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¡Jeb¡ Campaign Strategy of Acting as if He Likes Mexicans More Than Americans Proves Surprisingly Unappealing to Americans
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From Politico:

Jeb Bush slashes costs as campaign gasps
By ALEX ISENSTADT and ELI STOKOLS 10/23/15 11:18 AM EDT

Jeb Bush’s campaign insists the wholesale restructuring announced Friday is merely a course correction, a reallocation of resources and heightened focus on New Hampshire. But for a growing number of Bush’s supporters, frustrated by his prolonged slump and poor performance, the latest campaign shake-up is looking like more of a death knell.

Starting on Nov. 1, the campaign will cut payroll costs by 40 percent, downsize its Miami headquarters by more than 50 percent, reduce travel costs by 20 percent and cut 45 percent of spending on things other than media and voter contact. Even if those moves ease financial pressures on Bush’s large campaign operation, they only reinforce the prevailing narrative about a candidate, not long ago viewed as a front-runner, in freefall.

According to donors, some of whom called for Bush to rein in its spending, the campaign’s assurances about its organizational and financial advantages have worn thin; and the third-quarter financial report, filed last week, gave further definition to their growing concerns about the state of a big-spending campaign failing to deliver results.

“These donors are not finding these explanations by the Bush team believable,” said one bundler, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

I’ve got an explanation for Jeb’s poor performance: He keeps implying to voters that he likes Mexicans more than he likes Americans.

It’s not like insiders, such as donors and pundits, didn’t know that about Jeb — they just thought that was going to be a feature rather than a bug of his campaign.

 
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  1. Jeb ‘Milquetoast’ Bush himself was never very appealing. ¡Jeb¡ perhaps even less.

  2. • Agree: Realist, JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @eah

    Leftism is a social status contest in which participants jockey for position by trying to outdo each other in extremeness of deed and word, no matter how absurd their behavior may seem to outsiders.

    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @SFG
    @eah

    Notice how they're all white (and someone comments on it).

    I wonder how many people genuinely curious about the human sciences get driven away by this political posturing.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ivy, @EvolutionistX

    , @bomag
    @eah

    Brownie points galore for that group.

    , @Paco Wové
    @eah

    Oh man, Word-Salad Sally (bottom row, far left at your link) is awesome:

    "Diversity is not the question; rather, it is the way diversity is construed; what kind of meaning difference attains in various contexts; at what moments "culture" is a "political" issue."

    It's a perfect caption for her facial expression. She immediately reminded me of this.

    Replies: @jon

    , @tbraton
    @eah

    One "Quanita Roberson," who is pictured (and is most definitely black) and judging by the name is most likely a female, makes the following statement on the webpage:

    "Quanita Roberson I love the support but I can't help but notice there are no people of color on (Tenure-Track) faculty. We need to start with ourselves first!"

    How can she notice the difference if race "doesn't exist"? And, if "race doesn't exist," what difference does it make?

    , @Mr. Anon
    @eah

    Those horribly white people should all take positive action to combat racism by quitting and giving up their cushy sinecure to a person of color.

    At least the anthropologists are being honest in exorcising the word science from their official charters.

    , @Anonymous
    @eah

    There's hope though - 90% of the comments there lean race realist. Everyone knows they're bullshitting.

    , @Bobby
    @eah

    Wow. Everybody can check out their list of 10 demands they have for the U of Cincy here:

    http://www.theirate8.com/

    Talk about a shakedown.

    As for Jeb, I've seen some guys who just rollover for their wives in my life, but I've never seen one who just completely adopted her country, culture, language, and even ethnicity (which is of course impossible, but he tried.)

  3. A great title for an Onion article.

  4. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical_centrist"] says: • Website

    maybe his entire campaign was just to ingratiate himself with the Big Money. Big Money will reward those who help Big Money. Merkel will get her payoff once she leaves office…the payoff will be in the form of memberships on various boards of directors and in speaking fees.

    Quid pro quo…something for something….Merkel helps Big Money cram Germany full of more workers and consumers, thus suppressing wages and increasing sales and thus increasing profits…and then Big Money will pay her millions in director salaries and speaking fees.

    That is how all those politicians, central bankers etc make the millions. Look at Bill Clinton. When he and Hilary left the white house they were dead broke (right?), and now they are worth tens of millions. Speaking fees. Directorships. etc.

    Big Money wants as many human livestock crammed into the developing nations as they can get. That is how they obtain growth and profits, how they keep the price of homes and other assets climbing…how they keep the ponzi scheme going….eternal growth…

    Maybe Jeb thinks he can further ingratiate himself with Big Money by helping the change the culture of the GOP, or maybe he is just signaling Big Money that he is their boy.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    @Leftist conservative

    radical_centrist says: Big Money wants as many human livestock crammed into the developing nations as they can get.

    Hunsdon said: I think you mean developed nations, Homer J.

    Replies: @Leftist conservative

  5. He claimed that his brothers wars kept America safe. He got called on it and is now paying the price

  6. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Leftism is a social status contest in which participants jockey for position by trying to outdo each other in extremeness of deed and word, no matter how absurd their behavior may seem to outsiders.

    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @AndrewR


    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

     

    Anthropologists likely aren't any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics. When I was in grad school in the late 80s, the anthro people were already wandering around campus with glazed, lamb-to-the-slaughter expressions on their incredulous faces, as they went from one seminar to the next in which the entire premise of their field -- i.e. that by close, 'thick' observation and description, a la Clifford Geertz, members of one culture could analyse and understand the practices and beliefs of another culture -- was relentlessly undermined by pomo diatribes such as Edward Said's Orientalism. They were left with not much else to do but write whiny, self-abnegating pseudo travel books in which they minutely examined their own prejudices and unworthiness as they came face to face with the Exalted Other.

    Replies: @anowow

  7. Obviously Yeb’s handlers never wanted him to appeal to Anglos. They banked on the “naturally conservative” Mexicans voting for him en masse. But the shamelessly ethnocentric MexAm voters whose primary concern is la reconquista de Atzlan would never vote for Jeb! because in the general election there is absolutely no way that the Democrat candidate would allow themself to be out-liberaled on immigration by a Republican. Anyone doubting this should refer to last week’s Dem debate in which the candidates tripped over themselves to boast who would roll out the fanciest red carpet to Undocumented Democrats.

    A general election with Boosh would go like this:

    Shrub 2.5: I support instate tuition for undocumented immigrants.

    Rodham/Bernie: I support Free Tuition for them plus a 30,000 dollar a year stipend paid for by our white supremacist taKKKspayers

  8. I’d break it out as

    (a) his lack of charisma
    (b) Trump better grabbing people’s attention (at least in part due to the immigration issues you mention)
    (c) the field being so crowded (Trump only has about 20% or so)

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @SFG

    (c) the field being so crowded

    That was supposed to help Jeb by diivying up the anti-Jeb vote.

    You could add
    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.

    Replies: @fish, @SFG

    , @greysquirrell
    @SFG

    d) another Bush

  9. Obviously Jeb has has been living in his own Hispanic/Cubano/Mexicano bubble in Miami along with his Mexican children and wife. Comcast has Spanish language packages for cable TV with such offering as >>>

    EWTN Espanol, Gran Cine, HTV Musica, La Familia, La Telenovela, Mexicanal, Mexico 22, Multimedios, Ritmoson Latino, Sorpresa, Sur Peru, TBN Enlace, Telefe, Telehit, TV Chile, TV Colombia, TV Dominicana, TV Venezuela, TVE International, Utilisima and WAPA America

    This must be how he tunes into what is happening in the United States of America

    ****btw 25 years ago I had a Portuguese neighbor and sometimes I would watch the 6PM Spanish language news. Prolly Telemundo back then. 30 out of 60 minutes was devoted to immigration in all its forms, legal, illegal, border apprehensions, immigration lawyers advertising etc etc. A very hot topic among Spanish speakers here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Clyde

    I think your neighbour was not Portuguese.

    Replies: @whorefinder

  10. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Notice how they’re all white (and someone comments on it).

    I wonder how many people genuinely curious about the human sciences get driven away by this political posturing.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @SFG

    That's a feature not a bug. Ideologues don't want non-ideologues in their spaces because of the effect on the narrative. We need to completely defund universities until these parasites are driven away.

    , @Ivy
    @SFG

    A few of those Cincinnati folks look like they were less than enthused to hold those signs. Perhaps tenure weighed on their minds? That wouldn't be the first time some were coerced by others into embarrassing acts, and with Farcebook, their stance can gain immortality, for awhile.

    Replies: @Bill B.

    , @EvolutionistX
    @SFG

    It's how I ended up here instead of academia.

    ETA: I had to read Said *twice* in college.

  11. Second row, second from the left- is it a man or a woman?

  12. George W could at least pretend to be a folksy Texas rancher. Jeb doesn’t even have that luxury.

  13. Being Bush III doesn’t exactly help either. The last two Bush administrations were disasters for the country and the GOP. Perhaps voters aren’t as stupid as he thinks they are. Adios Jeb!

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Black Death

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Bill Jones, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

  14. Does anyone want another Bush even if Jeb weren’t so Meximum?

  15. It’s not like insiders, such as donors and pundits, didn’t know that about Jeb — they just thought that was going to be a feature rather than a bug of his campaign.

    This is the part I find endlessly fascinating. I’m a regular person living in normalville. My work has me travel a fair bit meeting strangers and acquaintances on a daily basis so I have a pretty big sample set from which to draw anecdotes.

    I could spend all morning writing a few thousand words on the range of opinions I encounter, but the one opinion I never hear is the “open borders, let them all in amnesty” version so popular with economists and politicians. The one end of the spectrum is the high walls with wide doors option. The other end is high walls with locked doors for now option. Yet, our rulers are all open border fanatics who openly preach what has no constituency.

    Why?

    My sense is it is a new religion or a modification of the old Public Protestantism. In a prior age, the Yankee religious impulse was focused on the salvation of society, not of the individual. You had men in black clothes making sure you were observant of the Sabbath and not having too much fun. Once God faded from the picture and the world got smaller, this impulse folded into what we call social activism. The moonbat woman next door with the Prius really does think she is saving the planet.

    History is not without examples where the rulers have a different religion from the ruled and set about converting the populace. Britain was largely converted to Christianity one noble family at a time. I’m at a loss to think of an example where the rulers adopted a religion of cultural suicide though. The only thing that comes to mind is the People’s Temple in the 70’s.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @The Z Blog

    I think early Christianity in Rome counts. They accused the government of killing their God then took over that very government

  16. @SFG
    I'd break it out as

    (a) his lack of charisma
    (b) Trump better grabbing people's attention (at least in part due to the immigration issues you mention)
    (c) the field being so crowded (Trump only has about 20% or so)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @greysquirrell

    (c) the field being so crowded

    That was supposed to help Jeb by diivying up the anti-Jeb vote.

    You could add
    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Harry Baldwin


    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.
     
    Note to the dying dynasty....run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    , @SFG
    @Harry Baldwin

    Agreed.

  17. If new Speaker Ryan allows amnesty to pass, what will be the political fallout? A fate accompli or popular rebellion? How different from what is happening in Europe?

    • Replies: @asdf
    @Luke Lea

    Excellent question. I don't know. I'm guessing that the coalition - Religious types / Business types vs. the rest of the coalition - is going to start dying. It's dying now, but it's going to become public.

    Ann Coulter, Derbyshire.. how many others? The Jeb party is over. We'll see what else comes up I guess.

  18. Scratch Americans, fill in Republicans. For Democrats, such rhetoric is quite appealing. In fact, it’s a minimum requirement.

  19. “You could add
    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.”

    It has been since 2005, but those geniuses at the RNC are just now noticing.

  20. I finally looked at his website, and it simply reinforced what has been said earlier and more:

    . Several pictures of him seems almost calculated to make him look weak and supplicating. It’s obvious that that’s how he is, but the pictures are so bad, it’s almost unconscious self-sabotaging. Seriously, he looks more passive than a hashtag sign holding SJW with a 0 T count. He’s like this frog peering up. I normally don’t hone in on such weaknesses but it’s so glaring that it’s impossible to ignore.

    . Steve has already cited this from his website: “My life changed forever when I was a young man on an exchange program in León Guanajuato, Mexico. Across a plaza, I saw a girl. She spoke little English, and my Spanish was a work in progress. But for me, it was love at first sight.

    Some people don’t think that’s a real thing—but I know. I couldn’t sleep; I couldn’t eat; I lost 20 pounds. From the moment I got to know her, I knew that I wanted to spend the rest of my life with her…” but I had missed that this is the first text you see on the home page. Unbelievable. This isn’t on the obligatory “Meet the Bush Family” link, it is up front and center, almost daring you to “Laugh at Me”. It really is his issue, it really lets us know what is his core.
    That this fellow is sustained completely by his Busy dynasty family name is so absurd that that only parallel that can think for it would be the lunatics of the late Spanish Hapsburgs, where courtiers had to tiptoe around His Excellency’s ravings and love of auto da fe’s .

    What are we to make of such a man? Forget the immigrant angle. Who the hell starts a presidential campaign site with an account of My First Crush?

    . The selfie pic on the “Meet Jeb” page is awful. His wimp factor far outstrips his father’s. He also needs to get his teeth cleaned.

    . His issues focus around the same stuff that Repub nomination dropouts-polling-at-5% have been running for two decades.

  21. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Brownie points galore for that group.

  22. “I’ve got an explanation for Jeb’s poor performance: He keeps implying to voters that he likes Mexicans more than he likes Americans.”

    [Laughs] No, Jeb’s poor performance is reflected by the insightful comments of SFG. The only implication is that his apparent disdain of Americans is simply manufactured. Go figure.

  23. @SFG
    @eah

    Notice how they're all white (and someone comments on it).

    I wonder how many people genuinely curious about the human sciences get driven away by this political posturing.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ivy, @EvolutionistX

    That’s a feature not a bug. Ideologues don’t want non-ideologues in their spaces because of the effect on the narrative. We need to completely defund universities until these parasites are driven away.

  24. @SFD

    The commenter is “Quanita”.
    First, I would be more embarassed that my faculty is so stupid, than by the color of their skin.
    Second, when commenting, I would change my name so my parents don’t look stupid.

  25. It’s as if he is trying to get democrats to vote for him

  26. OT but not entirely OT: Thomas Donohue, CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which is gearing up to pour millions into the fight against the the growing numbers of “radicals” interfering with its comfortable control of policy:

    “That hole in the middle is getting bigger …We hope to fill that hole with the American people…

    OK, I ellipsis’d that for comic effect, but that just leapt out at me and cracked me up. Dude, don’t ride metaphors you can’t control. They might reveal more than you want to reveal: (“We hope to fill that hole with the American people”…and pave it over with concrete and build apartments and parking lots on top of it for the illegals and H-1Bs we hope to replace them with…)

    Here’s the whole quote:

    Donohue lamented the absence of moderates from both parties. “That hole in the middle is getting bigger as more and more people get very conservative and more people get very liberal,” he said. “We hope to fill that hole with the American people who need the government to act on [their] behalf.”

    Creative wags could find a lot to work with in that article.

  27. Apart from his love of all things Mexican what has Yebbie said that sticks in anyone’s mind? He just seems to talk out of both sides of his mouth and is vague. I can’t imagine anyone getting out of bed to go vote for him.

  28. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Oh man, Word-Salad Sally (bottom row, far left at your link) is awesome:

    “Diversity is not the question; rather, it is the way diversity is construed; what kind of meaning difference attains in various contexts; at what moments “culture” is a “political” issue.”

    It’s a perfect caption for her facial expression. She immediately reminded me of this.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Paco Wové

    Yeah, I was just going to comment on that. What a ridiculous bunch of academicese. I would argue that her quite is a sign of her privilege and it is a microagression against the minorities who most likely can't understand a word of it.

  29. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    One “Quanita Roberson,” who is pictured (and is most definitely black) and judging by the name is most likely a female, makes the following statement on the webpage:

    “Quanita Roberson I love the support but I can’t help but notice there are no people of color on (Tenure-Track) faculty. We need to start with ourselves first!”

    How can she notice the difference if race “doesn’t exist”? And, if “race doesn’t exist,” what difference does it make?

  30. @Harry Baldwin
    @SFG

    (c) the field being so crowded

    That was supposed to help Jeb by diivying up the anti-Jeb vote.

    You could add
    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.

    Replies: @fish, @SFG

    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.

    Note to the dying dynasty….run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @fish

    "wonky intellectual"? do they have another one locked in the basement somewhere?

    Replies: @fish

    , @tbraton
    @fish

    "Note to the dying dynasty….run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!"

    Very funny, but what's even funnier is that was the original Bush Family Plan. Jeb!!!, as the "smarter brother," was to be the Bush to follow GHWBush. But, fortunately or unfortunately, Jeb!!! lost his first governor's race in Florida to Lawton Childs in 1994, and, surprise, surprise, George W. won his gubernatorial race against Anne Richards in Texas and got a leg up on his brother Jeb!!! George W. got reelected in a landslide in 1998, when Jeb!!! finally won the Florida governorship. Strange how things work out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

  31. “….they only reinforce the prevailing narrative about a candidate, not long ago viewed as a front-runner, in freefall.”

    Echo-chamber pseudojournalism at its ripest and most pungent. Who, other than the gaystream media, ever considered Yebby to be a frontrunner? The gaystream media desperately wants Mrs. B.J. Clinton v. Yebby Bustamante III, but reality is frustrating their desires.

  32. @SFG
    I'd break it out as

    (a) his lack of charisma
    (b) Trump better grabbing people's attention (at least in part due to the immigration issues you mention)
    (c) the field being so crowded (Trump only has about 20% or so)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @greysquirrell

    d) another Bush

  33. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Looking for link to Steve’s review of No Country for Old Men. (Google never links to the actual reviews…and the old blurbs on iSteve or Unz don’t get you there either.)

    P.s. Just watched it last night. Liked the killer and the good ole boy vet and Woody was OK/fun. Thought the treatment of Tommy Lee’s character didn’t make sense. All these soliloques, but no action…so that we are not invested in him and his development to retirement and the whole concept of the world becoming too screwed up and the country going to hell. [Those are fine themes, just not developed and coming out of thin air.]

    Also, for some reason, TLJ just strikes me as too recognizable/Hollywood (like Matthew McG in Mud–would have preferred a non recognizable character like Neckbone’s brother to play it…so the story stays a little more central to the young boys coming of age story/adventure.)

    And the ending sucked. Sure…kill of the vet if you want…but the whole off camera thing sucked. Can’t even tell for sure if it is her mother or her husband killed or both. And then another soliluquey and the black ending. I’m not saying you have to be formulaic, but that’s not even a story, less a movie. And if you are going to do something funky, it needs to work. [like the time switches in Pulp Fiction were strange…but worked.]

  34. He dropped when he pushed amnesty and Trump rose when he went against illegal immigration. The American people don’t want to be merged with Mexico despite what the plutocrats who run both parties want. They voted the Republicans in to control Congress to stop illegal immigration, but the Republicans are almost as bad as the Democrats. The Republicans don’t seem to care that they are writing their own death warrant. I wonder what replaces them.

  35. What Harry Baldwin says. The Bush brand is toxic. Jeb’s ability to raise vast sums of money for himself and his son from the oligarch class is not a strength. It merely serves to highlight what has long been suspected about where his family’s true loyalties lie.

    Jeb doesn’t exactly have to answer for the massive incompetence of his brother, but he needs to acknowledge, in a convincing manner, where they part ways. He hasn’t done that, and it may not even be possible. In addition, Jeb’s spent a decade defending a policy, his support for amnesty, that his brother could downplay prior to his reelection, even as the debate over illegal immigration has grown more heated and gained an ever higher profile.

    On every pressing issue, Jeb seems to be only to the left of his brother. He literally identifies as Hispanic. He openly embraces abolishing our borders. He embraces federal control of schools.

    I thought that Bush’s best strategy was to hunker down and wait it out as other, more weakly funded candidates dropped out of the race. I no longer think that’s possible. Marco Rubio is probably the only establishment candidate who might be able to do that. There are more Republican voters than I thought who won’t vote for Jeb under any condition.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey

    "There are more Republican voters than I thought who won’t vote for Jeb under any condition."

    That seems to be the case, and I was suprised at this development. Those voters should do a little pondering - anyone who refuses to vote for Jeb should likewise refuse to vote for Rubio, as there is virtually nothing to distinguish them in outlook or likely outcome.

    Replies: @tbraton

    , @NOTA
    @Wilkey

    Yeah, I don't know what Jeb could've done to get out from under his brother's disastrous legacy, but he sure hasn't done it. I suspect it would have taken a much more talented politician to carry it off--maybe a Bill Clinton or a Ronald Reagan could have managed it. And it would have been even harder without overtly repudiating his brother's actions, which he probably can't do for personal and family reasons.

  36. ¡Jeb¡ Campaign Strategy of Acting as if He Likes Mexicans More Than Americans Proves Surprisingly Unappealing to Americans

    Jeb was kind of hoping we wouldn’t notice, as we usually do with so many other policies and agendas that are self destructive for our country.

  37. Why doesn’t he simply renounce his US citizenship and move to Mexico? Perhaps he could run for El Presidente there – assuming the drug cartels didn’t kidnap and hold him for ransom first, of course.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Melendwyr

    Jebbie, like Brownie, could do a heckuva job.

    The present need has migrated to Mexico from New Orleans. Jebbie, a nacion turns its lonely eyes to you.

    , @AnAnon
    @Melendwyr

    Mexico probably wouldn't let him.

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Melendwyr

    To run for president in Mexico it is required not only that you be a natural born citizen but that both of your parents be natural born citizens. Jeb, not being a natural born citizen, isn't even eligible to run for dogcatcher in Mexico; all elected offices are open only to natural born citizens.

    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico's immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  38. “¡Jeb¡ Campaign Strategy of Acting as if He Likes Mexicans More Than Americans Proves Surprisingly Unappealing to Americans”

    Maybe ?Jeb? should have adopted the Trump platform instead of the Performance H. Wilsen platform:

    Performance H. Wilsen

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    Here

    ¿Jeb?

  39. @Wilkey
    What Harry Baldwin says. The Bush brand is toxic. Jeb's ability to raise vast sums of money for himself and his son from the oligarch class is not a strength. It merely serves to highlight what has long been suspected about where his family's true loyalties lie.

    Jeb doesn't exactly have to answer for the massive incompetence of his brother, but he needs to acknowledge, in a convincing manner, where they part ways. He hasn't done that, and it may not even be possible. In addition, Jeb's spent a decade defending a policy, his support for amnesty, that his brother could downplay prior to his reelection, even as the debate over illegal immigration has grown more heated and gained an ever higher profile.

    On every pressing issue, Jeb seems to be only to the left of his brother. He literally identifies as Hispanic. He openly embraces abolishing our borders. He embraces federal control of schools.

    I thought that Bush's best strategy was to hunker down and wait it out as other, more weakly funded candidates dropped out of the race. I no longer think that's possible. Marco Rubio is probably the only establishment candidate who might be able to do that. There are more Republican voters than I thought who won't vote for Jeb under any condition.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @NOTA

    “There are more Republican voters than I thought who won’t vote for Jeb under any condition.”

    That seems to be the case, and I was suprised at this development. Those voters should do a little pondering – anyone who refuses to vote for Jeb should likewise refuse to vote for Rubio, as there is virtually nothing to distinguish them in outlook or likely outcome.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Mr. Anon

    "That seems to be the case, and I was suprised at this development."

    This wouldn't be the first time that Jeb!!! has totally miscalculated. In 2003, after he had won reelection the prior November, he decided to get involved in the Terri Schiavo affair, which had been working its way through the local courts for a number of years. For some reason, he thought trying to save a brain-dead woman would gain him political points. First, he got the Republican-controlled state legislature involved, but the State Supreme Court blocked that. Then he decided to get his brother, the President, and the U.S. Congress involved, but that move was ultimately defeated by the courts. In the end, after the brain-dead woman was officially dead, polls showed the overwhelming majority of Floridians strongly disapproved of his actions, and that majority included many Catholics and born-again Christians. That was the first time I thought something was seriously wrong with Jeb!!! So, on the one hand, I was surprised by his dive in the polls, but, on the other hand, I wasn't.

  40. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Those horribly white people should all take positive action to combat racism by quitting and giving up their cushy sinecure to a person of color.

    At least the anthropologists are being honest in exorcising the word science from their official charters.

  41. @Melendwyr
    Why doesn't he simply renounce his US citizenship and move to Mexico? Perhaps he could run for El Presidente there - assuming the drug cartels didn't kidnap and hold him for ransom first, of course.

    Replies: @Ivy, @AnAnon, @(((Owen)))

    Jebbie, like Brownie, could do a heckuva job.

    The present need has migrated to Mexico from New Orleans. Jebbie, a nacion turns its lonely eyes to you.

  42. @SFG
    @eah

    Notice how they're all white (and someone comments on it).

    I wonder how many people genuinely curious about the human sciences get driven away by this political posturing.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ivy, @EvolutionistX

    A few of those Cincinnati folks look like they were less than enthused to hold those signs. Perhaps tenure weighed on their minds? That wouldn’t be the first time some were coerced by others into embarrassing acts, and with Farcebook, their stance can gain immortality, for awhile.

    • Replies: @Bill B.
    @Ivy

    I think the guy with the necktie really needs to get with the program.

  43. Well, his brother was the the same way, touting his “compassionate conservatism” and always implying that his voters were Nazis for not supporting amnesty and open borders. And they elected him twice! True, he didn’t go around jabbering in Spanish, but he was just as bad about hating his own constituency. Declasse, you know. Still, you really can’t blame Heb for his linguistic faux pas, Republican voters have shown over and over again that there is no bottom to their gullibility and capacity to act as human spittoons for their leaders. He might be right yet, the election’s not over and these are the Republicans after all.

    • Replies: @alcogito
    @TB2


    Because he looked normal compared to creepy Gore and Lurch.

  44. @Ivy
    @SFG

    A few of those Cincinnati folks look like they were less than enthused to hold those signs. Perhaps tenure weighed on their minds? That wouldn't be the first time some were coerced by others into embarrassing acts, and with Farcebook, their stance can gain immortality, for awhile.

    Replies: @Bill B.

    I think the guy with the necktie really needs to get with the program.

  45. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    There’s hope though – 90% of the comments there lean race realist. Everyone knows they’re bullshitting.

  46. It’s not like insiders, such as donors and pundits, didn’t know that about Jeb — they just thought that was going to be a feature rather than a bug of his campaign.

    Certainly true, but it does show that these people are totally out of touch with the rest of America or perhaps they simply want the natives wiped out for whatever dark reasons they’ve concocted.

    Either way they are cruising for a bruising if they push things to far.

  47. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve got an explanation for Jeb’s poor performance: He keeps implying to voters that he likes Mexicans more than he likes Americans.

    I got another reason for Team ¡Jeb! running out of cash!!!

    According to VDARE; Ben Carson is busy soaking up and spending all the Cuckservative and “White Guilt” ridden establishment Republican cash like a fleet of drunken sailors.

    Team ¡Jeb! is busy floundering ineffectively against Trump while the Carson campaign is drinking its milkshake.

    Meanwhile the laughable Carson campaign is exposing the corruption and vacuity at the heart of Conservative Inc.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Anonymous

    I wouldn't be that impressed by Carson's money haul. The only reason he's in the race is some direct mail politicos thought he would be a good vehicle to raise money. It turns out that it costs a lot of money to raise money by direct mail, so Carson has relatively little cash on hand. You know who profits from his race, don't you? I am somewhat surprised he's doing so well in the polls. Those fundamentalist Christians have a real weak spot for "polite, nice political candidates." Seems like an empty suit to me. He may do well in Iowa (Santorum won there is 2012, after all), but I think he will quickly fade thereafter. Rather than exposing the corruption and vacuity at the heart of Conservative, Inc., Carson is a symbol of the rot in the system.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  48. @Harry Baldwin
    @SFG

    (c) the field being so crowded

    That was supposed to help Jeb by diivying up the anti-Jeb vote.

    You could add
    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.

    Replies: @fish, @SFG

    Agreed.

  49. Papa Bush is upset. Must be tough for Yankee Republicans to see how their refusal to confront massive immigration from Latin America & Asia has cost them their perch on top of the GOP.

    http://nyti.ms/1jGubdW

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Ed


    No one, it seems, is more perplexed than the family patriarch by the race, and by what the Republican Party has become in its embrace of anti-establishment outsiders
     
    Perplexed. That's really rich. After encouraging the country to be flooded by the Third World, they're "perplexed" that the base is upset?

    I live in the Bush's Houston and send my kids to the whitest public school I could find. It's probably only 50% white and the rest are recent arrivals from Mexicans.

    Replies: @tbraton

    , @Dennis Dale
    @Ed

    Cost them the WASP's perch atop the world. I only hope they still have awareness enough to realize it, so it can torment to their last breath. ¿Jeb? should've married a nice Jewish girl.

  50. @eah
    OT

    Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That's just my interpretation.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @SFG, @bomag, @Paco Wové, @tbraton, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @Bobby

    Wow. Everybody can check out their list of 10 demands they have for the U of Cincy here:

    http://www.theirate8.com/

    Talk about a shakedown.

    As for Jeb, I’ve seen some guys who just rollover for their wives in my life, but I’ve never seen one who just completely adopted her country, culture, language, and even ethnicity (which is of course impossible, but he tried.)

  51. Jeb may be the most stupid of the Bush’s, but the bar is high.

  52. “These donors are not finding these explanations by the Bush team believable,” said one bundler, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

    Is that “bundler” or bungler?

  53. The consultants thought that they had a master strategy with Jeb, his Mexican wife was going get all the latino voters for him and together with the white votes he would become president. They seemed to have completely overlooked the problem that white people decided not to back somebody who endlessly pandered to Mexicans and sneered at whites.

    I can only guess they had this oversight because they were afraid to ask the very obvious question why white people should vote for him, they would probably talked about the voting habits of other ethnic groups but PC prevented them from asking about the one voting block that Bush really does need.

    • Replies: @fish
    @neutral


    "I can only guess they had this oversight because they were afraid to ask the very obvious question why white people should vote for him, they would probably talked about the voting habits of other ethnic groups but PC prevented them from asking about the one voting block that Bush really does need."
     
    Okay....I'll go through the logic one more time. The blacks voted for the current empty suit occupying public housing last time. Since there isn't a black guy running this time the blacks can vote for the somewhat off putting white woman with no real penalty this go around. The whites are supposed to vote for the white guy since the field isn't entirely composed of white guys and assuming the white guy under discussion is eventually the nominee except for those dirty traitors who vote for the white woman who is actually a lesbian and flaunts her middle eastern girlfriend (whose legal husband likes to send dick pictures to people seemingly at random) at every opportunity like a common tart. Now....because he, the white guy is married to a woman of Mexican descent the white guy is immediately entitled to the brown voters.....because brown….and married….and Spanish.

    It's really quite simple if you just work through the math.
  54. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Ed
    Papa Bush is upset. Must be tough for Yankee Republicans to see how their refusal to confront massive immigration from Latin America & Asia has cost them their perch on top of the GOP.

    http://nyti.ms/1jGubdW

    Replies: @anonymous, @Dennis Dale

    No one, it seems, is more perplexed than the family patriarch by the race, and by what the Republican Party has become in its embrace of anti-establishment outsiders

    Perplexed. That’s really rich. After encouraging the country to be flooded by the Third World, they’re “perplexed” that the base is upset?

    I live in the Bush’s Houston and send my kids to the whitest public school I could find. It’s probably only 50% white and the rest are recent arrivals from Mexicans.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @anonymous

    " It’s probably only 50% white and the rest are recent arrivals from Mexicans."

    You can thank the U.S. Supreme Court for that since it struck down the sensible Texas law making it illegal for unauthorized aliens to attend free public schools in a 5-4 decision more than 30 years ago. You can blame Congress for the other large magnet, free healthcare at hospitals. Free education for the kids, and free healthcare for the family. Sure beats Mexico.

  55. “¡Jeb¡ Campaign Strategy of Acting as if He Likes Mexicans More Than Americans Proves Surprisingly Unappealing to Americans”

    Jeb’s not acting.

  56. @Melendwyr
    Why doesn't he simply renounce his US citizenship and move to Mexico? Perhaps he could run for El Presidente there - assuming the drug cartels didn't kidnap and hold him for ransom first, of course.

    Replies: @Ivy, @AnAnon, @(((Owen)))

    Mexico probably wouldn’t let him.

  57. @Ed
    Papa Bush is upset. Must be tough for Yankee Republicans to see how their refusal to confront massive immigration from Latin America & Asia has cost them their perch on top of the GOP.

    http://nyti.ms/1jGubdW

    Replies: @anonymous, @Dennis Dale

    Cost them the WASP’s perch atop the world. I only hope they still have awareness enough to realize it, so it can torment to their last breath. ¿Jeb? should’ve married a nice Jewish girl.

  58. I can’t tell if Steve is now trolling the GOP campaigns or else feeding Trump his next twitter shivs.

  59. “…Faculty members of the Univ of Cincinnati Anthropology Dept use Facebook to show how stupid they all are. That’s just my interpretation.”

    Do these people consider themselves scientists or not? If they do, paging the Sceptical Inquirer for an article on pseudo-science and fringe-science within the hallowed halls…

  60. @fish
    @Harry Baldwin


    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.
     
    Note to the dying dynasty....run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    “wonky intellectual”? do they have another one locked in the basement somewhere?

    • Replies: @fish
    @Dennis Dale

    I seem to recall that this was how he was being marketed for a time. This in contrast with his "man ready for action" brother.

  61. @fish
    @Harry Baldwin


    (d) The Bush brand, now toxic.
     
    Note to the dying dynasty....run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    “Note to the dying dynasty….run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!”

    Very funny, but what’s even funnier is that was the original Bush Family Plan. Jeb!!!, as the “smarter brother,” was to be the Bush to follow GHWBush. But, fortunately or unfortunately, Jeb!!! lost his first governor’s race in Florida to Lawton Childs in 1994, and, surprise, surprise, George W. won his gubernatorial race against Anne Richards in Texas and got a leg up on his brother Jeb!!! George W. got reelected in a landslide in 1998, when Jeb!!! finally won the Florida governorship. Strange how things work out.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @tbraton

    George W. would have had a better instinct for how to handle Trump than Jeb does. I think of the debate when Al Gore (acting on some consultant's advice) left his lectern and went over to stand by Bush as he spoke, as if to intimidate him. Bush glanced over at him and then made an expression like, "What's up with this dude?" and it made Gore look silly.

    Not saying that Trump couldn't have bulldozed W, just that W probably wouldn't have been the pushover that Jeb has proved to be.

    Replies: @Lugash

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @tbraton

    George W. would have had a better instinct for how to handle Trump than Jeb does. I think of the debate when Al Gore (acting on some consultant's advice) left his lectern and went over to stand by Bush as he spoke, as if to intimidate him. Bush glanced over at him and then nodded dismissively; it made Gore look silly.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAUcyfKESts

    Not saying that Trump couldn't have bulldozed . Bush, just that W probably wouldn't have been the pushover that Jeb has proved to be.

  62. @neutral
    The consultants thought that they had a master strategy with Jeb, his Mexican wife was going get all the latino voters for him and together with the white votes he would become president. They seemed to have completely overlooked the problem that white people decided not to back somebody who endlessly pandered to Mexicans and sneered at whites.

    I can only guess they had this oversight because they were afraid to ask the very obvious question why white people should vote for him, they would probably talked about the voting habits of other ethnic groups but PC prevented them from asking about the one voting block that Bush really does need.

    Replies: @fish

    “I can only guess they had this oversight because they were afraid to ask the very obvious question why white people should vote for him, they would probably talked about the voting habits of other ethnic groups but PC prevented them from asking about the one voting block that Bush really does need.”

    Okay….I’ll go through the logic one more time. The blacks voted for the current empty suit occupying public housing last time. Since there isn’t a black guy running this time the blacks can vote for the somewhat off putting white woman with no real penalty this go around. The whites are supposed to vote for the white guy since the field isn’t entirely composed of white guys and assuming the white guy under discussion is eventually the nominee except for those dirty traitors who vote for the white woman who is actually a lesbian and flaunts her middle eastern girlfriend (whose legal husband likes to send dick pictures to people seemingly at random) at every opportunity like a common tart. Now….because he, the white guy is married to a woman of Mexican descent the white guy is immediately entitled to the brown voters…..because brown….and married….and Spanish.

    It’s really quite simple if you just work through the math.

  63. @Mr. Anon
    "¡Jeb¡ Campaign Strategy of Acting as if He Likes Mexicans More Than Americans Proves Surprisingly Unappealing to Americans"

    Maybe ?Jeb? should have adopted the Trump platform instead of the Performance H. Wilsen platform:

    Performance H. Wilsen

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Here

    ¿Jeb?

  64. @Wilkey
    What Harry Baldwin says. The Bush brand is toxic. Jeb's ability to raise vast sums of money for himself and his son from the oligarch class is not a strength. It merely serves to highlight what has long been suspected about where his family's true loyalties lie.

    Jeb doesn't exactly have to answer for the massive incompetence of his brother, but he needs to acknowledge, in a convincing manner, where they part ways. He hasn't done that, and it may not even be possible. In addition, Jeb's spent a decade defending a policy, his support for amnesty, that his brother could downplay prior to his reelection, even as the debate over illegal immigration has grown more heated and gained an ever higher profile.

    On every pressing issue, Jeb seems to be only to the left of his brother. He literally identifies as Hispanic. He openly embraces abolishing our borders. He embraces federal control of schools.

    I thought that Bush's best strategy was to hunker down and wait it out as other, more weakly funded candidates dropped out of the race. I no longer think that's possible. Marco Rubio is probably the only establishment candidate who might be able to do that. There are more Republican voters than I thought who won't vote for Jeb under any condition.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @NOTA

    Yeah, I don’t know what Jeb could’ve done to get out from under his brother’s disastrous legacy, but he sure hasn’t done it. I suspect it would have taken a much more talented politician to carry it off–maybe a Bill Clinton or a Ronald Reagan could have managed it. And it would have been even harder without overtly repudiating his brother’s actions, which he probably can’t do for personal and family reasons.

  65. The fact that the powers that be (big money, big media, party bosses) lined up behind Jeb and Hillary should make it clear that there really isn’t some inner circle of wise men making the big decisions. The ruling class is great at getting and keeping power, but they’re not so good at making decisions to keep things running well.

  66. @Leftist conservative
    maybe his entire campaign was just to ingratiate himself with the Big Money. Big Money will reward those who help Big Money. Merkel will get her payoff once she leaves office...the payoff will be in the form of memberships on various boards of directors and in speaking fees.

    Quid pro quo...something for something....Merkel helps Big Money cram Germany full of more workers and consumers, thus suppressing wages and increasing sales and thus increasing profits...and then Big Money will pay her millions in director salaries and speaking fees.

    That is how all those politicians, central bankers etc make the millions. Look at Bill Clinton. When he and Hilary left the white house they were dead broke (right?), and now they are worth tens of millions. Speaking fees. Directorships. etc.

    Big Money wants as many human livestock crammed into the developing nations as they can get. That is how they obtain growth and profits, how they keep the price of homes and other assets climbing...how they keep the ponzi scheme going....eternal growth...

    Maybe Jeb thinks he can further ingratiate himself with Big Money by helping the change the culture of the GOP, or maybe he is just signaling Big Money that he is their boy.

    Replies: @Hunsdon

    radical_centrist says: Big Money wants as many human livestock crammed into the developing nations as they can get.

    Hunsdon said: I think you mean developed nations, Homer J.

    • Replies: @Leftist conservative
    @Hunsdon

    as usual, the commentary around here is always at the highest level

  67. @Melendwyr
    Why doesn't he simply renounce his US citizenship and move to Mexico? Perhaps he could run for El Presidente there - assuming the drug cartels didn't kidnap and hold him for ransom first, of course.

    Replies: @Ivy, @AnAnon, @(((Owen)))

    To run for president in Mexico it is required not only that you be a natural born citizen but that both of your parents be natural born citizens. Jeb, not being a natural born citizen, isn’t even eligible to run for dogcatcher in Mexico; all elected offices are open only to natural born citizens.

    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico’s immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @(((Owen)))


    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico’s immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.
     
    Mexico isn't what I'd call an example of superior governance. Given the shambles that is Mexico (adjusting for its abundant natural resources and its proximity to the biggest market in the world), I'd say that anything its government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @(((Owen)))

  68. @Dennis Dale
    @fish

    "wonky intellectual"? do they have another one locked in the basement somewhere?

    Replies: @fish

    I seem to recall that this was how he was being marketed for a time. This in contrast with his “man ready for action” brother.

  69. @Black Death
    Being Bush III doesn't exactly help either. The last two Bush administrations were disasters for the country and the GOP. Perhaps voters aren't as stupid as he thinks they are. Adios Jeb!

    Replies: @bomag

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @bomag

    How so? The legacy of Bush senior amounts to NAFTA and the Gulf War. I'll say he had a certain "patrician" aura that you don't see today. The last American president who could plausibly be described as an great leader with the nation's interests at heart was Eisenhower.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @Bill Jones
    @bomag

    "n my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; "

    You are, of cause, confusing pretty good, with less bad.

    , @Anonymous
    @bomag

    Bush I started the great GOP tradition, carried to new heights by his son, of selling out his base. Remember "Read my lips - no new taxes"? Old man Bush spit right in the faces of the people who put it in office, then seemed surprised when they dropped him. His tax increases caused a nasty recession, and his approval rating, which rose to over 90% after the Gulf War, dropped to only 37.5% of the vote in the 1992 election.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @Mr. Anon
    @bomag

    Bush the elder did nothing good for the U.S., for whites, or for conservatism. He wasn't as disastrous as was his son, but that doesn't mean that he was really any good.

  70. @The Z Blog
    It’s not like insiders, such as donors and pundits, didn’t know that about Jeb — they just thought that was going to be a feature rather than a bug of his campaign.

    This is the part I find endlessly fascinating. I'm a regular person living in normalville. My work has me travel a fair bit meeting strangers and acquaintances on a daily basis so I have a pretty big sample set from which to draw anecdotes.

    I could spend all morning writing a few thousand words on the range of opinions I encounter, but the one opinion I never hear is the "open borders, let them all in amnesty" version so popular with economists and politicians. The one end of the spectrum is the high walls with wide doors option. The other end is high walls with locked doors for now option. Yet, our rulers are all open border fanatics who openly preach what has no constituency.

    Why?

    My sense is it is a new religion or a modification of the old Public Protestantism. In a prior age, the Yankee religious impulse was focused on the salvation of society, not of the individual. You had men in black clothes making sure you were observant of the Sabbath and not having too much fun. Once God faded from the picture and the world got smaller, this impulse folded into what we call social activism. The moonbat woman next door with the Prius really does think she is saving the planet.

    History is not without examples where the rulers have a different religion from the ruled and set about converting the populace. Britain was largely converted to Christianity one noble family at a time. I'm at a loss to think of an example where the rulers adopted a religion of cultural suicide though. The only thing that comes to mind is the People's Temple in the 70's.

    Replies: @Thea

    I think early Christianity in Rome counts. They accused the government of killing their God then took over that very government

  71. @Clyde
    Obviously Jeb has has been living in his own Hispanic/Cubano/Mexicano bubble in Miami along with his Mexican children and wife. Comcast has Spanish language packages for cable TV with such offering as >>>

    EWTN Espanol, Gran Cine, HTV Musica, La Familia, La Telenovela, Mexicanal, Mexico 22, Multimedios, Ritmoson Latino, Sorpresa, Sur Peru, TBN Enlace, Telefe, Telehit, TV Chile, TV Colombia, TV Dominicana, TV Venezuela, TVE International, Utilisima and WAPA America
     
    This must be how he tunes into what is happening in the United States of America

    ****btw 25 years ago I had a Portuguese neighbor and sometimes I would watch the 6PM Spanish language news. Prolly Telemundo back then. 30 out of 60 minutes was devoted to immigration in all its forms, legal, illegal, border apprehensions, immigration lawyers advertising etc etc. A very hot topic among Spanish speakers here.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I think your neighbour was not Portuguese.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @Anonymous

    Actually, he's quite right; in America, Portuguese speaking immigrants often watch Spanish-language TV, since it's the closest thing to Portuguese TV in America. They can at least make out about half of the words, and the action sort of does the rest.

    I know this because I have a friend whose grandparents were from Portugal but moved to the US (they moved to Fall River, MA, which has a huge Portuguese community). He says whenever they babysat him he watched a ton of Univision, especially Sabado Gigante and some Spanish version of Oprah called Cristina (she's a blond white lady, though). When he first saw the "Bee Guy" character on The Simpsons he went crazy with laughter, but the rest of us didn't get it until he explained Sabado Gigante.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  72. My local NPR station had a thing on the other day with a few Latino immigration advocates. They kept saying how much the business community loves immigration, and how much the religious community loves immigration. H1B’s great. Good god fearing folk, great.

    Not one mention of – housing prices, wage stagnation, sovereignty, etc.

    I think one of them brought up the discussion of *comprehensive* immigration reform, in that they shouldn’t go along with enforcing immigration law until the millions of current illegals get citizenship. (Roughly paraphrasing).

    I keep seeing numbers about how American’s want some sort of legal pathway for the 11 million (or so) illegals here now. For the sake of argument, I might be counted in that number. The question is – why can’t we have a taste of enforcement first? Then legalization?

    The answer seems to be, but slyly indicated, that there is no intention of actually enforcing anything.

    I get why.

    Why this slyness isn’t being called out, I don’t get. (Though I can speculate.)

  73. @Mr. Anon
    @Wilkey

    "There are more Republican voters than I thought who won’t vote for Jeb under any condition."

    That seems to be the case, and I was suprised at this development. Those voters should do a little pondering - anyone who refuses to vote for Jeb should likewise refuse to vote for Rubio, as there is virtually nothing to distinguish them in outlook or likely outcome.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “That seems to be the case, and I was suprised at this development.”

    This wouldn’t be the first time that Jeb!!! has totally miscalculated. In 2003, after he had won reelection the prior November, he decided to get involved in the Terri Schiavo affair, which had been working its way through the local courts for a number of years. For some reason, he thought trying to save a brain-dead woman would gain him political points. First, he got the Republican-controlled state legislature involved, but the State Supreme Court blocked that. Then he decided to get his brother, the President, and the U.S. Congress involved, but that move was ultimately defeated by the courts. In the end, after the brain-dead woman was officially dead, polls showed the overwhelming majority of Floridians strongly disapproved of his actions, and that majority included many Catholics and born-again Christians. That was the first time I thought something was seriously wrong with Jeb!!! So, on the one hand, I was surprised by his dive in the polls, but, on the other hand, I wasn’t.

  74. @bomag
    @Black Death

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Bill Jones, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    How so? The legacy of Bush senior amounts to NAFTA and the Gulf War. I’ll say he had a certain “patrician” aura that you don’t see today. The last American president who could plausibly be described as an great leader with the nation’s interests at heart was Eisenhower.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Yevardian

    HW cultivated some fiscal responsibility (cleaning up the savings and loan mess in decent fashion); he prosecuted Gulf War I in successful fashion.

    I suppose both things could have been headed off earlier by a more astute leader, but I'll take him over anybody since.

    I'll agree with you about Eisenhower, but I start counting "modern" with Kennedy, the era of politician as media figure, which seems to coincide with some of our various declines.

  75. @Anonymous

    I’ve got an explanation for Jeb’s poor performance: He keeps implying to voters that he likes Mexicans more than he likes Americans.
     
    I got another reason for Team ¡Jeb! running out of cash!!!

    According to VDARE; Ben Carson is busy soaking up and spending all the Cuckservative and "White Guilt" ridden establishment Republican cash like a fleet of drunken sailors.

    Team ¡Jeb! is busy floundering ineffectively against Trump while the Carson campaign is drinking its milkshake.

    Meanwhile the laughable Carson campaign is exposing the corruption and vacuity at the heart of Conservative Inc.

    Replies: @tbraton

    I wouldn’t be that impressed by Carson’s money haul. The only reason he’s in the race is some direct mail politicos thought he would be a good vehicle to raise money. It turns out that it costs a lot of money to raise money by direct mail, so Carson has relatively little cash on hand. You know who profits from his race, don’t you? I am somewhat surprised he’s doing so well in the polls. Those fundamentalist Christians have a real weak spot for “polite, nice political candidates.” Seems like an empty suit to me. He may do well in Iowa (Santorum won there is 2012, after all), but I think he will quickly fade thereafter. Rather than exposing the corruption and vacuity at the heart of Conservative, Inc., Carson is a symbol of the rot in the system.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @tbraton

    Speaking of modern direct mail fundraising, it can be traced to fundamentalist Christian leaders (e.g. televangelists) in the early/mid '70's. They perfected the art of sending out the letter with the personal touch to thousands of addresses.

    Today they would just send out the same text/tweet/email etc 100k times at once to different accounts.

  76. @anonymous
    @Ed


    No one, it seems, is more perplexed than the family patriarch by the race, and by what the Republican Party has become in its embrace of anti-establishment outsiders
     
    Perplexed. That's really rich. After encouraging the country to be flooded by the Third World, they're "perplexed" that the base is upset?

    I live in the Bush's Houston and send my kids to the whitest public school I could find. It's probably only 50% white and the rest are recent arrivals from Mexicans.

    Replies: @tbraton

    ” It’s probably only 50% white and the rest are recent arrivals from Mexicans.”

    You can thank the U.S. Supreme Court for that since it struck down the sensible Texas law making it illegal for unauthorized aliens to attend free public schools in a 5-4 decision more than 30 years ago. You can blame Congress for the other large magnet, free healthcare at hospitals. Free education for the kids, and free healthcare for the family. Sure beats Mexico.

  77. @Anonymous
    @Clyde

    I think your neighbour was not Portuguese.

    Replies: @whorefinder

    Actually, he’s quite right; in America, Portuguese speaking immigrants often watch Spanish-language TV, since it’s the closest thing to Portuguese TV in America. They can at least make out about half of the words, and the action sort of does the rest.

    I know this because I have a friend whose grandparents were from Portugal but moved to the US (they moved to Fall River, MA, which has a huge Portuguese community). He says whenever they babysat him he watched a ton of Univision, especially Sabado Gigante and some Spanish version of Oprah called Cristina (she’s a blond white lady, though). When he first saw the “Bee Guy” character on The Simpsons he went crazy with laughter, but the rest of us didn’t get it until he explained Sabado Gigante.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @whorefinder

    Unless your friend is in his mid-twenties, he never watched Univision in Fall River. It wasn't available there until the mid-Nineties.

  78. @tbraton
    @fish

    "Note to the dying dynasty….run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!"

    Very funny, but what's even funnier is that was the original Bush Family Plan. Jeb!!!, as the "smarter brother," was to be the Bush to follow GHWBush. But, fortunately or unfortunately, Jeb!!! lost his first governor's race in Florida to Lawton Childs in 1994, and, surprise, surprise, George W. won his gubernatorial race against Anne Richards in Texas and got a leg up on his brother Jeb!!! George W. got reelected in a landslide in 1998, when Jeb!!! finally won the Florida governorship. Strange how things work out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

    George W. would have had a better instinct for how to handle Trump than Jeb does. I think of the debate when Al Gore (acting on some consultant’s advice) left his lectern and went over to stand by Bush as he spoke, as if to intimidate him. Bush glanced over at him and then made an expression like, “What’s up with this dude?” and it made Gore look silly.

    Not saying that Trump couldn’t have bulldozed W, just that W probably wouldn’t have been the pushover that Jeb has proved to be.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @Harry Baldwin

    In the 2008 elections there were also subtle physical games. Both Obama and Biden grasped McCain and Palin by the arms. It showed McCain as a cripple and Palin as weak.

    http://media.npr.org/news/images/2008/oct/02/folkphoto_540.jpg

  79. @AndrewR
    @eah

    Leftism is a social status contest in which participants jockey for position by trying to outdo each other in extremeness of deed and word, no matter how absurd their behavior may seem to outsiders.

    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

    Anthropologists likely aren’t any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics. When I was in grad school in the late 80s, the anthro people were already wandering around campus with glazed, lamb-to-the-slaughter expressions on their incredulous faces, as they went from one seminar to the next in which the entire premise of their field — i.e. that by close, ‘thick’ observation and description, a la Clifford Geertz, members of one culture could analyse and understand the practices and beliefs of another culture — was relentlessly undermined by pomo diatribes such as Edward Said’s Orientalism. They were left with not much else to do but write whiny, self-abnegating pseudo travel books in which they minutely examined their own prejudices and unworthiness as they came face to face with the Exalted Other.

    • Replies: @anowow
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Anthropology departments are like islands of misfit toys and they become even more so as the years go by and the old [male] hippie and red diaper baby dinosaurs, who were at least somewhat rational and not so nihilistic and embittered, die off. The ghost of Margaret Mead is probably looking on with approval. That scholar, like Alfred Kinsey, evidently saw academia as a way of justifying her own perversions.

    I'm not sure how the Physical Anthropologists can stomach them.

    You can learn something about other cultures and ways of life from Oscar Lewis or about people's world-views from a Fredrik Barth, but try doing that with what's often published these days. I don't read much anthro stuff from after the mid-80's.

  80. @tbraton
    @fish

    "Note to the dying dynasty….run the wonky pseudo intellectual one first. That way the dumb one can extend family influence by running on his coattails!"

    Very funny, but what's even funnier is that was the original Bush Family Plan. Jeb!!!, as the "smarter brother," was to be the Bush to follow GHWBush. But, fortunately or unfortunately, Jeb!!! lost his first governor's race in Florida to Lawton Childs in 1994, and, surprise, surprise, George W. won his gubernatorial race against Anne Richards in Texas and got a leg up on his brother Jeb!!! George W. got reelected in a landslide in 1998, when Jeb!!! finally won the Florida governorship. Strange how things work out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

    George W. would have had a better instinct for how to handle Trump than Jeb does. I think of the debate when Al Gore (acting on some consultant’s advice) left his lectern and went over to stand by Bush as he spoke, as if to intimidate him. Bush glanced over at him and then nodded dismissively; it made Gore look silly.

    Not saying that Trump couldn’t have bulldozed . Bush, just that W probably wouldn’t have been the pushover that Jeb has proved to be.

  81. Bush is “perplexed” because he’s 91 and he thinks white Americans all think like his golfing/shuffleboard buddies.

  82. I think it will take a lot of expert damage control for Jeb to survive this performance:

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @fnn

    I'll take gridlock over anything Jeb has to offer. Gridlock has saved us from comprehensive immigration reform for a decade now.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  83. @Harry Baldwin
    @tbraton

    George W. would have had a better instinct for how to handle Trump than Jeb does. I think of the debate when Al Gore (acting on some consultant's advice) left his lectern and went over to stand by Bush as he spoke, as if to intimidate him. Bush glanced over at him and then made an expression like, "What's up with this dude?" and it made Gore look silly.

    Not saying that Trump couldn't have bulldozed W, just that W probably wouldn't have been the pushover that Jeb has proved to be.

    Replies: @Lugash

    In the 2008 elections there were also subtle physical games. Both Obama and Biden grasped McCain and Palin by the arms. It showed McCain as a cripple and Palin as weak.

  84. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @AndrewR


    Anthropologists from another civilization would very likely be puzzled as to why anthropologists in our civilzation are so willfully ignorant and childish. I see no reason why anthropology would be inherently predisposed to this shitbrained lunacy.

     

    Anthropologists likely aren't any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics. When I was in grad school in the late 80s, the anthro people were already wandering around campus with glazed, lamb-to-the-slaughter expressions on their incredulous faces, as they went from one seminar to the next in which the entire premise of their field -- i.e. that by close, 'thick' observation and description, a la Clifford Geertz, members of one culture could analyse and understand the practices and beliefs of another culture -- was relentlessly undermined by pomo diatribes such as Edward Said's Orientalism. They were left with not much else to do but write whiny, self-abnegating pseudo travel books in which they minutely examined their own prejudices and unworthiness as they came face to face with the Exalted Other.

    Replies: @anowow

    Anthropology departments are like islands of misfit toys and they become even more so as the years go by and the old [male] hippie and red diaper baby dinosaurs, who were at least somewhat rational and not so nihilistic and embittered, die off. The ghost of Margaret Mead is probably looking on with approval. That scholar, like Alfred Kinsey, evidently saw academia as a way of justifying her own perversions.

    I’m not sure how the Physical Anthropologists can stomach them.

    You can learn something about other cultures and ways of life from Oscar Lewis or about people’s world-views from a Fredrik Barth, but try doing that with what’s often published these days. I don’t read much anthro stuff from after the mid-80’s.

  85. @bomag
    @Black Death

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Bill Jones, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    “n my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; ”

    You are, of cause, confusing pretty good, with less bad.

  86. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Anthropologists likely aren’t any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics.”

    Franz Boaz:

    “…the “Father of American Anthropology”…

    …Studying in Germany, Boas was awarded a doctorate in 1881 in physics while also studying geography. He then participated in a geographical expedition to northern Canada where he became fascinated with the culture and language of the Baffin Island Inuit…

    …in 1899 became professor of anthropology at Columbia University where he remained for the rest of his career. Through his students, many of whom went on to found anthropology departments and research programmes inspired by their mentor, Boas profoundly influenced the development of American anthropology. Among his most significant students were Manuel Gamio, A. L. Kroeber, Ruth Benedict, Edward Sapir, Margaret Mead, and Zora Neale Hurston.

    …Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept and that human behavior is best understood through the typology of biological characteristics…

    …Boas also introduced the ideology of cultural relativism which holds that cultures cannot be objectively ranked as higher or lower…

    …Boas created the four field subdivision of anthropology which became prominent in American anthropology in the 20th century.

    …Although his grandparents were observant Jews, his parents embraced Enlightenment values, including their assimilation into modern German society. Boas’s parents were educated, well-to-do, and liberal…”

    Odd how a physicist born in 1858 still seems to hold sway over anthropology. Probably those who came after built an edifice resistant to common sense. It seems it was always about the future, not the past.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @anonymous

    …Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept

    Maybe someone who knows more about this can tell me something: did Boas oppose scientific racism because he felt he had evidence that disproved it, or did decide he was against it and then cobble together some arguments against it?

    I assume the latter but perhaps I'm wrong.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @anonymous

    "Zora Neale Hurston"

    ?

    Zora Neale Hurston wasn't an anthropologist but a popular writer. Isn't it a bit of a stretch to include her? Oh, maybe its like 'See? Its not just stale pale whites who were his students; even then a nurture oriented professor like Boaz was an early pioneer for the rights of minorities (Hurston); women (Mead and Benedict); and of course the rights of WWG (Benedict). Even in Boaz's classrooms, diversity reigned supreme 'cause he practiced what he preached.'

    "It seems it was always about the future, not the past."

    He who controls the present controls the past and the future.

    Replies: @Polearm

  87. @SFG
    @eah

    Notice how they're all white (and someone comments on it).

    I wonder how many people genuinely curious about the human sciences get driven away by this political posturing.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Ivy, @EvolutionistX

    It’s how I ended up here instead of academia.

    ETA: I had to read Said *twice* in college.

  88. @(((Owen)))
    @Melendwyr

    To run for president in Mexico it is required not only that you be a natural born citizen but that both of your parents be natural born citizens. Jeb, not being a natural born citizen, isn't even eligible to run for dogcatcher in Mexico; all elected offices are open only to natural born citizens.

    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico's immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico’s immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.

    Mexico isn’t what I’d call an example of superior governance. Given the shambles that is Mexico (adjusting for its abundant natural resources and its proximity to the biggest market in the world), I’d say that anything its government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Johann Ricke


    …, I’d say that anything [Mexico's] government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.
     
    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Johann Ricke

    "Mexico isn’t what I’d call an example of superior governance."

    Superior to what?

    Sixty years ago, Mexico was a third world socialist dictatorship with exploding overpopulation and poverty. Today Mexico is a prosperous first world country with rising education levels, a stable birth rate, free markets and entrepreneurship, universal health care (before the USA), and free elections. Even Slim's telecom monopoly has finally been reigned in.

    The average college educated young Mexican has higher wages (in relation to local cost of living) than the average college educated young American. The life expectancy of a nonsmoker is about the same -- probably a few weeks longer for a Mexican born today than an American. Mexico's urban transportation infrastructure and time wasted in traffic is better than LA or NY or SF.

    Look at how much progress America has made -- and in which direction -- over the same period.

    If you think Mexico's government is a shambles, you must be calling for Washington, D.C. to be nuked from Orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

    Replies: @Jimi

  89. @Luke Lea
    If new Speaker Ryan allows amnesty to pass, what will be the political fallout? A fate accompli or popular rebellion? How different from what is happening in Europe?

    Replies: @asdf

    Excellent question. I don’t know. I’m guessing that the coalition – Religious types / Business types vs. the rest of the coalition – is going to start dying. It’s dying now, but it’s going to become public.

    Ann Coulter, Derbyshire.. how many others? The Jeb party is over. We’ll see what else comes up I guess.

  90. @anonymous
    "Anthropologists likely aren’t any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics."

    Franz Boaz:


    "...the "Father of American Anthropology"...

    ...Studying in Germany, Boas was awarded a doctorate in 1881 in physics while also studying geography. He then participated in a geographical expedition to northern Canada where he became fascinated with the culture and language of the Baffin Island Inuit...

    ...in 1899 became professor of anthropology at Columbia University where he remained for the rest of his career. Through his students, many of whom went on to found anthropology departments and research programmes inspired by their mentor, Boas profoundly influenced the development of American anthropology. Among his most significant students were Manuel Gamio, A. L. Kroeber, Ruth Benedict, Edward Sapir, Margaret Mead, and Zora Neale Hurston.

    ...Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept and that human behavior is best understood through the typology of biological characteristics...

    ...Boas also introduced the ideology of cultural relativism which holds that cultures cannot be objectively ranked as higher or lower...

    ...Boas created the four field subdivision of anthropology which became prominent in American anthropology in the 20th century.

    ...Although his grandparents were observant Jews, his parents embraced Enlightenment values, including their assimilation into modern German society. Boas's parents were educated, well-to-do, and liberal..."

     

    Odd how a physicist born in 1858 still seems to hold sway over anthropology. Probably those who came after built an edifice resistant to common sense. It seems it was always about the future, not the past.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    …Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept

    Maybe someone who knows more about this can tell me something: did Boas oppose scientific racism because he felt he had evidence that disproved it, or did decide he was against it and then cobble together some arguments against it?

    I assume the latter but perhaps I’m wrong.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Harry Baldwin

    My impression is that Boas's influence over time is a another example of diminishing marginal returns. Initially, Boas's emphasis on Nurture served to helpfully even out the Nature-Nurture balance in Western thought, but the next couple of generations of his followers turned his useful objections to Galtonism into disastrous dogmas.

    The U. of Chicago's Social Sciences building has facing carvings of Galton and Boas, which strikes me as pretty reasonable. It was the Stock Market Crash of 1929, which reduced the amount of money available to academia for nice luxuries like carved busts of progenitors, that helped make Boas into a dogma.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  91. @fnn
    I think it will take a lot of expert damage control for Jeb to survive this performance:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9XzCUPPT7o

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    I’ll take gridlock over anything Jeb has to offer. Gridlock has saved us from comprehensive immigration reform for a decade now.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I’ll take gridlock over anything Jeb has to offer. Gridlock has saved us from comprehensive immigration reform for a decade now.

    I agree. Gridlock may be the best we can hope for.

  92. Jeb just ran at the wrong time. After the disastrous Bush presidencies, and the failed establishment candidacies of Dole, McCain, and Romney, his brand of politics is in low repute.
    Plus, he’s a terrible campaigner. Of course, Bush I was very bad too, but he had the VP as a launching pad and was able to lie about being a “Reagan Republican” in 1988.

    The contrast between him and Trump has highlighted all his defects. But never fear, the Republicans are the stupid party and will probably nominate him.

  93. @Johann Ricke
    @(((Owen)))


    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico’s immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.
     
    Mexico isn't what I'd call an example of superior governance. Given the shambles that is Mexico (adjusting for its abundant natural resources and its proximity to the biggest market in the world), I'd say that anything its government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @(((Owen)))

    …, I’d say that anything [Mexico’s] government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.

    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Reg Cæsar


    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.
     
    Actually, Mexico (meaning the hoi polloi) would be better off following our immigration policy*, and every other policy the Federal government has adopted. Of course, if Mexico did that, it would be a developed country, not a quasi-feudal state complete with landed aristocrats like Carlos Slim and other monopolists who keep the country in a perpetual state of economic languor that looks vigorous only compared with the rest of Latin America.

    * The onerous requirements for public office in Mexico are probably one reason Americans don't already run the country. The quasi-feudal lords who run Mexico are afraid of a Texas-style American takeover of the country.

    Replies: @NOTA

  94. @tbraton
    @Anonymous

    I wouldn't be that impressed by Carson's money haul. The only reason he's in the race is some direct mail politicos thought he would be a good vehicle to raise money. It turns out that it costs a lot of money to raise money by direct mail, so Carson has relatively little cash on hand. You know who profits from his race, don't you? I am somewhat surprised he's doing so well in the polls. Those fundamentalist Christians have a real weak spot for "polite, nice political candidates." Seems like an empty suit to me. He may do well in Iowa (Santorum won there is 2012, after all), but I think he will quickly fade thereafter. Rather than exposing the corruption and vacuity at the heart of Conservative, Inc., Carson is a symbol of the rot in the system.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Speaking of modern direct mail fundraising, it can be traced to fundamentalist Christian leaders (e.g. televangelists) in the early/mid ’70’s. They perfected the art of sending out the letter with the personal touch to thousands of addresses.

    Today they would just send out the same text/tweet/email etc 100k times at once to different accounts.

    • Agree: tbraton
  95. @anonymous
    "Anthropologists likely aren’t any stupider than the average American academic, but their field has been perhaps uniquely gutted by pomo/identity politics."

    Franz Boaz:


    "...the "Father of American Anthropology"...

    ...Studying in Germany, Boas was awarded a doctorate in 1881 in physics while also studying geography. He then participated in a geographical expedition to northern Canada where he became fascinated with the culture and language of the Baffin Island Inuit...

    ...in 1899 became professor of anthropology at Columbia University where he remained for the rest of his career. Through his students, many of whom went on to found anthropology departments and research programmes inspired by their mentor, Boas profoundly influenced the development of American anthropology. Among his most significant students were Manuel Gamio, A. L. Kroeber, Ruth Benedict, Edward Sapir, Margaret Mead, and Zora Neale Hurston.

    ...Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept and that human behavior is best understood through the typology of biological characteristics...

    ...Boas also introduced the ideology of cultural relativism which holds that cultures cannot be objectively ranked as higher or lower...

    ...Boas created the four field subdivision of anthropology which became prominent in American anthropology in the 20th century.

    ...Although his grandparents were observant Jews, his parents embraced Enlightenment values, including their assimilation into modern German society. Boas's parents were educated, well-to-do, and liberal..."

     

    Odd how a physicist born in 1858 still seems to hold sway over anthropology. Probably those who came after built an edifice resistant to common sense. It seems it was always about the future, not the past.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Zora Neale Hurston”

    ?

    Zora Neale Hurston wasn’t an anthropologist but a popular writer. Isn’t it a bit of a stretch to include her? Oh, maybe its like ‘See? Its not just stale pale whites who were his students; even then a nurture oriented professor like Boaz was an early pioneer for the rights of minorities (Hurston); women (Mead and Benedict); and of course the rights of WWG (Benedict). Even in Boaz’s classrooms, diversity reigned supreme ’cause he practiced what he preached.’

    “It seems it was always about the future, not the past.”

    He who controls the present controls the past and the future.

    • Replies: @Polearm
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Neale Hurston did graduate work in anthropology and studied under Boaz and Mead.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zora_Neale_Hurston#Anthropological_and_folkloric_fieldwork

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  96. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “You can thank the U.S. Supreme Court for that since it struck down the sensible Texas law making it illegal for unauthorized aliens to attend free public schools in a 5-4 decision more than 30 years ago. You can blame Congress for the other large magnet, free healthcare at hospitals. Free education for the kids, and free healthcare for the family. Sure beats Mexico.”

    Woudn’t it be wonderful if the US legal system paid some attention to reality and did not seem to be full of aggrieved people bent on abolishing the historic US nation? But wisdom is too much to expect, I imagine, all we have is the law.

  97. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Zora Neale Hurston wasn’t an anthropologist but a popular writer. Isn’t it a bit of a stretch to include her?”

    I don’t know anything about Zora Neale Hurston but what I read in the wikipedia. She may have been both, with her writing career overshadowing her anthropology career:

    Zora Neale Hurston:

    “…an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author. …

    …Columbia University, where she was the college’s sole black student…

    …Hurston received her B.A. in anthropology in 1928, when she was 37. While she was at Barnard, she conducted ethnographic research with noted anthropologist Franz Boas of Columbia University. She also worked with Ruth Benedict as well as fellow anthropology student Margaret Mead. After graduating from Barnard, Hurston spent two years as a graduate student in anthropology at Columbia University.”

    Anthropological and folkloric fieldwork:

    “…Hurston traveled extensively in the Caribbean and the American South and immersed herself in local cultural practices to conduct her anthropological research. Based on her work in the South… Hurston wrote Mules and Men in 1935.

    …In 1936 and 1937, Hurston traveled to Jamaica and Haiti for research, with support from the Guggenheim Foundation. She drew from this for her anthropological work, Tell My Horse (1938)…

    …From October 1947 to February 1948, she lived in Honduras… She had some hopes of locating either Mayan ruins or vestiges of an as yet undiscovered civilization… Hurston expressed interest in the polyethnic nature of the population… partial African ancestry and had developed creole cultures…”

    Wasn’t Margaret Mead also maybe a better popular writer than scientist? Maybe they were all really popular writers more than scientists; perhaps Hurston was just a better writer than the rest of them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    Zora Neale Hurston's autobiography is a good read.

  98. @Reg Cæsar
    @Johann Ricke


    …, I’d say that anything [Mexico's] government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.
     
    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.

    Actually, Mexico (meaning the hoi polloi) would be better off following our immigration policy*, and every other policy the Federal government has adopted. Of course, if Mexico did that, it would be a developed country, not a quasi-feudal state complete with landed aristocrats like Carlos Slim and other monopolists who keep the country in a perpetual state of economic languor that looks vigorous only compared with the rest of Latin America.

    * The onerous requirements for public office in Mexico are probably one reason Americans don’t already run the country. The quasi-feudal lords who run Mexico are afraid of a Texas-style American takeover of the country.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Johann Ricke

    For some inexplicable reason, people don't like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Mr. Anon, @Rob McX

  99. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “…did Boas oppose scientific racism because he felt he had evidence that disproved it, or did decide he was against it and then cobble together some arguments against it?”

    What I know about Boas I’ve learned mostly from google, so I’m no expert. Here’s the abstract of a paper in a journal published by a Washington DC think tank, The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies (full paper apparently :

    Franz Boas as Citizen-Scientist: Gramscian-Marxist Influence on American Anthropology, Gary Bullert, Columbia Basin College, Washington, JSPES, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Summer 2009) pp. 208-243:

    “Franz Boas’ role in shaping twentieth century American anthropology is well known, but less well known is his commitment to radical politics, and his political biases have been less thoroughly investigated. While traditional Marxism sought to advance its goals by way of violent revolution ostensibly vitalized by the “proletariat,” the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci (1897-1931) realized that Marxist egalitarian goals could be more effectively advanced by infiltrating and taking control of the existing institutional structure of a society. In the course of a thorough study of Boas’ correspondence, the author concludes that there is clear evidence that Boas was an effective convert to Gramscian Marxism and one of its most successful exponents.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    Wasn't Boas 39 years older than Gramsci?

  100. @anonymous
    "Zora Neale Hurston wasn’t an anthropologist but a popular writer. Isn’t it a bit of a stretch to include her?"

    I don't know anything about Zora Neale Hurston but what I read in the wikipedia. She may have been both, with her writing career overshadowing her anthropology career:

    Zora Neale Hurston:


    "...an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author. ...

    ...Columbia University, where she was the college's sole black student...

    ...Hurston received her B.A. in anthropology in 1928, when she was 37. While she was at Barnard, she conducted ethnographic research with noted anthropologist Franz Boas of Columbia University. She also worked with Ruth Benedict as well as fellow anthropology student Margaret Mead. After graduating from Barnard, Hurston spent two years as a graduate student in anthropology at Columbia University."

     

    Anthropological and folkloric fieldwork:


    "...Hurston traveled extensively in the Caribbean and the American South and immersed herself in local cultural practices to conduct her anthropological research. Based on her work in the South... Hurston wrote Mules and Men in 1935.

    ...In 1936 and 1937, Hurston traveled to Jamaica and Haiti for research, with support from the Guggenheim Foundation. She drew from this for her anthropological work, Tell My Horse (1938)...

    ...From October 1947 to February 1948, she lived in Honduras... She had some hopes of locating either Mayan ruins or vestiges of an as yet undiscovered civilization... Hurston expressed interest in the polyethnic nature of the population... partial African ancestry and had developed creole cultures..."

     

    Wasn't Margaret Mead also maybe a better popular writer than scientist? Maybe they were all really popular writers more than scientists; perhaps Hurston was just a better writer than the rest of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Zora Neale Hurston’s autobiography is a good read.

  101. @anonymous
    "...did Boas oppose scientific racism because he felt he had evidence that disproved it, or did decide he was against it and then cobble together some arguments against it?"

    What I know about Boas I've learned mostly from google, so I'm no expert. Here's the abstract of a paper in a journal published by a Washington DC think tank, The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies (full paper apparently :

    Franz Boas as Citizen-Scientist: Gramscian-Marxist Influence on American Anthropology, Gary Bullert, Columbia Basin College, Washington, JSPES, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Summer 2009) pp. 208-243:


    "Franz Boas’ role in shaping twentieth century American anthropology is well known, but less well known is his commitment to radical politics, and his political biases have been less thoroughly investigated. While traditional Marxism sought to advance its goals by way of violent revolution ostensibly vitalized by the “proletariat,” the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci (1897-1931) realized that Marxist egalitarian goals could be more effectively advanced by infiltrating and taking control of the existing institutional structure of a society. In the course of a thorough study of Boas’ correspondence, the author concludes that there is clear evidence that Boas was an effective convert to Gramscian Marxism and one of its most successful exponents."

     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Wasn’t Boas 39 years older than Gramsci?

  102. @Hunsdon
    @Leftist conservative

    radical_centrist says: Big Money wants as many human livestock crammed into the developing nations as they can get.

    Hunsdon said: I think you mean developed nations, Homer J.

    Replies: @Leftist conservative

    as usual, the commentary around here is always at the highest level

  103. @Paco Wové
    @eah

    Oh man, Word-Salad Sally (bottom row, far left at your link) is awesome:

    "Diversity is not the question; rather, it is the way diversity is construed; what kind of meaning difference attains in various contexts; at what moments "culture" is a "political" issue."

    It's a perfect caption for her facial expression. She immediately reminded me of this.

    Replies: @jon

    Yeah, I was just going to comment on that. What a ridiculous bunch of academicese. I would argue that her quite is a sign of her privilege and it is a microagression against the minorities who most likely can’t understand a word of it.

  104. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @anonymous

    "Zora Neale Hurston"

    ?

    Zora Neale Hurston wasn't an anthropologist but a popular writer. Isn't it a bit of a stretch to include her? Oh, maybe its like 'See? Its not just stale pale whites who were his students; even then a nurture oriented professor like Boaz was an early pioneer for the rights of minorities (Hurston); women (Mead and Benedict); and of course the rights of WWG (Benedict). Even in Boaz's classrooms, diversity reigned supreme 'cause he practiced what he preached.'

    "It seems it was always about the future, not the past."

    He who controls the present controls the past and the future.

    Replies: @Polearm

    Neale Hurston did graduate work in anthropology and studied under Boaz and Mead.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zora_Neale_Hurston#Anthropological_and_folkloric_fieldwork

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polearm

    Zora Neale Hurston's A.B.D. anthropology work at Boas's Columbia was kind of in the tradition of the Grimm Brothers in German 125 years before: she traveled around the black South collecting stories, folklore, linguistic patterns and the like. That gave her a lot of material for writing fiction: she wasn't really cut out for academic life, she was a big personality with more of a knack for storytelling than of factchecking (e.g., she was actually a decade older than she claimed to be and both of her husbands were much younger than she was). She attained some degree of stardom in the 1940s for her novels and her entertaining memoir.

    She was a conservative Republican who supported Taft over Eisenhower for the 1952 GOP nomination. She clashed openly with Communist Party-affiliated black writers like Richard Wright in the 1930s and 1940s.

  105. @Polearm
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Neale Hurston did graduate work in anthropology and studied under Boaz and Mead.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zora_Neale_Hurston#Anthropological_and_folkloric_fieldwork

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Zora Neale Hurston’s A.B.D. anthropology work at Boas’s Columbia was kind of in the tradition of the Grimm Brothers in German 125 years before: she traveled around the black South collecting stories, folklore, linguistic patterns and the like. That gave her a lot of material for writing fiction: she wasn’t really cut out for academic life, she was a big personality with more of a knack for storytelling than of factchecking (e.g., she was actually a decade older than she claimed to be and both of her husbands were much younger than she was). She attained some degree of stardom in the 1940s for her novels and her entertaining memoir.

    She was a conservative Republican who supported Taft over Eisenhower for the 1952 GOP nomination. She clashed openly with Communist Party-affiliated black writers like Richard Wright in the 1930s and 1940s.

  106. @Harry Baldwin
    @anonymous

    …Boas was one of the most prominent opponents of the then popular ideologies of scientific racism, the idea that race is a biological concept

    Maybe someone who knows more about this can tell me something: did Boas oppose scientific racism because he felt he had evidence that disproved it, or did decide he was against it and then cobble together some arguments against it?

    I assume the latter but perhaps I'm wrong.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My impression is that Boas’s influence over time is a another example of diminishing marginal returns. Initially, Boas’s emphasis on Nurture served to helpfully even out the Nature-Nurture balance in Western thought, but the next couple of generations of his followers turned his useful objections to Galtonism into disastrous dogmas.

    The U. of Chicago’s Social Sciences building has facing carvings of Galton and Boas, which strikes me as pretty reasonable. It was the Stock Market Crash of 1929, which reduced the amount of money available to academia for nice luxuries like carved busts of progenitors, that helped make Boas into a dogma.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer


    The U. of Chicago’s Social Sciences building has facing carvings of Galton and Boas, which strikes me as pretty reasonable.
     
    I'm surprised at that. What's the betting Galton will still be there in 2025?
  107. @Johann Ricke
    @Reg Cæsar


    Ironically, the big exception is immigration policy. We might best follow theirs to the letter.
     
    Actually, Mexico (meaning the hoi polloi) would be better off following our immigration policy*, and every other policy the Federal government has adopted. Of course, if Mexico did that, it would be a developed country, not a quasi-feudal state complete with landed aristocrats like Carlos Slim and other monopolists who keep the country in a perpetual state of economic languor that looks vigorous only compared with the rest of Latin America.

    * The onerous requirements for public office in Mexico are probably one reason Americans don't already run the country. The quasi-feudal lords who run Mexico are afraid of a Texas-style American takeover of the country.

    Replies: @NOTA

    For some inexplicable reason, people don’t like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @NOTA


    For some inexplicable reason, people don’t like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.
     
    By and large, Mexico consists of a bunch of Indians ruled by Spaniards. How are Americans any more foreign?
    , @Mr. Anon
    @NOTA

    "Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less."

    Perhaps it is seldom the case that foreigners actually do a better job and steal less.

    , @Rob McX
    @NOTA

    Trouble is, in white countries these days, the "corrupt locals" are bent on replacing the population with foreigners.

  108. @Johann Ricke
    @(((Owen)))


    Some countries are sick of being run for the benefit of outside powers that hold their citizens in contempt. Mexico’s immigration laws and its citizenship laws are stricter than those of El Norte and actually enforced.
     
    Mexico isn't what I'd call an example of superior governance. Given the shambles that is Mexico (adjusting for its abundant natural resources and its proximity to the biggest market in the world), I'd say that anything its government does, doing the complete opposite might be a good place to start.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @(((Owen)))

    “Mexico isn’t what I’d call an example of superior governance.”

    Superior to what?

    Sixty years ago, Mexico was a third world socialist dictatorship with exploding overpopulation and poverty. Today Mexico is a prosperous first world country with rising education levels, a stable birth rate, free markets and entrepreneurship, universal health care (before the USA), and free elections. Even Slim’s telecom monopoly has finally been reigned in.

    The average college educated young Mexican has higher wages (in relation to local cost of living) than the average college educated young American. The life expectancy of a nonsmoker is about the same — probably a few weeks longer for a Mexican born today than an American. Mexico’s urban transportation infrastructure and time wasted in traffic is better than LA or NY or SF.

    Look at how much progress America has made — and in which direction — over the same period.

    If you think Mexico’s government is a shambles, you must be calling for Washington, D.C. to be nuked from Orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.

    • Replies: @Jimi
    @(((Owen)))

    They also have a good immigration policy. Don't let low-income workers immigrate to Mexico and encourage the poorest Mexicans to emigrate out of Mexico!

  109. @Yevardian
    @bomag

    How so? The legacy of Bush senior amounts to NAFTA and the Gulf War. I'll say he had a certain "patrician" aura that you don't see today. The last American president who could plausibly be described as an great leader with the nation's interests at heart was Eisenhower.

    Replies: @bomag

    HW cultivated some fiscal responsibility (cleaning up the savings and loan mess in decent fashion); he prosecuted Gulf War I in successful fashion.

    I suppose both things could have been headed off earlier by a more astute leader, but I’ll take him over anybody since.

    I’ll agree with you about Eisenhower, but I start counting “modern” with Kennedy, the era of politician as media figure, which seems to coincide with some of our various declines.

  110. @whorefinder
    @Anonymous

    Actually, he's quite right; in America, Portuguese speaking immigrants often watch Spanish-language TV, since it's the closest thing to Portuguese TV in America. They can at least make out about half of the words, and the action sort of does the rest.

    I know this because I have a friend whose grandparents were from Portugal but moved to the US (they moved to Fall River, MA, which has a huge Portuguese community). He says whenever they babysat him he watched a ton of Univision, especially Sabado Gigante and some Spanish version of Oprah called Cristina (she's a blond white lady, though). When he first saw the "Bee Guy" character on The Simpsons he went crazy with laughter, but the rest of us didn't get it until he explained Sabado Gigante.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Unless your friend is in his mid-twenties, he never watched Univision in Fall River. It wasn’t available there until the mid-Nineties.

  111. http://mobile.nytimes.com/2010/12/10/science/10anthropology.html?referrer=

    American Anthropoligists dropped the scientific method half a decade ago much to the chagrin of archaeologist, physical anthropologists and to a lesser extent linguistic anthropologists.

    There are legitimate anthropologists out there still but you have to deal with a lot of clowns

  112. Also, when it comes to employablity, Anthropology comes in dead last of all majors. Even after bogus crap like women’s studies

  113. Anonymous [AKA "BlackDeath"] says:
    @bomag
    @Black Death

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Bill Jones, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Bush I started the great GOP tradition, carried to new heights by his son, of selling out his base. Remember “Read my lips – no new taxes”? Old man Bush spit right in the faces of the people who put it in office, then seemed surprised when they dropped him. His tax increases caused a nasty recession, and his approval rating, which rose to over 90% after the Gulf War, dropped to only 37.5% of the vote in the 1992 election.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Anonymous

    I'm not going to beat up Bush the First too much for trying some fiscal responsibility.

    There is a lot of ruin in a presidency, especially a modern one with all the media attention. But Bush 1 struck me as someone genuinely interested in the country, as opposed to some of the other resume fillers we've had. My point was that there was some goodwill left over from his reign that boosted W, a goodwill that is long gone.

  114. @Steve Sailer
    @Harry Baldwin

    My impression is that Boas's influence over time is a another example of diminishing marginal returns. Initially, Boas's emphasis on Nurture served to helpfully even out the Nature-Nurture balance in Western thought, but the next couple of generations of his followers turned his useful objections to Galtonism into disastrous dogmas.

    The U. of Chicago's Social Sciences building has facing carvings of Galton and Boas, which strikes me as pretty reasonable. It was the Stock Market Crash of 1929, which reduced the amount of money available to academia for nice luxuries like carved busts of progenitors, that helped make Boas into a dogma.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    The U. of Chicago’s Social Sciences building has facing carvings of Galton and Boas, which strikes me as pretty reasonable.

    I’m surprised at that. What’s the betting Galton will still be there in 2025?

  115. @NOTA
    @Johann Ricke

    For some inexplicable reason, people don't like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Mr. Anon, @Rob McX

    For some inexplicable reason, people don’t like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    By and large, Mexico consists of a bunch of Indians ruled by Spaniards. How are Americans any more foreign?

  116. @NOTA
    @Johann Ricke

    For some inexplicable reason, people don't like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Mr. Anon, @Rob McX

    “Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.”

    Perhaps it is seldom the case that foreigners actually do a better job and steal less.

  117. @Harry Baldwin
    @fnn

    I'll take gridlock over anything Jeb has to offer. Gridlock has saved us from comprehensive immigration reform for a decade now.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “I’ll take gridlock over anything Jeb has to offer. Gridlock has saved us from comprehensive immigration reform for a decade now.

    I agree. Gridlock may be the best we can hope for.

  118. @bomag
    @Black Death

    In my opinion Bush the Elder was pretty good as far as the modern presidency goes; one reason the country was willing to give W a chance.

    The brand is now damaged.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Bill Jones, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Bush the elder did nothing good for the U.S., for whites, or for conservatism. He wasn’t as disastrous as was his son, but that doesn’t mean that he was really any good.

  119. For some inexplicable reason, people don’t like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    Sort of like how parents don’t trade their kids in for higher-achieving kids.

  120. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Wasn’t Boas 39 years older than Gramsci?”

    Yes, but Boas started university teaching (at Columbia) in 1896 and stayed there until 1938.

    Gramsci seems to have done much of his work during WWI and the early 20s. (He had been a sickly child and was a hunchback.)

    Antonio Gramsci:

    “…Gramsci joined the Italian Socialist Party in late 1913.

    …From 1914 onward, Gramsci’s writings for socialist newspapers such as Il Grido del Popolo earned him a reputation as a notable journalist. In 1916 he became co-editor of the Piedmont edition of Avanti!, the Socialist Party official organ. An articulate and prolific writer of political theory, Gramsci proved a formidable commentator…

    …In April 1919 with Togliatti, Angelo Tasca and Umberto Terracini Gramsci set up the weekly newspaper L’Ordine Nuovo (The New Order)… The L’Ordine Nuovo group was seen by Vladimir Lenin as closest in orientation to the Bolsheviks, and it received his backing…

    …In 1924 Gramsci, now recognised as head of the PCI… started organizing the launch of the official newspaper of the party, called L’Unità (Unity), living in Rome while his family stayed in Moscow.

    …On 9 November 1926 the Fascist government… arrested Gramsci… received a sentence of 20 years…

    …Gramsci was one of the most important Marxist thinkers of the twentieth century, and a particularly key thinker in the development of Western Marxism. He wrote more than 30 notebooks and 3000 pages of history and analysis during his imprisonment. These writings, known as the Prison Notebooks

    Margaret Mead got her masters in 1924 and PhD in 1929. So the timing would have been right for Boas’ radical students to pick up Gramsci’s ideas from his earlier WWI-era work, before he wrote Prison Notebooks. It looks like everybody of that era who was “Gramscian” did, because Prison Notebooks wasn’t published until the 50s:

    “…The notebooks were smuggled out of prison in the 1930s. They were not published until the 1950s and were first translated into English in the 1970s.”

    So Boas could have been explicitly Gramscian for the last two decades of his career. Of course, he could have also arrived at a roughly similar position earlier, that is, he or others may have anticipated Gramsci, as Boas wrote:

    “…The background of my early thinking was a German home in which the ideals of the revolution of 1848 were a living force…”

  121. @(((Owen)))
    @Johann Ricke

    "Mexico isn’t what I’d call an example of superior governance."

    Superior to what?

    Sixty years ago, Mexico was a third world socialist dictatorship with exploding overpopulation and poverty. Today Mexico is a prosperous first world country with rising education levels, a stable birth rate, free markets and entrepreneurship, universal health care (before the USA), and free elections. Even Slim's telecom monopoly has finally been reigned in.

    The average college educated young Mexican has higher wages (in relation to local cost of living) than the average college educated young American. The life expectancy of a nonsmoker is about the same -- probably a few weeks longer for a Mexican born today than an American. Mexico's urban transportation infrastructure and time wasted in traffic is better than LA or NY or SF.

    Look at how much progress America has made -- and in which direction -- over the same period.

    If you think Mexico's government is a shambles, you must be calling for Washington, D.C. to be nuked from Orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

    Replies: @Jimi

    They also have a good immigration policy. Don’t let low-income workers immigrate to Mexico and encourage the poorest Mexicans to emigrate out of Mexico!

    • Agree: (((Owen)))
  122. @Anonymous
    @bomag

    Bush I started the great GOP tradition, carried to new heights by his son, of selling out his base. Remember "Read my lips - no new taxes"? Old man Bush spit right in the faces of the people who put it in office, then seemed surprised when they dropped him. His tax increases caused a nasty recession, and his approval rating, which rose to over 90% after the Gulf War, dropped to only 37.5% of the vote in the 1992 election.

    Replies: @bomag

    I’m not going to beat up Bush the First too much for trying some fiscal responsibility.

    There is a lot of ruin in a presidency, especially a modern one with all the media attention. But Bush 1 struck me as someone genuinely interested in the country, as opposed to some of the other resume fillers we’ve had. My point was that there was some goodwill left over from his reign that boosted W, a goodwill that is long gone.

  123. @TB2
    Well, his brother was the the same way, touting his "compassionate conservatism" and always implying that his voters were Nazis for not supporting amnesty and open borders. And they elected him twice! True, he didn't go around jabbering in Spanish, but he was just as bad about hating his own constituency. Declasse, you know. Still, you really can't blame Heb for his linguistic faux pas, Republican voters have shown over and over again that there is no bottom to their gullibility and capacity to act as human spittoons for their leaders. He might be right yet, the election's not over and these are the Republicans after all.

    Replies: @alcogito


    Because he looked normal compared to creepy Gore and Lurch.

  124. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Re http://mobile.nytimes.com/2010/12/10/science/10anthropology.html?referrer=&_r=0.

    “Anthropology a Science? Statement Deepens a Rift: Anthropology Group Drops ‘Science’ References, Deepening a Rift”, The NYT, NICHOLAS WADE, December 9, 2010:

    “…Anthropologists have been thrown into turmoil about the nature and future of their profession after a decision by the American Anthropological Association at its recent annual meeting to strip the word “science” from a statement of its long-range plan. …

    …many science-based anthropologists were dismayed to learn last month that the long-range plan of the association would no longer be to advance anthropology as a science but rather to focus on “public understanding.”

    …Dr. Peregrine, who is at Lawrence University in Wisconsin… “…the cat’s out of the bag and is running around clawing up the furniture,” he said.

    …“Much of this is like creationism in that it is based on the rejection of rational argument and thought,”…”

  125. Jeb Goes Off: I Could Be Doing ‘Really Cool Things’ Instead of Being President, You Know

    “I’ve got a lot of really cool things I could do other than sit around, being miserable, listening to people demonize me and me feeling compelled to demonize them. That is a joke. Elect Trump if you want that.”

  126. @NOTA
    @Johann Ricke

    For some inexplicable reason, people don't like being ruled by foreigners. Usually, people are more comfortable being ruled by inept and corrupt locals than by foreigners who do a better job and steal less.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Mr. Anon, @Rob McX

    Trouble is, in white countries these days, the “corrupt locals” are bent on replacing the population with foreigners.

  127. This is good news. May the Jeb campaign rot and be seen as an example of how not to make a campaign. What a pathetic neocon.

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