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Japan Closes All Schools for Month of March
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From the Associated Press:

Japan to close schools nationwide to control spread of coronavirus
By Associated Press February 27, 2020 | 5:43am | Updated

TOKYO — Japan is announcing the closure of schools nationwide to help control the spread of the coronavirus.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.

That sounds bad.

Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood. But for more outgoing and productive human beings, this sounds massive.

 
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  1. I wished this would have happened in like 2014 when i was in my otaku phase binge watching anime & movies on my laptop in my man cave.

    I’d only step outside to check the mail or mow the lawn or shoo away thugs and white trash knocking on my door asking to mow the lawn for 15$…..

    Now I’m married & have a kid and have to work. And man does she like to go out.

    If i didnt have to pay rent I’d gladly go back to my old lifestyle. I bet the otaku numbers in Japan are about to surge….

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @JMcG
    Glad to hear you’re doing well.
    , @Mr McKenna

    And man does she like to go out.
     
    IKR? Daniel Tosh to GF: "Of course I don't want to go out. The only reason I went out in the first place was to get you."
  2. anonymous[954] • Disclaimer says:

    All schools in China have been closed for over a month. Even children in villages are attending class through a webcam app on mobiles. I wonder what long term effect this will have one education. Will there no longer be as many English teaching jobs in Asia because students just take online classes taught by Ukrainians?

    • Replies: @bomag
    Agree that it could well suggest other ways to educate. If we are heading into a world with ever more crises, could do well to get away from large public gatherings.

    I'd say there's a good chance education outcomes could improve over this period:

    )) Modern structured instruction is overrated.

    )) There will be an adversity premium; kids will be extra diligent in studies as a way to do some part in alleviating the crisis, especially in a place like Japan.

    , @Homeschooling Mom in NY
    The current educational model is a relic of the industrial age. It should be dismantled. There’s no excuse to steal so much money from the people to prop up this aging, inefficient and abusive system. The children in Japan will do just fine taking this much needed metal health break.
    , @Ma Laoshi
    So glad you asked, I'm one of those people now teaching online for a university in China. It's taken quite seriously (like all education is here); the department makes sure we don't slack off, with classes being held on time and well-attended. But they also have my back, asking me if there's anything I need help with to do my job. The kids' Chinese New Year break was more boring than it'd normally have been, so they are mostly happy to have some normal activity back; and of course they know the various online tools better than either me or my bosses, so it'll all getting worked out even though it has its limitations.

    If education is seen by many as a false choice between bible indoctrination or transgender indoctrination, that only says something about the sorry state of Americans heads--not about the value of learning something about the world.
  3. Public schools should shutdown in the USA too. The staff are all dems and the kids are exposed to drugs, disease, marxism, racism, and dont learn alot. With no public schools some kids will not learn at all, like now, and some will learn more.

    • Troll: Jesse
    • Replies: @Anon
    As the parent of two high school age kids, I agree with you 100%.
  4. It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    • Replies: @Jesse
    It's amazing how many people actually believe the Chinese numbers. If you look at the purported death rates since it really took off, we're meant to believe that the death rate *every single day* has been 2.1%.

    I don't know if it's that high trust Westerners can't really from bald faced lies, or if a lot of alt right types have this hero workshop of the Chinese and an idea they'll save us. But it's leading to some utterly ridiculous twists and turns.
    , @Anonymous
    2% number is such BS, based on an understated Denominator.
    , @Daniel Williams
    Japan doesn’t have many kids to spare. The authorities there probably believe that any preventable non-zero mortality rate is too high.

    It’s hard to get too worked up about it, unless you think that they (Japan’s top decision-makers) know something about this virus that we (ordinary schmucks on the internet) do not.
    , @Michael S
    Sure, let's accept the 2% figure for Chinese. That means in a class of 50 students, basically all of them are going to catch it, and one of them is going to die.

    Would you send your kid to that school?
    , @reiner Tor
    There are two mortality rates for this thing: one is as long as there are not many cases. In such a case, mortality might be below 1%, maybe just 0.5%. But once hospitals get overwhelmed (and this happens quickly), mortality rates shoot up to something like 2-3%. It might actually be higher still, because some families could get ill together, and then they can't even provide care to each other.

    The statistics looks like this. Out of a population of 1000, maybe 500 will get infected, with 200 showing no symptoms, and 240 showing only mild to moderate symptoms (so like a common cold to a bad flu), but 60 will require hospitalization, and maybe 6 of those will require intensive care. Once hospitals get overwhelmed (very quickly, because ICU is a very limited resource), basically you can assume that each of those 6 will die. And a few of the others might die, too, because, even though they wouldn't need intensive care, they'd still need someone to look after them, but they'd be at home alone or with equally ill family members. Here's a famous guy (in his fifties) who died, along with his sister and two parents:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/18/coronavirus-kills-chinese-film-director-family-wuhan-covid-19

    The other issue is that people will start to panic. They will avoid public places, and many people will just refuse to go to work, because they don't even want to risk being infected there. They could easily just report sick (who could check them if they were lying..?), and so lots of companies and services would just stop working, one by one. This would include some essential services. The secondary effects of such a collapse are difficult to contemplate, but potentially could kill way more people than that, and could eventually result in a total collapse of the economy, as well as mass starvation.

    As the situation was getting out of hand in Wuhan (and increasingly elsewhere in China), the Standing Committee of the Central Political Bureau of the Chinese Communist Party (a body not famous for being exceedingly humanitarian or caring for a few people dying here or there) realized how bad it could get, and so they decided to just shut down the economy for several weeks, while keeping at least the most essential services everywhere (even in Wuhan).

    This decision might have to be made elsewhere, too. Italy has already locked down several towns, and perhaps they'll be forced to do more. But some other countries have declared that they won't ever implement such mass quarantines under any circumstances, like Merkel's Germany. We'll see. Merkel's Germany also insists that the risks to the public were still low. I would think that they have such good chances against a COVID-19 outbreak, as they had back in the day to destroy the Asiatic hordes at the gates of Berlin, with Steiner's forces.
    , @Jack Henson
    Almost 1b under some sort of travel restriction and people are still having smooth brained "just the flu" takes.

    Do you know what a sudden 5% extra strain on the ICUs is going to look like? Itll be chaos. Now add in the extra spice that is a low trust society with low IQ types who don't understand that there are only X amount of ventilators available and abuelita or gramma can't just be put on one. Now add the 5th column that is the media: wait until the news starts with "racist hospitals" stories.

    It's going to be a shit show in this country. Pretty sure the HHS isn't taking testing seriously because it thinks that the deaths will wash out in the annual flu deaths. That's the attitude right now.
  5. How much schooling did Americans get a century ago? My impression is they went through the 11th grade only. They had less homework. Maybe had more time off and shorter semesters. And yet, they performed quite well, if not better than modern high school graduates.

    Social-Welfare-Educational Complex is every much a monster as the Military Industrial Complex. And frankly, more wicked. They get right into your child’s mind with agendas without informing you what their game is.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    About 100-130 years ago we went to everyone goes to high school. People could drop out at 16. Prior to that, most states mandated through 8th grade, with variable enforcement.
    In Ohio, the law was through 8th grade mandatory, you could only go to high school if you passed a test.
    , @Louis Renault
    But they were reading the classics of western literature, using slide rules and maybe even having shop class; now they're all woke and rainbow flagish.
    , @james wilson
    Average educational level--average--in 1940 was tenth grade. They did pretty well.
  6. Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    In the backwoods areas of China, though English has been taught since the early 1980s, the teachers could not speak a lick of English, had their heavy dialects, and just taught the ABCs and such. It was kind of a joke.

    I would say the same for lots of American High School French and such, but we did have 2 teachers who were really into it, but additionally, French, German, Spanish, etc. (especially the latter) are so much closer to English than Chinese is. For Spanish, you only really need to learn a couple of new sounds.

    As for the American/Western young men that come to China to meet cute Oriental girls teach English, it depends on the students' backgrounds as to whether they will get anything out of it. I doubt 1 in 100 of these Western teachers speaks Chinese anything near fluently, unless he's been doing it for 10 years or more, and even then... I think it is more a sink-or-swim immersion program out of necessity.
    , @V
    My understanding is that many of the teachers learn it from books / professors who are ESL, and only have a bit of practice with native English speakers; there are mission trips and similar things to go teach English / give conversational practice to people who will be English teachers.
    , @epebble
    A child learns whatever language he/she/it hears without the "teacher speaking in the child's native language". That is the very definition of a child! (no/not much native language).
    , @Polynikes
    It varies. I know people who have taught esl. In most cases these are extra curricular classes taught at their parents expense—so rich or middle class kids. They range from courses where every kid has spent time in an English speaking country already (this would include even elementary level kids) who speak English better than your average American student to those kids who have been taught the basics of English by a non native speaker (every kid in Asia) and now want to pay to learn real English from a native speaker.
    , @Torn and Frayed
    It's probably better if the teacher does not speak the student's native language. Because if they did then it will be the native language that gets spoken and not the language being taught. A child learns his first language by being immersed in it and this is the best way to teach second and third languages as well.
    , @Alden
    It’s supposed to be better if the teacher just does total immersion.

    Don’t forget, they have books and materials in their own language. Since the entire population of China wants to learn English, it would be difficult to find enough bi lingual people. The Chinese seem to learn English through books materials and non Chinese speaking teachers just fine.
  7. OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks for the info, Anon 2 - I'm glad to hear that. As to your last part, that's a little-known addition of insult to injury, thanks to the elder Bush. However, I also think that the feeling of living in a foreign country took quite a while to ramp up, from 1965 onwards. You had the much larger numbers coming then, but it took a while for more offspring to enter the schools. The cumulative totals, NOT counting the kids born here, have now accumulated to where over 15% of "Americans" were born in foreign countries.
    , @Chucko

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.
     
    The Clinton administration was when I felt the rumble. When he announced that the federal government was going to go all in on handing out Section 8 vouchers to any black moron with half a pulse, sleepy, middle-class neighborhoods turned into crime mecca’s seemingly overnight. It was a damned shame to watch.

    L.A. before the mess:

    https://youtu.be/ESoJDNnK-j8
    , @Travis
    True. The immigration Act of 1990 effectively doubled Legal immigration while expanding amnesty and creating the diversity Visa program.

    Ending the Green card lottery should be a priority for Trump. The Diversity Lottery is how most Muslims and Africans gain legal entry into the United States. This was the most destructive aspect of the 1990 Immigration act. Ending the diversity lottery would benefit Americans more than building the wall and would instantly save Americans millions of dollars per day. The effect would be immediately and lasting.
    , @Paleo Liberal
    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 -- Reagan's new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall -- one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn't. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.
    , @Anonymous
    The 1990 Immigration Act basically put the 1965 Act on steroids.
    And who was president when this monstrosity was signed into law? Ahh yes, George HW Bush, the cuckservative godfather.
    Someone should do a statistical analysis as to how much farther along we are to becoming a full-fledged Third World hellhole thanks to this act alone. Heck even California might still be recognizably American, and hence still electorally competitive for the Stupid Party.

    As for Trump throwing sand into the immigration machinery, he could as a result of SCOTUS upholding the so-called Moslem travel ban in 2018 issue an EO tomorrow morning putting a halt to both the Diversity Visa Lottery and Chain migration. Oh, and finally issue that EO on anchor babies; although maybe he should wait till old Ruthie kicks the bucket.
    , @nebulafox
    The early 1990s really do seem to be the big turning point. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, immigration was much more strictly controlled, not just in making sure the numbers could be easily handled, but also in terms of quality. Anybody who works in software and sees the H1-B Ponzi scheme's effect and has also interacted with scientists who came from that part of the world during the Cold War will know what I'm talking about.

    (Google Hoseong Ryu. That they claim that *Koreans* of all people are lazy is the tell-tale BS flag.)

    It's hard not to fit this in with the general post-Cold War tendency of our ruling elite to sort of let go on any kind of restraints, from foreign policy to neoliberal dreams about the economy. The Baby Boomers taking power just after the USSR imploded-thus removing any incentive to think in terms of realism in dealings abroad or prudence in dealing with working Americans at home-was not the best combination in the world.

    , @Morris Applebaum IV
    The collapse of white fertility (and East Asian) doesn't seem to get much attention here. With each generation of white children close to 1/4 smaller than the previous (and worse for East Asians), you can get a pretty good idea of what America will look like in 20-30 years. Even by the 1980s, the maternity wards were much different than the America you remember. The only stats that count are newborns. Everything else is basically an illusion.
  8. That’s a little extreme for a disease that is “just the flu”, isn’t it?

    • Replies: @e
    Not when one considers there is as yet no vaccine for it nor a large enough population of those with immunity to it.

    Further, basic germ theory is that you have a good shot at forcing a virus to benignity if you don't allow it to spread easily from person to person.

  9. Headline should read “Japanese will test nationwide homeschooling for one month”

    Question, how will this affect the rate of teen pregnancy in Japan?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Teen pregnancy in Japan? I thought the Japanese have pretty much given up on pregnancy altogether.
  10. Anon[212] • Disclaimer says:

    Two weeks for the schools, starting Monday, so tomorrow Friday is the last day this term. The final two weeks are the regular annual Spring vacation. The Prime Minister announced it today. The opposition parties on the televised question sessions have been hectoring him to do more. He fixed their wagon and shut them up with this and yesterday’s “government request” that all large sports and music events, etc., cancel for the next two weeks at least. This is equivalent to an order in Japan’s orderly society.

    Pro sports events and Olympics qualifying events are happening with no spectators. Perfume cancelled a stadium concert today right after the announcement: it would have been a funny piece of performance art had they just done it to an empty stadium … or maybe to a dozen make-a-wish style kids with cancer, sitting in the cavernous stadium.

    The two Disney parks, and Universal Studios, continue on as usual, except staff are wearing surgical masks. They closed for a week and a half after the earthquake, although that was to repair damage. I think they are going to be pressured to close soon, like the Hong Kong and Shanghai parks.

    A big problem is the stuffy rush hour trains and subways. Flex time would help there. Stopping them would well and truly shut down the city.

    By the way, this is entrance exam season, for universities and high schools (all high schools are by exam, compulsory education is through junior high, although Japanese junior high is equivalent to most US high schools), and the exams have been disrupted.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    'A big problem is the stuffy rush hour trains and subways. Flex time would help there...'

    ! You're not kidding. It's a miracle how the Japanese manage to (politely, without bumping) pack themselves all in -- but that skill won't stop the spread of bacteria.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    I live in Hong Kong, where schools, universities, and many employers sent people home over a month ago. My daughter, like nearly all HK kids, has become an expert at using Zoom, the video conferencing app du jour, since all of her classes are using this. I've been working from home for a month also, although it looks as if that's coming to an end after this week.

    Daughter C also has big university entrance exams coming up, starting at the end of March and running through April. The HK Education department's solution, which was just announced this week, is to go ahead with the exams, but keep all other school kids at home until after Easter. It's widely assumed this is so the schools that host the university exams can provide lots of space for exam sitters this year, instead of crowding them into huge halls that seat up to 1,000. The rest of the kids, eh, they can stay home for a while longer. This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.
  11. anon[141] • Disclaimer says:

    All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship – Princess – were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese. I’, not saying there is a racial angle here, but suspect one. It is the main thing that can’t be openly speculated on by pundits.

    Of course, maybe it is just a lag reflecting time from exposure, but maybe not. If I were Asian, I would be more concerned.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    An Iranian former ambassador to the Vatican died yesterday. That is the first report confirmed report I have seen of a non East Asian death from coronavirus. He was 81 years though. Iran has 26 deaths out of 245 confirmed cases. We have no way of knowing how many of those are ethnically Chinese.
    , @ThreeCranes

    "All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship – Princess – were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese."

     

    Which explains why the shutdown isn't "over-reaction" as someone asked above. Shockingly, Asians actually revere their elderly. They value and protect them from the vicissitudes of old age, which is why the Japanese currently enjoy the world's longest lifespans.

    We Americans, on the other hand, wish that the elderly will get the hell out of the way and make room for whatever generation x, millennial etc. wants to get their hands on America's goodies (as that commenter yesterday made plain in his expressed death wish for boomers).

    As this disease disproportionately affects the elderly, so the Asian response appears disproportionate to the Western eye.

    What was our Social Security cost of living increase for this year? Peanuts. Even our government wants us dead. Once your past your prime consuming years you're looked upon as dead weight in America.

  12. So glad that the Trump Administration is prepared. Oh, wait…

    https://apnews.com/67a9a72531ca2e332bea9225cec2fda5?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=AP

    Of course, Trump supporters are holding his feet to the fire. Oh, wait…

    https://twitter.com/SethAbramson/status/1232694132650340352/photo/1

    When you dig deeper, you find out there is nothing about any “stonewalling” or even any mention of coronavirus funds—as this tweet, which has thousands of retweets, is a lie. Democrats are asking for three times more funding than Trump.

  13. The kids will hardly miss the month of school.

    But if we did this in the US, the real impact would be on the ability of parents to work. That could put a big dent in the economy.

    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    This is correct. Japanese women generally don’t work if they have children, and , importantly, don’t WANT to work. They understand that it’s much preferable to get their husband’s salary and meet their friends at Starbucks after lunch than to put up with bullshit all day long.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many "planning days" that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation--it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don't want to lose their votes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbgWX-t0EYA

    , @Anonymous
    Emmit Till month ?
  14. @candid_observer
    The kids will hardly miss the month of school.

    But if we did this in the US, the real impact would be on the ability of parents to work. That could put a big dent in the economy.

    This is correct. Japanese women generally don’t work if they have children, and , importantly, don’t WANT to work. They understand that it’s much preferable to get their husband’s salary and meet their friends at Starbucks after lunch than to put up with bullshit all day long.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Though its not like the "women who do lunch" exactly have more children. It is high status not to work, though. And do lunch with friends and flaunt how you don't have to work.
  15. Trump had better hope he gets lucky on the spread of this virus in North America or it could take him down. Worse than the Bernie virus.

    Bill in Glendale

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    Fakestream media coverage of the kung flu looks increasingly like a pretext to frighten women and bedwetting males into creating a recession. That would likely ensure a victory for the Democratic candidate. White Americans really don't need another eight years of governance by the nation's largest and best-funded hate group: the Democratic Party.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "Bill in Glendale"

    The same "Bill" who was a frequent guest on Phil Hendrie's radio show?
  16. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    In the backwoods areas of China, though English has been taught since the early 1980s, the teachers could not speak a lick of English, had their heavy dialects, and just taught the ABCs and such. It was kind of a joke.

    I would say the same for lots of American High School French and such, but we did have 2 teachers who were really into it, but additionally, French, German, Spanish, etc. (especially the latter) are so much closer to English than Chinese is. For Spanish, you only really need to learn a couple of new sounds.

    As for the American/Western young men that come to China to meet cute Oriental girls teach English, it depends on the students’ backgrounds as to whether they will get anything out of it. I doubt 1 in 100 of these Western teachers speaks Chinese anything near fluently, unless he’s been doing it for 10 years or more, and even then… I think it is more a sink-or-swim immersion program out of necessity.

  17. @Neoconned
    I wished this would have happened in like 2014 when i was in my otaku phase binge watching anime & movies on my laptop in my man cave.

    I'd only step outside to check the mail or mow the lawn or shoo away thugs and white trash knocking on my door asking to mow the lawn for 15$.....

    Now I'm married & have a kid and have to work. And man does she like to go out.

    If i didnt have to pay rent I'd gladly go back to my old lifestyle. I bet the otaku numbers in Japan are about to surge....

    Glad to hear you’re doing well.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    Thank u sir.

    And you as well.
  18. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    Thanks for the info, Anon 2 – I’m glad to hear that. As to your last part, that’s a little-known addition of insult to injury, thanks to the elder Bush. However, I also think that the feeling of living in a foreign country took quite a while to ramp up, from 1965 onwards. You had the much larger numbers coming then, but it took a while for more offspring to enter the schools. The cumulative totals, NOT counting the kids born here, have now accumulated to where over 15% of “Americans” were born in foreign countries.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I predict that the Elder Bush will go down as the most diabolical and cynical President of all time...along with his mean-spirited wife. So glad the younger, dumber Bushes are keeping their traps shut. 1991 & 2001 were the worst years of our lives; machinations that ensued, plague us to this day. However, at least the Bush brothers are staying out of sight and speaking no evil.
  19. It sure sounds like political ass-covering. We think of the Japanese as all smart cookies, but this is overkill. Don’t these people wear face-masks regularly anyway? (Just don’t buy any of the cheap China-made ones that don’t actually have a filter inside. I know about this from actual experience with a manufacturer in China. Corruption Cost-savings, you know …)

    • Replies: @Testing12
    They're smart. They know the mortality numbers reported by the fraudulent Chinese communists are fake as hell.
  20. Japan doesn’t have millions of savage teens they need to keep in quasi-prison during the day. There is no way the US could stop schooling for a month. The crime rate in cities would sky rocket. It’s one thing to spend your work day in a majority non-white city when all the teens are warehoused. It is quite another thing to have them all out on the streets with no controls. This is just reason n why a civilized, homogenous country is better than a diverse one.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Keep in mind that if schools are shut down, they'll do the same to businesses. Parents will be home with their kids. If we're quarantined, black teens wandering around outside will be stopped and questioned by cops or quarantine patrols. Blacks will try to rob the shut businesses, who will have nobody there to guard them. They'll be less likely to head into homes where the whole family is there to protect the house.
    , @Lagertha
    well, it would be hilarious if students went out-of-control in DC, NYC, Boston, SF, LA. I would say the Democrat pols of Dem controlled cities (urban dwellers & suburban dwellers of large metro areas) should not be so horny for full-boar Corona virus. They and theirs would be the most affected. Bring-it, indeed! hahaaa!
  21. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    The Clinton administration was when I felt the rumble. When he announced that the federal government was going to go all in on handing out Section 8 vouchers to any black moron with half a pulse, sleepy, middle-class neighborhoods turned into crime mecca’s seemingly overnight. It was a damned shame to watch.

    L.A. before the mess:

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    It looked so great that everyone else in the world wanted a slice of it too. So they moved here and demanded, "Where's mine?".
  22. @anonymous
    All schools in China have been closed for over a month. Even children in villages are attending class through a webcam app on mobiles. I wonder what long term effect this will have one education. Will there no longer be as many English teaching jobs in Asia because students just take online classes taught by Ukrainians?

    Agree that it could well suggest other ways to educate. If we are heading into a world with ever more crises, could do well to get away from large public gatherings.

    I’d say there’s a good chance education outcomes could improve over this period:

    )) Modern structured instruction is overrated.

    )) There will be an adversity premium; kids will be extra diligent in studies as a way to do some part in alleviating the crisis, especially in a place like Japan.

  23. Dr. John Campbell does some of the best work on this that I’ve found:

    Peak Prosperity are the other YouTube channel I go to for this:

    • Agree: Republic
  24. @RichardTaylor
    How much schooling did Americans get a century ago? My impression is they went through the 11th grade only. They had less homework. Maybe had more time off and shorter semesters. And yet, they performed quite well, if not better than modern high school graduates.

    Social-Welfare-Educational Complex is every much a monster as the Military Industrial Complex. And frankly, more wicked. They get right into your child's mind with agendas without informing you what their game is.

    About 100-130 years ago we went to everyone goes to high school. People could drop out at 16. Prior to that, most states mandated through 8th grade, with variable enforcement.
    In Ohio, the law was through 8th grade mandatory, you could only go to high school if you passed a test.

  25. My impression is that they are trying to create a sort of global panic with this. I don’t know why. Granted, it is a bit worrying, but the way it’s being treated seems a bit exaggerated. Maybe they know something that we don’t.

    Anyway, better safe than sorry, I guess. By spring it should be over so we need to hang on for a month more.

    • Replies: @Anon
    It’s been awhile we have been innoculated with ideas/habits through professional hashtags. In my immediate surroundings, I’ve noticed:
    2018 Immigration as a right (i know the flood into
    Europe started before).
    2019. Sacrifice to Mother Earth, and St Greta
    2020. Men are violent to women (i know you guys haven’t noticed, but there’s a flash strike in 150 countries scheduled for 8M, exarcebated through country-specific media coverage)
    2020. Restrictions to legal freedom of movement. Otherwise known as serfdom.

    The first innoculation causes long term chaos. The last three are about population control.

    In the NWO, it’s all about “it’s the population, stupid.”

    , @LondonBob
    April I assume the weather will be better, like the rest of the northern hemisphere, and flu normally dies down them. Two weeks is no big deal. I think the Olympics will be fine, it is held in the summer.
  26. @candid_observer
    The kids will hardly miss the month of school.

    But if we did this in the US, the real impact would be on the ability of parents to work. That could put a big dent in the economy.

    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many “planning days” that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation–it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don’t want to lose their votes.

    • Replies: @anon
    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    Might be something in Leviticus.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over.

    Too Jewish. No worries, though, there is a plan. Special Coronavirus-resistant clothing!

    https://babylonbee.com/img/articles/article-5667-1.jpg

    It's true! Here's the source, they've been fact-checked by Snopes!

    https://babylonbee.com/news/mike-pence-orders-all-women-to-wear-new-coronavirus-resistant-uniforms
    , @AnotherDad

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. ...

     

    Jonathan, i like to rant too, but i try to actually have something to say--even if it's often the same thing-- "minoritarianism" or "separate nations!".

    I have little use for evangelical Old Testament bible beating or their weird Judeophilia. (I guess it qualifies as turning the other cheek, because their sentiments are decidely not reciprocated.)

    But having Pence "in charge" simply means he's the politician in charge who's supposed to bless the whole effort politically and--if necessary--organize the political aspects for the response (asking Congress for more money, getting agencies to cooperate, etc.) It does not mean Pence replaces the CDCs epidemiologists or infection control specialists. Rather it means those people are telling Pence what should be done and what legal measures or resources they need to do it. It is giving their advice and needs a high profile advocate--a good thing!

    I know this. You know this. Everyone knows this. So what's the point here?

    , @Bill Jones
    "It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market."

    sb
    "It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local Halal meat market."

    tftfy
    , @Anon
    Iran has announced that visiting Qom and having lavender water up your ass will cure CoronaVirus, so I guess Allah is the real God and Pence is a loser. Sad.
  27. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    It’s amazing how many people actually believe the Chinese numbers. If you look at the purported death rates since it really took off, we’re meant to believe that the death rate *every single day* has been 2.1%.

    I don’t know if it’s that high trust Westerners can’t really from bald faced lies, or if a lot of alt right types have this hero workshop of the Chinese and an idea they’ll save us. But it’s leading to some utterly ridiculous twists and turns.

    • Agree: Testing12
  28. @anon
    All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship - Princess - were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese. I', not saying there is a racial angle here, but suspect one. It is the main thing that can't be openly speculated on by pundits.

    Of course, maybe it is just a lag reflecting time from exposure, but maybe not. If I were Asian, I would be more concerned.

    An Iranian former ambassador to the Vatican died yesterday. That is the first report confirmed report I have seen of a non East Asian death from coronavirus. He was 81 years though. Iran has 26 deaths out of 245 confirmed cases. We have no way of knowing how many of those are ethnically Chinese.

    • Replies: @Alice
    Right but MERS is a thing because the Persians have high Ace2 receptor ratios also.
    , @415 reasons
    Do you think all the people dying in Italy are Asian too?
    , @S. Anonyia
    Some elderly ethnic Italians have died. They have fewer ACE 2 receptors than Northern Euros...
  29. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    True. The immigration Act of 1990 effectively doubled Legal immigration while expanding amnesty and creating the diversity Visa program.

    Ending the Green card lottery should be a priority for Trump. The Diversity Lottery is how most Muslims and Africans gain legal entry into the United States. This was the most destructive aspect of the 1990 Immigration act. Ending the diversity lottery would benefit Americans more than building the wall and would instantly save Americans millions of dollars per day. The effect would be immediately and lasting.

  30. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    2% number is such BS, based on an understated Denominator.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Is the denominator understated more than the flu's?
  31. @RichardTaylor
    How much schooling did Americans get a century ago? My impression is they went through the 11th grade only. They had less homework. Maybe had more time off and shorter semesters. And yet, they performed quite well, if not better than modern high school graduates.

    Social-Welfare-Educational Complex is every much a monster as the Military Industrial Complex. And frankly, more wicked. They get right into your child's mind with agendas without informing you what their game is.

    But they were reading the classics of western literature, using slide rules and maybe even having shop class; now they’re all woke and rainbow flagish.

  32. Kneeling during the US national anthem is anti-racist, and kneeling during HaTikvah is racist.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    Let me get this straight. A Jewish college in the United States plays the national anthem of Israel, a foreign nation, while displaying the Israeli flag.

    But if I said that American Jews have divided loyalties, I would be labeled antisemitic.
    , @Dissident

    Kneeling during the US national anthem is anti-racist, and kneeling during HaTikvah is racist.
     
    PREFACE: I am emphatically not Zionist and would be uncomfortable even setting foot in a synagogue that displayed the Zionist flag or sang HaTikvah. I oppose dual citizenship, and I do not dismiss as necessarily unreasonable the suspicion of dual loyalty.* But fair is fair.

    1.) I am not at all familiar with the "StopAntisemitism[.]org" organization that tweeted the message you posted. (As difficult as it may be for some here to believe, I do not keep-up with the various activist organizations that claim to represent world Jewry and fight antisemitism, and this is surely not the first one that I had never even heard of before.) Do you have any knowledge that they have expressed support for or view at all favorably kneeling during the US national anthem, or any other breach of respect toward any other expressions or symbols of US patriotism?

    2.) You are aware, surely, that there are a considerable number of right-leaning Zionist Jews in the U.S.? (I recall you citing Dennis Prager, and much as we would almost certainly be in accord in opposing any number of his positions, he most certainly does not appear at all sympathetic to the NBA kneelers; see here.) Yeshiva University, where the incident occurred, leans heavily to the Right (certainly as far as colleges go). I recall reading that a large percentage of the student body there, possibly even a majority, voted for Trump in 2016. However many Woke students they may also have, I'm sure they total well within a minority.

    3.) The facilities where YU and similar Jewish schools hold their games have American flags as well. I would be quite surprised if they didn't sing the Star Spangled Banner.
    https://live.staticflickr.com/802/40213414904_ba895161d8_z.jpg
    https://live.staticflickr.com/793/40921948331_c8582ab02e_z.jpg
    https://live.staticflickr.com/784/27050533378_582df1186c_b.jpg

    4.)*Finally, an addendum to my preface:
    In fact, one of the many concerns raised by the rabbis who opposed Zionism (who, from its inception, formed a near-unanimous consensus of the foremost rabbinic authorities) was just this: that it would cause the loyalty of Jews everywhere to their host nations to be questioned.

    My response to the news that Bernie Sanders had snubbed AIPAC was to ask,

    What will the Israel-Firsters who until now opposed Trump do, should Bernie get the nomination? Will Never Trump! become Never Say Never!?
     
    Now I must run or I will be guilty of desecrating the Sabbath...
  33. Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.

    Hey, me too!

    Still waiting on flaming corpse pyramid and zombie horde.

    Note to the lurking snowflakes – that last sentence is an example of hyperbole. It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Are you sure? The plague zombies are now canon, praise Papa Nurgle.

    https://warhammer40k.fandom.com/wiki/Zombie_Plague
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.
     
    Sure, sure, that's what they always say.

    First they came for the zombies, but I said nothing, and fired another shell of 00 buckshot along with them.

    , @Anon
    I can see why people don't like being around you very much. Why don't you just say what you want to say, instead of worrying about what other people are going to say that they haven't said yet?

    I had to work around people like this, and they are all TERRIBLE people who wouldn't last 5 seconds in a survival situation away from their soft little office jobs.

  34. @anon
    All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship - Princess - were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese. I', not saying there is a racial angle here, but suspect one. It is the main thing that can't be openly speculated on by pundits.

    Of course, maybe it is just a lag reflecting time from exposure, but maybe not. If I were Asian, I would be more concerned.

    “All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship – Princess – were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese.”

    Which explains why the shutdown isn’t “over-reaction” as someone asked above. Shockingly, Asians actually revere their elderly. They value and protect them from the vicissitudes of old age, which is why the Japanese currently enjoy the world’s longest lifespans.

    We Americans, on the other hand, wish that the elderly will get the hell out of the way and make room for whatever generation x, millennial etc. wants to get their hands on America’s goodies (as that commenter yesterday made plain in his expressed death wish for boomers).

    As this disease disproportionately affects the elderly, so the Asian response appears disproportionate to the Western eye.

    What was our Social Security cost of living increase for this year? Peanuts. Even our government wants us dead. Once your past your prime consuming years you’re looked upon as dead weight in America.

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
    In fairness to the highly respected elders of japan they didn't let japan go down the shitter on their watch. The same cannot be said of the boomers, silents etc who traded their posterity's future for cheap landscaping.

    When I am old the general population won't even look like me. I literally will NOT even be one of the elders of the average american.

  35. @Foreign Expert
    This is correct. Japanese women generally don’t work if they have children, and , importantly, don’t WANT to work. They understand that it’s much preferable to get their husband’s salary and meet their friends at Starbucks after lunch than to put up with bullshit all day long.

    Though its not like the “women who do lunch” exactly have more children. It is high status not to work, though. And do lunch with friends and flaunt how you don’t have to work.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Flaunt? Perhaps they just want agreeable company, a change of scenery, somebody to swap ideas with? But face-to-face, not online. It’s very human, you know.
    , @Glt
    Maybe give them the benefit of the doubt. Having lunch with friends is pretty enjoyable.
  36. Anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dumbo
    My impression is that they are trying to create a sort of global panic with this. I don't know why. Granted, it is a bit worrying, but the way it's being treated seems a bit exaggerated. Maybe they know something that we don't.

    Anyway, better safe than sorry, I guess. By spring it should be over so we need to hang on for a month more.

    It’s been awhile we have been innoculated with ideas/habits through professional hashtags. In my immediate surroundings, I’ve noticed:
    2018 Immigration as a right (i know the flood into
    Europe started before).
    2019. Sacrifice to Mother Earth, and St Greta
    2020. Men are violent to women (i know you guys haven’t noticed, but there’s a flash strike in 150 countries scheduled for 8M, exarcebated through country-specific media coverage)
    2020. Restrictions to legal freedom of movement. Otherwise known as serfdom.

    The first innoculation causes long term chaos. The last three are about population control.

    In the NWO, it’s all about “it’s the population, stupid.”

    • Replies: @Alden
    Isn’t it a racist ethnicist religionist anti immigrant hate crime for Europeans to notice violence towards women?
  37. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.

    That sounds bad.

    Virus may be bad, but this sounds pretty darn great!

    Kids spend too much time in school listening to bozo/PC teachers. We’re 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model. Basically, because it’s a huge number of mediocrities’ iron rice bowl.

    Cut the kids loose. Assign them some reading in history and science. Give them some math lesson/exercise programs. (Math instruction is particularly easy to computerize–there’s a canon, there obvious exercises with numeric answers and the failure modes even give pretty good info on what the kid doesn’t understand.) Some science–heck some history–exercises as well. Point them at some books that are part of your nation’s literary tradtion.

    The sit still and listen model is particularly crappy for males. (Yes, i’m such a right-wing nut, i believe in biological sex.) Boys would benefit by more sports and scouting type activities, more “hands on” lab and shop work and less sit still and raise your hand.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Hail
    What a March closure is more like for Japan is the US calling off the last two weeks of school before summer, where kids do very little anyway.
    , @mobi

    We’re 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model.
     
    Lol, ironically, the current Premier of Ontario is a Ford, and has been locked in a death struggle with every teaching union in the province, who keep launching flash, one-day strikes, hoping that parents will get so frustrated with the inconvenience, they'll turn on Ford and his Conservative government.

    Just one of the points of contention was a new policy mandating that high school students must complete at least 4 full credits from online e-learning providers to graduate - for exactly the reason you might guess.

    Cue the predictable howling. All the 'experts' agree it's not only unworkable, but downright dangerous.

    Ford has backed off to 2 courses, but he might be about to get an unexpected wind at his back.

    , @S. Anonyia
    Schools do more “hands-on” project-based learning than ever. And kids are way more clueless than when the emphasis was rote memorization.

    The problem is discipline is out of control and there aren’t enough charismatic, energetic teachers to maintain order...particularly male ones. And some of them are run out of the profession because you can be sued over any perceived slight to a student or parent.

    Regarding hands-on learning...can’t explore if you don’t know left from right. And some high schoolers don’t. They also have no concept of time...WWII, slavery, the Renaissance, the American Revolution- it is all this vague interchangeable “long long ago” to probably 1/4 of young Americans.

    Hands-on learning only works with either very gifted or very motivated students.
  38. This is terrifying. I’ve heard that virus is projected to sicken 42 million people, put 600,000 in the hospital and KILL sixty-thousand people right here in the United States!

    It’s true. The name of this deadly virus is “influenza”, also known as “the flu”. It happens every year.

    Do we close the schools every February/March?

    • Replies: @anon
    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it, and half the country gets it, that's 3 million people. 50 years of common flu.
  39. @Daniel Chieh
    Though its not like the "women who do lunch" exactly have more children. It is high status not to work, though. And do lunch with friends and flaunt how you don't have to work.

    Flaunt? Perhaps they just want agreeable company, a change of scenery, somebody to swap ideas with? But face-to-face, not online. It’s very human, you know.

  40. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    My understanding is that many of the teachers learn it from books / professors who are ESL, and only have a bit of practice with native English speakers; there are mission trips and similar things to go teach English / give conversational practice to people who will be English teachers.

  41. • Replies: @Anonymous
    And just a few months ago in October 2019, there was a coronavirus pandemic simulation (basically a war game) held in New York City with public health experts from around the world, but with China uninvited.
  42. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.
     
    Hey, me too!

    Still waiting on flaming corpse pyramid and zombie horde.

    Note to the lurking snowflakes - that last sentence is an example of hyperbole. It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.

    Are you sure? The plague zombies are now canon, praise Papa Nurgle.

    https://warhammer40k.fandom.com/wiki/Zombie_Plague

  43. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    A child learns whatever language he/she/it hears without the “teacher speaking in the child’s native language”. That is the very definition of a child! (no/not much native language).

  44. @Chucko

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.
     
    The Clinton administration was when I felt the rumble. When he announced that the federal government was going to go all in on handing out Section 8 vouchers to any black moron with half a pulse, sleepy, middle-class neighborhoods turned into crime mecca’s seemingly overnight. It was a damned shame to watch.

    L.A. before the mess:

    https://youtu.be/ESoJDNnK-j8

    It looked so great that everyone else in the world wanted a slice of it too. So they moved here and demanded, “Where’s mine?”.

  45. the Tokyo Olympics are the real concern.

  46. Anonymous[942] • Disclaimer says:

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors in any given population.

    So yeah Japan is correct in taking this action.

    But it doesn’t have anything to do with Nebraska or Maine even though the corrupt media wants you to believe the entire planet is at risk.

    Worst case scenario stateside is localized outbreaks in Asian communities. Bay Area, parts of LA/Orange counties, Houston, NYC, various Chinatowns etc.

    • Replies: @Hail

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors
     
    This seems like a very confident statement

    All
     
    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for "Your Genotype" for the various genes. You'll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

  47. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.
     
    Hey, me too!

    Still waiting on flaming corpse pyramid and zombie horde.

    Note to the lurking snowflakes - that last sentence is an example of hyperbole. It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.

    It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.

    Sure, sure, that’s what they always say.

    First they came for the zombies, but I said nothing, and fired another shell of 00 buckshot along with them.

  48. @anon
    That's a little extreme for a disease that is "just the flu", isn't it?

    Not when one considers there is as yet no vaccine for it nor a large enough population of those with immunity to it.

    Further, basic germ theory is that you have a good shot at forcing a virus to benignity if you don’t allow it to spread easily from person to person.

    • Replies: @e
    I should have said "if you don't allow it to spread to multitudes easily." If the virus is virulent and kills many but has access to multitudes more as hosts (as is the case when hygiene is poor, when water sources are contaminated, etc), then it can remain virulent.

    Deny it more hosts and it evolves to less virulent strains. In such cases, the afflicted with the benign strain can be mobile and spread it among others who remain mobile to spread it to more. (common cold).
  49. Anon[872] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.
     
    Hey, me too!

    Still waiting on flaming corpse pyramid and zombie horde.

    Note to the lurking snowflakes - that last sentence is an example of hyperbole. It is not meant to be internalized or taken personally.

    I can see why people don’t like being around you very much. Why don’t you just say what you want to say, instead of worrying about what other people are going to say that they haven’t said yet?

    I had to work around people like this, and they are all TERRIBLE people who wouldn’t last 5 seconds in a survival situation away from their soft little office jobs.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    Thanks for proving my point.
  50. Anonymous[942] • Disclaimer says:

    Back in early Jan the first case hit ASU campus in PHX. This was before the virus profile was known. I was thinking then this could be a nightmare. But nothing happened for very good reasons. Now we know the reasons.

    1/ There are few Asians in AZ. So the virus has a scarcity of ACE2 receptors to work with.

    2/ The general level of medical hygiene is much better than China.

    3/ AZ is a low humidity environment. (The virus spreads through airborne droplets.)

    4/ The air quality in PHX metro while not perfect is much much better than the large cities in China. The amount of air pollution in Wuhan is enough to suppress the lung function and immune systems of everyone living there.

    The virus profile (not discussed in the MSM) explains the uneven global spread and death rates. Some populations face high risk and some face very low risk. But because it’s mostly a race issue and a hygiene issue the corrupt disallows any discussion of the facts and instead we get irrationally panicked citizenries around the world.

    • Replies: @Alice
    no, you aren't cynical enough. Most of media is simultaneously too stupid to understand ethnicity and race have real biological diversity consequences, and

    intentionally misinforming us on purpose to bring Sanders to victory.
    , @advancedatheist
    Phoenix looks like it has relatively clean air, but your windshield gets a black film on it when you drive around a bit.

    The higher UV levels in this environment will also tend to kill the virus particles in the outside air as we move into spring.
  51. anon[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many "planning days" that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation--it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don't want to lose their votes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbgWX-t0EYA

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    Might be something in Leviticus.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over.

    Too Jewish. No worries, though, there is a plan. Special Coronavirus-resistant clothing!

    It’s true! Here’s the source, they’ve been fact-checked by Snopes!

    https://babylonbee.com/news/mike-pence-orders-all-women-to-wear-new-coronavirus-resistant-uniforms

  52. @e
    Not when one considers there is as yet no vaccine for it nor a large enough population of those with immunity to it.

    Further, basic germ theory is that you have a good shot at forcing a virus to benignity if you don't allow it to spread easily from person to person.

    I should have said “if you don’t allow it to spread to multitudes easily.” If the virus is virulent and kills many but has access to multitudes more as hosts (as is the case when hygiene is poor, when water sources are contaminated, etc), then it can remain virulent.

    Deny it more hosts and it evolves to less virulent strains. In such cases, the afflicted with the benign strain can be mobile and spread it among others who remain mobile to spread it to more. (common cold).

  53. I get the distinct impression that the grotesquely hysterical overreactions to the COVID-19 haven’t even begun yet. Still, it is useful to know just how irrational and genuinely incompetent Governments and a health Organizations are;or, how thoroughly dishonest. In the meantime, there are no reliable numbers on infections or deaths, and a VERY tight muzzle being put on the fact that the deaths are overwhelmingly Age and Race specific.

    Bill Sardi’s article In today’s Lee Rockwell is an excellent primer, my pos iPhone is acting up furiously so I won’t be linking it right now.

  54. We Are All Hikikomori Now.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/02/27/obituaries/27xp-hashimoto-pix1/27xp-hashimoto-pix1-superJumbo.jpg
  55. @Anon
    I can see why people don't like being around you very much. Why don't you just say what you want to say, instead of worrying about what other people are going to say that they haven't said yet?

    I had to work around people like this, and they are all TERRIBLE people who wouldn't last 5 seconds in a survival situation away from their soft little office jobs.

    Thanks for proving my point.

  56. @Jonathan Mason
    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many "planning days" that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation--it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don't want to lose their votes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbgWX-t0EYA

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. …

    Jonathan, i like to rant too, but i try to actually have something to say–even if it’s often the same thing– “minoritarianism” or “separate nations!”.

    I have little use for evangelical Old Testament bible beating or their weird Judeophilia. (I guess it qualifies as turning the other cheek, because their sentiments are decidely not reciprocated.)

    But having Pence “in charge” simply means he’s the politician in charge who’s supposed to bless the whole effort politically and–if necessary–organize the political aspects for the response (asking Congress for more money, getting agencies to cooperate, etc.) It does not mean Pence replaces the CDCs epidemiologists or infection control specialists. Rather it means those people are telling Pence what should be done and what legal measures or resources they need to do it. It is giving their advice and needs a high profile advocate–a good thing!

    I know this. You know this. Everyone knows this. So what’s the point here?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Mocking Christians made sense in the eighties, when there were some pretty embarrassing public examples, and idiot politicians were using Christianity as an excuse for bad policies. It makes no sense now with the dramatic collapse of visible Christianity, flogged on by literal persecution. Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.
    , @Anon
    Because politicians, esp. religious ones, always just do what they’re told by the experts. It’s not like he would ever doubt a scientist, or have a motive like helping speed up the Apocalypse.
  57. The thing is, Japan’s school calendar, as well as its work calendar (new company intakes; fiscal year?) have always begun April 1 in any case. March is already the end of the school year, and nothing much gets done.

    This is not as big a measure as the headline might seem on first glance.

  58. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:

    Last night I discovered that 4 of my elderly relatives became sick this week. They all live in the Midwest in the same college town and are recovering, but it’s weird that they all got sick together at the same time. This is the first time it’s ever happened. One volunteers to work with the poor during tax season, so that may have been the route of infection. Fortunately, the fifth relative who lives there and works in a hospital isn’t sick. One of those relatives had symptoms exactly like stomach flu, with fever, vomiting and diarrhea. The other three had milder symptoms of the head-cold type. It seems too early to be Covid-19 there, but if the normal seasonal flu is becoming more virulent right now, it’s lousy timing.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    It seems like we have some crazy strains of streptococcus going around as well.
  59. @AnotherDad


    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.
     
    That sounds bad.
     
    Virus may be bad, but this sounds pretty darn great!

    Kids spend too much time in school listening to bozo/PC teachers. We're 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model. Basically, because it's a huge number of mediocrities' iron rice bowl.

    Cut the kids loose. Assign them some reading in history and science. Give them some math lesson/exercise programs. (Math instruction is particularly easy to computerize--there's a canon, there obvious exercises with numeric answers and the failure modes even give pretty good info on what the kid doesn't understand.) Some science--heck some history--exercises as well. Point them at some books that are part of your nation's literary tradtion.

    The sit still and listen model is particularly crappy for males. (Yes, i'm such a right-wing nut, i believe in biological sex.) Boys would benefit by more sports and scouting type activities, more "hands on" lab and shop work and less sit still and raise your hand.

    What a March closure is more like for Japan is the US calling off the last two weeks of school before summer, where kids do very little anyway.

  60. @Jonathan Mason
    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many "planning days" that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation--it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don't want to lose their votes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbgWX-t0EYA

    “It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.”

    sb
    “It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local Halal meat market.”

    tftfy

  61. The Japanese are not outgoing. Modern kids spend their lives online.

  62. @candid_observer
    The kids will hardly miss the month of school.

    But if we did this in the US, the real impact would be on the ability of parents to work. That could put a big dent in the economy.

    Emmit Till month ?

  63. @Anonymous
    Back in early Jan the first case hit ASU campus in PHX. This was before the virus profile was known. I was thinking then this could be a nightmare. But nothing happened for very good reasons. Now we know the reasons.

    1/ There are few Asians in AZ. So the virus has a scarcity of ACE2 receptors to work with.

    2/ The general level of medical hygiene is much better than China.

    3/ AZ is a low humidity environment. (The virus spreads through airborne droplets.)

    4/ The air quality in PHX metro while not perfect is much much better than the large cities in China. The amount of air pollution in Wuhan is enough to suppress the lung function and immune systems of everyone living there.

    The virus profile (not discussed in the MSM) explains the uneven global spread and death rates. Some populations face high risk and some face very low risk. But because it's mostly a race issue and a hygiene issue the corrupt disallows any discussion of the facts and instead we get irrationally panicked citizenries around the world.

    no, you aren’t cynical enough. Most of media is simultaneously too stupid to understand ethnicity and race have real biological diversity consequences, and

    intentionally misinforming us on purpose to bring Sanders to victory.

  64. @Barnard
    An Iranian former ambassador to the Vatican died yesterday. That is the first report confirmed report I have seen of a non East Asian death from coronavirus. He was 81 years though. Iran has 26 deaths out of 245 confirmed cases. We have no way of knowing how many of those are ethnically Chinese.

    Right but MERS is a thing because the Persians have high Ace2 receptor ratios also.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Do you have a source on Persians having lots of ACE2 receptors? I've heard East Asians do, but hadn't heard that Persians do as well.
  65. Anonymous[835] • Disclaimer says:

    I CLAIM THIS VIRUS COULD BE DELIBERATELY AIRDROPPED OR SPREAD WITH SPRAYERS LIKE A PESTICIDE THROUGHOUT PHOENIX AZ WITHOUT CAUSING ANYTHING MORE THAN COLD SYMPTOMS IN SOME OF THE NON ASIAN POPULATION (AND ISOLATED CASES SOME SEVERE IN THE ASIAN POPULATION).

    Lack of Asians on the ground plus low humidity and good medical hygiene says I’m right.

    OTOH doing the same thing in say Hanoi Vietnam would cause a disaster.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    You're overstating the case here. It's true that white people typically seem to get milder cases of this than Asians but they are not immune. White people are gonna die too. It's also true that the disease seems to vary widely in its impact (and not totally by race or age although those are strongly correlating factors) - some people develop few if any symptoms and others die. As the disease is studied further perhaps we will develop a better understanding of why the severity of the disease seems to vary so greatly among individuals, what climates it thrives in, and so on. But for now these things are still poorly understood and it's wise to be cautious and to try to contain it.

    The trick is not to make the "cure" worse than the disease. In those who die, it is the overreaction of their own body's immune system that kills them, not the disease itself. We have to be sure that we don't overreact to the disease in a way that kills the world economy worse than if we allowed the epidemic to run its course. Probably it will runs its course one way or the other, but if we overreact there is going to be a lot of unnecessary economic damage. Aside from all the trips not taken, etc. Congressional Democrats are already foaming at the mouth as to how many billions of government $ we can waste on this - Democrats never met a spending program that they didn't like. Let's spend $4 billion - no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.

  66. @Anon
    Two weeks for the schools, starting Monday, so tomorrow Friday is the last day this term. The final two weeks are the regular annual Spring vacation. The Prime Minister announced it today. The opposition parties on the televised question sessions have been hectoring him to do more. He fixed their wagon and shut them up with this and yesterday's "government request" that all large sports and music events, etc., cancel for the next two weeks at least. This is equivalent to an order in Japan's orderly society.

    Pro sports events and Olympics qualifying events are happening with no spectators. Perfume cancelled a stadium concert today right after the announcement: it would have been a funny piece of performance art had they just done it to an empty stadium ... or maybe to a dozen make-a-wish style kids with cancer, sitting in the cavernous stadium.

    The two Disney parks, and Universal Studios, continue on as usual, except staff are wearing surgical masks. They closed for a week and a half after the earthquake, although that was to repair damage. I think they are going to be pressured to close soon, like the Hong Kong and Shanghai parks.

    A big problem is the stuffy rush hour trains and subways. Flex time would help there. Stopping them would well and truly shut down the city.

    By the way, this is entrance exam season, for universities and high schools (all high schools are by exam, compulsory education is through junior high, although Japanese junior high is equivalent to most US high schools), and the exams have been disrupted.

    ‘A big problem is the stuffy rush hour trains and subways. Flex time would help there…’

    ! You’re not kidding. It’s a miracle how the Japanese manage to (politely, without bumping) pack themselves all in — but that skill won’t stop the spread of bacteria.

  67. @Barnard
    An Iranian former ambassador to the Vatican died yesterday. That is the first report confirmed report I have seen of a non East Asian death from coronavirus. He was 81 years though. Iran has 26 deaths out of 245 confirmed cases. We have no way of knowing how many of those are ethnically Chinese.

    Do you think all the people dying in Italy are Asian too?

  68. Shades of the Asian Flu epidemic here in the US. When I was in fifth grade in the spring of 1958 we were let out of (parochial) school a week or two before the regular Easter recess. It was pretty bad back then. This thing may be at least as bad if not worse. Happy trails!

  69. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob
    Japan doesn’t have millions of savage teens they need to keep in quasi-prison during the day. There is no way the US could stop schooling for a month. The crime rate in cities would sky rocket. It’s one thing to spend your work day in a majority non-white city when all the teens are warehoused. It is quite another thing to have them all out on the streets with no controls. This is just reason n why a civilized, homogenous country is better than a diverse one.

    Keep in mind that if schools are shut down, they’ll do the same to businesses. Parents will be home with their kids. If we’re quarantined, black teens wandering around outside will be stopped and questioned by cops or quarantine patrols. Blacks will try to rob the shut businesses, who will have nobody there to guard them. They’ll be less likely to head into homes where the whole family is there to protect the house.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna

    If we’re quarantined, black teens wandering around outside will be stopped and questioned by cops or quarantine patrols.
     
    What's that? It's 1935 again and no one told me??
  70. Japan is a serious country.

  71. @Anonymous
    2% number is such BS, based on an understated Denominator.

    Is the denominator understated more than the flu’s?

  72. @Dumbo
    My impression is that they are trying to create a sort of global panic with this. I don't know why. Granted, it is a bit worrying, but the way it's being treated seems a bit exaggerated. Maybe they know something that we don't.

    Anyway, better safe than sorry, I guess. By spring it should be over so we need to hang on for a month more.

    April I assume the weather will be better, like the rest of the northern hemisphere, and flu normally dies down them. Two weeks is no big deal. I think the Olympics will be fine, it is held in the summer.

  73. @J.Ross
    Kneeling during the US national anthem is anti-racist, and kneeling during HaTikvah is racist.
    https://twitter.com/StopAntisemites/status/1231745608710590464

    Let me get this straight. A Jewish college in the United States plays the national anthem of Israel, a foreign nation, while displaying the Israeli flag.

    But if I said that American Jews have divided loyalties, I would be labeled antisemitic.

    • Agree: JMcG
  74. @RichardTaylor
    How much schooling did Americans get a century ago? My impression is they went through the 11th grade only. They had less homework. Maybe had more time off and shorter semesters. And yet, they performed quite well, if not better than modern high school graduates.

    Social-Welfare-Educational Complex is every much a monster as the Military Industrial Complex. And frankly, more wicked. They get right into your child's mind with agendas without informing you what their game is.

    Average educational level–average–in 1940 was tenth grade. They did pretty well.

  75. 700 infected, four dead, all over 80. That’s good news, but I’m not 80.

  76. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 — Reagan’s new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall — one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn’t. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.

    • Agree: Leopold
    • Replies: @anon
    Wow! Ph. D. in hard sciences having to use WIC and EIC. What was the area you did the Ph.D. on that is so much not in demand? Aren't National labs and NASA mostly hiring citizens? Also, all the defense contractors have to use citizens, right?
    , @Hail

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.
     
    Somewhere deep in the comment archives here, I tried to calculate what share of Chinese in the USA are of "Tienanmen Square stock," meaning those given blank-check green cards by that decision, eventually citizened-in, and their children (now as old as 30), and the chain-migrant relatives this specific group later brought over.

    The answer is, a surprisingly large percent.

    That single, one-time decision has dramatically increased the share of Chinese within the castle walls.

    , @Corvinus
    "That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. "

    I can do you one better--the "invasion" began when we allowed in scoundrels and derelicts from Eastern and Southern Europe. Heritage America has been paying the price ever since...at least that is what the nativists led us to believe.

    https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-anti-immigration-cartoon-entitled-unrestricted-immigration-and-its-32393339.html
    , @Corvinus
    "That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. "

    I can do you one better--the "invasion" began when we allowed in scoundrels and derelicts from Eastern and Southern Europe. Heritage America has been paying the price ever since...at least that is what the nativists led us to believe.

    https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-anti-immigration-cartoon-entitled-unrestricted-immigration-and-its-32393339.html
  77. @AnotherDad


    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.
     
    That sounds bad.
     
    Virus may be bad, but this sounds pretty darn great!

    Kids spend too much time in school listening to bozo/PC teachers. We're 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model. Basically, because it's a huge number of mediocrities' iron rice bowl.

    Cut the kids loose. Assign them some reading in history and science. Give them some math lesson/exercise programs. (Math instruction is particularly easy to computerize--there's a canon, there obvious exercises with numeric answers and the failure modes even give pretty good info on what the kid doesn't understand.) Some science--heck some history--exercises as well. Point them at some books that are part of your nation's literary tradtion.

    The sit still and listen model is particularly crappy for males. (Yes, i'm such a right-wing nut, i believe in biological sex.) Boys would benefit by more sports and scouting type activities, more "hands on" lab and shop work and less sit still and raise your hand.

    We’re 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model.

    Lol, ironically, the current Premier of Ontario is a Ford, and has been locked in a death struggle with every teaching union in the province, who keep launching flash, one-day strikes, hoping that parents will get so frustrated with the inconvenience, they’ll turn on Ford and his Conservative government.

    Just one of the points of contention was a new policy mandating that high school students must complete at least 4 full credits from online e-learning providers to graduate – for exactly the reason you might guess.

    Cue the predictable howling. All the ‘experts’ agree it’s not only unworkable, but downright dangerous.

    Ford has backed off to 2 courses, but he might be about to get an unexpected wind at his back.

  78. @Paleo Liberal
    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 -- Reagan's new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall -- one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn't. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.

    Wow! Ph. D. in hard sciences having to use WIC and EIC. What was the area you did the Ph.D. on that is so much not in demand? Aren’t National labs and NASA mostly hiring citizens? Also, all the defense contractors have to use citizens, right?

    • Replies: @Alice
    Are you kidding? I spent a summer at LANl as a grad student in the 1990s right when Wen Ho Lee had stolen all of the miniaturizing nuke warhead plans.
    My boss was from Canada. His colleague Britain. But the rest of the dept were Indians, Chinese, Koreans, Russians etc. its worse now.

    I'm not talking about WWII refugees here. Age 50 and below.

    the grad students just in my group were from Slovenia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Belgium, India, Israel.

    And no, defense contractors don't have to use only citizens. Lots of green cards and h1Bs.
  79. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    Japan doesn’t have many kids to spare. The authorities there probably believe that any preventable non-zero mortality rate is too high.

    It’s hard to get too worked up about it, unless you think that they (Japan’s top decision-makers) know something about this virus that we (ordinary schmucks on the internet) do not.

  80. @Paleo Liberal
    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 -- Reagan's new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall -- one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn't. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    Somewhere deep in the comment archives here, I tried to calculate what share of Chinese in the USA are of “Tienanmen Square stock,” meaning those given blank-check green cards by that decision, eventually citizened-in, and their children (now as old as 30), and the chain-migrant relatives this specific group later brought over.

    The answer is, a surprisingly large percent.

    That single, one-time decision has dramatically increased the share of Chinese within the castle walls.

  81. @anon
    Trump had better hope he gets lucky on the spread of this virus in North America or it could take him down. Worse than the Bernie virus.

    Bill in Glendale

    Fakestream media coverage of the kung flu looks increasingly like a pretext to frighten women and bedwetting males into creating a recession. That would likely ensure a victory for the Democratic candidate. White Americans really don’t need another eight years of governance by the nation’s largest and best-funded hate group: the Democratic Party.

  82. @Anonymous
    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors in any given population.

    So yeah Japan is correct in taking this action.

    But it doesn't have anything to do with Nebraska or Maine even though the corrupt media wants you to believe the entire planet is at risk.

    Worst case scenario stateside is localized outbreaks in Asian communities. Bay Area, parts of LA/Orange counties, Houston, NYC, various Chinatowns etc.

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors

    This seems like a very confident statement

    All

    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for “Your Genotype” for the various genes. You’ll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    But does 3/6 vs 6/6 mutations matter? Isn’t it just total ACE2 Receptors. I heard people are misinterpreting ACE2 Receptor chart being floated out there:

    https://drjessesantiano.com/are-asians-more-prone-to-get-the-covid-19/

    , @danand
    The good news is Africans seem to be little affected. Is their ACE2 cell receptor count typically/exceptionally low, or was the virus just not engineered to attack them?

    http://www.rfi.fr/en/wires/20200227-virus-enigma-experts-ask-why-africa-seems-have-few-cases
    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    "Not genotyped" only means 23andme didn't get a good read on that gene. They use different chips that only look at certain genes; they don't sequence the whole genome.

    I've heard various claims about the ACE2 genes being related to coronavirus susceptibility but some are clearly erroneous and others unconvincing. I've looked a bit for anyone listing which ACE2 variants are better or worse for coronavirus but found none. I only found some claims that ACE2 expression was higher in some victims.

    , @Dieter Kief
    So - this looks as if there was a racial component with regard to individual vulnerability.

    This is now: You, Lot, Ron Unz and Lance Welton vs. Anatoly Karlin and Peter Frost, or would it be too dramatic to conclude, that there'd be two opposing teams? - Is this thing gradual? - If this looks so simple to me, why isn't there an expert able to quantify this seemingly differing racial vulnerability? - Just curious.

  83. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    Sure, let’s accept the 2% figure for Chinese. That means in a class of 50 students, basically all of them are going to catch it, and one of them is going to die.

    Would you send your kid to that school?

  84. @ThreeCranes

    "All four of the deaths on the Cruise Ship – Princess – were Japanese. 80 year old Japanese."

     

    Which explains why the shutdown isn't "over-reaction" as someone asked above. Shockingly, Asians actually revere their elderly. They value and protect them from the vicissitudes of old age, which is why the Japanese currently enjoy the world's longest lifespans.

    We Americans, on the other hand, wish that the elderly will get the hell out of the way and make room for whatever generation x, millennial etc. wants to get their hands on America's goodies (as that commenter yesterday made plain in his expressed death wish for boomers).

    As this disease disproportionately affects the elderly, so the Asian response appears disproportionate to the Western eye.

    What was our Social Security cost of living increase for this year? Peanuts. Even our government wants us dead. Once your past your prime consuming years you're looked upon as dead weight in America.

    In fairness to the highly respected elders of japan they didn’t let japan go down the shitter on their watch. The same cannot be said of the boomers, silents etc who traded their posterity’s future for cheap landscaping.

    When I am old the general population won’t even look like me. I literally will NOT even be one of the elders of the average american.

  85. @AnotherDad

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. ...

     

    Jonathan, i like to rant too, but i try to actually have something to say--even if it's often the same thing-- "minoritarianism" or "separate nations!".

    I have little use for evangelical Old Testament bible beating or their weird Judeophilia. (I guess it qualifies as turning the other cheek, because their sentiments are decidely not reciprocated.)

    But having Pence "in charge" simply means he's the politician in charge who's supposed to bless the whole effort politically and--if necessary--organize the political aspects for the response (asking Congress for more money, getting agencies to cooperate, etc.) It does not mean Pence replaces the CDCs epidemiologists or infection control specialists. Rather it means those people are telling Pence what should be done and what legal measures or resources they need to do it. It is giving their advice and needs a high profile advocate--a good thing!

    I know this. You know this. Everyone knows this. So what's the point here?

    Mocking Christians made sense in the eighties, when there were some pretty embarrassing public examples, and idiot politicians were using Christianity as an excuse for bad policies. It makes no sense now with the dramatic collapse of visible Christianity, flogged on by literal persecution. Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.

    • Replies: @Anon

    Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.
     
    Seriously. And if I were in the market for a wife, religion is the best signal for avoiding hidden extreme feminism or SJWism:

    Correlation, per major meta study from last year:

    Religious: 0.91
    MAGA hat: 0.89
    Lack of tattoos: 0.85
    Virgin: 0.82
    Zero Student Load Debt: 0.79
    STEM major: 0.75
  86. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:

    I came across a very oddball and suspicious fact about Chinese health. After reading a Covid-19 study in China, which labelled a patient death with tuberculosis as a co-factor, I wondered what their tuberculosis rate actually is.

    Well, it turns out it’s high.

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-china/

    “In 2014 there were an estimated 930,000 new cases of TB in China, and an estimated 120,000 cases of pulmonary MDR TB. Overall China has 10% of the global burden of TB with 400 million people having latent TB.”

    “A total of approximately 900,000 new cases of TB are reported annually.”

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.

    From Wiki: “Latent tuberculosis is when a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not have active tuberculosis. The main risk is that approximately 10% of these people (5% in the first two years after infection and 0.1% per year thereafter) will go on to develop active tuberculosis. This is particularly true, and there is added risk, in particular situations such as medication that suppresses the immune system or advancing age.”

    The site I quote says 400 million people in China have latent TB, but Wiki says 10% of these people will go on to develop active TB. 10% of 400 million is 40 million.

    The math says 40 million Chinese have active TB, and their air is polluted, and half their men smoke. No wonder they’re dying from Covid-19. They have lot of people with preexisting lung disease.

    In the study I read, the dead patient was labelled as having ‘chronic pulmonary disease,’ which they explained was from tuberculosis. Okay. This may be Chinese communist covering-up via nicer sounding labels, but how many patients with ‘chronic pulmonary disease in these studies’ are actually tuberculosis patients?

    If 1/3rd of China has latent tuberculosis, that means 1/3rd of Wuhan should. City is 10 million, so that’s around 3.3 million cases of latent tuberculosis.

    Which means, if 10% that has become active with time, in older people and in those with weak immune systems, Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.

    If that many people have serious pre-existing TB, we may have just explained China’s higher death rate. No wonder the Chinese are being dodgy about all the pre-existing medical conditions in their patients.

    I heard the Chinese government has order a lot of mobile incinerators for all the dead bodies. They may need to.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.
     
    Quote from the website:

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-india/

    It is estimated that about 40% of the Indian population is infected with TB bacteria, the vast majority of whom have latent TB rather than TB disease.
     
    That would suggest that over 500m Indians have latent TB. It will be interesting to see if the coronavirus makes significant headway in India.
    , @Jack D

    Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.
     
    Your number is based on a fallacy. This assumes that once you develop active TB they do nothing to treat it. I highly doubt this is the case. It's true that 10% of latent cases eventually become active (and 90% never do) - 5% in the 1st year and then .1% per year thereafter. (Therefore if you have latent TB and don't develop the disease in the 1st year after you are infected you only have a 1 in 1,000 chance of getting the disease in any future year - not an enormous risk). But once they become active and symptomatic, presumably most of them are put on antibiotics and cured within a few months.

    The accurate statement is that Wuhan has 330,000 people who have or once had active tuberculosis. (Actually more because some people go right to the active disease after becoming infected). Probably most of that number are people who once had it and have now been cured.

    , @anonymous
    TB is a serious problem in China, Mexico, South America, etc.

    HOWEVER, the figure of 400 million for latent TB cases seems far too high - this amounts to about 30% of the Chinese population.

    U.S.-based figures for TB are highly suspicious because the CDC insists on pushing its 1950s-era policies, i.e. no TB vaccinations for the native (non-immigrant) U.S. population, Mantoux skin test to test for TB antibodies, repeated chest x-rays (job program) for those "deemed" infected based on a positive Mantoux skin test, etc.

    Mantoux tests for antibodies and thus comes up positive for 100% of patients vaccinated against TB in the U.S. military, in another country, etc. This is a population of 10s of million in the U.S. since almost all countries outside the U.S. either have mandatory TB vaccination or encourage voluntary vaccination.

    CDC insists as a matter of institutional theology that a positive Mantoux test is "deemed" to indicate latent TB irrespective of a history of TB vaccination. Patients "deemed" infected are put patients on a regime consisting of months of liver-damaging medication for a non-existent infection. Of course, only middle-class whites submit to this nonsense. Meanwhile, ilegales with actual active TB go to work in the food industry, agriculture, etc.

    At the same time, active TB brought by massive numbers of illegals to the unvaccinated U.S. population is systematically ignored and if occasionally discovered is covered up.

    Not surprisingly, infectious disease specialists in Asia and Europe quietly dismiss U.S. practices as institutionalized insanity.

  87. @Hail

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors
     
    This seems like a very confident statement

    All
     
    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for "Your Genotype" for the various genes. You'll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

    But does 3/6 vs 6/6 mutations matter? Isn’t it just total ACE2 Receptors. I heard people are misinterpreting ACE2 Receptor chart being floated out there:

    https://drjessesantiano.com/are-asians-more-prone-to-get-the-covid-19/

    • Thanks: Hail
    • Replies: @Hail
    There is also this:

    The AFs of the top 6 common variants (rs4646127, rs2158082, rs5936011, rs6629110, rs4830983, and rs5936029) were higher than 95% in EAS populations, whereas the AFs of these variants in European populations were much lower (52%–65%).
     

    Our findings indicated that no direct evidence was identified genetically supporting the existence of coronavirus S-protein binding-resistant ACE2 mutants in different populations (Fig. 1a). The data of variant distribution and AFs may contribute to the further investigations of ACE2, including its roles in acute lung injury and lung function.

    The East Asian populations have much higher AFs in the eQTL variants associated with higher ACE2 expression in tissues (Fig. 1c), which may suggest different susceptibility or response to 2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2 from different populations under the similar conditions.
     

    From what I can get from that, these Chinese genetic researchers are saying, Yes there is evidence for the "(six variants of) ACE2 higher in East Asians" idea, but, No evidence this matters for COVID-19.

    __________

    Paper title: "Comparative genetic analysis of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2) receptor ACE2 in different populations." Authors: Yanan Cao, Lin Li, Zhimin Feng, Shengqing Wan, Peide Huang, Xiaohui Sun, Fang Wen, Xuanlin Huang, Guang Ning & Weiqing Wang. Published: 24 February 2020, with journal Cell Discovery.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-0147-1

  88. If we shut down the public schools, little black kids will starve because the school systems feeds them 3 meals a day now.

  89. @dearieme
    May I offer you a remarkable link? (Hat tip Tim Price.)

    About a year ago the chap who is now Chief Guru to Boris in 10 Downing St wrote this:

    https://dominiccummings.com/2019/03/04/the-most-secure-bio-labs-routinely-make-errors-that-could-cause-a-global-pandemic-are-about-to-re-start-experiments-on-pathogens-engineered-to-make-them-mammalian-airborne-transmissible/

    And just a few months ago in October 2019, there was a coronavirus pandemic simulation (basically a war game) held in New York City with public health experts from around the world, but with China uninvited.

    • Replies: @CJ
    And just a few months ago in October 2019, there was a coronavirus pandemic simulation (basically a war game) held in New York City with public health experts from around the world, but with China uninvited.

    It was called Event 201, it was held at Johns Hopkins (in Baltimore, not NYC) and China was very much invited. Their chief representative was Dr. George Fu Gao. From his conference bio:

    Professor George F. Gao is the Director-General, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; a Professor in the Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; President of the Chinese Society of Biotechnology; and President of the Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB).
     
    http://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/event201/players/gao.html
  90. @Alice
    Right but MERS is a thing because the Persians have high Ace2 receptor ratios also.

    Do you have a source on Persians having lots of ACE2 receptors? I’ve heard East Asians do, but hadn’t heard that Persians do as well.

  91. Turkey is opening all the borders it controlled and sending “Syrians” into Europe without delay, apparently in retaliation for some of their uniformed genocidal terrorists getting bombed by Russians. The real bad guy here is whoever decided that Turks were capable of national leadership and adulthood. So if Turkey kills your people in an unprovoked attack, you have to roll with it, but if any of their guys buy it in a combat zone where they are uniformed combatants fighting in a civil war, they get to flip over the card table and attack unrelated third parties? This total failure of leadership will end when we hang bureaucrats.

  92. @Daniel Chieh
    Though its not like the "women who do lunch" exactly have more children. It is high status not to work, though. And do lunch with friends and flaunt how you don't have to work.

    Maybe give them the benefit of the doubt. Having lunch with friends is pretty enjoyable.

  93. @JMcG
    Glad to hear you’re doing well.

    Thank u sir.

    And you as well.

  94. Steve’s walk in closet: ground zero of the infodemic.

  95. @Hail

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors
     
    This seems like a very confident statement

    All
     
    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for "Your Genotype" for the various genes. You'll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

    The good news is Africans seem to be little affected. Is their ACE2 cell receptor count typically/exceptionally low, or was the virus just not engineered to attack them?

    http://www.rfi.fr/en/wires/20200227-virus-enigma-experts-ask-why-africa-seems-have-few-cases

    • Replies: @Jack Henson
    You are conflating no testing with no virus. They are not the same thing.
  96. @Haole
    Public schools should shutdown in the USA too. The staff are all dems and the kids are exposed to drugs, disease, marxism, racism, and dont learn alot. With no public schools some kids will not learn at all, like now, and some will learn more.

    As the parent of two high school age kids, I agree with you 100%.

  97. @Hail

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors
     
    This seems like a very confident statement

    All
     
    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for "Your Genotype" for the various genes. You'll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

    “Not genotyped” only means 23andme didn’t get a good read on that gene. They use different chips that only look at certain genes; they don’t sequence the whole genome.

    I’ve heard various claims about the ACE2 genes being related to coronavirus susceptibility but some are clearly erroneous and others unconvincing. I’ve looked a bit for anyone listing which ACE2 variants are better or worse for coronavirus but found none. I only found some claims that ACE2 expression was higher in some victims.

  98. @anon
    Wow! Ph. D. in hard sciences having to use WIC and EIC. What was the area you did the Ph.D. on that is so much not in demand? Aren't National labs and NASA mostly hiring citizens? Also, all the defense contractors have to use citizens, right?

    Are you kidding? I spent a summer at LANl as a grad student in the 1990s right when Wen Ho Lee had stolen all of the miniaturizing nuke warhead plans.
    My boss was from Canada. His colleague Britain. But the rest of the dept were Indians, Chinese, Koreans, Russians etc. its worse now.

    I’m not talking about WWII refugees here. Age 50 and below.

    the grad students just in my group were from Slovenia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Belgium, India, Israel.

    And no, defense contractors don’t have to use only citizens. Lots of green cards and h1Bs.

  99. @Hail

    All that matters regarding this virus is the level of ACE2 cell receptors
     
    This seems like a very confident statement

    All
     
    Anyway, commenter Lot pointed out in another thread that anyone who has 23andMe can check their own level of ACE2 easily. Just type ACE2 into the search box, click, and look for "Your Genotype" for the various genes. You'll see how many you have (are genotyped for; single letters), vs. how many “not genotyped.”

    I have 3 of 6, aligned with the European average.

    Many racial East Asians have 6 of 6; all seem to have at least 5 of 6.

    So – this looks as if there was a racial component with regard to individual vulnerability.

    This is now: You, Lot, Ron Unz and Lance Welton vs. Anatoly Karlin and Peter Frost, or would it be too dramatic to conclude, that there’d be two opposing teams? – Is this thing gradual? – If this looks so simple to me, why isn’t there an expert able to quantify this seemingly differing racial vulnerability? – Just curious.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    One thing that can be said with certainty already is that it's complex and tricky (observe the "cured" people getting reinfected and the infected not showing any symptoms). Months from now we will know some major factor we can not know now. Simply not having as many receptors is only one thing. An anon on a Manchurian bat fancier message board said: "all governments, but especially Asiatic ones, and most especially Communists, live on indoctrination, and count their pulse by maintaining the public order. And these Asiatic governments are shutting down all the schools for months." This is big enough that trying to outthink it in advance is wrong.
    , @Lot
    I’m agnostic on the Asians are more vulnerable issue. ACE would be the reason if true, but it could be negligible or nothing or large.

    Having more vulnerable receptors in the lungs just might not matter so much. If a you have a bomb in your house and your house catches fire, the bomb will go off just the same if it has one fuse or ten.

    I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.
  100. @Neoconned
    I wished this would have happened in like 2014 when i was in my otaku phase binge watching anime & movies on my laptop in my man cave.

    I'd only step outside to check the mail or mow the lawn or shoo away thugs and white trash knocking on my door asking to mow the lawn for 15$.....

    Now I'm married & have a kid and have to work. And man does she like to go out.

    If i didnt have to pay rent I'd gladly go back to my old lifestyle. I bet the otaku numbers in Japan are about to surge....

    And man does she like to go out.

    IKR? Daniel Tosh to GF: “Of course I don’t want to go out. The only reason I went out in the first place was to get you.”

  101. @Anon
    Keep in mind that if schools are shut down, they'll do the same to businesses. Parents will be home with their kids. If we're quarantined, black teens wandering around outside will be stopped and questioned by cops or quarantine patrols. Blacks will try to rob the shut businesses, who will have nobody there to guard them. They'll be less likely to head into homes where the whole family is there to protect the house.

    If we’re quarantined, black teens wandering around outside will be stopped and questioned by cops or quarantine patrols.

    What’s that? It’s 1935 again and no one told me??

  102. @George
    Headline should read "Japanese will test nationwide homeschooling for one month"

    Question, how will this affect the rate of teen pregnancy in Japan?

    Teen pregnancy in Japan? I thought the Japanese have pretty much given up on pregnancy altogether.

    • Replies: @White Guy In Japan
    -Teen pregnancy in Japan?

    Doing my best over here.
  103. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    There are two mortality rates for this thing: one is as long as there are not many cases. In such a case, mortality might be below 1%, maybe just 0.5%. But once hospitals get overwhelmed (and this happens quickly), mortality rates shoot up to something like 2-3%. It might actually be higher still, because some families could get ill together, and then they can’t even provide care to each other.

    The statistics looks like this. Out of a population of 1000, maybe 500 will get infected, with 200 showing no symptoms, and 240 showing only mild to moderate symptoms (so like a common cold to a bad flu), but 60 will require hospitalization, and maybe 6 of those will require intensive care. Once hospitals get overwhelmed (very quickly, because ICU is a very limited resource), basically you can assume that each of those 6 will die. And a few of the others might die, too, because, even though they wouldn’t need intensive care, they’d still need someone to look after them, but they’d be at home alone or with equally ill family members. Here’s a famous guy (in his fifties) who died, along with his sister and two parents:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/18/coronavirus-kills-chinese-film-director-family-wuhan-covid-19

    The other issue is that people will start to panic. They will avoid public places, and many people will just refuse to go to work, because they don’t even want to risk being infected there. They could easily just report sick (who could check them if they were lying..?), and so lots of companies and services would just stop working, one by one. This would include some essential services. The secondary effects of such a collapse are difficult to contemplate, but potentially could kill way more people than that, and could eventually result in a total collapse of the economy, as well as mass starvation.

    As the situation was getting out of hand in Wuhan (and increasingly elsewhere in China), the Standing Committee of the Central Political Bureau of the Chinese Communist Party (a body not famous for being exceedingly humanitarian or caring for a few people dying here or there) realized how bad it could get, and so they decided to just shut down the economy for several weeks, while keeping at least the most essential services everywhere (even in Wuhan).

    This decision might have to be made elsewhere, too. Italy has already locked down several towns, and perhaps they’ll be forced to do more. But some other countries have declared that they won’t ever implement such mass quarantines under any circumstances, like Merkel’s Germany. We’ll see. Merkel’s Germany also insists that the risks to the public were still low. I would think that they have such good chances against a COVID-19 outbreak, as they had back in the day to destroy the Asiatic hordes at the gates of Berlin, with Steiner’s forces.

  104. @Dieter Kief
    So - this looks as if there was a racial component with regard to individual vulnerability.

    This is now: You, Lot, Ron Unz and Lance Welton vs. Anatoly Karlin and Peter Frost, or would it be too dramatic to conclude, that there'd be two opposing teams? - Is this thing gradual? - If this looks so simple to me, why isn't there an expert able to quantify this seemingly differing racial vulnerability? - Just curious.

    One thing that can be said with certainty already is that it’s complex and tricky (observe the “cured” people getting reinfected and the infected not showing any symptoms). Months from now we will know some major factor we can not know now. Simply not having as many receptors is only one thing. An anon on a Manchurian bat fancier message board said: “all governments, but especially Asiatic ones, and most especially Communists, live on indoctrination, and count their pulse by maintaining the public order. And these Asiatic governments are shutting down all the schools for months.” This is big enough that trying to outthink it in advance is wrong.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Anon
    Even with normal illnesses, every now and then someone gets reinfected. The Johns Hopkins site says there are around 36K considered to be recovered. How many of that total have been found to be reinfected? It's very few. But that's within the range of normal. The immune systems of some people don't operate perfectly, and it may take them longer to fully shake off the virus. A novel virus will take longer for everybody's immune systems to figure out. I wouldn't panic about reinfection yet. Reinfections will drop off once the pandemic is over and viral loads everywhere start decreasing.
  105. @Paleo Liberal
    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 -- Reagan's new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall -- one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn't. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.

    “That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. ”

    I can do you one better–the “invasion” began when we allowed in scoundrels and derelicts from Eastern and Southern Europe. Heritage America has been paying the price ever since…at least that is what the nativists led us to believe.

    https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-anti-immigration-cartoon-entitled-unrestricted-immigration-and-its-32393339.html

  106. @Paleo Liberal
    That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. The 1965 immigration law in and of itself was not enough to transform America, although it played a huge role.

    Other events that played a huge role between 1965 and 1991:

    Bringing in a lot of Indochinese refugees after the Vietnam war ended. In many cases, there was a strong case to be made for this. As in, there were people risking their lives to be on our side, so perhaps we owed them something. However, there were many fraudulent cases, such as babies born > 1 year after we left with the mother claiming the father was an American GI.

    The 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens (Simpson-Mizzolli act).

    Also in 1986 -- Reagan's new tax laws eliminated all tax breaks for American graduate students, but kept the tax breaks for foreign students. When I was in grad school, suddenly Americans were paying 25% of our stipends in taxes, while the Chinese students paid ZERO.

    After the Tienanmen Square Massacre in 1989, Bush I let all the Chinese students in the US stay permanently.

    To show what effect these, plus the 1991 doubling of immigration, plus the increase of H1-B visas had on American science:

    In the mid early-mid 1990s I looked at a lab in a grad school in a large American city. There were two phone lists on the wall -- one current, one from 10 years earlier.

    The one from the early-mid 1980s had 100 students:

    90 American (including Asian Americans,)
    5 PRC
    5 Rest of World

    The one from the early-mid 1990s had 100 students:
    5 American
    90 PRC
    5 Rest of World.

    I tried to make a living with a PhD in the hard sciences for a few years in the mid-late 1990s. I couldn't. I lived off of WIC and EIC and some money I inherited. All the good jobs went to Chinese, while we Americans fought over third-rate teaching positions that paid in the 30s. Most of the time I tried to make a living as an adjunct.

    I later went to computer programming, and made a lot more money, until H1-Bs took that over. Back around 2000 I could walk into almost any dot-com in NYC and see almost all Americans working there. Those were the days.

    “That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. ”

    I can do you one better–the “invasion” began when we allowed in scoundrels and derelicts from Eastern and Southern Europe. Heritage America has been paying the price ever since…at least that is what the nativists led us to believe.

    https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-anti-immigration-cartoon-entitled-unrestricted-immigration-and-its-32393339.html

    • Troll: Leopold
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another, while my far more considered ministrations languish in whimbo for days at a time. But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too, so perhaps it's all about stirring things up and creating activity at all costs. Knock yourself out!
  107. In Iran, it’s apparently not just octogenarians who are dying of this:

    Meanwhile, it has been disclosed that a 22-year-old member of Iranian women’s futsal national team, Elham Sheikhi, has died of Covid-19, or coronavirus. Ms. Sheikhi was from the province of Qom that has been described as the epicenter of the deadly outbreak.

    https://en.radiofarda.com/a/football-games-to-continue-in-iran-as-female-player-dies-of-coronavirus/30458514.html

    • Replies: @Anon
    We know nothing about her medical history. She could have gotten sick from something else right before Covid-19 hit her. Having 2 illnesses at once is very risky even in the young and apparently healthy. Or she may have been one of the unlucky ones who had a cytokine storm. I have read that cytokine storms have a genetic basis. It's one of those things where you have two copies of a gene or one, and there's a bad outcome if you have the wrong set of genes.
  108. Here’s some of what the people in the UK are being told by their chief medical officer, who is an MD and a professor:

    Emergency plans are being drawn up by health officials to contain the coronavirus which could see schools closed for at least two months.

    Football matches, concerts and other mass gatherings may also need to be suspended, the chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said.

    He said: ‘We’re not saying we will do them, we have to look at them and say, ‘How likely are they to work?’

    He goes on to say some other things that would seem to apply to the US too:

    But Professor Witty said: ‘If it is something that is containable, the UK can contain it. If it is not containable, it will be not containable everywhere and then it is coming our way.’

    Professor Witty said the key was for scientists to now work out what could ‘delay’ or ‘flatten’ the outbreak.

    He added: ‘Everybody knows that the kinds of things you consider are reducing mass gatherings, school closures which may or may not be appropriate for this type of virus we don’t know yet, we need to find that out.

    ‘There are several things – to be clear, we’re not saying we will do them, we have to look at them and say how likely are they to work and what’s our evidence base here. What’s the social cost of this?

    ‘Because one of the things that’s clear with this virus, much more so than with the flu, is anything we do we’re going to have to do for quite a long time – probably more than two months.’

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8053555/UK-schools-close-TWO-MONTHS-plan-contain-coronavirus.html

    I was also going to note here that according to MarketWatch, stock futures were running at -5% for tomorrow. I just double-checked and I see that they are now +0.35%. Very interesting change in less than two hours.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    I just double-checked and I see that they are now +0.35%. Very interesting change in less than two hours.
     
    Algorithms are dumb, not prescient.
  109. @Achmed E. Newman
    It sure sounds like political ass-covering. We think of the Japanese as all smart cookies, but this is overkill. Don't these people wear face-masks regularly anyway? (Just don't buy any of the cheap China-made ones that don't actually have a filter inside. I know about this from actual experience with a manufacturer in China. Corruption Cost-savings, you know ...)

    They’re smart. They know the mortality numbers reported by the fraudulent Chinese communists are fake as hell.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I agree the Chinese government numbers are fake as hell. I still don't know if this thing will be any big deal. Taking care of who and what comes into your country is common sense, and that's a big FU to the Globalists.
  110. Anonymous[342] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    The 1990 Immigration Act basically put the 1965 Act on steroids.
    And who was president when this monstrosity was signed into law? Ahh yes, George HW Bush, the cuckservative godfather.
    Someone should do a statistical analysis as to how much farther along we are to becoming a full-fledged Third World hellhole thanks to this act alone. Heck even California might still be recognizably American, and hence still electorally competitive for the Stupid Party.

    As for Trump throwing sand into the immigration machinery, he could as a result of SCOTUS upholding the so-called Moslem travel ban in 2018 issue an EO tomorrow morning putting a halt to both the Diversity Visa Lottery and Chain migration. Oh, and finally issue that EO on anchor babies; although maybe he should wait till old Ruthie kicks the bucket.

  111. @Anon
    Two weeks for the schools, starting Monday, so tomorrow Friday is the last day this term. The final two weeks are the regular annual Spring vacation. The Prime Minister announced it today. The opposition parties on the televised question sessions have been hectoring him to do more. He fixed their wagon and shut them up with this and yesterday's "government request" that all large sports and music events, etc., cancel for the next two weeks at least. This is equivalent to an order in Japan's orderly society.

    Pro sports events and Olympics qualifying events are happening with no spectators. Perfume cancelled a stadium concert today right after the announcement: it would have been a funny piece of performance art had they just done it to an empty stadium ... or maybe to a dozen make-a-wish style kids with cancer, sitting in the cavernous stadium.

    The two Disney parks, and Universal Studios, continue on as usual, except staff are wearing surgical masks. They closed for a week and a half after the earthquake, although that was to repair damage. I think they are going to be pressured to close soon, like the Hong Kong and Shanghai parks.

    A big problem is the stuffy rush hour trains and subways. Flex time would help there. Stopping them would well and truly shut down the city.

    By the way, this is entrance exam season, for universities and high schools (all high schools are by exam, compulsory education is through junior high, although Japanese junior high is equivalent to most US high schools), and the exams have been disrupted.

    I live in Hong Kong, where schools, universities, and many employers sent people home over a month ago. My daughter, like nearly all HK kids, has become an expert at using Zoom, the video conferencing app du jour, since all of her classes are using this. I’ve been working from home for a month also, although it looks as if that’s coming to an end after this week.

    Daughter C also has big university entrance exams coming up, starting at the end of March and running through April. The HK Education department’s solution, which was just announced this week, is to go ahead with the exams, but keep all other school kids at home until after Easter. It’s widely assumed this is so the schools that host the university exams can provide lots of space for exam sitters this year, instead of crowding them into huge halls that seat up to 1,000. The rest of the kids, eh, they can stay home for a while longer. This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    >This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.

    The schools here have not been closed yet, though opposition parties are arguing than they should be. If ever gets to that point, I wouldn't be shocked with a similar response that bends to the demands of exams. South Korea and Japan are probably going to be similar, too, and you better believe that the gaokao is not going to be slowed down in China for anything.

    Everything else here that involves public meetings, from gyms to hotels to religious sites (mosques that serve Singapore's Malay and mamak minorities are requiring people to bring their own prayer mats rather than offering communal ones like usual) will scan your temperature here. One thing I do know is that some guys from the PRC managed to escape their quarantine and head over the Malaysian border a couple of weeks ago. You can't fix stupid, no matter how Platonic Republic you are.

  112. Problems with 2020 Tokyo Olympics predicted (in a cartoon) 32 years ago; a couple decades prior to Tokyo getting the nod to host.

    Akira (1988) – Scene predicting Tokyo Olympic 2020

  113. Anonymous[169] • Disclaimer says:

    Very frustrating to keep hearing media claim Italian virus cases are evidence of spread to European populations. But actually it’s evidence of spread to Chinese diaspora.

    Info on Chinese workers in Italy is readily available:

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Italy+Chinese+workers&t=h_&ia=web

    Many provocative links on this page. The workers have flooded in. Assume tons of illegals.

    In 2020 the numbers might be ~500,000 (illegal #s unknown) …one half million is a % about the equivalent of 3+ million in the USA.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_people_in_Italy

    The media is a giant fog machine!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    People much prefer (and will pay higher prices for) a suit or a pair of shoes or a handbag that is marked "Made in Italy" than one that is marked "Made in China". The former is synonymous with high quality craftsmanship and style. The latter is synonymous with cheap junk.

    However, young people in Italy (to the extent that there even are young people (the Italian birth rate of 1.35 births per woman is among the lowest in the world and of course way below replacement level) do not want to pursue the needle trades. The solution is to bring in Chinese. The same handbag stitched together by the same Chinese worker might be worth 10x more in the market if it is stitched together in Florence instead of Shenzen.
  114. Anon[151] • Disclaimer says:

    The Japanese National Tax Agency (their IRA) just extended the income tax filing deadline by a month, to April 16. In Japan few people use tax preparers or software or accountants because you can just go to the tax office and meet with a tax person there, even with multiple specialists, for free. I’ve met with tax civil servants about real estate, stock sales, a foreign corporation, IRAs, double taxation treaty matters, for instance. And then they fill out your forms for you on the computer if you ask, or let you do it yourself in their offices.

    But the month before the deadlines is a real crunch, and there is a long line outside the office, and lines and rows of waiting chairs inside, leading to various cubicles and rows of computers and form-filling stations inside the offices. Attempts to promote online filing, which is free and uses a government system, have only partially ameliorated this crunch time. Retired tax office staff are brought in to help out. It’s the perfect storm as far as virus vector ground zeros go. So this delay is probably going to reduce the risk both by delaying things a bit and by spreading out the crunch.

    Prefectural and city taxes are determined from your national filings, as well as national health insurance payments, all of which are then deducted periodically from your bank account, so this filing delay may cause problems on down the line.

    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    This only applies to self employed people mostly. In Japan if you are salaried your taxes are done by your employer. If you have a special case you can file an amendment.
  115. @anonymous
    All schools in China have been closed for over a month. Even children in villages are attending class through a webcam app on mobiles. I wonder what long term effect this will have one education. Will there no longer be as many English teaching jobs in Asia because students just take online classes taught by Ukrainians?

    The current educational model is a relic of the industrial age. It should be dismantled. There’s no excuse to steal so much money from the people to prop up this aging, inefficient and abusive system. The children in Japan will do just fine taking this much needed metal health break.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman, J.Ross
  116. @AnotherDad


    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.
     
    That sounds bad.
     
    Virus may be bad, but this sounds pretty darn great!

    Kids spend too much time in school listening to bozo/PC teachers. We're 25 years into the Internet revolution and still doing education with the Fordist model. Basically, because it's a huge number of mediocrities' iron rice bowl.

    Cut the kids loose. Assign them some reading in history and science. Give them some math lesson/exercise programs. (Math instruction is particularly easy to computerize--there's a canon, there obvious exercises with numeric answers and the failure modes even give pretty good info on what the kid doesn't understand.) Some science--heck some history--exercises as well. Point them at some books that are part of your nation's literary tradtion.

    The sit still and listen model is particularly crappy for males. (Yes, i'm such a right-wing nut, i believe in biological sex.) Boys would benefit by more sports and scouting type activities, more "hands on" lab and shop work and less sit still and raise your hand.

    Schools do more “hands-on” project-based learning than ever. And kids are way more clueless than when the emphasis was rote memorization.

    The problem is discipline is out of control and there aren’t enough charismatic, energetic teachers to maintain order…particularly male ones. And some of them are run out of the profession because you can be sued over any perceived slight to a student or parent.

    Regarding hands-on learning…can’t explore if you don’t know left from right. And some high schoolers don’t. They also have no concept of time…WWII, slavery, the Renaissance, the American Revolution- it is all this vague interchangeable “long long ago” to probably 1/4 of young Americans.

    Hands-on learning only works with either very gifted or very motivated students.

  117. Anonymous[169] • Disclaimer says:

    For past 48 hrs endless repetition of “store shelves emptied in Milan” in the media.

    What’s special about Milan? MILAN HAS THE LARGEST CHINESE DIASPORA POPULATION IN ITALY.

    Milan 18,918 (1.43% on total resident population)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_people_in_Italy

    …….

    Just imagine the underground railroad of illegal aliens that has developed over the years from China to this industrial zone in Northern Italy. Obvious disease vector. Illegals living in typical squalid cramped conditions etc.

  118. Anon[309] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, the Daily Mail gives us a preview of BernieCare:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8053555/UK-schools-close-TWO-MONTHS-plan-contain-coronavirus.html

    ‘Treating the elderly would be sacrificed if coronavirus overwhelms UK’: NHS would prioritise critical care for those most likely to survive rather than most vulnerable patients, senior doctors admit

    Under protocol dubbed ‘Three Wise Men’, senior medics at hospitals would need to decipher which patients to give care such as ventilators and beds to, with a focus on saving those most likely to recover.

    This seems to a triage system invoking the DIE principle of (age)diversity, institution(al limits), and equality:

    In preparation for the 2009 Swine Flu pandemic, the committee on Ethical Aspects of Pandemic Influenza (CEAPI) developed an ethical framework in 2007 and this was based on the principle of ‘the three wise men’.

    This has since been reviewed post 2009, and the conclusions are that the framework remains appropriate to future pandemic management.

    According to the guidance, this means that:

    Everyone matters
    Everyone matters equally – but this does not mean that everyone is treated the same

    [and so on]

    In an adjacent Daily Mail article, women’s liberation proceeds apace:

    ‘Feeling brave’: Scarlett Moffatt poses in a chic black swimsuit as she embraces her ‘boobs, hips and cellulite’ in defiant body confidence post during family getaway to Iceland

  119. The WHO publishes a daily situation report, which summarizes the new cases (and provides some additional information) in each country around the world.

    https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

    I’ve also been following the daily situation reports from the Singapore government over the last couple of weeks. Until last week, Singapore had the highest number of cases outside of China and that cruise ship, and though seemingly few in number, quite high, per capita.

    Not surprisingly, Singapore’s response has been efficient and thorough, with over 2,000 people quarantined for a two weeks each, and travelers from China and some other places denied entry since late January. A foreigner who broke his quarantine lost his visa and has been kicked out. Of course, Singapore has the advantage of being an enclosed area, an island, and is also wealthy and authoritarian.

    https://www.moh.gov.sg/news-highlights/details/four-more-cases-discharged-three-new-cases-of-covid-19-infection-confirmed

    https://www.moh.gov.sg/covid-19

    https://www.sgpc.gov.sg/sgpcmedia/media_releases/ica/press_release/P-20200226-2/attachment/Press%20Release%20-%20Singapore%20Permanent%20Resident%20Breached%20Stay-Home%20Notice%20Requirements.pdf

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    I'm living in Singapore right now. A lot of Chinese Singaporeans go to the mainland for the lunar NY, and Wuhan is a major transportation hub with links all over the PRC. Given this, a coronavirus outbreak was inevitable, regardless of what the government did or whether the Singaporeans were in Hubei or not. However, as you've said, they've handled things efficiently: anybody who shows signs of the coronvirus is quarantined immediately.

    There's a lot more telecommuting for work going on than usual, but other than that, life is going on more or less normally. It's a concern, but it isn't as if civilization is ending.

    Also: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/singapore-claims-first-use-antibody-test-track-coronavirus-infections

  120. @Barnard
    An Iranian former ambassador to the Vatican died yesterday. That is the first report confirmed report I have seen of a non East Asian death from coronavirus. He was 81 years though. Iran has 26 deaths out of 245 confirmed cases. We have no way of knowing how many of those are ethnically Chinese.

    Some elderly ethnic Italians have died. They have fewer ACE 2 receptors than Northern Euros…

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Were they elderly ethnic Italians already in hospital for treatment though?

    My Aunt is in hospital with terminal cancer, the flu would kill her if she got it. Actually a little surprised the hospital did the last surgery, she hasn't long to live.

  121. But for more outgoing and productive human beings, this sounds massive.

    This kids who’ll get to stay home probably won’t see it that way (although in Japan you never know).

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.

    Imagine, if you will, an insipid remark, perhaps a lame attempt at humor, about a viral illness that has, apparently, already sickened a very large number of people, killing some, one that seems to be spreading around the world, a development which will, perhaps, eventually result in a huge number of additional victims, and many more deaths.

    Steve Sailer: “Hold my beer.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Lighten up, Francis. It might help to stay off the TV infotainment for a spell. They want people like you to be freaking out.
    , @J.Ross
    The insipid remark was all the Ivy league grads and at-least-genius magnates and deep staters who all said, in unison, for decades, "let's open all the borders while we're historically overdue for a pandemic." When they're dead (or cowering in guarded and walled tropical dacha) we'll "say any damn thing [we] want."
  122. @Anon
    It does.. yet it’s 2% mortality rate.. the chinese & japanese reactions sound like overeacting. In Japan’s case, it could be related to the August Olympics. Delay outbreaks until vaccine is found to avoid a flop.

    Almost 1b under some sort of travel restriction and people are still having smooth brained “just the flu” takes.

    Do you know what a sudden 5% extra strain on the ICUs is going to look like? Itll be chaos. Now add in the extra spice that is a low trust society with low IQ types who don’t understand that there are only X amount of ventilators available and abuelita or gramma can’t just be put on one. Now add the 5th column that is the media: wait until the news starts with “racist hospitals” stories.

    It’s going to be a shit show in this country. Pretty sure the HHS isn’t taking testing seriously because it thinks that the deaths will wash out in the annual flu deaths. That’s the attitude right now.

  123. @PiltdownMan
    The WHO publishes a daily situation report, which summarizes the new cases (and provides some additional information) in each country around the world.

    https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

     

    I've also been following the daily situation reports from the Singapore government over the last couple of weeks. Until last week, Singapore had the highest number of cases outside of China and that cruise ship, and though seemingly few in number, quite high, per capita.

    Not surprisingly, Singapore's response has been efficient and thorough, with over 2,000 people quarantined for a two weeks each, and travelers from China and some other places denied entry since late January. A foreigner who broke his quarantine lost his visa and has been kicked out. Of course, Singapore has the advantage of being an enclosed area, an island, and is also wealthy and authoritarian.

    https://www.moh.gov.sg/news-highlights/details/four-more-cases-discharged-three-new-cases-of-covid-19-infection-confirmed

    https://www.moh.gov.sg/covid-19

    https://www.sgpc.gov.sg/sgpcmedia/media_releases/ica/press_release/P-20200226-2/attachment/Press%20Release%20-%20Singapore%20Permanent%20Resident%20Breached%20Stay-Home%20Notice%20Requirements.pdf


     

    I’m living in Singapore right now. A lot of Chinese Singaporeans go to the mainland for the lunar NY, and Wuhan is a major transportation hub with links all over the PRC. Given this, a coronavirus outbreak was inevitable, regardless of what the government did or whether the Singaporeans were in Hubei or not. However, as you’ve said, they’ve handled things efficiently: anybody who shows signs of the coronvirus is quarantined immediately.

    There’s a lot more telecommuting for work going on than usual, but other than that, life is going on more or less normally. It’s a concern, but it isn’t as if civilization is ending.

    Also: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/singapore-claims-first-use-antibody-test-track-coronavirus-infections

    • Replies: @Jack Henson
    Singapore is an island that isn't afraid to strip citizenship from people. It is handling this in a grown up fashion. NK is as well: So far two government officials were shot out of hand for their screw ups, and surprisingly it wasnt the communist "how dare he tell the truth" but for a coverup of how bad it was and breaking quarantine to go to the baths or something.

    Far cry from the US where it's only a matter of time before a Hawaii judge decides that homeless people being quarantined is a violation of civil rights or something.

    , @R.G. Camara
    There's a difference between a mono-culture and a multi-culture, such as ours, in disasters. Witness the Japanese in Fukashima, or the Han Chinese now. Plus the latter is a police state.

    Ours has too much diversity. Think LA riots. Think Katrina.
  124. @notsaying
    Here's some of what the people in the UK are being told by their chief medical officer, who is an MD and a professor:

    Emergency plans are being drawn up by health officials to contain the coronavirus which could see schools closed for at least two months.

    Football matches, concerts and other mass gatherings may also need to be suspended, the chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty said.

    He said: 'We're not saying we will do them, we have to look at them and say, 'How likely are they to work?'
     
    He goes on to say some other things that would seem to apply to the US too:

    But Professor Witty said: 'If it is something that is containable, the UK can contain it. If it is not containable, it will be not containable everywhere and then it is coming our way.'

    Professor Witty said the key was for scientists to now work out what could 'delay' or 'flatten' the outbreak.

    He added: 'Everybody knows that the kinds of things you consider are reducing mass gatherings, school closures which may or may not be appropriate for this type of virus we don't know yet, we need to find that out.

    'There are several things – to be clear, we're not saying we will do them, we have to look at them and say how likely are they to work and what's our evidence base here. What's the social cost of this?

    'Because one of the things that's clear with this virus, much more so than with the flu, is anything we do we're going to have to do for quite a long time – probably more than two months.'
     
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8053555/UK-schools-close-TWO-MONTHS-plan-contain-coronavirus.html

    I was also going to note here that according to MarketWatch, stock futures were running at -5% for tomorrow. I just double-checked and I see that they are now +0.35%. Very interesting change in less than two hours.

    I just double-checked and I see that they are now +0.35%. Very interesting change in less than two hours.

    Algorithms are dumb, not prescient.

  125. @nebulafox
    I'm living in Singapore right now. A lot of Chinese Singaporeans go to the mainland for the lunar NY, and Wuhan is a major transportation hub with links all over the PRC. Given this, a coronavirus outbreak was inevitable, regardless of what the government did or whether the Singaporeans were in Hubei or not. However, as you've said, they've handled things efficiently: anybody who shows signs of the coronvirus is quarantined immediately.

    There's a lot more telecommuting for work going on than usual, but other than that, life is going on more or less normally. It's a concern, but it isn't as if civilization is ending.

    Also: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/singapore-claims-first-use-antibody-test-track-coronavirus-infections

    Singapore is an island that isn’t afraid to strip citizenship from people. It is handling this in a grown up fashion. NK is as well: So far two government officials were shot out of hand for their screw ups, and surprisingly it wasnt the communist “how dare he tell the truth” but for a coverup of how bad it was and breaking quarantine to go to the baths or something.

    Far cry from the US where it’s only a matter of time before a Hawaii judge decides that homeless people being quarantined is a violation of civil rights or something.

  126. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I live in Hong Kong, where schools, universities, and many employers sent people home over a month ago. My daughter, like nearly all HK kids, has become an expert at using Zoom, the video conferencing app du jour, since all of her classes are using this. I've been working from home for a month also, although it looks as if that's coming to an end after this week.

    Daughter C also has big university entrance exams coming up, starting at the end of March and running through April. The HK Education department's solution, which was just announced this week, is to go ahead with the exams, but keep all other school kids at home until after Easter. It's widely assumed this is so the schools that host the university exams can provide lots of space for exam sitters this year, instead of crowding them into huge halls that seat up to 1,000. The rest of the kids, eh, they can stay home for a while longer. This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.

    >This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.

    The schools here have not been closed yet, though opposition parties are arguing than they should be. If ever gets to that point, I wouldn’t be shocked with a similar response that bends to the demands of exams. South Korea and Japan are probably going to be similar, too, and you better believe that the gaokao is not going to be slowed down in China for anything.

    Everything else here that involves public meetings, from gyms to hotels to religious sites (mosques that serve Singapore’s Malay and mamak minorities are requiring people to bring their own prayer mats rather than offering communal ones like usual) will scan your temperature here. One thing I do know is that some guys from the PRC managed to escape their quarantine and head over the Malaysian border a couple of weeks ago. You can’t fix stupid, no matter how Platonic Republic you are.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Yeah, we had a case of a neighbor from the north getting off the high-speed train here, then sneaking onto the tracks and then out through an emergency exit to avoid quarantine.

    We've found it interesting that Singapore schools haven't closed, but given how few young people seem to have been seriously infected, it probably is a reasonable choice.

    We've had an incredible surge in people doing outdoor stuff. The weather throughout most of February has been excellent, much better than most years, and HK's hiking trails and BBQ areas are overrun. We were out for a hike last Saturday and saw more people, by far, on the trail than we'd ever seen before.
  127. This Corona Virus thing is totally my fault. When it first started, I scoffed at the Chinese quarantining a city of 11 million over a handful of dead senior citizens. Surely, more Chinese must slip and fall in the bathtub and crack their skulls open than that everyday!

    I sincerely apologize.

  128. @Corvinus
    "That was one of the big moments in the transformation of America, and it is often forgotten. "

    I can do you one better--the "invasion" began when we allowed in scoundrels and derelicts from Eastern and Southern Europe. Heritage America has been paying the price ever since...at least that is what the nativists led us to believe.

    https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-anti-immigration-cartoon-entitled-unrestricted-immigration-and-its-32393339.html

    For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another, while my far more considered ministrations languish in whimbo for days at a time. But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too, so perhaps it’s all about stirring things up and creating activity at all costs. Knock yourself out!

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another..."

    I did not realize that providing factual information constitutes "tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another". Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too"

    I'm guessing Tiny Duck is a character from one of Steve's pilot scripts. Sometimes the characters a writer creates become more real than the flesh and blood human asking you what you want for dinner. I'm also guessing Corvinus is far too ordinary to pop out of reclusive Steve's character generator. The stuff that guy spouts is Moderate Liberal 101. Or maybe Corvinus is a caricature of the goodwhite liberal. In that case, kudos.
  129. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    The early 1990s really do seem to be the big turning point. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, immigration was much more strictly controlled, not just in making sure the numbers could be easily handled, but also in terms of quality. Anybody who works in software and sees the H1-B Ponzi scheme’s effect and has also interacted with scientists who came from that part of the world during the Cold War will know what I’m talking about.

    (Google Hoseong Ryu. That they claim that *Koreans* of all people are lazy is the tell-tale BS flag.)

    It’s hard not to fit this in with the general post-Cold War tendency of our ruling elite to sort of let go on any kind of restraints, from foreign policy to neoliberal dreams about the economy. The Baby Boomers taking power just after the USSR imploded-thus removing any incentive to think in terms of realism in dealings abroad or prudence in dealing with working Americans at home-was not the best combination in the world.

  130. It’s not a question of “if”, is a question of “when” here in the U.S.

    You should assume your region will have an outbreak and a quarantine, if you live anywhere near a large or mid-size city. With a city of 100,000 people or more, you can bet it will hit at some time.

    This will cause diversity panic. Store shelves will clear, looters will try their luck, good people will live in fear as the police take longer and longer to respond.

    Get some rice, beans, water, and meds, keep your gas cans filled, and be prepared to flee to the suburbs and beyond when it does.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "With a city of 100,000 people or more, you can bet it will hit at some time.

    This will cause diversity panic. Store shelves will clear, looters will try their luck, good people will live in fear as the police take longer and longer to respond."

    LMAO. Um, no. My city's population is about 165,000. Shelves will stay full, looters will stay home and stare at they sailfoams. Idiots might live in fear, but they do that anyway. Other than making jokes, nobody talks about the kung flu. Stop talking like a ninny - it is unmanly.
  131. @nebulafox
    I'm living in Singapore right now. A lot of Chinese Singaporeans go to the mainland for the lunar NY, and Wuhan is a major transportation hub with links all over the PRC. Given this, a coronavirus outbreak was inevitable, regardless of what the government did or whether the Singaporeans were in Hubei or not. However, as you've said, they've handled things efficiently: anybody who shows signs of the coronvirus is quarantined immediately.

    There's a lot more telecommuting for work going on than usual, but other than that, life is going on more or less normally. It's a concern, but it isn't as if civilization is ending.

    Also: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/singapore-claims-first-use-antibody-test-track-coronavirus-infections

    There’s a difference between a mono-culture and a multi-culture, such as ours, in disasters. Witness the Japanese in Fukashima, or the Han Chinese now. Plus the latter is a police state.

    Ours has too much diversity. Think LA riots. Think Katrina.

    • Replies: @The Wobbly Guy
    Singapore is not a monoculture. We have significant minorities here, 30% muslims (malays and arabs), 10% indians (majority tamils).

    Most successful multi-cultural nation in the world. I always joke that there are only two successful stable multicultural nations in the world, ourselves and the swiss. And the swiss are multicultural because they have french, germans, and italians.

    Most people are too stupid to get the joke.

  132. @Anon 2
    OT: According to an article about Mick Mulvaney in today’s New York Times,
    last year the number of legal immigrants dropped sharply down to 595,000,
    from roughly one million that was typical of the last few years, since 1991
    when the average number of legal immigrants was doubled from about
    half a million to one million. Thus it appears that Trump has kept his chief
    campaign promise in the sense that reducing legal immigration is even
    more important than the wall. He basically did it by throwing sand into
    the immigration machinery, thus reducing chain migration, etc.

    It was really the decision in 1991 to double the immigration levels that
    transformed the U.S. irrevocably. Hence for those of us who remember,
    it was the 1980s that the United States was still recognizably American,
    far from the chaotic mess that it is today.

    The collapse of white fertility (and East Asian) doesn’t seem to get much attention here. With each generation of white children close to 1/4 smaller than the previous (and worse for East Asians), you can get a pretty good idea of what America will look like in 20-30 years. Even by the 1980s, the maternity wards were much different than the America you remember. The only stats that count are newborns. Everything else is basically an illusion.

  133. Anonymous[882] • Disclaimer says:

    How about this theory:

    The Iranian virus outbreak source is actually a Chinese illegal alien smuggling route community.

    Overland smuggling routes from China probably feed the illegal workers into many countries but one prime destination is the industrial zone in Italy.

    Also I bet Albanians control the end traffic into Europe.

    • Replies: @Alden
    You’ve got it exactly right. The city of Qom seems to be a center of the outbreak. It’s a religious center, something like the Vatican, beautiful art and architecture as well as religion.

    Because of all the seminaries, clergy conferences, pilgrims and tourists it’s a major, major transit hub, especially for long distance buses and trucks because of highways going in all directions It’s nowhere near any border, so no border patrol. Plus lots of pilgrim hostels and seminary dorms.

    Chinese are noticeable in Iran, but the smugglers are adept at keeping them out of sight. Probably transport them in enclosed trucks to Qom, house them in old pilgrim hotels the smugglers own, then pack them in trucks headed all over Europe &Middle East.
  134. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    It varies. I know people who have taught esl. In most cases these are extra curricular classes taught at their parents expense—so rich or middle class kids. They range from courses where every kid has spent time in an English speaking country already (this would include even elementary level kids) who speak English better than your average American student to those kids who have been taught the basics of English by a non native speaker (every kid in Asia) and now want to pay to learn real English from a native speaker.

    • Replies: @The Wobbly Guy
    Every kid in Asia?

    Pls don't overgeneralise. Students in Singapore, regardless of ethnicity, generally speak better English than so-called native speakers.

    A lot of the comments really reveals the provincial ignorance of the readers here.
  135. @Testing12
    They're smart. They know the mortality numbers reported by the fraudulent Chinese communists are fake as hell.

    I agree the Chinese government numbers are fake as hell. I still don’t know if this thing will be any big deal. Taking care of who and what comes into your country is common sense, and that’s a big FU to the Globalists.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    And, like, holycrap, last year, 60,000 people died of the flu in the USA. Most of the Corona deaths in China, Korea, Japan, Italy are of seniors.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500's is creepy in itself.

    *will elaborate at some distant date as to why April is a dreaded month.

    , @LondonBob
    I don't agree that the Chinese figures are fake as hell, massaged to be sure but the Chinese response has been pretty impressive, clearly the spread has been stymied. The CDC hasn't even got a good test for it yet.
  136. @eah
    But for more outgoing and productive human beings, this sounds massive.

    This kids who'll get to stay home probably won't see it that way (although in Japan you never know).

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.

    Imagine, if you will, an insipid remark, perhaps a lame attempt at humor, about a viral illness that has, apparently, already sickened a very large number of people, killing some, one that seems to be spreading around the world, a development which will, perhaps, eventually result in a huge number of additional victims, and many more deaths.

    Steve Sailer: "Hold my beer."

    Lighten up, Francis. It might help to stay off the TV infotainment for a spell. They want people like you to be freaking out.

  137. @Dieter Kief
    So - this looks as if there was a racial component with regard to individual vulnerability.

    This is now: You, Lot, Ron Unz and Lance Welton vs. Anatoly Karlin and Peter Frost, or would it be too dramatic to conclude, that there'd be two opposing teams? - Is this thing gradual? - If this looks so simple to me, why isn't there an expert able to quantify this seemingly differing racial vulnerability? - Just curious.

    I’m agnostic on the Asians are more vulnerable issue. ACE would be the reason if true, but it could be negligible or nothing or large.

    Having more vulnerable receptors in the lungs just might not matter so much. If a you have a bomb in your house and your house catches fire, the bomb will go off just the same if it has one fuse or ten.

    I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Too early for definitive sound reasoning - that sounds reasonable. -

    Ron Unz over the top - isn't that a pattern?
    , @nebulafox
    The first guy to get sick in Singapore who wasn't one of the people returning from China was an ethnic Tamil. Between that and the outbreaks in Iran and Italy, the virus seems to be not totally limited to East Asians, at a bare minimum. That's all we can safely conclude. What does seem to be clear is that the disease is only fatal if you have a compromised immune system, which is relatively good news.

    >I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.

    Nah. Iran is a surprisingly popular tourist destination for people in this part of the world, particularly the Chinese. Some PRC tourists had the virus and passed it on to the locals, who weren't at all prepared for it given the shortcomings of Iran's medical care system.

    I guess it makes a certain kind of sense, considering the cultural ties the two countries have had going back to pre-Islamic times. Hui culture in the mainland has a strong Persianate strain to it, as does Uighur culture despite their ethnic Turkic background. The last surviving Sassanids were given asylum in Chang'an, and ended up assimilating into the Chinese nobility when it became clear that the caliphate wasn't going anywhere.

  138. Anyone listen to Dave Pinsen’s suggestion to buy SPY puts? Would have turned out well!

    I moved into bonds and cash in late January early February. Not as much as I should have, but didn’t want to pay capital gains on some of the big winners. Oops!

    No signs of panic shopping around here yet.

  139. @Mr McKenna
    For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another, while my far more considered ministrations languish in whimbo for days at a time. But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too, so perhaps it's all about stirring things up and creating activity at all costs. Knock yourself out!

    “For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another…”

    I did not realize that providing factual information constitutes “tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another”. Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.

    • Replies: @Lagertha

    Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.
     
    In your wet dreams - or, seriously, in your obnoxious, self-righteous, narcissistic dreams.

    You have no self awareness how tedious you are!, hahhaaaa! No one here, wants to go to your Principal's Office and be lectured about wrongthink! I guess you are too young to understand the phrase, "you can't teach an old dog new tricks."

    Your home-schooling-like-scolding and shushing is truly revolting & vomitous. If you are female, ok....I get it...if you are male, heaven help you. No one cares about you; and, you spend way too much time here, that people (outside of iSteve) who may have cared about you, probably think there is something lacking in your priorities. Get a life.

    , @anonymous
    Let's see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no.

    Would there be any difference in outcome in the United States, temporary or permanent, between the United States letting in 10,000,000 Pakistani Muslims and 10,000,000 English Anglicans in a single month?
  140. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks for the info, Anon 2 - I'm glad to hear that. As to your last part, that's a little-known addition of insult to injury, thanks to the elder Bush. However, I also think that the feeling of living in a foreign country took quite a while to ramp up, from 1965 onwards. You had the much larger numbers coming then, but it took a while for more offspring to enter the schools. The cumulative totals, NOT counting the kids born here, have now accumulated to where over 15% of "Americans" were born in foreign countries.

    I predict that the Elder Bush will go down as the most diabolical and cynical President of all time…along with his mean-spirited wife. So glad the younger, dumber Bushes are keeping their traps shut. 1991 & 2001 were the worst years of our lives; machinations that ensued, plague us to this day. However, at least the Bush brothers are staying out of sight and speaking no evil.

  141. @Corvinus
    "For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another..."

    I did not realize that providing factual information constitutes "tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another". Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.

    Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.

    In your wet dreams – or, seriously, in your obnoxious, self-righteous, narcissistic dreams.

    You have no self awareness how tedious you are!, hahhaaaa! No one here, wants to go to your Principal’s Office and be lectured about wrongthink! I guess you are too young to understand the phrase, “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

    Your home-schooling-like-scolding and shushing is truly revolting & vomitous. If you are female, ok….I get it…if you are male, heaven help you. No one cares about you; and, you spend way too much time here, that people (outside of iSteve) who may have cared about you, probably think there is something lacking in your priorities. Get a life.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    Given your temper tantrum, it is suffice to say that the truth and levity I bring bothers your conscience greatly.
  142. @Rob
    Japan doesn’t have millions of savage teens they need to keep in quasi-prison during the day. There is no way the US could stop schooling for a month. The crime rate in cities would sky rocket. It’s one thing to spend your work day in a majority non-white city when all the teens are warehoused. It is quite another thing to have them all out on the streets with no controls. This is just reason n why a civilized, homogenous country is better than a diverse one.

    well, it would be hilarious if students went out-of-control in DC, NYC, Boston, SF, LA. I would say the Democrat pols of Dem controlled cities (urban dwellers & suburban dwellers of large metro areas) should not be so horny for full-boar Corona virus. They and theirs would be the most affected. Bring-it, indeed! hahaaa!

  143. But of course, many will be fooled again!

  144. OT: Will COVID-2019 virus concerns neutralize one of President Trump’s most effect campaign tactics – the massive rally?

  145. Anon[646] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Mocking Christians made sense in the eighties, when there were some pretty embarrassing public examples, and idiot politicians were using Christianity as an excuse for bad policies. It makes no sense now with the dramatic collapse of visible Christianity, flogged on by literal persecution. Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.

    Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.

    Seriously. And if I were in the market for a wife, religion is the best signal for avoiding hidden extreme feminism or SJWism:

    Correlation, per major meta study from last year:

    Religious: 0.91
    MAGA hat: 0.89
    Lack of tattoos: 0.85
    Virgin: 0.82
    Zero Student Load Debt: 0.79
    STEM major: 0.75

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    the best signals: daughter of married parents; daughter who loves her parents; daughter who has multiple friends and relations who like her (dogs & cats don't count, but are sort of a plus); daughter who knows she is in charge of her own happiness - this is too complicated to explain, but it is a must for young men today. Women who can deal with hardship or sudden changes; a woman who is essentially, able to be a warrior/provider if the husband/partner is ill or incapacitated.

    I often told my sons that they should marry a woman who they would have no doubt, that she would carry him across a stream/frozen lake (very GOT) if he were incapacitated. I admit that I am a dark person but I felt that my baby boys need women who truly would die for them. I'll let you all know if my dreams come true!

    Here's a little Corona Break! https://youtu.be/_CI7Fo4p0v8

    , @North Carolina Resident
    Correlation to what?
  146. @Anonymous
    Back in early Jan the first case hit ASU campus in PHX. This was before the virus profile was known. I was thinking then this could be a nightmare. But nothing happened for very good reasons. Now we know the reasons.

    1/ There are few Asians in AZ. So the virus has a scarcity of ACE2 receptors to work with.

    2/ The general level of medical hygiene is much better than China.

    3/ AZ is a low humidity environment. (The virus spreads through airborne droplets.)

    4/ The air quality in PHX metro while not perfect is much much better than the large cities in China. The amount of air pollution in Wuhan is enough to suppress the lung function and immune systems of everyone living there.

    The virus profile (not discussed in the MSM) explains the uneven global spread and death rates. Some populations face high risk and some face very low risk. But because it's mostly a race issue and a hygiene issue the corrupt disallows any discussion of the facts and instead we get irrationally panicked citizenries around the world.

    Phoenix looks like it has relatively clean air, but your windshield gets a black film on it when you drive around a bit.

    The higher UV levels in this environment will also tend to kill the virus particles in the outside air as we move into spring.

  147. @Achmed E. Newman
    I agree the Chinese government numbers are fake as hell. I still don't know if this thing will be any big deal. Taking care of who and what comes into your country is common sense, and that's a big FU to the Globalists.

    And, like, holycrap, last year, 60,000 people died of the flu in the USA. Most of the Corona deaths in China, Korea, Japan, Italy are of seniors.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500’s is creepy in itself.

    *will elaborate at some distant date as to why April is a dreaded month.

    • Replies: @CJ
    From T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land:

    I. The Burial of the Dead

    April is the cruellest month, breeding
    Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    Memory and desire, stirring
    Dull roots with spring rain.
     
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500’s is creepy in itself.
     
    A Finnish friend told me her uncle committed suicide in the spring, and she thought that odd. But a little research showed her spring was the worst season for suicides. She couldn't understand why.

    I told her it was obvious. Everybody is miserable during the long, dark winter. (Helsinki-- Hell-sinki-- at the south end of the country, is roughly at Anchorage's latitude.) Misery lives company, and the depressed are among psychic compatriots.

    But it brightens up in the spring. People are smiling. Now Mr Dyingly Sad is all alone, and it's unbearable.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    My recollection is that you are from a cold dreary place, at least in the long winter season. Just be glad every May then, that you are still alive and kicking.

    I agree with your take on the over-worrying about this virus, especially by those who can't really do a lot about it, besides taking ordinary precautions. My one additional precaution now is to not be fooled by anyone offering me a case of Corona ...

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1359A.jpg
  148. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    One thing that can be said with certainty already is that it's complex and tricky (observe the "cured" people getting reinfected and the infected not showing any symptoms). Months from now we will know some major factor we can not know now. Simply not having as many receptors is only one thing. An anon on a Manchurian bat fancier message board said: "all governments, but especially Asiatic ones, and most especially Communists, live on indoctrination, and count their pulse by maintaining the public order. And these Asiatic governments are shutting down all the schools for months." This is big enough that trying to outthink it in advance is wrong.

    Even with normal illnesses, every now and then someone gets reinfected. The Johns Hopkins site says there are around 36K considered to be recovered. How many of that total have been found to be reinfected? It’s very few. But that’s within the range of normal. The immune systems of some people don’t operate perfectly, and it may take them longer to fully shake off the virus. A novel virus will take longer for everybody’s immune systems to figure out. I wouldn’t panic about reinfection yet. Reinfections will drop off once the pandemic is over and viral loads everywhere start decreasing.

  149. @Anon

    Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.
     
    Seriously. And if I were in the market for a wife, religion is the best signal for avoiding hidden extreme feminism or SJWism:

    Correlation, per major meta study from last year:

    Religious: 0.91
    MAGA hat: 0.89
    Lack of tattoos: 0.85
    Virgin: 0.82
    Zero Student Load Debt: 0.79
    STEM major: 0.75

    the best signals: daughter of married parents; daughter who loves her parents; daughter who has multiple friends and relations who like her (dogs & cats don’t count, but are sort of a plus); daughter who knows she is in charge of her own happiness this is too complicated to explain, but it is a must for young men today. Women who can deal with hardship or sudden changes; a woman who is essentially, able to be a warrior/provider if the husband/partner is ill or incapacitated.

    I often told my sons that they should marry a woman who they would have no doubt, that she would carry him across a stream/frozen lake (very GOT) if he were incapacitated. I admit that I am a dark person but I felt that my baby boys need women who truly would die for them. I’ll let you all know if my dreams come true!

    Here’s a little Corona Break!

    • Replies: @Jesse
    I'm always struck at how much conservatives baby their sons.
  150. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor
    In Iran, it's apparently not just octogenarians who are dying of this:

    Meanwhile, it has been disclosed that a 22-year-old member of Iranian women's futsal national team, Elham Sheikhi, has died of Covid-19, or coronavirus. Ms. Sheikhi was from the province of Qom that has been described as the epicenter of the deadly outbreak.

    https://en.radiofarda.com/a/football-games-to-continue-in-iran-as-female-player-dies-of-coronavirus/30458514.html

    We know nothing about her medical history. She could have gotten sick from something else right before Covid-19 hit her. Having 2 illnesses at once is very risky even in the young and apparently healthy. Or she may have been one of the unlucky ones who had a cytokine storm. I have read that cytokine storms have a genetic basis. It’s one of those things where you have two copies of a gene or one, and there’s a bad outcome if you have the wrong set of genes.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    She was a young semi-professional soccer player, so theoretically without any chronic conditions.
    , @Jack D
    If I had to guess, I would bet on cytokine storm. The ironic thing about cytokine storms is that the younger and healthier you are, the stronger your immune system is. So when your immune system misfires and decides to go after your own body, it has the strength to kill you. Cytokine storms ESPECIALLY kill young healthy individuals like top athletes. Luckily most young healthy people do not develop cytokine storms as a result of viral infections but when they do, it's very grim. Probably what killed her was not the fact that she was smoking shishas on the down low or was really a dude on hormones or other nonsense that people are speculating about (entirely out of their imagination and perhaps fantasy projection) but the very fact that she was young and fit.
  151. OT:

    Is seemingly based Ebony Bowden secretly one of us?

    Is It Racist? NYPost Journalist Busted Mocking Indian Reporter During White House Presser

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/it-racist-nytimes-journalist-busted-mocking-indian-reporter-during-white-house-presser

  152. I think they blew the name. They should have called it “CFluLhu”. Or maybe “CFluWu”.

    • LOL: Rob
  153. Looking for the article Steve had with research that showed whites only ethnicity to dislike themselves.

    Especially left whites really didnt like white people.

    Thanks! Asking for a friend. Haha

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Zach Goldberg at https://twitter.com/ZachG932 is the authority on such things. I think I was quoting him.
  154. • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    "Community spread" in my neck of the woods. Good thing my job requires me to be a recluse.
  155. @nebulafox
    >This gives some insight into the insanity of the exam culture here.

    The schools here have not been closed yet, though opposition parties are arguing than they should be. If ever gets to that point, I wouldn't be shocked with a similar response that bends to the demands of exams. South Korea and Japan are probably going to be similar, too, and you better believe that the gaokao is not going to be slowed down in China for anything.

    Everything else here that involves public meetings, from gyms to hotels to religious sites (mosques that serve Singapore's Malay and mamak minorities are requiring people to bring their own prayer mats rather than offering communal ones like usual) will scan your temperature here. One thing I do know is that some guys from the PRC managed to escape their quarantine and head over the Malaysian border a couple of weeks ago. You can't fix stupid, no matter how Platonic Republic you are.

    Yeah, we had a case of a neighbor from the north getting off the high-speed train here, then sneaking onto the tracks and then out through an emergency exit to avoid quarantine.

    We’ve found it interesting that Singapore schools haven’t closed, but given how few young people seem to have been seriously infected, it probably is a reasonable choice.

    We’ve had an incredible surge in people doing outdoor stuff. The weather throughout most of February has been excellent, much better than most years, and HK’s hiking trails and BBQ areas are overrun. We were out for a hike last Saturday and saw more people, by far, on the trail than we’d ever seen before.

  156. Japan matched our 4.5% stock crash on Friday, German futures suggest it will too. Rest of Asia and Europe looking like -2.5 to -4.5. Futures suggest the US opens down another 1.5% for a total loss this week of about 12%.

    Given the pace of the headlines, holding over the weekend seems like a risk.

    Chinese traffic stats from TomTom picked up a lot on Monday, from down 90% to down 50% compared to normal. They did not improve any further during the week however.

    Hong Kong never fell as much as Red China but is steady around -50%. Milan got slightly worse every day and is also down about half.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    The stock market always overreacts to bad news. The best time to buy is after a major dip due to some bad news.
  157. @anon
    We Are All Hikikomori Now.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/NYTObits/status/1233460009608105984

    https://twitter.com/NYTObits/status/1233395695094321152
  158. @Lot
    I’m agnostic on the Asians are more vulnerable issue. ACE would be the reason if true, but it could be negligible or nothing or large.

    Having more vulnerable receptors in the lungs just might not matter so much. If a you have a bomb in your house and your house catches fire, the bomb will go off just the same if it has one fuse or ten.

    I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.

    Too early for definitive sound reasoning – that sounds reasonable. –

    Ron Unz over the top – isn’t that a pattern?

    • Agree: Dissident
  159. @Anon7
    This is terrifying. I’ve heard that virus is projected to sicken 42 million people, put 600,000 in the hospital and KILL sixty-thousand people right here in the United States!

    It’s true. The name of this deadly virus is “influenza”, also known as “the flu”. It happens every year.

    Do we close the schools every February/March?

    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it, and half the country gets it, that’s 3 million people. 50 years of common flu.

    • Replies: @Hail

    50 years of common flu.
     
    So far killing 1% of those who get it outside China and Iran.

    A bad flu season will kill a bit over 0.1% of those who get it, so that's more like 8–10 years of the common flu crammed into one year. COVID19 as super-flu.

    (Re: Iran. Something is out-of-whack with Iran's numbers; they must have a lot more cases than they have confirmed. Going by the WHO's numbers, based on Iranian authorities' reports, they have a death rate of 16%.)

    , @Anon7
    I like how you phrased it; let's deconstruct your statement.

    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it

    We have no data on how many people will die once hospitalized in the United States, where we have the most advanced care in the world. We don't know how much COVID-19 will overlap with weakened individuals who would also die if they got one of the regular flu strains. Speculation is always dangerous, but I'd guess the fatality rate would be less in the US.

    AND half the country gets it

    In a typical year, the strains of influenza that come into the country from Southeast Asia (because that's where the flu comes from every year) infect about one-eigth of the population, and that's without any efforts of any kind to constrain it by quarantine, school and event cessation, etc. OTOH, there is a flu shot, which must be reformulated every year, and is only partially effective in the best of years; still better than nothing and there is no COVID-19 shot.
    As far as I know, there is no estimate of whether COVID-19 is more or less transmissible than the many flu strains.

    That's 3 million people.

    Here's what the Center for Disease Control says, as of twenty minutes ago:

    ...there have been 53 cases within the United States. No deaths have been reported in the United States.

    Currently, COVID-19 is not recognized to be spreading in U.S. communities...

    In the United States, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators are working on development of candidate vaccines and therapeutics for COVID-19. In China, multiple clinical trials of investigational therapeutics have been implemented, including two clinical trials of remdesivir, an investigational antiviral drug.§§ An NIH randomized controlled clinical trial of investigational therapeutics for hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the United States was approved by the Food and Drug Administration; the first investigational therapeutic to be studied is remdesivir.¶¶ In the absence of a vaccine or therapeutic, community mitigation measures are the primary method to respond to widespread transmission and supportive care is the current medical treatment.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6908e1.htm

     

  160. @Anon
    The Japanese National Tax Agency (their IRA) just extended the income tax filing deadline by a month, to April 16. In Japan few people use tax preparers or software or accountants because you can just go to the tax office and meet with a tax person there, even with multiple specialists, for free. I've met with tax civil servants about real estate, stock sales, a foreign corporation, IRAs, double taxation treaty matters, for instance. And then they fill out your forms for you on the computer if you ask, or let you do it yourself in their offices.

    But the month before the deadlines is a real crunch, and there is a long line outside the office, and lines and rows of waiting chairs inside, leading to various cubicles and rows of computers and form-filling stations inside the offices. Attempts to promote online filing, which is free and uses a government system, have only partially ameliorated this crunch time. Retired tax office staff are brought in to help out. It's the perfect storm as far as virus vector ground zeros go. So this delay is probably going to reduce the risk both by delaying things a bit and by spreading out the crunch.

    Prefectural and city taxes are determined from your national filings, as well as national health insurance payments, all of which are then deducted periodically from your bank account, so this filing delay may cause problems on down the line.

    This only applies to self employed people mostly. In Japan if you are salaried your taxes are done by your employer. If you have a special case you can file an amendment.

    • Replies: @Anon

    This only applies to self employed people mostly. In Japan if you are salaried your taxes are done by your employer. If you have a special case you can file an amendment.
     
    True. I previously worked for a small company and then a zaibatsu. I never dealt with taxes then, but for the small company I had to use the city for health insurance, but the zaibatsu employee “union” handled that company's insurance, and even had a full-blown hospital in Tokyo.
  161. @Edmund
    Looking for the article Steve had with research that showed whites only ethnicity to dislike themselves.

    Especially left whites really didnt like white people.


    Thanks! Asking for a friend. Haha

    Zach Goldberg at https://twitter.com/ZachG932 is the authority on such things. I think I was quoting him.

  162. @Lot
    I’m agnostic on the Asians are more vulnerable issue. ACE would be the reason if true, but it could be negligible or nothing or large.

    Having more vulnerable receptors in the lungs just might not matter so much. If a you have a bomb in your house and your house catches fire, the bomb will go off just the same if it has one fuse or ten.

    I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.

    The first guy to get sick in Singapore who wasn’t one of the people returning from China was an ethnic Tamil. Between that and the outbreaks in Iran and Italy, the virus seems to be not totally limited to East Asians, at a bare minimum. That’s all we can safely conclude. What does seem to be clear is that the disease is only fatal if you have a compromised immune system, which is relatively good news.

    >I don’t think Unz’s theory that covid19 is an American bioweapon set off by troops visiting Wuhan and an undercover agent in Qom is at all plausible.

    Nah. Iran is a surprisingly popular tourist destination for people in this part of the world, particularly the Chinese. Some PRC tourists had the virus and passed it on to the locals, who weren’t at all prepared for it given the shortcomings of Iran’s medical care system.

    I guess it makes a certain kind of sense, considering the cultural ties the two countries have had going back to pre-Islamic times. Hui culture in the mainland has a strong Persianate strain to it, as does Uighur culture despite their ethnic Turkic background. The last surviving Sassanids were given asylum in Chang’an, and ended up assimilating into the Chinese nobility when it became clear that the caliphate wasn’t going anywhere.

  163. @Lot
    Japan matched our 4.5% stock crash on Friday, German futures suggest it will too. Rest of Asia and Europe looking like -2.5 to -4.5. Futures suggest the US opens down another 1.5% for a total loss this week of about 12%.

    Given the pace of the headlines, holding over the weekend seems like a risk.

    Chinese traffic stats from TomTom picked up a lot on Monday, from down 90% to down 50% compared to normal. They did not improve any further during the week however.

    Hong Kong never fell as much as Red China but is steady around -50%. Milan got slightly worse every day and is also down about half.

    The stock market always overreacts to bad news. The best time to buy is after a major dip due to some bad news.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The stock market didn't react at all until a week ago.
  164. @anonymous
    All schools in China have been closed for over a month. Even children in villages are attending class through a webcam app on mobiles. I wonder what long term effect this will have one education. Will there no longer be as many English teaching jobs in Asia because students just take online classes taught by Ukrainians?

    So glad you asked, I’m one of those people now teaching online for a university in China. It’s taken quite seriously (like all education is here); the department makes sure we don’t slack off, with classes being held on time and well-attended. But they also have my back, asking me if there’s anything I need help with to do my job. The kids’ Chinese New Year break was more boring than it’d normally have been, so they are mostly happy to have some normal activity back; and of course they know the various online tools better than either me or my bosses, so it’ll all getting worked out even though it has its limitations.

    If education is seen by many as a false choice between bible indoctrination or transgender indoctrination, that only says something about the sorry state of Americans heads–not about the value of learning something about the world.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for this update -- just curious; what video conferencing software are you using?

    Any tips on what works well/doesn't work in your online class sessions?
    , @anon

    says something about the sorry state of Americans heads
     
    If America, Australia, Canada and New Zealand are so horrible, why are you awful people flocking to our nice countries and making them shit?
    Stay in china please - the first world is full.
  165. The US should get ahead of the curve and close all universities pending further evaluation in September.

  166. @Anon
    We know nothing about her medical history. She could have gotten sick from something else right before Covid-19 hit her. Having 2 illnesses at once is very risky even in the young and apparently healthy. Or she may have been one of the unlucky ones who had a cytokine storm. I have read that cytokine storms have a genetic basis. It's one of those things where you have two copies of a gene or one, and there's a bad outcome if you have the wrong set of genes.

    She was a young semi-professional soccer player, so theoretically without any chronic conditions.

    • Replies: @Anon
    It’s Iran, but did she vape? Vaping leads to pulmonary malfunction and the presence of mold.
    , @Jesse
    It's Iran. There's a good shot "she" was a dude whacked to his eyeballs on cross sex hormones.
  167. @Ma Laoshi
    So glad you asked, I'm one of those people now teaching online for a university in China. It's taken quite seriously (like all education is here); the department makes sure we don't slack off, with classes being held on time and well-attended. But they also have my back, asking me if there's anything I need help with to do my job. The kids' Chinese New Year break was more boring than it'd normally have been, so they are mostly happy to have some normal activity back; and of course they know the various online tools better than either me or my bosses, so it'll all getting worked out even though it has its limitations.

    If education is seen by many as a false choice between bible indoctrination or transgender indoctrination, that only says something about the sorry state of Americans heads--not about the value of learning something about the world.

    Thanks for this update — just curious; what video conferencing software are you using?

    Any tips on what works well/doesn’t work in your online class sessions?

    • Replies: @Ma Laoshi
    So far, I've lucked out in that both of my classes are graduate courses with < 10 students. So it was easy enough to set up a group call on WeChat (the "Chinese Skype"). In situations where an Old School guy like me would normally hop over to the blackboard, I can write something on a sheet of paper, snap it with my cellphone, and voila, they have it as well. This last part you could do a bit more high-tech on a laptop/tablet with pen input, through a "share screen" option. Or with simple things like f(x) = \int_a^x g(y) dy , just type it into the chat window. Anything more elaborate, and you could prepare say a .ppt in advance and send it to them; or just as likely you can find existing materials online and copy-paste the link to the class. People with bigger classes to teach use "real" online-teaching software like YukeTang, with which I have no experience so far; but you often need to sign up for it separately and it all goes tits up when their server crashes. So I'd guess it's not a magic solution either.

    So it's a pretty basic operation I'm running so far, doesn't make it the equal of professionally produced online-course videos you can easily find in both EN and CN. But I'm around to hear their questions, to elaborate on the points I see they need my help with; that's how I'm earning my keep I think, and that interactivity is also what makes it worth doing for me.

    At the end of the day, the bottleneck is not the tech but their command of the English language. But I'm not completely going to smooth that out for them: no pain, no gain when you study with Teacher Ma, they'd better get used to it. :-)
  168. @danand
    The good news is Africans seem to be little affected. Is their ACE2 cell receptor count typically/exceptionally low, or was the virus just not engineered to attack them?

    http://www.rfi.fr/en/wires/20200227-virus-enigma-experts-ask-why-africa-seems-have-few-cases

    You are conflating no testing with no virus. They are not the same thing.

  169. @Ma Laoshi
    So glad you asked, I'm one of those people now teaching online for a university in China. It's taken quite seriously (like all education is here); the department makes sure we don't slack off, with classes being held on time and well-attended. But they also have my back, asking me if there's anything I need help with to do my job. The kids' Chinese New Year break was more boring than it'd normally have been, so they are mostly happy to have some normal activity back; and of course they know the various online tools better than either me or my bosses, so it'll all getting worked out even though it has its limitations.

    If education is seen by many as a false choice between bible indoctrination or transgender indoctrination, that only says something about the sorry state of Americans heads--not about the value of learning something about the world.

    says something about the sorry state of Americans heads

    If America, Australia, Canada and New Zealand are so horrible, why are you awful people flocking to our nice countries and making them shit?
    Stay in china please – the first world is full.

  170. @S. Anonyia
    Some elderly ethnic Italians have died. They have fewer ACE 2 receptors than Northern Euros...

    Were they elderly ethnic Italians already in hospital for treatment though?

    My Aunt is in hospital with terminal cancer, the flu would kill her if she got it. Actually a little surprised the hospital did the last surgery, she hasn’t long to live.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    I’m sorry for your trouble, I hope they are keeping her comfortable.
  171. @Achmed E. Newman
    I agree the Chinese government numbers are fake as hell. I still don't know if this thing will be any big deal. Taking care of who and what comes into your country is common sense, and that's a big FU to the Globalists.

    I don’t agree that the Chinese figures are fake as hell, massaged to be sure but the Chinese response has been pretty impressive, clearly the spread has been stymied. The CDC hasn’t even got a good test for it yet.

  172. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for this update -- just curious; what video conferencing software are you using?

    Any tips on what works well/doesn't work in your online class sessions?

    So far, I’ve lucked out in that both of my classes are graduate courses with < 10 students. So it was easy enough to set up a group call on WeChat (the "Chinese Skype"). In situations where an Old School guy like me would normally hop over to the blackboard, I can write something on a sheet of paper, snap it with my cellphone, and voila, they have it as well. This last part you could do a bit more high-tech on a laptop/tablet with pen input, through a "share screen" option. Or with simple things like f(x) = \int_a^x g(y) dy , just type it into the chat window. Anything more elaborate, and you could prepare say a .ppt in advance and send it to them; or just as likely you can find existing materials online and copy-paste the link to the class. People with bigger classes to teach use "real" online-teaching software like YukeTang, with which I have no experience so far; but you often need to sign up for it separately and it all goes tits up when their server crashes. So I'd guess it's not a magic solution either.

    So it's a pretty basic operation I'm running so far, doesn't make it the equal of professionally produced online-course videos you can easily find in both EN and CN. But I'm around to hear their questions, to elaborate on the points I see they need my help with; that’s how I’m earning my keep I think, and that interactivity is also what makes it worth doing for me.

    At the end of the day, the bottleneck is not the tech but their command of the English language. But I’m not completely going to smooth that out for them: no pain, no gain when you study with Teacher Ma, they’d better get used to it. 🙂

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks much for that response, Ma. It sounds as if you're dedicated and resourceful.

    I was wondering about the software because of course you need to use stuff that will run in the PRC. As I mentioned above, Zoom has really taken off (so to speak; sorry) here in HK. Daughter C has been using it regularly for schoolwork, and I've been running a church group on it as well. It's pretty slick. One of its best features is that it makes screen sharing extremely easy; you can put up a slide presentation, play a video, whatever, and the other side gets it loud and clear.

    I've been interested for some years in online 'presence' and the effects it has on different forms of online communication, especially in education. This topic is getting a serious workout these days.
  173. @anon
    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it, and half the country gets it, that's 3 million people. 50 years of common flu.

    50 years of common flu.

    So far killing 1% of those who get it outside China and Iran.

    A bad flu season will kill a bit over 0.1% of those who get it, so that’s more like 8–10 years of the common flu crammed into one year. COVID19 as super-flu.

    (Re: Iran. Something is out-of-whack with Iran’s numbers; they must have a lot more cases than they have confirmed. Going by the WHO’s numbers, based on Iranian authorities’ reports, they have a death rate of 16%.)

    • Replies: @Anon
    Could it be the arab water pipe? Shisha? It’s effect is similar or worse than vaping.
    , @anon
    But the estimated R0 (contagiousness) is perhaps double the common flu. This has exponential effect on total number infected.


    https://www.vox.com/2020/2/20/21143785/coronavirus-covid-19-spread-transmission-how (pardon the source; referring to infographic "How contagious is a disease?")

  174. @Anonymous
    But does 3/6 vs 6/6 mutations matter? Isn’t it just total ACE2 Receptors. I heard people are misinterpreting ACE2 Receptor chart being floated out there:

    https://drjessesantiano.com/are-asians-more-prone-to-get-the-covid-19/

    There is also this:

    The AFs of the top 6 common variants (rs4646127, rs2158082, rs5936011, rs6629110, rs4830983, and rs5936029) were higher than 95% in EAS populations, whereas the AFs of these variants in European populations were much lower (52%–65%).

    Our findings indicated that no direct evidence was identified genetically supporting the existence of coronavirus S-protein binding-resistant ACE2 mutants in different populations (Fig. 1a). The data of variant distribution and AFs may contribute to the further investigations of ACE2, including its roles in acute lung injury and lung function.

    The East Asian populations have much higher AFs in the eQTL variants associated with higher ACE2 expression in tissues (Fig. 1c), which may suggest different susceptibility or response to 2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2 from different populations under the similar conditions.

    From what I can get from that, these Chinese genetic researchers are saying, Yes there is evidence for the “(six variants of) ACE2 higher in East Asians” idea, but, No evidence this matters for COVID-19.

    __________

    Paper title: “Comparative genetic analysis of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2) receptor ACE2 in different populations.” Authors: Yanan Cao, Lin Li, Zhimin Feng, Shengqing Wan, Peide Huang, Xiaohui Sun, Fang Wen, Xuanlin Huang, Guang Ning & Weiqing Wang. Published: 24 February 2020, with journal Cell Discovery.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-0147-1

  175. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    It’s probably better if the teacher does not speak the student’s native language. Because if they did then it will be the native language that gets spoken and not the language being taught. A child learns his first language by being immersed in it and this is the best way to teach second and third languages as well.

  176. @Ma Laoshi
    So far, I've lucked out in that both of my classes are graduate courses with < 10 students. So it was easy enough to set up a group call on WeChat (the "Chinese Skype"). In situations where an Old School guy like me would normally hop over to the blackboard, I can write something on a sheet of paper, snap it with my cellphone, and voila, they have it as well. This last part you could do a bit more high-tech on a laptop/tablet with pen input, through a "share screen" option. Or with simple things like f(x) = \int_a^x g(y) dy , just type it into the chat window. Anything more elaborate, and you could prepare say a .ppt in advance and send it to them; or just as likely you can find existing materials online and copy-paste the link to the class. People with bigger classes to teach use "real" online-teaching software like YukeTang, with which I have no experience so far; but you often need to sign up for it separately and it all goes tits up when their server crashes. So I'd guess it's not a magic solution either.

    So it's a pretty basic operation I'm running so far, doesn't make it the equal of professionally produced online-course videos you can easily find in both EN and CN. But I'm around to hear their questions, to elaborate on the points I see they need my help with; that's how I'm earning my keep I think, and that interactivity is also what makes it worth doing for me.

    At the end of the day, the bottleneck is not the tech but their command of the English language. But I'm not completely going to smooth that out for them: no pain, no gain when you study with Teacher Ma, they'd better get used to it. :-)

    Thanks much for that response, Ma. It sounds as if you’re dedicated and resourceful.

    I was wondering about the software because of course you need to use stuff that will run in the PRC. As I mentioned above, Zoom has really taken off (so to speak; sorry) here in HK. Daughter C has been using it regularly for schoolwork, and I’ve been running a church group on it as well. It’s pretty slick. One of its best features is that it makes screen sharing extremely easy; you can put up a slide presentation, play a video, whatever, and the other side gets it loud and clear.

    I’ve been interested for some years in online ‘presence’ and the effects it has on different forms of online communication, especially in education. This topic is getting a serious workout these days.

  177. Anon[324] • Disclaimer says:
    @Foreign Expert
    This only applies to self employed people mostly. In Japan if you are salaried your taxes are done by your employer. If you have a special case you can file an amendment.

    This only applies to self employed people mostly. In Japan if you are salaried your taxes are done by your employer. If you have a special case you can file an amendment.

    True. I previously worked for a small company and then a zaibatsu. I never dealt with taxes then, but for the small company I had to use the city for health insurance, but the zaibatsu employee “union” handled that company’s insurance, and even had a full-blown hospital in Tokyo.

  178. @LondonBob
    Were they elderly ethnic Italians already in hospital for treatment though?

    My Aunt is in hospital with terminal cancer, the flu would kill her if she got it. Actually a little surprised the hospital did the last surgery, she hasn't long to live.

    I’m sorry for your trouble, I hope they are keeping her comfortable.

    • Thanks: LondonBob
  179. • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    So we can finally stop pretending that Harvard is a good school!
  180. @Anon

    Devout Christianity nowadays is actually a marker for competence and seriousness.
     
    Seriously. And if I were in the market for a wife, religion is the best signal for avoiding hidden extreme feminism or SJWism:

    Correlation, per major meta study from last year:

    Religious: 0.91
    MAGA hat: 0.89
    Lack of tattoos: 0.85
    Virgin: 0.82
    Zero Student Load Debt: 0.79
    STEM major: 0.75

    Correlation to what?

  181. Japan Closes All Schools for Month of March

    Japanese students can ‘afford it’. The US should close all public schools…forever.

  182. @Harry Baldwin
    Teen pregnancy in Japan? I thought the Japanese have pretty much given up on pregnancy altogether.

    -Teen pregnancy in Japan?

    Doing my best over here.

  183. anonymous[767] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    "For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another..."

    I did not realize that providing factual information constitutes "tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another". Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.

    Let’s see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no.

    Would there be any difference in outcome in the United States, temporary or permanent, between the United States letting in 10,000,000 Pakistani Muslims and 10,000,000 English Anglicans in a single month?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Let’s see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no."

    LOL, thanks for creating a question that is utterly unrealistic and lacks proper context and background. First, the U.S. has never let in 10,000,000 immigrants in a single month, and especially from one particular place. Second, what dramatic turn of events led to this phenomenon? Third, what American leader in their right mind to agree to this extraordinary number. Fourth, you are leaving out pertinent information, like level of education, political involvement, and social standing, that would typify each group.

    Now, I would venture to say that in your mind there is only one response that you would accept. Of course, you could surprise us and be open minded about such matters. So, to be a sport, there would be no difference. The inclusion of both groups would lead to an undue burden to our current population and to our institutions. If they insist, I would say let us employ the logic of your pal, Vox Day--always sink the ships. Should we not protect our borders regardless if the immigrant is white/non-white or Christian-non-Christian?

    So, I answered the question honestly and openly. If you reject this response in any way, or question my motivation, fine. It makes no difference to me.
  184. @Anonymous
    I CLAIM THIS VIRUS COULD BE DELIBERATELY AIRDROPPED OR SPREAD WITH SPRAYERS LIKE A PESTICIDE THROUGHOUT PHOENIX AZ WITHOUT CAUSING ANYTHING MORE THAN COLD SYMPTOMS IN SOME OF THE NON ASIAN POPULATION (AND ISOLATED CASES SOME SEVERE IN THE ASIAN POPULATION).

    Lack of Asians on the ground plus low humidity and good medical hygiene says I'm right.

    OTOH doing the same thing in say Hanoi Vietnam would cause a disaster.

    You’re overstating the case here. It’s true that white people typically seem to get milder cases of this than Asians but they are not immune. White people are gonna die too. It’s also true that the disease seems to vary widely in its impact (and not totally by race or age although those are strongly correlating factors) – some people develop few if any symptoms and others die. As the disease is studied further perhaps we will develop a better understanding of why the severity of the disease seems to vary so greatly among individuals, what climates it thrives in, and so on. But for now these things are still poorly understood and it’s wise to be cautious and to try to contain it.

    The trick is not to make the “cure” worse than the disease. In those who die, it is the overreaction of their own body’s immune system that kills them, not the disease itself. We have to be sure that we don’t overreact to the disease in a way that kills the world economy worse than if we allowed the epidemic to run its course. Probably it will runs its course one way or the other, but if we overreact there is going to be a lot of unnecessary economic damage. Aside from all the trips not taken, etc. Congressional Democrats are already foaming at the mouth as to how many billions of government $ we can waste on this – Democrats never met a spending program that they didn’t like. Let’s spend $4 billion – no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Democrats never met a spending program that they didn’t like. Let’s spend $4 billion – no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.
     
    It is not that most people are worried about this virus.

    The problem is that even though there may not really be anything that can be done that will be effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, individuals and companies are terrified of being seen as incompetent or worse, negligent and these days every one has risk managers and emergency management systems full of people who are terrified for their jobs, or that they may be sued if they don't follow the "official recommendations", even if those recommendations are actually worthless.

    This is particularly the case in institutions like nursing homes, hospitals, and prisons that may contain vulnerable populations with litigious family members. It doesn't matter that they were going to die pretty soon anyway from old age or infirmity, not with ambulance-chasing lawyers everywhere trying to earn an honest crust.

    "Did you family member die of the deadly Corona virus in a nursing home? You may be eligible for compensation. Call Sue, Grabbitt and Runne NOW for your FREE consulation!"

    This is why it is important to have the CDC issue sensible precautions for vulnerable populations that everyone can follow so that they can say they are "in compliance" with best practices.

    Best practices would include not needlessly exposing vulnerable people like the elderly or those with respiratory diseases to people who are sick, and keeping the people who are sick away from activities in communal settings.

    Whether this will include mass distribution of billions face masks, which will make someone somewhere a lot of money, remains to be seen.

    What is less likely is that hospitals will be required to build large numbers of expensive new "positive pressure" rooms whose air conditioner systems vent to the outside of the type used to isolate TB patients on respiratory precautions.

    Anyway, I predict that life will go on, except when it doesn't.

    , @OFWHAP

    Aside from all the trips not taken, etc.
     
    While doing my daily social media perusing, I noticed that my friends do not seem to be canceling their travel plans yet.
  185. @reiner Tor
    She was a young semi-professional soccer player, so theoretically without any chronic conditions.

    It’s Iran, but did she vape? Vaping leads to pulmonary malfunction and the presence of mold.

  186. @Hail

    50 years of common flu.
     
    So far killing 1% of those who get it outside China and Iran.

    A bad flu season will kill a bit over 0.1% of those who get it, so that's more like 8–10 years of the common flu crammed into one year. COVID19 as super-flu.

    (Re: Iran. Something is out-of-whack with Iran's numbers; they must have a lot more cases than they have confirmed. Going by the WHO's numbers, based on Iranian authorities' reports, they have a death rate of 16%.)

    Could it be the arab water pipe? Shisha? It’s effect is similar or worse than vaping.

  187. Don’t the Japanese go to school on Saturdays and until 7pm or something crazy like that? Even with this, they probably have less vacation than the typical American student.

    If you ask me, the Japanese could use less school and more socialization.

  188. anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    You’re overstating the case here. It’s true that white people typically seem to get milder cases of this than Asians but they are not immune. White people are gonna die too.

    The planet is overpopulated. Administrating population growth is out of the question in a democracy. The most efficient, and quite frankly, greenest choice is the development of a supercharged virus, with a predisposition of eradicating the low IQ population, as well as a chunk of the Chinese population. Aimless existence is expensive, whether it’s the tribe, or the population of the planet. If you’re Chinese, you know something needs to happen. White people dying as statistical outliers is the “cost of doing business.”

    China has a significant financial interest in the black population being purged in Africa. They could also use some more culling in their own country. It’s in their best interests not to kill off the white folks. Their population growth is the least robust, while offering civilization the most “bang for the buck.”

    Machiavellian as it is, for the Chinese, a virus prejudicial towards all but white people isn’t a bad plan for their long term interests, looking decades ahead, as the Chinese do.

  189. @Anonymous
    And just a few months ago in October 2019, there was a coronavirus pandemic simulation (basically a war game) held in New York City with public health experts from around the world, but with China uninvited.

    And just a few months ago in October 2019, there was a coronavirus pandemic simulation (basically a war game) held in New York City with public health experts from around the world, but with China uninvited.

    It was called Event 201, it was held at Johns Hopkins (in Baltimore, not NYC) and China was very much invited. Their chief representative was Dr. George Fu Gao. From his conference bio:

    Professor George F. Gao is the Director-General, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; a Professor in the Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; President of the Chinese Society of Biotechnology; and President of the Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB).

    http://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/event201/players/gao.html

  190. @Lagertha
    And, like, holycrap, last year, 60,000 people died of the flu in the USA. Most of the Corona deaths in China, Korea, Japan, Italy are of seniors.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500's is creepy in itself.

    *will elaborate at some distant date as to why April is a dreaded month.

    From T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land:

    I. The Burial of the Dead

    April is the cruellest month, breeding
    Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    Memory and desire, stirring
    Dull roots with spring rain.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    From T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land:
     
    Alright, Gerth, come back with something from the Kalevala.
  191. @R.G. Camara
    There's a difference between a mono-culture and a multi-culture, such as ours, in disasters. Witness the Japanese in Fukashima, or the Han Chinese now. Plus the latter is a police state.

    Ours has too much diversity. Think LA riots. Think Katrina.

    Singapore is not a monoculture. We have significant minorities here, 30% muslims (malays and arabs), 10% indians (majority tamils).

    Most successful multi-cultural nation in the world. I always joke that there are only two successful stable multicultural nations in the world, ourselves and the swiss. And the swiss are multicultural because they have french, germans, and italians.

    Most people are too stupid to get the joke.

  192. @Jack D
    You're overstating the case here. It's true that white people typically seem to get milder cases of this than Asians but they are not immune. White people are gonna die too. It's also true that the disease seems to vary widely in its impact (and not totally by race or age although those are strongly correlating factors) - some people develop few if any symptoms and others die. As the disease is studied further perhaps we will develop a better understanding of why the severity of the disease seems to vary so greatly among individuals, what climates it thrives in, and so on. But for now these things are still poorly understood and it's wise to be cautious and to try to contain it.

    The trick is not to make the "cure" worse than the disease. In those who die, it is the overreaction of their own body's immune system that kills them, not the disease itself. We have to be sure that we don't overreact to the disease in a way that kills the world economy worse than if we allowed the epidemic to run its course. Probably it will runs its course one way or the other, but if we overreact there is going to be a lot of unnecessary economic damage. Aside from all the trips not taken, etc. Congressional Democrats are already foaming at the mouth as to how many billions of government $ we can waste on this - Democrats never met a spending program that they didn't like. Let's spend $4 billion - no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.

    Democrats never met a spending program that they didn’t like. Let’s spend $4 billion – no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.

    It is not that most people are worried about this virus.

    The problem is that even though there may not really be anything that can be done that will be effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, individuals and companies are terrified of being seen as incompetent or worse, negligent and these days every one has risk managers and emergency management systems full of people who are terrified for their jobs, or that they may be sued if they don’t follow the “official recommendations”, even if those recommendations are actually worthless.

    This is particularly the case in institutions like nursing homes, hospitals, and prisons that may contain vulnerable populations with litigious family members. It doesn’t matter that they were going to die pretty soon anyway from old age or infirmity, not with ambulance-chasing lawyers everywhere trying to earn an honest crust.

    “Did you family member die of the deadly Corona virus in a nursing home? You may be eligible for compensation. Call Sue, Grabbitt and Runne NOW for your FREE consulation!”

    This is why it is important to have the CDC issue sensible precautions for vulnerable populations that everyone can follow so that they can say they are “in compliance” with best practices.

    Best practices would include not needlessly exposing vulnerable people like the elderly or those with respiratory diseases to people who are sick, and keeping the people who are sick away from activities in communal settings.

    Whether this will include mass distribution of billions face masks, which will make someone somewhere a lot of money, remains to be seen.

    What is less likely is that hospitals will be required to build large numbers of expensive new “positive pressure” rooms whose air conditioner systems vent to the outside of the type used to isolate TB patients on respiratory precautions.

    Anyway, I predict that life will go on, except when it doesn’t.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    The problem is that even though there may not really be anything that can be done that will be effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, individuals and companies are terrified of being seen as incompetent or worse, negligent and these days every one has risk managers and emergency management systems full of people who are terrified for their jobs, or that they may be sued if they don’t follow the “official recommendations”, even if those recommendations are actually worthless.

    This is particularly the case in institutions like nursing homes, hospitals, and prisons that may contain vulnerable populations with litigious family members.
     

    This is a very good insight; thanks. We're seeing lots of evidence of this attitude/fear in HK right now, as employers fall over themselves to come up with and implement 'safety' measures that are extremely troublesome, but that may not really do much good.

    There are strong parallels to the establishment of the TSA and other air travel 'security' procedures.

  193. @eah
    But for more outgoing and productive human beings, this sounds massive.

    This kids who'll get to stay home probably won't see it that way (although in Japan you never know).

    Granted, my lifestyle largely consists of stumbling from my bed into my walk-in closet where my desk is, so I’m fairly prepped for The New Reclusehood.

    Imagine, if you will, an insipid remark, perhaps a lame attempt at humor, about a viral illness that has, apparently, already sickened a very large number of people, killing some, one that seems to be spreading around the world, a development which will, perhaps, eventually result in a huge number of additional victims, and many more deaths.

    Steve Sailer: "Hold my beer."

    The insipid remark was all the Ivy league grads and at-least-genius magnates and deep staters who all said, in unison, for decades, “let’s open all the borders while we’re historically overdue for a pandemic.” When they’re dead (or cowering in guarded and walled tropical dacha) we’ll “say any damn thing [we] want.”

  194. @Polynikes
    It varies. I know people who have taught esl. In most cases these are extra curricular classes taught at their parents expense—so rich or middle class kids. They range from courses where every kid has spent time in an English speaking country already (this would include even elementary level kids) who speak English better than your average American student to those kids who have been taught the basics of English by a non native speaker (every kid in Asia) and now want to pay to learn real English from a native speaker.

    Every kid in Asia?

    Pls don’t overgeneralise. Students in Singapore, regardless of ethnicity, generally speak better English than so-called native speakers.

    A lot of the comments really reveals the provincial ignorance of the readers here.

  195. Anon[242] • Disclaimer says:

    We are finally beginning to get some useful data on the true mortality rate of Covid-19 from South Korea. Everyone knows that China is fudging its data, and that Iran has lousy medical care and isn’t testing anywhere the number that needs to be tested.

    South Korea, by contrast, has a better medical system than either country, and they’ve been testing everyone they can get their hands on. As of today, their death rate is 0.5%. That number is closer to the death rate from regular flu. Granted, it’s still early in the Korean epidemic, but papers from the Chinese epidemic indicate that the majority of those who die from Covid-19 die in the first week of the illness, so a few more days should settle the true mortality rate problem–minus preexisting conditions.

    • Replies: @Lot
    SK infections may have a younger and healthier profile though because of the strange practices of the church linked to most cases.

    IOW a young healthy person who normally would not be infected did so in SK because of repeated close exposures.
  196. @Anon
    We are finally beginning to get some useful data on the true mortality rate of Covid-19 from South Korea. Everyone knows that China is fudging its data, and that Iran has lousy medical care and isn't testing anywhere the number that needs to be tested.

    South Korea, by contrast, has a better medical system than either country, and they've been testing everyone they can get their hands on. As of today, their death rate is 0.5%. That number is closer to the death rate from regular flu. Granted, it's still early in the Korean epidemic, but papers from the Chinese epidemic indicate that the majority of those who die from Covid-19 die in the first week of the illness, so a few more days should settle the true mortality rate problem--minus preexisting conditions.

    SK infections may have a younger and healthier profile though because of the strange practices of the church linked to most cases.

    IOW a young healthy person who normally would not be infected did so in SK because of repeated close exposures.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Covid-19 mortality (like flu) seems to be strongly correlated with age. According to the Chinese numbers (and they would have no particular reason to lie about age distribution) patients over the age of 80 had a 14.9 percent chance of dying after being infected, while those in their 70s were found to have an 8 percent chance of death. Patients in their 50s were about three times more likely to die than patients in their 40s, at a rate of 1.3 percent and patients ages 10 to 19 were as likely to die as patients in their 30s, at just 0.2 percent. So if those infected in SK skewed young then their average mortality would be lower than the general population.

    That being said, most older people in China would have led a very hard life due to the massive disruptions caused by the Japanese and then by the Communists (not to mention that most were poor peasants to begin with) - Chinese old people look 10 or 15 years older than their American equivalents. People are like cars - you can't just go by age you also have to go by mileage and older Chinese have a LOT of mileage on the clock from having often lived a very hard life of manual labor, poor nutrition and lack of medical care. Not to mention that health care in Wuhan seems to have broken down in the early days of the epidemic and people were left to die in the street, so 15% mortality is probably higher than you would expect in a place with advanced medical care, even for the elderly.
  197. @Lagertha
    the best signals: daughter of married parents; daughter who loves her parents; daughter who has multiple friends and relations who like her (dogs & cats don't count, but are sort of a plus); daughter who knows she is in charge of her own happiness - this is too complicated to explain, but it is a must for young men today. Women who can deal with hardship or sudden changes; a woman who is essentially, able to be a warrior/provider if the husband/partner is ill or incapacitated.

    I often told my sons that they should marry a woman who they would have no doubt, that she would carry him across a stream/frozen lake (very GOT) if he were incapacitated. I admit that I am a dark person but I felt that my baby boys need women who truly would die for them. I'll let you all know if my dreams come true!

    Here's a little Corona Break! https://youtu.be/_CI7Fo4p0v8

    I’m always struck at how much conservatives baby their sons.

  198. @reiner Tor
    She was a young semi-professional soccer player, so theoretically without any chronic conditions.

    It’s Iran. There’s a good shot “she” was a dude whacked to his eyeballs on cross sex hormones.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Have you looked at her photo? Didn't look masculine at all. Not a dude.

    https://gdb.rferl.org/C4BE7C76-3A1F-4021-A57E-3D279896ACC0_cx10_cy20_cw88_w650_r1_s.jpg
  199. @Lot
    SK infections may have a younger and healthier profile though because of the strange practices of the church linked to most cases.

    IOW a young healthy person who normally would not be infected did so in SK because of repeated close exposures.

    Covid-19 mortality (like flu) seems to be strongly correlated with age. According to the Chinese numbers (and they would have no particular reason to lie about age distribution) patients over the age of 80 had a 14.9 percent chance of dying after being infected, while those in their 70s were found to have an 8 percent chance of death. Patients in their 50s were about three times more likely to die than patients in their 40s, at a rate of 1.3 percent and patients ages 10 to 19 were as likely to die as patients in their 30s, at just 0.2 percent. So if those infected in SK skewed young then their average mortality would be lower than the general population.

    That being said, most older people in China would have led a very hard life due to the massive disruptions caused by the Japanese and then by the Communists (not to mention that most were poor peasants to begin with) – Chinese old people look 10 or 15 years older than their American equivalents. People are like cars – you can’t just go by age you also have to go by mileage and older Chinese have a LOT of mileage on the clock from having often lived a very hard life of manual labor, poor nutrition and lack of medical care. Not to mention that health care in Wuhan seems to have broken down in the early days of the epidemic and people were left to die in the street, so 15% mortality is probably higher than you would expect in a place with advanced medical care, even for the elderly.

  200. @anon
    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it, and half the country gets it, that's 3 million people. 50 years of common flu.

    I like how you phrased it; let’s deconstruct your statement.

    If this virus kills 2% of those who get it

    We have no data on how many people will die once hospitalized in the United States, where we have the most advanced care in the world. We don’t know how much COVID-19 will overlap with weakened individuals who would also die if they got one of the regular flu strains. Speculation is always dangerous, but I’d guess the fatality rate would be less in the US.

    AND half the country gets it

    In a typical year, the strains of influenza that come into the country from Southeast Asia (because that’s where the flu comes from every year) infect about one-eigth of the population, and that’s without any efforts of any kind to constrain it by quarantine, school and event cessation, etc. OTOH, there is a flu shot, which must be reformulated every year, and is only partially effective in the best of years; still better than nothing and there is no COVID-19 shot.
    As far as I know, there is no estimate of whether COVID-19 is more or less transmissible than the many flu strains.

    That’s 3 million people.

    Here’s what the Center for Disease Control says, as of twenty minutes ago:

    …there have been 53 cases within the United States. No deaths have been reported in the United States.

    Currently, COVID-19 is not recognized to be spreading in U.S. communities…

    In the United States, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and their collaborators are working on development of candidate vaccines and therapeutics for COVID-19. In China, multiple clinical trials of investigational therapeutics have been implemented, including two clinical trials of remdesivir, an investigational antiviral drug.§§ An NIH randomized controlled clinical trial of investigational therapeutics for hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the United States was approved by the Food and Drug Administration; the first investigational therapeutic to be studied is remdesivir.¶¶ In the absence of a vaccine or therapeutic, community mitigation measures are the primary method to respond to widespread transmission and supportive care is the current medical treatment.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6908e1.htm

  201. @R.G. Camara
    It's not a question of "if", is a question of "when" here in the U.S.

    You should assume your region will have an outbreak and a quarantine, if you live anywhere near a large or mid-size city. With a city of 100,000 people or more, you can bet it will hit at some time.

    This will cause diversity panic. Store shelves will clear, looters will try their luck, good people will live in fear as the police take longer and longer to respond.

    Get some rice, beans, water, and meds, keep your gas cans filled, and be prepared to flee to the suburbs and beyond when it does.

    “With a city of 100,000 people or more, you can bet it will hit at some time.

    This will cause diversity panic. Store shelves will clear, looters will try their luck, good people will live in fear as the police take longer and longer to respond.”

    LMAO. Um, no. My city’s population is about 165,000. Shelves will stay full, looters will stay home and stare at they sailfoams. Idiots might live in fear, but they do that anyway. Other than making jokes, nobody talks about the kung flu. Stop talking like a ninny – it is unmanly.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Denial ain't a river in Egypt there, little girl:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCXj8cLhkBg
  202. @Anon
    We know nothing about her medical history. She could have gotten sick from something else right before Covid-19 hit her. Having 2 illnesses at once is very risky even in the young and apparently healthy. Or she may have been one of the unlucky ones who had a cytokine storm. I have read that cytokine storms have a genetic basis. It's one of those things where you have two copies of a gene or one, and there's a bad outcome if you have the wrong set of genes.

    If I had to guess, I would bet on cytokine storm. The ironic thing about cytokine storms is that the younger and healthier you are, the stronger your immune system is. So when your immune system misfires and decides to go after your own body, it has the strength to kill you. Cytokine storms ESPECIALLY kill young healthy individuals like top athletes. Luckily most young healthy people do not develop cytokine storms as a result of viral infections but when they do, it’s very grim. Probably what killed her was not the fact that she was smoking shishas on the down low or was really a dude on hormones or other nonsense that people are speculating about (entirely out of their imagination and perhaps fantasy projection) but the very fact that she was young and fit.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Also genetic predisposition with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), often referred to as macrophage activation syndrome.

    https://www.uab.edu/reporter/know-more/publications/item/8909-here-s-a-playbook-for-stopping-deadly-cytokine-storm-syndrome

    “Unfortunately, “there are a lot of triggers for this,” Cron said. “In addition to rheumatic diseases, such as juvenile arthritis and lupus, certain types of blood cancers, like leukemias and lymphomas,” can cause cytokine storm syndrome, he said. “And there are a whole slew of infections that can do this, including the herpes virus family (including the bug that causes mono and CMV), Ebola, dengue — there are 80 to 100 bugs that have been associated with it in case reports.” Also reported, although less common, are cases of cytokine storm syndrome in patients with rare metabolic disorders and in patients who go on heart-lung bypass machines such as ECMO.”


    One of the first lines of defense when a cytokine storm is suspected is to administer anti-rheumatic: anakinra.
  203. @Anon
    I came across a very oddball and suspicious fact about Chinese health. After reading a Covid-19 study in China, which labelled a patient death with tuberculosis as a co-factor, I wondered what their tuberculosis rate actually is.

    Well, it turns out it's high.

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-china/

    "In 2014 there were an estimated 930,000 new cases of TB in China, and an estimated 120,000 cases of pulmonary MDR TB. Overall China has 10% of the global burden of TB with 400 million people having latent TB."

    "A total of approximately 900,000 new cases of TB are reported annually."

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.

    From Wiki: "Latent tuberculosis is when a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not have active tuberculosis. The main risk is that approximately 10% of these people (5% in the first two years after infection and 0.1% per year thereafter) will go on to develop active tuberculosis. This is particularly true, and there is added risk, in particular situations such as medication that suppresses the immune system or advancing age."

    The site I quote says 400 million people in China have latent TB, but Wiki says 10% of these people will go on to develop active TB. 10% of 400 million is 40 million.

    The math says 40 million Chinese have active TB, and their air is polluted, and half their men smoke. No wonder they're dying from Covid-19. They have lot of people with preexisting lung disease.

    In the study I read, the dead patient was labelled as having 'chronic pulmonary disease,' which they explained was from tuberculosis. Okay. This may be Chinese communist covering-up via nicer sounding labels, but how many patients with 'chronic pulmonary disease in these studies' are actually tuberculosis patients?

    If 1/3rd of China has latent tuberculosis, that means 1/3rd of Wuhan should. City is 10 million, so that's around 3.3 million cases of latent tuberculosis.

    Which means, if 10% that has become active with time, in older people and in those with weak immune systems, Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.

    If that many people have serious pre-existing TB, we may have just explained China's higher death rate. No wonder the Chinese are being dodgy about all the pre-existing medical conditions in their patients.

    I heard the Chinese government has order a lot of mobile incinerators for all the dead bodies. They may need to.

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.

    Quote from the website:

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-india/

    It is estimated that about 40% of the Indian population is infected with TB bacteria, the vast majority of whom have latent TB rather than TB disease.

    That would suggest that over 500m Indians have latent TB. It will be interesting to see if the coronavirus makes significant headway in India.

  204. @Anon
    Last night I discovered that 4 of my elderly relatives became sick this week. They all live in the Midwest in the same college town and are recovering, but it's weird that they all got sick together at the same time. This is the first time it's ever happened. One volunteers to work with the poor during tax season, so that may have been the route of infection. Fortunately, the fifth relative who lives there and works in a hospital isn't sick. One of those relatives had symptoms exactly like stomach flu, with fever, vomiting and diarrhea. The other three had milder symptoms of the head-cold type. It seems too early to be Covid-19 there, but if the normal seasonal flu is becoming more virulent right now, it's lousy timing.

    It seems like we have some crazy strains of streptococcus going around as well.

  205. @Hail

    50 years of common flu.
     
    So far killing 1% of those who get it outside China and Iran.

    A bad flu season will kill a bit over 0.1% of those who get it, so that's more like 8–10 years of the common flu crammed into one year. COVID19 as super-flu.

    (Re: Iran. Something is out-of-whack with Iran's numbers; they must have a lot more cases than they have confirmed. Going by the WHO's numbers, based on Iranian authorities' reports, they have a death rate of 16%.)

    But the estimated R0 (contagiousness) is perhaps double the common flu. This has exponential effect on total number infected.

    https://www.vox.com/2020/2/20/21143785/coronavirus-covid-19-spread-transmission-how (pardon the source; referring to infographic “How contagious is a disease?”)

  206. @Lagertha

    Perhaps the truth I bring to the table is inconvenient for you, but it is necessary.
     
    In your wet dreams - or, seriously, in your obnoxious, self-righteous, narcissistic dreams.

    You have no self awareness how tedious you are!, hahhaaaa! No one here, wants to go to your Principal's Office and be lectured about wrongthink! I guess you are too young to understand the phrase, "you can't teach an old dog new tricks."

    Your home-schooling-like-scolding and shushing is truly revolting & vomitous. If you are female, ok....I get it...if you are male, heaven help you. No one cares about you; and, you spend way too much time here, that people (outside of iSteve) who may have cared about you, probably think there is something lacking in your priorities. Get a life.

    Given your temper tantrum, it is suffice to say that the truth and levity I bring bothers your conscience greatly.

  207. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    If I had to guess, I would bet on cytokine storm. The ironic thing about cytokine storms is that the younger and healthier you are, the stronger your immune system is. So when your immune system misfires and decides to go after your own body, it has the strength to kill you. Cytokine storms ESPECIALLY kill young healthy individuals like top athletes. Luckily most young healthy people do not develop cytokine storms as a result of viral infections but when they do, it's very grim. Probably what killed her was not the fact that she was smoking shishas on the down low or was really a dude on hormones or other nonsense that people are speculating about (entirely out of their imagination and perhaps fantasy projection) but the very fact that she was young and fit.

    Also genetic predisposition with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), often referred to as macrophage activation syndrome.

    https://www.uab.edu/reporter/know-more/publications/item/8909-here-s-a-playbook-for-stopping-deadly-cytokine-storm-syndrome

    “Unfortunately, “there are a lot of triggers for this,” Cron said. “In addition to rheumatic diseases, such as juvenile arthritis and lupus, certain types of blood cancers, like leukemias and lymphomas,” can cause cytokine storm syndrome, he said. “And there are a whole slew of infections that can do this, including the herpes virus family (including the bug that causes mono and CMV), Ebola, dengue — there are 80 to 100 bugs that have been associated with it in case reports.” Also reported, although less common, are cases of cytokine storm syndrome in patients with rare metabolic disorders and in patients who go on heart-lung bypass machines such as ECMO.”

    One of the first lines of defense when a cytokine storm is suspected is to administer anti-rheumatic: anakinra.

  208. WHO say there is no evidence for children transmitting, indeed children seem unaffected, so children as the traditional transmitters of flu is not the case here. WHO says China’s numbers add up, that their unprecedented methods have worked, what are the chances of us implementing similar?

  209. @anonymous
    Let's see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no.

    Would there be any difference in outcome in the United States, temporary or permanent, between the United States letting in 10,000,000 Pakistani Muslims and 10,000,000 English Anglicans in a single month?

    “Let’s see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no.”

    LOL, thanks for creating a question that is utterly unrealistic and lacks proper context and background. First, the U.S. has never let in 10,000,000 immigrants in a single month, and especially from one particular place. Second, what dramatic turn of events led to this phenomenon? Third, what American leader in their right mind to agree to this extraordinary number. Fourth, you are leaving out pertinent information, like level of education, political involvement, and social standing, that would typify each group.

    Now, I would venture to say that in your mind there is only one response that you would accept. Of course, you could surprise us and be open minded about such matters. So, to be a sport, there would be no difference. The inclusion of both groups would lead to an undue burden to our current population and to our institutions. If they insist, I would say let us employ the logic of your pal, Vox Day–always sink the ships. Should we not protect our borders regardless if the immigrant is white/non-white or Christian-non-Christian?

    So, I answered the question honestly and openly. If you reject this response in any way, or question my motivation, fine. It makes no difference to me.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The answer is yes and you know it. Everyone knows it.

    If you were more concerned with being honest than with being a goodwhite, then you would have answered directly and then explained why the differences aren’t that important over the long run (not that I agree with this!) or something similar.

    Obviously, you are a dishonest person who wants to promote the fantasy that culture doesn’t matter. That all people will behave the same once they emigrate to America. Very few here are buying it, yet, looking at the responses you get, many don’t block you out. Both their behavior and your own are weird.
    , @Alden
    “ America .....let in immigrants”? What world do you live in?? Some immigrants such as Silicon Valley and Redmond Wa tech workers, medical workers and students are legally “let in” with visas.

    More immigrants arrive illegally than legally and we’re not “ let in”.
  210. @anon
    Trump had better hope he gets lucky on the spread of this virus in North America or it could take him down. Worse than the Bernie virus.

    Bill in Glendale

    “Bill in Glendale”

    The same “Bill” who was a frequent guest on Phil Hendrie’s radio show?

    • Replies: @anon
    No, I listened to Art Bell a few times just to listen to the crazies.
  211. @Anonymous
    Very frustrating to keep hearing media claim Italian virus cases are evidence of spread to European populations. But actually it's evidence of spread to Chinese diaspora.

    Info on Chinese workers in Italy is readily available:

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Italy+Chinese+workers&t=h_&ia=web

    Many provocative links on this page. The workers have flooded in. Assume tons of illegals.

    In 2020 the numbers might be ~500,000 (illegal #s unknown) ...one half million is a % about the equivalent of 3+ million in the USA.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_people_in_Italy

    The media is a giant fog machine!

    People much prefer (and will pay higher prices for) a suit or a pair of shoes or a handbag that is marked “Made in Italy” than one that is marked “Made in China”. The former is synonymous with high quality craftsmanship and style. The latter is synonymous with cheap junk.

    However, young people in Italy (to the extent that there even are young people (the Italian birth rate of 1.35 births per woman is among the lowest in the world and of course way below replacement level) do not want to pursue the needle trades. The solution is to bring in Chinese. The same handbag stitched together by the same Chinese worker might be worth 10x more in the market if it is stitched together in Florence instead of Shenzen.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    So true. Was it you that pointed out that the Amish quilts for sale in Lancaster County, PA are often stitched by Southeast Asians who might maybe be resident there?
  212. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1233265579764670465

    “Community spread” in my neck of the woods. Good thing my job requires me to be a recluse.

  213. @CJ
    From T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land:

    I. The Burial of the Dead

    April is the cruellest month, breeding
    Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    Memory and desire, stirring
    Dull roots with spring rain.
     

    From T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land:

    Alright, Gerth, come back with something from the Kalevala.

  214. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/michaelshermer/status/1230964923598954501

    So we can finally stop pretending that Harvard is a good school!

  215. @Anon
    I came across a very oddball and suspicious fact about Chinese health. After reading a Covid-19 study in China, which labelled a patient death with tuberculosis as a co-factor, I wondered what their tuberculosis rate actually is.

    Well, it turns out it's high.

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-china/

    "In 2014 there were an estimated 930,000 new cases of TB in China, and an estimated 120,000 cases of pulmonary MDR TB. Overall China has 10% of the global burden of TB with 400 million people having latent TB."

    "A total of approximately 900,000 new cases of TB are reported annually."

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.

    From Wiki: "Latent tuberculosis is when a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not have active tuberculosis. The main risk is that approximately 10% of these people (5% in the first two years after infection and 0.1% per year thereafter) will go on to develop active tuberculosis. This is particularly true, and there is added risk, in particular situations such as medication that suppresses the immune system or advancing age."

    The site I quote says 400 million people in China have latent TB, but Wiki says 10% of these people will go on to develop active TB. 10% of 400 million is 40 million.

    The math says 40 million Chinese have active TB, and their air is polluted, and half their men smoke. No wonder they're dying from Covid-19. They have lot of people with preexisting lung disease.

    In the study I read, the dead patient was labelled as having 'chronic pulmonary disease,' which they explained was from tuberculosis. Okay. This may be Chinese communist covering-up via nicer sounding labels, but how many patients with 'chronic pulmonary disease in these studies' are actually tuberculosis patients?

    If 1/3rd of China has latent tuberculosis, that means 1/3rd of Wuhan should. City is 10 million, so that's around 3.3 million cases of latent tuberculosis.

    Which means, if 10% that has become active with time, in older people and in those with weak immune systems, Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.

    If that many people have serious pre-existing TB, we may have just explained China's higher death rate. No wonder the Chinese are being dodgy about all the pre-existing medical conditions in their patients.

    I heard the Chinese government has order a lot of mobile incinerators for all the dead bodies. They may need to.

    Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.

    Your number is based on a fallacy. This assumes that once you develop active TB they do nothing to treat it. I highly doubt this is the case. It’s true that 10% of latent cases eventually become active (and 90% never do) – 5% in the 1st year and then .1% per year thereafter. (Therefore if you have latent TB and don’t develop the disease in the 1st year after you are infected you only have a 1 in 1,000 chance of getting the disease in any future year – not an enormous risk). But once they become active and symptomatic, presumably most of them are put on antibiotics and cured within a few months.

    The accurate statement is that Wuhan has 330,000 people who have or once had active tuberculosis. (Actually more because some people go right to the active disease after becoming infected). Probably most of that number are people who once had it and have now been cured.

  216. @Lagertha
    And, like, holycrap, last year, 60,000 people died of the flu in the USA. Most of the Corona deaths in China, Korea, Japan, Italy are of seniors.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500's is creepy in itself.

    *will elaborate at some distant date as to why April is a dreaded month.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500’s is creepy in itself.

    A Finnish friend told me her uncle committed suicide in the spring, and she thought that odd. But a little research showed her spring was the worst season for suicides. She couldn’t understand why.

    I told her it was obvious. Everybody is miserable during the long, dark winter. (Helsinki– Hell-sinki– at the south end of the country, is roughly at Anchorage’s latitude.) Misery lives company, and the depressed are among psychic compatriots.

    But it brightens up in the spring. People are smiling. Now Mr Dyingly Sad is all alone, and it’s unbearable.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Hahaa! clever one, you are! I was told (in Finland) that old people have a tough time with the end of winter, when March arrives, thinking they have to start all over again (kind of like Groundhog Day) and get through all the months until Christmas (the Season of Light, and all) and, shucks....they just can't anymore! Maybe it's just the shear amount of family holidays and family drama, again, that drains them...

    I have, euthanized, or my dogs have expired in my arms - when I have been lucky- mostly in the spring. My parents died in the spring, as did most of my ancestors. I still dread April.

  217. @Mr McKenna
    For reasons known only to himself, Steve continues to approve instantly your tiresome, repetitious attempts at dividing white people from one another, while my far more considered ministrations languish in whimbo for days at a time. But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too, so perhaps it's all about stirring things up and creating activity at all costs. Knock yourself out!

    “But then, Tiny Duck seems to have an inside line too”

    I’m guessing Tiny Duck is a character from one of Steve’s pilot scripts. Sometimes the characters a writer creates become more real than the flesh and blood human asking you what you want for dinner. I’m also guessing Corvinus is far too ordinary to pop out of reclusive Steve’s character generator. The stuff that guy spouts is Moderate Liberal 101. Or maybe Corvinus is a caricature of the goodwhite liberal. In that case, kudos.

  218. @Jack D
    You're overstating the case here. It's true that white people typically seem to get milder cases of this than Asians but they are not immune. White people are gonna die too. It's also true that the disease seems to vary widely in its impact (and not totally by race or age although those are strongly correlating factors) - some people develop few if any symptoms and others die. As the disease is studied further perhaps we will develop a better understanding of why the severity of the disease seems to vary so greatly among individuals, what climates it thrives in, and so on. But for now these things are still poorly understood and it's wise to be cautious and to try to contain it.

    The trick is not to make the "cure" worse than the disease. In those who die, it is the overreaction of their own body's immune system that kills them, not the disease itself. We have to be sure that we don't overreact to the disease in a way that kills the world economy worse than if we allowed the epidemic to run its course. Probably it will runs its course one way or the other, but if we overreact there is going to be a lot of unnecessary economic damage. Aside from all the trips not taken, etc. Congressional Democrats are already foaming at the mouth as to how many billions of government $ we can waste on this - Democrats never met a spending program that they didn't like. Let's spend $4 billion - no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.

    Aside from all the trips not taken, etc.

    While doing my daily social media perusing, I noticed that my friends do not seem to be canceling their travel plans yet.

  219. @Paleo Liberal
    The stock market always overreacts to bad news. The best time to buy is after a major dip due to some bad news.

    The stock market didn’t react at all until a week ago.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    A week ago when news of the Coronavirus was spreading. Indeed, the stock market does overreact to such things. So, Mr. Sailer, do you think the Coronavirus is a hoax? To what extent should Americans be concerned about it and its spread? How much faith do you have in President Trump dealing with this issue?
  220. @Jack D
    People much prefer (and will pay higher prices for) a suit or a pair of shoes or a handbag that is marked "Made in Italy" than one that is marked "Made in China". The former is synonymous with high quality craftsmanship and style. The latter is synonymous with cheap junk.

    However, young people in Italy (to the extent that there even are young people (the Italian birth rate of 1.35 births per woman is among the lowest in the world and of course way below replacement level) do not want to pursue the needle trades. The solution is to bring in Chinese. The same handbag stitched together by the same Chinese worker might be worth 10x more in the market if it is stitched together in Florence instead of Shenzen.

    So true. Was it you that pointed out that the Amish quilts for sale in Lancaster County, PA are often stitched by Southeast Asians who might maybe be resident there?

  221. @MEH 0910
    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/02/27/obituaries/27xp-hashimoto-pix1/27xp-hashimoto-pix1-superJumbo.jpg

    OT:


    [MORE]

  222. @J.Ross
    Kneeling during the US national anthem is anti-racist, and kneeling during HaTikvah is racist.
    https://twitter.com/StopAntisemites/status/1231745608710590464

    Kneeling during the US national anthem is anti-racist, and kneeling during HaTikvah is racist.

    PREFACE: I am emphatically not Zionist and would be uncomfortable even setting foot in a synagogue that displayed the Zionist flag or sang HaTikvah. I oppose dual citizenship, and I do not dismiss as necessarily unreasonable the suspicion of dual loyalty.* But fair is fair.

    1.) I am not at all familiar with the “StopAntisemitism[.]org” organization that tweeted the message you posted. (As difficult as it may be for some here to believe, I do not keep-up with the various activist organizations that claim to represent world Jewry and fight antisemitism, and this is surely not the first one that I had never even heard of before.) Do you have any knowledge that they have expressed support for or view at all favorably kneeling during the US national anthem, or any other breach of respect toward any other expressions or symbols of US patriotism?

    2.) You are aware, surely, that there are a considerable number of right-leaning Zionist Jews in the U.S.? (I recall you citing Dennis Prager, and much as we would almost certainly be in accord in opposing any number of his positions, he most certainly does not appear at all sympathetic to the NBA kneelers; see here.) Yeshiva University, where the incident occurred, leans heavily to the Right (certainly as far as colleges go). I recall reading that a large percentage of the student body there, possibly even a majority, voted for Trump in 2016. However many Woke students they may also have, I’m sure they total well within a minority.

    3.) The facilities where YU and similar Jewish schools hold their games have American flags as well. I would be quite surprised if they didn’t sing the Star Spangled Banner.

    [MORE]

    4.)*Finally, an addendum to my preface:
    In fact, one of the many concerns raised by the rabbis who opposed Zionism (who, from its inception, formed a near-unanimous consensus of the foremost rabbinic authorities) was just this: that it would cause the loyalty of Jews everywhere to their host nations to be questioned.

    My response to the news that Bernie Sanders had snubbed AIPAC was to ask,

    What will the Israel-Firsters who until now opposed Trump do, should Bernie get the nomination? Will Never Trump! become Never Say Never!?

    Now I must run or I will be guilty of desecrating the Sabbath…

  223. @Lagertha
    And, like, holycrap, last year, 60,000 people died of the flu in the USA. Most of the Corona deaths in China, Korea, Japan, Italy are of seniors.

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500's is creepy in itself.

    *will elaborate at some distant date as to why April is a dreaded month.

    My recollection is that you are from a cold dreary place, at least in the long winter season. Just be glad every May then, that you are still alive and kicking.

    I agree with your take on the over-worrying about this virus, especially by those who can’t really do a lot about it, besides taking ordinary precautions. My one additional precaution now is to not be fooled by anyone offering me a case of Corona …

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Crazy and true: every time I felt like I had a sore throat; felt my nose being twitchy, or had an intense lack of energy, when I was in college, I would buy a sixer of beer and drink almost all of it - a yuge amount of carbs and alcohol at once! (Don't lecture me about alcohol, duh.)

    It helped to walk to my favorite frat house after studying - I did go to a serious Uni! hahaa! I went there to play pool (I am really, really good at it - learned as a child) and I always knew the guys wanted an excuse to play pool, adored girls who liked to drink beer and just shoot the shit. Frat guys were always ready to drink beer, play pool and gossip about their girl issues (I felt very lucky to be their confidant). Next day, I felt fine - no sign of dreaded cold/sore throat.

    My advice: everyone: buy a six of Corona, just in case, during the furious month of March! Get back to me if it worked for you! Also, up your intake of Vitamin C/fruit & veggies. Hand sanitizer! - wipes/wipe surfaces often. It helps to be ADHD & OCD.
  224. @Alfa158
    Can someone tell me how teaching a language even works if the teacher doesn’t speak the native language of the students?
    I was taught two more languages in addition to the two I grew up with as a child and in both cases the teachers spoke English. Are these people teaching English to Chinese students who have already gotten a little basic English, so they can communicate enough to their skills?

    It’s supposed to be better if the teacher just does total immersion.

    Don’t forget, they have books and materials in their own language. Since the entire population of China wants to learn English, it would be difficult to find enough bi lingual people. The Chinese seem to learn English through books materials and non Chinese speaking teachers just fine.

  225. anonymous[417] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    I came across a very oddball and suspicious fact about Chinese health. After reading a Covid-19 study in China, which labelled a patient death with tuberculosis as a co-factor, I wondered what their tuberculosis rate actually is.

    Well, it turns out it's high.

    https://tbfacts.org/tb-china/

    "In 2014 there were an estimated 930,000 new cases of TB in China, and an estimated 120,000 cases of pulmonary MDR TB. Overall China has 10% of the global burden of TB with 400 million people having latent TB."

    "A total of approximately 900,000 new cases of TB are reported annually."

    400 million people with latent TB? Oh, brother.

    From Wiki: "Latent tuberculosis is when a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not have active tuberculosis. The main risk is that approximately 10% of these people (5% in the first two years after infection and 0.1% per year thereafter) will go on to develop active tuberculosis. This is particularly true, and there is added risk, in particular situations such as medication that suppresses the immune system or advancing age."

    The site I quote says 400 million people in China have latent TB, but Wiki says 10% of these people will go on to develop active TB. 10% of 400 million is 40 million.

    The math says 40 million Chinese have active TB, and their air is polluted, and half their men smoke. No wonder they're dying from Covid-19. They have lot of people with preexisting lung disease.

    In the study I read, the dead patient was labelled as having 'chronic pulmonary disease,' which they explained was from tuberculosis. Okay. This may be Chinese communist covering-up via nicer sounding labels, but how many patients with 'chronic pulmonary disease in these studies' are actually tuberculosis patients?

    If 1/3rd of China has latent tuberculosis, that means 1/3rd of Wuhan should. City is 10 million, so that's around 3.3 million cases of latent tuberculosis.

    Which means, if 10% that has become active with time, in older people and in those with weak immune systems, Wuhan has 330,000 cases of active tuberculosis.

    If that many people have serious pre-existing TB, we may have just explained China's higher death rate. No wonder the Chinese are being dodgy about all the pre-existing medical conditions in their patients.

    I heard the Chinese government has order a lot of mobile incinerators for all the dead bodies. They may need to.

    TB is a serious problem in China, Mexico, South America, etc.

    HOWEVER, the figure of 400 million for latent TB cases seems far too high – this amounts to about 30% of the Chinese population.

    U.S.-based figures for TB are highly suspicious because the CDC insists on pushing its 1950s-era policies, i.e. no TB vaccinations for the native (non-immigrant) U.S. population, Mantoux skin test to test for TB antibodies, repeated chest x-rays (job program) for those “deemed” infected based on a positive Mantoux skin test, etc.

    Mantoux tests for antibodies and thus comes up positive for 100% of patients vaccinated against TB in the U.S. military, in another country, etc. This is a population of 10s of million in the U.S. since almost all countries outside the U.S. either have mandatory TB vaccination or encourage voluntary vaccination.

    CDC insists as a matter of institutional theology that a positive Mantoux test is “deemed” to indicate latent TB irrespective of a history of TB vaccination. Patients “deemed” infected are put patients on a regime consisting of months of liver-damaging medication for a non-existent infection. Of course, only middle-class whites submit to this nonsense. Meanwhile, ilegales with actual active TB go to work in the food industry, agriculture, etc.

    At the same time, active TB brought by massive numbers of illegals to the unvaccinated U.S. population is systematically ignored and if occasionally discovered is covered up.

    Not surprisingly, infectious disease specialists in Asia and Europe quietly dismiss U.S. practices as institutionalized insanity.

  226. @Jesse
    It's Iran. There's a good shot "she" was a dude whacked to his eyeballs on cross sex hormones.

    Have you looked at her photo? Didn’t look masculine at all. Not a dude.

  227. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    "Let’s see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no."

    LOL, thanks for creating a question that is utterly unrealistic and lacks proper context and background. First, the U.S. has never let in 10,000,000 immigrants in a single month, and especially from one particular place. Second, what dramatic turn of events led to this phenomenon? Third, what American leader in their right mind to agree to this extraordinary number. Fourth, you are leaving out pertinent information, like level of education, political involvement, and social standing, that would typify each group.

    Now, I would venture to say that in your mind there is only one response that you would accept. Of course, you could surprise us and be open minded about such matters. So, to be a sport, there would be no difference. The inclusion of both groups would lead to an undue burden to our current population and to our institutions. If they insist, I would say let us employ the logic of your pal, Vox Day--always sink the ships. Should we not protect our borders regardless if the immigrant is white/non-white or Christian-non-Christian?

    So, I answered the question honestly and openly. If you reject this response in any way, or question my motivation, fine. It makes no difference to me.

    The answer is yes and you know it. Everyone knows it.

    If you were more concerned with being honest than with being a goodwhite, then you would have answered directly and then explained why the differences aren’t that important over the long run (not that I agree with this!) or something similar.

    Obviously, you are a dishonest person who wants to promote the fantasy that culture doesn’t matter. That all people will behave the same once they emigrate to America. Very few here are buying it, yet, looking at the responses you get, many don’t block you out. Both their behavior and your own are weird.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The answer is yes and you know it. Everyone knows it."

    Only YOU think you know it.

    "If you were more concerned with being honest than with being a goodwhite..."

    Except I was being honest. And, pray tell, what is a "goodwhite"?

    "then you would have answered directly and then explained why the differences aren’t that important over the long run (not that I agree with this!) or something similar."

    Except I did answer directly. You just do not prefer the response.

    "Obviously, you are a dishonest person who wants to promote the fantasy that culture doesn’t matter."

    LOL, I wasn't the one who offered the fantasy question!
  228. @Anonymous
    The answer is yes and you know it. Everyone knows it.

    If you were more concerned with being honest than with being a goodwhite, then you would have answered directly and then explained why the differences aren’t that important over the long run (not that I agree with this!) or something similar.

    Obviously, you are a dishonest person who wants to promote the fantasy that culture doesn’t matter. That all people will behave the same once they emigrate to America. Very few here are buying it, yet, looking at the responses you get, many don’t block you out. Both their behavior and your own are weird.

    “The answer is yes and you know it. Everyone knows it.”

    Only YOU think you know it.

    “If you were more concerned with being honest than with being a goodwhite…”

    Except I was being honest. And, pray tell, what is a “goodwhite”?

    “then you would have answered directly and then explained why the differences aren’t that important over the long run (not that I agree with this!) or something similar.”

    Except I did answer directly. You just do not prefer the response.

    “Obviously, you are a dishonest person who wants to promote the fantasy that culture doesn’t matter.”

    LOL, I wasn’t the one who offered the fantasy question!

  229. @Steve Sailer
    The stock market didn't react at all until a week ago.

    A week ago when news of the Coronavirus was spreading. Indeed, the stock market does overreact to such things. So, Mr. Sailer, do you think the Coronavirus is a hoax? To what extent should Americans be concerned about it and its spread? How much faith do you have in President Trump dealing with this issue?

  230. @Corvinus
    "Let’s see how truthful and direct you can be. Please answer the following question with a yes or no. Elaborate only after first answering the question truthfully and directly with a yes or no."

    LOL, thanks for creating a question that is utterly unrealistic and lacks proper context and background. First, the U.S. has never let in 10,000,000 immigrants in a single month, and especially from one particular place. Second, what dramatic turn of events led to this phenomenon? Third, what American leader in their right mind to agree to this extraordinary number. Fourth, you are leaving out pertinent information, like level of education, political involvement, and social standing, that would typify each group.

    Now, I would venture to say that in your mind there is only one response that you would accept. Of course, you could surprise us and be open minded about such matters. So, to be a sport, there would be no difference. The inclusion of both groups would lead to an undue burden to our current population and to our institutions. If they insist, I would say let us employ the logic of your pal, Vox Day--always sink the ships. Should we not protect our borders regardless if the immigrant is white/non-white or Christian-non-Christian?

    So, I answered the question honestly and openly. If you reject this response in any way, or question my motivation, fine. It makes no difference to me.

    “ America …..let in immigrants”? What world do you live in?? Some immigrants such as Silicon Valley and Redmond Wa tech workers, medical workers and students are legally “let in” with visas.

    More immigrants arrive illegally than legally and we’re not “ let in”.

  231. @Jonathan Mason

    Democrats never met a spending program that they didn’t like. Let’s spend $4 billion – no $8, no $16. The more government wastes on this the more virtuous they are even if we produce mountains of masks that will later need to be landfilled.
     
    It is not that most people are worried about this virus.

    The problem is that even though there may not really be anything that can be done that will be effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, individuals and companies are terrified of being seen as incompetent or worse, negligent and these days every one has risk managers and emergency management systems full of people who are terrified for their jobs, or that they may be sued if they don't follow the "official recommendations", even if those recommendations are actually worthless.

    This is particularly the case in institutions like nursing homes, hospitals, and prisons that may contain vulnerable populations with litigious family members. It doesn't matter that they were going to die pretty soon anyway from old age or infirmity, not with ambulance-chasing lawyers everywhere trying to earn an honest crust.

    "Did you family member die of the deadly Corona virus in a nursing home? You may be eligible for compensation. Call Sue, Grabbitt and Runne NOW for your FREE consulation!"

    This is why it is important to have the CDC issue sensible precautions for vulnerable populations that everyone can follow so that they can say they are "in compliance" with best practices.

    Best practices would include not needlessly exposing vulnerable people like the elderly or those with respiratory diseases to people who are sick, and keeping the people who are sick away from activities in communal settings.

    Whether this will include mass distribution of billions face masks, which will make someone somewhere a lot of money, remains to be seen.

    What is less likely is that hospitals will be required to build large numbers of expensive new "positive pressure" rooms whose air conditioner systems vent to the outside of the type used to isolate TB patients on respiratory precautions.

    Anyway, I predict that life will go on, except when it doesn't.

    The problem is that even though there may not really be anything that can be done that will be effective to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, individuals and companies are terrified of being seen as incompetent or worse, negligent and these days every one has risk managers and emergency management systems full of people who are terrified for their jobs, or that they may be sued if they don’t follow the “official recommendations”, even if those recommendations are actually worthless.

    This is particularly the case in institutions like nursing homes, hospitals, and prisons that may contain vulnerable populations with litigious family members.

    This is a very good insight; thanks. We’re seeing lots of evidence of this attitude/fear in HK right now, as employers fall over themselves to come up with and implement ‘safety’ measures that are extremely troublesome, but that may not really do much good.

    There are strong parallels to the establishment of the TSA and other air travel ‘security’ procedures.

  232. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Bill in Glendale"

    The same "Bill" who was a frequent guest on Phil Hendrie's radio show?

    No, I listened to Art Bell a few times just to listen to the crazies.

  233. @Anon
    It’s been awhile we have been innoculated with ideas/habits through professional hashtags. In my immediate surroundings, I’ve noticed:
    2018 Immigration as a right (i know the flood into
    Europe started before).
    2019. Sacrifice to Mother Earth, and St Greta
    2020. Men are violent to women (i know you guys haven’t noticed, but there’s a flash strike in 150 countries scheduled for 8M, exarcebated through country-specific media coverage)
    2020. Restrictions to legal freedom of movement. Otherwise known as serfdom.

    The first innoculation causes long term chaos. The last three are about population control.

    In the NWO, it’s all about “it’s the population, stupid.”

    Isn’t it a racist ethnicist religionist anti immigrant hate crime for Europeans to notice violence towards women?

  234. @Anonymous
    How about this theory:

    The Iranian virus outbreak source is actually a Chinese illegal alien smuggling route community.

    Overland smuggling routes from China probably feed the illegal workers into many countries but one prime destination is the industrial zone in Italy.

    Also I bet Albanians control the end traffic into Europe.

    You’ve got it exactly right. The city of Qom seems to be a center of the outbreak. It’s a religious center, something like the Vatican, beautiful art and architecture as well as religion.

    Because of all the seminaries, clergy conferences, pilgrims and tourists it’s a major, major transit hub, especially for long distance buses and trucks because of highways going in all directions It’s nowhere near any border, so no border patrol. Plus lots of pilgrim hostels and seminary dorms.

    Chinese are noticeable in Iran, but the smugglers are adept at keeping them out of sight. Probably transport them in enclosed trucks to Qom, house them in old pilgrim hotels the smugglers own, then pack them in trucks headed all over Europe &Middle East.

  235. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "With a city of 100,000 people or more, you can bet it will hit at some time.

    This will cause diversity panic. Store shelves will clear, looters will try their luck, good people will live in fear as the police take longer and longer to respond."

    LMAO. Um, no. My city's population is about 165,000. Shelves will stay full, looters will stay home and stare at they sailfoams. Idiots might live in fear, but they do that anyway. Other than making jokes, nobody talks about the kung flu. Stop talking like a ninny - it is unmanly.

    Denial ain’t a river in Egypt there, little girl:

  236. @Jonathan Mason
    Well, exactly. The cost to the economy would be immense as there would be mass absenteeism of parents of children whose eldest child is less than about 12, as they could not be left at home without a supervising adult to protect them from roving sexual predators. In the US many grandparents of young children are also you enough to still be working themselves.

    And parents would not be able to send children to day cares instead, because they would have to be closed for the same reason.

    It is true that it would be no different from having the summer vacation early, but many parents schedule time off during the summer or take a break between switching jobs in the summer, so the effect of an unscheduled hiatus in the school year would be very disruptive. And presumably tens of thousands of school bus drivers would be laid off unexpectedly.

    Teachers would be able to take so many "planning days" that they would not need another for the next decade.

    And just in case people are thinking we could take the summer break at Easter, and have school through the summer, when the a/c bills would be sky high, many states have the number of days in the school year and the dates when school starts written into legislation--it is not just decided at a local level.

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. (However do not do this at home without consulting your local vetinerary and health departments and homeowners association, if applicable, for local regulations on the slaughter of live animals and smearing of blood ou the exterior of your home. You do not want to have to deal with a plague of flies.)

    It may also be possible to obtain frozen blood of sacrificial lambs from your local meat market.

    You also have to worry about the effect of a plague on the evangelical community, many of whom are experts in infection control. You don't want to lose their votes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbgWX-t0EYA

    Iran has announced that visiting Qom and having lavender water up your ass will cure CoronaVirus, so I guess Allah is the real God and Pence is a loser. Sad.

  237. @AnotherDad

    However the plague management system has been placed in the capable hands of Mike Pence, who Trump had divined has a special aptitude for infection control.

    Pence is a man of faith and should be able to supply some tips from the Bible.

    For example, sacrificing a lamb and painting your door lintels with the blood can confer immunity to the household and make the angel of death pass right over. ...

     

    Jonathan, i like to rant too, but i try to actually have something to say--even if it's often the same thing-- "minoritarianism" or "separate nations!".

    I have little use for evangelical Old Testament bible beating or their weird Judeophilia. (I guess it qualifies as turning the other cheek, because their sentiments are decidely not reciprocated.)

    But having Pence "in charge" simply means he's the politician in charge who's supposed to bless the whole effort politically and--if necessary--organize the political aspects for the response (asking Congress for more money, getting agencies to cooperate, etc.) It does not mean Pence replaces the CDCs epidemiologists or infection control specialists. Rather it means those people are telling Pence what should be done and what legal measures or resources they need to do it. It is giving their advice and needs a high profile advocate--a good thing!

    I know this. You know this. Everyone knows this. So what's the point here?

    Because politicians, esp. religious ones, always just do what they’re told by the experts. It’s not like he would ever doubt a scientist, or have a motive like helping speed up the Apocalypse.

  238. @Reg Cæsar

    Coming from the North, winter, and especially April, are the months of death. 95% of my relatives died in April.* The tombstones are kind of creepy because it seems that April just screams out. And, looking at 1500’s is creepy in itself.
     
    A Finnish friend told me her uncle committed suicide in the spring, and she thought that odd. But a little research showed her spring was the worst season for suicides. She couldn't understand why.

    I told her it was obvious. Everybody is miserable during the long, dark winter. (Helsinki-- Hell-sinki-- at the south end of the country, is roughly at Anchorage's latitude.) Misery lives company, and the depressed are among psychic compatriots.

    But it brightens up in the spring. People are smiling. Now Mr Dyingly Sad is all alone, and it's unbearable.

    Hahaa! clever one, you are! I was told (in Finland) that old people have a tough time with the end of winter, when March arrives, thinking they have to start all over again (kind of like Groundhog Day) and get through all the months until Christmas (the Season of Light, and all) and, shucks….they just can’t anymore! Maybe it’s just the shear amount of family holidays and family drama, again, that drains them…

    I have, euthanized, or my dogs have expired in my arms – when I have been lucky– mostly in the spring. My parents died in the spring, as did most of my ancestors. I still dread April.

  239. @Achmed E. Newman
    My recollection is that you are from a cold dreary place, at least in the long winter season. Just be glad every May then, that you are still alive and kicking.

    I agree with your take on the over-worrying about this virus, especially by those who can't really do a lot about it, besides taking ordinary precautions. My one additional precaution now is to not be fooled by anyone offering me a case of Corona ...

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1359A.jpg

    Crazy and true: every time I felt like I had a sore throat; felt my nose being twitchy, or had an intense lack of energy, when I was in college, I would buy a sixer of beer and drink almost all of it – a yuge amount of carbs and alcohol at once! (Don’t lecture me about alcohol, duh.)

    It helped to walk to my favorite frat house after studying – I did go to a serious Uni! hahaa! I went there to play pool (I am really, really good at it – learned as a child) and I always knew the guys wanted an excuse to play pool, adored girls who liked to drink beer and just shoot the shit. Frat guys were always ready to drink beer, play pool and gossip about their girl issues (I felt very lucky to be their confidant). Next day, I felt fine – no sign of dreaded cold/sore throat.

    My advice: everyone: buy a six of Corona, just in case, during the furious month of March! Get back to me if it worked for you! Also, up your intake of Vitamin C/fruit & veggies. Hand sanitizer! – wipes/wipe surfaces often. It helps to be ADHD & OCD.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I was not one of those Frat boys, Lagertha, but I used to be fairly good at pool though.

    Veggies - CHECK
    V-C (via fruits) - CHECK
    ADHD & OCD - No can do
    Corona - Doc says I can't drink any more. He means don't drink any more than I already do, not to quit or any other kind of shock to the system.

    Here's the post - Goodbye to Rosie, the Queen of Corona.
  240. @Lagertha
    Crazy and true: every time I felt like I had a sore throat; felt my nose being twitchy, or had an intense lack of energy, when I was in college, I would buy a sixer of beer and drink almost all of it - a yuge amount of carbs and alcohol at once! (Don't lecture me about alcohol, duh.)

    It helped to walk to my favorite frat house after studying - I did go to a serious Uni! hahaa! I went there to play pool (I am really, really good at it - learned as a child) and I always knew the guys wanted an excuse to play pool, adored girls who liked to drink beer and just shoot the shit. Frat guys were always ready to drink beer, play pool and gossip about their girl issues (I felt very lucky to be their confidant). Next day, I felt fine - no sign of dreaded cold/sore throat.

    My advice: everyone: buy a six of Corona, just in case, during the furious month of March! Get back to me if it worked for you! Also, up your intake of Vitamin C/fruit & veggies. Hand sanitizer! - wipes/wipe surfaces often. It helps to be ADHD & OCD.

    I was not one of those Frat boys, Lagertha, but I used to be fairly good at pool though.

    Veggies – CHECK
    V-C (via fruits) – CHECK
    ADHD & OCD – No can do
    Corona – Doc says I can’t drink any more. He means don’t drink any more than I already do, not to quit or any other kind of shock to the system.

    Here’s the post – Goodbye to Rosie, the Queen of Corona.

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