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Since the invention of polyurethane wheels in the late 1970s, Los Angeles’s Venice Beach has been wildly popular with tourists.

From FoxLA:

… Meanwhile, sanitation workers continues to clean up the Venice Boardwalk. The Venice Boardwalk has become an area of great concern to residents due to a recent increase in crime.

For the past few months, the sheriff’s department and outreach teams have walked along the boardwalk, spoke with homeless people and offered housing and mental health services.

According to [L.A. County Sheriff] Villanueva, during their outreach over 250 homeless people were interviewed. During that interview, the sheriff’s department gathered stats on their age, gender, race and location of origin.

Villanueva said majority of the homeless people in Venice came to California from other states. He said 23 states were listed as location of origin including, Ohio, Texas, Maryland, Louisiana and even countries such as Iraq, Germany and Mexico.

According to data they collected, 70% of the Venice homeless population is male, 29% is female, 1% identify as transgender, 57% were White, 24% were Black and 13% were Hispanic.

While discussing the homeless crisis on Facebook Live, the sheriff stated that LA County has half of the state’s entire homeless population. According to the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, in 2020 over 66,000 people in Los Angeles County were experiencing homelessness.

The sheriff said in the past 10 years $6.5 billion has been spent to address the homeless problem in LA County.

“Governor if you wish to have them on your vineyard, in your property, in our mansion by all means you have the freedom to invite them there, but here in LA County we are pretty much full,” the sheriff exclaimed when referring to Governor Newsom’s California Comeback Plan.

On Monday, Newsom addressed the state’s homelessness crisis from the city of Sebastopol in Sonoma County where he signed a $12 billion bill for homeless funding.

 
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  1. Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    , @AnotherDad
    @Thucydides


    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?
     
    Skating girls' rear ends--and tank topped front ends.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    , @The Alarmist
    @Thucydides

    https://youtu.be/0pu1xGPDJXU?t=1m40s

    Replies: @Jiminy

    , @TomKat Books
    @Thucydides

    Roller blades.

  2. 6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    • LOL: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Anthony Aaron
    @beavertales

    The 66K is today's number … over the past 10 years, it has likely been noticeably less the more distant in time.

    No matter -- that's a lot of good money going, like you said, likely into questionable places.

    A recent article about homeless expenditures in SFO talked about some of the homeless housing that has been built -- at an average cost of more than $660,000 PER UNIT …

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @beavertales

    Look at the salaries that are being paid out to people who work for these homeless nonprofit/advocacy/outreach groups. Most are well into the 6 figures. They were discussing it on Joe Rogan's podcast not to long ago. That's where the biggest chunk of money is going.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @John Johnson
    @beavertales

    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Lazy California mainstream media won't bother to investigate. No reason to reinforce the image that California Democrats have no idea as to what they are doing.

    I am for spending more on the homeless but not through the government of California. They don't want to do anything about the drug problem because their liberal directors in the media tell them that even hard drugs like heroin are to be tolerated.

    , @fish
    @beavertales

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went.


    You really don't.....

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @beavertales

    Yeah. $10,000 per homeless individual per year.

    For that sum, you could offer them a tiny mini-apartment ($400-500/month), basic food ($150-$200/month), utilities ($100-150/month), toiletries ($50-100/month), and other miscellaneous expenses ($100/month). It'd seem like for that sum, you could provide them with a basic first-world standard of living.

    Where exactly is the money going?

    Replies: @Escher, @Anonymous Jew

    , @MM
    @beavertales

    A little less than $10,000 per person per year. Doesn't sound like a lot. I suspect that one arrest per year per person would end up costing much more.

    Of course apparently that's only local spending (I assume the sheriff isn't counting state or federal). So it might be a lot more than that.

    Replies: @Charon

    , @James Speaks
    @beavertales

    A solution to the homeless population is to form government services to plan for and erect micro-houses for the homeless - and to employ homeless people to staff the new agencies.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @beavertales

    Hmm.

    That’s just under $10,000 for every single homeless person every year for a decade.

    Shift just one half of one percent into someone’s pocket for “administrative services” and somebody’s picking up $3.25 million every year for ten years running.

    $32.5 million sounds like a nice gig/grift if you can get it . . .

    , @res
    @beavertales


    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.
     
    That seems like one of the best use cases for cryptocurrency I have heard.
  3. Steve,

    A thread you may be able to relate to, and could provide some insight into popular skepticism re: the medical (and not just the medical) community (and thus of course the vacks).

    Irony being that Gell-Mann style the healthiest people largely haven’t seen this from the inside. Perhaps you haven’t lately. I have.

  4. Ronald Reagan told us this in a more general sense 40 years ago, except without that “almost as if” part. Do you want that Trademarked, Steve? I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The classic Reddit joke:


    It's almost as if saying it's almost as if is a smarmy assholish opener and it's almost as if people would receive the message better without saying it's almost as if.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    , @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    California would have a huge homeless problem even if they didn't spend a penny.

    The weather is moderate throughout the year and the southern half of the state is filled with weak liberal Whites that will let drug addicts setup tents in public parks and near schools.

    I doubt the spending has much of an effect. The vast majority of it isn't going directly to the homeless. They stopped giving out cash assistance a long time ago.

    Replies: @HbutnotG

    , @Hi There
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Obviously spending more on homeless amenities attracts homeless people from other areas, no need for the smarmy "it's almost if..."

    My suspicion is politicians, particularly left-leaing ones, spend way too much public money on homeless.

    Either A) get a serious career in politics or policy research, or advocacy, or punditry.
    Or B) do something else in life and don't let this stuff you don't control bother you.

    I find myself drawn to these articles, I would like to change policy on these issues, but not enough to change my career to pursue such changes.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.
     
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EkhOsauXUAEa2HF.jpg
  5. 2020 over 66,000 people in Los Angeles County were “””experiencing homelessness”””

    There’s a real name for that.

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
    @interesting

    CATO-4321

    https://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/RadioDerb/2019-04-26.html#06

    , @Stan d Mute
    @interesting


    There’s a real name for that.
     
    As true as this is, I can assure you that you do not want the alternative identity of “gangster”. At least not if you reside within public transportation distance from the malefactors.

    From a comfortable “white supremacist” (NOTE: Apple just attempted to capitalize Supremacist - a new development) distance, it’s all mildly amusing and ripe with schadenfreude. Up close, 90+% of you wouldn’t survive. I have related some stories, but they cannot begin to truly describe the reality of life in a negro majority (city, nation, subdivision, etc). If there were cell phone cameras in 1967, recent videos from South Africa would be blasé.

    I can assure you that none (most) of you would hate me. And yet, I am you after being forced to live within the paradigm that you have (voted for, condoned, acquiesced to, or just ignored). I never asked for any of this. I never scammed or even hurt anyone (with exceptions for those who demanded it), yet my life in America is objectively no different to the current tales from South Africa. Shot at? Check. Robbed? Check. Raped? (Not personally but witnessed it). Check. Watched a friend or loved one being brutally beaten by a mob? Check. Had a gun stuck in your face? Treble check. Had to contemplate whether or not to call the pigs? Ha! Support your blue you pathetic retards. Right up to the moment that they murder you for calling them to yet another of the infinite examples of negro dysfunction.

    Detriot is YOUR future. I sincerely doubt that anyone could stop it even if they thought that Israel commanded it. ISteve is in some weird bubble where the Mexicans who don’t worship the negro have granted a reprieve. But how many of you live in Detriot, Newark, Birmingham, Tampa, Atlanta, Memphis, Dallas, Denver (no shit! Shocks me too!), Chicongo, St Louis, New Orleans, Mobile, District of Corruption, Baltimore, and the list just goes on and on? LA is some kind of Mexican bubble in America (Miami comes close, as does El Paso).

    Right now, I would GLADLY relocate my family to Mexico City or perhaps any other metropolis outside the USA. If only the government hadn’t sucked up 200% of my net worth..

    Bend over and spread the other cheek Goyim. And for you secular Jews, a massive wake up call is in your future as you learn that you are actually just Super Honkie and probably the first to be tossed into the cannibal’s pot.
  6. and even countries such as…

    I look forward to the day of interplanetary travel, when Newsom and his ilk can invite in entire planetary populations to whom he can apply his uplift. FEELZ!

    Twelve billion? As bernie sanders likes to say, “that’s just a start.”

  7. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ronald Reagan told us this in a more general sense 40 years ago, except without that "almost as if" part. Do you want that Trademarked, Steve? I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    Replies: @Anon, @John Johnson, @Hi There, @MEH 0910

    The classic Reddit joke:

    It’s almost as if saying it’s almost as if is a smarmy assholish opener and it’s almost as if people would receive the message better without saying it’s almost as if.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Anon

    Maybe he is related to Cathy "so what you are saying is" Newman

    Replies: @Anon

  8. @Thucydides
    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @The Alarmist, @TomKat Books

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Ahhh, Venice Beach and polyurethane wheels.

    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

    I taught many a girl how to roller blade down there. (Ex hockey player.) Also discovered, to my surprise, that Electric Avenue is a real place.

    And there was a spot where you could get a killer swordfish sandwich.

    All gone now, I suppose. Thanks, immigration!

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs

    , @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    You're so weird dude

    Replies: @Carol

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    Sometimes your knowledge is too esoteric for jokes.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Gaspar DeLaFunk
    @Steve Sailer

    Oh, I thought maybe they could melt down the polyurethane and smoke it,or something. Thanks.

    , @James Speaks
    @Steve Sailer

    If I understand correctly, the Chinese company Evenflo, which manufactures wheels, prompts the development of other products to use the wheels. Classic case of a hammer in search of a nail.

    Compare and contrast with the Mad Housers who provide part of the solution to homeless: free micro-houses. All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.

    http://madhousers.org

    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Curle

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    ...which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    And a movie. That started a fad. Not a real long-lived fad, though.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NRnIIQ9bnc

    , @Welshman
    @Steve Sailer

    The emergence of polyurethane wheels contributed significantly to the development of skateboarding culture, too, which eventually made Venice beach itself something of a mecca (according to those early skateboarding magazines).

    , @Bernard
    @Steve Sailer


    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.
     
    The evolution was from clay to polyurethane wheels. Same was true with skateboards.
  9. we love our based castizo sheriffs

  10. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    Ahhh, Venice Beach and polyurethane wheels.

    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

    I taught many a girl how to roller blade down there. (Ex hockey player.) Also discovered, to my surprise, that Electric Avenue is a real place.

    And there was a spot where you could get a killer swordfish sandwich.

    All gone now, I suppose. Thanks, immigration!

    • Replies: @Sick of Orcs
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

     

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Perry_(musician)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  11. OT: The Cleveland Indians do their part to help Major League Baseball drive away as many of their remaining fans as possible. I can’t tell if this name change is immediate, ESPN still has the Indians up on their website for now. I am sure the fans will be won over by a two minute video narrated by noted northeast Ohio resident and lifelong Indians fan Tom Hanks talking about their traditions while a ten year old Black Keys song plays in the background. I can’t imagine giving these people my money.

    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/31868331/cleveland-changing-name-indians-guardians

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Barnard

    Barnard, When my son moved to Cleveland the guy down the street had Chief Wahoo painted on his house, image was about 8 feet high. This should play well with the Indian fans.Sigh.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Barnard

    The "Guardians"? Who thought that up?

    Took me about 30 seconds to do better--the Cleveland "Erie". The lake and the native people it's named for. (Who no longer exist--but not because of the white man--so can't complain.)

    Don't like that--how about the "Cuyahoga Fire"?

    Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat, @bomag

    , @SafeNow
    @Barnard

    General Milley recently referred to “soldiers sailors airmen marines and guardians.” I didn’t want to hear this guy going anywhere near the Coast Guard, which does not fall under the jurisdiction of the Pentagon. ( “that outfit over there”) Now I am relieved know he had advance notice of the name change, and was actually referring to the Cleveland baseball team, making a scholarly, intersectional connection beyond our understanding.

  12. Let me see if I read that title correctly: If a city (or nation, or species) houses its homeless, more people will forego their homes and go live on a beach.

    Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!

    • Replies: @anon
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Let me see if I read that title correctly: If a city (or nation, or species) houses its homeless, more people will forego their homes and go live on a beach.

    You did not read it correctly.

    , @interesting
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    "Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!"

    Well yeah. The life you describe is about $4K a month.

    The life they are living only requires one to buy the drugs they want.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dacian Julien Soros

  13. If you have to be homeless, LA seems like a nice choice.

    Cycling through Homeless Camps on Santa Ana River Bike Trail in Orange County California (2017)

  14. I find on NextDoor discussions of homeless in our neighborhoods that a lot of people cannot believe that anyone would like to camp on the sidewalks of sunny LA and do drugs all day. Clearly it’s a tiny fraction of humanity but a tiny fraction of a huge number is still a lot of people. If you incentivize them with nice weather and protection from the big bad policemen you get this situation

  15. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    You’re so weird dude

    • Replies: @Carol
    @AndrewR

    He's not wrong. I was stuck in Dallas trying to find someplace nice to skate on the new quiet wheels, eating my heart out that I was so far away from that sweet, long paved "boardwalk" at Venice.

    It took years for other towns to catch up. Now they all have skateparks!

    I was born too late.

  16. “It’s almost as if” spending money won’t help if the government refuses to imprison or institutionalize the large portion of the homeless population who cannot or will not control themselves. I’m referring to the many homeless people who are mentally ill and/or violent, intimidating, harassing, or disruptive and/or publicly indecent and/or blocking sidewalks and streets.

    Notwithstanding the glorious weather and the taxpayer-funded benefits, most of these people would not come here (LA County) if they saw us institutionalize 25,000 of our aggressive obnoxious homeless population and jail 25,000 more.

    Give them food, water, safe clean shelter, clothes, showers, and help getting free drug rehab and job placement. Then tell them to get the fuck off our streets and sidewalks, stop jacking off in their open tents front of our daughters, stop ranting and screaming and scaring people, stop making the parks filthy and unusable, stop walking into traffic, stop throwing trash on the ground when there are cans right there, stop leaving their drug needles and trash and vomit and shit where our family walks, etc. — or be dealt with brutally.

    Tough love, giving them what they need to stop living like animals — but demanding that they respect us and our public spaces while we move them to prison, mental hospital, or drug rehab and job placement. Three choices. Actually, there’s a fourth: resist and get a beatdown on the way to that inevitable prison or mental hospital.

    The current situation helps neither homeless people nor the rest of us.

    And while the confused unrealistic faggots who run California may deserve what they’re getting, we don’t.

  17. And yet they still need to be taken care of. A way around that would be to introduce restriction of movement (which is already happening – check out the 2005 lawsuit LA took against a Nevada county).

  18. At some point America won’t be rich enough to waste vast sums of money on frivolous things.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Charon
    @Flip

    It'll happen gradually, then suddenly, as they say.

    Sort of hope I'm around to see it. Sort of.

  19. I’ve always wondered why any homeless people stay anywhere above the Mason-Dixon line.

    Then I realized that applying logic to the situation is the first thing a homeless bum isn’t likely to do.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @R.G. Camara

    "going where the weather suits my clothes"

  20. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    Sometimes your knowledge is too esoteric for jokes.

    • Replies: @anon
    @R.G. Camara

    Sometimes your knowledge is too esoteric for jokes.

    Dude, it was not esoteric. It was obvious. Obvious.

  21. $12B is more than enough to give each homeless person 2 or more votes to cast in the next election.

  22. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    The 66K is today’s number … over the past 10 years, it has likely been noticeably less the more distant in time.

    No matter — that’s a lot of good money going, like you said, likely into questionable places.

    A recent article about homeless expenditures in SFO talked about some of the homeless housing that has been built — at an average cost of more than $660,000 PER UNIT …

  23. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    Look at the salaries that are being paid out to people who work for these homeless nonprofit/advocacy/outreach groups. Most are well into the 6 figures. They were discussing it on Joe Rogan’s podcast not to long ago. That’s where the biggest chunk of money is going.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Sick 'n Tired

    Agree.

    First thing they do is rent office space and hire staff.

    Then start having meetings.

    That's as far as some programs go.

  24. OT

    The latest on Emmett Till:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/09/barn-emmett-till-murder/619493/

    8,000 words about the barn that Mr. Till was “hung at.”

  25. Venice beach is only getting attention because of a single youtuber who goes by German in Venice.

    As with Skid Row the county seems fine to look the other way but that is no longer possible with alternative media.

    California really doesn’t care about the homeless. What they care about is their image and they are worried that the tourists will start going elsewhere.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @John Johnson

    I specifically advised some on-tour friends to avoid VB, Hollywood, etc.

  26. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Lazy California mainstream media won’t bother to investigate. No reason to reinforce the image that California Democrats have no idea as to what they are doing.

    I am for spending more on the homeless but not through the government of California. They don’t want to do anything about the drug problem because their liberal directors in the media tell them that even hard drugs like heroin are to be tolerated.

  27. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went.

    You really don’t…..

  28. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    Yeah. $10,000 per homeless individual per year.

    For that sum, you could offer them a tiny mini-apartment ($400-500/month), basic food ($150-$200/month), utilities ($100-150/month), toiletries ($50-100/month), and other miscellaneous expenses ($100/month). It’d seem like for that sum, you could provide them with a basic first-world standard of living.

    Where exactly is the money going?

    • Replies: @Escher
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The money is going to provide REAL first world standard of living to the government employees who are responsible for spending it.

    , @Anonymous Jew
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s called the Homeless Industrial Complex (social workers, non-profits and the like).

  29. 57 percent white, 70 percent male, in a state that is majority ppl of color, and a city that is overwhelmingly of color…. Just shows where white males are headed today, with all the white male hate…. Here in Louisville KY, all i see are young homeless white males walking around everywhere

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Edomite male

    My sense is that whites are more likely to be alienated from their families than other ethnic groups. For some reason in this day and age, intra-family hostility among whites is pretty bad, and a lot outcast whites don't have any family to support them so they end up on the streets.

    Part of this also stems from blacks (as we've known about since at least the OJ trial) seeming to have a much greater degree of tolerance of deviance in their communities and families*. But whites will disown their own family members for drug use, stealing, excessive lying, mooching, and criminal convictions. It could be argued that some dysfunctional whites could be better off if they get more family support.

    *Of course, black deviance is much more perverted and violent than white deviance, so deviant blacks often end up in prison. More benign outcast whites aren't quite dangerous enough to be sent to prison so they just drift onto the streets.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Charon
    @Edomite male

    Whatever white males get, it's better than what they deserve. That's the operative modus in place now.

    , @Jay Fink
    @Edomite male

    My city is over 50% Hispanic but the homeless population seems to be at least 90% white.

  30. Steve, Villanueva is toast. The Board of Supervisors wants to fire him for arresting too many blacks and Hispanic gang members. [Most of them are on the pad of the gangs.]

    Moreover, big shots WANT homelessness. They consistently invite more homeless, spend money on creating more homeless, and do things to make homeless welcome. Homeless are very, very important to big shots.

    First, they ruin nice places that ordinary people could enjoy and make life miserable for anyone not a big shot. That’s the primary sense of life for big shots. It drives the Green stuff (“eat cockroaches dirt person!”) and Great Reset and all the like. Big shots get a special tingle feeling when contemplating the misery of ordinary people. Always have, always will.

    Second, homeless create a street army of untouchable holy people to make small businesses fail. Big shots HATE HATE HATE small business and want them all crushed into powder to make life safe for BigMart.

    Third, homeless are an endless reservoir of disease and infection, that big shots can use at any time to crush dirt people with lockdowns that never, ever end.

    Fourth, homeless are a source of vote banks for whatever candidate / proposition big shots want passed. They provide the “legitimacy” that big shots crave instead of naked power rule.

    So we will always have ever greater amounts of homeless until everyone but big shots are homeless. Which to be honest is their goal anyway.

  31. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ronald Reagan told us this in a more general sense 40 years ago, except without that "almost as if" part. Do you want that Trademarked, Steve? I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    Replies: @Anon, @John Johnson, @Hi There, @MEH 0910

    California would have a huge homeless problem even if they didn’t spend a penny.

    The weather is moderate throughout the year and the southern half of the state is filled with weak liberal Whites that will let drug addicts setup tents in public parks and near schools.

    I doubt the spending has much of an effect. The vast majority of it isn’t going directly to the homeless. They stopped giving out cash assistance a long time ago.

    • Replies: @HbutnotG
    @John Johnson

    Very true about the weather.

    But there are far more psychotic people among "the homeless" than drug addicts. When the liberals deemed mental hospitals "inhumane" 40 years ago and proceeded to close them (also citing that modern antipsychotic drugs are remarkably effective but ignoring the all-to-common tendency for psychotics to stop taking their meds) this homeless thing began to emerge. You see, one manifestation of psychosis (present in some, but not most of them) is the loss of the basic human urge to keep a roof over your head. That's one reason there were mental hospitals with locks on the gate. Of course you'd have to shut off your drinking buddies, and be a psychiatrist to realize that.

    I presume there are probably a few planning to pen a book and make lots of money - like the Clintons, for example.

    Any dope addict worth his salt finds a place to flop. Dope addicts network a lot. This is so they can get their fix and secondarily, if necessary, find an indoor place to flop.

    Don't confuse the two. It makes you look like a meatball.

    Replies: @anon

  32. Hmm. If you’re going to be homeless, choose a place with great weather, year-round. Huh? Free money too? Solution without a problem here.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Charon

    I live here. The massive mentally ill and/or drug-addicted homeless population here in LA has been a serious and dangerous problem for my wife, children, and me. Funny line, though.

  33. MM says:
    @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    A little less than $10,000 per person per year. Doesn’t sound like a lot. I suspect that one arrest per year per person would end up costing much more.

    Of course apparently that’s only local spending (I assume the sheriff isn’t counting state or federal). So it might be a lot more than that.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @MM

    It's also assuming that all the freebies will cause them to stop committing crimes. Big assumption.

  34. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:

    I think inline skating was pioneered by Scandinavian entrepreneurs in Minnesota — the morphology w/ hockey is obvious — but Santa Monica & Venice Beach (as distinct from the canal part, and from the slum part) both were instrumental in glamorizing/popularizing it. Here’s another guy from up north who got into the biz ca. 1979, not very Nordic-looking but shares their enthusiasm for rambling shirtless:
    http://www.cora.org/dmiles.html

  35. @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The classic Reddit joke:


    It's almost as if saying it's almost as if is a smarmy assholish opener and it's almost as if people would receive the message better without saying it's almost as if.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    Maybe he is related to Cathy “so what you are saying is” Newman

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Ron Mexico

    After the infamous Cathy Newman interview I noticed that I did that also. I've managed to cut down since then, but when done right, restating your opponent's argument, steelmanning it, and then pointing out problems with it, is one of the best ways to debate. It's just that Cathy Newman did it so badly, by strawmanning Peterson. Glenn Loury is a master of how to do it right.

    As for Steve, he's taken "almost as if" beyond a cliche'd tic to being a personal trademark.

  36. Even back in the 70’s, Venice beach was a bit of a freak show. Now it’s just a joke, like most of the California coastal cities.

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ronald Reagan told us this in a more general sense 40 years ago, except without that "almost as if" part. Do you want that Trademarked, Steve? I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    Replies: @Anon, @John Johnson, @Hi There, @MEH 0910

    Obviously spending more on homeless amenities attracts homeless people from other areas, no need for the smarmy “it’s almost if…”

    My suspicion is politicians, particularly left-leaing ones, spend way too much public money on homeless.

    Either A) get a serious career in politics or policy research, or advocacy, or punditry.
    Or B) do something else in life and don’t let this stuff you don’t control bother you.

    I find myself drawn to these articles, I would like to change policy on these issues, but not enough to change my career to pursue such changes.

  38. “Homeless” is an interesting term. People living well sheltered in an RV on a side street, with an electrical hook from a nearby street light are considered homeless. Yes they have to go get water, usually from a faucet at the back of a business and yes they dump their sewage into the nearby storm drain. (Try that if you are a contractor cleaning out your mortar mixer or paint brushes) They also get free hypodermic needles if they want them (SF gives out hundreds of thousands of them) In Berkeley free testing of your drugs to make sure they don’t contain fentanyl. Free food from a number of charities and city programs and even pet care. Many California cities give out free tents to those who need them or want them and of course you can get free blankets and cots. Asking people to leave the streets usually doesn’t work. So many video interviews where the homeless person says ‘no way, you have to follow too many rules.’ Tiny homes, we call the garden sheds that you can buy from the Amish for a couple of thousand, cost $60,000 when Cali buys them for the homeless. Hey, it’s only money. Watch some videos. Start with “Fight for the Soul of Seattle” Yes, I know Seattle is not California but it is a great learning experience. Some one I know well used to work for SalesForce, which is head quartered in San Francisco. He told me the city would gag a maggot. So sad, once the gem of the Bay Area. The weather attracts, the liberals cuddle and feed them. Think about this…in Berkeley a cop gave car chase to a perp when he witnessed him violently beating a woman in his car. The suspect’s car jumped the curb cut at an ADA corner. He ran over an killed a homeless woman sleeping on the sidewalk. She had been in the same spot for at least two days. Cops checked on her daily but no one moved her to shelter.BECAUSE SHE DIDN’T WANT TO BE MOVED. Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    “Homeless” is an interesting term.

    It is a political term, coined by some libtards back in the 80's. Because "bum" and "beggar" are perjorative, and "The Homeless" was a useful club. Still is, but not as useful as before.

    Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    Not entirely, Joe, but to a very large extent...yes.

    Hey, I have an idea, but it could be whack. If a lot of people in the US are existing in tent camps because they don't have jobs, and they don't have a lot of skills so the main jobs they can work are minimum wage, maybe we should not import 100,000 more minimum-wage-level people every month?

    Whattaya think? Crazy or not?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Carol

  39. anon[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    "Homeless" is an interesting term. People living well sheltered in an RV on a side street, with an electrical hook from a nearby street light are considered homeless. Yes they have to go get water, usually from a faucet at the back of a business and yes they dump their sewage into the nearby storm drain. (Try that if you are a contractor cleaning out your mortar mixer or paint brushes) They also get free hypodermic needles if they want them (SF gives out hundreds of thousands of them) In Berkeley free testing of your drugs to make sure they don't contain fentanyl. Free food from a number of charities and city programs and even pet care. Many California cities give out free tents to those who need them or want them and of course you can get free blankets and cots. Asking people to leave the streets usually doesn't work. So many video interviews where the homeless person says 'no way, you have to follow too many rules.' Tiny homes, we call the garden sheds that you can buy from the Amish for a couple of thousand, cost $60,000 when Cali buys them for the homeless. Hey, it's only money. Watch some videos. Start with "Fight for the Soul of Seattle" Yes, I know Seattle is not California but it is a great learning experience. Some one I know well used to work for SalesForce, which is head quartered in San Francisco. He told me the city would gag a maggot. So sad, once the gem of the Bay Area. The weather attracts, the liberals cuddle and feed them. Think about this...in Berkeley a cop gave car chase to a perp when he witnessed him violently beating a woman in his car. The suspect's car jumped the curb cut at an ADA corner. He ran over an killed a homeless woman sleeping on the sidewalk. She had been in the same spot for at least two days. Cops checked on her daily but no one moved her to shelter.BECAUSE SHE DIDN'T WANT TO BE MOVED. Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    Replies: @anon

    “Homeless” is an interesting term.

    It is a political term, coined by some libtards back in the 80’s. Because “bum” and “beggar” are perjorative, and “The Homeless” was a useful club. Still is, but not as useful as before.

    Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    Not entirely, Joe, but to a very large extent…yes.

    Hey, I have an idea, but it could be whack. If a lot of people in the US are existing in tent camps because they don’t have jobs, and they don’t have a lot of skills so the main jobs they can work are minimum wage, maybe we should not import 100,000 more minimum-wage-level people every month?

    Whattaya think? Crazy or not?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @anon

    OneEightThree, you too funny, but they are still crossing the border into California everyday.

    , @Carol
    @anon

    I first heard "homeless" used by Mitch Snyder, an activist who got all sorts of nice press for his do-gooder work in DC early in the first Reagan admin. Funny that.

    Right off I figured the "homeless" were the dregs of the hippie "street people" plus some bag ladies.

    And look at us now.

  40. ‘…over 66,000 people in Los Angeles County were experiencing homelessness…’

    ‘Experiencing homelessness’ is like ‘insurrection’ and all those other mendacious verbal formulae.

    It inserts an implicit argument into a statement that, if it were explicit, would be indefensible.

    ‘Experiencing homelessness’ is not like appendicitis, or having red hair. It doesn’t just happen to you, irrespective of your behavior. These people do have agency. They could have refrained from alienating their families, getting repeatedly fired from their jobs, not seeking help with their mental issues.

    Where they are is not simple bad luck. It has a great deal to do with who they are, and what they’ve done. They aren’t ‘experiencing homelessness.’ They became homeless, and however much they may need and deserve help, that was a function of their behavior.

    It matters, because if we see their problem as ‘experiencing homelessness,’ well, all we have to do is give them a home, and the problem’s solved.

    Well, we all know giving them a home won’t solve the problem, because they aren’t ‘experiencing homelessness.’ Some aspect of their behavior caused them to become homeless, and therefore their behavior has to change.

    • Agree: mark green
  41. Your comment would be a lot easier to read if you divided up into four paragraphs.

  42. Sheriff Villanueva might wind up with his comrades Leroy Baca and Paul Tanaka–in prison–if the criminal gangs within the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (the Executioners out of Compton, the Banditos out of East L.A., and the Jump Out Boys et al. in the Mens’ Central Jail, etc.) are not eradicated.

    The more money they throw at the homeless, the more profiteers will get into the grift. The homeless industrial complex has been established and isn’t going away. It is all grift, writ large.

    As for polyurethane wheels, the greatest invention ever, especially for skateboarding. I wonder if Muscle Beach, where Arnold Schwarzenegger got his start, is still around in Venice, but I am not going there to find out.

  43. Much like the Draft in the olden days, most people just aren’t fit for service anymore. If they were still drafting men into the military, most of those men would be completely useless and it would bog down the entire Military dealing with them. So, they cut everyone loose and switched to all volunteer forces.

    I mention that because I feel like olden days concepts such as “work” and “paying bills” are just way to far beyond the ability of an ever growing proportion of our populace. Be it because of drug addiction, or mental illness, or sheer demoralization, people just can’t contribute meaningfully and they end up living hellish lives.

    What to do about that constitues big part of what we will have to figure out as a civilization over the coming decades. Are we just going to hurl countless millions into the street like how cities used to have Skid Row with homeless alcoholics dying in despair on the sidewalk? Surely with all of our advances in Social Science we can come up with something that works better than that. But then there will always be those geezerly boomers who complain about taxes and don’t want to help anyone who isn’t “helping themselves”.

    We need social services that succeed in alleviating social problems rather than just accepting that the defeated, the downtrodden, and the morons among us are doomed to misery.

  44. What if the mob bought up inner-city real estate depressed by homeless people, and then just made the homeless “an offer they can’t refuse” to leave, couldn’t they make a lot of money? If so, why haven’t they?

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    Oh, I thought maybe they could melt down the polyurethane and smoke it,or something. Thanks.

  46. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    If I understand correctly, the Chinese company Evenflo, which manufactures wheels, prompts the development of other products to use the wheels. Classic case of a hammer in search of a nail.

    Compare and contrast with the Mad Housers who provide part of the solution to homeless: free micro-houses. All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.

    http://madhousers.org

    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @James Speaks

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They've been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks. In 2000 FEMA was purchasing 14 x 60 foot basic model singlewide mobile homes from various manufacturers nationwide for about $10 per sq. ft. FOB factory. Granted, some of the new microhouses are more energy efficient and better built, but that is still a largely trivial difference. The biggest difference with most of the new microhouses is that they are just too fucking micro to live in 365 days a year. (300-400 Sq. Ft.-- but hey, it's airtight and I can heat it all winter with one can of Sterno.) They are also way out of line on a retail price per sq. ft. basis. Most conventional trailer parks are pretty depressing places full of depressing people (for a variety of reasons), but that's not the fault of the trailers.

    There are well run manufactured housing communities, but it really is quite a difficult task with all these "civil rights" and HUD laws on the books to keep a sharp and clean operation up and running. The microhouse (or trailer or mobile home or manufactured house) is no more magic than the dirt underneath it. It's the people and the content of their character stupid. But we're not allowed to judge that anymore.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    , @Curle
    @James Speaks

    “ All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.”

    And all zoning law changes require are neighbors willing to live near micro-houses or, as I like to call them, future vagrant communities.

  47. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    A solution to the homeless population is to form government services to plan for and erect micro-houses for the homeless – and to employ homeless people to staff the new agencies.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @James Speaks

    "employ homeless people to staff the new agencies."

    You might be assuming a higher level of functioning among homeless people than their actual abilities.

    Then again, through my lifetime of dealings with various states' DMV's, there already is a place for people with behavior difficulties.

  48. California gets all the homeless because it doesn’t snow in winter. Sleeping rough is not quite so hard. This is not rocket science. Who wouldn’t go where it’s balmy all year if they became homeless.

    And by the way, most of them are white, and they mostly aren’t crazy anymore. The times changeth. Liberals give them freedom and conservatives jack the rents so high it’s a sin.

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment. It is cheaper for the municipality in the long run. But of course, the rent jacker-uppers oppose this solution. They always oppose any simple and clear and logical solution. Just like employing efficiency/conservation for the energy crisis. Can’t do that. Rich guys would suffer.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @obwandiyag

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment.

    Under communism, gypsies were forced into apartments equal in niceness to those given to workers. They ripped out every convenience and fixture to sell for black market cash. The problem with your generosity is that there are homeless people who don't want an apartment. There are reasons and not all are crazy: I love animals but own no pets because they aren't allowed in my building, or in pretty much any buildings in my area. If you did allow people who have been homeless for habit-forming years to keep pets in their government-provided apartments ... well, you see where that goes ...

    Replies: @TomKat Books

    , @AnotherDad
    @obwandiyag


    Liberals give them freedom and conservatives jack the rents so high it’s a sin.
     
    Huh? What do conservatives have to do with jacking up housing prices?

    The housing price insanity stems partly from progressives land use controls and bureaucracy costs and mostly from massive immigration driving up demand.

    Some of the housing regulation has some merit. Fire codes, earthquake codes. Perhaps some environmental open space preserving regulation is quality-of-life valuable as well. California could actually use stricter fire building codes. It is possible to build houses that are much, much more resistant to catching fire in these California brush fires. Some of this stuff has merit.

    But there's zero merit to mass immigration--the main culprit driving the housing run up.
  49. You “people” kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I’d call you race traitors if you didn’t know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Anon
    @obwandiyag

    Homeless people are disproportionately nonwhite, dumbass.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    , @RadicalCenter
    @obwandiyag

    I have to agree with you.

    Personally, I have no problem paying to help Americans if they have gotten themselves addicted to drugs, even though it is their fault, and even less problem paying to help Americans who are truly mentally ill, which by definition is not their “fault.”

    I just want all categories of the homeless, whatever their race or drug use or level of fault for their predicament, both helped more and forcibly removed from our streets, sidewalks, and parks once and for all.

    , @Alfa158
    @obwandiyag

    If the problem is that rents are too high, homeless people wouldn’t be flooding to areas of the country with the highest rents. If a person is mentally ill or on drugs, any rent above $0 is too high.
    Comment 28 by JohhnyWalker123 to provide free low cost housing and subsistence to the homeless might work, but no one is going to implement it because the homeless and their advocates would scream about being stripped of their humanity and herded into concentration camps.
    Almost all that homeless relief money is going to be spent precisely where it is intended, on middle class government bureaucrats and private industry contractors.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @John Johnson
    @obwandiyag

    You “people” kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I’d call you race traitors if you didn’t know you were already.

    I said I was for increasing spending on the homeless. I'm against running that spending through liberal governments because most of their theories are based on feelz and they have a hard time admitting failure (see drug tolerance in SF).

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    They really aren't given anything but food unless they are on disability and most aren't.

    I'm aware of that.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Do you realize how much it costs to build housing in California? This problem is far more complicated than just throwing money at public apartment buildings. It's very difficult to build apartments in California because they have mastered NIMBY techniques. Liberals are completely full of crap when it comes to actually helping people in need. They pass "Feel good" programs that do nothing and then fight any public housing proposal that might ruin their drive to starbucks.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    And most liberal politicians of SF are against rent caps because so many of them are making money off rentals.

    Liberals on the ground are total rubes and put up with politicians that tolerate violent crime and don't do anything that might help workers. This is because most liberals are indoctrinated to do whatever the mainstream media tells them. CNN could tell them that educated people now support beastiality and SF liberal rubes would be lining up to legalize it.

    So no I don't hate White people or the homeless. I hate liberals.

    , @Paperback Writer
    @obwandiyag

    Who the hell are you, Jimmy McMillan?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dt889tUZaLI

    go to 1:42

    , @Paperback Writer
    @obwandiyag


    And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy.
     
    Where do you get that from?

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @tyrone
    @obwandiyag

    "You “people” kill me".........well, we try to make the world a better place.

    , @personfellowindividual
    @obwandiyag

    If the ones who aren't crazy and/or drug addicts want to get off the streets, there are resources available everywhere you look. The charities are capable of helping them most of all.

    No, the problem is the crazies. They don't want to be helped, and they won't help themselves. Sane people don't pull their pants down and shit on the sidewalk in plain sight of other people. Sane people don't shoot up on the sidewalk and zonk out for half a day, oblivious to the world.

    They are a threat to health, safety, commerce, civic interaction, and mere decency, and it's a government's duty to take care of exactly this kind of problem. Somehow, the Democrats who run virtually all the cities in America are failing to do the most important job they were hired to do, which is look after the welfare of their tax-paying, law-abiding citizens. Not thousands of filthy, degenerate madmen who contribute nothing whatsoever to society.

    People who are down on their luck and making an effort to get back into the real world are worthy of assistance and sympathy. People who don't want anything but the next high, are much less deserving, no matter what color, gender or religion they are. Crazy people who won't take their prescribed meds need to be institutionalized, full stop.

  50. @Thucydides
    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @The Alarmist, @TomKat Books

    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    Skating girls’ rear ends–and tank topped front ends.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @AnotherDad

    To illustrate:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_mF4AONqwc

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  51. @interesting
    2020 over 66,000 people in Los Angeles County were """experiencing homelessness"""

    There's a real name for that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCB42DDDXPI

    Replies: @John Derbyshire, @Stan d Mute

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  52. PSR says:

    Leftists are such fools to think we believe them. I heard an interview on NPR (yes, I know) with a Minneapolis city councilman discussing some asinine measure that will be on the ballot this fall dealing with public safety and he said they need to find new ways to become a “crime free city”. Yes, this was an adult, a leftist half-wit, but, still, an adult.

    • Replies: @anon
    @PSR

    Yes, this was an adult, a leftist half-wit, but, still, an adult.

    Only in the chronological sense.

    Emotionally and mentally? Somewhere in mid-high.

  53. I’ve worked for the LAFD amongst the homeless for over 30 years. The complete failure to acknowledge the causes of homelessness has led to the complete failure of every solution that has been tried. I would estimate over half need to be institutionalized. Due to mental illness or substance abuse they are not rational actors and no amount of free housing or voluntary programs will ever get them off of the street.

    The big change I’ve seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They’ve made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won’t institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words “jobs” or “work” are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    The other factor that municipal idiots like Eric Garcetti can’t quite grasp is that by definition they’re homeless. That means it’s almost impossible to distinguish between one who has been in your city for years or one who showed up on the bus yesterday. When one city has better benefits than another its supply of homeless and thus demand for benefits can never be satisfied. Thus Angelenos are on the hook for thousands of recent arrivals from all over the United States because the idiot Mayor keeps writing the checks.

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small that I don’t think there is anyone who would argue against generously helping them with public funds.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin, Neuday
    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Kevin Rudd

    Thanks for the comment. This accords with my observation. Most of the homeless are severely mentally ill and/or alcoholic or addicted. The number of meritorious, but just hard-luck, zeroed-out folks whom we would gladly help to get back on their feet is minuscule. It's funny how all this data is being scrupulously collected, except for mental health evaluation and substance abuse.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Kevin Rudd


    The big change I’ve seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They’ve made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won’t institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words “jobs” or “work” are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.
     

    Excellent comment Mr. Rudd--best of the bunch, pick of the litter.

    This line struck me as a particular gem:


    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil.
     
    So much social destruction has flowed from our welfare system not understanding this.

    "Work organizes life". And builds self-respect. We can give people work--plenty of unskilled work to do. But no one should be on the public teat for nothing. (Unless truly institutionally incapable.)

    "Work organizes life". Things decay without it. Heck, if i didn't have iSteve, i'd be out on the street causing trouble.

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Kevin Rudd


    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small
     
    And yet right there I am calling BULLSHIT! The actual number of white Americans who are DESPERATELY in need of help is staggering. They have zero net worth. They have zero investment in “the stock market (booming)”. They are discriminated against in every job application (except perhaps the small local companies that value performance more than performative). Negroes may in fact be disproportionately fucked. But in absolute numbers, poor whitey is beyond fucked.

    Curiously, this is an exact mirror of 1855. Unz has, I think, “They Were White and They Were Slaves” online. Ron’s mentioned it in one of his articles. I encourage you to read it and elucidate us all on how the lot of the poor honkie has improved in the last 150+ years.

    Replies: @Kevin Rudd

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Kevin Rudd

    I had an elderly neighbor about 15 years ago whose deadbeat daughter moved from Maryland to California because the welfare was better. States once had residency requirements to receive welfare but they were struck down by SCOTUS which said they were a property right. We've been encouraging this for years and many people make good money "helping" the homeless.

  54. right because homelessness is a lifestyle choice and the honeless are keen interstate arbitrageurs.

    is steve dumb or does he just play a dumb guy on the interwebs?

    • Replies: @Kevin Rudd
    @anon

    Yet, it happens all the time. Go spend some time at the bus station on 7th St. in Los Angeles and you will see that this is not uncommon.

    , @John Johnson
    @anon

    right because homelessness is a lifestyle choice and the homeless are keen interstate arbitrageurs.

    For some it is indeed a lifestyle choice. There are interviews on youtube with homeless that basically talk about themselves as nomads and don't want a normal job.

    Are they representative of most homeless? I don't know, probably not. My guess is that the majority are addicted to heroin or meth and burned out of a normal life. When I lived in the city I didn't believe for one second that the majority were unable to work. I constantly saw able bodied men begging for money. There is kind of a junkie street culture that exists. Young men in their 20s basically drop out of society and roam the streets. Once they get addicted it is hard for them to return.

  55. Yes, they are paying people to be homeless zombies.

    If, instead, you taxed them (fined, arrested, confiscated property, forcibly removed them) you would have far fewer if any, zombies on your sidewalks or beaches.

    Like feral cats. If you feed them they multiply.

    Left/liberal/mush-heads treat the “homeless” like helpless pets, unable to live on their own, with no agency.

    So treating humans like dumb animals is the “humane” way to solve their problems.

  56. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    Hmm.

    That’s just under $10,000 for every single homeless person every year for a decade.

    Shift just one half of one percent into someone’s pocket for “administrative services” and somebody’s picking up $3.25 million every year for ten years running.

    $32.5 million sounds like a nice gig/grift if you can get it . . .

  57. Oh, yes – “The Great Hobo Migration” to the Left Coast. Here in Seattle, the vast majority of the homeless in the encampments are from out of town (75% from outside of King County, so likely ~90% from outside of Seattle proper) which means they came from places with lower rents. And they call their new home “Freeattle” because of the city’s permissive law enforcement and culture.

    I wish Sowell covered the Great Hobo Migration in “Intellectuals and Society”. The activist class continues to be successful in obscuring the issue as a housing affordability crisis. If there were balanced media coverage of the issue I believe even my lefty neighbors would be in favor of a tough love policy. Most of Seattle’s affluent suburbs have a policy whereby if the city can find shelter, any homeless will be forced to accept that shelter or go elsewhere (likely Seattle). But these types of policies – which effectively put an end to the outdoor encampments – are too right wing for Seattle and other large blue cities.

  58. @Kevin Rudd
    I've worked for the LAFD amongst the homeless for over 30 years. The complete failure to acknowledge the causes of homelessness has led to the complete failure of every solution that has been tried. I would estimate over half need to be institutionalized. Due to mental illness or substance abuse they are not rational actors and no amount of free housing or voluntary programs will ever get them off of the street.

    The big change I've seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They've made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won't institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words "jobs" or "work" are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    The other factor that municipal idiots like Eric Garcetti can't quite grasp is that by definition they're homeless. That means it's almost impossible to distinguish between one who has been in your city for years or one who showed up on the bus yesterday. When one city has better benefits than another its supply of homeless and thus demand for benefits can never be satisfied. Thus Angelenos are on the hook for thousands of recent arrivals from all over the United States because the idiot Mayor keeps writing the checks.

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small that I don't think there is anyone who would argue against generously helping them with public funds.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @AnotherDad, @Stan d Mute, @Jim Don Bob

    Thanks for the comment. This accords with my observation. Most of the homeless are severely mentally ill and/or alcoholic or addicted. The number of meritorious, but just hard-luck, zeroed-out folks whom we would gladly help to get back on their feet is minuscule. It’s funny how all this data is being scrupulously collected, except for mental health evaluation and substance abuse.

  59. Homelessness as an individual circumstance is multi-causal–including some societal issues like increased drug use, family breakdown, and dysgenic fertility.

    But homelessness as a social problem is entirely just another instantiation of minoritarianism.

    The needs and desires of the majority ignored, pushed aside, to cater to some minority.

    The “homeless problem” is not remotely difficult to solve. You either have a “skid row” area they are allowed to be in (old school) or (AD recommended) build a camp far outside of town where the homeless are allowed to camp and do their crazy shit (drugs). Then you arrest anyone trying to camp, piss, panhandle, or just generally being a problem for productive citizens … and pack ’em off to the boonies. (If they are dangerously nuts–lock ’em up in the nut bin.) Enforce relentlessly–problem solved and your community is livable again. Like so much else in life, if you are hard in enforcing your standards … suddenly your joint will have those standards!

    As with other “intractable” problems–the border, black crime–the issue isn’t the difficulty of a solution. The solutions are straightforward. The issue is will. Stand up to minoritarianism and do it–problem solved.

    Minoritarianism is simply a cancer. Either a society/nation/civilization enforces the majority’s norms allowing it to flourish and reproduce itself–or it dies.

  60. @Kevin Rudd
    I've worked for the LAFD amongst the homeless for over 30 years. The complete failure to acknowledge the causes of homelessness has led to the complete failure of every solution that has been tried. I would estimate over half need to be institutionalized. Due to mental illness or substance abuse they are not rational actors and no amount of free housing or voluntary programs will ever get them off of the street.

    The big change I've seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They've made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won't institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words "jobs" or "work" are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    The other factor that municipal idiots like Eric Garcetti can't quite grasp is that by definition they're homeless. That means it's almost impossible to distinguish between one who has been in your city for years or one who showed up on the bus yesterday. When one city has better benefits than another its supply of homeless and thus demand for benefits can never be satisfied. Thus Angelenos are on the hook for thousands of recent arrivals from all over the United States because the idiot Mayor keeps writing the checks.

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small that I don't think there is anyone who would argue against generously helping them with public funds.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @AnotherDad, @Stan d Mute, @Jim Don Bob

    The big change I’ve seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They’ve made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won’t institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words “jobs” or “work” are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    Excellent comment Mr. Rudd–best of the bunch, pick of the litter.

    This line struck me as a particular gem:

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil.

    So much social destruction has flowed from our welfare system not understanding this.

    “Work organizes life”. And builds self-respect. We can give people work–plenty of unskilled work to do. But no one should be on the public teat for nothing. (Unless truly institutionally incapable.)

    “Work organizes life”. Things decay without it. Heck, if i didn’t have iSteve, i’d be out on the street causing trouble.

  61. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:


    so why alaska and hawaii? and nevada?

    anon: because they are for so many unfortunates not born there, escape…the farthest they can go trying to find a home, a place better than whence they came. the same with greater NYC, “the greatest city in the world”…but i admit MA doesn’t fit. jim cramer was homeless in LA for a spell. so was zach “i hate mel gibson” galafianakis.

    rainbow dildo butt monkey, chair of the rice economics department and steve’s undergraduate advisor: because “the left” lefts in a totally lefty way…fucking leftists!..why won’t ron let me leave the park?

    needless to say for non-autsists…the US has NO left. bernie sold out…but it still has adolph “hitler” reed, jr. the world’s smartest negro.

    • Replies: @res
    @anon

    Here is a state map by number of homeless. Notice how CA has over 25% of the homeless in the entire country (select "Percentage of Total Homelessness by State").
    https://www.usich.gov/tools-for-action/map
    It has about 12% of the US population overall.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

  62. … so two and a half trannies? Is one, like, having trouble making up his mind?

  63. Remarkable that Scott owes his seat to his own Stop the Steal now turns up his nose at those who prevented what happened to Trump from happening to him.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Desiderius


    How do we trick the GOP into thinking Americans are Cubans
     
    Boy did he nail our problem there. Great tweet.
  64. @anon
    right because homelessness is a lifestyle choice and the honeless are keen interstate arbitrageurs.

    is steve dumb or does he just play a dumb guy on the interwebs?

    Replies: @Kevin Rudd, @John Johnson

    Yet, it happens all the time. Go spend some time at the bus station on 7th St. in Los Angeles and you will see that this is not uncommon.

  65. some of the volunteers are probably thinking this:
    you will never own a home
    you will never marry
    you will never have kids
    you will never retire
    you will never work a job that respects things like “being at home” or “eight hour day” or “chew people out in private and not in public”
    you will never work the career you wanted
    you will never pay off student debt
    but do pile all that post-debt income into a house

    also, for the people seeing this as a bit dark
    will your vote ever matter? will the lockdown ever end?

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @J.Ross

    You're stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they're dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America's modest restriction will never end if we don't invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we're going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    Replies: @anon, @bomag, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer

  66. @obwandiyag
    California gets all the homeless because it doesn't snow in winter. Sleeping rough is not quite so hard. This is not rocket science. Who wouldn't go where it's balmy all year if they became homeless.

    And by the way, most of them are white, and they mostly aren't crazy anymore. The times changeth. Liberals give them freedom and conservatives jack the rents so high it's a sin.

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment. It is cheaper for the municipality in the long run. But of course, the rent jacker-uppers oppose this solution. They always oppose any simple and clear and logical solution. Just like employing efficiency/conservation for the energy crisis. Can't do that. Rich guys would suffer.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment.

    Under communism, gypsies were forced into apartments equal in niceness to those given to workers. They ripped out every convenience and fixture to sell for black market cash. The problem with your generosity is that there are homeless people who don’t want an apartment. There are reasons and not all are crazy: I love animals but own no pets because they aren’t allowed in my building, or in pretty much any buildings in my area. If you did allow people who have been homeless for habit-forming years to keep pets in their government-provided apartments … well, you see where that goes …

    • Replies: @TomKat Books
    @J.Ross

    Throughout the country Section 8 housing cannot have copper plumbing -- it will be torn out and scrapped for cash by the tenants. Only PVC can be used.

  67. 28% of the homeless in America live in California, and according this article, half of California’s homeless are in LA county.
    So 14% of all the homeless people in the United States live in LA county.
    What a paradise!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Exador

    Orange County next door probably adds a few percent too.

    I can recall as a Boy Scout in 1970 and 1971 visiting the colossal Moreton Bay Fig tree next to the bus station in downtown Santa Barbara. But by the next time I got back, maybe in 1980, its park was overrun by bums. Apparently, homeless beggars used it as a national rendezvous point: If one friend went to NYC to beg for the summer and another to Chicago, they'd say something like, Meet you under the Fig Tree in November.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  68. @Dacian Julien Soros
    Let me see if I read that title correctly: If a city (or nation, or species) houses its homeless, more people will forego their homes and go live on a beach.

    Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!

    Replies: @anon, @interesting

    Let me see if I read that title correctly: If a city (or nation, or species) houses its homeless, more people will forego their homes and go live on a beach.

    You did not read it correctly.

  69. @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    Sometimes your knowledge is too esoteric for jokes.

    Replies: @anon

    Sometimes your knowledge is too esoteric for jokes.

    Dude, it was not esoteric. It was obvious. Obvious.

  70. @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    You're so weird dude

    Replies: @Carol

    He’s not wrong. I was stuck in Dallas trying to find someplace nice to skate on the new quiet wheels, eating my heart out that I was so far away from that sweet, long paved “boardwalk” at Venice.

    It took years for other towns to catch up. Now they all have skateparks!

    I was born too late.

  71. @Barnard
    OT: The Cleveland Indians do their part to help Major League Baseball drive away as many of their remaining fans as possible. I can't tell if this name change is immediate, ESPN still has the Indians up on their website for now. I am sure the fans will be won over by a two minute video narrated by noted northeast Ohio resident and lifelong Indians fan Tom Hanks talking about their traditions while a ten year old Black Keys song plays in the background. I can't imagine giving these people my money.


    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/31868331/cleveland-changing-name-indians-guardians

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @SafeNow

    Barnard, When my son moved to Cleveland the guy down the street had Chief Wahoo painted on his house, image was about 8 feet high. This should play well with the Indian fans.Sigh.

  72. @anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    “Homeless” is an interesting term.

    It is a political term, coined by some libtards back in the 80's. Because "bum" and "beggar" are perjorative, and "The Homeless" was a useful club. Still is, but not as useful as before.

    Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    Not entirely, Joe, but to a very large extent...yes.

    Hey, I have an idea, but it could be whack. If a lot of people in the US are existing in tent camps because they don't have jobs, and they don't have a lot of skills so the main jobs they can work are minimum wage, maybe we should not import 100,000 more minimum-wage-level people every month?

    Whattaya think? Crazy or not?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Carol

    OneEightThree, you too funny, but they are still crossing the border into California everyday.

  73. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    …which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    And a movie. That started a fad. Not a real long-lived fad, though.

  74. I never liked Venice Beach. Impossible to park, too many people, some of them quite weird, also some obvious gang activity around. In terms of touristy places, Santa Monica seemed better, but it was also full of homeless people, and now it might be worse.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    Venice is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, while next door Santa Monica is an independent municipality.

    The last time I spent much time at the beach was in 2018. I was surprised that Santa Monica's homeless problem was relatively under control, while once you crossed the exact boundary into Venice, the homeless were large and in charge. Oddly, I sat at a table with the Santa Monica city manager, a conservatively dressed white man in his 60s who looked like the type who would have been city manager in the 1960s, a few weeks later. But I didn't get around to asking him how he was keeping the homeless from overrunning Santa Monica. Anyway, he retired rather abruptly during the Racial Reckoning.

    My guess was that Santa Monica cops were enforcing a rule that's basically: street people can do non-criminal tasks like look through garbage cans for aluminum cans, but they have to do it alone. The homeless in 2018 were not allowed to congregate, apparently. The homeless tended to look they knew they were in Santa Monica on the forebearance of the authorities and tried to act in manners that wouldn't call attention to themselves.

    In contrast, the moment you stepped over the boundary between Santa Monica into Venice on the famous Bike Path, it was suddenly a giant homeless party, with tent campers whooping it up together.

    I tried to find something online articulating Santa Monica's policy, but I couldn't. Perhaps the SM authorities kept it hush-hush to avoid arousing local liberals. Or something.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alfa158

  75. • Replies: @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Okay, you got me, this is, uhh, radiation? I have no idea.

  76. TG says:

    Never forget that it has been official elite policy to force the growth of California’s population. It was about 10 million in 1950… and now, mostly because of government population policy, it is about 40 million.

    FYI governments do not have immigration policies, they have population policies. And it’s not the number of immigrants, it’s the total increase in population due to immigration.

    This forced population growth was jammed down our throats against the wishes of the bulk of the American people – because ‘democracy’ is fascism when it gets in the way of the rich making a quick buck.

    We were told that forcing the population up was guaranteed to make things better, that it could not possibly ever have any negative consequences at all. That was a lie, wasn’t it?

    The annual precipitation over California has trended constant, and now with four times as many people water is running short. Sure, that could be solved with massive (unprecedented in human history) investments in desalinization and changing the entire structure of agriculture to drip irrigation etc., but none of that AUTOMATICALLY happens just because you jam in more people, right?

    And did quadrupling the population AUTOMATICALLY quadruple the availability of housing? Of course not. Doing that would require ripping up the entire installed base of housing and transportation and rebuilding it to a higher density – while people are still living there – it’s not clear there is enough money in the world for that. So instead, rents and commuting times skyrocketed.

    And sure, a lot of the homelessness problem is due to laziness and/or bad government policies – but – would homelessness be as bad if rents were a fraction of what they are today, and real blue-collar hourly wages double or triple?

    But no, we can’t blame forced population increases. It’s all ‘systemic racism’ or maybe ‘commie-pinko liberalism.’

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @TG

    jobs and cheap housing are great, but the new designer drugs are much greater.

    So, Yes, homelessness would be just as bad now as if we had better governance. People who don't do drugs have no idea how powerful and all-consuming they can be for others.

  77. @R.G. Camara
    I've always wondered why any homeless people stay anywhere above the Mason-Dixon line.

    Then I realized that applying logic to the situation is the first thing a homeless bum isn't likely to do.

    Replies: @Flip

    “going where the weather suits my clothes”

  78. @PSR
    Leftists are such fools to think we believe them. I heard an interview on NPR (yes, I know) with a Minneapolis city councilman discussing some asinine measure that will be on the ballot this fall dealing with public safety and he said they need to find new ways to become a "crime free city". Yes, this was an adult, a leftist half-wit, but, still, an adult.

    Replies: @anon

    Yes, this was an adult, a leftist half-wit, but, still, an adult.

    Only in the chronological sense.

    Emotionally and mentally? Somewhere in mid-high.

  79. Anon[180] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ron Mexico
    @Anon

    Maybe he is related to Cathy "so what you are saying is" Newman

    Replies: @Anon

    After the infamous Cathy Newman interview I noticed that I did that also. I’ve managed to cut down since then, but when done right, restating your opponent’s argument, steelmanning it, and then pointing out problems with it, is one of the best ways to debate. It’s just that Cathy Newman did it so badly, by strawmanning Peterson. Glenn Loury is a master of how to do it right.

    As for Steve, he’s taken “almost as if” beyond a cliche’d tic to being a personal trademark.

  80. @Charon
    Hmm. If you're going to be homeless, choose a place with great weather, year-round. Huh? Free money too? Solution without a problem here.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    I live here. The massive mentally ill and/or drug-addicted homeless population here in LA has been a serious and dangerous problem for my wife, children, and me. Funny line, though.

  81. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    Homeless people are disproportionately nonwhite, dumbass.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Anon

    "According to data they collected, 70% of the Venice homeless population is male, 29% is female, 1% identify as transgender, 57% were White, 24% were Black and 13% were Hispanic."

    I love you dumbasses who didn't read the article and yet feel qualified to comment.

    Replies: @Anon

  82. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    I have to agree with you.

    Personally, I have no problem paying to help Americans if they have gotten themselves addicted to drugs, even though it is their fault, and even less problem paying to help Americans who are truly mentally ill, which by definition is not their “fault.”

    I just want all categories of the homeless, whatever their race or drug use or level of fault for their predicament, both helped more and forcibly removed from our streets, sidewalks, and parks once and for all.

  83. There are real workable solutions to this dire problem, but in our current CA dystopia of harm avoidance hysteria, equality obsession, and the total leftist gridlock in LA and Sacramento, it’s very unlikely our bubble-dwelling overlords would ever entertain it.

    1. Vigorously enforce existing loitering laws and strictly forbid camping/sleeping in public parks and public spaces. Authorize new police funding to facilitate the resulting increase in homeless patrols, arrests, and processing.

    2. Divert the approved homeless funding to expanding mental health care facilities and rehab centers to contain the homeless who fall into these situations.

    3. Authorize permanent humane institutionalization for the mentally unstable homeless who are otherwise deemed unemployable and a public nuisance. This was how the mentally ill were managed decades ago and why so few mental patients chronically lived on the streets.

    4. Structure the above in a two-year phase-in plan to get the necessary infrastructure and personnel built up to accommodate the influx and get a public awareness campaign going for the remaining homeless to voluntarily leave LA and CA to avoid the above.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Element59

    There used to a huge state insane asylum complex in rural Oxnard near the Pacific, with very tranquil architecture and grounds and excellent weather. It's now the nice campus of Cal State Channel Islands.

    Replies: @Alfa158

  84. @Barnard
    OT: The Cleveland Indians do their part to help Major League Baseball drive away as many of their remaining fans as possible. I can't tell if this name change is immediate, ESPN still has the Indians up on their website for now. I am sure the fans will be won over by a two minute video narrated by noted northeast Ohio resident and lifelong Indians fan Tom Hanks talking about their traditions while a ten year old Black Keys song plays in the background. I can't imagine giving these people my money.


    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/31868331/cleveland-changing-name-indians-guardians

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @SafeNow

    The “Guardians”? Who thought that up?

    Took me about 30 seconds to do better–the Cleveland “Erie”. The lake and the native people it’s named for. (Who no longer exist–but not because of the white man–so can’t complain.)

    Don’t like that–how about the “Cuyahoga Fire”?

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
    @AnotherDad

    I think they looked up all the words in the dictionary ending in "-dians" and decided they didn't want to be the Comedians or the Custodians.

    , @bomag
    @AnotherDad

    Looks like another example of the perils of doing things by committee. Especially in this sensitive age.

    I'd like to see the runners up:

    Cleveland Anodynes

    Cleveland Neutrals

    Cleveland Kindness

    Cleveland Sorry (wait, that kind of works)

  85. @anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    “Homeless” is an interesting term.

    It is a political term, coined by some libtards back in the 80's. Because "bum" and "beggar" are perjorative, and "The Homeless" was a useful club. Still is, but not as useful as before.

    Mental health and addiction, treat them and you solve your homeless problem.

    Not entirely, Joe, but to a very large extent...yes.

    Hey, I have an idea, but it could be whack. If a lot of people in the US are existing in tent camps because they don't have jobs, and they don't have a lot of skills so the main jobs they can work are minimum wage, maybe we should not import 100,000 more minimum-wage-level people every month?

    Whattaya think? Crazy or not?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Carol

    I first heard “homeless” used by Mitch Snyder, an activist who got all sorts of nice press for his do-gooder work in DC early in the first Reagan admin. Funny that.

    Right off I figured the “homeless” were the dregs of the hippie “street people” plus some bag ladies.

    And look at us now.

  86. @J.Ross
    some of the volunteers are probably thinking this:
    you will never own a home
    you will never marry
    you will never have kids
    you will never retire
    you will never work a job that respects things like "being at home" or "eight hour day" or "chew people out in private and not in public"
    you will never work the career you wanted
    you will never pay off student debt
    but do pile all that post-debt income into a house
    ...
    also, for the people seeing this as a bit dark
    will your vote ever matter? will the lockdown ever end?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    You’re stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they’re dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America’s modest restriction will never end if we don’t invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we’re going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    • Replies: @anon
    @JohnPlywood

    Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they’re dirt poor.

    Retarded, boring troll. Just plain boring.

    , @bomag
    @JohnPlywood


    Working hours have declined since the 1970s.
     
    Only when you average the grifter and non-grifter class.

    America’s modest restriction will never end if we don’t invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did.
     
    You know nothing.
    , @Paperback Writer
    @JohnPlywood

    You're stupid as fuck. Lockdown for what? A virus whose average victim is 70 and/or obese?

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1191568/reported-deaths-from-covid-by-age-us/

    Sweden:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-europe-mortality/sweden-saw-lower-2020-death-spike-than-much-of-europe-data-idUSKBN2BG1R9

    Wanna know why, genius?

    BECAUSE LOCKDOWNS SKILL.

    , @Paperback Writer
    @JohnPlywood

    Here's another thing dickwad.

    You have a virus that kills frail elderly people. So whaddya do? If you're a Democrat governor, you release the infected elderly into nursing homes, which then exterminate the population.

    But that's OK because who needs all those old white people?

    If they were black, do you think that Biden would have done this:

    https://nypost.com/2021/07/23/doj-drops-civil-rights-probe-of-cuomo-nursing-home-covid-scandal/

    Oh, God, no. If the majority of the murdered elderly had been "Black," we'd never hear the end of it.

  87. @AnotherDad
    @Barnard

    The "Guardians"? Who thought that up?

    Took me about 30 seconds to do better--the Cleveland "Erie". The lake and the native people it's named for. (Who no longer exist--but not because of the white man--so can't complain.)

    Don't like that--how about the "Cuyahoga Fire"?

    Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat, @bomag

    I think they looked up all the words in the dictionary ending in “-dians” and decided they didn’t want to be the Comedians or the Custodians.

  88. @Sick 'n Tired
    @beavertales

    Look at the salaries that are being paid out to people who work for these homeless nonprofit/advocacy/outreach groups. Most are well into the 6 figures. They were discussing it on Joe Rogan's podcast not to long ago. That's where the biggest chunk of money is going.

    Replies: @bomag

    Agree.

    First thing they do is rent office space and hire staff.

    Then start having meetings.

    That’s as far as some programs go.

  89. Anonymous[289] • Disclaimer says:

    A lot of years ago, I remember the city of Chicago loading a bus with homeless, and shipping them to the San Francisco area. Probably been going on since then. Being homeless in California beats the hell out of being homeless in Illinois. I was once asked for money by a homeless (?) man, in key west. I actually yelled at him. “You’re living in key west, and begging for money.” For a second, I was actually jealous.

  90. Since the invention of polyurethane wheels in the late 1970s, Los Angeles’s Venice Beach has been wildly popular with tourists.

    I’m not going to any Venice without gondoliers.

  91. @Dacian Julien Soros
    Let me see if I read that title correctly: If a city (or nation, or species) houses its homeless, more people will forego their homes and go live on a beach.

    Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!

    Replies: @anon, @interesting

    “Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!”

    Well yeah. The life you describe is about $4K a month.

    The life they are living only requires one to buy the drugs they want.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @interesting

    The temperature on Venice Beach is between 60 F and 82 F for about 98% of the hours in the year.

    The Southern California beach climate is really nice.

    , @Dacian Julien Soros
    @interesting

    Maybe I was too subtle? Even if LA county or city would stop giving free food to these homeless, it's not like these people will obtain that 4K income, or would otherwise evaporate. They will just steal from the stores and homes in the area.

    Americans can't jail all their half a million homeless. Even if they would be able to jail them, it would be more expensive than any other option.

    Of course, the cheapest option is to tax, and tax, and tax, any entity or person owning more than one home, until they give up hoarding and renting. You can easily bring down the value of an American home to thousands of dollars. Despite any claim that you would lose money, you can learn from Trump how to deduct the building costs from taxes over 30 years, at which point it becomes a free home. Yes, it would be a half-ruin, but most people would prefer that to sleeping rough, even in the amazing Venice Beach. I wish we had these deductions in Romania.

    There are enough homes in almost any country outside Subsaharan Africa, to house their population and even more. How could the tens (hundreds?) of thousands move from New York to Florida, if there wouldn't have been vacancies? Unfortunately, your most beloved president, Trump, also led the way in the idea that you must hold on to buildings.

    Replies: @bomag

  92. @Thucydides
    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @The Alarmist, @TomKat Books

    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @The Alarmist

    It’s nice to see women with trim figures, with not a single obese twerker in sight. I suppose the coke kept the hunger pangs at bay. It’s funny when you go back through the history of housing construction and look at all of the new futuristic ideas on solving the housing problems with low cost housing. And basically the examples all led to nothing.

    Replies: @Curle

  93. @anon
    right because homelessness is a lifestyle choice and the honeless are keen interstate arbitrageurs.

    is steve dumb or does he just play a dumb guy on the interwebs?

    Replies: @Kevin Rudd, @John Johnson

    right because homelessness is a lifestyle choice and the homeless are keen interstate arbitrageurs.

    For some it is indeed a lifestyle choice. There are interviews on youtube with homeless that basically talk about themselves as nomads and don’t want a normal job.

    Are they representative of most homeless? I don’t know, probably not. My guess is that the majority are addicted to heroin or meth and burned out of a normal life. When I lived in the city I didn’t believe for one second that the majority were unable to work. I constantly saw able bodied men begging for money. There is kind of a junkie street culture that exists. Young men in their 20s basically drop out of society and roam the streets. Once they get addicted it is hard for them to return.

  94. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    If the problem is that rents are too high, homeless people wouldn’t be flooding to areas of the country with the highest rents. If a person is mentally ill or on drugs, any rent above $0 is too high.
    Comment 28 by JohhnyWalker123 to provide free low cost housing and subsistence to the homeless might work, but no one is going to implement it because the homeless and their advocates would scream about being stripped of their humanity and herded into concentration camps.
    Almost all that homeless relief money is going to be spent precisely where it is intended, on middle class government bureaucrats and private industry contractors.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Alfa158

    Alfa, some place in California, either SF or Berkeley, and I am too lazy to look it up, the county or city has set up a building for the 'unhoused' (preferred term), The building has tents set up inside in orderly rows, with access to indoor toilets and water. BUT, there are rules against drugs and alcohol and smoking and pets, so too restrictive. The homeless have turned Peoples Park in Berkeley into a no go zone for regular citizens. A camp, far away from society, which by the way supports these people, is not a bad idea, but will never happen.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  95. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    You “people” kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I’d call you race traitors if you didn’t know you were already.

    I said I was for increasing spending on the homeless. I’m against running that spending through liberal governments because most of their theories are based on feelz and they have a hard time admitting failure (see drug tolerance in SF).

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    They really aren’t given anything but food unless they are on disability and most aren’t.

    I’m aware of that.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Do you realize how much it costs to build housing in California? This problem is far more complicated than just throwing money at public apartment buildings. It’s very difficult to build apartments in California because they have mastered NIMBY techniques. Liberals are completely full of crap when it comes to actually helping people in need. They pass “Feel good” programs that do nothing and then fight any public housing proposal that might ruin their drive to starbucks.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    And most liberal politicians of SF are against rent caps because so many of them are making money off rentals.

    Liberals on the ground are total rubes and put up with politicians that tolerate violent crime and don’t do anything that might help workers. This is because most liberals are indoctrinated to do whatever the mainstream media tells them. CNN could tell them that educated people now support beastiality and SF liberal rubes would be lining up to legalize it.

    So no I don’t hate White people or the homeless. I hate liberals.

  96. @beavertales
    6.5 billion to spend on roughly 66,000 people over 10 years.

    I'd like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    Replies: @Anthony Aaron, @Sick 'n Tired, @John Johnson, @fish, @JohnnyWalker123, @MM, @James Speaks, @Paul Jolliffe, @res

    I’d like to see the breakdown of where the money went. How much is in private bank accounts, and what path did it take to get there.

    That seems like one of the best use cases for cryptocurrency I have heard.

  97. @anon
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/2019_PEP-ICH_Population-Homeless_population_ratios.png

    so why alaska and hawaii? and nevada?

    anon: because they are for so many unfortunates not born there, escape...the farthest they can go trying to find a home, a place better than whence they came. the same with greater NYC, "the greatest city in the world"...but i admit MA doesn't fit. jim cramer was homeless in LA for a spell. so was zach "i hate mel gibson" galafianakis.

    rainbow dildo butt monkey, chair of the rice economics department and steve's undergraduate advisor: because "the left" lefts in a totally lefty way...fucking leftists!..why won't ron let me leave the park?

    needless to say for non-autsists...the US has NO left. bernie sold out...but it still has adolph "hitler" reed, jr. the world's smartest negro.

    Replies: @res

    Here is a state map by number of homeless. Notice how CA has over 25% of the homeless in the entire country (select “Percentage of Total Homelessness by State”).
    https://www.usich.gov/tools-for-action/map
    It has about 12% of the US population overall.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @res


    Here is a state map by number of homeless.
     
    Well, a state-by-state map. What sticks out is comparing states with similar total populations but wide differences in homeless numbers: Texas/California, Florida/New York, Wisconsin/Minnesota.

    Pennsylvania has 60% of the population of New York, but barely one-seventh the number of homeless. Too bad we don't have maps breaking it down by county. (Or do we?) I imagine a large majority of New York's are huddled in the City. Can't imagine being homeless in Watertown or Salamanca. Brrr.

    Here is a map from 2013. Note that the differences between states are not as vast:


    https://i2.wp.com/www.theurbanist.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/homelessness-by-state1.png


    How much of this is a difference in numbers, and how much a difference in definition? We could be looking at 50 different standards.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    , @stillCARealist
    @res

    25%? I'll bet it's higher than that. Don't we also have close to a third of all welfare recipients here?

    12% of the total US population in CA, but a clear majority of its dregs: This is the curse of good weather. The blessing is the good weather.

  98. @Alfa158
    @obwandiyag

    If the problem is that rents are too high, homeless people wouldn’t be flooding to areas of the country with the highest rents. If a person is mentally ill or on drugs, any rent above $0 is too high.
    Comment 28 by JohhnyWalker123 to provide free low cost housing and subsistence to the homeless might work, but no one is going to implement it because the homeless and their advocates would scream about being stripped of their humanity and herded into concentration camps.
    Almost all that homeless relief money is going to be spent precisely where it is intended, on middle class government bureaucrats and private industry contractors.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Alfa, some place in California, either SF or Berkeley, and I am too lazy to look it up, the county or city has set up a building for the ‘unhoused’ (preferred term), The building has tents set up inside in orderly rows, with access to indoor toilets and water. BUT, there are rules against drugs and alcohol and smoking and pets, so too restrictive. The homeless have turned Peoples Park in Berkeley into a no go zone for regular citizens. A camp, far away from society, which by the way supports these people, is not a bad idea, but will never happen.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Buffalo Joe

    UC Berkeley Athletics spent $500M+ to retro-eq’proof an old football stadium into a palace. Subsequently, tickets didn’t sell well, so the AD was financially ruined.

    The regents then bailed it out, but that wrecked its own finances. So it has needed to scramble for money.

    UCB, owner of People’s Park, will soon be evicting the bums and druggies encamped there in order to construct revenue generating facilities (I think dorms). (When AD began the football stadium project, some tree hugger stayed up in a tree, on the grounds, for a year in protest of the planned removal of trees).

    Meanwhile, as a condition of bailout, the AD was forced to cede its T&F stadium, located on the opposite side of the campus, back to the regents. They’re planning some sort of commercial development, e.g. shops and apartments, on the site.

    UC just announced a tuition increase.

    Public education at its finest.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  99. 70% of the Venice homeless population is male, 29% is female,

    How on earth do those poor women survive?

  100. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    Who the hell are you, Jimmy McMillan?

    go to 1:42

    • Thanks: tyrone
  101. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy.

    Where do you get that from?

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Paperback Writer

    He makes it up, just like Plywood does. And Steve loves you all, because your posts are approved automatically while many others among us wait from half a day to two days. Privilege!

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  102. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    Ahhh, Venice Beach and polyurethane wheels.

    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

    I taught many a girl how to roller blade down there. (Ex hockey player.) Also discovered, to my surprise, that Electric Avenue is a real place.

    And there was a spot where you could get a killer swordfish sandwich.

    All gone now, I suppose. Thanks, immigration!

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs

    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Perry_(musician)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sick of Orcs

    I used to see him at Venice Beach all the time in 1981-82 when I lived next door in Santa Monica.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Sick of Orcs, @Harry Baldwin

  103. @James Speaks
    @beavertales

    A solution to the homeless population is to form government services to plan for and erect micro-houses for the homeless - and to employ homeless people to staff the new agencies.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    “employ homeless people to staff the new agencies.”

    You might be assuming a higher level of functioning among homeless people than their actual abilities.

    Then again, through my lifetime of dealings with various states’ DMV’s, there already is a place for people with behavior difficulties.

  104. @interesting
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    "Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!"

    Well yeah. The life you describe is about $4K a month.

    The life they are living only requires one to buy the drugs they want.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dacian Julien Soros

    The temperature on Venice Beach is between 60 F and 82 F for about 98% of the hours in the year.

    The Southern California beach climate is really nice.

  105. @John Johnson
    Venice beach is only getting attention because of a single youtuber who goes by German in Venice.

    As with Skid Row the county seems fine to look the other way but that is no longer possible with alternative media.

    California really doesn't care about the homeless. What they care about is their image and they are worried that the tourists will start going elsewhere.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    I specifically advised some on-tour friends to avoid VB, Hollywood, etc.

  106. @Paperback Writer
    @obwandiyag


    And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy.
     
    Where do you get that from?

    Replies: @Polistra

    He makes it up, just like Plywood does. And Steve loves you all, because your posts are approved automatically while many others among us wait from half a day to two days. Privilege!

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Polistra

    I just came across this:


    The homeless individuals featured in the article are all long-term transients afflicted with substance addiction, mental illness, or both. One young man tells Lowe that he came to Venice Beach from Washington State last year, “hoping for a new life apart from his estranged wife and children.” He appears to have no disability preventing him from working; he paints artwork to sell. He’s less a romantic artist than (likely) a child-support deadbeat who left someone else with the burden of making a living for his offspring. An older man, 64, says he’s been homeless for three decades, after “his family banished him because of his alcoholism.” The star of the story is a 19-year-old woman who goes by the name of “Angel.” She was recently arrested for weapons possession and recently refused government shelter inland, preferring the beach.

     

    https://www.city-journal.org/venice-beach-homelessness-crisis?wallit_nosession=1
  107. @obwandiyag
    California gets all the homeless because it doesn't snow in winter. Sleeping rough is not quite so hard. This is not rocket science. Who wouldn't go where it's balmy all year if they became homeless.

    And by the way, most of them are white, and they mostly aren't crazy anymore. The times changeth. Liberals give them freedom and conservatives jack the rents so high it's a sin.

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment. It is cheaper for the municipality in the long run. But of course, the rent jacker-uppers oppose this solution. They always oppose any simple and clear and logical solution. Just like employing efficiency/conservation for the energy crisis. Can't do that. Rich guys would suffer.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AnotherDad

    Liberals give them freedom and conservatives jack the rents so high it’s a sin.

    Huh? What do conservatives have to do with jacking up housing prices?

    The housing price insanity stems partly from progressives land use controls and bureaucracy costs and mostly from massive immigration driving up demand.

    Some of the housing regulation has some merit. Fire codes, earthquake codes. Perhaps some environmental open space preserving regulation is quality-of-life valuable as well. California could actually use stricter fire building codes. It is possible to build houses that are much, much more resistant to catching fire in these California brush fires. Some of this stuff has merit.

    But there’s zero merit to mass immigration–the main culprit driving the housing run up.

  108. @Barnard
    OT: The Cleveland Indians do their part to help Major League Baseball drive away as many of their remaining fans as possible. I can't tell if this name change is immediate, ESPN still has the Indians up on their website for now. I am sure the fans will be won over by a two minute video narrated by noted northeast Ohio resident and lifelong Indians fan Tom Hanks talking about their traditions while a ten year old Black Keys song plays in the background. I can't imagine giving these people my money.


    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/31868331/cleveland-changing-name-indians-guardians

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @AnotherDad, @SafeNow

    General Milley recently referred to “soldiers sailors airmen marines and guardians.” I didn’t want to hear this guy going anywhere near the Coast Guard, which does not fall under the jurisdiction of the Pentagon. ( “that outfit over there”) Now I am relieved know he had advance notice of the name change, and was actually referring to the Cleveland baseball team, making a scholarly, intersectional connection beyond our understanding.

  109. Yes, incentivizing bad behavior gets us more of it. We have done it with homos, trannies, negroes, and every other minority totem on the pole.

    I’ve lived in this town for 15 years. I’ve seen more beggars (they aren’t homeless) standing at expressway off ramps in the last 2 years than the previous 13 years combined.

  110. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    “You “people” kill me”………well, we try to make the world a better place.

  111. @James Speaks
    @Steve Sailer

    If I understand correctly, the Chinese company Evenflo, which manufactures wheels, prompts the development of other products to use the wheels. Classic case of a hammer in search of a nail.

    Compare and contrast with the Mad Housers who provide part of the solution to homeless: free micro-houses. All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.

    http://madhousers.org

    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Curle

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They’ve been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks. In 2000 FEMA was purchasing 14 x 60 foot basic model singlewide mobile homes from various manufacturers nationwide for about $10 per sq. ft. FOB factory. Granted, some of the new microhouses are more energy efficient and better built, but that is still a largely trivial difference. The biggest difference with most of the new microhouses is that they are just too fucking micro to live in 365 days a year. (300-400 Sq. Ft.– but hey, it’s airtight and I can heat it all winter with one can of Sterno.) They are also way out of line on a retail price per sq. ft. basis. Most conventional trailer parks are pretty depressing places full of depressing people (for a variety of reasons), but that’s not the fault of the trailers.

    There are well run manufactured housing communities, but it really is quite a difficult task with all these “civil rights” and HUD laws on the books to keep a sharp and clean operation up and running. The microhouse (or trailer or mobile home or manufactured house) is no more magic than the dirt underneath it. It’s the people and the content of their character stupid. But we’re not allowed to judge that anymore.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I wrote:


    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.
     
    and then you wrote:

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They’ve been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks.
     
    I believe this is called unintentional irony. BTW, Mad Housers' microhouses are designed to be placed where the homeless person has decided to pitch a tent. Trailers don't work.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

  112. @Sick of Orcs
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Is that crazy guy still around down there, the zany Black dude on roller blades with the portable electric guitar and the robe and the turban, who would skate up to you and start playing some sort of bizarre Hendrix/Sun Ra/Arthur Lee mishmash right in your face?

     

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Perry_(musician)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I used to see him at Venice Beach all the time in 1981-82 when I lived next door in Santa Monica.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Steve Sailer

    Can't hold a candle to the greatest of the homeless, a man who contributed much more to society than most men.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3D0qfK8JNA

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Steve Sailer

    Neat guy and VB icon! I'd love to do what he does, only with an accordion.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Steve Sailer

    Back in the 1980s, one of the star attractions on Venice Beach was a tanned, muscular guy in red shorts who juggled running chainsaws while serving his audience jokes and Don Rickles-type insults. One of the jokes was to ask his audience to contribute generously because he needed to keep up the payments on his Porsche. A friend who lived in the area once saw him packing up his gear in his car, which was in fact a Porsche.

    The chainsaw juggler appeared on the Johnny Carson show, IIRC. Also, as someone who uses chainsaws, I noticed he had filed off the teeth off his.

  113. If you take your family camping in a California state park they charge you $50 per night for the campsite. But you can camp on a public street in LA or SF for less than free—they’ll even buy you stuff. Clown World.

  114. @Element59
    There are real workable solutions to this dire problem, but in our current CA dystopia of harm avoidance hysteria, equality obsession, and the total leftist gridlock in LA and Sacramento, it's very unlikely our bubble-dwelling overlords would ever entertain it.

    1. Vigorously enforce existing loitering laws and strictly forbid camping/sleeping in public parks and public spaces. Authorize new police funding to facilitate the resulting increase in homeless patrols, arrests, and processing.

    2. Divert the approved homeless funding to expanding mental health care facilities and rehab centers to contain the homeless who fall into these situations.

    3. Authorize permanent humane institutionalization for the mentally unstable homeless who are otherwise deemed unemployable and a public nuisance. This was how the mentally ill were managed decades ago and why so few mental patients chronically lived on the streets.

    4. Structure the above in a two-year phase-in plan to get the necessary infrastructure and personnel built up to accommodate the influx and get a public awareness campaign going for the remaining homeless to voluntarily leave LA and CA to avoid the above.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    There used to a huge state insane asylum complex in rural Oxnard near the Pacific, with very tranquil architecture and grounds and excellent weather. It’s now the nice campus of Cal State Channel Islands.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    I remember decades ago we kids would insult each other by asking “so when did you break out of Camarillo?”

    Replies: @Rohirrimborn

  115. @Dumbo
    I never liked Venice Beach. Impossible to park, too many people, some of them quite weird, also some obvious gang activity around. In terms of touristy places, Santa Monica seemed better, but it was also full of homeless people, and now it might be worse.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Venice is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, while next door Santa Monica is an independent municipality.

    The last time I spent much time at the beach was in 2018. I was surprised that Santa Monica’s homeless problem was relatively under control, while once you crossed the exact boundary into Venice, the homeless were large and in charge. Oddly, I sat at a table with the Santa Monica city manager, a conservatively dressed white man in his 60s who looked like the type who would have been city manager in the 1960s, a few weeks later. But I didn’t get around to asking him how he was keeping the homeless from overrunning Santa Monica. Anyway, he retired rather abruptly during the Racial Reckoning.

    My guess was that Santa Monica cops were enforcing a rule that’s basically: street people can do non-criminal tasks like look through garbage cans for aluminum cans, but they have to do it alone. The homeless in 2018 were not allowed to congregate, apparently. The homeless tended to look they knew they were in Santa Monica on the forebearance of the authorities and tried to act in manners that wouldn’t call attention to themselves.

    In contrast, the moment you stepped over the boundary between Santa Monica into Venice on the famous Bike Path, it was suddenly a giant homeless party, with tent campers whooping it up together.

    I tried to find something online articulating Santa Monica’s policy, but I couldn’t. Perhaps the SM authorities kept it hush-hush to avoid arousing local liberals. Or something.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I visited LA in summer 2019 and went to a bunch of the beaches there, from Malibu, to Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Venice Beach, Manhattan Beach, etc.

    I didn't notice any homeless encampments or congregations at the beaches then. The homeless seemed to be relatively few in number at the beaches at the time, and more dispersed with individual stragglers here and there outnumbered by "civilians".

    I only really noticed the encampments/congregations when driving downtown or to a Dodger game, where you'd see a bunch of tents by the road under overpasses and the like.

    I liked Venice Beach because there's a lot of beach area so lots of space between the water and the street and the walking/skating/biking path. It was nice how wide and expansive the beach area was. Like an ocean of sand before the ocean. It was a nice contrast to the beaches in Malibu, which were nice of course but relatively thin from the water to the road.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    I think my Whitopia Beach is applying the same sort of policies.
    I also noticed you see no shopping carts on the street here, which is a big disincentive to people who like to use them to store and transport their pitiful belongings. You can’t just buy a shopping cart, so if anyone has a cart it is grounds for making an arrest for theft and getting them out of the city.
    All liberals including ours are NIMBY’s and don’t want to know how it is done if it’s being done in their own neighborhood. Our homeless are rare, alone, non-interactive and personify the description as “transient”.

  116. @Exador
    28% of the homeless in America live in California, and according this article, half of California's homeless are in LA county.
    So 14% of all the homeless people in the United States live in LA county.
    What a paradise!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Orange County next door probably adds a few percent too.

    I can recall as a Boy Scout in 1970 and 1971 visiting the colossal Moreton Bay Fig tree next to the bus station in downtown Santa Barbara. But by the next time I got back, maybe in 1980, its park was overrun by bums. Apparently, homeless beggars used it as a national rendezvous point: If one friend went to NYC to beg for the summer and another to Chicago, they’d say something like, Meet you under the Fig Tree in November.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Steve Sailer

    Will you please admit, and tell all these ignoramuses commenting on things they know not of, these absolute facts?

    "In our current economy, a jaw-dropping 59% of US workers are just one paycheck away from homelessness. "

    "In pre-pandemic America, 44% of homeless people were employed. As a point of reference, only 10% to 15% of homeless people are addicted to illegal drugs. This means more homeless people are employed than addicted to illegal substances. To hear the media spin on this, it would be easy (but wrong) to draw the opposite conclusion."

    https://invisiblepeople.tv/it-isnt-that-people-dont-want-to-work-they-just-dont-want-to-work-and-still-be-homeless/

  117. @Edomite male
    57 percent white, 70 percent male, in a state that is majority ppl of color, and a city that is overwhelmingly of color.... Just shows where white males are headed today, with all the white male hate.... Here in Louisville KY, all i see are young homeless white males walking around everywhere

    Replies: @Feryl, @Charon, @Jay Fink

    My sense is that whites are more likely to be alienated from their families than other ethnic groups. For some reason in this day and age, intra-family hostility among whites is pretty bad, and a lot outcast whites don’t have any family to support them so they end up on the streets.

    Part of this also stems from blacks (as we’ve known about since at least the OJ trial) seeming to have a much greater degree of tolerance of deviance in their communities and families*. But whites will disown their own family members for drug use, stealing, excessive lying, mooching, and criminal convictions. It could be argued that some dysfunctional whites could be better off if they get more family support.

    *Of course, black deviance is much more perverted and violent than white deviance, so deviant blacks often end up in prison. More benign outcast whites aren’t quite dangerous enough to be sent to prison so they just drift onto the streets.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Feryl

    Drug addicts are thieves and liars and even the most loving of relatives soon don't want them around.

  118. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/emeriticus/status/1418351104119738368?s=20

    Remarkable that Scott owes his seat to his own Stop the Steal now turns up his nose at those who prevented what happened to Trump from happening to him.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    How do we trick the GOP into thinking Americans are Cubans

    Boy did he nail our problem there. Great tweet.

  119. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/sovietvisuals/status/1245969282951008257

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Okay, you got me, this is, uhh, radiation? I have no idea.

  120. @Anon
    @obwandiyag

    Homeless people are disproportionately nonwhite, dumbass.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    “According to data they collected, 70% of the Venice homeless population is male, 29% is female, 1% identify as transgender, 57% were White, 24% were Black and 13% were Hispanic.”

    I love you dumbasses who didn’t read the article and yet feel qualified to comment.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @obwandiyag

    How much of a fucking retard do you have to be, to not understand the following:


    1.) Venice Beach is not the USA

    2.) The 57% white homeless population of Venice Beach is a massive under-representation from the demographics of Venice, California (68% non-Hispanic white, not including tourist population)

    3.) Venice Beach's homeless population is therefore, like the USA's homeless population, disproportionately nonwhite

    4.) You have no business interacting with people on the internet. Turn your computer off right now and destroy it.

  121. @Steve Sailer
    @Sick of Orcs

    I used to see him at Venice Beach all the time in 1981-82 when I lived next door in Santa Monica.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Sick of Orcs, @Harry Baldwin

    Can’t hold a candle to the greatest of the homeless, a man who contributed much more to society than most men.

  122. @Steve Sailer
    @Exador

    Orange County next door probably adds a few percent too.

    I can recall as a Boy Scout in 1970 and 1971 visiting the colossal Moreton Bay Fig tree next to the bus station in downtown Santa Barbara. But by the next time I got back, maybe in 1980, its park was overrun by bums. Apparently, homeless beggars used it as a national rendezvous point: If one friend went to NYC to beg for the summer and another to Chicago, they'd say something like, Meet you under the Fig Tree in November.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Will you please admit, and tell all these ignoramuses commenting on things they know not of, these absolute facts?

    “In our current economy, a jaw-dropping 59% of US workers are just one paycheck away from homelessness. ”

    “In pre-pandemic America, 44% of homeless people were employed. As a point of reference, only 10% to 15% of homeless people are addicted to illegal drugs. This means more homeless people are employed than addicted to illegal substances. To hear the media spin on this, it would be easy (but wrong) to draw the opposite conclusion.”

    https://invisiblepeople.tv/it-isnt-that-people-dont-want-to-work-they-just-dont-want-to-work-and-still-be-homeless/

  123. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @James Speaks

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They've been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks. In 2000 FEMA was purchasing 14 x 60 foot basic model singlewide mobile homes from various manufacturers nationwide for about $10 per sq. ft. FOB factory. Granted, some of the new microhouses are more energy efficient and better built, but that is still a largely trivial difference. The biggest difference with most of the new microhouses is that they are just too fucking micro to live in 365 days a year. (300-400 Sq. Ft.-- but hey, it's airtight and I can heat it all winter with one can of Sterno.) They are also way out of line on a retail price per sq. ft. basis. Most conventional trailer parks are pretty depressing places full of depressing people (for a variety of reasons), but that's not the fault of the trailers.

    There are well run manufactured housing communities, but it really is quite a difficult task with all these "civil rights" and HUD laws on the books to keep a sharp and clean operation up and running. The microhouse (or trailer or mobile home or manufactured house) is no more magic than the dirt underneath it. It's the people and the content of their character stupid. But we're not allowed to judge that anymore.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    I wrote:

    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.

    and then you wrote:

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They’ve been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks.

    I believe this is called unintentional irony. BTW, Mad Housers’ microhouses are designed to be placed where the homeless person has decided to pitch a tent. Trailers don’t work.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @James Speaks

    I see; not only does the homeless person get a free microhouse (along with UBI, EBT, drug addiction services etc.), he also gets to decide where his microhouse will be placed. Hopefully you'll luck out and get to observe first hand how that plays out when you get a couple of microhouses plopped down in front of your abode.

  124. The solution to vagrancy starts with a cop and a nightstick. We won’t see that day again until the liberal middle class has endured the poverty and war their leaders are bringing on and learned their lesson. Knowledge lessons can be learned from a book but life lessons have to be learned the hard way.

  125. @obwandiyag
    You "people" kill me. I thought you liked white people. Those are mostly white people sleeping out there in the streets and back in the copses and bushes. And many, perhaps most, are neither drug addicts nor crazy. I'd call you race traitors if you didn't know you were already.

    And you are so insanely stupid as to think that the problem is giving homeless people minimum (yes, minimum, what they give the homeless is peanuts, in a world where the number trillion is thrown around like it was nothing, what they give the homeless is tiny little peanuts, minimum, not enough by a long shot) support.

    The problem is the rents are too high. The rents are too high. You goddam assholes, the rents are too goddam high.

    Replies: @Anon, @RadicalCenter, @Alfa158, @John Johnson, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer, @tyrone, @personfellowindividual

    If the ones who aren’t crazy and/or drug addicts want to get off the streets, there are resources available everywhere you look. The charities are capable of helping them most of all.

    No, the problem is the crazies. They don’t want to be helped, and they won’t help themselves. Sane people don’t pull their pants down and shit on the sidewalk in plain sight of other people. Sane people don’t shoot up on the sidewalk and zonk out for half a day, oblivious to the world.

    They are a threat to health, safety, commerce, civic interaction, and mere decency, and it’s a government’s duty to take care of exactly this kind of problem. Somehow, the Democrats who run virtually all the cities in America are failing to do the most important job they were hired to do, which is look after the welfare of their tax-paying, law-abiding citizens. Not thousands of filthy, degenerate madmen who contribute nothing whatsoever to society.

    People who are down on their luck and making an effort to get back into the real world are worthy of assistance and sympathy. People who don’t want anything but the next high, are much less deserving, no matter what color, gender or religion they are. Crazy people who won’t take their prescribed meds need to be institutionalized, full stop.

  126. @res
    @anon

    Here is a state map by number of homeless. Notice how CA has over 25% of the homeless in the entire country (select "Percentage of Total Homelessness by State").
    https://www.usich.gov/tools-for-action/map
    It has about 12% of the US population overall.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

    Here is a state map by number of homeless.

    Well, a state-by-state map. What sticks out is comparing states with similar total populations but wide differences in homeless numbers: Texas/California, Florida/New York, Wisconsin/Minnesota.

    Pennsylvania has 60% of the population of New York, but barely one-seventh the number of homeless. Too bad we don’t have maps breaking it down by county. (Or do we?) I imagine a large majority of New York’s are huddled in the City. Can’t imagine being homeless in Watertown or Salamanca. Brrr.

    Here is a map from 2013. Note that the differences between states are not as vast:

    How much of this is a difference in numbers, and how much a difference in definition? We could be looking at 50 different standards.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    Number of homeless is not the same as people living in open and visible encampments. Many areas in Texas and even the suburbs here in Seattle compel homeless people to accept available shelter and don’t allow public camping. I follow the issue where I live in Seattle and, IIRC, something like 50% of people in Seattle’s encampments refuse shelter. So a city in Texas and the Left Coast may have comparable homeless populations, but in Texas they’re not allowed to camp in public. This, and permissive drug and other law enforcement, is why so many migrate to LA, SF, BC, Seattle etc.

  127. @JohnnyWalker123
    @beavertales

    Yeah. $10,000 per homeless individual per year.

    For that sum, you could offer them a tiny mini-apartment ($400-500/month), basic food ($150-$200/month), utilities ($100-150/month), toiletries ($50-100/month), and other miscellaneous expenses ($100/month). It'd seem like for that sum, you could provide them with a basic first-world standard of living.

    Where exactly is the money going?

    Replies: @Escher, @Anonymous Jew

    The money is going to provide REAL first world standard of living to the government employees who are responsible for spending it.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
  128. @JohnPlywood
    @J.Ross

    You're stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they're dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America's modest restriction will never end if we don't invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we're going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    Replies: @anon, @bomag, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer

    Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they’re dirt poor.

    Retarded, boring troll. Just plain boring.

    • Agree: black sea, Hangnail Hans
  129. Dang, this is starting to sound pretty good to me. I can pay an absurd sum to rent a millennial trendy crib in Detriot (in about a three square block area of relative safety) or I can decamp for LA and forget about the crappy weather and 90% negro majority here in Detriot.

    Sign me up iSteve. I’ll pitch my holey (maybe holy too for you thumpers) tent in your front gravel (surely you don’t still have grass!). Maybe soon you’ll be required to give me shower and shitter rights. Followed shortly thereafter by the right to your blogging closet.

    You Boomers really have figured it all out. California IS utopia!

  130. @AnotherDad
    @Thucydides


    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?
     
    Skating girls' rear ends--and tank topped front ends.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    To illustrate:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    That's a nice new video for the 40-year-old Dire Straits song "Roller Girl."

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  131. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    Venice is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, while next door Santa Monica is an independent municipality.

    The last time I spent much time at the beach was in 2018. I was surprised that Santa Monica's homeless problem was relatively under control, while once you crossed the exact boundary into Venice, the homeless were large and in charge. Oddly, I sat at a table with the Santa Monica city manager, a conservatively dressed white man in his 60s who looked like the type who would have been city manager in the 1960s, a few weeks later. But I didn't get around to asking him how he was keeping the homeless from overrunning Santa Monica. Anyway, he retired rather abruptly during the Racial Reckoning.

    My guess was that Santa Monica cops were enforcing a rule that's basically: street people can do non-criminal tasks like look through garbage cans for aluminum cans, but they have to do it alone. The homeless in 2018 were not allowed to congregate, apparently. The homeless tended to look they knew they were in Santa Monica on the forebearance of the authorities and tried to act in manners that wouldn't call attention to themselves.

    In contrast, the moment you stepped over the boundary between Santa Monica into Venice on the famous Bike Path, it was suddenly a giant homeless party, with tent campers whooping it up together.

    I tried to find something online articulating Santa Monica's policy, but I couldn't. Perhaps the SM authorities kept it hush-hush to avoid arousing local liberals. Or something.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alfa158

    I visited LA in summer 2019 and went to a bunch of the beaches there, from Malibu, to Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Venice Beach, Manhattan Beach, etc.

    I didn’t notice any homeless encampments or congregations at the beaches then. The homeless seemed to be relatively few in number at the beaches at the time, and more dispersed with individual stragglers here and there outnumbered by “civilians”.

    I only really noticed the encampments/congregations when driving downtown or to a Dodger game, where you’d see a bunch of tents by the road under overpasses and the like.

    I liked Venice Beach because there’s a lot of beach area so lots of space between the water and the street and the walking/skating/biking path. It was nice how wide and expansive the beach area was. Like an ocean of sand before the ocean. It was a nice contrast to the beaches in Malibu, which were nice of course but relatively thin from the water to the road.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Right. Venice Beach is hugely wide. It's one reason I was so annoyed by the 2020 hysteria about shutting down the beaches.

  132. @interesting
    2020 over 66,000 people in Los Angeles County were """experiencing homelessness"""

    There's a real name for that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCB42DDDXPI

    Replies: @John Derbyshire, @Stan d Mute

    There’s a real name for that.

    As true as this is, I can assure you that you do not want the alternative identity of “gangster”. At least not if you reside within public transportation distance from the malefactors.

    From a comfortable “white supremacist” (NOTE: Apple just attempted to capitalize Supremacist – a new development) distance, it’s all mildly amusing and ripe with schadenfreude. Up close, 90+% of you wouldn’t survive. I have related some stories, but they cannot begin to truly describe the reality of life in a negro majority (city, nation, subdivision, etc). If there were cell phone cameras in 1967, recent videos from South Africa would be blasé.

    I can assure you that none (most) of you would hate me. And yet, I am you after being forced to live within the paradigm that you have (voted for, condoned, acquiesced to, or just ignored). I never asked for any of this. I never scammed or even hurt anyone (with exceptions for those who demanded it), yet my life in America is objectively no different to the current tales from South Africa. Shot at? Check. Robbed? Check. Raped? (Not personally but witnessed it). Check. Watched a friend or loved one being brutally beaten by a mob? Check. Had a gun stuck in your face? Treble check. Had to contemplate whether or not to call the pigs? Ha! Support your blue you pathetic retards. Right up to the moment that they murder you for calling them to yet another of the infinite examples of negro dysfunction.

    Detriot is YOUR future. I sincerely doubt that anyone could stop it even if they thought that Israel commanded it. ISteve is in some weird bubble where the Mexicans who don’t worship the negro have granted a reprieve. But how many of you live in Detriot, Newark, Birmingham, Tampa, Atlanta, Memphis, Dallas, Denver (no shit! Shocks me too!), Chicongo, St Louis, New Orleans, Mobile, District of Corruption, Baltimore, and the list just goes on and on? LA is some kind of Mexican bubble in America (Miami comes close, as does El Paso).

    Right now, I would GLADLY relocate my family to Mexico City or perhaps any other metropolis outside the USA. If only the government hadn’t sucked up 200% of my net worth..

    Bend over and spread the other cheek Goyim. And for you secular Jews, a massive wake up call is in your future as you learn that you are actually just Super Honkie and probably the first to be tossed into the cannibal’s pot.

  133. @Steve Sailer
    @Element59

    There used to a huge state insane asylum complex in rural Oxnard near the Pacific, with very tranquil architecture and grounds and excellent weather. It's now the nice campus of Cal State Channel Islands.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    I remember decades ago we kids would insult each other by asking “so when did you break out of Camarillo?”

    • Replies: @Rohirrimborn
    @Alfa158

    I grew up in Boston and NYC in the fifties and sixties. In lieu of "Camarillo" it was "Danvers" in Boston and "Bellevue" in NYC.

  134. @Steve Sailer
    @Dumbo

    Venice is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, while next door Santa Monica is an independent municipality.

    The last time I spent much time at the beach was in 2018. I was surprised that Santa Monica's homeless problem was relatively under control, while once you crossed the exact boundary into Venice, the homeless were large and in charge. Oddly, I sat at a table with the Santa Monica city manager, a conservatively dressed white man in his 60s who looked like the type who would have been city manager in the 1960s, a few weeks later. But I didn't get around to asking him how he was keeping the homeless from overrunning Santa Monica. Anyway, he retired rather abruptly during the Racial Reckoning.

    My guess was that Santa Monica cops were enforcing a rule that's basically: street people can do non-criminal tasks like look through garbage cans for aluminum cans, but they have to do it alone. The homeless in 2018 were not allowed to congregate, apparently. The homeless tended to look they knew they were in Santa Monica on the forebearance of the authorities and tried to act in manners that wouldn't call attention to themselves.

    In contrast, the moment you stepped over the boundary between Santa Monica into Venice on the famous Bike Path, it was suddenly a giant homeless party, with tent campers whooping it up together.

    I tried to find something online articulating Santa Monica's policy, but I couldn't. Perhaps the SM authorities kept it hush-hush to avoid arousing local liberals. Or something.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Alfa158

    I think my Whitopia Beach is applying the same sort of policies.
    I also noticed you see no shopping carts on the street here, which is a big disincentive to people who like to use them to store and transport their pitiful belongings. You can’t just buy a shopping cart, so if anyone has a cart it is grounds for making an arrest for theft and getting them out of the city.
    All liberals including ours are NIMBY’s and don’t want to know how it is done if it’s being done in their own neighborhood. Our homeless are rare, alone, non-interactive and personify the description as “transient”.

  135. @Kevin Rudd
    I've worked for the LAFD amongst the homeless for over 30 years. The complete failure to acknowledge the causes of homelessness has led to the complete failure of every solution that has been tried. I would estimate over half need to be institutionalized. Due to mental illness or substance abuse they are not rational actors and no amount of free housing or voluntary programs will ever get them off of the street.

    The big change I've seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They've made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won't institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words "jobs" or "work" are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    The other factor that municipal idiots like Eric Garcetti can't quite grasp is that by definition they're homeless. That means it's almost impossible to distinguish between one who has been in your city for years or one who showed up on the bus yesterday. When one city has better benefits than another its supply of homeless and thus demand for benefits can never be satisfied. Thus Angelenos are on the hook for thousands of recent arrivals from all over the United States because the idiot Mayor keeps writing the checks.

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small that I don't think there is anyone who would argue against generously helping them with public funds.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @AnotherDad, @Stan d Mute, @Jim Don Bob

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small

    And yet right there I am calling BULLSHIT! The actual number of white Americans who are DESPERATELY in need of help is staggering. They have zero net worth. They have zero investment in “the stock market (booming)”. They are discriminated against in every job application (except perhaps the small local companies that value performance more than performative). Negroes may in fact be disproportionately fucked. But in absolute numbers, poor whitey is beyond fucked.

    Curiously, this is an exact mirror of 1855. Unz has, I think, “They Were White and They Were Slaves” online. Ron’s mentioned it in one of his articles. I encourage you to read it and elucidate us all on how the lot of the poor honkie has improved in the last 150+ years.

    • Replies: @Kevin Rudd
    @Stan d Mute

    You can call whatever the hell you want. I'm just telling you what I've seen for 30 years in LA. No matter what you give them, the vast majority of the homeless in LA aren't rejoining mainstream society anytime soon.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

  136. @James Speaks
    @Steve Sailer

    If I understand correctly, the Chinese company Evenflo, which manufactures wheels, prompts the development of other products to use the wheels. Classic case of a hammer in search of a nail.

    Compare and contrast with the Mad Housers who provide part of the solution to homeless: free micro-houses. All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.

    http://madhousers.org

    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Curle

    “ All that is needed are zoning law changes to allow micro-house developments.”

    And all zoning law changes require are neighbors willing to live near micro-houses or, as I like to call them, future vagrant communities.

  137. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I visited LA in summer 2019 and went to a bunch of the beaches there, from Malibu, to Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Venice Beach, Manhattan Beach, etc.

    I didn't notice any homeless encampments or congregations at the beaches then. The homeless seemed to be relatively few in number at the beaches at the time, and more dispersed with individual stragglers here and there outnumbered by "civilians".

    I only really noticed the encampments/congregations when driving downtown or to a Dodger game, where you'd see a bunch of tents by the road under overpasses and the like.

    I liked Venice Beach because there's a lot of beach area so lots of space between the water and the street and the walking/skating/biking path. It was nice how wide and expansive the beach area was. Like an ocean of sand before the ocean. It was a nice contrast to the beaches in Malibu, which were nice of course but relatively thin from the water to the road.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right. Venice Beach is hugely wide. It’s one reason I was so annoyed by the 2020 hysteria about shutting down the beaches.

  138. @Hamlet's Ghost
    @AnotherDad

    To illustrate:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_mF4AONqwc

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    That’s a nice new video for the 40-year-old Dire Straits song “Roller Girl.”

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skateaway

  139. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    The emergence of polyurethane wheels contributed significantly to the development of skateboarding culture, too, which eventually made Venice beach itself something of a mecca (according to those early skateboarding magazines).

  140. @Buffalo Joe
    @Alfa158

    Alfa, some place in California, either SF or Berkeley, and I am too lazy to look it up, the county or city has set up a building for the 'unhoused' (preferred term), The building has tents set up inside in orderly rows, with access to indoor toilets and water. BUT, there are rules against drugs and alcohol and smoking and pets, so too restrictive. The homeless have turned Peoples Park in Berkeley into a no go zone for regular citizens. A camp, far away from society, which by the way supports these people, is not a bad idea, but will never happen.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    UC Berkeley Athletics spent $500M+ to retro-eq’proof an old football stadium into a palace. Subsequently, tickets didn’t sell well, so the AD was financially ruined.

    The regents then bailed it out, but that wrecked its own finances. So it has needed to scramble for money.

    UCB, owner of People’s Park, will soon be evicting the bums and druggies encamped there in order to construct revenue generating facilities (I think dorms). (When AD began the football stadium project, some tree hugger stayed up in a tree, on the grounds, for a year in protest of the planned removal of trees).

    Meanwhile, as a condition of bailout, the AD was forced to cede its T&F stadium, located on the opposite side of the campus, back to the regents. They’re planning some sort of commercial development, e.g. shops and apartments, on the site.

    UC just announced a tuition increase.

    Public education at its finest.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Abolish_public_education

    Abolish, I read Berkeleyside daily. They started to fence off People's Park to start surveying and the Unhoused and their many allies took down the fencing and stacked in front of city hall IIRC. So many bleeding hearts supporting the unhoused and so many NIMBYs against campus expansion I don't see the property being developed in the near future, maybe never.

    Replies: @anon

  141. @The Alarmist
    @Thucydides

    https://youtu.be/0pu1xGPDJXU?t=1m40s

    Replies: @Jiminy

    It’s nice to see women with trim figures, with not a single obese twerker in sight. I suppose the coke kept the hunger pangs at bay. It’s funny when you go back through the history of housing construction and look at all of the new futuristic ideas on solving the housing problems with low cost housing. And basically the examples all led to nothing.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Jiminy

    “ And basically the examples all led to nothing.”

    Hardly, they were tried and all became ghettos or the equivalent.

  142. @interesting
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    "Nothing like a pampered life on the Venice Beach, I tell you. Beats a bedroom with a bed, a living room with air conditioning, and a fridge with some food!"

    Well yeah. The life you describe is about $4K a month.

    The life they are living only requires one to buy the drugs they want.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dacian Julien Soros

    Maybe I was too subtle? Even if LA county or city would stop giving free food to these homeless, it’s not like these people will obtain that 4K income, or would otherwise evaporate. They will just steal from the stores and homes in the area.

    Americans can’t jail all their half a million homeless. Even if they would be able to jail them, it would be more expensive than any other option.

    Of course, the cheapest option is to tax, and tax, and tax, any entity or person owning more than one home, until they give up hoarding and renting. You can easily bring down the value of an American home to thousands of dollars. Despite any claim that you would lose money, you can learn from Trump how to deduct the building costs from taxes over 30 years, at which point it becomes a free home. Yes, it would be a half-ruin, but most people would prefer that to sleeping rough, even in the amazing Venice Beach. I wish we had these deductions in Romania.

    There are enough homes in almost any country outside Subsaharan Africa, to house their population and even more. How could the tens (hundreds?) of thousands move from New York to Florida, if there wouldn’t have been vacancies? Unfortunately, your most beloved president, Trump, also led the way in the idea that you must hold on to buildings.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    Of course, the cheapest option is to tax, and tax, and tax, any entity or person owning more than one home, until they give up hoarding and renting.
     
    Only problem here would be the hoarding, but I suspect that doesn't matter much in the big picture.

    Shouldn't encourage our "leaders" to tax things to solve a problem.
  143. @Flip
    At some point America won't be rich enough to waste vast sums of money on frivolous things.

    Replies: @Charon

    It’ll happen gradually, then suddenly, as they say.

    Sort of hope I’m around to see it. Sort of.

  144. @Edomite male
    57 percent white, 70 percent male, in a state that is majority ppl of color, and a city that is overwhelmingly of color.... Just shows where white males are headed today, with all the white male hate.... Here in Louisville KY, all i see are young homeless white males walking around everywhere

    Replies: @Feryl, @Charon, @Jay Fink

    Whatever white males get, it’s better than what they deserve. That’s the operative modus in place now.

  145. @MM
    @beavertales

    A little less than $10,000 per person per year. Doesn't sound like a lot. I suspect that one arrest per year per person would end up costing much more.

    Of course apparently that's only local spending (I assume the sheriff isn't counting state or federal). So it might be a lot more than that.

    Replies: @Charon

    It’s also assuming that all the freebies will cause them to stop committing crimes. Big assumption.

  146. @Thucydides
    Uhh, what do polyurethane wheels have to do with the popularity of Venice Beach?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @The Alarmist, @TomKat Books

    Roller blades.

  147. Seriously, homelessness is a problem that we need to solve. It affects the liveability of cities for one thing, and although I’m somewhat right-wing on many issues, when it makes sense to apply a little socialism, I say go for it. No one system is perfect.

    There is no one homeless problem (singular) but there are many homeless problems (plural).

    1. Psychotics need a place to live and receive treatment.
    2. Broken people (war vets or victims of abuse) need sancuary and a plan.
    3. Drug addicts need to get clean.
    4. Working class people who suffer a setback and lose their homes need help getting back into regular housing.
    5. Irresponsible people who just find it easier to live in tent camps need to leave the county.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @James Speaks

    Homelessness is a symptom. It's not the problem.

    The real problem is that too many people are mentally dropping out and falling for the allure of drugs and booze and general lack of responsibility of not having to worry about paying rent any more.

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    Replies: @anon, @HbutnotG

  148. @J.Ross
    @obwandiyag

    And by the way, the answer to the homeless question is simple. Just give them each an apartment.

    Under communism, gypsies were forced into apartments equal in niceness to those given to workers. They ripped out every convenience and fixture to sell for black market cash. The problem with your generosity is that there are homeless people who don't want an apartment. There are reasons and not all are crazy: I love animals but own no pets because they aren't allowed in my building, or in pretty much any buildings in my area. If you did allow people who have been homeless for habit-forming years to keep pets in their government-provided apartments ... well, you see where that goes ...

    Replies: @TomKat Books

    Throughout the country Section 8 housing cannot have copper plumbing — it will be torn out and scrapped for cash by the tenants. Only PVC can be used.

  149. Anon[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag
    @Anon

    "According to data they collected, 70% of the Venice homeless population is male, 29% is female, 1% identify as transgender, 57% were White, 24% were Black and 13% were Hispanic."

    I love you dumbasses who didn't read the article and yet feel qualified to comment.

    Replies: @Anon

    How much of a fucking retard do you have to be, to not understand the following:

    1.) Venice Beach is not the USA

    2.) The 57% white homeless population of Venice Beach is a massive under-representation from the demographics of Venice, California (68% non-Hispanic white, not including tourist population)

    3.) Venice Beach’s homeless population is therefore, like the USA’s homeless population, disproportionately nonwhite

    4.) You have no business interacting with people on the internet. Turn your computer off right now and destroy it.

    • Thanks: Jim Bob Lassiter
  150. @Jiminy
    @The Alarmist

    It’s nice to see women with trim figures, with not a single obese twerker in sight. I suppose the coke kept the hunger pangs at bay. It’s funny when you go back through the history of housing construction and look at all of the new futuristic ideas on solving the housing problems with low cost housing. And basically the examples all led to nothing.

    Replies: @Curle

    “ And basically the examples all led to nothing.”

    Hardly, they were tried and all became ghettos or the equivalent.

  151. Anonymous[319] • Disclaimer says:
    @Feryl
    @Edomite male

    My sense is that whites are more likely to be alienated from their families than other ethnic groups. For some reason in this day and age, intra-family hostility among whites is pretty bad, and a lot outcast whites don't have any family to support them so they end up on the streets.

    Part of this also stems from blacks (as we've known about since at least the OJ trial) seeming to have a much greater degree of tolerance of deviance in their communities and families*. But whites will disown their own family members for drug use, stealing, excessive lying, mooching, and criminal convictions. It could be argued that some dysfunctional whites could be better off if they get more family support.

    *Of course, black deviance is much more perverted and violent than white deviance, so deviant blacks often end up in prison. More benign outcast whites aren't quite dangerous enough to be sent to prison so they just drift onto the streets.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Drug addicts are thieves and liars and even the most loving of relatives soon don’t want them around.

  152. @Steve Sailer
    @Sick of Orcs

    I used to see him at Venice Beach all the time in 1981-82 when I lived next door in Santa Monica.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Sick of Orcs, @Harry Baldwin

    Neat guy and VB icon! I’d love to do what he does, only with an accordion.

  153. @JohnPlywood
    @J.Ross

    You're stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they're dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America's modest restriction will never end if we don't invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we're going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    Replies: @anon, @bomag, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer

    Working hours have declined since the 1970s.

    Only when you average the grifter and non-grifter class.

    America’s modest restriction will never end if we don’t invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did.

    You know nothing.

  154. @AnotherDad
    @Barnard

    The "Guardians"? Who thought that up?

    Took me about 30 seconds to do better--the Cleveland "Erie". The lake and the native people it's named for. (Who no longer exist--but not because of the white man--so can't complain.)

    Don't like that--how about the "Cuyahoga Fire"?

    Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat, @bomag

    Looks like another example of the perils of doing things by committee. Especially in this sensitive age.

    I’d like to see the runners up:

    Cleveland Anodynes

    Cleveland Neutrals

    Cleveland Kindness

    Cleveland Sorry (wait, that kind of works)

  155. @TG
    Never forget that it has been official elite policy to force the growth of California's population. It was about 10 million in 1950... and now, mostly because of government population policy, it is about 40 million.

    FYI governments do not have immigration policies, they have population policies. And it's not the number of immigrants, it's the total increase in population due to immigration.

    This forced population growth was jammed down our throats against the wishes of the bulk of the American people - because 'democracy' is fascism when it gets in the way of the rich making a quick buck.

    We were told that forcing the population up was guaranteed to make things better, that it could not possibly ever have any negative consequences at all. That was a lie, wasn't it?

    The annual precipitation over California has trended constant, and now with four times as many people water is running short. Sure, that could be solved with massive (unprecedented in human history) investments in desalinization and changing the entire structure of agriculture to drip irrigation etc., but none of that AUTOMATICALLY happens just because you jam in more people, right?

    And did quadrupling the population AUTOMATICALLY quadruple the availability of housing? Of course not. Doing that would require ripping up the entire installed base of housing and transportation and rebuilding it to a higher density - while people are still living there - it's not clear there is enough money in the world for that. So instead, rents and commuting times skyrocketed.

    And sure, a lot of the homelessness problem is due to laziness and/or bad government policies - but - would homelessness be as bad if rents were a fraction of what they are today, and real blue-collar hourly wages double or triple?

    But no, we can't blame forced population increases. It's all 'systemic racism' or maybe 'commie-pinko liberalism.'

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    jobs and cheap housing are great, but the new designer drugs are much greater.

    So, Yes, homelessness would be just as bad now as if we had better governance. People who don’t do drugs have no idea how powerful and all-consuming they can be for others.

  156. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @interesting

    Maybe I was too subtle? Even if LA county or city would stop giving free food to these homeless, it's not like these people will obtain that 4K income, or would otherwise evaporate. They will just steal from the stores and homes in the area.

    Americans can't jail all their half a million homeless. Even if they would be able to jail them, it would be more expensive than any other option.

    Of course, the cheapest option is to tax, and tax, and tax, any entity or person owning more than one home, until they give up hoarding and renting. You can easily bring down the value of an American home to thousands of dollars. Despite any claim that you would lose money, you can learn from Trump how to deduct the building costs from taxes over 30 years, at which point it becomes a free home. Yes, it would be a half-ruin, but most people would prefer that to sleeping rough, even in the amazing Venice Beach. I wish we had these deductions in Romania.

    There are enough homes in almost any country outside Subsaharan Africa, to house their population and even more. How could the tens (hundreds?) of thousands move from New York to Florida, if there wouldn't have been vacancies? Unfortunately, your most beloved president, Trump, also led the way in the idea that you must hold on to buildings.

    Replies: @bomag

    Of course, the cheapest option is to tax, and tax, and tax, any entity or person owning more than one home, until they give up hoarding and renting.

    Only problem here would be the hoarding, but I suspect that doesn’t matter much in the big picture.

    Shouldn’t encourage our “leaders” to tax things to solve a problem.

  157. @res
    @anon

    Here is a state map by number of homeless. Notice how CA has over 25% of the homeless in the entire country (select "Percentage of Total Homelessness by State").
    https://www.usich.gov/tools-for-action/map
    It has about 12% of the US population overall.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

    25%? I’ll bet it’s higher than that. Don’t we also have close to a third of all welfare recipients here?

    12% of the total US population in CA, but a clear majority of its dregs: This is the curse of good weather. The blessing is the good weather.

  158. @James Speaks
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I wrote:


    Synchronicity happens when Evenflo starts making wheels for the Mad Housers.
     
    and then you wrote:

    Microhouses are not some new cutting edge concept in housing. They’ve been around in one form or another since before WW II. They were called trailers back in the day and they were placed in trailer parks.
     
    I believe this is called unintentional irony. BTW, Mad Housers' microhouses are designed to be placed where the homeless person has decided to pitch a tent. Trailers don't work.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I see; not only does the homeless person get a free microhouse (along with UBI, EBT, drug addiction services etc.), he also gets to decide where his microhouse will be placed. Hopefully you’ll luck out and get to observe first hand how that plays out when you get a couple of microhouses plopped down in front of your abode.

  159. @Steve Sailer
    @Sick of Orcs

    I used to see him at Venice Beach all the time in 1981-82 when I lived next door in Santa Monica.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Sick of Orcs, @Harry Baldwin

    Back in the 1980s, one of the star attractions on Venice Beach was a tanned, muscular guy in red shorts who juggled running chainsaws while serving his audience jokes and Don Rickles-type insults. One of the jokes was to ask his audience to contribute generously because he needed to keep up the payments on his Porsche. A friend who lived in the area once saw him packing up his gear in his car, which was in fact a Porsche.

    The chainsaw juggler appeared on the Johnny Carson show, IIRC. Also, as someone who uses chainsaws, I noticed he had filed off the teeth off his.

  160. @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    I remember decades ago we kids would insult each other by asking “so when did you break out of Camarillo?”

    Replies: @Rohirrimborn

    I grew up in Boston and NYC in the fifties and sixties. In lieu of “Camarillo” it was “Danvers” in Boston and “Bellevue” in NYC.

  161. @Steve Sailer
    @Thucydides

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AndrewR, @R.G. Camara, @Gaspar DeLaFunk, @James Speaks, @anon, @Welshman, @Bernard

    The introduction of soft polyurethane wheels instead of traditional metal wheels made roller skating more popular in the 1970s, which made the Venice Beach roller skating path more popular.

    The evolution was from clay to polyurethane wheels. Same was true with skateboards.

  162. @James Speaks
    Seriously, homelessness is a problem that we need to solve. It affects the liveability of cities for one thing, and although I'm somewhat right-wing on many issues, when it makes sense to apply a little socialism, I say go for it. No one system is perfect.

    There is no one homeless problem (singular) but there are many homeless problems (plural).

    1. Psychotics need a place to live and receive treatment.
    2. Broken people (war vets or victims of abuse) need sancuary and a plan.
    3. Drug addicts need to get clean.
    4. Working class people who suffer a setback and lose their homes need help getting back into regular housing.
    5. Irresponsible people who just find it easier to live in tent camps need to leave the county.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    Homelessness is a symptom. It’s not the problem.

    The real problem is that too many people are mentally dropping out and falling for the allure of drugs and booze and general lack of responsibility of not having to worry about paying rent any more.

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    Dude, just make pot legal and cheap, everyone will mellow out. That's what the Liberteenies have been telling me for years, must be true.

    , @HbutnotG
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    I'd bet that's a good number of them but most of them are the former inpatients in state run mental hospitals. Not wanting a roof over your head is a psychosis thing. Not a drug addiction symptom. And yes, no factories anymore where 65% of the population once made a living. You can't pay much rent pushing carts back into a Wal Mart or being a greeter unless you can round up a few roomies - something that has mysteriously gone out of style.

  163. @Abolish_public_education
    @Buffalo Joe

    UC Berkeley Athletics spent $500M+ to retro-eq’proof an old football stadium into a palace. Subsequently, tickets didn’t sell well, so the AD was financially ruined.

    The regents then bailed it out, but that wrecked its own finances. So it has needed to scramble for money.

    UCB, owner of People’s Park, will soon be evicting the bums and druggies encamped there in order to construct revenue generating facilities (I think dorms). (When AD began the football stadium project, some tree hugger stayed up in a tree, on the grounds, for a year in protest of the planned removal of trees).

    Meanwhile, as a condition of bailout, the AD was forced to cede its T&F stadium, located on the opposite side of the campus, back to the regents. They’re planning some sort of commercial development, e.g. shops and apartments, on the site.

    UC just announced a tuition increase.

    Public education at its finest.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Abolish, I read Berkeleyside daily. They started to fence off People’s Park to start surveying and the Unhoused and their many allies took down the fencing and stacked in front of city hall IIRC. So many bleeding hearts supporting the unhoused and so many NIMBYs against campus expansion I don’t see the property being developed in the near future, maybe never.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    The aging Boomer hippies want Berkeley to remain in a bubble full of Summer 1968.

    More recent arrivals want their bubble, too. This is a micro example of iSteve's observation about "what California should look like"; it should look like whatever it was when a given person arrived there. Prior to around 1920 or so, Los Angeles and environs was a 90+% white city, so I guess there are some 100+ year old survivors who want to see that.

    One of the interesting things about old silent movies, such as Buster Keaton, is the background. Filmed in and around the LA basin, one can see scenic grassy hills with oil drilling rigs studded all over; interurban trains outrunning buses; street after street of tidy bungalows; entire crowds of white people in the street.

    The vids of skatergirls in the 70's is just a more recent example the different country called "the past".

    I wonder what the Mexican-Americans will be nostaligic for in, say, 2060?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  164. anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    @Abolish_public_education

    Abolish, I read Berkeleyside daily. They started to fence off People's Park to start surveying and the Unhoused and their many allies took down the fencing and stacked in front of city hall IIRC. So many bleeding hearts supporting the unhoused and so many NIMBYs against campus expansion I don't see the property being developed in the near future, maybe never.

    Replies: @anon

    The aging Boomer hippies want Berkeley to remain in a bubble full of Summer 1968.

    More recent arrivals want their bubble, too. This is a micro example of iSteve’s observation about “what California should look like”; it should look like whatever it was when a given person arrived there. Prior to around 1920 or so, Los Angeles and environs was a 90+% white city, so I guess there are some 100+ year old survivors who want to see that.

    One of the interesting things about old silent movies, such as Buster Keaton, is the background. Filmed in and around the LA basin, one can see scenic grassy hills with oil drilling rigs studded all over; interurban trains outrunning buses; street after street of tidy bungalows; entire crowds of white people in the street.

    The vids of skatergirls in the 70’s is just a more recent example the different country called “the past”.

    I wonder what the Mexican-Americans will be nostaligic for in, say, 2060?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @anon

    The presence of white people?

  165. @Hamlet's Ghost
    @James Speaks

    Homelessness is a symptom. It's not the problem.

    The real problem is that too many people are mentally dropping out and falling for the allure of drugs and booze and general lack of responsibility of not having to worry about paying rent any more.

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    Replies: @anon, @HbutnotG

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    Dude, just make pot legal and cheap, everyone will mellow out. That’s what the Liberteenies have been telling me for years, must be true.

  166. https://www.wweek.com/news/city/2021/06/21/womens-professional-golf-tournament-cites-concerns-about-homeless-camp-near-country-club-as-it-moves-out-of-portland/

    “The tournament organizers had concerns about the safety of the city and opted to find a venue out of the city limits.”

    An annual women’s professional golf tournament won’t be held at its typical location at a Portland country club this September because the tournament organizers believe nearby homeless camps have made the club unsafe.

    The Columbia Edgewater Country Club broke the bad news to its members on June 20. For thirty years, the private club, in deep Northeast Portland on Marine Drive, has helped host the Ladies Professional Golf Association Portland Classic, a tournament on the LPGA tour.

    Portland strikes out again!

  167. @JohnPlywood
    @J.Ross

    You're stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they're dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America's modest restriction will never end if we don't invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we're going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    Replies: @anon, @bomag, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer

    You’re stupid as fuck. Lockdown for what? A virus whose average victim is 70 and/or obese?

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1191568/reported-deaths-from-covid-by-age-us/

    Sweden:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-europe-mortality/sweden-saw-lower-2020-death-spike-than-much-of-europe-data-idUSKBN2BG1R9

    Wanna know why, genius?

    BECAUSE LOCKDOWNS SKILL.

  168. @JohnPlywood
    @J.Ross

    You're stupid as fuck. Working hours have declined since the 1970s. Nobody works 8 hours anymore unless they're dirt poor.

    The lockdown never even began in this country. Look at China 2020 if you want to see what lockdown means. America's modest restriction will never end if we don't invest in a solid 1 year lockdown like China did. We can kick the can down the road for 100 years if you like. But eventually we're going to do that 1 year lockdown.

    Replies: @anon, @bomag, @Paperback Writer, @Paperback Writer

    Here’s another thing dickwad.

    You have a virus that kills frail elderly people. So whaddya do? If you’re a Democrat governor, you release the infected elderly into nursing homes, which then exterminate the population.

    But that’s OK because who needs all those old white people?

    If they were black, do you think that Biden would have done this:

    https://nypost.com/2021/07/23/doj-drops-civil-rights-probe-of-cuomo-nursing-home-covid-scandal/

    Oh, God, no. If the majority of the murdered elderly had been “Black,” we’d never hear the end of it.

  169. @anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    The aging Boomer hippies want Berkeley to remain in a bubble full of Summer 1968.

    More recent arrivals want their bubble, too. This is a micro example of iSteve's observation about "what California should look like"; it should look like whatever it was when a given person arrived there. Prior to around 1920 or so, Los Angeles and environs was a 90+% white city, so I guess there are some 100+ year old survivors who want to see that.

    One of the interesting things about old silent movies, such as Buster Keaton, is the background. Filmed in and around the LA basin, one can see scenic grassy hills with oil drilling rigs studded all over; interurban trains outrunning buses; street after street of tidy bungalows; entire crowds of white people in the street.

    The vids of skatergirls in the 70's is just a more recent example the different country called "the past".

    I wonder what the Mexican-Americans will be nostaligic for in, say, 2060?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    The presence of white people?

  170. @JohnnyWalker123
    @beavertales

    Yeah. $10,000 per homeless individual per year.

    For that sum, you could offer them a tiny mini-apartment ($400-500/month), basic food ($150-$200/month), utilities ($100-150/month), toiletries ($50-100/month), and other miscellaneous expenses ($100/month). It'd seem like for that sum, you could provide them with a basic first-world standard of living.

    Where exactly is the money going?

    Replies: @Escher, @Anonymous Jew

    It’s called the Homeless Industrial Complex (social workers, non-profits and the like).

  171. @Reg Cæsar
    @res


    Here is a state map by number of homeless.
     
    Well, a state-by-state map. What sticks out is comparing states with similar total populations but wide differences in homeless numbers: Texas/California, Florida/New York, Wisconsin/Minnesota.

    Pennsylvania has 60% of the population of New York, but barely one-seventh the number of homeless. Too bad we don't have maps breaking it down by county. (Or do we?) I imagine a large majority of New York's are huddled in the City. Can't imagine being homeless in Watertown or Salamanca. Brrr.

    Here is a map from 2013. Note that the differences between states are not as vast:


    https://i2.wp.com/www.theurbanist.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/homelessness-by-state1.png


    How much of this is a difference in numbers, and how much a difference in definition? We could be looking at 50 different standards.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Number of homeless is not the same as people living in open and visible encampments. Many areas in Texas and even the suburbs here in Seattle compel homeless people to accept available shelter and don’t allow public camping. I follow the issue where I live in Seattle and, IIRC, something like 50% of people in Seattle’s encampments refuse shelter. So a city in Texas and the Left Coast may have comparable homeless populations, but in Texas they’re not allowed to camp in public. This, and permissive drug and other law enforcement, is why so many migrate to LA, SF, BC, Seattle etc.

  172. @Kevin Rudd
    I've worked for the LAFD amongst the homeless for over 30 years. The complete failure to acknowledge the causes of homelessness has led to the complete failure of every solution that has been tried. I would estimate over half need to be institutionalized. Due to mental illness or substance abuse they are not rational actors and no amount of free housing or voluntary programs will ever get them off of the street.

    The big change I've seen in the last decade is the increase in the number of rational individuals who have chosen to be homeless. They've made a choice not to participate in the workforce and to use whatever compensation they can obtain through other means to live without permanent housing. Government, media, academia, etc. chooses not to admit this. No supply of housing will ever satisfy the demand of those who want it for free.

    As long as you won't institutionalize the mentally incompetent nor the substance abusers while at the same time allowing those who choose not to work to occupy pretty much whatever space they choose, the problem will only get worse.

    Compensating individuals for not working is almost always evil. I find it interesting that the words "jobs" or "work" are never ever mentioned in these billion dollar homeless schemes. If your goal is to make things worse minimum guaranteed incomes and free housing are a good start. Freedom from responsibility with easy access to drugs and alcohol is a recipe for dystopia.

    The other factor that municipal idiots like Eric Garcetti can't quite grasp is that by definition they're homeless. That means it's almost impossible to distinguish between one who has been in your city for years or one who showed up on the bus yesterday. When one city has better benefits than another its supply of homeless and thus demand for benefits can never be satisfied. Thus Angelenos are on the hook for thousands of recent arrivals from all over the United States because the idiot Mayor keeps writing the checks.

    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small that I don't think there is anyone who would argue against generously helping them with public funds.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @AnotherDad, @Stan d Mute, @Jim Don Bob

    I had an elderly neighbor about 15 years ago whose deadbeat daughter moved from Maryland to California because the welfare was better. States once had residency requirements to receive welfare but they were struck down by SCOTUS which said they were a property right. We’ve been encouraging this for years and many people make good money “helping” the homeless.

  173. @Polistra
    @Paperback Writer

    He makes it up, just like Plywood does. And Steve loves you all, because your posts are approved automatically while many others among us wait from half a day to two days. Privilege!

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    I just came across this:

    The homeless individuals featured in the article are all long-term transients afflicted with substance addiction, mental illness, or both. One young man tells Lowe that he came to Venice Beach from Washington State last year, “hoping for a new life apart from his estranged wife and children.” He appears to have no disability preventing him from working; he paints artwork to sell. He’s less a romantic artist than (likely) a child-support deadbeat who left someone else with the burden of making a living for his offspring. An older man, 64, says he’s been homeless for three decades, after “his family banished him because of his alcoholism.” The star of the story is a 19-year-old woman who goes by the name of “Angel.” She was recently arrested for weapons possession and recently refused government shelter inland, preferring the beach.

    https://www.city-journal.org/venice-beach-homelessness-crisis?wallit_nosession=1

  174. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    California would have a huge homeless problem even if they didn't spend a penny.

    The weather is moderate throughout the year and the southern half of the state is filled with weak liberal Whites that will let drug addicts setup tents in public parks and near schools.

    I doubt the spending has much of an effect. The vast majority of it isn't going directly to the homeless. They stopped giving out cash assistance a long time ago.

    Replies: @HbutnotG

    Very true about the weather.

    But there are far more psychotic people among “the homeless” than drug addicts. When the liberals deemed mental hospitals “inhumane” 40 years ago and proceeded to close them (also citing that modern antipsychotic drugs are remarkably effective but ignoring the all-to-common tendency for psychotics to stop taking their meds) this homeless thing began to emerge. You see, one manifestation of psychosis (present in some, but not most of them) is the loss of the basic human urge to keep a roof over your head. That’s one reason there were mental hospitals with locks on the gate. Of course you’d have to shut off your drinking buddies, and be a psychiatrist to realize that.

    I presume there are probably a few planning to pen a book and make lots of money – like the Clintons, for example.

    Any dope addict worth his salt finds a place to flop. Dope addicts network a lot. This is so they can get their fix and secondarily, if necessary, find an indoor place to flop.

    Don’t confuse the two. It makes you look like a meatball.

    • Replies: @anon
    @HbutnotG

    But there are far more psychotic people among “the homeless” than drug addicts.

    Some of the guys under the freeway are self-medicating. Dopamine hits are dopamine hits.

    This is a good moment to point at Biology of Desire.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23214265-the-biology-of-desire

    Addiction is not a disease per se, but it may be associated with various maladies, both physical and mental.

  175. @Edomite male
    57 percent white, 70 percent male, in a state that is majority ppl of color, and a city that is overwhelmingly of color.... Just shows where white males are headed today, with all the white male hate.... Here in Louisville KY, all i see are young homeless white males walking around everywhere

    Replies: @Feryl, @Charon, @Jay Fink

    My city is over 50% Hispanic but the homeless population seems to be at least 90% white.

  176. @Hamlet's Ghost
    @James Speaks

    Homelessness is a symptom. It's not the problem.

    The real problem is that too many people are mentally dropping out and falling for the allure of drugs and booze and general lack of responsibility of not having to worry about paying rent any more.

    That the powers that be have been encouraging this dead-end mindset with various carrots and sticks for a long time is the real problem.

    Replies: @anon, @HbutnotG

    I’d bet that’s a good number of them but most of them are the former inpatients in state run mental hospitals. Not wanting a roof over your head is a psychosis thing. Not a drug addiction symptom. And yes, no factories anymore where 65% of the population once made a living. You can’t pay much rent pushing carts back into a Wal Mart or being a greeter unless you can round up a few roomies – something that has mysteriously gone out of style.

  177. anon[305] • Disclaimer says:
    @HbutnotG
    @John Johnson

    Very true about the weather.

    But there are far more psychotic people among "the homeless" than drug addicts. When the liberals deemed mental hospitals "inhumane" 40 years ago and proceeded to close them (also citing that modern antipsychotic drugs are remarkably effective but ignoring the all-to-common tendency for psychotics to stop taking their meds) this homeless thing began to emerge. You see, one manifestation of psychosis (present in some, but not most of them) is the loss of the basic human urge to keep a roof over your head. That's one reason there were mental hospitals with locks on the gate. Of course you'd have to shut off your drinking buddies, and be a psychiatrist to realize that.

    I presume there are probably a few planning to pen a book and make lots of money - like the Clintons, for example.

    Any dope addict worth his salt finds a place to flop. Dope addicts network a lot. This is so they can get their fix and secondarily, if necessary, find an indoor place to flop.

    Don't confuse the two. It makes you look like a meatball.

    Replies: @anon

    But there are far more psychotic people among “the homeless” than drug addicts.

    Some of the guys under the freeway are self-medicating. Dopamine hits are dopamine hits.

    This is a good moment to point at Biology of Desire.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23214265-the-biology-of-desire

    Addiction is not a disease per se, but it may be associated with various maladies, both physical and mental.

  178. @Stan d Mute
    @Kevin Rudd


    The small percentage of individuals who truly just need some help until they can get back on their feet is so small
     
    And yet right there I am calling BULLSHIT! The actual number of white Americans who are DESPERATELY in need of help is staggering. They have zero net worth. They have zero investment in “the stock market (booming)”. They are discriminated against in every job application (except perhaps the small local companies that value performance more than performative). Negroes may in fact be disproportionately fucked. But in absolute numbers, poor whitey is beyond fucked.

    Curiously, this is an exact mirror of 1855. Unz has, I think, “They Were White and They Were Slaves” online. Ron’s mentioned it in one of his articles. I encourage you to read it and elucidate us all on how the lot of the poor honkie has improved in the last 150+ years.

    Replies: @Kevin Rudd

    You can call whatever the hell you want. I’m just telling you what I’ve seen for 30 years in LA. No matter what you give them, the vast majority of the homeless in LA aren’t rejoining mainstream society anytime soon.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @Kevin Rudd


    the vast majority of the homeless in LA aren’t rejoining mainstream society anytime soon.
     
    A large component of the homeless is insane. Look at my comment in iSteve’s thread on asylums last week. Detriot alone lost nearly 20,000 psychiatric beds from the 1950’s to today. And yet these aren’t even the folks that I am concerned about. The elites shuttered the loony bins and degraded OUR (not their) quality of life significantly.

    But the larger problem isn’t how to handle the insane, but how to help the tens of millions of poor whites with an IQ under 100 who face unrelenting wage pressures from the illegal labor market as well as price inflation and confiscation of familial wealth through taxation and usury. Middle America is being starved to death.
  179. The idea with the homeless invasion is to destroy the communities of every state. Chaos is what the evil people want. They want homeowners killing homeless people, for instance.

  180. this way, they can send in the Robocops (hahhahahahahhahahhaaaa – not) that they have created from years of research and lab work. This is true and real, and fuck-off and wait for it it you think I am just drunk and stupid.

  181. @Steve Sailer
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    That's a nice new video for the 40-year-old Dire Straits song "Roller Girl."

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  182. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ronald Reagan told us this in a more general sense 40 years ago, except without that "almost as if" part. Do you want that Trademarked, Steve? I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    Replies: @Anon, @John Johnson, @Hi There, @MEH 0910

    I know a guy whose brother is a Notary Public.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  183. @Kevin Rudd
    @Stan d Mute

    You can call whatever the hell you want. I'm just telling you what I've seen for 30 years in LA. No matter what you give them, the vast majority of the homeless in LA aren't rejoining mainstream society anytime soon.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    the vast majority of the homeless in LA aren’t rejoining mainstream society anytime soon.

    A large component of the homeless is insane. Look at my comment in iSteve’s thread on asylums last week. Detriot alone lost nearly 20,000 psychiatric beds from the 1950’s to today. And yet these aren’t even the folks that I am concerned about. The elites shuttered the loony bins and degraded OUR (not their) quality of life significantly.

    But the larger problem isn’t how to handle the insane, but how to help the tens of millions of poor whites with an IQ under 100 who face unrelenting wage pressures from the illegal labor market as well as price inflation and confiscation of familial wealth through taxation and usury. Middle America is being starved to death.

  184. “Build it and they will come.”

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