Sharing" the property they have taken is probably the very last thing these people intend on doing with it.

  34. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Why is her face lopsided?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Physiognomy is real. I'm not sure that is a genetic "her", either.

    Replies: @Jewels, @MBlanc46, @Truth

    , @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Why is her face lopsided? Things like that are relatively common within an endogamous community. Some people really are their own grandpa, (or grandma), as the case may be.

  35. @SF
    There is video that shows the ex girlfriend being more than half black and talking with an uneducated ghetto accent. She mentions her kids being in that car. At that point, she is sympathetic with Blake.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mr McKenna, @Lurker

    I’m not clear on something. The kids are hers – agreed. But are they also the progeny of Blessed St. Jacob?

    • Replies: @danand
    @Lurker


    “But are they also the progeny of Blessed St. Jacob?“
     
    Won’t know for certain until after his Maury Povich Show episode airs. In the meantime, here are what are presumed to be Jacob’s little angels.

    https://flic.kr/p/2jBaaBW
  36. Reminder that in Weimar USA, if you do decide to kill somebody of team red-brown-woke-(((concerned professional))), they will demand a lynching and Emmettilling:

    Leftist Twitter pundit says MOB JUSTICE ‘will be served’ for 17-year-old Kenosha shooter if court fails to convict

  37. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    So, looting is about the thrill of destruction and getting stuff for free.

    Who knew?

    • LOL: jon
  38. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Finally, the Age of Aquarius is upon us.

    Hippies seemed a lot more entertaining than this little flock of harpies.

  39. Vickie looks like a dude.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anonymous

    Maybe he she it is a transgender woman.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    Vicki's partner is 31 year old feminist writer Sophie Lewis who wants to abolish the nuclear family.

    Some guy at Taki's opined that the reason Ellen became a lesbian is that she realized she wasn't cute enough to pull the guys she wanted. That theory fits these two.

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qjdzwb/sophie-lewis-feminist-abolishing-the-family-full-surrogacy-now

    https://video-images.vice.com/test-uploads/articles/5e4c175d6b5b2900986d48ef/lede/1582232846803-Sophie-Lews_Vice_Leaman_0176.jpeg

    Replies: @Anonymous

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @Torn and Frayed

    Was the ex-girlfriend white?

    Replies: @Altai

    Not sure, but based on the appearance of the children, probably not. Here is a complaint against him from May of a similar incident at the same residence I think. I think that was the one he bad a warrant out for.

    https://archive.is/YcYRU

    He entered the home at night and confronted a sleeping subject to get the keys to the white van. She alledges that she was sleeping next to her youngest son when he entered drunk and stuck his finger in her and stole the van. It isn’t stated clearly to my understanding in the complaint that he subsequently raped her (It’s vague if the ‘assault’ part refers to a subsequent rape or just his sexual assault, it seems odd that it wouldn’t be stated explicitly) but the charge is one there unless what he did would be chargeable under rape and not sexual assault? Though I suppose penetration against somebodies will with anything would probably all be the same charge, it would be difficult to define a lesser crime.

  41. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    I know a lot of these shootings occur after a a failed tasing. But apparently an old model taser failed to subdue Rodney King 29 years ago. It seems blacks have evolved to be taser-proof.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Escher
    @Rob McX

    Was thinking the same thing.
    Must be some Wakandan technology.

  42. @Lurker
    @SF

    I'm not clear on something. The kids are hers - agreed. But are they also the progeny of Blessed St. Jacob?

    Replies: @danand

    “But are they also the progeny of Blessed St. Jacob?“

    Won’t know for certain until after his Maury Povich Show episode airs. In the meantime, here are what are presumed to be Jacob’s little angels.

    9CA2B76F-D61A-4EB3-BA5C-01D46703C8CA

  43. @Kronos
    @danand

    Can you still buy the older models for civilian use? Not as impressive as a classic “Browning High Power” but still effectively useful.

    Replies: @danand

    “Can you still buy the older models for civilian use?”

    You got me to thinking, so I quick checked EBay. While I did not come across any vintage models on offer, there was this listing:

    2CCCBB29-6648-42FA-ACBF-C91E8195666F

    • Thanks: Kronos
  44. @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Replies: @anon, @Kolya Krassotkin

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Physiognomy is real. I’m not sure that is a genetic “her”, either.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Jewels
    @anon

    Could “Vicky” actually be William?

    https://www.commondreams.org/author/willie-osterweil

    , @MBlanc46
    @anon

    It sure has a masculine look about it, but I do see signs of facial hair or Adam’s apple.

    Replies: @Truth

    , @Truth
    @anon

    Are you being serious now, Dude?

  45. Anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:

    These stories have a strange way of resolving themselves.

    The (ahem) upshot of this Kenosha debacle is that two – by all accounts rather unsavory – so called ‘antifa’ bandits were killed by a rather pudgy 17 year old kid with an AK. Notwithstanding that one of the bandits happened to be a convicted child rapist – *THE* lowest of the low in the US prison system hierarchy – the ultimate irony is that the names of these bandits will soon be memory holed and forgotten, no one really cares, their wasted lives given over in vain by a ’cause’ which cares not for them. Surely, there is a moral in there somewhere.

    Another way in this piece of extreme street theater imitates American life is in the personage of that short, fat, pudgy bespectacled kid who took out the antifa bandits. Surely, a character from ‘King of the Hill’ or ‘Family Guy’ made flesh. The stereotypical all-American nerdy kid, with a charming little penchant for heavy duty assault weapons.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Anonymous

    If I could believe my ears I just heard a radio report claiming one of the dead thugs -- Huber -- was "a hero" for pushing some chick rioter out of the way of the teen "vigilante's" gunfire.

  46. The officers did not see the knife initially. The officers first saw him holding the knife while they were on the passenger side of the vehicle.

    If they did see the knife they should have taken several steps back. They did not because they did not see the knife or because they were not properly trained or they are lying now as there was no knife.

    If indeed he had a knife in his left hand the moment he put his left hand inside the car the risk of him using the knife on them was greatly diminished. This was also an opportunity to take few steps back to deescalate the situation.

    The officers failed several opportunities to deescalate the situation instead they followed him too closely, even tried to hold his T-shirt and then decided to shoot to kill with seven shots in the back.

    The argument that officers were trying to protect children in car is totally made up as their inept and unprofessional actions shows that they were totally at loss what they were doing and all they knew is that they can kill. That was their back up plan or real intention from the very beginning if they were actually smarter and more evil. A thought of protecting children could not appear in their minds preoccupied with their bungling up in the space of 20 or seconds during the whole incident.

    As the uncontested facts above demonstrate, the officers involved gave Mr. Blake numerous opportunities to comply. He chose not to. None of the officers involved wished for things to transpire the way it did.

    Whether they wished or not ‘for things to transpire the way it did’ remains to be established. What matters now is that ‘the numerous opportunities to comply’ that officer gave apparently were too few because they decided to kill him while there was no threat to their lives as he kept moving away from them not towards them. Their specific task was to arrest him not to kill him and the task did not have the specific maximum of opportunities to comply to be given to him. If arresting him would require them spending there 24 hours that what they should do. Instead they decided to kill him within few minutes upon their arrival.

    • Disagree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @utu

    "Detached reflection cannot be expected in the presence of an uplifted [or even held at hip level] knife."

    --Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Brown v. United States [adjusted for circumstances]

    It's easy to critique police actions after the fact. Officers have to make these decisions in fractions of seconds and the consequences of a wrong decision can be the officer's death.

    The fundamental problem is trying to impose and enforce White standards of behavior on feral Negroes. White officers should stop responding to calls involving blacks. Wait until a black officer is available.

    Replies: @yakushimaru, @Known Fact

    , @anon
    @utu

    So what did you go to jail for?

    , @Ben tillman
    @utu

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him.

    Replies: @anon, @Poco

  47. @Torn and Frayed
    Police officials should make clear that in any "defund the police" policies are implemented, they will immediately stop responding to domestic violence calls. Had Blake simply slashed this white baby momma's throat then there would be no problems, life in Kenosha would be normal, and the NBA would have continued as planned.

    If Lebron, Kaep, or any other black sports stars want to make a difference, they should make public service videos showing the black Lumpen-proletariat how to comply while being arrested by white police officers. A clever slogan like, "Black Lives That Comply Don't Die" could accompany all the Big Sport events. That way corporate athleticism could make an actual contribution to society instead of just parasitically stripping it of resources.

    Replies: @jon

    this white baby momma

    Was the ex-girlfriend white? I watched both videos of the shooting, didn’t look like there were any white people (other than the cops) in that neighborhood.

  48. @Torn and Frayed
    We haven't heard much about the white woman who called the police on Blake. For example what is her first name? Because there may now need to be a name like Karen, but for white women who called the police on their black exes. Brenda perhaps?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden

    The girl friend is black, a typical Ebonics speaking ghetto black.

    Another MAN OF UNZ who spends so much time jacking off to black man White woman open he doesn’t realize the real world isn’t full of black man White woman couples. Go back to your porn sites.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Alden

    https://i.ibb.co/41GCsD2/Screenshot-20200829-061826-Gmail.jpg

    Replies: @Alden, @William Badwhite

    , @SkylertheWeird
    @Alden

    Seems like half of all the couples on commercials and television shows and 100% of Lesbian couples are black white.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Alden

    You're a tranny, right?

  49. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Hopefully she’ll get involved with a Jacob Blake and learn what blacks are really like when he loots everything she has.

  50. Is a Karambit curved knife the counterpart to a gun held sideways. How would you stab someone with it?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    The karambit is primarily a slashing weapon, though of course you can stab someone with it as well. I won one once at a shooting class, but sold it because it was more of a fighting knife than one suitable for everyday tasks, like the Griptilian I carry. From Wikipedia:


    The karambit is held with the blade pointing downward from the bottom of the fist, usually curving forwards however occasionally backwards. While it is primarily used in a slashing or hooking motion, karambit with a finger ring are also used in a punching motion hitting the opponent with the finger ring. Some karambit are designed to be used in a hammering motion. This flexibility of striking methods is what makes it useful in self-defense situations. The finger guard makes it difficult to disarm and allows the knife to be maneuvered in the fingers without losing one's grip.

    The short Filipino karambit has found some favor in the West because such proponents allege the biomechanics of the weapon allow for more powerful cutting strokes and painful "ripping" wounds, and because its usability is hypothesized as more intuitive, though there continues to be debate about this matter.

    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.
     

    Replies: @Gordo, @The Wild Geese Howard

  51. @Anonymous
    Vickie looks like a dude.

    Replies: @Alden, @Jim Don Bob

    Maybe he she it is a transgender woman.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alden

    Bingo.

    https://youtu.be/m4t-OehvtZk

  52. Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @yakushimaru


    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.
     
    Nobody said he "deserves to die". If some troubled person decides to jump into a woodchipper for no good reason he doesn't "deserve to die" either, but the result is likely not uplifting in any case. Unlike video games, where you can ragequit and reload, the real world is unforgiving.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.
     
    What about "tasering several times" is unclear to you?

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq.
     
    That's a different problem. Talk you your local neocon about that.

    https://i.postimg.cc/RF5khYbP/The-little-difference-makes-all-the-difference.png

    Replies: @utu, @J.Ross

    , @Redneck farmer
    @yakushimaru

    Rodney King wasn't shot, moron. If Blake had been hit hard enough to stay down, there would have been riots over that.

    Replies: @yakushimaru

    , @Alden
    @yakushimaru

    Blake wasn’t Killed. He was shot and seriously wounded when attempting to steal his baby mamma’s car. It is confusing, so many black criminals killed while resisting arrest.

    , @ThreeCranes
    @yakushimaru

    "It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them..."

    This is true. But, who is? Who can control unruly negros? You? You think your people could do any better? Hah. Just wait until your country has become diversified by the Tribe and then we'll see who's talking trash. Fool.

    , @William Badwhite
    @yakushimaru


    He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.
     
    But these Chinese peasants did, right?

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/chinese-man-being-beheaded.jpg

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @Poco
    @yakushimaru

    He isn't deceased.

    , @shoot
    @yakushimaru

    Whether applicable this case, or not, Gore Vidal's dictum/observation "Give a sissy a gun & he will kill everything in sight" has always had 4WD & studs traction. Much of world history/events rolls in that one lowest gear monster truck along straight, flat, dry roman roads, compensating for self-fulfilling sissy self-loathing.

    Ouroborosssss assmouth is a lot older than methmouth & “hooping,” but has much better narrative/pr implants (the better to eat each other up with, dears). Easier to project sour cider onto a snakeapple, for example. & if this projectile badco had a market cap, it’d be way more astronomical than $2T, even if priced in $35 gold.

    Only way I can imagine Camusysiphus accurate is if by “happy” is meant happy idiot. Not that an idiot selects idiot from a menu, even if it seems to sound like Iditarod, & mush, being mushed, sounds like a good happymeal. Everybody gets what they get. Table is set, not rasa. Cue Leo Sayer. (Think you can dance, sodbuster?)

    Endogenous hopium & foamy Planet Pangloss it, mostly, is.

  53. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    Were you wasted high out of your senses on PCP when you did it, though?

  54. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    I’m still waiting for Star Trek phasers to become a reality. What’s the hold up?

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Henry's Cat

    Abe Lincoln is sharpening up some sticks for us in the meantime

  55. @Ano
    Someone has admitted the fact Mr Sailer!

    The headline in my local newspaper is:

    Brave Police Intervention saves the Lives of 3 Kids from Violent Criminal Father armed with a Combat Knife

    If you're interested, the name of the paper is:

    The Daily Just-the-facts-Ma'am Bugle

    Replies: @El Dato

    Philip K. Dick’s writings are terrific.

  56. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    Nobody said he “deserves to die”. If some troubled person decides to jump into a woodchipper for no good reason he doesn’t “deserve to die” either, but the result is likely not uplifting in any case. Unlike video games, where you can ragequit and reload, the real world is unforgiving.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    What about “tasering several times” is unclear to you?

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq.

    That’s a different problem. Talk you your local neocon about that.

    • Replies: @utu
    @El Dato

    You really do no see the difference between a woodchipper and a policeman?

    , @J.Ross
    @El Dato

    In Iraq totally innocent people who looked like they were getting too close to American vehicles got .50 calibre nudging without [more] warning [than already-given the public order to stay 50 feet away]. This criminal had every possible opportunity to not get shot. The comparison is ridiculous.

  57. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    The sequel, ‘In Defence of Shooting’.

  58. Anonymous[827] • Disclaimer says:

    . But a lot of very nasty domestic disputes start exactly like that: the dad shows up to take his kids, the mom objects, the cops are called, and things go even further downhill from there.

    Steve makes it sound like calling the police contributes to things going downhill. Not fair.

  59. PRESS STATEMENT

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    They’ll be lucky. By the time some semblance of the facts permeate to the surface, the Circus will have packed up and moved on to the next stop.

  60. Blake probably realized that getting arrested with the knife on his person would have resulted in additional charges and was trying to hide it in the car. Since the cops weren’t mind readers, they assumed he was attempting to retrieve a weapon from the car.
    Unfortunate, for all involved.

    As a public service, I’ll divulge not one, but TWO weird tricks to avoid being shot by the police:
    1) Don’t commit crime.
    2)Don’t resist arrest.

  61. @Alden
    @Anonymous

    Maybe he she it is a transgender woman.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Bingo.

  62. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    They probably shifted production to China.

    • LOL: TomSchmidt, bomag
  63. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    Rodney King wasn’t shot, moron. If Blake had been hit hard enough to stay down, there would have been riots over that.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    @Redneck farmer

    You are just surrendering to the sad situation. Men can have their moments. Domestic dispute can be emotional. Police is supposed to be there to help. And you are saying that the only way they can do their job is by either shooting the unfortunate guy to death or hit the shit out of him. That is not normal. I kind of hope that you can see it.

    You know, maybe you have kids, sometime kids do stupid things too. Parents, especially the father can physically control the kid, stop him in the heat of the moment, and then having time to do the teaching. By your logic, this is unthinkable. The father or any adult nearby, what they can do is either kill the stupid kid on spot, or beat him really hard like the adult himself is losing control.

    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Muggles

  64. @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    The girl friend is black, a typical Ebonics speaking ghetto black.

    Another MAN OF UNZ who spends so much time jacking off to black man White woman open he doesn’t realize the real world isn’t full of black man White woman couples. Go back to your porn sites.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SkylertheWeird, @ThreeCranes

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The girl friend is a black woman named Laquisha. You can’t deny that.

    Like many MEN OF UNZ, Torn and Frayed confuses the black man White woman porn he’s addicted to with reality. Never having had a relationship with a White woman in his life, Torn and Frayed, is stuck with porn and his hand.

    The MEN OF UNZ live in a porn fantasy world of of horny teen harlots love creepy old men and black man White woman porn in which the main attraction is their homosexual attraction to the black men.

    Replies: @JMcG, @bomag

    , @William Badwhite
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Lol. I find her crazed rants to be pretty amusing.

    She's far more entertaining than "Mr. Sailer you FAIL to NOTICE my endless nuh uhhs" guy.

  65. The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.

    Honest question: when was that last time a police shooting did, indisputably, have anything to do with racism? I don’t mean situations where you can speculate about “implicit bias,” I mean where the police officer said or did something that plainly demonstrated that his behavior was motivated by racial animus? Have there been any incidents in the past 50 years or so that couldn’t be characterized as the police treating a black person exactly as they would have treated a white person , and then the press characterizing it as racism because of course the police would never have treated a white person that way?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @jb

    Maybe the one in Dallas where the idiot police lady went to the wrong floor in her apartment building and shot the black accountant in his own apartment?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @jb

  66. The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.

    They don’t have domestic disputes in the blackiverse.

  67. @jb

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    Honest question: when was that last time a police shooting did, indisputably, have anything to do with racism? I don't mean situations where you can speculate about "implicit bias," I mean where the police officer said or did something that plainly demonstrated that his behavior was motivated by racial animus? Have there been any incidents in the past 50 years or so that couldn't be characterized as the police treating a black person exactly as they would have treated a white person , and then the press characterizing it as racism because of course the police would never have treated a white person that way?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Maybe the one in Dallas where the idiot police lady went to the wrong floor in her apartment building and shot the black accountant in his own apartment?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.

    Replies: @Charon, @Reg Cæsar

    , @jb
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe. But was that even a "police shooting," or was she acting as a private citizen who happened to be armed and who thought there was an intruder in her house? And do we know she wouldn't have shot a white intruder?

    In any case, given that the stereotype about violent blacks is both widespread and, on average, correct, I have no doubt that people sometimes act on it in borderline cases, even where no racial animus is involved. What I'm wondering about is incidents that go beyond that, incidents where you don't have to speculate about the officer's interior state of mind. At one point such incidents occurred with some regularity. Officers said and did things that left no doubt that it was about race. So when did that stop? When did you have to start guessing?

    Replies: @Barnard

  68. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories.

    But, none dare call them Commies.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't know. Vicky's economic proposals don't seem sufficiently organized to rise even to the level of naive schoolgirl socialism. Her program seems to be:

    steal stuff --> utopia

    Even the commies try to fill in one or two more steps in the process than this.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @SkylertheWeird
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Read that old John Stormer book from the Sixties Death of a Nation. It's the same old same old Commie bullshit now funded by Soros and the CCP instead of the Soviets.

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Achmed E. Newman

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery. Once you have agreed to sell your time to the capitalist, he is empowered to hire people like Frederick Winslow Taylor to construct time studies to make sure you aren't "stealing" any of his time by, you know, not working 3600 of the 3600 seconds in an hour. You might not see this as the slave relationship because it is normal, but a society that had actual slavery would see it as such.

    Communism just replaces the "capitalist" with a diffused, unaccountable committee run by the worst sorts of people who've climbed the greasy pole to The top. It's debatable which system causes more misery, though Communism certainly kills a lot more people. Or at least it has; the Crony Capitalists, who take the Taylorist view of labor as cost to be cut and milked for every second, seem to have found a way to make millions redundant with their bailout-for-Wall-Street lockdowns. The worldwide death toll from the economic collapse due to lockdowns will almost certainly exceed that of COVID; poor, demoralized people live less long than wealthy sociopaths.

    Stealing and looting won't solve the problem, and in imposing higher security costs will make it worse. You might check out the Mondragon Cooperatives for a true capitalist route, focusing on the meaning of capital as derived from caput, head.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @jb

    Maybe the one in Dallas where the idiot police lady went to the wrong floor in her apartment building and shot the black accountant in his own apartment?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @jb

    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Rob McX

    Whatever happened to her? Is her trial scheduled for late October by any chance?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob McX


    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.
     
    Those who can't find their own apartments probably shouldn't be going around armed. Or be licensed to drive or registered to vote, for that matter.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  70. @utu

    The officers did not see the knife initially. The officers first saw him holding the knife while they were on the passenger side of the vehicle.
     
    If they did see the knife they should have taken several steps back. They did not because they did not see the knife or because they were not properly trained or they are lying now as there was no knife.

    If indeed he had a knife in his left hand the moment he put his left hand inside the car the risk of him using the knife on them was greatly diminished. This was also an opportunity to take few steps back to deescalate the situation.

    The officers failed several opportunities to deescalate the situation instead they followed him too closely, even tried to hold his T-shirt and then decided to shoot to kill with seven shots in the back.

    The argument that officers were trying to protect children in car is totally made up as their inept and unprofessional actions shows that they were totally at loss what they were doing and all they knew is that they can kill. That was their back up plan or real intention from the very beginning if they were actually smarter and more evil. A thought of protecting children could not appear in their minds preoccupied with their bungling up in the space of 20 or seconds during the whole incident.

    As the uncontested facts above demonstrate, the officers involved gave Mr. Blake numerous opportunities to comply. He chose not to. None of the officers involved wished for things to transpire the way it did.
     
    Whether they wished or not 'for things to transpire the way it did' remains to be established. What matters now is that 'the numerous opportunities to comply' that officer gave apparently were too few because they decided to kill him while there was no threat to their lives as he kept moving away from them not towards them. Their specific task was to arrest him not to kill him and the task did not have the specific maximum of opportunities to comply to be given to him. If arresting him would require them spending there 24 hours that what they should do. Instead they decided to kill him within few minutes upon their arrival.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @anon, @Ben tillman

    “Detached reflection cannot be expected in the presence of an uplifted [or even held at hip level] knife.”

    –Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Brown v. United States [adjusted for circumstances]

    It’s easy to critique police actions after the fact. Officers have to make these decisions in fractions of seconds and the consequences of a wrong decision can be the officer’s death.

    The fundamental problem is trying to impose and enforce White standards of behavior on feral Negroes. White officers should stop responding to calls involving blacks. Wait until a black officer is available.

    • Agree: ThreeCranes
    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    @Diversity Heretic


    It’s easy to critique police actions after the fact.
     
    This line is repeated so many times. Just at what kind of situation can you question the police's performance? They're neighborhood police, they are not Navy Seals fighting in remote corners of the world, you know.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

    , @Known Fact
    @Diversity Heretic

    Or send in a robot, like the Dallas PD did with that assassin a few years ago

  71. Any drugs in his system?

  72. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Vicky’s a guy.

  73. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Is Vicky short for Victor/Victoria?

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon

    She looks a lot less Victor/Victoria and a lot more Shlomo/Shlomit.

  74. @utu

    The officers did not see the knife initially. The officers first saw him holding the knife while they were on the passenger side of the vehicle.
     
    If they did see the knife they should have taken several steps back. They did not because they did not see the knife or because they were not properly trained or they are lying now as there was no knife.

    If indeed he had a knife in his left hand the moment he put his left hand inside the car the risk of him using the knife on them was greatly diminished. This was also an opportunity to take few steps back to deescalate the situation.

    The officers failed several opportunities to deescalate the situation instead they followed him too closely, even tried to hold his T-shirt and then decided to shoot to kill with seven shots in the back.

    The argument that officers were trying to protect children in car is totally made up as their inept and unprofessional actions shows that they were totally at loss what they were doing and all they knew is that they can kill. That was their back up plan or real intention from the very beginning if they were actually smarter and more evil. A thought of protecting children could not appear in their minds preoccupied with their bungling up in the space of 20 or seconds during the whole incident.

    As the uncontested facts above demonstrate, the officers involved gave Mr. Blake numerous opportunities to comply. He chose not to. None of the officers involved wished for things to transpire the way it did.
     
    Whether they wished or not 'for things to transpire the way it did' remains to be established. What matters now is that 'the numerous opportunities to comply' that officer gave apparently were too few because they decided to kill him while there was no threat to their lives as he kept moving away from them not towards them. Their specific task was to arrest him not to kill him and the task did not have the specific maximum of opportunities to comply to be given to him. If arresting him would require them spending there 24 hours that what they should do. Instead they decided to kill him within few minutes upon their arrival.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @anon, @Ben tillman

    So what did you go to jail for?

  75. @Redneck farmer
    @yakushimaru

    Rodney King wasn't shot, moron. If Blake had been hit hard enough to stay down, there would have been riots over that.

    Replies: @yakushimaru

    You are just surrendering to the sad situation. Men can have their moments. Domestic dispute can be emotional. Police is supposed to be there to help. And you are saying that the only way they can do their job is by either shooting the unfortunate guy to death or hit the shit out of him. That is not normal. I kind of hope that you can see it.

    You know, maybe you have kids, sometime kids do stupid things too. Parents, especially the father can physically control the kid, stop him in the heat of the moment, and then having time to do the teaching. By your logic, this is unthinkable. The father or any adult nearby, what they can do is either kill the stupid kid on spot, or beat him really hard like the adult himself is losing control.

    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @yakushimaru

    Because there is no difference in the disparity of strength between a child and an adult. Redneck farmer was right, you really are a moron.

    There are thousands and thousands of domestic dispute calls every year where the police don't kill anyone. I don't see how any method can be 100% effective when used against violent, dangerous, actively resisting, unpredictable subjects

    When you brawl with police, fight off tasering and are armed with a deadly weapon, you are doing everything possible to get yourself killed. The police don't have magic wands.

    , @Muggles
    @yakushimaru


    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)
     
    Well, "yakushimaru" since you seem to be Japanese, why not tell the oppressive racists here how the cops in Japan handle their unruly and disobedient racial/ethnic minorities? Say, about like 35% of the population here. I'm sure the "Korean-Japanese", Vietnamese and Chinese and Filipino illegal immigrants or descendants (not eligible for Japanese citizenship of course) would be happy to tell us about that.

    Japan is a very high trust/low crime nation, when they aren't out running an empire based upon their own ethnic superiority. But that was years ago! Their former subjects can tell us about their gentle, peaceful policing back then.

    The Euros years ago lectured brutish Americans about civil rights and police brutality. Now that they have ample "diversity" due to illegal migrants, things seem a bit different there. We can send some diversity to Japan now too, if that's want they want. We'll be waiting for your advice after that.
  76. @Steve Sailer
    @jb

    Maybe the one in Dallas where the idiot police lady went to the wrong floor in her apartment building and shot the black accountant in his own apartment?

    Replies: @Rob McX, @jb

    Maybe. But was that even a “police shooting,” or was she acting as a private citizen who happened to be armed and who thought there was an intruder in her house? And do we know she wouldn’t have shot a white intruder?

    In any case, given that the stereotype about violent blacks is both widespread and, on average, correct, I have no doubt that people sometimes act on it in borderline cases, even where no racial animus is involved. What I’m wondering about is incidents that go beyond that, incidents where you don’t have to speculate about the officer’s interior state of mind. At one point such incidents occurred with some regularity. Officers said and did things that left no doubt that it was about race. So when did that stop? When did you have to start guessing?

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @jb

    She was off duty. At this point any officer who shoots any black man while on duty understands he has worked his last shift. The only reason to do it is fearing for your life.

  77. @Diversity Heretic
    @utu

    "Detached reflection cannot be expected in the presence of an uplifted [or even held at hip level] knife."

    --Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Brown v. United States [adjusted for circumstances]

    It's easy to critique police actions after the fact. Officers have to make these decisions in fractions of seconds and the consequences of a wrong decision can be the officer's death.

    The fundamental problem is trying to impose and enforce White standards of behavior on feral Negroes. White officers should stop responding to calls involving blacks. Wait until a black officer is available.

    Replies: @yakushimaru, @Known Fact

    It’s easy to critique police actions after the fact.

    This line is repeated so many times. Just at what kind of situation can you question the police’s performance? They’re neighborhood police, they are not Navy Seals fighting in remote corners of the world, you know.

    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    @yakushimaru

    You can question police actions when they fall outside the permissible boundaries established by training, protocol and standard accepted practices. You can start to strongly question police actions when they indicate gross negligence. And we should always question police actions when they indicate premeditated malice.

    None of those thresholds are even close to being met in this case.

  78. @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories.
     
    But, none dare call them Commies.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @SkylertheWeird, @TomSchmidt

    I don’t know. Vicky’s economic proposals don’t seem sufficiently organized to rise even to the level of naive schoolgirl socialism. Her program seems to be:

    steal stuff –> utopia

    Even the commies try to fill in one or two more steps in the process than this.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Even the commies try to fill in one or two more steps in the process than this.
     
    But real Commies (capital C) had to read thick, dull, nonsensical books to get a Party Card. It was hard work.

    The Vickies of the new Woke communism don't have to read anything, even if they could. Just parrot slogans they see on Twitter. Clever man, that Soros.
  79. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Vicky is Victor. Empower crazy people, hear them say crazy things.

  80. @Hippopotamusdrome
    Is a Karambit curved knife the counterpart to a gun held sideways. How would you stab someone with it?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    The karambit is primarily a slashing weapon, though of course you can stab someone with it as well. I won one once at a shooting class, but sold it because it was more of a fighting knife than one suitable for everyday tasks, like the Griptilian I carry. From Wikipedia:

    The karambit is held with the blade pointing downward from the bottom of the fist, usually curving forwards however occasionally backwards. While it is primarily used in a slashing or hooking motion, karambit with a finger ring are also used in a punching motion hitting the opponent with the finger ring. Some karambit are designed to be used in a hammering motion. This flexibility of striking methods is what makes it useful in self-defense situations. The finger guard makes it difficult to disarm and allows the knife to be maneuvered in the fingers without losing one’s grip.

    The short Filipino karambit has found some favor in the West because such proponents allege the biomechanics of the weapon allow for more powerful cutting strokes and painful “ripping” wounds, and because its usability is hypothesized as more intuitive, though there continues to be debate about this matter.

    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Harry Baldwin


    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.
     
    That may be what it says on Wikipedia today, by tomorrow it will say that the Karambit is mainly used to hold slices of bread over a fire to make toast.
    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Harry Baldwin


    Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.
     
    There is some bull-shido going on in this video, but the extremely high damage potential of the karambit should be apparent:

    https://youtu.be/vi7TPa1eQ8w
  81. @anon
    @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Physiognomy is real. I'm not sure that is a genetic "her", either.

    Replies: @Jewels, @MBlanc46, @Truth

    Could “Vicky” actually be William?

    https://www.commondreams.org/author/willie-osterweil

  82. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Is that an M to F tranny???

  83. @Harry Baldwin
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    The karambit is primarily a slashing weapon, though of course you can stab someone with it as well. I won one once at a shooting class, but sold it because it was more of a fighting knife than one suitable for everyday tasks, like the Griptilian I carry. From Wikipedia:


    The karambit is held with the blade pointing downward from the bottom of the fist, usually curving forwards however occasionally backwards. While it is primarily used in a slashing or hooking motion, karambit with a finger ring are also used in a punching motion hitting the opponent with the finger ring. Some karambit are designed to be used in a hammering motion. This flexibility of striking methods is what makes it useful in self-defense situations. The finger guard makes it difficult to disarm and allows the knife to be maneuvered in the fingers without losing one's grip.

    The short Filipino karambit has found some favor in the West because such proponents allege the biomechanics of the weapon allow for more powerful cutting strokes and painful "ripping" wounds, and because its usability is hypothesized as more intuitive, though there continues to be debate about this matter.

    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.
     

    Replies: @Gordo, @The Wild Geese Howard

    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.

    That may be what it says on Wikipedia today, by tomorrow it will say that the Karambit is mainly used to hold slices of bread over a fire to make toast.

    • LOL: Muggles
  84. @indocon
    Black Panther actor is dead, official statement is that he had colon cancer for 4 years, I call bullshit on that.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Black Panther actor is dead, official statement is that he had colon cancer for 4 years, I call bullshit on that.

    Why? Was he a poofter?

  85. Anon[386] • Disclaimer says:

    @ “The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.”

    Agree.

    But still you’re nuts, Mr Sailer. You state the obvious without addressing the underlying injustice of incompetence-driven police brutality. (It’s an injustice perpetrated on all who deal with police, black or white)

    You saw the video. Will you now tell us, you of all journalists, not to believe our lyin’ eyes?

    Thing is, righteous indignation gets high jacked by the BLMs thugs. This is the first installment of a two-part paper with great links
    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/16181/black-lives-matter

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Anon

    The only incompetence I saw was Blake's. Incompetence at behaving like a rational human and cooperating with police.

  86. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    Blake wasn’t Killed. He was shot and seriously wounded when attempting to steal his baby mamma’s car. It is confusing, so many black criminals killed while resisting arrest.

  87. @Anonymous
    Vickie looks like a dude.

    Replies: @Alden, @Jim Don Bob

    Vicki’s partner is 31 year old feminist writer Sophie Lewis who wants to abolish the nuclear family.

    Some guy at Taki’s opined that the reason Ellen became a lesbian is that she realized she wasn’t cute enough to pull the guys she wanted. That theory fits these two.

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qjdzwb/sophie-lewis-feminist-abolishing-the-family-full-surrogacy-now

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    Yeah she’s an ever lovin trainwreck, that one. Her green card should be revoked.

  88. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Alden

    https://i.ibb.co/41GCsD2/Screenshot-20200829-061826-Gmail.jpg

    Replies: @Alden, @William Badwhite

    The girl friend is a black woman named Laquisha. You can’t deny that.

    Like many MEN OF UNZ, Torn and Frayed confuses the black man White woman porn he’s addicted to with reality. Never having had a relationship with a White woman in his life, Torn and Frayed, is stuck with porn and his hand.

    The MEN OF UNZ live in a porn fantasy world of of horny teen harlots love creepy old men and black man White woman porn in which the main attraction is their homosexual attraction to the black men.

    • Troll: Charon
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Alden

    Hey, what’s bringing tbis on? You’ve brought a lot of really good background info to us here.

    , @bomag
    @Alden

    LOL!

    Well, you go to war with the army you've got.

  89. @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    The girl friend is black, a typical Ebonics speaking ghetto black.

    Another MAN OF UNZ who spends so much time jacking off to black man White woman open he doesn’t realize the real world isn’t full of black man White woman couples. Go back to your porn sites.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SkylertheWeird, @ThreeCranes

    Seems like half of all the couples on commercials and television shows and 100% of Lesbian couples are black white.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SkylertheWeird

    Yeah, but do they all comment on unz? Maybe that explains what Alden has been continuously ranting about, the cable company miswired her box (heh!), and she's looking at TV commercials instead of our comments? Plus, you still can't jack off on TV, right? It's been 22 years since I've watched, so I may have missed something trending...

  90. Blake probably realized that getting arrested with the knife on his person would have resulted in additional charges and was trying to hide it in the car. Since the cops weren’t mind readers, they assumed he was attempting to retrieve a weapon from the car.

    I used to have sympathy for these blacks that get themselves killed by doing this kind of thing. But I no longer do. It’s not the responsibility of the cops to meet you 99.9% of the way. People need to understand that it’s their responsibility to cooperate and not get themselves shot. And most people do because it’s really just common sense. I remember being taught in drivers ed or somewhere that you should keep your hands visible and not to go reaching anywhere that might look like you’re going for a weapon.

    Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    When you see blacks with poor outcomes and you want to blame it on racism but there’s no obvious racism to point to, you have to start getting creative. They came up with this “systemic racism” as a vague and unfalsifiable form of racism.

    “Systemic racism” is relevant here to the extent that blacks are much more likely to behave in such a way as to get themselves killed by police. The behavioral differences are by definition due to “systemic racism.” Implicitly, they want a double standard where blacks have a legal right to resist arrest. The cops will ask the black guy if he consents to the arrest and if he says no then they just have to leave.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  91. @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories.
     
    But, none dare call them Commies.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @SkylertheWeird, @TomSchmidt

    Read that old John Stormer book from the Sixties Death of a Nation. It’s the same old same old Commie bullshit now funded by Soros and the CCP instead of the Soviets.

  92. @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.

    Replies: @Charon, @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever happened to her? Is her trial scheduled for late October by any chance?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Charon

    She was found guilty last October and got ten years for murder, which is pretty lenient for Texas. I'm surprised this didn't provoke riots, given that this was a case of a guy sitting at home minding his own business when he was killed. Funny how a guy who resists arrest get more sympathy.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

  93. @Anonymous
    These stories have a strange way of resolving themselves.

    The (ahem) upshot of this Kenosha debacle is that two - by all accounts rather unsavory - so called 'antifa' bandits were killed by a rather pudgy 17 year old kid with an AK. Notwithstanding that one of the bandits happened to be a convicted child rapist - *THE* lowest of the low in the US prison system hierarchy - the ultimate irony is that the names of these bandits will soon be memory holed and forgotten, no one really cares, their wasted lives given over in vain by a 'cause' which cares not for them. Surely, there is a moral in there somewhere.

    Another way in this piece of extreme street theater imitates American life is in the personage of that short, fat, pudgy bespectacled kid who took out the antifa bandits. Surely, a character from 'King of the Hill' or 'Family Guy' made flesh. The stereotypical all-American nerdy kid, with a charming little penchant for heavy duty assault weapons.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    If I could believe my ears I just heard a radio report claiming one of the dead thugs — Huber — was “a hero” for pushing some chick rioter out of the way of the teen “vigilante’s” gunfire.

  94. 1) It seems like back in the day, the cops used to have nightsticks and stuff like that. Now it’s moved to the taser and gun. And they have women on the force as well. I wonder if there is too little “police brutality” and if this might ultimately lead to more deaths. In other words, say you hired bouncer type guys who can handle themselves and give them billy clubs and give them a fairly free hand to administer beatings to uncooperative perps. There is more “brutality” but things don’t escalate as frequently to the point of shooting. And if people know they’re going to get a beat down they’re less likely to resist in the first place. Shootings are too low probability to be a deterrent. Guys (especially blacks) aren’t thinking about a 1% chance of getting shot. But 100% chance of a beat down would register.

    2) It’s really funny to watch old TV and movies because the cops are so trigger happy. If the bad guy is running away, the bullets are flying. I’m not an expert on the legal issues but it seems it wasn’t until the 80s when the Supreme Court said you couldn’t shoot a fleeing suspect in the back unless he was an imminent threat to the community. Until they started making a big deal about these shooting, I always assumed it was completely legal for the cops to shoot you in the back if you tried to get away or resist.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_v._Garner

  95. Okay,
    1. It wouldn’t have happened if Blake has not been violent and stupid a number of times.
    2. It could have happened to a white guy.
    3. It might have been a black cop who shot the suspect.
    4. If it had been a white victim, no one would have heard of it outside his local community, because:
    5. White people do not love to watch violence porn on Internet; and
    6. A white person, seeing the incident, would chiefly think of how stupid and violent the white victim was; and
    7. It would never have been amplified by the national media.

    All that still leaves the cop with a difficult defense based on a general fear of a gun in the car (or abduction of kids?)

    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    @Henry Canaday

    Cops are not subject to the same self-defense laws as ordinary people, which stems from the fact that they have a duty to advance on threats whereas in many states a civilian has a duty to retreat.

    The police had already attempted the highest-level non-lethal means multiple times to stop the suspected felony in progress. The suspected felon, with a felony background of which the cops were aware, was holding a deadly weapon and not complying. Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?

    The problem there is that it gives every criminal an avoid-arrest option exercised through immediate escalation.

    Replies: @Henry Canaday

  96. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Well she lives in Philadelphia–maybe someone can stop by her place and take her stuff!

  97. @J.Ross
    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
    https://twitter.com/BrandonStraka/status/1299355762507087872

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    For once, whiny homosexuals serve a useful purpose! Will wonders never cease?

  98. @prime noticer
    maybe he was going to try to kill the kids next. or maybe like Steve said he was trying to make his escape with the kids.

    years ago i had a girlfriend from California who had 3 sisters, and one of them had a crazy african boyfriend from Tennessee. and one day he did abduct their 2 kids from LA and drove them to Tennessee without telling anybody, and it took the authorities to get the kids back and impose a restraining order on him. needless to say that was the last time he was around.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    maybe he was going to try to kill the kids next. or maybe like Steve said he was trying to make his escape with the kids.

    At some point the proper procedure for police, upon being called to intervene in a black-on-black domestic dispute, is going to be to shrug and keep driving.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @William Badwhite

    That would violate Joe Biden's VAWA.

  99. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    I think “she” once was a he

  100. In answer to your query Item #24: Yes, NPR still does receive public funding although it’s usually superficially camouflaged!

  101. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Alden

    https://i.ibb.co/41GCsD2/Screenshot-20200829-061826-Gmail.jpg

    Replies: @Alden, @William Badwhite

    Lol. I find her crazed rants to be pretty amusing.

    She’s far more entertaining than “Mr. Sailer you FAIL to NOTICE my endless nuh uhhs” guy.

  102. @Achmed E. Newman
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that’s unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories.
     
    But, none dare call them Commies.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @SkylertheWeird, @TomSchmidt

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery. Once you have agreed to sell your time to the capitalist, he is empowered to hire people like Frederick Winslow Taylor to construct time studies to make sure you aren’t “stealing” any of his time by, you know, not working 3600 of the 3600 seconds in an hour. You might not see this as the slave relationship because it is normal, but a society that had actual slavery would see it as such.

    Communism just replaces the “capitalist” with a diffused, unaccountable committee run by the worst sorts of people who’ve climbed the greasy pole to The top. It’s debatable which system causes more misery, though Communism certainly kills a lot more people. Or at least it has; the Crony Capitalists, who take the Taylorist view of labor as cost to be cut and milked for every second, seem to have found a way to make millions redundant with their bailout-for-Wall-Street lockdowns. The worldwide death toll from the economic collapse due to lockdowns will almost certainly exceed that of COVID; poor, demoralized people live less long than wealthy sociopaths.

    Stealing and looting won’t solve the problem, and in imposing higher security costs will make it worse. You might check out the Mondragon Cooperatives for a true capitalist route, focusing on the meaning of capital as derived from caput, head.

    • Agree: ThreeCranes
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @TomSchmidt

    Your 1st paragraph: BS. Ever even opened the Bible, Tom? Even one takes it just as a history book, one can read about actual slavery along with people hired out for talents, etc. Do you think He just made it all up ... OK, they were parables, but you get the idea...

    No, of course, not everyone should hire himself out. In history, and even very recent history of the US, running a small production or service business was quite doable. It's just that without property rights, there is not way it can happen. Secondly, with hugely onerous regulation and tax burdens, as we have now, so many people are forced to work for the massive firms that, BTW, help MAKE these burdensome regulations and avoid the taxes, because small business is forced out.

    Of course that's not good, leading to your 2nd paragraph. You finally used the term "crony capitalism". That's what we have, but it doesn't roll off the tongue, so I'd like to just use what this Big-State/Big-Biz cooperation should be called, which is Fascism. (Only thing is, that reminds people of guys with armbands, salutes, and crooked crosses, while I'm just talking economic systems.) Yes, that's we have, but it's most certainly not the entrepreneurial free-market Capitalism that existed before.

    I won't argue at all that the Fascists in charge of Big-Biz in America have pillaged the American taxpayer and saver via FED and Feral Gov't bailouts and other policies. How is that Capitalism?

    So, the world "capital" comes from the root word for "head". Nice job, etymologist, but the word "capital" has meant plant and equipment since the Industrial Revolution went into full swing. Otherwise, you would certainly not read people writing about "capital" vs. "labor". That wouldn't make sense, per your idea. If you don't have property rights, you, as a small businessman, can't hold onto your plant and equipment for your product or service business. That's BAD.

    Lastly, you seem to be doing what Communists have done through every one of their revolutions: They tell everyone that their problems are due to this bogeyman Capitalism, while the nations in turmoil are not experiencing anything like it. Change the definition, rant against it, because the actual situation DOES suck, and then, there you go, Communism is the only way to go, right?

    Tom, I'm telling you, if you don't believe in property rights, then you may very well be a Communist. You have a lot more in common with Victor/Victoria* than I would have thought from your more reasonable posts in the past.

    .

    * With Calvinists' point still in mind, that the woman in question is likely much too stupid to read Das Kapital, much less quote it, that's what she is.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @anon
    @TomSchmidt

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Lol, whoever DavidGraeber is he is ignorant and you are even more so. Which "ancients" are you babbling about, Ancient Aliens maybe? The Romans and Greeks are pretty "ancient" and they recognized hired workers.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That's nothing new, it's been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don't want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you'd either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Mondragon Cooperatives lol, a rather traditional organization formed in Catholic Spain that's a whole lot like other organizations dating back over 1,000 years. Your education was obviously quite niggardly and you really don't know anything about human history or human nature.

    Shouldn't you be down at your nearest Antifa / Only Black Lives Matter peaceful looting riot looking for some stuff to steal or burn?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  103. @Diversity Heretic
    @utu

    "Detached reflection cannot be expected in the presence of an uplifted [or even held at hip level] knife."

    --Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Brown v. United States [adjusted for circumstances]

    It's easy to critique police actions after the fact. Officers have to make these decisions in fractions of seconds and the consequences of a wrong decision can be the officer's death.

    The fundamental problem is trying to impose and enforce White standards of behavior on feral Negroes. White officers should stop responding to calls involving blacks. Wait until a black officer is available.

    Replies: @yakushimaru, @Known Fact

    Or send in a robot, like the Dallas PD did with that assassin a few years ago

  104. @William Badwhite
    @prime noticer


    maybe he was going to try to kill the kids next. or maybe like Steve said he was trying to make his escape with the kids.
     
    At some point the proper procedure for police, upon being called to intervene in a black-on-black domestic dispute, is going to be to shrug and keep driving.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    That would violate Joe Biden’s VAWA.

  105. @Henry's Cat
    @Yancey Ward

    I'm still waiting for Star Trek phasers to become a reality. What's the hold up?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Abe Lincoln is sharpening up some sticks for us in the meantime

  106. @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    The girl friend is black, a typical Ebonics speaking ghetto black.

    Another MAN OF UNZ who spends so much time jacking off to black man White woman open he doesn’t realize the real world isn’t full of black man White woman couples. Go back to your porn sites.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @SkylertheWeird, @ThreeCranes

    You’re a tranny, right?

  107. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    “It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them…”

    This is true. But, who is? Who can control unruly negros? You? You think your people could do any better? Hah. Just wait until your country has become diversified by the Tribe and then we’ll see who’s talking trash. Fool.

  108. @El Dato
    @yakushimaru


    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.
     
    Nobody said he "deserves to die". If some troubled person decides to jump into a woodchipper for no good reason he doesn't "deserve to die" either, but the result is likely not uplifting in any case. Unlike video games, where you can ragequit and reload, the real world is unforgiving.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.
     
    What about "tasering several times" is unclear to you?

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq.
     
    That's a different problem. Talk you your local neocon about that.

    https://i.postimg.cc/RF5khYbP/The-little-difference-makes-all-the-difference.png

    Replies: @utu, @J.Ross

    You really do no see the difference between a woodchipper and a policeman?

  109. Lease part of Somalia from warlords, and offer inner city blacks the getaway vacation opportunity of a lifetime!

    Skip ahead to 0’20” and see beautiful Somalia!

  110. @jb
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe. But was that even a "police shooting," or was she acting as a private citizen who happened to be armed and who thought there was an intruder in her house? And do we know she wouldn't have shot a white intruder?

    In any case, given that the stereotype about violent blacks is both widespread and, on average, correct, I have no doubt that people sometimes act on it in borderline cases, even where no racial animus is involved. What I'm wondering about is incidents that go beyond that, incidents where you don't have to speculate about the officer's interior state of mind. At one point such incidents occurred with some regularity. Officers said and did things that left no doubt that it was about race. So when did that stop? When did you have to start guessing?

    Replies: @Barnard

    She was off duty. At this point any officer who shoots any black man while on duty understands he has worked his last shift. The only reason to do it is fearing for your life.

  111. @Charon
    @Rob McX

    Whatever happened to her? Is her trial scheduled for late October by any chance?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    She was found guilty last October and got ten years for murder, which is pretty lenient for Texas. I’m surprised this didn’t provoke riots, given that this was a case of a guy sitting at home minding his own business when he was killed. Funny how a guy who resists arrest get more sympathy.

    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Rob McX

    Actually, that is not lenient for Texas. Texas’s murder law is unusual.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  112. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    But these Chinese peasants did, right?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @William Badwhite

    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I'm sure that they would flourish in that environment.....

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  113. @Rob McX
    @Yancey Ward

    I know a lot of these shootings occur after a a failed tasing. But apparently an old model taser failed to subdue Rodney King 29 years ago. It seems blacks have evolved to be taser-proof.

    Replies: @Escher

    Was thinking the same thing.
    Must be some Wakandan technology.

  114. @anon
    What's ironic about all this is that, if he had a knife all along, and he was getting close enough to the cops to put one of them in a headlock, they could have shot him a lot earlier with total justification. If a guy gets you in a headlock and has a knife in his hand, you're about a second away, or less, from getting your throat cut. The fact that they didn't shoot him right away, and waited until he was trying to get away, is the only thing that makes this sort of questionable.

    I mean, the blacks still would have rioted, but sensible people wouldn't have any problem with it.

    But I still say that an armed man trying to drive away with some kids that he doesn't have custody of, still trumps everything.

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @I Have Scinde

    “Instead of standing there and teaching a cop when there’s an unarmed person coming at ‘em with a knife or something, shoot ‘em in the leg instead of in the heart.”

    -Joseph Robinette Biden

  115. @Alden
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The girl friend is a black woman named Laquisha. You can’t deny that.

    Like many MEN OF UNZ, Torn and Frayed confuses the black man White woman porn he’s addicted to with reality. Never having had a relationship with a White woman in his life, Torn and Frayed, is stuck with porn and his hand.

    The MEN OF UNZ live in a porn fantasy world of of horny teen harlots love creepy old men and black man White woman porn in which the main attraction is their homosexual attraction to the black men.

    Replies: @JMcG, @bomag

    Hey, what’s bringing tbis on? You’ve brought a lot of really good background info to us here.

  116. @anon
    What's ironic about all this is that, if he had a knife all along, and he was getting close enough to the cops to put one of them in a headlock, they could have shot him a lot earlier with total justification. If a guy gets you in a headlock and has a knife in his hand, you're about a second away, or less, from getting your throat cut. The fact that they didn't shoot him right away, and waited until he was trying to get away, is the only thing that makes this sort of questionable.

    I mean, the blacks still would have rioted, but sensible people wouldn't have any problem with it.

    But I still say that an armed man trying to drive away with some kids that he doesn't have custody of, still trumps everything.

    Replies: @I Have Scinde, @I Have Scinde

    “Instead of standing there and teaching a cop, when there’s an unarmed person coming at ’em with a knife or something, you shoot them in the leg instead of in the heart is a very different thing. There’s a lot of different things that could change.”

    -Joseph Robinette Biden

  117. @William Badwhite
    @yakushimaru


    He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.
     
    But these Chinese peasants did, right?

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/chinese-man-being-beheaded.jpg

    Replies: @syonredux

    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I’m sure that they would flourish in that environment…..

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @syonredux


    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I’m sure that they would flourish in that environment…..
     
    We certainly know that Mr. Yakushimaru's local police would have no problem restraining people like Mr. Blake or Mr. Floyd.

    Replies: @Glt

  118. @syonredux
    @William Badwhite

    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I'm sure that they would flourish in that environment.....

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I’m sure that they would flourish in that environment…..

    We certainly know that Mr. Yakushimaru’s local police would have no problem restraining people like Mr. Blake or Mr. Floyd.

    • Replies: @Glt
    @William Badwhite

    They still have free rein with batons.

  119. @Anon
    @ “The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.”

    Agree.

    But still you’re nuts, Mr Sailer. You state the obvious without addressing the underlying injustice of incompetence-driven police brutality. (It’s an injustice perpetrated on all who deal with police, black or white)

    You saw the video. Will you now tell us, you of all journalists, not to believe our lyin’ eyes?

    Thing is, righteous indignation gets high jacked by the BLMs thugs. This is the first installment of a two-part paper with great links
    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/16181/black-lives-matter

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    The only incompetence I saw was Blake’s. Incompetence at behaving like a rational human and cooperating with police.

  120. “The lawyers for Mr. Blake…” And who might they be and who’s paying them. Well, the name that jumped out at me was none other than Benjamin Crump, all purpose troublemaker. He is the new Al Sharpton, ready to poor gasoline on any racial flicker he can find. He burst upon the national scene as the family lawyer for Trayvon Martin, the man most responsible for the Trayvon Martin hoax. See https://dcdave.heresycentral.is/2020/07/05/trayvons-fake-witness/. That we’re getting lies about what transpired from him is only to be expected, given his record. Oh, I forgost to mention, he also represents the George Floyd family. Maybe it’s not a systemic racism problem that we have, but a Benjamin Crump problem.

  121. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Kronos

    Vicky in the Jewish Currents interview:


    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street. Obviously, riots are not the revolution in and of themselves. But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.
     

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.

    So, basically when Cthulu awakens from his slumber in R’lyeh.

  122. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    The best way I have to comprehend the current state of the world is remember Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

     

    Me too. I read it for the first time earlier this year. There is no better to time to get to know this work than right now.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks to both of you for the recommendation. There is also a version entitled Demons.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @res

    The title depends on the translation, as you might expect. The version I read is the 1916 public domain translation by Constance Garnett, but you might find a different translation to be more congenial.

    Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky are the most famous and well-regarded recent translators of Dostoyevsky.

    Thinking about this topic helped me recall an article I read a long time ago from the New Yorker (having a look back at it confirms this magazine in the past included at least some interesting content) about translations of the Russians. It's here if you'd like a look: LINK.

    Replies: @res

  123. @yakushimaru
    @Redneck farmer

    You are just surrendering to the sad situation. Men can have their moments. Domestic dispute can be emotional. Police is supposed to be there to help. And you are saying that the only way they can do their job is by either shooting the unfortunate guy to death or hit the shit out of him. That is not normal. I kind of hope that you can see it.

    You know, maybe you have kids, sometime kids do stupid things too. Parents, especially the father can physically control the kid, stop him in the heat of the moment, and then having time to do the teaching. By your logic, this is unthinkable. The father or any adult nearby, what they can do is either kill the stupid kid on spot, or beat him really hard like the adult himself is losing control.

    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Muggles

    Because there is no difference in the disparity of strength between a child and an adult. Redneck farmer was right, you really are a moron.

    There are thousands and thousands of domestic dispute calls every year where the police don’t kill anyone. I don’t see how any method can be 100% effective when used against violent, dangerous, actively resisting, unpredictable subjects

    When you brawl with police, fight off tasering and are armed with a deadly weapon, you are doing everything possible to get yourself killed. The police don’t have magic wands.

  124. @yakushimaru
    @Diversity Heretic


    It’s easy to critique police actions after the fact.
     
    This line is repeated so many times. Just at what kind of situation can you question the police's performance? They're neighborhood police, they are not Navy Seals fighting in remote corners of the world, you know.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

    You can question police actions when they fall outside the permissible boundaries established by training, protocol and standard accepted practices. You can start to strongly question police actions when they indicate gross negligence. And we should always question police actions when they indicate premeditated malice.

    None of those thresholds are even close to being met in this case.

  125. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Only in the very short term. A morality of aggression is pure misanthropy.

  126. @Harry Baldwin
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    The karambit is primarily a slashing weapon, though of course you can stab someone with it as well. I won one once at a shooting class, but sold it because it was more of a fighting knife than one suitable for everyday tasks, like the Griptilian I carry. From Wikipedia:


    The karambit is held with the blade pointing downward from the bottom of the fist, usually curving forwards however occasionally backwards. While it is primarily used in a slashing or hooking motion, karambit with a finger ring are also used in a punching motion hitting the opponent with the finger ring. Some karambit are designed to be used in a hammering motion. This flexibility of striking methods is what makes it useful in self-defense situations. The finger guard makes it difficult to disarm and allows the knife to be maneuvered in the fingers without losing one's grip.

    The short Filipino karambit has found some favor in the West because such proponents allege the biomechanics of the weapon allow for more powerful cutting strokes and painful "ripping" wounds, and because its usability is hypothesized as more intuitive, though there continues to be debate about this matter.

    The technique of the karambit is also heavily focused on striking the weak points of the human body, such as the muscles from the knee and elbow. This is a very effective technique because of the curved blade. Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.
     

    Replies: @Gordo, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Because of this, the karambit is considered to be one of the deadliest melee weapons.

    There is some bull-shido going on in this video, but the extremely high damage potential of the karambit should be apparent:

  127. @Almost Missouri

    Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    "Systemic racism", which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of "systemic racism". Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant "systemic racism" a validity it does not possess.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @SMK, @Hypnotoad666

    “Systemic racism”, which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith.

    This sentence would be just as true without the extraneous word “systemic”.

    • Agree: Negrolphin Pool
  128. @J.Ross
    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
    https://twitter.com/BrandonStraka/status/1299355762507087872

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    This incident is interesting because it demonstrates how far gays have fallen down the DIE-versity totem pole.

  129. @utu

    The officers did not see the knife initially. The officers first saw him holding the knife while they were on the passenger side of the vehicle.
     
    If they did see the knife they should have taken several steps back. They did not because they did not see the knife or because they were not properly trained or they are lying now as there was no knife.

    If indeed he had a knife in his left hand the moment he put his left hand inside the car the risk of him using the knife on them was greatly diminished. This was also an opportunity to take few steps back to deescalate the situation.

    The officers failed several opportunities to deescalate the situation instead they followed him too closely, even tried to hold his T-shirt and then decided to shoot to kill with seven shots in the back.

    The argument that officers were trying to protect children in car is totally made up as their inept and unprofessional actions shows that they were totally at loss what they were doing and all they knew is that they can kill. That was their back up plan or real intention from the very beginning if they were actually smarter and more evil. A thought of protecting children could not appear in their minds preoccupied with their bungling up in the space of 20 or seconds during the whole incident.

    As the uncontested facts above demonstrate, the officers involved gave Mr. Blake numerous opportunities to comply. He chose not to. None of the officers involved wished for things to transpire the way it did.
     
    Whether they wished or not 'for things to transpire the way it did' remains to be established. What matters now is that 'the numerous opportunities to comply' that officer gave apparently were too few because they decided to kill him while there was no threat to their lives as he kept moving away from them not towards them. Their specific task was to arrest him not to kill him and the task did not have the specific maximum of opportunities to comply to be given to him. If arresting him would require them spending there 24 hours that what they should do. Instead they decided to kill him within few minutes upon their arrival.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @anon, @Ben tillman

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Ben tillman

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him

    Last time I checked he's still not dead. You might want to revise the facts in your head.

    prosa123
    Physical standards for cops are much less today than they used to be.

    That's because the older standards were sexist and evil and had to be replaced because lieberals are always right and everyone else is always wrong.

    Many of the modern world problems are the result of lieberal solutions from the previous century.

    , @Poco
    @Ben tillman

    He wasn't killed.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

  130. @Henry Canaday
    Okay,
    1. It wouldn’t have happened if Blake has not been violent and stupid a number of times.
    2. It could have happened to a white guy.
    3. It might have been a black cop who shot the suspect.
    4. If it had been a white victim, no one would have heard of it outside his local community, because:
    5. White people do not love to watch violence porn on Internet; and
    6. A white person, seeing the incident, would chiefly think of how stupid and violent the white victim was; and
    7. It would never have been amplified by the national media.

    All that still leaves the cop with a difficult defense based on a general fear of a gun in the car (or abduction of kids?)

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

    Cops are not subject to the same self-defense laws as ordinary people, which stems from the fact that they have a duty to advance on threats whereas in many states a civilian has a duty to retreat.

    The police had already attempted the highest-level non-lethal means multiple times to stop the suspected felony in progress. The suspected felon, with a felony background of which the cops were aware, was holding a deadly weapon and not complying. Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?

    The problem there is that it gives every criminal an avoid-arrest option exercised through immediate escalation.

    • Replies: @Henry Canaday
    @Negrolphin Pool

    "Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?"

    Well, he was retreating when shot. I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    Replies: @anon, @Gandydancer

  131. Physical standards for cops are much less today than they used to be. This could have been avoided, at least hopefully so, if the cops simply had overpowered him.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @prosa123

    This, and, the standards have been forced lower because nobody in his right mind becomes a cop.

    , @Jack Armstrong
    @prosa123

    George Floyd was overpowered.

  132. @Rob McX
    @Charon

    She was found guilty last October and got ten years for murder, which is pretty lenient for Texas. I'm surprised this didn't provoke riots, given that this was a case of a guy sitting at home minding his own business when he was killed. Funny how a guy who resists arrest get more sympathy.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    Actually, that is not lenient for Texas. Texas’s murder law is unusual.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Ben tillman

    I know, I've seen some pretty perverse cases, such as one guy getting two concurrent sentences of five years for a double murder he committed in 2000. But it seems to me that short sentences for murder are usually part of a plea bargain, and Guyger went to trial.

  133. @TomSchmidt
    @Achmed E. Newman

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery. Once you have agreed to sell your time to the capitalist, he is empowered to hire people like Frederick Winslow Taylor to construct time studies to make sure you aren't "stealing" any of his time by, you know, not working 3600 of the 3600 seconds in an hour. You might not see this as the slave relationship because it is normal, but a society that had actual slavery would see it as such.

    Communism just replaces the "capitalist" with a diffused, unaccountable committee run by the worst sorts of people who've climbed the greasy pole to The top. It's debatable which system causes more misery, though Communism certainly kills a lot more people. Or at least it has; the Crony Capitalists, who take the Taylorist view of labor as cost to be cut and milked for every second, seem to have found a way to make millions redundant with their bailout-for-Wall-Street lockdowns. The worldwide death toll from the economic collapse due to lockdowns will almost certainly exceed that of COVID; poor, demoralized people live less long than wealthy sociopaths.

    Stealing and looting won't solve the problem, and in imposing higher security costs will make it worse. You might check out the Mondragon Cooperatives for a true capitalist route, focusing on the meaning of capital as derived from caput, head.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

    Your 1st paragraph: BS. Ever even opened the Bible, Tom? Even one takes it just as a history book, one can read about actual slavery along with people hired out for talents, etc. Do you think He just made it all up … OK, they were parables, but you get the idea…

    No, of course, not everyone should hire himself out. In history, and even very recent history of the US, running a small production or service business was quite doable. It’s just that without property rights, there is not way it can happen. Secondly, with hugely onerous regulation and tax burdens, as we have now, so many people are forced to work for the massive firms that, BTW, help MAKE these burdensome regulations and avoid the taxes, because small business is forced out.

    Of course that’s not good, leading to your 2nd paragraph. You finally used the term “crony capitalism”. That’s what we have, but it doesn’t roll off the tongue, so I’d like to just use what this Big-State/Big-Biz cooperation should be called, which is Fascism. (Only thing is, that reminds people of guys with armbands, salutes, and crooked crosses, while I’m just talking economic systems.) Yes, that’s we have, but it’s most certainly not the entrepreneurial free-market Capitalism that existed before.

    I won’t argue at all that the Fascists in charge of Big-Biz in America have pillaged the American taxpayer and saver via FED and Feral Gov’t bailouts and other policies. How is that Capitalism?

    So, the world “capital” comes from the root word for “head”. Nice job, etymologist, but the word “capital” has meant plant and equipment since the Industrial Revolution went into full swing. Otherwise, you would certainly not read people writing about “capital” vs. “labor”. That wouldn’t make sense, per your idea. If you don’t have property rights, you, as a small businessman, can’t hold onto your plant and equipment for your product or service business. That’s BAD.

    Lastly, you seem to be doing what Communists have done through every one of their revolutions: They tell everyone that their problems are due to this bogeyman Capitalism, while the nations in turmoil are not experiencing anything like it. Change the definition, rant against it, because the actual situation DOES suck, and then, there you go, Communism is the only way to go, right?

    Tom, I’m telling you, if you don’t believe in property rights, then you may very well be a Communist. You have a lot more in common with Victor/Victoria* than I would have thought from your more reasonable posts in the past.

    .

    * With Calvinists’ point still in mind, that the woman in question is likely much too stupid to read Das Kapital, much less quote it, that’s what she is.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thank you for the detailed and honest critique, Achmed.

    Graeber when mentioning the ancients is little in contact with the Bible; he means the Romans, the Greeks, and Babylonians. He uses the Bible not much at all, so there's an oversight there.

    You raise an interesting counterpoint; of course, Jewish law was different from Roman standards. One of the Catholic four sins crying out to heaven for vengeance, based on Old Testament theology, is depriving a worker of his just wages. Carcopino, in Daily Life in Ancient Rome, gives a picture of the workplace then. No labor market, as today; perhaps a functioning labor market requires as a precondition a proclamation from God that you violate HIS law when you defraud the worker. No proclamation from God, no belief in Him, and the basis for hiring labor by the day goes away.

    What's captured in Taylorism is a few things reinforced by your point. First, time-motion studies require accurate clocks, not present in ancient times (though some prostitutes in Athens used accurate water clocks, from my recollection), when a Roman hour would vary with the length of the day.

    Second, recall Kierkegaard's idea that Christianity requires one to see other humans as ends in themselves, and not as means. Remove Christian thinking from employment, add clocks, and you see humans as meat robots whose time does not belong to them, but to you, who owns it.

    I wouldn't argue against property rights; calling stealing and looting by those terms might indicate that to you. And stealing increases security costs at no benefit to most, though it is at least honest: calling it reparations is at least an effort to justify it, when they know it's wrong. It beats the theft whereby one "engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

    Graeber has a nice section on "self-ownership," which is the absurd position one is forced to adopt to justify selling pieces of oneself; if you want I can dig it up and post. As you note, better to run a small production business and sell things, capturing the increased value of the goods or services. Jane Jacobs points out how a VAT penalizes these small businesses because they have to float the value of VAT on input items before getting rebate when they sell; this is a higher percentage of capital for them, and for a corporation that can take in low-value materials and turn out high-value products, there's basically no capital tied up in VAT. Add that to your regulations imposing burdens on small businesses.

    "Nice job, etymologist, but the word “capital” has meant plant and equipment since the Industrial Revolution went into full swing. "

    Let's just quote La Wik: "In economics, capital consists of assets that can enhance one's power to perform economically useful work. "

    The second definition allows us to include things like, for instance, knowledge as a form of capital. Trust, as a variant of social capital, as a form of value. And, of course, plant and equipment.

    Once you get past plant and equipment, and include knowledge as a form of capital, so many of the childishly simple Friedmanite concepts like "the only purpose of a business is to turn a profit" collapse. Perhaps the best explication for this is Gilder's Knowledge and Power; you might also appreciate his take in Life After Googleabout how Google's mechanistic view of human knowledge isn't wrong, but incomplete. Like viewing capital as "plant and equipment," and ignoring law, social order, human knowledge, and ethics as forms of capital.

    To give one example, since this is a site with plenty of dissenters, we know from Robert Putnam that diversity destroys social capital. Putnam is saddened to come to this conclusion, as a liberal, but it's what the data show him. So large employers who advocate for mass immigration to drive down wages are doing two things: generating higher profits for themselves, and destroying the social capital represented by high-trust communities. (I'd argue that it's much easier to turn social capital into economic capital than vice-versa.) under your definition of capital, or Milton Friedman's, they're good capitalists; under a wider definition of capital, they're destroying capital instead of preserving or growing it.

    Another example. Producing an object produces two things: the object itself, and the knowledge of how to make it. Under comparative advantage, only the first has any value, which is why Ricardo can propose that one country make only one thing while another makes another, and they trade. Humorously, modern bad economists use guns and butter in plenty of examples; any country that gave up making guns to focus only on butter would likely face the loss of all butter by armed men who refused to trade. The overall point: a surface gain, economically, might come at the loss of actual capital represented by the tacit knowledge in complex supply chains.

    Of course, our society has come to see things my way. Compare the market cap of something like Google to its tangible book value, and you'll see that most of the capital therein is not plant and equipment, but things like goodwill.

    I assume you don't send your kids to, or ever attended, public education, one of the goals of the communist manifesto. Unfortunately, we are all Communists to some extent now. Was Marx wrong to advocate for universal public education? If not, why isn't universal college justified?

    What you quickly find is that Marx is a pretty good diagnostician, and a lot of his concepts have held up over time, Labor theory of value not being one of them. But he has one solution, it seems, to every diagnosis: amputate. A lot of people got amputated in the effort to put in place his solution to the problem.

    I won't link you to articles about Mondragon, but invite you to investigate it on your own. It's a form of cooperative capitalism that requires worker ownership of the means of production, with profits distributed to the workers themselves. I find it fascinating because it actually pushes capitalism as the format for society, but eliminates the function of "capitalists" strip mining other forms of capital to turn into economic capital. It's based on Catholic Social Teaching.

    If you know what carried interest is, you should know that Mondragon allows workers to pay a carried interest tax rate on their income; check out Subchapter T of the tax code. If you own a copy of TurboTax, run the following experiment: give a married man 10,000 in salary, and 80,000 in dividends. Then calculate the income tax due. It's 0, or it least it was before the 2017 tax act; you do wind up paying $765 for SS/Medicare on the $10,000 salary. In a state like Texas with no state income tax, this gives the worker $7440 monthly in income, after tax.

    Sounds like a great way to actually build capital. Check it out.

  134. @Ben tillman
    @Rob McX

    Actually, that is not lenient for Texas. Texas’s murder law is unusual.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    I know, I’ve seen some pretty perverse cases, such as one guy getting two concurrent sentences of five years for a double murder he committed in 2000. But it seems to me that short sentences for murder are usually part of a plea bargain, and Guyger went to trial.

  135. @El Dato
    @yakushimaru


    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.
     
    Nobody said he "deserves to die". If some troubled person decides to jump into a woodchipper for no good reason he doesn't "deserve to die" either, but the result is likely not uplifting in any case. Unlike video games, where you can ragequit and reload, the real world is unforgiving.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.
     
    What about "tasering several times" is unclear to you?

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq.
     
    That's a different problem. Talk you your local neocon about that.

    https://i.postimg.cc/RF5khYbP/The-little-difference-makes-all-the-difference.png

    Replies: @utu, @J.Ross

    In Iraq totally innocent people who looked like they were getting too close to American vehicles got .50 calibre nudging without [more] warning [than already-given the public order to stay 50 feet away]. This criminal had every possible opportunity to not get shot. The comparison is ridiculous.

  136. @prosa123
    Physical standards for cops are much less today than they used to be. This could have been avoided, at least hopefully so, if the cops simply had overpowered him.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jack Armstrong

    This, and, the standards have been forced lower because nobody in his right mind becomes a cop.

  137. @SkylertheWeird
    @Alden

    Seems like half of all the couples on commercials and television shows and 100% of Lesbian couples are black white.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, but do they all comment on unz? Maybe that explains what Alden has been continuously ranting about, the cable company miswired her box (heh!), and she’s looking at TV commercials instead of our comments? Plus, you still can’t jack off on TV, right? It’s been 22 years since I’ve watched, so I may have missed something trending…

  138. anon[227] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ben tillman
    @utu

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him.

    Replies: @anon, @Poco

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him

    Last time I checked he’s still not dead. You might want to revise the facts in your head.

    prosa123
    Physical standards for cops are much less today than they used to be.

    That’s because the older standards were sexist and evil and had to be replaced because lieberals are always right and everyone else is always wrong.

    Many of the modern world problems are the result of lieberal solutions from the previous century.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  139. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    He isn’t deceased.

  140. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    > Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting. Some key quotations:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property… So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Sounds like a great book! How much will it cost for me to buy?

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @ic1000

    Recall Abby Hoffman; merely change the title from Steal This Book, to Loot This Book, and there ya are.

    , @J.Ross
    @ic1000

    It certainly would suck (and be rightly illegal) if somebody burglarized that Vicky guy while using his own argument.

    , @Kolya Krassotkin
    @ic1000

    A book titled "In Defense of Looting" is meant to be stolen, not bought and paid for.

    There are less than four months until Kwanzaa, and it sounds like the perfect book to loot for Aunt Shaneeqwa

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

  141. @Ben tillman
    @utu

    Killing him was the only way they could arrest him.

    Replies: @anon, @Poco

    He wasn’t killed.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Poco

    You’re right. I should have said shooting him was the only way to arrest him.

  142. The whole country needs to admit the fact that blks are simply different-in some very significant ways.

    You can’t put a square peg into a round hole. And the country needs to quit pretending the peg is round instead of square..

  143. @yakushimaru
    Based on the descriptions, the deceased black man was hardly evil. He did not deserve to be killed on spot, presumably in front of his own very young kids.

    It tells us that the USA police is simply not up to the job facing them. In a better world, police should be able to use non-lethal force to control the black man and the situation would not have exploded.

    Physically weak policemen. It seems the only way they can do police work is by pulling a gun on you three minutes into a domestic dispute.

    It reminds me what USA did in Iraq. First the rosy imagination of democracy and freedom. Then burst in anger when one of their men got killed by locals. One might call it Chickens with Guns. The inverse of Stick and Carrot.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Redneck farmer, @Alden, @ThreeCranes, @William Badwhite, @Poco, @shoot

    Whether applicable this case, or not, Gore Vidal’s dictum/observation “Give a sissy a gun & he will kill everything in sight” has always had 4WD & studs traction. Much of world history/events rolls in that one lowest gear monster truck along straight, flat, dry roman roads, compensating for self-fulfilling sissy self-loathing.

    Ouroborosssss assmouth is a lot older than methmouth & “hooping,” but has much better narrative/pr implants (the better to eat each other up with, dears). Easier to project sour cider onto a snakeapple, for example. & if this projectile badco had a market cap, it’d be way more astronomical than $2T, even if priced in $35 gold.

    Only way I can imagine Camusysiphus accurate is if by “happy” is meant happy idiot. Not that an idiot selects idiot from a menu, even if it seems to sound like Iditarod, & mush, being mushed, sounds like a good happymeal. Everybody gets what they get. Table is set, not rasa. Cue Leo Sayer. (Think you can dance, sodbuster?)

    Endogenous hopium & foamy Planet Pangloss it, mostly, is.

  144. @yakushimaru
    @Redneck farmer

    You are just surrendering to the sad situation. Men can have their moments. Domestic dispute can be emotional. Police is supposed to be there to help. And you are saying that the only way they can do their job is by either shooting the unfortunate guy to death or hit the shit out of him. That is not normal. I kind of hope that you can see it.

    You know, maybe you have kids, sometime kids do stupid things too. Parents, especially the father can physically control the kid, stop him in the heat of the moment, and then having time to do the teaching. By your logic, this is unthinkable. The father or any adult nearby, what they can do is either kill the stupid kid on spot, or beat him really hard like the adult himself is losing control.

    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Muggles

    US is supposed to be a beacon of something. A society of trust for goodness sake. Obviously you cannot trust the police not to kill someone on an ordinary dispute call. And you can neither trust the ordinary guy in their moments not to be a terrorist. Maybe that is the reason Americans are all acting up like morons (and yes, your word back to you.)

    Well, “yakushimaru” since you seem to be Japanese, why not tell the oppressive racists here how the cops in Japan handle their unruly and disobedient racial/ethnic minorities? Say, about like 35% of the population here. I’m sure the “Korean-Japanese”, Vietnamese and Chinese and Filipino illegal immigrants or descendants (not eligible for Japanese citizenship of course) would be happy to tell us about that.

    Japan is a very high trust/low crime nation, when they aren’t out running an empire based upon their own ethnic superiority. But that was years ago! Their former subjects can tell us about their gentle, peaceful policing back then.

    The Euros years ago lectured brutish Americans about civil rights and police brutality. Now that they have ample “diversity” due to illegal migrants, things seem a bit different there. We can send some diversity to Japan now too, if that’s want they want. We’ll be waiting for your advice after that.

  145. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't know. Vicky's economic proposals don't seem sufficiently organized to rise even to the level of naive schoolgirl socialism. Her program seems to be:

    steal stuff --> utopia

    Even the commies try to fill in one or two more steps in the process than this.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Even the commies try to fill in one or two more steps in the process than this.

    But real Commies (capital C) had to read thick, dull, nonsensical books to get a Party Card. It was hard work.

    The Vickies of the new Woke communism don’t have to read anything, even if they could. Just parrot slogans they see on Twitter. Clever man, that Soros.

  146. @BenKenobi
    @anon

    Anon999! The Last Anon.

    As to the subject at hand, I'm glad the police union found its collective balls. Perhaps the Kenosha Kid showed many that yes they can be defeated.

    Keep your powder dry. Over the top. Oh my fair cousin, and all that jazz.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    It’s funny how many in the media are saying “Where were his parents?”

    Because he’s white.

    But is he white?

  147. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    M to F tranny. Look closely at the jawline; there is a discontinuity where the heavier, square jaw suddenly becomes an attempt to replicate the gracile female chin. Flipping the hair over one side of the jawline is an attempt to obscure this.

  148. SMK says: • Website
    @Almost Missouri

    Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    "Systemic racism", which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of "systemic racism". Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant "systemic racism" a validity it does not possess.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @SMK, @Hypnotoad666

    “Systemic racism” -whatever that means exactly?- doesn’t exist objectively, unlike systematic reverse discrimination against whites, preferential treatment, double standards, “affirmative-action,” and quotas that favor blacks and penalize whites in education and the workplace, hiring and promotions, college admissions, grading, criminal justice (one should say injustice that favors blacks and penalizes whites in regard to arrests, indictments, prosecutions, convictions, and sentencing), etc.

    As for “racism”: what does that mean, exactly? Irrational, obsessive, hysterical, psychotic, murderous,, genocidal hatred of a race that often results in violence and destruction, individual and collective:: assaults, rapes and gang-rapes, muggings, armed robbery, torture, kidnapping,, murder, riots, arson, looting, etc. If so, blacks are the worst “racists,” by far. For example, blacks are 25-20 times more likely to murder whites than vice-versa and I’m sure the disparities in respect to assaults, robbery, rape and gang-rape are even more damning, enormous, startling, and revelatory.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  149. @anon
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is Vicky short for Victor/Victoria?

    Replies: @anon

    She looks a lot less Victor/Victoria and a lot more Shlomo/Shlomit.

  150. @ic1000
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    > Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting. Some key quotations:


    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property... So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.
     
    Sounds like a great book! How much will it cost for me to buy?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @J.Ross, @Kolya Krassotkin

    Recall Abby Hoffman; merely change the title from Steal This Book, to Loot This Book, and there ya are.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  151. @prosa123
    Physical standards for cops are much less today than they used to be. This could have been avoided, at least hopefully so, if the cops simply had overpowered him.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jack Armstrong

    George Floyd was overpowered.

  152. @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.

    Replies: @Charon, @Reg Cæsar

    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.

    Those who can’t find their own apartments probably shouldn’t be going around armed. Or be licensed to drive or registered to vote, for that matter.

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Reg Cæsar

    In the endless homogeneity that's much of postwar suburban development, discriminating ones place becomes difficult. You've never tried to open the wrong door at a hotel in one of those long corridors, only to discover you're on the wrong floor?

    It's the leap to the gun that's problematic.

  153. @ic1000
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    > Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting. Some key quotations:


    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property... So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.
     
    Sounds like a great book! How much will it cost for me to buy?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @J.Ross, @Kolya Krassotkin

    It certainly would suck (and be rightly illegal) if somebody burglarized that Vicky guy while using his own argument.

  154. @ADL Pyramid of Hate
    My mom has never voted GOP, and would never, but it took me about three minutes to “redpill” her on how this incident wasn’t exactly like how The Narrative painted it to be. The ongoing BLM “unrest,” to use MSM’s favorite term for it, is really turning out to be a whopping loser of an issue for the Dhimmicrats, even with the 400-point lead their simpatico status with The Cathedral gives them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …even with the 400-point lead their simpatico status with The Cathedral gives them.

    Those aren’t “points”, they’re called “Electors”.

    It’s not inconceivable that this could be flipped. Not to 469-69 (snicker, snicker), but a healthy 400 is within reach.

    Start with DJT retaining his 306 from 2016. Should he carry the states he lost by five points (rounded), i.e., VA, ME, NH, MN, CO and NV, that’s another 45. (He won one Maine elector in 2016.) Make the number 12, and that’s 15 more, albeit including his opponent’s state; a 17-pt. swing nets 57 more. Nixon pulled off a 17-pt rise between 1968 and 1972.

    Candidates who survive squeakers, “inversions”, recounts, recalls, etc, often win comfortably the next time around.

    This is not a prediction, by the way. I gave that up decades ago. Biden could win 400 electors should the majority at the polls be as mad as the minority in the street.

    Don’t write off this possibility. This Australian analysis attributes Trump’s 2016 inversion to educated whites packed into large states:

    US 2016 election final results: how Trump won

    Biden’s hope is that the same types in swing states will go for him. I suppose that depends on how close they live to the riot zones.

  155. @Negrolphin Pool
    @Henry Canaday

    Cops are not subject to the same self-defense laws as ordinary people, which stems from the fact that they have a duty to advance on threats whereas in many states a civilian has a duty to retreat.

    The police had already attempted the highest-level non-lethal means multiple times to stop the suspected felony in progress. The suspected felon, with a felony background of which the cops were aware, was holding a deadly weapon and not complying. Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?

    The problem there is that it gives every criminal an avoid-arrest option exercised through immediate escalation.

    Replies: @Henry Canaday

    “Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?”

    Well, he was retreating when shot. I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Henry Canaday

    Well, he was retreating when shot.

    Or he was reaching for a better weapon.

    I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    You think? You think? More like "I feelze" because I don't see any evidence of actual cognition on your part.

    Look up the laws in question, it's all out there on the net. Educate yourself, cure your ignorance.

    , @Gandydancer
    @Henry Canaday


    I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.
     
    Not just cops, anyone. That's the basic self-defense requirement. That this applies directly to cops is the import of Tennessee v Garner, the Wikipedia article for which is already linked to above. But in these circumstances Blake's ignoring orders to stop and apparently reaching for a better weapon than the knife he was already carrying did cause a reasonable apprehension that he was about to use deadly force on the cops. Like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOtyrS4ofAE&t=85 No, they are not required to wait until he actually produces the weapon.
  156. The writer says, “Trump won the Electoral College by 0.8%.” But 74/536 = 13.8%, so I don’t follow his analysis there.

  157. @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Replies: @anon, @Kolya Krassotkin

    Why is her face lopsided? Things like that are relatively common within an endogamous community. Some people really are their own grandpa, (or grandma), as the case may be.

  158. @ic1000
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    > Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting. Some key quotations:


    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property... So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.
     
    Sounds like a great book! How much will it cost for me to buy?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @J.Ross, @Kolya Krassotkin

    A book titled “In Defense of Looting” is meant to be stolen, not bought and paid for.

    There are less than four months until Kwanzaa, and it sounds like the perfect book to loot for Aunt Shaneeqwa

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Kolya Krassotkin


    A book titled “In Defense of Looting” is meant to be stolen, not bought and paid for.
     
    Except for the fact that the book is aimed at a certain 'Good' type of Person of Pallor who would never dream of shoplifting a book.
  159. anon[384] • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry Canaday
    @Negrolphin Pool

    "Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?"

    Well, he was retreating when shot. I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    Replies: @anon, @Gandydancer

    Well, he was retreating when shot.

    Or he was reaching for a better weapon.

    I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    You think? You think? More like “I feelze” because I don’t see any evidence of actual cognition on your part.

    Look up the laws in question, it’s all out there on the net. Educate yourself, cure your ignorance.

  160. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Things are moving on rather quickly at the moment.

    Via Instapundit comes this link to an NPR interview with Vicky Osterweil (LINK), the author of a new book titled In Defense of Looting.

    Some key quotations from the interview, with my emphasis:

    [Looting] also attacks the very way in which food and things are distributed. It attacks the idea of property, and it attacks the idea that in order for someone to have a roof over their head or have a meal ticket, they have to work for a boss, in order to buy things that people just like them somewhere else in the world had to make under the same conditions. It points to the way in which that's unjust. And the reason that the world is organized that way, obviously, is for the profit of the people who own the stores and the factories. So you get to the heart of that property relation, and demonstrate that without police and without state oppression, we can have things for free.

    Importantly, I think especially when it's in the context of a Black uprising like the one we're living through now, it also attacks the history of whiteness and white supremacy. The very basis of property in the U.S. is derived through whiteness and through Black oppression, through the history of slavery and settler domination of the country. Looting strikes at the heart of property, of whiteness and of the police. It gets to the very root of the way those three things are interconnected. And also it provides people with an imaginative sense of freedom and pleasure and helps them imagine a world that could be. And I think that's a part of it that doesn't really get talked about—that riots and looting are experienced as sort of joyous and liberatory.
     
    Vicky's clearly brewing up some hate-fueled rebellion against Mom, Dad, and Western Civ, which then fuels a raging case of ultra-woke Substitute Savior Syndrome.

    Here's a publicity photo of Vicky:

    https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/VickyOsterweil.jpg

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Kronos, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @black sea, @Daniel Chieh, @Alden, @Henry's Cat, @Achmed E. Newman, @ChrisZ, @anon, @Ed, @Dr. X, @Possumman, @William Badwhite, @Ben tillman, @ic1000, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    I have oddball tastes, so in the event that person were actually a woman, I just might find her strangely attractive.

    But that, my friends, is a dude.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Servant of Gla'aki


    But that, my friends, is a dude.

     

    Yes, this seems fairly clear, and it's why I included the photo. But then I forgot to include the quotation marks around the name 'Vicky' I was intending to use to signal this in my post above. Having done this might have saved a lot of effort from you and many other commenters, all carried out while I slumbered blissfully. I sincerely hope you are not all exhausted by your efforts on this.
  161. The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.

    And George Floyd killed himself without any assistance from the MPD.

    • Replies: @Gandydancer
    @JimB


    And George Floyd killed himself without any assistance from the MPD.
     
    Correct. And your point is?

    Replies: @JimB

  162. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    Time was, the cops were allowed to beat a perp into submission with their batons. That didn’t look good so they had to use choke holds. A couple people didn’t wake up, and so they went to tasers.

    A couple speedfreaks had heart attacks, so they have to turn the voltage down to “mildly anoying” instead of incapacitating.

    But once you’ve taken away all non-lethal means to subdue a dangerous criminal it can’t surprise anyone that cops have no choice left but to use deadly force when its life or death reaction time.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  163. @Almost Missouri

    Systemic Racism has got nothing to do with it.

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    "Systemic racism", which is a fake concept anyway, has never been alleged in good faith. No one alleging it now is waiting just for true cases of systemic racism before deploying the allegation. The ability to deploy the accusation at will, irrespective of facts, is the entire purpose of "systemic racism". Requesting that accusers only allege it in valid instances, is to grant "systemic racism" a validity it does not possess.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @SMK, @Hypnotoad666

    System Racism is a form of alchemy that turns the lead of black dysfunction into the gold of white guilt.

    For example, all of these BLM incidents simply involve black criminal violently resisting lawful arrest. Instead of reforming the police, it would more logical to think about reforming black people.

    But since that is an impermissible idea, the burden of blacks’ bad behavior somehow lands on white people. It’s quite amazing, actually.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Hypnotoad666


    But since that is an impermissible idea, the burden of blacks’ bad behavior somehow lands on white people. It’s quite amazing, actually.
     
    If you assume, deep down, that black people aren't fully human, and therefore are not responsible for their actions, then this is where you end up. As a Good White Person, it becomes your job to 'save' black people.

    Of course you have to be full of yourself and utterly blind to your own sins and shortcomings to think you can take on such a role, but such is the state of the SJW/Woke of the West.

    This is the essence of what I call Substitute Savior Syndrome.
  164. @Hypnotoad666
    @Almost Missouri

    System Racism is a form of alchemy that turns the lead of black dysfunction into the gold of white guilt.

    For example, all of these BLM incidents simply involve black criminal violently resisting lawful arrest. Instead of reforming the police, it would more logical to think about reforming black people.

    But since that is an impermissible idea, the burden of blacks' bad behavior somehow lands on white people. It's quite amazing, actually.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    But since that is an impermissible idea, the burden of blacks’ bad behavior somehow lands on white people. It’s quite amazing, actually.

    If you assume, deep down, that black people aren’t fully human, and therefore are not responsible for their actions, then this is where you end up. As a Good White Person, it becomes your job to ‘save’ black people.

    Of course you have to be full of yourself and utterly blind to your own sins and shortcomings to think you can take on such a role, but such is the state of the SJW/Woke of the West.

    This is the essence of what I call Substitute Savior Syndrome.

  165. @Servant of Gla'aki
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I have oddball tastes, so in the event that person were actually a woman, I just might find her strangely attractive.

    But that, my friends, is a dude.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    But that, my friends, is a dude.

    Yes, this seems fairly clear, and it’s why I included the photo. But then I forgot to include the quotation marks around the name ‘Vicky’ I was intending to use to signal this in my post above. Having done this might have saved a lot of effort from you and many other commenters, all carried out while I slumbered blissfully. I sincerely hope you are not all exhausted by your efforts on this.

  166. @res
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thanks to both of you for the recommendation. There is also a version entitled Demons.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    The title depends on the translation, as you might expect. The version I read is the 1916 public domain translation by Constance Garnett, but you might find a different translation to be more congenial.

    Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky are the most famous and well-regarded recent translators of Dostoyevsky.

    Thinking about this topic helped me recall an article I read a long time ago from the New Yorker (having a look back at it confirms this magazine in the past included at least some interesting content) about translations of the Russians. It’s here if you’d like a look: LINK.

    • Replies: @res
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thanks! The version I am going to read is ISBN 0375411224 which was translated by Pevear and Volokhonsky.

  167. @anon
    @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Physiognomy is real. I'm not sure that is a genetic "her", either.

    Replies: @Jewels, @MBlanc46, @Truth

    It sure has a masculine look about it, but I do see signs of facial hair or Adam’s apple.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @MBlanc46

    (... I guess he was).

  168. @anon
    @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Why is her face lopsided?

    Physiognomy is real. I'm not sure that is a genetic "her", either.

    Replies: @Jewels, @MBlanc46, @Truth

    Are you being serious now, Dude?

  169. @MBlanc46
    @anon

    It sure has a masculine look about it, but I do see signs of facial hair or Adam’s apple.

    Replies: @Truth

    (… I guess he was).

  170. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The millenarian longing is right out there on a platter in this one. This is almost purely religious, utopian language, with only the barest veil of political cover.


    You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street.

     

    And the number of the Beast was Adam-12?

    Replies: @Charon

    You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street.

    1) Police and Property are two things, not one, but never mind.

    2) Taking property and “getting rid of property” are likewise also two very different things.

    3) “Sharing” the property they have taken is probably the very last thing these people intend on doing with it.

  171. @JimB

    The whole country should take a deep breath and then admit a fact: This was just a domestic dispute that didn’t have anything to do with racism.
     
    And George Floyd killed himself without any assistance from the MPD.

    Replies: @Gandydancer

    And George Floyd killed himself without any assistance from the MPD.

    Correct. And your point is?

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Gandydancer

    That it should added to the list of bullshit accusations against cops.

  172. @Henry Canaday
    @Negrolphin Pool

    "Is the argument that the felony arrest should have somehow been cancelled because the suspect decided to brandish a deadly weapon?"

    Well, he was retreating when shot. I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    Replies: @anon, @Gandydancer

    I think the law is that no matter what he did or brandished in the past, even a few seconds ago, if there is not an immediate future danger to innocent life, the cop cannot use lethal force.

    Not just cops, anyone. That’s the basic self-defense requirement. That this applies directly to cops is the import of Tennessee v Garner, the Wikipedia article for which is already linked to above. But in these circumstances Blake’s ignoring orders to stop and apparently reaching for a better weapon than the knife he was already carrying did cause a reasonable apprehension that he was about to use deadly force on the cops. Like this:

    No, they are not required to wait until he actually produces the weapon.

  173. @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    Vicki's partner is 31 year old feminist writer Sophie Lewis who wants to abolish the nuclear family.

    Some guy at Taki's opined that the reason Ellen became a lesbian is that she realized she wasn't cute enough to pull the guys she wanted. That theory fits these two.

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qjdzwb/sophie-lewis-feminist-abolishing-the-family-full-surrogacy-now

    https://video-images.vice.com/test-uploads/articles/5e4c175d6b5b2900986d48ef/lede/1582232846803-Sophie-Lews_Vice_Leaman_0176.jpeg

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yeah she’s an ever lovin trainwreck, that one. Her green card should be revoked.

  174. @Alden
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The girl friend is a black woman named Laquisha. You can’t deny that.

    Like many MEN OF UNZ, Torn and Frayed confuses the black man White woman porn he’s addicted to with reality. Never having had a relationship with a White woman in his life, Torn and Frayed, is stuck with porn and his hand.

    The MEN OF UNZ live in a porn fantasy world of of horny teen harlots love creepy old men and black man White woman porn in which the main attraction is their homosexual attraction to the black men.

    Replies: @JMcG, @bomag

    LOL!

    Well, you go to war with the army you’ve got.

  175. @Kolya Krassotkin
    @ic1000

    A book titled "In Defense of Looting" is meant to be stolen, not bought and paid for.

    There are less than four months until Kwanzaa, and it sounds like the perfect book to loot for Aunt Shaneeqwa

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    A book titled “In Defense of Looting” is meant to be stolen, not bought and paid for.

    Except for the fact that the book is aimed at a certain ‘Good’ type of Person of Pallor who would never dream of shoplifting a book.

  176. @Achmed E. Newman
    @TomSchmidt

    Your 1st paragraph: BS. Ever even opened the Bible, Tom? Even one takes it just as a history book, one can read about actual slavery along with people hired out for talents, etc. Do you think He just made it all up ... OK, they were parables, but you get the idea...

    No, of course, not everyone should hire himself out. In history, and even very recent history of the US, running a small production or service business was quite doable. It's just that without property rights, there is not way it can happen. Secondly, with hugely onerous regulation and tax burdens, as we have now, so many people are forced to work for the massive firms that, BTW, help MAKE these burdensome regulations and avoid the taxes, because small business is forced out.

    Of course that's not good, leading to your 2nd paragraph. You finally used the term "crony capitalism". That's what we have, but it doesn't roll off the tongue, so I'd like to just use what this Big-State/Big-Biz cooperation should be called, which is Fascism. (Only thing is, that reminds people of guys with armbands, salutes, and crooked crosses, while I'm just talking economic systems.) Yes, that's we have, but it's most certainly not the entrepreneurial free-market Capitalism that existed before.

    I won't argue at all that the Fascists in charge of Big-Biz in America have pillaged the American taxpayer and saver via FED and Feral Gov't bailouts and other policies. How is that Capitalism?

    So, the world "capital" comes from the root word for "head". Nice job, etymologist, but the word "capital" has meant plant and equipment since the Industrial Revolution went into full swing. Otherwise, you would certainly not read people writing about "capital" vs. "labor". That wouldn't make sense, per your idea. If you don't have property rights, you, as a small businessman, can't hold onto your plant and equipment for your product or service business. That's BAD.

    Lastly, you seem to be doing what Communists have done through every one of their revolutions: They tell everyone that their problems are due to this bogeyman Capitalism, while the nations in turmoil are not experiencing anything like it. Change the definition, rant against it, because the actual situation DOES suck, and then, there you go, Communism is the only way to go, right?

    Tom, I'm telling you, if you don't believe in property rights, then you may very well be a Communist. You have a lot more in common with Victor/Victoria* than I would have thought from your more reasonable posts in the past.

    .

    * With Calvinists' point still in mind, that the woman in question is likely much too stupid to read Das Kapital, much less quote it, that's what she is.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Thank you for the detailed and honest critique, Achmed.

    Graeber when mentioning the ancients is little in contact with the Bible; he means the Romans, the Greeks, and Babylonians. He uses the Bible not much at all, so there’s an oversight there.

    You raise an interesting counterpoint; of course, Jewish law was different from Roman standards. One of the Catholic four sins crying out to heaven for vengeance, based on Old Testament theology, is depriving a worker of his just wages. Carcopino, in Daily Life in Ancient Rome, gives a picture of the workplace then. No labor market, as today; perhaps a functioning labor market requires as a precondition a proclamation from God that you violate HIS law when you defraud the worker. No proclamation from God, no belief in Him, and the basis for hiring labor by the day goes away.

    What’s captured in Taylorism is a few things reinforced by your point. First, time-motion studies require accurate clocks, not present in ancient times (though some prostitutes in Athens used accurate water clocks, from my recollection), when a Roman hour would vary with the length of the day.

    Second, recall Kierkegaard’s idea that Christianity requires one to see other humans as ends in themselves, and not as means. Remove Christian thinking from employment, add clocks, and you see humans as meat robots whose time does not belong to them, but to you, who owns it.

    I wouldn’t argue against property rights; calling stealing and looting by those terms might indicate that to you. And stealing increases security costs at no benefit to most, though it is at least honest: calling it reparations is at least an effort to justify it, when they know it’s wrong. It beats the theft whereby one “engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose.”

    Graeber has a nice section on “self-ownership,” which is the absurd position one is forced to adopt to justify selling pieces of oneself; if you want I can dig it up and post. As you note, better to run a small production business and sell things, capturing the increased value of the goods or services. Jane Jacobs points out how a VAT penalizes these small businesses because they have to float the value of VAT on input items before getting rebate when they sell; this is a higher percentage of capital for them, and for a corporation that can take in low-value materials and turn out high-value products, there’s basically no capital tied up in VAT. Add that to your regulations imposing burdens on small businesses.

    “Nice job, etymologist, but the word “capital” has meant plant and equipment since the Industrial Revolution went into full swing. “

    Let’s just quote La Wik: “In economics, capital consists of assets that can enhance one’s power to perform economically useful work. ”

    The second definition allows us to include things like, for instance, knowledge as a form of capital. Trust, as a variant of social capital, as a form of value. And, of course, plant and equipment.

    Once you get past plant and equipment, and include knowledge as a form of capital, so many of the childishly simple Friedmanite concepts like “the only purpose of a business is to turn a profit” collapse. Perhaps the best explication for this is Gilder’s Knowledge and Power; you might also appreciate his take in Life After Googleabout how Google’s mechanistic view of human knowledge isn’t wrong, but incomplete. Like viewing capital as “plant and equipment,” and ignoring law, social order, human knowledge, and ethics as forms of capital.

    To give one example, since this is a site with plenty of dissenters, we know from Robert Putnam that diversity destroys social capital. Putnam is saddened to come to this conclusion, as a liberal, but it’s what the data show him. So large employers who advocate for mass immigration to drive down wages are doing two things: generating higher profits for themselves, and destroying the social capital represented by high-trust communities. (I’d argue that it’s much easier to turn social capital into economic capital than vice-versa.) under your definition of capital, or Milton Friedman’s, they’re good capitalists; under a wider definition of capital, they’re destroying capital instead of preserving or growing it.

    Another example. Producing an object produces two things: the object itself, and the knowledge of how to make it. Under comparative advantage, only the first has any value, which is why Ricardo can propose that one country make only one thing while another makes another, and they trade. Humorously, modern bad economists use guns and butter in plenty of examples; any country that gave up making guns to focus only on butter would likely face the loss of all butter by armed men who refused to trade. The overall point: a surface gain, economically, might come at the loss of actual capital represented by the tacit knowledge in complex supply chains.

    Of course, our society has come to see things my way. Compare the market cap of something like Google to its tangible book value, and you’ll see that most of the capital therein is not plant and equipment, but things like goodwill.

    I assume you don’t send your kids to, or ever attended, public education, one of the goals of the communist manifesto. Unfortunately, we are all Communists to some extent now. Was Marx wrong to advocate for universal public education? If not, why isn’t universal college justified?

    What you quickly find is that Marx is a pretty good diagnostician, and a lot of his concepts have held up over time, Labor theory of value not being one of them. But he has one solution, it seems, to every diagnosis: amputate. A lot of people got amputated in the effort to put in place his solution to the problem.

    I won’t link you to articles about Mondragon, but invite you to investigate it on your own. It’s a form of cooperative capitalism that requires worker ownership of the means of production, with profits distributed to the workers themselves. I find it fascinating because it actually pushes capitalism as the format for society, but eliminates the function of “capitalists” strip mining other forms of capital to turn into economic capital. It’s based on Catholic Social Teaching.

    If you know what carried interest is, you should know that Mondragon allows workers to pay a carried interest tax rate on their income; check out Subchapter T of the tax code. If you own a copy of TurboTax, run the following experiment: give a married man 10,000 in salary, and 80,000 in dividends. Then calculate the income tax due. It’s 0, or it least it was before the 2017 tax act; you do wind up paying $765 for SS/Medicare on the $10,000 salary. In a state like Texas with no state income tax, this gives the worker $7440 monthly in income, after tax.

    Sounds like a great way to actually build capital. Check it out.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  177. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob McX


    She was acting on the reasonable assumption that a black intruder would be more dangerous than a white one, having made the very unreasonable assumption that she was in her own apartment.
     
    Those who can't find their own apartments probably shouldn't be going around armed. Or be licensed to drive or registered to vote, for that matter.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    In the endless homogeneity that’s much of postwar suburban development, discriminating ones place becomes difficult. You’ve never tried to open the wrong door at a hotel in one of those long corridors, only to discover you’re on the wrong floor?

    It’s the leap to the gun that’s problematic.

  178. @Poco
    @Ben tillman

    He wasn't killed.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    You’re right. I should have said shooting him was the only way to arrest him.

  179. @danand

    “Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades?”
     
    Yancey Ward, at least some are:

    “Cops in three major cities report their current Tasers aren't as effective as previous models:

    Police departments in New York, Los Angeles and Houston each switched from older models to newer ones in recent years. Those newer models, called the X2 and the X26P, were designed to be safer for suspects, because they put out less electrical charge than the older X26.”

    Replies: @Kronos, @HA

    “Those newer models, called the X2 and the X26P, were designed to be safer for suspects, because they put out less electrical charge than the older X26.”

    If the only alternative to a tasering that doesn’t incapacitate is shooting someone, then the next generation of tasers will probably provide a higher charge with each successive shock — in other words, the first shock will be some relatively milder X2-level, while the second or third will be comparable to the X26.

    You’d need some finessing for the cases where there are two or more people that get tasered (so that the second person would be able to receive a starter shock instead of whatever happens to be the second-setting) and that may already be too complicated in the heat of the moment, but it’s worth a shot (so to speak).

  180. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @res

    The title depends on the translation, as you might expect. The version I read is the 1916 public domain translation by Constance Garnett, but you might find a different translation to be more congenial.

    Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky are the most famous and well-regarded recent translators of Dostoyevsky.

    Thinking about this topic helped me recall an article I read a long time ago from the New Yorker (having a look back at it confirms this magazine in the past included at least some interesting content) about translations of the Russians. It's here if you'd like a look: LINK.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks! The version I am going to read is ISBN 0375411224 which was translated by Pevear and Volokhonsky.

  181. anon[155] • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt
    @Achmed E. Newman

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery. Once you have agreed to sell your time to the capitalist, he is empowered to hire people like Frederick Winslow Taylor to construct time studies to make sure you aren't "stealing" any of his time by, you know, not working 3600 of the 3600 seconds in an hour. You might not see this as the slave relationship because it is normal, but a society that had actual slavery would see it as such.

    Communism just replaces the "capitalist" with a diffused, unaccountable committee run by the worst sorts of people who've climbed the greasy pole to The top. It's debatable which system causes more misery, though Communism certainly kills a lot more people. Or at least it has; the Crony Capitalists, who take the Taylorist view of labor as cost to be cut and milked for every second, seem to have found a way to make millions redundant with their bailout-for-Wall-Street lockdowns. The worldwide death toll from the economic collapse due to lockdowns will almost certainly exceed that of COVID; poor, demoralized people live less long than wealthy sociopaths.

    Stealing and looting won't solve the problem, and in imposing higher security costs will make it worse. You might check out the Mondragon Cooperatives for a true capitalist route, focusing on the meaning of capital as derived from caput, head.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @anon

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Lol, whoever DavidGraeber is he is ignorant and you are even more so. Which “ancients” are you babbling about, Ancient Aliens maybe? The Romans and Greeks are pretty “ancient” and they recognized hired workers.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That’s nothing new, it’s been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don’t want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you’d either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Mondragon Cooperatives lol, a rather traditional organization formed in Catholic Spain that’s a whole lot like other organizations dating back over 1,000 years. Your education was obviously quite niggardly and you really don’t know anything about human history or human nature.

    Shouldn’t you be down at your nearest Antifa / Only Black Lives Matter peaceful looting riot looking for some stuff to steal or burn?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @anon

    Ah, anon. I do love the use of the term niggardly with respect to my education. Well done, sir, since there's zero chance you could be a madam.

    I give you two reports on Ancient Rome/Greece that your education decrease in niggardliness.

    First, from Aristotle, you poo-flinging cretin:

    https://philosophy.lander.edu/logic/person.html

    Second, a page on ancient labor markets. Since you cannot be energetic enough to even choose a pseudonym (from the Greek; look it up), I assume you won't bother going to the page. Read, and enjoy the learning.

    https://erenow.net/ancient/ancient-greece-and-rome-an-encyclopedia-for-students-4-volume-set/245.php


    Although only a minority of the wealthier citizens could avoid working to earn a living, those who did have to work strove to work for themselves. Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.

    Because of this attitude toward labor and wages, there was only limited development of a working class in ancient Greece and Rome. Most work was done instead by slaves or others who were forced to work. An exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     

    Replies: @anon

  182. @William Badwhite
    @syonredux


    Maybe American Blacks should emigrate to Japan. I’m sure that they would flourish in that environment…..
     
    We certainly know that Mr. Yakushimaru's local police would have no problem restraining people like Mr. Blake or Mr. Floyd.

    Replies: @Glt

    They still have free rein with batons.

  183. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Kronos

    Vicky in the Jewish Currents interview:


    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible, which is the police and property. You attack the thing that makes caring impossible in order to have things for free, to share pleasure on the street. Obviously, riots are not the revolution in and of themselves. But they gesture toward the world to come, where the streets are spaces where we are free to be happy, and be with each other, and care for each other.
     

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    Riots are really emotive, an emotional way of expressing yourself. It is about pleasure and social reproduction. You care for one another by getting rid of the thing that makes that impossible . . .

    This could be a quote from Mein Kampf, or a rationalization for Kristallnacht.

    Maybe the sequel to In Defense of Looting will be In Defense of Lynching.

  184. @J.Ross
    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
    https://twitter.com/BrandonStraka/status/1299355762507087872

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Hypnotoad666

    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.

    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day “occupation” of DC?

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Hypnotoad666

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Lol, why would they want to do that? Nah, journo-lists want to get in on that sweet, sweet NGO / colour revo money for themselves, that's all.

    It's getting to the point where people need to stop asking these rhetorical questions. We all know the answers, the journo-lists either don't know because stupid or they do know and certainly won't break the code of silence. Let's just put the facts out there: Only Black Lives Matter operators are being put up in fancy hotels with other people's money. Could be Soros or many other billionaires, could be parts of our own government, could be the People's Republic of China or a combination of the above. But there's no way any of the riot co-ordinators are spending their own shekels. In a confrontation one could ask them "Who's paying for your bar bill and hotel room? What white billionaire is paying you to be here?" but that would be just more of the same entertainment.

    The people are paid rioters intent on overthrowing what's left of the Constitution by force. That makes them enemies and traitors. Full stop.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Hypnotoad666


    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?
     
    They will get right on that after they are done writing down the license plates number of the obvious Antifa vans in Kenosha. If they are not emotionally exhausted, that is. /s

    There is so much low hanging info here. Where is the vaunted FBI? Or even some amateur secret agent wannabe?
    , @prosa123
    @Hypnotoad666

    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day “occupation” of DC?

    Not as bad as the even more expensive NYC hotels that are now housing skells at taxpayer expense. To the great consternation of people living near the hotels.

  185. anon[155] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666
    @J.Ross


    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
     
    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day "occupation" of DC?

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about "boogaloo boy" conspiracies, perhaps one of our "journalists" could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @prosa123

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Lol, why would they want to do that? Nah, journo-lists want to get in on that sweet, sweet NGO / colour revo money for themselves, that’s all.

    It’s getting to the point where people need to stop asking these rhetorical questions. We all know the answers, the journo-lists either don’t know because stupid or they do know and certainly won’t break the code of silence. Let’s just put the facts out there: Only Black Lives Matter operators are being put up in fancy hotels with other people’s money. Could be Soros or many other billionaires, could be parts of our own government, could be the People’s Republic of China or a combination of the above. But there’s no way any of the riot co-ordinators are spending their own shekels. In a confrontation one could ask them “Who’s paying for your bar bill and hotel room? What white billionaire is paying you to be here?” but that would be just more of the same entertainment.

    The people are paid rioters intent on overthrowing what’s left of the Constitution by force. That makes them enemies and traitors. Full stop.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Are there fancy hotels in Kenosha?

  186. @Hypnotoad666
    @J.Ross


    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
     
    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day "occupation" of DC?

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about "boogaloo boy" conspiracies, perhaps one of our "journalists" could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @prosa123

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    They will get right on that after they are done writing down the license plates number of the obvious Antifa vans in Kenosha. If they are not emotionally exhausted, that is. /s

    There is so much low hanging info here. Where is the vaunted FBI? Or even some amateur secret agent wannabe?

  187. @Gandydancer
    @JimB


    And George Floyd killed himself without any assistance from the MPD.
     
    Correct. And your point is?

    Replies: @JimB

    That it should added to the list of bullshit accusations against cops.

  188. @Hypnotoad666
    @J.Ross


    BLM protesters in DC (a top story on BBC radio) are staying in nice hotels.
     
    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day "occupation" of DC?

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about "boogaloo boy" conspiracies, perhaps one of our "journalists" could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Replies: @anon, @Jim Don Bob, @prosa123

    DC Hotels are at least a couple hundred dollars per night. So who is paying for these BLM carpetbaggers to set up in DC for the duration of their 60-day “occupation” of DC?

    Not as bad as the even more expensive NYC hotels that are now housing skells at taxpayer expense. To the great consternation of people living near the hotels.

  189. @anon
    @Hypnotoad666

    Instead of writing fantasy fiction about “boogaloo boy” conspiracies, perhaps one of our “journalists” could ask some of these professional protesters who is paying their hotel bill?

    Lol, why would they want to do that? Nah, journo-lists want to get in on that sweet, sweet NGO / colour revo money for themselves, that's all.

    It's getting to the point where people need to stop asking these rhetorical questions. We all know the answers, the journo-lists either don't know because stupid or they do know and certainly won't break the code of silence. Let's just put the facts out there: Only Black Lives Matter operators are being put up in fancy hotels with other people's money. Could be Soros or many other billionaires, could be parts of our own government, could be the People's Republic of China or a combination of the above. But there's no way any of the riot co-ordinators are spending their own shekels. In a confrontation one could ask them "Who's paying for your bar bill and hotel room? What white billionaire is paying you to be here?" but that would be just more of the same entertainment.

    The people are paid rioters intent on overthrowing what's left of the Constitution by force. That makes them enemies and traitors. Full stop.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Are there fancy hotels in Kenosha?

  190. No idea about Kenosha but there sure are fancy hotels in Washington, DC and some Only Black Lives Matter people were staying in them…as seen in this vid beginning at 00:57

  191. @Yancey Ward
    Have tasers been made less powerful in the last two decades? I was tased as part of demonstration of their use- it put me down instantly and I pissed my pants. This was 20 years+ ago, so are tasers being reduced in power for some reason? I have read a spate of these stories in recent years- tased arrestees not being affected at all.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Redneck farmer, @El Dato, @Rob McX, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Henry's Cat, @Bill P, @Hypnotoad666, @Jiminy

    A couple of years ago in a small town here, the cops killed a raging druggo by tasering him. After examining the guns, it was determined that he was tasered a total of 28 times. Man, he must have had smoke coming out of his ears!

  192. @anon
    @TomSchmidt

    She is actually correct, here. To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Lol, whoever DavidGraeber is he is ignorant and you are even more so. Which "ancients" are you babbling about, Ancient Aliens maybe? The Romans and Greeks are pretty "ancient" and they recognized hired workers.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That's nothing new, it's been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don't want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you'd either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Mondragon Cooperatives lol, a rather traditional organization formed in Catholic Spain that's a whole lot like other organizations dating back over 1,000 years. Your education was obviously quite niggardly and you really don't know anything about human history or human nature.

    Shouldn't you be down at your nearest Antifa / Only Black Lives Matter peaceful looting riot looking for some stuff to steal or burn?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Ah, anon. I do love the use of the term niggardly with respect to my education. Well done, sir, since there’s zero chance you could be a madam.

    I give you two reports on Ancient Rome/Greece that your education decrease in niggardliness.

    First, from Aristotle, you poo-flinging cretin:

    https://philosophy.lander.edu/logic/person.html

    Second, a page on ancient labor markets. Since you cannot be energetic enough to even choose a pseudonym (from the Greek; look it up), I assume you won’t bother going to the page. Read, and enjoy the learning.

    https://erenow.net/ancient/ancient-greece-and-rome-an-encyclopedia-for-students-4-volume-set/245.php

    Although only a minority of the wealthier citizens could avoid working to earn a living, those who did have to work strove to work for themselves. Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.

    Because of this attitude toward labor and wages, there was only limited development of a working class in ancient Greece and Rome. Most work was done instead by slaves or others who were forced to work. An exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.

    • Replies: @anon
    @TomSchmidt

    Lol. Self contradict much?

    Then:


    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery
     
    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     
    Thanks for showing Now that you were wrong Then. It's great that you agree with me!

    Next, let's return to your support for looting, shall we?

    I'll repeat myself:

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That’s nothing new, it’s been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don’t want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you’d either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Perhaps you could repair to Aristotle's Politics in order to find yourself some support for chaos and looting in The Ancients? I'd like to watch that. Or is this just a case of a lieberal's mask accidentally slipping down a bit, revealing the usually hidden Jacobin underneath?

    In another comment thread today you are in sympathy with people renting U-Hauls to escape from New York, lest they lose whatever investment remains in their house / condo / etc. so apparently when looting and rioting affects people near you, it is not so funny a thing that you are sanguine about it. So...looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York -- not so much. Isn't this rather hypocritical?

    Oh, then there's the Mondragon co-op, you didn't explain why it is so different from other, similar forms of economic activity dating back to the days of Charlemagne, nor did you explain the relevance of such co-ops with regard to your endorsement of theft and robbery. It would be most helpful if you could get around to that. Thanks.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  193. anon[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt
    @anon

    Ah, anon. I do love the use of the term niggardly with respect to my education. Well done, sir, since there's zero chance you could be a madam.

    I give you two reports on Ancient Rome/Greece that your education decrease in niggardliness.

    First, from Aristotle, you poo-flinging cretin:

    https://philosophy.lander.edu/logic/person.html

    Second, a page on ancient labor markets. Since you cannot be energetic enough to even choose a pseudonym (from the Greek; look it up), I assume you won't bother going to the page. Read, and enjoy the learning.

    https://erenow.net/ancient/ancient-greece-and-rome-an-encyclopedia-for-students-4-volume-set/245.php


    Although only a minority of the wealthier citizens could avoid working to earn a living, those who did have to work strove to work for themselves. Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.

    Because of this attitude toward labor and wages, there was only limited development of a working class in ancient Greece and Rome. Most work was done instead by slaves or others who were forced to work. An exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     

    Replies: @anon

    Lol. Self contradict much?

    Then:

    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.

    Thanks for showing Now that you were wrong Then. It’s great that you agree with me!

    Next, let’s return to your support for looting, shall we?

    I’ll repeat myself:

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That’s nothing new, it’s been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don’t want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you’d either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Perhaps you could repair to Aristotle’s Politics in order to find yourself some support for chaos and looting in The Ancients? I’d like to watch that. Or is this just a case of a lieberal’s mask accidentally slipping down a bit, revealing the usually hidden Jacobin underneath?

    In another comment thread today you are in sympathy with people renting U-Hauls to escape from New York, lest they lose whatever investment remains in their house / condo / etc. so apparently when looting and rioting affects people near you, it is not so funny a thing that you are sanguine about it. So…looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York — not so much. Isn’t this rather hypocritical?

    Oh, then there’s the Mondragon co-op, you didn’t explain why it is so different from other, similar forms of economic activity dating back to the days of Charlemagne, nor did you explain the relevance of such co-ops with regard to your endorsement of theft and robbery. It would be most helpful if you could get around to that. Thanks.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @anon


    Then:

    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     

    Are you even vaguely familiar with the concept of "paraphrase?" I see that you ignored these words:

    Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.
     
    I wonder why?

    Note that some ancient contracts for farm labor tried to elide the problem of buying time by selling the right to harvest and offering to buy back the commodities harvested, as if they had been "produced" by the harvesters. Even today, much of harvesting is piece work, not hourly, which is why farmers can pay for items harvested by children. One wonders what might happen if the grower grew the field, sold the right to harvest it, promised to offer a set rate for crops when selling the right, but left the workers free to bargain with whomever they wanted to buy the results of the harvest.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery.
    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn't title it "Steal This Book." Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    So…looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York — not so much. Isn’t this rather hypocritical?
    I'm not in favor of any form of looting. We're taking a part of Osterwiler's argument to look at a hidden form of looting, where sociopaths running corporations loot the wealth of first the working class, next the middle class, to increase "profits" (which are actually destructive conversions of other forms of capital to monetary capital) that allows said sociopaths to buy back stock, driving up stock prices and the value of the options they have previously been granted: in effect, they get to use someone else's money (if you consider a corporation to be owned by the stockholders; different issue) to make themselves richer.

    Prithee, good pilgrim: do you approve of people who drink fresh monetary water from the Fed spigot using it to "wet their beaks" while the rest of us get to use the secondary substances that result? That looting is tied with the agency problem inherent in the wage system empowered by Taylor's "Scientific" management, and put into hyperdrive with modern information technology.

    I'm not sure why you're so in favor of wage labor? Maybe you derive benefit from it as an overseer. If so, "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you..."

    Mondragon is similar to Medieval corporate forms; you seem familiar with some of the economic history of the times. Those Terrible Middle Ages by Regine Perrod dispels a lot of the nonsense that propagandists from the "Renaissance" foisted on us: if not for the Black Death, that age might have continued to today.

    Here's the brief argument for Mondragon. You still have corporations, but they are owned by workers. Decisions are democratic while rewards are economic. Capital doesn't hire labor; labor hires capital is one of their principles.

    The fascinating thing about a Mondragon style cooperative is this: it allows workers to avoid the double-taxation of dividends at the corporate level. See Subchapter T dividends; Agway is one such cooperative corporation. Structured correctly, all the corporate profits pass through to the workers as dividends. If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you'll find it's $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends. If resident in a state without income tax, then, a man could earn $7440 a month, after tax, which would go to pay for a lot of housing, kids, and all the other good things in life. Leaving the biggest looter of all, the Fed-creating US federal government, with $1530, annually.

    Now go, and fight the looters.

    Replies: @vhrm, @anon

  194. What people fail to realize is most of these protestors are homosexual. It’s gay rage, the military knows of this, so did Adolf Hitler who used them until he had power all sewn up.
    The other faction are felons who ruined their lives so they want the old government that tagged them with that abolished.
    These are not serious people, these are mentally ill losers.
    They will be the first people to lose their rights once their dream is realized, they are too stupid to see no government wants anarchists anywhere in the world.

  195. @anon
    @TomSchmidt

    Lol. Self contradict much?

    Then:


    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery
     
    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     
    Thanks for showing Now that you were wrong Then. It's great that you agree with me!

    Next, let's return to your support for looting, shall we?

    I'll repeat myself:

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery. That’s nothing new, it’s been the Hume-an condition for millennia. Virtue signal all you want, you really don’t want to live in the world this mentally ill Jew is proposing. Because like most comfy-chair thinkers, you’d either die of violence or starvation, or you would be enslaved by some kind of gang.

    Perhaps you could repair to Aristotle's Politics in order to find yourself some support for chaos and looting in The Ancients? I'd like to watch that. Or is this just a case of a lieberal's mask accidentally slipping down a bit, revealing the usually hidden Jacobin underneath?

    In another comment thread today you are in sympathy with people renting U-Hauls to escape from New York, lest they lose whatever investment remains in their house / condo / etc. so apparently when looting and rioting affects people near you, it is not so funny a thing that you are sanguine about it. So...looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York -- not so much. Isn't this rather hypocritical?

    Oh, then there's the Mondragon co-op, you didn't explain why it is so different from other, similar forms of economic activity dating back to the days of Charlemagne, nor did you explain the relevance of such co-ops with regard to your endorsement of theft and robbery. It would be most helpful if you could get around to that. Thanks.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Then:

    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.

    Are you even vaguely familiar with the concept of “paraphrase?” I see that you ignored these words:

    Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.

    I wonder why?

    Note that some ancient contracts for farm labor tried to elide the problem of buying time by selling the right to harvest and offering to buy back the commodities harvested, as if they had been “produced” by the harvesters. Even today, much of harvesting is piece work, not hourly, which is why farmers can pay for items harvested by children. One wonders what might happen if the grower grew the field, sold the right to harvest it, promised to offer a set rate for crops when selling the right, but left the workers free to bargain with whomever they wanted to buy the results of the harvest.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery.
    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn’t title it “Steal This Book.” Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    So…looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York — not so much. Isn’t this rather hypocritical?
    I’m not in favor of any form of looting. We’re taking a part of Osterwiler’s argument to look at a hidden form of looting, where sociopaths running corporations loot the wealth of first the working class, next the middle class, to increase “profits” (which are actually destructive conversions of other forms of capital to monetary capital) that allows said sociopaths to buy back stock, driving up stock prices and the value of the options they have previously been granted: in effect, they get to use someone else’s money (if you consider a corporation to be owned by the stockholders; different issue) to make themselves richer.

    Prithee, good pilgrim: do you approve of people who drink fresh monetary water from the Fed spigot using it to “wet their beaks” while the rest of us get to use the secondary substances that result? That looting is tied with the agency problem inherent in the wage system empowered by Taylor’s “Scientific” management, and put into hyperdrive with modern information technology.

    I’m not sure why you’re so in favor of wage labor? Maybe you derive benefit from it as an overseer. If so, “If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you…”

    Mondragon is similar to Medieval corporate forms; you seem familiar with some of the economic history of the times. Those Terrible Middle Ages by Regine Perrod dispels a lot of the nonsense that propagandists from the “Renaissance” foisted on us: if not for the Black Death, that age might have continued to today.

    Here’s the brief argument for Mondragon. You still have corporations, but they are owned by workers. Decisions are democratic while rewards are economic. Capital doesn’t hire labor; labor hires capital is one of their principles.

    The fascinating thing about a Mondragon style cooperative is this: it allows workers to avoid the double-taxation of dividends at the corporate level. See Subchapter T dividends; Agway is one such cooperative corporation. Structured correctly, all the corporate profits pass through to the workers as dividends. If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you’ll find it’s $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends. If resident in a state without income tax, then, a man could earn $7440 a month, after tax, which would go to pay for a lot of housing, kids, and all the other good things in life. Leaving the biggest looter of all, the Fed-creating US federal government, with $1530, annually.

    Now go, and fight the looters.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @TomSchmidt


    If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you’ll find it’s $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends.
     
    Have you actually tried this? I'm no tax pro but i'm not aware of any way to not have dividends taxed as income in the US. In fact, the challenge is to not have them DOUBLE taxed, once as corporate income and then again as individual income.

    One of the advantages of S-corps is that they only get taxed as individual income (https://www.fundera.com/blog/s-corp-vs-c-corp )

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @anon
    @TomSchmidt

    My error for failing to point out that your whole "muh ANCIENTS" handwaving is merely begging the question.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery, and you agree.

    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn’t title it “Steal This Book.” Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    He / she is mentally ill. You presumably are not, yet you without qualifications agree with this person on the topic of looting.

    I’m not in favor of any form of looting.

    Self contradiction.

    We’re taking a part of Osterwiler’s argument to look at a hidden form of looting,

    Who is "we"? I didn't agree to your question begging, to your agreement with looting, or your multiple obfuscations. Osterwiler wants to break other people's lives and take their stuff so "we can care for each other in the street", and you insist "she has a point". So to both of you, looting the RiteAid is justifiable in order to get a bandage for someone's foot blister? Both of you are arguing that normal people should do the actual work of producing "stuff" in order that punks like Osterwiler can smash in the front windows and take it whenever they need to "care for each other in the street", as far as I can tell.

    By the way, it is obvious Osterwiler wants stuff for free. No co-op would tolerate a free rider, including your precious Mondragon. Yet you insist 'she has a point', so once again we see under your mask.

    Here is a video from Kenosha of some obvious fat-cat Kapitalists you will no doubt sneer deeply at. They ooze with White Privilege from their petit-bourgeoise skin, I'm sure you will notice. 40 years in the business of office furniture supply, 35 of them in that building. Well, I'm sure that at some point that woman in her 60's no doubt totally oppressed workers with Taylorism, so they clearly got what they deserved.

    Look upon the faces of people whom both Osterwiler and you have hatred for, and tell me if the burning of their store, their place of work, their service to the community was a good thing. Go ahead, watch the vid, then reply. That man probably grew up helping his parents in the store. Insurance will not even cover the demolition required to rebuild, let alone replace the stock.

    But I'm sure the rioters were going to "care for each other in the streets" with stolen file cabinets, computers, desk chairs, whiteboards, office lighting, and so forth. Oh, yeah, so sure of that.

    This is what you and Osterwiler want. Justify it. Use all the Aristotle you desire, too. Don't run away and hide, defend this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztl4BKA8DpE&feature=youtu.be

  196. @TomSchmidt
    @anon


    Then:

    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     

    Are you even vaguely familiar with the concept of "paraphrase?" I see that you ignored these words:

    Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.
     
    I wonder why?

    Note that some ancient contracts for farm labor tried to elide the problem of buying time by selling the right to harvest and offering to buy back the commodities harvested, as if they had been "produced" by the harvesters. Even today, much of harvesting is piece work, not hourly, which is why farmers can pay for items harvested by children. One wonders what might happen if the grower grew the field, sold the right to harvest it, promised to offer a set rate for crops when selling the right, but left the workers free to bargain with whomever they wanted to buy the results of the harvest.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery.
    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn't title it "Steal This Book." Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    So…looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York — not so much. Isn’t this rather hypocritical?
    I'm not in favor of any form of looting. We're taking a part of Osterwiler's argument to look at a hidden form of looting, where sociopaths running corporations loot the wealth of first the working class, next the middle class, to increase "profits" (which are actually destructive conversions of other forms of capital to monetary capital) that allows said sociopaths to buy back stock, driving up stock prices and the value of the options they have previously been granted: in effect, they get to use someone else's money (if you consider a corporation to be owned by the stockholders; different issue) to make themselves richer.

    Prithee, good pilgrim: do you approve of people who drink fresh monetary water from the Fed spigot using it to "wet their beaks" while the rest of us get to use the secondary substances that result? That looting is tied with the agency problem inherent in the wage system empowered by Taylor's "Scientific" management, and put into hyperdrive with modern information technology.

    I'm not sure why you're so in favor of wage labor? Maybe you derive benefit from it as an overseer. If so, "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you..."

    Mondragon is similar to Medieval corporate forms; you seem familiar with some of the economic history of the times. Those Terrible Middle Ages by Regine Perrod dispels a lot of the nonsense that propagandists from the "Renaissance" foisted on us: if not for the Black Death, that age might have continued to today.

    Here's the brief argument for Mondragon. You still have corporations, but they are owned by workers. Decisions are democratic while rewards are economic. Capital doesn't hire labor; labor hires capital is one of their principles.

    The fascinating thing about a Mondragon style cooperative is this: it allows workers to avoid the double-taxation of dividends at the corporate level. See Subchapter T dividends; Agway is one such cooperative corporation. Structured correctly, all the corporate profits pass through to the workers as dividends. If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you'll find it's $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends. If resident in a state without income tax, then, a man could earn $7440 a month, after tax, which would go to pay for a lot of housing, kids, and all the other good things in life. Leaving the biggest looter of all, the Fed-creating US federal government, with $1530, annually.

    Now go, and fight the looters.

    Replies: @vhrm, @anon

    If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you’ll find it’s $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends.

    Have you actually tried this? I’m no tax pro but i’m not aware of any way to not have dividends taxed as income in the US. In fact, the challenge is to not have them DOUBLE taxed, once as corporate income and then again as individual income.

    One of the advantages of S-corps is that they only get taxed as individual income (https://www.fundera.com/blog/s-corp-vs-c-corp )

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @vhrm

    s corps are a disaster. If you don't pay yourself a high enough salary, then the government can sue you for the missing SS/Medicare taxes yu SHOULD have paid. You might recall that John Edwards did something along these lines, forgiven in the press, when he took legal pay in S corp form so as to avoid paying Medicare of 2.9% on millions in legal fees he earned.

    You can take a look here for dividend tax rates:

    https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/taxes/dividend-tax-rate/

    Married, filing jointly
    If your taxable income is... The tax rate on qualified dividends is...
    *Nonqualified dividends are taxed as ordinary income according to federal income tax brackets.
    $0 to $78,750 0%.

    So it has changed a little from 2017, when I last ran it.

    Check my previous link to Subchapter T dividends. Not onlyCAN you do, it has already been done, with established case law.

  197. @vhrm
    @TomSchmidt


    If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you’ll find it’s $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends.
     
    Have you actually tried this? I'm no tax pro but i'm not aware of any way to not have dividends taxed as income in the US. In fact, the challenge is to not have them DOUBLE taxed, once as corporate income and then again as individual income.

    One of the advantages of S-corps is that they only get taxed as individual income (https://www.fundera.com/blog/s-corp-vs-c-corp )

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    s corps are a disaster. If you don’t pay yourself a high enough salary, then the government can sue you for the missing SS/Medicare taxes yu SHOULD have paid. You might recall that John Edwards did something along these lines, forgiven in the press, when he took legal pay in S corp form so as to avoid paying Medicare of 2.9% on millions in legal fees he earned.

    You can take a look here for dividend tax rates:

    https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/taxes/dividend-tax-rate/

    Married, filing jointly
    If your taxable income is… The tax rate on qualified dividends is…
    *Nonqualified dividends are taxed as ordinary income according to federal income tax brackets.
    $0 to $78,750 0%.

    So it has changed a little from 2017, when I last ran it.

    Check my previous link to Subchapter T dividends. Not onlyCAN you do, it has already been done, with established case law.

    • Thanks: vhrm
  198. anon[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt
    @anon


    Then:

    . To paraphrase DavidGraeber in Debt, the very notion that a man could sell his time to another would have been foreign to the ancients, who would have recognized it as a form of slavery

    Now:

    On exception to this was agricultural work, which, because of its seasonal nature, required temporary wage workers at certain times of the year. Other exceptions included military and government work. Working as a paid soldier or as a laborer constructing a state temple did not carry the same stigma as other types of wage labor.
     

    Are you even vaguely familiar with the concept of "paraphrase?" I see that you ignored these words:

    Working for another person was considered degrading, because it meant being dependent on someone else—or, in other words, not free. This is because wages were seen as purchasing the entire person, not just his or her labor.
     
    I wonder why?

    Note that some ancient contracts for farm labor tried to elide the problem of buying time by selling the right to harvest and offering to buy back the commodities harvested, as if they had been "produced" by the harvesters. Even today, much of harvesting is piece work, not hourly, which is why farmers can pay for items harvested by children. One wonders what might happen if the grower grew the field, sold the right to harvest it, promised to offer a set rate for crops when selling the right, but left the workers free to bargain with whomever they wanted to buy the results of the harvest.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery.
    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn't title it "Steal This Book." Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    So…looting in theory or in flyover is understandable to you, looting in your part of New York — not so much. Isn’t this rather hypocritical?
    I'm not in favor of any form of looting. We're taking a part of Osterwiler's argument to look at a hidden form of looting, where sociopaths running corporations loot the wealth of first the working class, next the middle class, to increase "profits" (which are actually destructive conversions of other forms of capital to monetary capital) that allows said sociopaths to buy back stock, driving up stock prices and the value of the options they have previously been granted: in effect, they get to use someone else's money (if you consider a corporation to be owned by the stockholders; different issue) to make themselves richer.

    Prithee, good pilgrim: do you approve of people who drink fresh monetary water from the Fed spigot using it to "wet their beaks" while the rest of us get to use the secondary substances that result? That looting is tied with the agency problem inherent in the wage system empowered by Taylor's "Scientific" management, and put into hyperdrive with modern information technology.

    I'm not sure why you're so in favor of wage labor? Maybe you derive benefit from it as an overseer. If so, "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you..."

    Mondragon is similar to Medieval corporate forms; you seem familiar with some of the economic history of the times. Those Terrible Middle Ages by Regine Perrod dispels a lot of the nonsense that propagandists from the "Renaissance" foisted on us: if not for the Black Death, that age might have continued to today.

    Here's the brief argument for Mondragon. You still have corporations, but they are owned by workers. Decisions are democratic while rewards are economic. Capital doesn't hire labor; labor hires capital is one of their principles.

    The fascinating thing about a Mondragon style cooperative is this: it allows workers to avoid the double-taxation of dividends at the corporate level. See Subchapter T dividends; Agway is one such cooperative corporation. Structured correctly, all the corporate profits pass through to the workers as dividends. If you own TurboTax, run this experiment: pay a married man a salary of $10,000,and pay him $80,000 in dividends. Ask TurboTax to calculate the Federal income tax due; you'll find it's $0. There will be $1530 due in SS/Medicare taxes on the $10K salary, but no such taxes on the dividends. If resident in a state without income tax, then, a man could earn $7440 a month, after tax, which would go to pay for a lot of housing, kids, and all the other good things in life. Leaving the biggest looter of all, the Fed-creating US federal government, with $1530, annually.

    Now go, and fight the looters.

    Replies: @vhrm, @anon

    My error for failing to point out that your whole “muh ANCIENTS” handwaving is merely begging the question.

    This person is advocating theft, including armed robbery, and you agree.

    Yep. Curiously, he is advocating theft in a book that is for sale, presumably paying him royalties. Unlike Abbie Hoffman, he didn’t title it “Steal This Book.” Watch what people DO, not what they SAY. He is self-contradictory on the looting, and I did not take him seriously in that.

    He / she is mentally ill. You presumably are not, yet you without qualifications agree with this person on the topic of looting.

    I’m not in favor of any form of looting.

    Self contradiction.

    We’re taking a part of Osterwiler’s argument to look at a hidden form of looting,

    Who is “we”? I didn’t agree to your question begging, to your agreement with looting, or your multiple obfuscations. Osterwiler wants to break other people’s lives and take their stuff so “we can care for each other in the street”, and you insist “she has a point”. So to both of you, looting the RiteAid is justifiable in order to get a bandage for someone’s foot blister? Both of you are arguing that normal people should do the actual work of producing “stuff” in order that punks like Osterwiler can smash in the front windows and take it whenever they need to “care for each other in the street”, as far as I can tell.

    By the way, it is obvious Osterwiler wants stuff for free. No co-op would tolerate a free rider, including your precious Mondragon. Yet you insist ‘she has a point’, so once again we see under your mask.

    Here is a video from Kenosha of some obvious fat-cat Kapitalists you will no doubt sneer deeply at. They ooze with White Privilege from their petit-bourgeoise skin, I’m sure you will notice. 40 years in the business of office furniture supply, 35 of them in that building. Well, I’m sure that at some point that woman in her 60’s no doubt totally oppressed workers with Taylorism, so they clearly got what they deserved.

    Look upon the faces of people whom both Osterwiler and you have hatred for, and tell me if the burning of their store, their place of work, their service to the community was a good thing. Go ahead, watch the vid, then reply. That man probably grew up helping his parents in the store. Insurance will not even cover the demolition required to rebuild, let alone replace the stock.

    But I’m sure the rioters were going to “care for each other in the streets” with stolen file cabinets, computers, desk chairs, whiteboards, office lighting, and so forth. Oh, yeah, so sure of that.

    This is what you and Osterwiler want. Justify it. Use all the Aristotle you desire, too. Don’t run away and hide, defend this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztl4BKA8DpE&feature=youtu.be

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