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But individuals with their “unique genetic code” share more of their genetic code with members of their nation, family, and sex than they do with random consumers.

It’s possible for the genetic code glass to be both part full and part empty simultaneously. Similarly, it’s possible for ethical obligations to be more concentric than leapfrogging.

As an American, the notion that there’s a place called Italy, and that it is full of beautiful towns built by Italians, and that the builders’ Italian descendants continue to live charming lives in the Italian manner in the places their ancestors built does not fill me with foreboding.

I hope to someday be able to afford to revisit Italy, which struck me when I backpacked around Europe in 1980 as the World’s Best Tourist Destination, just as young gentlemen doing the Grand Tour in centuries past had concluded. But even if I never get back, it warms my heart that Italy is still there.

What does fill me with foreboding is the thought that someday Italy won’t be Italy anymore, that it will become StripMall One.

 
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  1. In Clown World you are a fully atomized consumer, a unique and special snowflake, just like all the others.

    The idea that individuals might share some unapproved commonality with others just does not compute.

  2. • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Heckuva job, Johnny.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm surprised both numbers for DC are so low.

    That town is constantly awash in government cash. They have never experienced a recession.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    , @Alfa158
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Tracks to the increase in mortgage interest rates.

    , @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    House prices are crazy--appalling. We need an absolute hard immigration stop, and an end to foreign purchases. Housing policy should be about affordable family formation for ... Americans.

    But the biggest driver of th e2020-2022 change here is mostly just interest rates. And what is going to happen here is that house prices are going to have drop to accommodate the interest rate surge.

    Our "elites" have misbehaved for so long not just with immigration but with ridiculous spending and money printing that they've even screwed up even the freebie of America having world currency seigniorage.

    , @bomag
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Q: Who pays the price for Clown World?

    A: People buying houses.

  3. LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Currahee

    On the whole I like Gillespie and Reason, but I agree, they can be really really annoying when they take cheap and lazy shots like this one.

    , @Polistra
    @Currahee

    Also from Reason today:


    https://i.ibb.co/8jm4cx1/Screenshot-20220926-151753-Chrome.jpg

    Replies: @Rob McX, @bomag

    , @AnotherDad
    @Currahee


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    Autism. Libertarianism is autism as an ideology.

    I'm fairly instinctually libertarian. I'm not a natural "rule follower", and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is "leave me alone". Go do your thing, I'll do mine.

    But i'm also not three years old. I.e. i'm not autistic.

    We exist as individuals--i'll never be anyone else, will never see the world from inside their head. But the most obvious fact on the planet is that human beings are a highly social species. We exist in groups. In fact, basically our salient--world conquering survival skill--is having a big brain that allows us to communicate the stuff we figure out to other people in our tribe and organize ourselves as a cohesive group to do cool stuff. That's why we have ships and books and steel and electricity and sewers and airplanes and the internet. Individuals alone ... have absolutely zero of that. They'd live in a tree ... and then get eaten.

    This duality of human life--the individual and the social--just ridiculously obvious. If you care about individual freedom and flourishing you have to think about what sort of society that actually happens in. It doesn't "just happen".

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    Replies: @Mactoul, @Muggles, @Mike Tre

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Currahee

    Currahee wrote:


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    reason and Gillespie are "liberaltarain."

    Check out the Lew Rockwell site or the Mises Institute for an alternative libertarianism that argues that human interactions among adults should be consensual without denying obvious facts about human nature. Incidentally, Rockwell and Mises are actually more radical on political issues than Gillespie, but they are not hostile to the values of normal middle-class/working-class people.

    I don't agree with Lew or the Mises Institute on everything, but to think that libertarians are clones of Nick Gillespie is a bit like thinking that everyone on the political Right is a clone of Mitt Romney.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Muggles
    @Currahee


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    So one stupid tweet from DC's best known (but deservedly obscure) House Libertarian and you condemn all libertarians?

    Now do conservatives.

    Reason has a few good writers (though I haven't read them in decades) but it is the only self described semi libertarian magazine out there. Did you expect them to be really that good?

    All other national print publications (save a few) are owned/controlled by Woke oligarchs or self serving billionaires or their ex wives. The Koch brothers are now down to one, and he's quit the libertarian game long ago. The few self described somewhat libertarian billionaires don't do media.

    As for actual politics, aside from Ron and Rand Paul (and a few like Cong. Thomas Massie, far more obscure) there are zero libertarians running things.

    But by all means, piss on their shoes. No one much will complain. You'll feel smarter, which in your case is badly needed self esteem therapy.

    (When modern libertarians first coalesced into a small group in the late 60s, there were a few debates about "open borders" etc. While a few like Gillespie drank that Kool-Aide, everyone else came to the proper conclusion that until "State property" -- i.e. government owned -- became private property with accompanying rights to exclude others, open borders wasn't workable. FYI)
  4. ‘What does fill me with foreboding is the thought that someday Italy won’t be Italy anymore, that it will become StripMall One.’

    How about the northernmost state in black Africa?

    The dream is already coming true.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Colin Wright


    How about the northernmost state in black Africa?
     
    These days Africa begins at Naples.

    And Marseille.

    Replies: @slumber_j

  5. What I find morbidly amusing is that it’s routine to call Meloni a ‘fascist.’

    I doubt it — but Italy led the way with the real Fascists almost exactly a hundred years ago. Over the next two decades, much of the rest of Europe followed.

    Call her whatever you like, but maybe Meloni means Italy will lead the way again.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Colin Wright


    What I find morbidly amusing is that it’s routine to call Meloni a ‘fascist.’
     
    And of course they reflexively call her and Orban and the Swedish Democrats "far right" as well. Which is weird because they are a bunch of socialists who just want a sane immigration policy and no tranny stuff.
    , @snootybaronet
    @Colin Wright

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin's Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini's Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn't until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @bispora, @slumber_j, @Ron Mexico

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Colin Wright

    Colin Wright wrote:


    What I find morbidly amusing is that it’s routine to call Meloni a ‘fascist.’
     
    The biggest hit on her is that she is a fan of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings!

    Which of course proves that her critics are incapable of reading: the central theme of LOTR is, after all, the destructive impact of the lust for power -- One ring of power to rule them all!

    Sorta like the illiterates who think that Huckleberry Finn is a racist book, when it is in fact an intense attack on racism.

    “Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens.”
  6. Meloni’s invocation of individualism (“unique genetic code”) is incompatible w her invocation of collective identity (nation, family, gender).

    Gillespie is just being stupid here. There is zero conflict between being a self-directed individual (per his libertarian creed) and also voluntarily choosing, as an individual, to find succor and identity within your own nation, family, or biology.

    Favoring individual freedom (for yourself or others) does not equate with advocating isolation and nihilism. (Sometimes conservatives make this same mistake when moving in the opposite direction –i.e., criticizing freedom as being necessarily anti-tradition).

    Gillespie’s problem is that being a doctrinaire libertarian should require you to be agnostic about other people’s choices. But that’s inconsistent with his role as a pundit, which requires him to have a half-assed opinion about everything.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    @Hypnotoad666

    The realization that ordered liberty is just something that most races are incapable of is a big part of what made me leave libertarianism.

    Africans and Middle Eastern Muslims are particularly inept at maintaining rule of law, property rights, and other things necessary for a functioning capitalist economy. And assimilated, secular Muslims are mostly leftists.

    To be blunt, I’d even prefer living in East Berlin or Prague ca. 1980 than in the most capitalist country in Africa or the Middle East today. Istanbul might have been tolerable but Erdogan took care of that.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @Forbes
    @Hypnotoad666

    I gave up on Reason and CATO libertarianism when it finally dawned on me that they don't take human nature into account. People prefer order, community, family, which are a contrast (in conflict?) with Gillespie's individualism. Reason's version results in chaos and nihilism as proxies for freedom and liberty.

    When anything goes, anything will.

  7. Anon[359] • Disclaimer says:

    Italy has managed to preserve some of Roman and Renaissance past because it’s like a poor person who spends all his money the instant he gets it, and he’s broke until the next payday. Turning yourself into one big strip mall requires a significant accumulation of capital for that kind of sort of construction, and Italy has always been too financially irresponsible for it.

    Italy contains individuals who build nice things occasionally, but collectively, the country is not capable of developing itself that way. This is what they get for being excitable Southern Europeans instead of cold, thrifty Northern Europeans.

    Of course, one of the reasons why we go to Italy at all, is the minute anybody got any money they went out and blew it all constructing a nice building or hiring a famous artist to create great artwork. Rich Italians have always loved to show off what their money can do in a way that everybody can admire. Rich Arabs living in Dubai would understand this mentality perfectly.

  8. Well stated, Steve — Agree! On the other hand, my Italian cousins are doubtlessly distraught at Meloni’s ascendence. I haven’t asked, in the service of maintaining amiable family relations.

    Given its fractious history, no surprise that Italy is as riven by political great divides as is our own country.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @ic1000

    From what I've seen the Italian Left is less averse to her than the globalists are.

  9. She’s tough talking the talk. It remains to be seen if she’ll tough walk the walk. Here’s hoping, as the hour grows ever late.

    • Replies: @1John
    @usNthem

    Yes, now we will see what she is made of, now we will see if she is committed in saving the Italian ethnicity. Three items she must do immediately:
    -1) close borders.
    -2) commence repatriations.
    -3) amend the Italian Constitution to state that Italy 🇮🇹 is the homeland of Italians in perpetuity & must be always no less than 95% of its demographics.
    If she does not, then, she will have betrayed the Italian People & Italians need to act quickly in saving Italy for Italians because the invasion is nonstop.

  10. Italy is a 400-mile chain of mountains flanked by beaches on both sides. In other words, it is California, only with two West Coasts, no deserts or boring inland plains, and studded with the best art, sculpture and architecture mankind has produced. Who doesn’t want to live there?

    • Agree: Pastit
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @The Wild Geese Howard, @slumber_j, @AndrewR

    , @anonymous
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy's exceptionally fanatic strictness on the covid pass, the most extreme in Europe (aside from that Austrian heavy-fines-for-all-unvaxed law that got aborted at the last minute) put off many people from living there, as people wonder if that oppression could happen again. Meloni was not on board with the 'vaccine cult extremism' tho reportedly got vaxed herself.

    The great surge in votes for Meloni's party, taking away votes from her coalition partner, the formerly popular Salvini, was in part because of that difference; Meloni wasn't soiled by being in the oily previous 'technocrat' government. The attractive Meloni does have a great sense of humour, and also was smart enough to encourage the young zoomers who love memes so much:

    https://i.postimg.cc/nLhRqNwB/meloni-n-melons.jpg

    https://i.postimg.cc/4yjYdjQ5/giorgia-meloni-chan.jpg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Muggles

    , @SFG
    @Henry Canaday

    You forgot the food, so tasty everyone copies it. Google ‘Italian cuisine in Japan’ sometime.


    That said the country is quite inefficient and has long-standing problems with corruption; the Italians are as much disgusted with the last batch of incompetents as they are believers in Meloni. There is no nation without pluses and minuses to its culture.

    I still support their right to self determination and to keep on doing whatever they want. It is their country, after all. Viva Meloni!

  11. Is Nick G. still going for the Fonz look? Damn lolbergs never know when they’ve jumped the shark.

  12. Nick Gillespie is 59 years old.

    And he still dresses like that?

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Forbes
    @vinteuil

    When he's 70, he'll still have never left the '70s behind. Too funny.

  13. @Henry Canaday
    Italy is a 400-mile chain of mountains flanked by beaches on both sides. In other words, it is California, only with two West Coasts, no deserts or boring inland plains, and studded with the best art, sculpture and architecture mankind has produced. Who doesn’t want to live there?

    Replies: @vinteuil, @anonymous, @SFG

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @vinteuil

    "Italy is Heaven on Earth."

    That basically aligns with what I've heard from peeps -- European and American -- who have made the trip.

    "Nothing else compares to it. ... not even Saint Petersburg."

    Ha! That's where my wife's family is from. The midnight sun in summertime played a number on my brain. So did my wife's family apartment. Fairly large with a number of rooms but filled with three generations and visiting cousins. A lot of giggling girls. Really sweet people.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @vinteuil


    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it.
     
    I'm convinced there is no better downhill skiing experience on Earth than the Italian Alps.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @slumber_j
    @vinteuil

    You'll find no bigger foreign fan of Italy than I, except maybe for my wife, who wrote her doctoral dissertation on a building in Venice. We go there every chance we get, and I went there a lot before I met her--even having gone so far as to date a Palermitan woman for a while in the Before Time. (And I subsequently learned that the Sicilians practice what they preach when they say revenge is a dish best served cold.)

    Nevertheless, I'd never want to live there. My previous father-in-law--a snide and highly accomplished American whose own first mother-in-law was a Roman princess--liked to claim that the proudest achievement of his adult life was the time he managed to register a car in Rome.

    , @AndrewR
    @vinteuil

    Rome is the only part I've been to but it seemed like hell on earth in terms of people. Nothing but thieves.

  14. I hope all the other EU countries eventually elect their own Melonis and Orbáns. The EU Commission President isn’t happy about that. “…I’ve spoken about Hungary and Poland, we have tools [to punish countries who vote for the wrong kind of party],” she said before the election. They’re desperately trying to formulate some social credit system to keep all member states frightened into voting for their own extinction.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  15. According to the BBC Meloni is ‘far-right’.

    According to me the BBC is far-left.

    But they have the megaphone.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Gordo

    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy's "the most right-wing leader since Mussolini" in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times. The time is coming when the people will no longer be scared by these trigger words. They're expected to react like Pavlov's dog and rush back into the arms of the old parties that are selling them out.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  16. @Currahee
    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Polistra, @AnotherDad, @PhysicistDave, @Muggles

    On the whole I like Gillespie and Reason, but I agree, they can be really really annoying when they take cheap and lazy shots like this one.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  17. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1574360635906805760

    Replies: @Desiderius, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Alfa158, @AnotherDad, @bomag

    Heckuva job, Johnny.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Desiderius

    Yeah, the "rank" is alphabetical.

  18. Well put.

    She’s great.

  19. @ic1000
    Well stated, Steve -- Agree! On the other hand, my Italian cousins are doubtlessly distraught at Meloni's ascendence. I haven't asked, in the service of maintaining amiable family relations.

    Given its fractious history, no surprise that Italy is as riven by political great divides as is our own country.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    From what I’ve seen the Italian Left is less averse to her than the globalists are.

  20. anonymous[301] • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry Canaday
    Italy is a 400-mile chain of mountains flanked by beaches on both sides. In other words, it is California, only with two West Coasts, no deserts or boring inland plains, and studded with the best art, sculpture and architecture mankind has produced. Who doesn’t want to live there?

    Replies: @vinteuil, @anonymous, @SFG

    Italy’s exceptionally fanatic strictness on the covid pass, the most extreme in Europe (aside from that Austrian heavy-fines-for-all-unvaxed law that got aborted at the last minute) put off many people from living there, as people wonder if that oppression could happen again. Meloni was not on board with the ‘vaccine cult extremism’ tho reportedly got vaxed herself.

    The great surge in votes for Meloni’s party, taking away votes from her coalition partner, the formerly popular Salvini, was in part because of that difference; Meloni wasn’t soiled by being in the oily previous ‘technocrat’ government. The attractive Meloni does have a great sense of humour, and also was smart enough to encourage the young zoomers who love memes so much:

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @anonymous

    I don't think the West needs female leaders. (We white men need to step up and act like men.) But if you're going to have one, this gal fits the bill.

    Meloni should know though that this sort of disgusting behavior will no longer be tolerated by the "Hate Eradicators." The idea that women have "melons" ... I can't even sleep at night thinking about it.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    , @Muggles
    @anonymous

    But we have Kamala!

    (And she giggles and chatters like that because of the THC gummies. You would too if you worked for Creepy Joe...)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  21. Many European cultures won’t exist in a generation or two. Better get to Holland, Sweden, Britain, Belgium, Ireland and Germany while you can.

    It’s like going to Los Angeles and expecting to see Surfin” USA and the Brady Bunch

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @anon

    Or the LA Randy Newman loved.

  22. Sounds like Meloni would believe in some sort of plan for Affordable Family Formation.
    She’s a Fascist for sure, wanting Italy to be for Italians.

    God, Family, country and now sex are now markers for Fascism.

    Wait till they find out how she feels about Amazons Rings of Power.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @mc23

    Notice the name of the author. It's so predictable it's almost boring: like, pointing out the inevitable.

    Replies: @mc23

  23. “random consumer”

    Excellent comment, Steve. Tragic hipster Gillespie is unable to reconcile two conflicting thoughts in his brain. In truth, neither can I. But unlike Dick I believe other people have that ability. I used to believe libertarianism was the perfect operating system for any society. But then I turned seventeen.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @SunBakedSuburb

    The reconciliation is that she is saying that the globohomo technocrats want to turn the world into nothing but proverbial NPC's (i.e. automatons) with no loyalties or obligations beyond consumerism and gratifying their own individual desires. Or, as an economist would say, pursuing their own "utility".

    In other words, they want supranational subjects of the EU and not individual Italians (or Englishmen, or Frenchmen, or whatever)... so why not bring in more foreigners and expand the consumer pool even further?

    This is obvious from the context of the speech, but Gillespie can't shrug and say, "She has a point" or concede that maybe this is itself an issue of individual liberty versus subjugation at a level above the state itself, and just STFU.

    No, he has to make a tendentious connection to "libertarian modernism" and insert himself because Libertarians can never just STFU and stay out of things.

    It's not that they always have to be right, it's that everyone else always has to be wrong.

  24. @Colin Wright
    What I find morbidly amusing is that it's routine to call Meloni a 'fascist.'

    I doubt it -- but Italy led the way with the real Fascists almost exactly a hundred years ago. Over the next two decades, much of the rest of Europe followed.

    Call her whatever you like, but maybe Meloni means Italy will lead the way again.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @snootybaronet, @PhysicistDave

    What I find morbidly amusing is that it’s routine to call Meloni a ‘fascist.’

    And of course they reflexively call her and Orban and the Swedish Democrats “far right” as well. Which is weird because they are a bunch of socialists who just want a sane immigration policy and no tranny stuff.

  25. Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve’s Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Fight the battles you can actually win instead of wanting there to be some global equity in the battles we all should fight.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    , @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve’s Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?
     

    Steve wants to win?

    Steve's never said, you can't be an American white tribal patriot. But Steve wants a clear political ideology to counter "Our Democracy"--i.e. America as nothing but a global marketplace for looting, run by elite diktat, using various other minorities as cudgels against America's core white people. His "Citizenism"--"hey a nation's supposed to be run for its citizens!"--is the obvious counter that can actually win in a first-past-the-post electoral system.

    Meloni is great, but Italy--while grotesquely "enriched" with diversity--is still Italian. And Italy has a mixed system with single member and proportional top up ... and Meloni won what a quarter of the vote? and her coalition 40 something percent?

    You want to win in the USofA yelling "white pride!" isn't going to do it. But "America for Americans!" or the like is a winning strategy.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  26. @vinteuil
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @The Wild Geese Howard, @slumber_j, @AndrewR

    “Italy is Heaven on Earth.”

    That basically aligns with what I’ve heard from peeps — European and American — who have made the trip.

    “Nothing else compares to it. … not even Saint Petersburg.”

    Ha! That’s where my wife’s family is from. The midnight sun in summertime played a number on my brain. So did my wife’s family apartment. Fairly large with a number of rooms but filled with three generations and visiting cousins. A lot of giggling girls. Really sweet people.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Italy was indeed very much like heaven on earth. For hundreds of years, maybe more. Lately though it also has hundreds of thousands of Africans and Chinese so it's only heaven in certain places. Hence the new government.

    Hope it works. I'll be praying for her.

  27. @Henry Canaday
    Italy is a 400-mile chain of mountains flanked by beaches on both sides. In other words, it is California, only with two West Coasts, no deserts or boring inland plains, and studded with the best art, sculpture and architecture mankind has produced. Who doesn’t want to live there?

    Replies: @vinteuil, @anonymous, @SFG

    You forgot the food, so tasty everyone copies it. Google ‘Italian cuisine in Japan’ sometime.

    That said the country is quite inefficient and has long-standing problems with corruption; the Italians are as much disgusted with the last batch of incompetents as they are believers in Meloni. There is no nation without pluses and minuses to its culture.

    I still support their right to self determination and to keep on doing whatever they want. It is their country, after all. Viva Meloni!

  28. Google ‘Italian cuisine in Japan’ sometime.

    The Chinese, Koreans and Japanese have not interacted well with European food. I’ve talked to travellers who have told me the European food in Asian countries is not very good. Also I’ve heard from a number of people from these countries that they don’t like “white people food”.

    India and Britain on the other hand have shared and mixed their cuisines for centuries. HP sauce has tamarind in it, Brits like cardamom, etc. Both love tea with milk and sugar (I have at least 5 cups a day).

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @loveshumanity

    I disagree. Japanese Italian food is a real thing and it's delicious. I've had spaghetti with sea urchin (uni) in cream sauce and it was very good.

    Korean fried chicken sandwiches are also a real thing in southern California.

    Hong Kong cafes often feature prime rib and baked potato. Things like baked pork chops with tomato sauce and spaghetti covered in cheese is also a real thing. It's the only Chinese food that uses cheese in their fusion dishes. Go to the San Gabriel valley and try it yourself.

    It works both ways. The tea you enjoy was brought to the UK from Hong Kong, including the 3pm tea time.

  29. @Colin Wright
    What I find morbidly amusing is that it's routine to call Meloni a 'fascist.'

    I doubt it -- but Italy led the way with the real Fascists almost exactly a hundred years ago. Over the next two decades, much of the rest of Europe followed.

    Call her whatever you like, but maybe Meloni means Italy will lead the way again.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @snootybaronet, @PhysicistDave

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin’s Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn’t until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave, Sam Malone
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @snootybaronet

    '...Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy...'

    Oh, I dunno. There's a lot of fascism here in America these days. The tactics of Antifa, for example, were very similar to those of the early Italian squadristi. Biden is transforming the FBI in the same way the Nazis transformed the German state police.

    What's irritating, though, is that our fascists label their opponents fascists.

    Go ahead. Be fascist. But do you have to be so goddamned dishonest about it?

    , @bispora
    @snootybaronet

    Is it not interesting that the term fascism is used instead of Nazism by the progressive media and political elite? In the full name of Hitler's NSDAP party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), it is two words that make them negate the term nazi: one is socialism and the other is the term worker. It is rumoured that Stalin instructed the communist media to prefer the word Fascism over Nazism for these very reasons. Now I can see the impact of the Georgian butcher on the progressive intellectuals, politicians and media of today...

    , @slumber_j
    @snootybaronet


    Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy
     
    I dunno: Franco's FET y de las JONS did call itself "Phalangist." But quibbles about nomenclature aside, the party was both essentially and superficially Fascist in pretty much every way I can think of--with a lot of Roman Catholicism and lip-service to Monarchism thrown in, but still...

    Replies: @snootybaronet, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    , @Ron Mexico
    @snootybaronet

    Yes. Thank you. From a HS government teacher this is an excellent summary. In the end it is all Marxism.

  30. So much idiotic drivel because a woman gets elected.

  31. @anon
    Many European cultures won't exist in a generation or two. Better get to Holland, Sweden, Britain, Belgium, Ireland and Germany while you can.

    It's like going to Los Angeles and expecting to see Surfin" USA and the Brady Bunch

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Or the LA Randy Newman loved.

  32. This is one of those things Nick, that if you need it explained, you won’t understand it.

  33. @SunBakedSuburb
    @vinteuil

    "Italy is Heaven on Earth."

    That basically aligns with what I've heard from peeps -- European and American -- who have made the trip.

    "Nothing else compares to it. ... not even Saint Petersburg."

    Ha! That's where my wife's family is from. The midnight sun in summertime played a number on my brain. So did my wife's family apartment. Fairly large with a number of rooms but filled with three generations and visiting cousins. A lot of giggling girls. Really sweet people.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Italy was indeed very much like heaven on earth. For hundreds of years, maybe more. Lately though it also has hundreds of thousands of Africans and Chinese so it’s only heaven in certain places. Hence the new government.

    Hope it works. I’ll be praying for her.

  34. The thing that always strikes me about Italians is that they like being Italian. They don’t need mass immigration, even with low birth rates, because there are plenty of Italians willing to do the “jobs (Americans/Brits/Germans etc) don’t want to do.”

    Why? Because they get to live in Italy.

  35. @Gordo
    According to the BBC Meloni is ‘far-right’.

    According to me the BBC is far-left.

    But they have the megaphone.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy’s “the most right-wing leader since Mussolini” in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times. The time is coming when the people will no longer be scared by these trigger words. They’re expected to react like Pavlov’s dog and rush back into the arms of the old parties that are selling them out.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Rob McX


    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy’s “the most right-wing leader since Mussolini” in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times.
     
    “If I had been Italian, I am sure I would have been with you from the beginning.” Winston Churchill, speaking to Mussolini, 1927.

    “(I am) deeply impressed by what he has accomplished.” FDR on Mussolini, 1933.

    “One of the great statesmen of our time.” Mahatma Ghandi on Mussolini, 1931.

    "He has done more things for his country since the war than any hundred men in any
    other country. " Will Rogers on Mussolini, 1929.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  36. Meloni spent the last two years fighting against the Covid passports. Yet she is called a fascist ? She opposed this fascist policy which forced all Italians to show their proper papers to venture outside and go to restaurants, take a train or attend a concert…

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco


    take a train or attend a concert…
     
    and the Covid passport contributed nothing to the trains' on-time performance.
  37. Why would italians think third world migrants can become first worlders in huge numbers? Northern Italy can’t even get southern Italy to become first world. Nature or nurture, differences seem to intractable in that relocating just means that wherever you go, there you are.

    Who were Italy’s last migrant influx? The Germanic peoples back in Roman times?

    • Replies: @ForeverCARealist
    @Rob

    When we were there in 2016, all the people doing the work in Rome were from the Middle East or Eastern Europe. Just like London. Also, Italians don't make babies.

    It was simultaneously beautiful and trashy. The beauty came from nature and the past civilizations. The trash came from the people.

    , @Juvenalis
    @Rob

    You must not be too familiar with Italy, Europe, or the world, if you believe disparities in development between different regions of Italy are at all comparable to the gap between 'first world' and 'third world' countries.

    Any region with human development index >0.7 is considered at "high" level of development; any region with HDI >0.8 is considered to be at "very high" level of human development. While the more rural South is not as rich as the more urban North, every region of Italy scores at a "very high" level on the human development index.

    From the POV of the average person on earth—out of 8 billion in 2022—any part of Italy is a futuristic first-world paradise that might as well be El Dorado compared to the actual third world hellscapes whence they are emigrating en masse.
    https://i.redd.it/6p7x61o8ovc11.png

    Replies: @Rob

  38. @Desiderius
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Heckuva job, Johnny.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Yeah, the “rank” is alphabetical.

  39. @Currahee
    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Polistra, @AnotherDad, @PhysicistDave, @Muggles

    Also from Reason today:

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Polistra

    Libspergtarians.

    , @bomag
    @Polistra


    Migrants are people, not props.
     
    Could be the most ironic statement possible.
  40. I’m sure Gillespie fancied he was being clever.

  41. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve's Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @AnotherDad

    Fight the battles you can actually win instead of wanting there to be some global equity in the battles we all should fight.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Pincher Martin

    The battles that you can win are local and tribal.

    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.

    Steve is a gatekeeper, even if unintentionally.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  42. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1574360635906805760

    Replies: @Desiderius, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Alfa158, @AnotherDad, @bomag

    I’m surprised both numbers for DC are so low.

    That town is constantly awash in government cash. They have never experienced a recession.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    I suspect much of the DC housing stock that's available for sale is in iffy neighborhoods or worse.

  43. @Colin Wright
    'What does fill me with foreboding is the thought that someday Italy won’t be Italy anymore, that it will become StripMall One.'

    How about the northernmost state in black Africa?

    The dream is already coming true.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    How about the northernmost state in black Africa?

    These days Africa begins at Naples.

    And Marseille.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @The Wild Geese Howard


    These days Africa begins at Naples.
     
    Well to be fair, Northern Italians have been saying Africa begins at Naples for a long, long time...

    Replies: @Anonymous

  44. @vinteuil
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @The Wild Geese Howard, @slumber_j, @AndrewR

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it.

    I’m convinced there is no better downhill skiing experience on Earth than the Italian Alps.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    I remember when covid was breaking out in Italian Alps hill towns below the Dolomites in February 2020 and know it alls were saying that that was only because that part of Italy is so polluted and the people are so fat. I said, no, that's just about the best place in the world.

    Replies: @quewin

  45. I get that this isn’t 4chan, but sometimes the meme is better than commentary.

  46. Meloni tweeted a video showing some black African migrant raping a screaming blonde Ukrainian woman against a wall in an alley. I’ve seen it; it’s horrifying. But timidity doesn’t win elections. Fear of what the usuals will do to you for telling the truth will not win elections. Hopefully, other European and American leaders will be inspired by her win.

  47. @Currahee
    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Polistra, @AnotherDad, @PhysicistDave, @Muggles

    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Autism. Libertarianism is autism as an ideology.

    I’m fairly instinctually libertarian. I’m not a natural “rule follower”, and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is “leave me alone”. Go do your thing, I’ll do mine.

    But i’m also not three years old. I.e. i’m not autistic.

    We exist as individuals–i’ll never be anyone else, will never see the world from inside their head. But the most obvious fact on the planet is that human beings are a highly social species. We exist in groups. In fact, basically our salient–world conquering survival skill–is having a big brain that allows us to communicate the stuff we figure out to other people in our tribe and organize ourselves as a cohesive group to do cool stuff. That’s why we have ships and books and steel and electricity and sewers and airplanes and the internet. Individuals alone … have absolutely zero of that. They’d live in a tree … and then get eaten.

    This duality of human life–the individual and the social–just ridiculously obvious. If you care about individual freedom and flourishing you have to think about what sort of society that actually happens in. It doesn’t “just happen”.

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    • Thanks: Paul Jolliffe
    • Replies: @Mactoul
    @AnotherDad

    It is actually a triplet of individual, family and nation or tribe.

    , @Muggles
    @AnotherDad


    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.
     
    Yes, by all means laboriously belittle the only ideology that champions leaving you alone as much as possible.

    Must be bad...

    "Duality" and all. You certainly need something more controlling, complex and full of incomprehensible jargon. So you can tell others how wrong they are and also, how to live their lives to the fullest, as you do.

    We're waiting for your book...
    , @Mike Tre
    @AnotherDad

    "I’m fairly instinctually libertarian. I’m not a natural “rule follower”, and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is “leave me alone”. Go do your thing, I’ll do mine. "

    Not really. You were all aboard the mask mandates, possibly the best measure of "get in line, citizen" there has been the last few years.

  48. @mc23
    Sounds like Meloni would believe in some sort of plan for Affordable Family Formation.
    She's a Fascist for sure, wanting Italy to be for Italians.

    God, Family, country and now sex are now markers for Fascism.

    Wait till they find out how she feels about Amazons Rings of Power.


    https://twitter.com/JoKaiGonZo/status/1574393518017368069?s=20&t=o-j8AGIoX_nFLBnJhHtk4g

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    Notice the name of the author. It’s so predictable it’s almost boring: like, pointing out the inevitable.

    • Replies: @mc23
    @Colin Wright

    If she was a fan of some other absurd book of mystic religious estoteric she would considered admirable

  49. @Rob McX
    @Gordo

    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy's "the most right-wing leader since Mussolini" in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times. The time is coming when the people will no longer be scared by these trigger words. They're expected to react like Pavlov's dog and rush back into the arms of the old parties that are selling them out.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy’s “the most right-wing leader since Mussolini” in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times.

    “If I had been Italian, I am sure I would have been with you from the beginning.” Winston Churchill, speaking to Mussolini, 1927.

    “(I am) deeply impressed by what he has accomplished.” FDR on Mussolini, 1933.

    “One of the great statesmen of our time.” Mahatma Ghandi on Mussolini, 1931.

    “He has done more things for his country since the war than any hundred men in any
    other country. ” Will Rogers on Mussolini, 1929.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @AceDeuce

    Thanks. The memory hole is a wonderful thing.

  50. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1574360635906805760

    Replies: @Desiderius, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Alfa158, @AnotherDad, @bomag

    Tracks to the increase in mortgage interest rates.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  51. Wow, I made my own Grand Tour the same year.
    When I was in college I had come across a book titled “Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa” and I was on my way.
    Had my “Let’s Go, Europe” book and it was hitch hiking, rail passes and youth hostels.
    Almost five months.
    I shall never forget Christiania commune in Copenhagen.
    Or the Guinness, Heineken and Carlsburg breweries.

  52. “Financial speculators” Is that a loose Italian translation of “rootless globalist”?

  53. Globalist elite tool Ursula von der Leyen, who of course is a creature of the WEF:

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/authors/ursula-von-der-leyen

    threatened punishments from the EU if the Italian people voted in Meloni’s party – i.e., if they had the temerity to think that democracy means that the people elect whom they want. She (von der Leyen) said that the EU has “tools” with which to retaliate.

    To paraphrase Clemenceau: Democracy is too important to be left to the voters.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Mr. Anon

    The modern EU way of getting rid of dangerously popular politicians in Italy is to engineer an Italian bond crisis (origins plausibly deniable) followed by parachuting in a technocrat like Draghi or suchlike to 'clean up the mess'. Perhaps this has stopped working.

  54. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1574360635906805760

    Replies: @Desiderius, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Alfa158, @AnotherDad, @bomag

    House prices are crazy–appalling. We need an absolute hard immigration stop, and an end to foreign purchases. Housing policy should be about affordable family formation for … Americans.

    But the biggest driver of th e2020-2022 change here is mostly just interest rates. And what is going to happen here is that house prices are going to have drop to accommodate the interest rate surge.

    Our “elites” have misbehaved for so long not just with immigration but with ridiculous spending and money printing that they’ve even screwed up even the freebie of America having world currency seigniorage.

    • Agree: Daniel H
  55. Is Nick Gillespie still doing his Fonzie routine? Prancing around in a leather jacket trying to sound edgy, while repeating standard Establishment talking points.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @Ben Andrews
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Have you seen his Fess Parker routine? Studiously sitting back in a buckskin jacket (is he Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett?) while interviewing Glenn Greenwald, being a condescending schmuck the whole time. Where did this creep come from? I never saw him before, and hope I won't again.

  56. “StripMall One,” as a variation on Orwell’s “Airstrip One,” is a superb iSteve neologism. Kudos!

    • Agree: JackOH
    • Replies: @JackOH
    @Harry Baldwin

    Harry, you got that right.

    Neologisms and epigrams sometimes offer for me at least a machete that whacks through accumulated brain vegetation.

    When my early morning eyes saw Steve's "StripMall One", my brain snapped straightaway to Orwell, then to 100 million men and women volunteering for or conscripted for the 1914-1945 bonfire as fungible combat units, then Randolph Bourne's phrase "war is the health of the state".

    My brain stopped at---consumption is the health of the state. I don't want to be a fungible consumption unit. I don't want Italians to be fungible consumption units. Or anyone else.

    We're human beings!---Mario Savio, Sproul Hall.

  57. I just love hearing animated Italian women speaking Italian. Nice to know that we are gonna’ have a good deal of this over the coming years.

  58. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve's Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @AnotherDad

    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve’s Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?

    Steve wants to win?

    Steve’s never said, you can’t be an American white tribal patriot. But Steve wants a clear political ideology to counter “Our Democracy”–i.e. America as nothing but a global marketplace for looting, run by elite diktat, using various other minorities as cudgels against America’s core white people. His “Citizenism”–“hey a nation’s supposed to be run for its citizens!”–is the obvious counter that can actually win in a first-past-the-post electoral system.

    Meloni is great, but Italy–while grotesquely “enriched” with diversity–is still Italian. And Italy has a mixed system with single member and proportional top up … and Meloni won what a quarter of the vote? and her coalition 40 something percent?

    You want to win in the USofA yelling “white pride!” isn’t going to do it. But “America for Americans!” or the like is a winning strategy.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @AnotherDad

    And Steve's Citizenism is a winning strategy. It has failed miserably for 50 years.

    Steve's whole shtick is Citizenism is a triple bank shot to save American whites and their values. But, again, it has failed.

    It's time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I'm not trying to save the system. I don't want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don't. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @AnotherDad

    This is all getting ahead of ourselves. Nobody is asking for a grand strategy for anything. And the last thing we need is some political strategy to win the next election (and nobody is listening to us anyway).

    What we can do, what we must do, is identify the anti-white nature of our current system. Period. Make that absolutely clear and demand that we have a right to have a public discussion of it. Demand that it be pushed into the public square.

    Where do things go from there? We'll find out when it happens.

  59. @SunBakedSuburb
    "random consumer"

    Excellent comment, Steve. Tragic hipster Gillespie is unable to reconcile two conflicting thoughts in his brain. In truth, neither can I. But unlike Dick I believe other people have that ability. I used to believe libertarianism was the perfect operating system for any society. But then I turned seventeen.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    The reconciliation is that she is saying that the globohomo technocrats want to turn the world into nothing but proverbial NPC’s (i.e. automatons) with no loyalties or obligations beyond consumerism and gratifying their own individual desires. Or, as an economist would say, pursuing their own “utility”.

    In other words, they want supranational subjects of the EU and not individual Italians (or Englishmen, or Frenchmen, or whatever)… so why not bring in more foreigners and expand the consumer pool even further?

    This is obvious from the context of the speech, but Gillespie can’t shrug and say, “She has a point” or concede that maybe this is itself an issue of individual liberty versus subjugation at a level above the state itself, and just STFU.

    No, he has to make a tendentious connection to “libertarian modernism” and insert himself because Libertarians can never just STFU and stay out of things.

    It’s not that they always have to be right, it’s that everyone else always has to be wrong.

    • Agree: Forbes
    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  60. There’s nothing wrong with being BOTH Libertarian and Conservative (unlike some of the Reason Retards). My point in “What’s the deal with Peak Stupidity – Libertarian or Conservative?” is that each ideology could learn something important from the other.

    Libertarians ought to realize that their Open Borders stupidity does not help the proportion of Libertarians, hence the cause, in the country one bit.

    Conservatives ought to realize that their stupidity in not fighting the Welfare State means dysgenics which sure doesn’t help the proportion of Conservatives in the country one bit.

    If you think one can’t embrace BOTH kinds of ideology, see Ron Paul’s latest column here on this very site. He’s very much of the ideas of Giorgia Meloni and people like her.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave, Mark G.
  61. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @vinteuil


    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it.
     
    I'm convinced there is no better downhill skiing experience on Earth than the Italian Alps.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I remember when covid was breaking out in Italian Alps hill towns below the Dolomites in February 2020 and know it alls were saying that that was only because that part of Italy is so polluted and the people are so fat. I said, no, that’s just about the best place in the world.

    • Replies: @quewin
    @Steve Sailer

    Fat people and polluted land?

    Some people are so monstrously ignorant that one starts to think they are demons who are intentionally trying to mislead.

    (Years of Covid Nonsense is a huge blackpill for me. I’m normally one of the most hostile and anti-social people you’ll ever meet, but everything that was done “to flatten the curve” is so unbelievably sad and wrong.)

  62. @snootybaronet
    @Colin Wright

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin's Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini's Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn't until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @bispora, @slumber_j, @Ron Mexico

    ‘…Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy…’

    Oh, I dunno. There’s a lot of fascism here in America these days. The tactics of Antifa, for example, were very similar to those of the early Italian squadristi. Biden is transforming the FBI in the same way the Nazis transformed the German state police.

    What’s irritating, though, is that our fascists label their opponents fascists.

    Go ahead. Be fascist. But do you have to be so goddamned dishonest about it?

  63. individualism is a white thing (see non-white countries.) This is the missing piece lolberts don’t get.

    similar to how lolberts think having open borders and mass immigration of far left leaning non-whites is somehow promoting freedom. Nope! it’s literally mass importing people who want expansive, tyrannical government.

  64. @Currahee
    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Polistra, @AnotherDad, @PhysicistDave, @Muggles

    Currahee wrote:

    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    reason and Gillespie are “liberaltarain.”

    Check out the Lew Rockwell site or the Mises Institute for an alternative libertarianism that argues that human interactions among adults should be consensual without denying obvious facts about human nature. Incidentally, Rockwell and Mises are actually more radical on political issues than Gillespie, but they are not hostile to the values of normal middle-class/working-class people.

    I don’t agree with Lew or the Mises Institute on everything, but to think that libertarians are clones of Nick Gillespie is a bit like thinking that everyone on the political Right is a clone of Mitt Romney.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @PhysicistDave

    Agreed, Dave. Thanks for clearing that up for the people who single out one magazine and some leather-jacketed dipshit as representing an entire way of thinking.

    I used to read lots of Lew Rockwell and his contributors - nothing against them still, but I can't be reading the whole damn internet every day, like I used to.

    I mentioned Ron Paul already - he is not just one ex-Congressman - he's got his Liberty Report and his homeschool curriculum. If there's anything anyone on here has against Ron Paul, please spill it here - you got nothing, do you?

    Finally, I've got good memories of Libertarian Vin Suprynowitz, former columnist of the Las Vegas Review Journal: "Papiere bitte!" - "Your papers, please!" and memories of Mr. Vin Suprynowicz, "Papiere bitte!" - "Your papers, please!" - Part 2, and "Papiere bitte!" - "Your papers, please!" - Stories from the real deal.

    I shook his hand in '10 or so, and he gave me a copy of his The Balled of Carl Drega. Earlier, I'd read his Send in the Waco Killers.

  65. @Colin Wright
    What I find morbidly amusing is that it's routine to call Meloni a 'fascist.'

    I doubt it -- but Italy led the way with the real Fascists almost exactly a hundred years ago. Over the next two decades, much of the rest of Europe followed.

    Call her whatever you like, but maybe Meloni means Italy will lead the way again.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @snootybaronet, @PhysicistDave

    Colin Wright wrote:

    What I find morbidly amusing is that it’s routine to call Meloni a ‘fascist.’

    The biggest hit on her is that she is a fan of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings!

    Which of course proves that her critics are incapable of reading: the central theme of LOTR is, after all, the destructive impact of the lust for power — One ring of power to rule them all!

    Sorta like the illiterates who think that Huckleberry Finn is a racist book, when it is in fact an intense attack on racism.

    “Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens.”

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  66. @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve’s Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?
     

    Steve wants to win?

    Steve's never said, you can't be an American white tribal patriot. But Steve wants a clear political ideology to counter "Our Democracy"--i.e. America as nothing but a global marketplace for looting, run by elite diktat, using various other minorities as cudgels against America's core white people. His "Citizenism"--"hey a nation's supposed to be run for its citizens!"--is the obvious counter that can actually win in a first-past-the-post electoral system.

    Meloni is great, but Italy--while grotesquely "enriched" with diversity--is still Italian. And Italy has a mixed system with single member and proportional top up ... and Meloni won what a quarter of the vote? and her coalition 40 something percent?

    You want to win in the USofA yelling "white pride!" isn't going to do it. But "America for Americans!" or the like is a winning strategy.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    And Steve’s Citizenism is a winning strategy. It has failed miserably for 50 years.

    Steve’s whole shtick is Citizenism is a triple bank shot to save American whites and their values. But, again, it has failed.

    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?
     
    I've kept asking you what your actual strategy is?

    Mine--as I've made clear--is "separation". Push for separation. Call out the anti-white stuff and push back hard. Basically, normies saying "Hey, we're here. We are proud of our whiteness, our history, culture, accomplishments, and we're going to live according to our norms and culture ... and if you don't like it, well screw you. We'll live in different nations." To me other productive people who are happy with traditional American white culture will find that appealing as well.

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve's citizenism--which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation's policies should be to look after the nation's citizens not other people.

    But what I don't understand is what you actually want to *do*?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

     

    How exactly do you plan to do that?
  67. @AnotherDad
    @Currahee


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    Autism. Libertarianism is autism as an ideology.

    I'm fairly instinctually libertarian. I'm not a natural "rule follower", and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is "leave me alone". Go do your thing, I'll do mine.

    But i'm also not three years old. I.e. i'm not autistic.

    We exist as individuals--i'll never be anyone else, will never see the world from inside their head. But the most obvious fact on the planet is that human beings are a highly social species. We exist in groups. In fact, basically our salient--world conquering survival skill--is having a big brain that allows us to communicate the stuff we figure out to other people in our tribe and organize ourselves as a cohesive group to do cool stuff. That's why we have ships and books and steel and electricity and sewers and airplanes and the internet. Individuals alone ... have absolutely zero of that. They'd live in a tree ... and then get eaten.

    This duality of human life--the individual and the social--just ridiculously obvious. If you care about individual freedom and flourishing you have to think about what sort of society that actually happens in. It doesn't "just happen".

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    Replies: @Mactoul, @Muggles, @Mike Tre

    It is actually a triplet of individual, family and nation or tribe.

  68. @Pincher Martin
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Fight the battles you can actually win instead of wanting there to be some global equity in the battles we all should fight.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    The battles that you can win are local and tribal.

    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.

    Steve is a gatekeeper, even if unintentionally.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    You asked of Steve, "Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?".

    Why is this stupid consistency important to you? Fight the battles you can win. If you think you will make American white again or even as white as Italy, then you have already lost. I suggest a time machine so you can travel back to no later than the early seventies.


    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.
     
    What lines are those? Your lines? Maybe Steve isn't interested in pushing your agenda any more than you are interested in pushing his. But at least his modest proposal - as unlikely as it might seem today to become a new consensus in the country - still seems far more likely to win and do some good than does your suggestion.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  69. The distribution of points on the political spectrum has become weirdly bimodal. There is no extreme left, but suddenly a left, then a climb to a peak at the center, and next a huge gap on the right-hand side and finally a tall spike at the rightmost point.

    We shall call it ϝ, the woke distribution.

  70. @Polistra
    @Currahee

    Also from Reason today:


    https://i.ibb.co/8jm4cx1/Screenshot-20220926-151753-Chrome.jpg

    Replies: @Rob McX, @bomag

    Libspergtarians.

  71. @AceDeuce
    @Rob McX


    Indeed. The Mail keeps referring to her as Italy’s “the most right-wing leader since Mussolini” in its headlines and this article goes on to mention the name Mussolini a dozen more times.
     
    “If I had been Italian, I am sure I would have been with you from the beginning.” Winston Churchill, speaking to Mussolini, 1927.

    “(I am) deeply impressed by what he has accomplished.” FDR on Mussolini, 1933.

    “One of the great statesmen of our time.” Mahatma Ghandi on Mussolini, 1931.

    "He has done more things for his country since the war than any hundred men in any
    other country. " Will Rogers on Mussolini, 1929.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Thanks. The memory hole is a wonderful thing.

  72. @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    Can someone please explain to me how this post squares with Steve’s Citizenism?

    Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?
     

    Steve wants to win?

    Steve's never said, you can't be an American white tribal patriot. But Steve wants a clear political ideology to counter "Our Democracy"--i.e. America as nothing but a global marketplace for looting, run by elite diktat, using various other minorities as cudgels against America's core white people. His "Citizenism"--"hey a nation's supposed to be run for its citizens!"--is the obvious counter that can actually win in a first-past-the-post electoral system.

    Meloni is great, but Italy--while grotesquely "enriched" with diversity--is still Italian. And Italy has a mixed system with single member and proportional top up ... and Meloni won what a quarter of the vote? and her coalition 40 something percent?

    You want to win in the USofA yelling "white pride!" isn't going to do it. But "America for Americans!" or the like is a winning strategy.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    This is all getting ahead of ourselves. Nobody is asking for a grand strategy for anything. And the last thing we need is some political strategy to win the next election (and nobody is listening to us anyway).

    What we can do, what we must do, is identify the anti-white nature of our current system. Period. Make that absolutely clear and demand that we have a right to have a public discussion of it. Demand that it be pushed into the public square.

    Where do things go from there? We’ll find out when it happens.

  73. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Pincher Martin

    The battles that you can win are local and tribal.

    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.

    Steve is a gatekeeper, even if unintentionally.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    You asked of Steve, “Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?”.

    Why is this stupid consistency important to you? Fight the battles you can win. If you think you will make American white again or even as white as Italy, then you have already lost. I suggest a time machine so you can travel back to no later than the early seventies.

    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.

    What lines are those? Your lines? Maybe Steve isn’t interested in pushing your agenda any more than you are interested in pushing his. But at least his modest proposal – as unlikely as it might seem today to become a new consensus in the country – still seems far more likely to win and do some good than does your suggestion.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pincher Martin

    So can white people be on their own side or not? Forget how that manifests politically in any particular country or time. Just, can they be on their own side?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  74. @loveshumanity

    Google ‘Italian cuisine in Japan’ sometime.
     
    The Chinese, Koreans and Japanese have not interacted well with European food. I've talked to travellers who have told me the European food in Asian countries is not very good. Also I've heard from a number of people from these countries that they don't like "white people food".

    India and Britain on the other hand have shared and mixed their cuisines for centuries. HP sauce has tamarind in it, Brits like cardamom, etc. Both love tea with milk and sugar (I have at least 5 cups a day).

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    I disagree. Japanese Italian food is a real thing and it’s delicious. I’ve had spaghetti with sea urchin (uni) in cream sauce and it was very good.

    Korean fried chicken sandwiches are also a real thing in southern California.

    Hong Kong cafes often feature prime rib and baked potato. Things like baked pork chops with tomato sauce and spaghetti covered in cheese is also a real thing. It’s the only Chinese food that uses cheese in their fusion dishes. Go to the San Gabriel valley and try it yourself.

    It works both ways. The tea you enjoy was brought to the UK from Hong Kong, including the 3pm tea time.

  75. @Pincher Martin
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    You asked of Steve, "Is it only okay for American whites to be lost, but not Italians?".

    Why is this stupid consistency important to you? Fight the battles you can win. If you think you will make American white again or even as white as Italy, then you have already lost. I suggest a time machine so you can travel back to no later than the early seventies.


    Steve is a wannabe member of the managerial class. He never steps over certain lines.
     
    What lines are those? Your lines? Maybe Steve isn't interested in pushing your agenda any more than you are interested in pushing his. But at least his modest proposal - as unlikely as it might seem today to become a new consensus in the country - still seems far more likely to win and do some good than does your suggestion.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    So can white people be on their own side or not? Forget how that manifests politically in any particular country or time. Just, can they be on their own side?

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    You're asking the wrong question. A winner would ask, "What can someone with my beliefs do to make things marginally better, both for my own self interest and for those who think like me?" But because you think like a loser, you ask the wrong question.

    Of course white people can be on "their own side." But framed in the way you have stated it, the vast majority of Americans and even most white Americans won't be on your side. They will reject your message. After all, they have had that choice for many decades - and consistently rejected it.

    But framed in the way Sailer has put it in "Citizenism," we at least have a slim chance to build a winning coalition to shut the borders and stop the demographic bleeding. That you and "Citizen of a Foreign Country" both reject that kind of politics shows you prefer sulking in your own hatred to winning.

    Politics is a team sport. Your individual politics won't find success unless you can blend it into a coalition that many other people who don't share your beliefs are comfortable with.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  76. @Mr. Anon
    Globalist elite tool Ursula von der Leyen, who of course is a creature of the WEF:

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/authors/ursula-von-der-leyen

    threatened punishments from the EU if the Italian people voted in Meloni's party - i.e., if they had the temerity to think that democracy means that the people elect whom they want. She (von der Leyen) said that the EU has "tools" with which to retaliate.

    To paraphrase Clemenceau: Democracy is too important to be left to the voters.

    Replies: @Anon

    The modern EU way of getting rid of dangerously popular politicians in Italy is to engineer an Italian bond crisis (origins plausibly deniable) followed by parachuting in a technocrat like Draghi or suchlike to ‘clean up the mess’. Perhaps this has stopped working.

  77. @anonymous
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy's exceptionally fanatic strictness on the covid pass, the most extreme in Europe (aside from that Austrian heavy-fines-for-all-unvaxed law that got aborted at the last minute) put off many people from living there, as people wonder if that oppression could happen again. Meloni was not on board with the 'vaccine cult extremism' tho reportedly got vaxed herself.

    The great surge in votes for Meloni's party, taking away votes from her coalition partner, the formerly popular Salvini, was in part because of that difference; Meloni wasn't soiled by being in the oily previous 'technocrat' government. The attractive Meloni does have a great sense of humour, and also was smart enough to encourage the young zoomers who love memes so much:

    https://i.postimg.cc/nLhRqNwB/meloni-n-melons.jpg

    https://i.postimg.cc/4yjYdjQ5/giorgia-meloni-chan.jpg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Muggles

    I don’t think the West needs female leaders. (We white men need to step up and act like men.) But if you’re going to have one, this gal fits the bill.

    Meloni should know though that this sort of disgusting behavior will no longer be tolerated by the “Hate Eradicators.” The idea that women have “melons” … I can’t even sleep at night thinking about it.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @AnotherDad

    https://youtu.be/C906lbkcYug

  78. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pincher Martin

    So can white people be on their own side or not? Forget how that manifests politically in any particular country or time. Just, can they be on their own side?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    You’re asking the wrong question. A winner would ask, “What can someone with my beliefs do to make things marginally better, both for my own self interest and for those who think like me?” But because you think like a loser, you ask the wrong question.

    Of course white people can be on “their own side.” But framed in the way you have stated it, the vast majority of Americans and even most white Americans won’t be on your side. They will reject your message. After all, they have had that choice for many decades – and consistently rejected it.

    But framed in the way Sailer has put it in “Citizenism,” we at least have a slim chance to build a winning coalition to shut the borders and stop the demographic bleeding. That you and “Citizen of a Foreign Country” both reject that kind of politics shows you prefer sulking in your own hatred to winning.

    Politics is a team sport. Your individual politics won’t find success unless you can blend it into a coalition that many other people who don’t share your beliefs are comfortable with.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pincher Martin

    So can White people can be on their own side?

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.

    As far "citizenism", everyone is already a citizen. The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, "citizenism" is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat. You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You're dreaming.

    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.

    Replies: @bomag, @Pincher Martin

  79. @snootybaronet
    @Colin Wright

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin's Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini's Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn't until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @bispora, @slumber_j, @Ron Mexico

    Is it not interesting that the term fascism is used instead of Nazism by the progressive media and political elite? In the full name of Hitler’s NSDAP party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), it is two words that make them negate the term nazi: one is socialism and the other is the term worker. It is rumoured that Stalin instructed the communist media to prefer the word Fascism over Nazism for these very reasons. Now I can see the impact of the Georgian butcher on the progressive intellectuals, politicians and media of today…

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  80. @Pincher Martin
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    You're asking the wrong question. A winner would ask, "What can someone with my beliefs do to make things marginally better, both for my own self interest and for those who think like me?" But because you think like a loser, you ask the wrong question.

    Of course white people can be on "their own side." But framed in the way you have stated it, the vast majority of Americans and even most white Americans won't be on your side. They will reject your message. After all, they have had that choice for many decades - and consistently rejected it.

    But framed in the way Sailer has put it in "Citizenism," we at least have a slim chance to build a winning coalition to shut the borders and stop the demographic bleeding. That you and "Citizen of a Foreign Country" both reject that kind of politics shows you prefer sulking in your own hatred to winning.

    Politics is a team sport. Your individual politics won't find success unless you can blend it into a coalition that many other people who don't share your beliefs are comfortable with.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    So can White people can be on their own side?

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.

    As far “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen. The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, “citizenism” is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat. You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You’re dreaming.

    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    As far as “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen.
     
    Not really.

    Steve hints that everyone in this country should want to be an American citizen. Many move here with the intention of turning it into a version of where they left.
    , @Pincher Martin
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    So can White people can be on their own side?
     
    I answered your question.

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.
     
    No, Americans make political coalitions to advance their own interests. Many Americans are happy to coalesce with the weak in order to do that. What matters is the strength and cohesiveness of the overall coalition, not the strength of each of its separate parts.

    Your analogy is a confused mish-mash of warfare ("Peace is made with the strong...") and politics, which strongly suggests you have no idea what you are trying to do.


    As far “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen.
     
    No, they are not all American citizens. To me, one of the most important political problems of the last fifty years is how much Americans have devalued their own citizenship by allowing in so many people into the country who can't live up to the high standards of freedom we have set for ourselves, including freedom of speech and the right to bear arms.

    The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, “citizenism” is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat.
     
    Yes, but they have pushed it dishonestly and cynically.

    For example, until about thirty years ago, assimilation included making sure all our citizens spoke English. But then the 1990 Immigration Act removed the provision for an English-language test for naturalization. Immigrants no longer had to even speak English to be a US citizen, which probably explains why when I go into a post office or a bank, I often bump into workers who can barely communicate with me.

    Ironically, the Immigration Act of 1990 passed with George H. W. Bush's support who had said on the campaign trial in 1988 that immigrants needed to speak English. He lied.


    You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You’re dreaming.
     
    Nope. The problem with your political rhetoric is that it has limited appeal to other whites. I'm of the opinion that if the GOP could regularly win 65% to 70% of the white vote under a serious "Citizenism" platform, then almost all its political and policy problems would be solved even if we don't win a single additional minority vote.

    Sailer's "Citizenism" ideas, if divorced from his name, have that potential political appeal. They can appeal to moderate whites and not antagonize the small fraction of minorities who already support us.

    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.


    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.
     
    Your problem is twofold. 1) Your side is not strong, and pretending to be strong is not a sound political strategy; 2) political alliances in America do not tend toward the "strong horse."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  81. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm surprised both numbers for DC are so low.

    That town is constantly awash in government cash. They have never experienced a recession.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    I suspect much of the DC housing stock that’s available for sale is in iffy neighborhoods or worse.

    • Agree: Giant Duck
  82. Imagine believing in democracy at all, let alone following a female “leader” as one’s savior. What a pathetic retards.

  83. @Harry Baldwin
    "StripMall One," as a variation on Orwell's "Airstrip One," is a superb iSteve neologism. Kudos!

    Replies: @JackOH

    Harry, you got that right.

    Neologisms and epigrams sometimes offer for me at least a machete that whacks through accumulated brain vegetation.

    When my early morning eyes saw Steve’s “StripMall One”, my brain snapped straightaway to Orwell, then to 100 million men and women volunteering for or conscripted for the 1914-1945 bonfire as fungible combat units, then Randolph Bourne’s phrase “war is the health of the state”.

    My brain stopped at—consumption is the health of the state. I don’t want to be a fungible consumption unit. I don’t want Italians to be fungible consumption units. Or anyone else.

    We’re human beings!—Mario Savio, Sproul Hall.

  84. I hope to someday be able to afford to revisit Italy, which struck me when I backpacked around Europe in 1980 as the World’s Best Tourist Destination

    This was quite a dangerous time to be in Italy, with the “Years of Lead” situation. For example, this happened the same year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bologna_massacre

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Nodwink

    I walked around the Bologna train station about a month before it got blown up.

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    I remember when covid was breaking out in Italian Alps hill towns below the Dolomites in February 2020 and know it alls were saying that that was only because that part of Italy is so polluted and the people are so fat. I said, no, that's just about the best place in the world.

    Replies: @quewin

    Fat people and polluted land?

    Some people are so monstrously ignorant that one starts to think they are demons who are intentionally trying to mislead.

    (Years of Covid Nonsense is a huge blackpill for me. I’m normally one of the most hostile and anti-social people you’ll ever meet, but everything that was done “to flatten the curve” is so unbelievably sad and wrong.)

  86. @Nodwink

    I hope to someday be able to afford to revisit Italy, which struck me when I backpacked around Europe in 1980 as the World’s Best Tourist Destination
     
    This was quite a dangerous time to be in Italy, with the "Years of Lead" situation. For example, this happened the same year: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bologna_massacre

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I walked around the Bologna train station about a month before it got blown up.

  87. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1574360635906805760

    Replies: @Desiderius, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Alfa158, @AnotherDad, @bomag

    Q: Who pays the price for Clown World?

    A: People buying houses.

  88. @Polistra
    @Currahee

    Also from Reason today:


    https://i.ibb.co/8jm4cx1/Screenshot-20220926-151753-Chrome.jpg

    Replies: @Rob McX, @bomag

    Migrants are people, not props.

    Could be the most ironic statement possible.

  89. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Colin Wright


    How about the northernmost state in black Africa?
     
    These days Africa begins at Naples.

    And Marseille.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    These days Africa begins at Naples.

    Well to be fair, Northern Italians have been saying Africa begins at Naples for a long, long time…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @slumber_j

    I vê heard that’s phrase “ Africa begins at Naples “

    It s yet another example of whites believing the magic dirt and bad dirt theory . It s fundamentally not true .

    The reason Southern and Sicilian Italians look dark and swarthy is because these areas got invaded by dark and swarthy Arabs and Literally fu$&@ed up the White gene pool .

    The reverse is true - lots of beautiful White Nordic people in South Africa and Brazil .

    The Spanish colonialists in the new world Western Hemisphere had a bad dirt rule that no “ White” Spanish child born in the Western Hemisphere could serve in the Spanish colonial government because the new world had corrupt /bad dirt .

    It was a racial matter - Spanish authorities back in Spain fresh off the Reconquest of the Arab Moors and expulsion of the Js in 1492 we’re racially aware that White Spanish colonialists we’re having “ relations” with good looking Aztec ative women and their children were a bit off White.

    So the moral to this story is….

    There is no magic dirt or racially bad dirt . The way things are going Malmo Sweden will look , snell and act like Pakistan and Somalia in 80 years .

    Egyptian and Greek royals knew all this blood and race stuff 1,000 BC

    Why don t we ?

    Jr
    TPC Radio show

    Replies: @Anonymous

  90. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pincher Martin

    So can White people can be on their own side?

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.

    As far "citizenism", everyone is already a citizen. The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, "citizenism" is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat. You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You're dreaming.

    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.

    Replies: @bomag, @Pincher Martin

    As far as “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen.

    Not really.

    Steve hints that everyone in this country should want to be an American citizen. Many move here with the intention of turning it into a version of where they left.

  91. @snootybaronet
    @Colin Wright

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin's Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini's Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn't until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @bispora, @slumber_j, @Ron Mexico

    Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy

    I dunno: Franco’s FET y de las JONS did call itself “Phalangist.” But quibbles about nomenclature aside, the party was both essentially and superficially Fascist in pretty much every way I can think of–with a lot of Roman Catholicism and lip-service to Monarchism thrown in, but still…

    • Replies: @snootybaronet
    @slumber_j

    Franco was a traditional authoritarian. He personally loathed ideology. His dictatorship was pieced together by corralling rightist factions ranging from monarchists like the Catholic Carlists on one end and the Falange types on the other, and other factions in between.. The resulting patchwork was all about preserving the Franco dictatorship, not instituting an ideology.

    , @Art Deco
    @slumber_j

    Nope. The FET was a fusion of falangists and Carlists to which the Alfonsine monarchists signed on. To the extent Franco had a ideology, it was in favor of throne and altar. The regime wasn't revanchist and neither was Salazar's.

    , @Anonymous
    @slumber_j

    Fascism is the middle class asserting its self-interest in opposition to both radical revolution from below and to hereditary/aristocratic privilege from above. That's all. It's strange how much BS is written/spoken about this.

    Franco however was definitely on the side of hereditary/aristocratic privilege. He used the fascists to defeat the communists, but then thoroughly excluded them from power. During WWII he even had fascist leaders shot for showing insufficient loyalty to the regime.

  92. @vinteuil
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @The Wild Geese Howard, @slumber_j, @AndrewR

    You’ll find no bigger foreign fan of Italy than I, except maybe for my wife, who wrote her doctoral dissertation on a building in Venice. We go there every chance we get, and I went there a lot before I met her–even having gone so far as to date a Palermitan woman for a while in the Before Time. (And I subsequently learned that the Sicilians practice what they preach when they say revenge is a dish best served cold.)

    Nevertheless, I’d never want to live there. My previous father-in-law–a snide and highly accomplished American whose own first mother-in-law was a Roman princess–liked to claim that the proudest achievement of his adult life was the time he managed to register a car in Rome.

  93. @slumber_j
    @snootybaronet


    Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy
     
    I dunno: Franco's FET y de las JONS did call itself "Phalangist." But quibbles about nomenclature aside, the party was both essentially and superficially Fascist in pretty much every way I can think of--with a lot of Roman Catholicism and lip-service to Monarchism thrown in, but still...

    Replies: @snootybaronet, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    Franco was a traditional authoritarian. He personally loathed ideology. His dictatorship was pieced together by corralling rightist factions ranging from monarchists like the Catholic Carlists on one end and the Falange types on the other, and other factions in between.. The resulting patchwork was all about preserving the Franco dictatorship, not instituting an ideology.

  94. @Hypnotoad666

    Meloni's invocation of individualism ("unique genetic code") is incompatible w her invocation of collective identity (nation, family, gender).
     
    Gillespie is just being stupid here. There is zero conflict between being a self-directed individual (per his libertarian creed) and also voluntarily choosing, as an individual, to find succor and identity within your own nation, family, or biology.

    Favoring individual freedom (for yourself or others) does not equate with advocating isolation and nihilism. (Sometimes conservatives make this same mistake when moving in the opposite direction --i.e., criticizing freedom as being necessarily anti-tradition).

    Gillespie's problem is that being a doctrinaire libertarian should require you to be agnostic about other people's choices. But that's inconsistent with his role as a pundit, which requires him to have a half-assed opinion about everything.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Forbes

    The realization that ordered liberty is just something that most races are incapable of is a big part of what made me leave libertarianism.

    Africans and Middle Eastern Muslims are particularly inept at maintaining rule of law, property rights, and other things necessary for a functioning capitalist economy. And assimilated, secular Muslims are mostly leftists.

    To be blunt, I’d even prefer living in East Berlin or Prague ca. 1980 than in the most capitalist country in Africa or the Middle East today. Istanbul might have been tolerable but Erdogan took care of that.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Ian Smith


    ...other things necessary for a functioning capitalist economy.
     
    You mean like preventative maintenance?

    I'm pretty sure that only happens in White and NE Asian countries.
  95. @slumber_j
    @snootybaronet


    Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy
     
    I dunno: Franco's FET y de las JONS did call itself "Phalangist." But quibbles about nomenclature aside, the party was both essentially and superficially Fascist in pretty much every way I can think of--with a lot of Roman Catholicism and lip-service to Monarchism thrown in, but still...

    Replies: @snootybaronet, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    Nope. The FET was a fusion of falangists and Carlists to which the Alfonsine monarchists signed on. To the extent Franco had a ideology, it was in favor of throne and altar. The regime wasn’t revanchist and neither was Salazar’s.

  96. @Rob
    Why would italians think third world migrants can become first worlders in huge numbers? Northern Italy can’t even get southern Italy to become first world. Nature or nurture, differences seem to intractable in that relocating just means that wherever you go, there you are.

    Who were Italy’s last migrant influx? The Germanic peoples back in Roman times?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Juvenalis

    When we were there in 2016, all the people doing the work in Rome were from the Middle East or Eastern Europe. Just like London. Also, Italians don’t make babies.

    It was simultaneously beautiful and trashy. The beauty came from nature and the past civilizations. The trash came from the people.

  97. @vinteuil
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy is Heaven on Earth. Nothing else compares to it. Not even Prague, not even Saint Petersburg.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @The Wild Geese Howard, @slumber_j, @AndrewR

    Rome is the only part I’ve been to but it seemed like hell on earth in terms of people. Nothing but thieves.

  98. @Hypnotoad666

    Meloni's invocation of individualism ("unique genetic code") is incompatible w her invocation of collective identity (nation, family, gender).
     
    Gillespie is just being stupid here. There is zero conflict between being a self-directed individual (per his libertarian creed) and also voluntarily choosing, as an individual, to find succor and identity within your own nation, family, or biology.

    Favoring individual freedom (for yourself or others) does not equate with advocating isolation and nihilism. (Sometimes conservatives make this same mistake when moving in the opposite direction --i.e., criticizing freedom as being necessarily anti-tradition).

    Gillespie's problem is that being a doctrinaire libertarian should require you to be agnostic about other people's choices. But that's inconsistent with his role as a pundit, which requires him to have a half-assed opinion about everything.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @Forbes

    I gave up on Reason and CATO libertarianism when it finally dawned on me that they don’t take human nature into account. People prefer order, community, family, which are a contrast (in conflict?) with Gillespie’s individualism. Reason’s version results in chaos and nihilism as proxies for freedom and liberty.

    When anything goes, anything will.

  99. @vinteuil
    Nick Gillespie is 59 years old.

    And he still dresses like that?

    Replies: @Forbes

    When he’s 70, he’ll still have never left the ’70s behind. Too funny.

  100. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @AnotherDad

    And Steve's Citizenism is a winning strategy. It has failed miserably for 50 years.

    Steve's whole shtick is Citizenism is a triple bank shot to save American whites and their values. But, again, it has failed.

    It's time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I'm not trying to save the system. I don't want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don't. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?

    I’ve kept asking you what your actual strategy is?

    Mine–as I’ve made clear–is “separation”. Push for separation. Call out the anti-white stuff and push back hard. Basically, normies saying “Hey, we’re here. We are proud of our whiteness, our history, culture, accomplishments, and we’re going to live according to our norms and culture … and if you don’t like it, well screw you. We’ll live in different nations.” To me other productive people who are happy with traditional American white culture will find that appealing as well.

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve’s citizenism–which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation’s policies should be to look after the nation’s citizens not other people.

    But what I don’t understand is what you actually want to *do*?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @AnotherDad

    He wants to cry "Mighty Whitey!" as he twists his own nipples. He believes this is a winning political strategy because it makes him look like a "strong horse" instead of like an out-of-touch wacko.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve’s citizenism–which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation’s policies should be to look after the nation’s citizens not other people.
     
    Civic nationalism, or whatever the more accepted term for Steve's clumsily-named "philosophy" (or, more accurately, just strategy), has its good and bad points, as do "racial solidarity" and other competitors.

    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims. "Citizenism", libertarianism, Anglo-Saxon common law, and other individualist modes of thought easily dismiss corporate racial guilt. No slave traders or slaves are alive today (in the West), so who is left bound to pay, or to be paid?

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes. We already see this, nationally, with Germany, and with the US and internment. Though the latter reparations rightly went only to the individuals who directly suffered, not their descendants.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Zelo

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad

    Question of the hour: which one, Citizen of a Silly Country or Pincher Martin, is the Corvinus sock puppet? Or are they both?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  101. I could be wrong, but hasn’t Leicester become England’s number one travel destination because it’s so diverse and vibrant?

    • LOL: Rob McX
  102. What does fill me with foreboding is the thought that someday Italy won’t be Italy…

    Even Ben Wattenberg decried a world without Italians.

  103. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pincher Martin

    So can White people can be on their own side?

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.

    As far "citizenism", everyone is already a citizen. The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, "citizenism" is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat. You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You're dreaming.

    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.

    Replies: @bomag, @Pincher Martin

    So can White people can be on their own side?

    I answered your question.

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.

    No, Americans make political coalitions to advance their own interests. Many Americans are happy to coalesce with the weak in order to do that. What matters is the strength and cohesiveness of the overall coalition, not the strength of each of its separate parts.

    Your analogy is a confused mish-mash of warfare (“Peace is made with the strong…”) and politics, which strongly suggests you have no idea what you are trying to do.

    As far “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen.

    No, they are not all American citizens. To me, one of the most important political problems of the last fifty years is how much Americans have devalued their own citizenship by allowing in so many people into the country who can’t live up to the high standards of freedom we have set for ourselves, including freedom of speech and the right to bear arms.

    The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, “citizenism” is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat.

    Yes, but they have pushed it dishonestly and cynically.

    For example, until about thirty years ago, assimilation included making sure all our citizens spoke English. But then the 1990 Immigration Act removed the provision for an English-language test for naturalization. Immigrants no longer had to even speak English to be a US citizen, which probably explains why when I go into a post office or a bank, I often bump into workers who can barely communicate with me.

    Ironically, the Immigration Act of 1990 passed with George H. W. Bush’s support who had said on the campaign trial in 1988 that immigrants needed to speak English. He lied.

    You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You’re dreaming.

    Nope. The problem with your political rhetoric is that it has limited appeal to other whites. I’m of the opinion that if the GOP could regularly win 65% to 70% of the white vote under a serious “Citizenism” platform, then almost all its political and policy problems would be solved even if we don’t win a single additional minority vote.

    Sailer’s “Citizenism” ideas, if divorced from his name, have that potential political appeal. They can appeal to moderate whites and not antagonize the small fraction of minorities who already support us.

    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.

    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.

    Your problem is twofold. 1) Your side is not strong, and pretending to be strong is not a sound political strategy; 2) political alliances in America do not tend toward the “strong horse.”

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.
     
    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.

    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Pincher Martin

  104. Well…maybe I need to go back, and starting with Venice and Venetians may have prejudiced me from the start, but…

    Italy is a wonderful country. Too bad it’s full of Italians. My wife and I traveled all over Europe and points adjacent in 2015: Morocco, Spain, Portugal, Ireland, England, Scotland, Sweden, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary, Romania, Greece, Turkey…and Italy.

    Okay. Moroccans can be unpleasant as well. But out of everyone else on that list, at least this time around, the Italians definitely ranked last…and that includes the French, who are supposed to be awful but whom I found perfectly agreeable.

    Of course, a second pass may cause me to revise my opinion. It’s been my experience that superficial acquaintance usually leads to a firm opinion. More extended contact produces a more nuanced judgement. In the end, nobody’s all that awful — or all that great.

    Meantime, it really is a wonderful country — even if it’s inhabited by Italians. I’m perfectly willing to give it a second chance.

  105. @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?
     
    I've kept asking you what your actual strategy is?

    Mine--as I've made clear--is "separation". Push for separation. Call out the anti-white stuff and push back hard. Basically, normies saying "Hey, we're here. We are proud of our whiteness, our history, culture, accomplishments, and we're going to live according to our norms and culture ... and if you don't like it, well screw you. We'll live in different nations." To me other productive people who are happy with traditional American white culture will find that appealing as well.

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve's citizenism--which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation's policies should be to look after the nation's citizens not other people.

    But what I don't understand is what you actually want to *do*?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    He wants to cry “Mighty Whitey!” as he twists his own nipples. He believes this is a winning political strategy because it makes him look like a “strong horse” instead of like an out-of-touch wacko.

  106. @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?
     
    I've kept asking you what your actual strategy is?

    Mine--as I've made clear--is "separation". Push for separation. Call out the anti-white stuff and push back hard. Basically, normies saying "Hey, we're here. We are proud of our whiteness, our history, culture, accomplishments, and we're going to live according to our norms and culture ... and if you don't like it, well screw you. We'll live in different nations." To me other productive people who are happy with traditional American white culture will find that appealing as well.

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve's citizenism--which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation's policies should be to look after the nation's citizens not other people.

    But what I don't understand is what you actually want to *do*?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve’s citizenism–which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation’s policies should be to look after the nation’s citizens not other people.

    Civic nationalism, or whatever the more accepted term for Steve’s clumsily-named “philosophy” (or, more accurately, just strategy), has its good and bad points, as do “racial solidarity” and other competitors.

    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims. “Citizenism”, libertarianism, Anglo-Saxon common law, and other individualist modes of thought easily dismiss corporate racial guilt. No slave traders or slaves are alive today (in the West), so who is left bound to pay, or to be paid?

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes. We already see this, nationally, with Germany, and with the US and internment. Though the latter reparations rightly went only to the individuals who directly suffered, not their descendants.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims.
     
    Reparations claims don’t need “racial solidarity” of any group as a reason to exist and be pressed. The American government is sufficient as a hypothetical defendant.

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes.
     
    On a legal level in America, it would have to be proven that slavery of Blacks cost their descendants more than if slavery never happened. If slavery “built America” as some DOAS Blacks claim, then Blacks should thank Whites for having practicing slavery, and for ending it, and then elevating Blacks to full (and now privileged) citizen status. Today’s DOAS Blacks have benefitted from slavery. Arguably, they owe Whites tribute.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.
     
    As above, “racial solidarity” is a non sequitur concern, because with White racial solidarity against Black claimants, Blacks would have no procedural or practical way to enforce their claims.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.
     
    White racial solidarity in the context of reparations claims is a shield, not a “weapon”: your metaphor is bunk. Unified pro-White Whites can simply laugh in the face of Black claims.
    , @Zelo
    @Reg Cæsar


    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.
     
    Nah. You're describing how a bunch of suckers would act. Which is basically how whites have acted over the last few generations because they weren't thinking in terms of racial solitary.

    The less racially solid whites were the more they got taken advantage of.

  107. @AnotherDad
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don’t. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?
     
    I've kept asking you what your actual strategy is?

    Mine--as I've made clear--is "separation". Push for separation. Call out the anti-white stuff and push back hard. Basically, normies saying "Hey, we're here. We are proud of our whiteness, our history, culture, accomplishments, and we're going to live according to our norms and culture ... and if you don't like it, well screw you. We'll live in different nations." To me other productive people who are happy with traditional American white culture will find that appealing as well.

    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve's citizenism--which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation's policies should be to look after the nation's citizens not other people.

    But what I don't understand is what you actually want to *do*?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Question of the hour: which one, Citizen of a Silly Country or Pincher Martin, is the Corvinus sock puppet? Or are they both?

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Reg Cæsar

    Did Corvinus mount your girlfriend or sister, buddy? You seem obsessed with the man, and even more obsessed with turning me into him. Whatever it was, let it go and move on with your life. I'm not Corvinus. I've had my own run-ins with the dishonest fellow. It's not healthy for you to be so obsessed with a pseudonymous name you see only on a computer screen.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  108. @Ian Smith
    @Hypnotoad666

    The realization that ordered liberty is just something that most races are incapable of is a big part of what made me leave libertarianism.

    Africans and Middle Eastern Muslims are particularly inept at maintaining rule of law, property rights, and other things necessary for a functioning capitalist economy. And assimilated, secular Muslims are mostly leftists.

    To be blunt, I’d even prefer living in East Berlin or Prague ca. 1980 than in the most capitalist country in Africa or the Middle East today. Istanbul might have been tolerable but Erdogan took care of that.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    …other things necessary for a functioning capitalist economy.

    You mean like preventative maintenance?

    I’m pretty sure that only happens in White and NE Asian countries.

  109. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad

    Question of the hour: which one, Citizen of a Silly Country or Pincher Martin, is the Corvinus sock puppet? Or are they both?

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Did Corvinus mount your girlfriend or sister, buddy? You seem obsessed with the man, and even more obsessed with turning me into him. Whatever it was, let it go and move on with your life. I’m not Corvinus. I’ve had my own run-ins with the dishonest fellow. It’s not healthy for you to be so obsessed with a pseudonymous name you see only on a computer screen.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Pincher Martin

    I've been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    If you're not him, you could certainly fool a professional attributionist. Not by stance or content, but by style and approach. You're the one who once called me a "prescriptivist", which Richard Taylor botched as "prescriptionist", leading me to wonder if he's on the same team, too.

    Whatever a prescriptivist is, an example of a prescriptionist would be Morty the Eutectic.

    Reading your and Jenner's and Richard's comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  110. Amen! How about this for a T-shirt: “DISCRIMINATION IS A HUMAN RIGHT!”

  111. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve’s citizenism–which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation’s policies should be to look after the nation’s citizens not other people.
     
    Civic nationalism, or whatever the more accepted term for Steve's clumsily-named "philosophy" (or, more accurately, just strategy), has its good and bad points, as do "racial solidarity" and other competitors.

    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims. "Citizenism", libertarianism, Anglo-Saxon common law, and other individualist modes of thought easily dismiss corporate racial guilt. No slave traders or slaves are alive today (in the West), so who is left bound to pay, or to be paid?

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes. We already see this, nationally, with Germany, and with the US and internment. Though the latter reparations rightly went only to the individuals who directly suffered, not their descendants.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Zelo

    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims.

    Reparations claims don’t need “racial solidarity” of any group as a reason to exist and be pressed. The American government is sufficient as a hypothetical defendant.

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes.

    On a legal level in America, it would have to be proven that slavery of Blacks cost their descendants more than if slavery never happened. If slavery “built America” as some DOAS Blacks claim, then Blacks should thank Whites for having practicing slavery, and for ending it, and then elevating Blacks to full (and now privileged) citizen status. Today’s DOAS Blacks have benefitted from slavery. Arguably, they owe Whites tribute.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    As above, “racial solidarity” is a non sequitur concern, because with White racial solidarity against Black claimants, Blacks would have no procedural or practical way to enforce their claims.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.

    White racial solidarity in the context of reparations claims is a shield, not a “weapon”: your metaphor is bunk. Unified pro-White Whites can simply laugh in the face of Black claims.

  112. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    Is Nick Gillespie still doing his Fonzie routine? Prancing around in a leather jacket trying to sound edgy, while repeating standard Establishment talking points.

    Replies: @Ben Andrews

    Have you seen his Fess Parker routine? Studiously sitting back in a buckskin jacket (is he Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett?) while interviewing Glenn Greenwald, being a condescending schmuck the whole time. Where did this creep come from? I never saw him before, and hope I won’t again.

  113. @Pincher Martin
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    So can White people can be on their own side?
     
    I answered your question.

    As far as coalitions, yes, they exist. People make coalitions with the strong and healthy. Nobody likes an ethnomasochist. Peace is made with the strong, not the weak.
     
    No, Americans make political coalitions to advance their own interests. Many Americans are happy to coalesce with the weak in order to do that. What matters is the strength and cohesiveness of the overall coalition, not the strength of each of its separate parts.

    Your analogy is a confused mish-mash of warfare ("Peace is made with the strong...") and politics, which strongly suggests you have no idea what you are trying to do.


    As far “citizenism”, everyone is already a citizen.
     
    No, they are not all American citizens. To me, one of the most important political problems of the last fifty years is how much Americans have devalued their own citizenship by allowing in so many people into the country who can't live up to the high standards of freedom we have set for ourselves, including freedom of speech and the right to bear arms.

    The whole concept would be baffling to Asians, Latinos and Blacks. Actually, “citizenism” is pretty much the standard line the GOP has been pushing for 50 years, a version of CivNat.
     
    Yes, but they have pushed it dishonestly and cynically.

    For example, until about thirty years ago, assimilation included making sure all our citizens spoke English. But then the 1990 Immigration Act removed the provision for an English-language test for naturalization. Immigrants no longer had to even speak English to be a US citizen, which probably explains why when I go into a post office or a bank, I often bump into workers who can barely communicate with me.

    Ironically, the Immigration Act of 1990 passed with George H. W. Bush's support who had said on the campaign trial in 1988 that immigrants needed to speak English. He lied.


    You imagine making some autistic grand speech that carries barrios, ghettos, and Chinatown. You’re dreaming.
     
    Nope. The problem with your political rhetoric is that it has limited appeal to other whites. I'm of the opinion that if the GOP could regularly win 65% to 70% of the white vote under a serious "Citizenism" platform, then almost all its political and policy problems would be solved even if we don't win a single additional minority vote.

    Sailer's "Citizenism" ideas, if divorced from his name, have that potential political appeal. They can appeal to moderate whites and not antagonize the small fraction of minorities who already support us.

    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.


    Now, as we actually get on our own side (which is happening), other groups will want to ally with a strong horse.
     
    Your problem is twofold. 1) Your side is not strong, and pretending to be strong is not a sound political strategy; 2) political alliances in America do not tend toward the "strong horse."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.

    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.

    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I never said anything about voting. The last person I know who said anything about that was Tucker Carlson, who last night called our system a Fake Democracy. Apparently, tens of millions agree with him.

    And I don't know what a "war" scenario is; not my interest. All I know is that whatever happens in the future, it will involve politics.

    Grand Strategies are time wasters and distracters. They are Fantasy Football. Some are either nuts (and created by the feds) or autistic mind games.

    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction. Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.
     
    I just think it's stupid to argue that Sailer is a MSM "gatekeeper" or a "wannabe member of the managerial class" and that he "never steps over certain lines."

    I don't know what Steve's goals were when he first became a journalist, but it's safe to say that if they included becoming a "member of the managerial class" or a "gatekeeper" that he failed spectacularly, probably because he stepped over way too many lines with his honesty about some social issues.


    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.
     
    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If "our" side fails continuously because it can't put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too. The defeat will just be quicker and more thorough.

    Too many people here are addicted to losing strategies. Like the dipshits who thought Putin was going to save them from the Woke. At least Steve proposes some ideas that have the semblance of seriousness about them - the kind of ideas one can see modern politicians making in a Western society.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  114. @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    But again, I hear you complaining about Steve’s citizenism–which to me is just standard issue (pre-minoritarian lunacy) normal ideology, a nation’s policies should be to look after the nation’s citizens not other people.
     
    Civic nationalism, or whatever the more accepted term for Steve's clumsily-named "philosophy" (or, more accurately, just strategy), has its good and bad points, as do "racial solidarity" and other competitors.

    Racial solidarity could backfire immensely, as it provides a basis for reparations claims. "Citizenism", libertarianism, Anglo-Saxon common law, and other individualist modes of thought easily dismiss corporate racial guilt. No slave traders or slaves are alive today (in the West), so who is left bound to pay, or to be paid?

    But if your race is guilty of crimes against another, then if follows from solidarity that you yourself are responsible for atonement of those crimes. We already see this, nationally, with Germany, and with the US and internment. Though the latter reparations rightly went only to the individuals who directly suffered, not their descendants.

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    Any weapon cuts both ways.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Zelo

    But racial solidarity opens up the door to reparations to descendants as well. After all, they are members of the aggrieved race, as you are of the responsible one.

    Nah. You’re describing how a bunch of suckers would act. Which is basically how whites have acted over the last few generations because they weren’t thinking in terms of racial solitary.

    The less racially solid whites were the more they got taken advantage of.

  115. @Currahee
    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Polistra, @AnotherDad, @PhysicistDave, @Muggles

    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.

    So one stupid tweet from DC’s best known (but deservedly obscure) House Libertarian and you condemn all libertarians?

    Now do conservatives.

    Reason has a few good writers (though I haven’t read them in decades) but it is the only self described semi libertarian magazine out there. Did you expect them to be really that good?

    All other national print publications (save a few) are owned/controlled by Woke oligarchs or self serving billionaires or their ex wives. The Koch brothers are now down to one, and he’s quit the libertarian game long ago. The few self described somewhat libertarian billionaires don’t do media.

    As for actual politics, aside from Ron and Rand Paul (and a few like Cong. Thomas Massie, far more obscure) there are zero libertarians running things.

    But by all means, piss on their shoes. No one much will complain. You’ll feel smarter, which in your case is badly needed self esteem therapy.

    (When modern libertarians first coalesced into a small group in the late 60s, there were a few debates about “open borders” etc. While a few like Gillespie drank that Kool-Aide, everyone else came to the proper conclusion that until “State property” — i.e. government owned — became private property with accompanying rights to exclude others, open borders wasn’t workable. FYI)

  116. @anonymous
    @Henry Canaday

    Italy's exceptionally fanatic strictness on the covid pass, the most extreme in Europe (aside from that Austrian heavy-fines-for-all-unvaxed law that got aborted at the last minute) put off many people from living there, as people wonder if that oppression could happen again. Meloni was not on board with the 'vaccine cult extremism' tho reportedly got vaxed herself.

    The great surge in votes for Meloni's party, taking away votes from her coalition partner, the formerly popular Salvini, was in part because of that difference; Meloni wasn't soiled by being in the oily previous 'technocrat' government. The attractive Meloni does have a great sense of humour, and also was smart enough to encourage the young zoomers who love memes so much:

    https://i.postimg.cc/nLhRqNwB/meloni-n-melons.jpg

    https://i.postimg.cc/4yjYdjQ5/giorgia-meloni-chan.jpg

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Muggles

    But we have Kamala!

    (And she giggles and chatters like that because of the THC gummies. You would too if you worked for Creepy Joe…)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles


    But we have Kamala!
     
    Not yet. Not enough. When her boss claims that granny praying the rosary outside the clinic is a "domestic terrorist", Kamala's presidency is long overdue.

    Instead of taking Joe's recent statements as insults, we should be viewing, and using, them as evidence of progressive dementia. Never mind impeachment, 25th, here we come!
  117. @AnotherDad
    @Currahee


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    Autism. Libertarianism is autism as an ideology.

    I'm fairly instinctually libertarian. I'm not a natural "rule follower", and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is "leave me alone". Go do your thing, I'll do mine.

    But i'm also not three years old. I.e. i'm not autistic.

    We exist as individuals--i'll never be anyone else, will never see the world from inside their head. But the most obvious fact on the planet is that human beings are a highly social species. We exist in groups. In fact, basically our salient--world conquering survival skill--is having a big brain that allows us to communicate the stuff we figure out to other people in our tribe and organize ourselves as a cohesive group to do cool stuff. That's why we have ships and books and steel and electricity and sewers and airplanes and the internet. Individuals alone ... have absolutely zero of that. They'd live in a tree ... and then get eaten.

    This duality of human life--the individual and the social--just ridiculously obvious. If you care about individual freedom and flourishing you have to think about what sort of society that actually happens in. It doesn't "just happen".

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    Replies: @Mactoul, @Muggles, @Mike Tre

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    Yes, by all means laboriously belittle the only ideology that champions leaving you alone as much as possible.

    Must be bad…

    “Duality” and all. You certainly need something more controlling, complex and full of incomprehensible jargon. So you can tell others how wrong they are and also, how to live their lives to the fullest, as you do.

    We’re waiting for your book…

  118. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @AnotherDad

    And Steve's Citizenism is a winning strategy. It has failed miserably for 50 years.

    Steve's whole shtick is Citizenism is a triple bank shot to save American whites and their values. But, again, it has failed.

    It's time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I'm not trying to save the system. I don't want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    You believe in the system. I don't. The past 50 years are on my side. What do you have?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @JohnnyWalker123

    It’s time whites move on. Unlike you and Steve, I’m not trying to save the system. I don’t want a seat at the table; I want to turn the table over.

    How exactly do you plan to do that?

  119. @Rob
    Why would italians think third world migrants can become first worlders in huge numbers? Northern Italy can’t even get southern Italy to become first world. Nature or nurture, differences seem to intractable in that relocating just means that wherever you go, there you are.

    Who were Italy’s last migrant influx? The Germanic peoples back in Roman times?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Juvenalis

    You must not be too familiar with Italy, Europe, or the world, if you believe disparities in development between different regions of Italy are at all comparable to the gap between ‘first world’ and ‘third world’ countries.

    Any region with human development index >0.7 is considered at “high” level of development; any region with HDI >0.8 is considered to be at “very high” level of human development. While the more rural South is not as rich as the more urban North, every region of Italy scores at a “very high” level on the human development index.

    From the POV of the average person on earth—out of 8 billion in 2022—any part of Italy is a futuristic first-world paradise that might as well be El Dorado compared to the actual third world hellscapes whence they are emigrating en masse.

    • Thanks: Rob
    • Replies: @Rob
    @Juvenalis

    Not familiar with italy at all. I thought the south was a lot poorer than the north.

  120. @snootybaronet
    @Colin Wright

    Fascism is an epithet of the Left. It has been that way since Stalin's Comintern used it to form the Popular Front crusade in the 30s. Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini's Italy, and is characterized by corporatist statism to bring about socialist ends, with a central place for nationalism. Fascism is a contrivance to achieve socialism using nationalism as its engine. In the 20s Mussolini was lauded as the premier example of the socialist leader. He was praised by Lenin, Roosevelt and the New Dealers, to name just a few admirers of his on the Left. It wasn't until his subservience to Nazi foreign policy that he was excoriated and rejected by the Left.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @bispora, @slumber_j, @Ron Mexico

    Yes. Thank you. From a HS government teacher this is an excellent summary. In the end it is all Marxism.

  121. Anonymous[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @slumber_j
    @The Wild Geese Howard


    These days Africa begins at Naples.
     
    Well to be fair, Northern Italians have been saying Africa begins at Naples for a long, long time...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I vê heard that’s phrase “ Africa begins at Naples “

    It s yet another example of whites believing the magic dirt and bad dirt theory . It s fundamentally not true .

    The reason Southern and Sicilian Italians look dark and swarthy is because these areas got invaded by dark and swarthy Arabs and Literally fu$&@ed up the White gene pool .

    The reverse is true – lots of beautiful White Nordic people in South Africa and Brazil .

    The Spanish colonialists in the new world Western Hemisphere had a bad dirt rule that no “ White” Spanish child born in the Western Hemisphere could serve in the Spanish colonial government because the new world had corrupt /bad dirt .

    It was a racial matter – Spanish authorities back in Spain fresh off the Reconquest of the Arab Moors and expulsion of the Js in 1492 we’re racially aware that White Spanish colonialists we’re having “ relations” with good looking Aztec ative women and their children were a bit off White.

    So the moral to this story is….

    There is no magic dirt or racially bad dirt . The way things are going Malmo Sweden will look , snell and act like Pakistan and Somalia in 80 years .

    Egyptian and Greek royals knew all this blood and race stuff 1,000 BC

    Why don t we ?

    Jr
    TPC Radio show

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    The reason Southern and Sicilian Italians look dark and swarthy is because these areas got invaded by dark and swarthy Arabs and Literally fu$&@ed up the White gene pool .
     
    False

    https://italianthro.blogspot.com/p/italians101.html

    Idiot
  122. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.
     
    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.

    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Pincher Martin

    I never said anything about voting. The last person I know who said anything about that was Tucker Carlson, who last night called our system a Fake Democracy. Apparently, tens of millions agree with him.

    And I don’t know what a “war” scenario is; not my interest. All I know is that whatever happens in the future, it will involve politics.

    Grand Strategies are time wasters and distracters. They are Fantasy Football. Some are either nuts (and created by the feds) or autistic mind games.

    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction. Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction.
     
    Uh, direction towards what goal, exactly? Vagueness is lame.

    Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.
     
    Oh. So you’re more into feelings, but definitely not actions or outcomes? Sounds like a recipe for useless kvetching. If there’s a problem, you are right, feelings are important (“Yo, there’s a fuckin’ problem!”) and also if there’s a problem: What are solutions to that problem? Complaining that Steve doesn’t have your particular attitude is useless. Instead, let us know your attitude, and your solutions, preferably in an entertaining/enlightening way.

    And I don’t know what a “war” scenario is; not my interest.
     
    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest. But your stated stance is like a 4AM Memphis jogging lady considering danger from criminals to be not in her interest.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  123. @AnotherDad
    @anonymous

    I don't think the West needs female leaders. (We white men need to step up and act like men.) But if you're going to have one, this gal fits the bill.

    Meloni should know though that this sort of disgusting behavior will no longer be tolerated by the "Hate Eradicators." The idea that women have "melons" ... I can't even sleep at night thinking about it.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  124. @AnotherDad
    @Currahee


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    Autism. Libertarianism is autism as an ideology.

    I'm fairly instinctually libertarian. I'm not a natural "rule follower", and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is "leave me alone". Go do your thing, I'll do mine.

    But i'm also not three years old. I.e. i'm not autistic.

    We exist as individuals--i'll never be anyone else, will never see the world from inside their head. But the most obvious fact on the planet is that human beings are a highly social species. We exist in groups. In fact, basically our salient--world conquering survival skill--is having a big brain that allows us to communicate the stuff we figure out to other people in our tribe and organize ourselves as a cohesive group to do cool stuff. That's why we have ships and books and steel and electricity and sewers and airplanes and the internet. Individuals alone ... have absolutely zero of that. They'd live in a tree ... and then get eaten.

    This duality of human life--the individual and the social--just ridiculously obvious. If you care about individual freedom and flourishing you have to think about what sort of society that actually happens in. It doesn't "just happen".

    Libertarianism is this autistic ideology of sort of denying that one side of this duality is important.

    Replies: @Mactoul, @Muggles, @Mike Tre

    “I’m fairly instinctually libertarian. I’m not a natural “rule follower”, and my basic feeling about a lot of stuff is “leave me alone”. Go do your thing, I’ll do mine. ”

    Not really. You were all aboard the mask mandates, possibly the best measure of “get in line, citizen” there has been the last few years.

  125. @Colin Wright
    @mc23

    Notice the name of the author. It's so predictable it's almost boring: like, pointing out the inevitable.

    Replies: @mc23

    If she was a fan of some other absurd book of mystic religious estoteric she would considered admirable

  126. @Pincher Martin
    @Reg Cæsar

    Did Corvinus mount your girlfriend or sister, buddy? You seem obsessed with the man, and even more obsessed with turning me into him. Whatever it was, let it go and move on with your life. I'm not Corvinus. I've had my own run-ins with the dishonest fellow. It's not healthy for you to be so obsessed with a pseudonymous name you see only on a computer screen.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    If you’re not him, you could certainly fool a professional attributionist. Not by stance or content, but by style and approach. You’re the one who once called me a “prescriptivist”, which Richard Taylor botched as “prescriptionist”, leading me to wonder if he’s on the same team, too.

    Whatever a prescriptivist is, an example of a prescriptionist would be Morty the Eutectic.

    Reading your and Jenner’s and Richard’s comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Reg Cæsar


    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.
     
    But we weren't going down a "rabbit hole," were we? Not here in this thread nor indeed anytime recently in any thread. I hadn't addressed you nor had I mentioned any of your posts.

    So you're holding some ancient grudge toward me about some argument we had a couple years back after you tried to henpeck my posts like a schoolmarm with some tedious and incorrect point of grammar. What's more baffling is that you still insist I'm Corvinus - a poster I neither like nor whose politics I agree with.


    Reading your and Jenner’s and Richard’s comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.
     
    Right back at you, dude. At least I try to vary my insults to make my posts more interesting. You don't see me calling you Corvinus ten posts in a row over a period of a couple years.

    Déjà vu, indeed.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.
     
    I can't speak to your arguments with anyone else, but that taste you apparently like, given your willingness to repeatedly "go down the rabbit hole" with me, is the taste of defeat— because I've whupped you in every argument we've had. They all end the same: you finally either bow out without response, or cry uncle by squawking “Corvinus! Corvinus!” Apparently others have been whupping you in arguments, as well.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  127. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Your ideas do not have any of this. They are mathematically innumerate, unless you assume that a naked appeal to white pride can win two-thirds of the white vote and not lose any minority votes. Good luck with that.
     
    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.

    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Pincher Martin

    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.

    I just think it’s stupid to argue that Sailer is a MSM “gatekeeper” or a “wannabe member of the managerial class” and that he “never steps over certain lines.”

    I don’t know what Steve’s goals were when he first became a journalist, but it’s safe to say that if they included becoming a “member of the managerial class” or a “gatekeeper” that he failed spectacularly, probably because he stepped over way too many lines with his honesty about some social issues.

    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.

    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If “our” side fails continuously because it can’t put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too. The defeat will just be quicker and more thorough.

    Too many people here are addicted to losing strategies. Like the dipshits who thought Putin was going to save them from the Woke. At least Steve proposes some ideas that have the semblance of seriousness about them – the kind of ideas one can see modern politicians making in a Western society.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If “our” side fails continuously because it can’t put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too.
     
    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes. After that, fence-sitters and sleepwalkers were no longer thing. The new policy agenda was survival and victory for patriots.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  128. @Muggles
    @anonymous

    But we have Kamala!

    (And she giggles and chatters like that because of the THC gummies. You would too if you worked for Creepy Joe...)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    But we have Kamala!

    Not yet. Not enough. When her boss claims that granny praying the rosary outside the clinic is a “domestic terrorist”, Kamala’s presidency is long overdue.

    Instead of taking Joe’s recent statements as insults, we should be viewing, and using, them as evidence of progressive dementia. Never mind impeachment, 25th, here we come!

  129. @Reg Cæsar
    @Pincher Martin

    I've been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    If you're not him, you could certainly fool a professional attributionist. Not by stance or content, but by style and approach. You're the one who once called me a "prescriptivist", which Richard Taylor botched as "prescriptionist", leading me to wonder if he's on the same team, too.

    Whatever a prescriptivist is, an example of a prescriptionist would be Morty the Eutectic.

    Reading your and Jenner's and Richard's comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    But we weren’t going down a “rabbit hole,” were we? Not here in this thread nor indeed anytime recently in any thread. I hadn’t addressed you nor had I mentioned any of your posts.

    So you’re holding some ancient grudge toward me about some argument we had a couple years back after you tried to henpeck my posts like a schoolmarm with some tedious and incorrect point of grammar. What’s more baffling is that you still insist I’m Corvinus – a poster I neither like nor whose politics I agree with.

    Reading your and Jenner’s and Richard’s comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.

    Right back at you, dude. At least I try to vary my insults to make my posts more interesting. You don’t see me calling you Corvinus ten posts in a row over a period of a couple years.

    Déjà vu, indeed.

  130. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I never said anything about voting. The last person I know who said anything about that was Tucker Carlson, who last night called our system a Fake Democracy. Apparently, tens of millions agree with him.

    And I don't know what a "war" scenario is; not my interest. All I know is that whatever happens in the future, it will involve politics.

    Grand Strategies are time wasters and distracters. They are Fantasy Football. Some are either nuts (and created by the feds) or autistic mind games.

    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction. Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction.

    Uh, direction towards what goal, exactly? Vagueness is lame.

    Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.

    Oh. So you’re more into feelings, but definitely not actions or outcomes? Sounds like a recipe for useless kvetching. If there’s a problem, you are right, feelings are important (“Yo, there’s a fuckin’ problem!”) and also if there’s a problem: What are solutions to that problem? Complaining that Steve doesn’t have your particular attitude is useless. Instead, let us know your attitude, and your solutions, preferably in an entertaining/enlightening way.

    And I don’t know what a “war” scenario is; not my interest.

    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest. But your stated stance is like a 4AM Memphis jogging lady considering danger from criminals to be not in her interest.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest
     
    Is this Ray Epps? LOL

    Anyone trying to lure people into illegal war talk (on the Internet of all places) is always a bad actor.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  131. @PhysicistDave
    @Currahee

    Currahee wrote:


    LOL! Why libertarians are useless cucks.
     
    reason and Gillespie are "liberaltarain."

    Check out the Lew Rockwell site or the Mises Institute for an alternative libertarianism that argues that human interactions among adults should be consensual without denying obvious facts about human nature. Incidentally, Rockwell and Mises are actually more radical on political issues than Gillespie, but they are not hostile to the values of normal middle-class/working-class people.

    I don't agree with Lew or the Mises Institute on everything, but to think that libertarians are clones of Nick Gillespie is a bit like thinking that everyone on the political Right is a clone of Mitt Romney.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Agreed, Dave. Thanks for clearing that up for the people who single out one magazine and some leather-jacketed dipshit as representing an entire way of thinking.

    I used to read lots of Lew Rockwell and his contributors – nothing against them still, but I can’t be reading the whole damn internet every day, like I used to.

    I mentioned Ron Paul already – he is not just one ex-Congressman – he’s got his Liberty Report and his homeschool curriculum. If there’s anything anyone on here has against Ron Paul, please spill it here – you got nothing, do you?

    Finally, I’ve got good memories of Libertarian Vin Suprynowitz, former columnist of the Las Vegas Review Journal: “Papiere bitte!” – “Your papers, please!” and memories of Mr. Vin Suprynowicz, “Papiere bitte!” – “Your papers, please!” – Part 2, and “Papiere bitte!” – “Your papers, please!” – Stories from the real deal.

    I shook his hand in ’10 or so, and he gave me a copy of his The Balled of Carl Drega. Earlier, I’d read his Send in the Waco Killers.

  132. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    What needs to happen is that whites simply need to get the right attitude and sense of direction.
     
    Uh, direction towards what goal, exactly? Vagueness is lame.

    Like, are they into self-hatred or not? How do they feel about other whites who betray them? Things like that.
     
    Oh. So you’re more into feelings, but definitely not actions or outcomes? Sounds like a recipe for useless kvetching. If there’s a problem, you are right, feelings are important (“Yo, there’s a fuckin’ problem!”) and also if there’s a problem: What are solutions to that problem? Complaining that Steve doesn’t have your particular attitude is useless. Instead, let us know your attitude, and your solutions, preferably in an entertaining/enlightening way.

    And I don’t know what a “war” scenario is; not my interest.
     
    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest. But your stated stance is like a 4AM Memphis jogging lady considering danger from criminals to be not in her interest.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest

    Is this Ray Epps? LOL

    Anyone trying to lure people into illegal war talk (on the Internet of all places) is always a bad actor.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Anonymous

    Read it carefully.

    I'm not saying 'go do a war action', or 'it will be good if we have a war', I wrote:


    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest
     
    If you disagree with the above, you are not a serious commenter.
  133. @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    Both CoaSC and LOIQW have dismissed the “voting” strategy, but for some reason are too afraid to personally articulate a (third-person, non-fedposting) war scenario outlook. Oddly, they want Steve to do it for them. Maybe they in-artfully have brought it up before and have been whimmed, I dunno. But Steve isn’t here to rally partisans, racial or otherwise, for a potential civil war. Steve shares his thoughts and noticing with us because Knowledge (and debate) Is Good. What we do with that knowledge (individually and collectively) is up to us.
     
    I just think it's stupid to argue that Sailer is a MSM "gatekeeper" or a "wannabe member of the managerial class" and that he "never steps over certain lines."

    I don't know what Steve's goals were when he first became a journalist, but it's safe to say that if they included becoming a "member of the managerial class" or a "gatekeeper" that he failed spectacularly, probably because he stepped over way too many lines with his honesty about some social issues.


    Any serious speculation about the future for Whites in America, and indeed Whites in the whole world, needs to countenance both peacetime “citizenist” strategies and war scenarios—whether those hypothetical wars be ‘race wars’ or some political hybrid.
     
    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If "our" side fails continuously because it can't put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too. The defeat will just be quicker and more thorough.

    Too many people here are addicted to losing strategies. Like the dipshits who thought Putin was going to save them from the Woke. At least Steve proposes some ideas that have the semblance of seriousness about them - the kind of ideas one can see modern politicians making in a Western society.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If “our” side fails continuously because it can’t put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too.

    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes. After that, fence-sitters and sleepwalkers were no longer thing. The new policy agenda was survival and victory for patriots.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes.
     
    The Revolutionary War was years in coming. The Boston Massacre took place five years before Lexington and Concord. The British army the colonial Americans fought had to be sailed over from a distant land by a government which had various other national security concerns.

    So don't fool yourself with sloppy historical analogies. A new civil war will be much different. Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn't end well for them.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.
     
    If civil war comes, it won't come on cat's feet. We'll see it coming years in advance. There's barely a hint of it today. January 6th wasn't an insurrection, but a protest gone awry because a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi's desk.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  134. @Reg Cæsar
    @Pincher Martin

    I've been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    If you're not him, you could certainly fool a professional attributionist. Not by stance or content, but by style and approach. You're the one who once called me a "prescriptivist", which Richard Taylor botched as "prescriptionist", leading me to wonder if he's on the same team, too.

    Whatever a prescriptivist is, an example of a prescriptionist would be Morty the Eutectic.

    Reading your and Jenner's and Richard's comments gives a sense of, as another famous St Louis native put it, déjà vu all over again.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.

    I can’t speak to your arguments with anyone else, but that taste you apparently like, given your willingness to repeatedly “go down the rabbit hole” with me, is the taste of defeat— because I’ve whupped you in every argument we’ve had. They all end the same: you finally either bow out without response, or cry uncle by squawking “Corvinus! Corvinus!” Apparently others have been whupping you in arguments, as well.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    because I’ve whupped you in every argument we’ve had
     
    Nothing is more corvine than "crowing" about imagined victories.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  135. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Discussing war at this stage is just silly poppycock. If “our” side fails continuously because it can’t put together a serious political coalition to advance a serious policy agenda, then it will fail at war, too.
     
    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes. After that, fence-sitters and sleepwalkers were no longer thing. The new policy agenda was survival and victory for patriots.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes.

    The Revolutionary War was years in coming. The Boston Massacre took place five years before Lexington and Concord. The British army the colonial Americans fought had to be sailed over from a distant land by a government which had various other national security concerns.

    So don’t fool yourself with sloppy historical analogies. A new civil war will be much different. Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn’t end well for them.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.

    If civil war comes, it won’t come on cat’s feet. We’ll see it coming years in advance. There’s barely a hint of it today. January 6th wasn’t an insurrection, but a protest gone awry because a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi’s desk.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    The Revolutionary War was years in coming.
     
    In hindsight, sure. Similarly, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain! They were soon brought into the Patriot fold. Seems obvious and tautological, but 1776 followed 1775.


    A new civil war will be much different.
     
    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.

    Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn’t end well for them.
     
    Perhaps, but as you say, don’t make “sloppy historical analogies”.

    If civil war comes, it won’t come on cat’s feet. We’ll see it coming years in advance. There’s barely a hint of it today.
     
    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi’s desk
     
    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  136. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    I’ve been down the rabbit hole a few times with the Crow. And with Jenner and you. It leaves the same taste.
     
    I can't speak to your arguments with anyone else, but that taste you apparently like, given your willingness to repeatedly "go down the rabbit hole" with me, is the taste of defeat— because I've whupped you in every argument we've had. They all end the same: you finally either bow out without response, or cry uncle by squawking “Corvinus! Corvinus!” Apparently others have been whupping you in arguments, as well.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    because I’ve whupped you in every argument we’ve had

    Nothing is more corvine than “crowing” about imagined victories.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar

    Imagined victories?

    Hoo boy Reg, you done got whupped every time and apparently you like the taste!

  137. @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I’m sure plenty of reluctant colonial Americans thought the same until events at Lexington and Concord pressed the issue and galvanized and polarized attitudes.
     
    The Revolutionary War was years in coming. The Boston Massacre took place five years before Lexington and Concord. The British army the colonial Americans fought had to be sailed over from a distant land by a government which had various other national security concerns.

    So don't fool yourself with sloppy historical analogies. A new civil war will be much different. Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn't end well for them.

    Beyond all the current verbal and procedural politics going on, the implied threat of force is always in the background, from all sides. You may not have the luxury of foresight of if and when and where it could kick off: What appears to be ‘peacetime’ political and demographic equilibrium can turn on a dime.
     
    If civil war comes, it won't come on cat's feet. We'll see it coming years in advance. There's barely a hint of it today. January 6th wasn't an insurrection, but a protest gone awry because a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi's desk.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The Revolutionary War was years in coming.

    In hindsight, sure. Similarly, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain! They were soon brought into the Patriot fold. Seems obvious and tautological, but 1776 followed 1775.

    A new civil war will be much different.

    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.

    Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn’t end well for them.

    Perhaps, but as you say, don’t make “sloppy historical analogies”.

    If civil war comes, it won’t come on cat’s feet. We’ll see it coming years in advance. There’s barely a hint of it today.

    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi’s desk

    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    In hindsight, sure.
     
    No, in real time. The people then could see it coming and several leading colonists of the time were dedicated to making it happen years before it actually did.

    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams. You can't because there isn't one.


    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain!
     
    Sure, and some of those colonists returned to England to remain faithful subjects of the King. But you mistake "debate" or differences of opinion for a lack of knowledge and foresight. How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?

    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.
     
    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer then it would be less a war than a massacre - and they its victims.

    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.
     
    Yes, but the same could've been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s, and several points during the 19th century. Yet, we have had only one civil war.

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades. Except for civil war.


    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.
     
    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn't have meant anything.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  138. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    because I’ve whupped you in every argument we’ve had
     
    Nothing is more corvine than "crowing" about imagined victories.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Imagined victories?

    Hoo boy Reg, you done got whupped every time and apparently you like the taste!

  139. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    Meloni spent the last two years fighting against the Covid passports. Yet she is called a fascist ? She opposed this fascist policy which forced all Italians to show their proper papers to venture outside and go to restaurants, take a train or attend a concert...

    Replies: @Hibernian

    take a train or attend a concert…

    and the Covid passport contributed nothing to the trains’ on-time performance.

  140. @Anonymous
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest
     
    Is this Ray Epps? LOL

    Anyone trying to lure people into illegal war talk (on the Internet of all places) is always a bad actor.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Read it carefully.

    I’m not saying ‘go do a war action’, or ‘it will be good if we have a war’, I wrote:

    If you are for real, the possibility and outcomes of war should be in your conscious interest

    If you disagree with the above, you are not a serious commenter.

  141. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    The Revolutionary War was years in coming.
     
    In hindsight, sure. Similarly, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain! They were soon brought into the Patriot fold. Seems obvious and tautological, but 1776 followed 1775.


    A new civil war will be much different.
     
    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.

    Plenty of Confederates thought they, too, were fighting a battle for their freedoms. Didn’t end well for them.
     
    Perhaps, but as you say, don’t make “sloppy historical analogies”.

    If civil war comes, it won’t come on cat’s feet. We’ll see it coming years in advance. There’s barely a hint of it today.
     
    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    a few fools thought it would be a swell idea to take some selfies on Nancy Pelosi’s desk
     
    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    In hindsight, sure.

    No, in real time. The people then could see it coming and several leading colonists of the time were dedicated to making it happen years before it actually did.

    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams. You can’t because there isn’t one.

    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain!

    Sure, and some of those colonists returned to England to remain faithful subjects of the King. But you mistake “debate” or differences of opinion for a lack of knowledge and foresight. How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?

    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.

    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer then it would be less a war than a massacre – and they its victims.

    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.

    Yes, but the same could’ve been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s, and several points during the 19th century. Yet, we have had only one civil war.

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades. Except for civil war.

    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.

    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn’t have meant anything.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams.
     
    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.

    How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?
     
    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.

    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer
     
    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong) I detect from you is because you assume I think or advocate that pro-White Whites countenancing the possibility of war should proactively/preemptively initiate war. No, my view is more of an observer of precursors moving into place: war could start by the brazen acts of a relative few (of any side), compelling escalating reaction upon reaction.

    Yes, but the same could’ve been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s
     
    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades.
     
    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.

    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn’t have meant anything.
     
    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up.

    But relax, PM—I’m not saying civil war is likely anytime soon, or is inevitable, I’m just saying anyone coming here to Steve’s HBD and politics blog is a Pollyanna if it isn’t on his or her mind as an ever-present possible outcome to our current national disputes.

    Originally in this thread some commenters were complaining (again) about Sailer not being more explicitly pro-White. But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

  142. @Juvenalis
    @Rob

    You must not be too familiar with Italy, Europe, or the world, if you believe disparities in development between different regions of Italy are at all comparable to the gap between 'first world' and 'third world' countries.

    Any region with human development index >0.7 is considered at "high" level of development; any region with HDI >0.8 is considered to be at "very high" level of human development. While the more rural South is not as rich as the more urban North, every region of Italy scores at a "very high" level on the human development index.

    From the POV of the average person on earth—out of 8 billion in 2022—any part of Italy is a futuristic first-world paradise that might as well be El Dorado compared to the actual third world hellscapes whence they are emigrating en masse.
    https://i.redd.it/6p7x61o8ovc11.png

    Replies: @Rob

    Not familiar with italy at all. I thought the south was a lot poorer than the north.

  143. @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    In hindsight, sure.
     
    No, in real time. The people then could see it coming and several leading colonists of the time were dedicated to making it happen years before it actually did.

    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams. You can't because there isn't one.


    Back in 1775, there was still debate between leaders of different colonies as to what to do after Lexington and Concord (and Bunker Hill) happened. Some believed peace could still be made with Britain!
     
    Sure, and some of those colonists returned to England to remain faithful subjects of the King. But you mistake "debate" or differences of opinion for a lack of knowledge and foresight. How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?

    Sure. I’m not predicting exactly how it would go. I’m just saying there are existing ‘sides’ that will have interest in winning a war should our national politics become deadly.
     
    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer then it would be less a war than a massacre - and they its victims.

    As I wrote above, our current national divides will be seen as obvious precursors should a civil war have broken out.
     
    Yes, but the same could've been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s, and several points during the 19th century. Yet, we have had only one civil war.

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades. Except for civil war.


    Back in the day, a “motley rabble of saucy boys” thought it would be swell to chuck rocks at British soldiers in Boston. Maybe it didn’t mean anything.
     
    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn't have meant anything.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams.

    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.

    How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?

    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.

    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer

    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong) I detect from you is because you assume I think or advocate that pro-White Whites countenancing the possibility of war should proactively/preemptively initiate war. No, my view is more of an observer of precursors moving into place: war could start by the brazen acts of a relative few (of any side), compelling escalating reaction upon reaction.

    Yes, but the same could’ve been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s

    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades.

    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.

    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn’t have meant anything.

    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up.

    But relax, PM—I’m not saying civil war is likely anytime soon, or is inevitable, I’m just saying anyone coming here to Steve’s HBD and politics blog is a Pollyanna if it isn’t on his or her mind as an ever-present possible outcome to our current national disputes.

    Originally in this thread some commenters were complaining (again) about Sailer not being more explicitly pro-White. But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.
     
    Since one can make historical analogies without being sloppy, what historical events in democracies would you describe as being tinderboxes comparable to today's America?

    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.
     
    But the point is that many colonial Americans - even those who advocated peace or sat on the fence - not only saw war coming long before 1775, but helped to agitate for it. High-profile partisans existed who wished for war.

    You now claim that no such leaders are necessary in today's environment, that war could possibly spring up from the streets spontaneously. Violence certainly could. Riots certainly have. But war needs organization and therefore leaders. Even decentralized guerrilla organizations require them.


    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?
     
    Sure. Published in 1968 by Garry Wills:

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Fe2qg8lHL._SX393_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    Blurb: "Garry Wills toured the country to investigate preparations for the next long hot summer. he smeared new chemicals on his face, fired experimental guns, checked riot plans, talked with municipal officials, civil rights leaders, and black and white racists. In this alarming and disturbing book he tells why he fears America could be arming for catastrophe - the second civil war."

    Many other observers at the time held similar views. Race riots were happening in many of our cities. Crime was skyrocketing. We were losing a war. Inflation was beginning. Youth were rebelling against authority. Our politics seemed dysfunctional.


    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.
     
    But the violence always seems to come from only one racial quarter, who are not much greater in their share of the national population today than they were in the 1960s. Who fears Asian-Americans taking up arms in our streets? Even Hispanics seem less supportive of the violence we are seeing today than many pro-Soros white groups. I guess some Muslims and Indians might take up anti-white violence, but their numbers are fairly small.

    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up
     

    It's a long way from any kind of open support for armed violence or independence. Frankly, we aren't even up to 1960s-level violence yet, even if we are trending in that direction.

    But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.
     
    Frankly, some whites are among the most anti-white people I meet. But, yes, there is an alarming trend of anti-white attitudes among many minorities and immigrant groups. But do I think civil war is in our near future? Nope, not even close.
    , @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong)....
     
    My annoyance comes mainly from the fact that I think many ideas from the nativist right are smart, useful and would help our country immensely. So I dislike sloppy and stupid talk of war when I don't see many of these people using their full capabilities to explore all their political options.

    In 2016, we saw a man get elected to the highest office in the land who had no earthly reason being anywhere near the White House. He was a clown, a carnival barker. But to his credit, he ran on a handful of neglected political ideas and policies. He proved that even an unworthy vessel could win the highest office in the land with those ideas. They were no handicap to office. He then was nearly re-elected during a recession and pandemic. His vote total went up in all fifty states.

    If that doesn't prove to the New Right there is a great untapped political potential out there for a different kind of politics, what will?

    Replies: @Anonymous

  144. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams.
     
    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.

    How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?
     
    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.

    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer
     
    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong) I detect from you is because you assume I think or advocate that pro-White Whites countenancing the possibility of war should proactively/preemptively initiate war. No, my view is more of an observer of precursors moving into place: war could start by the brazen acts of a relative few (of any side), compelling escalating reaction upon reaction.

    Yes, but the same could’ve been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s
     
    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades.
     
    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.

    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn’t have meant anything.
     
    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up.

    But relax, PM—I’m not saying civil war is likely anytime soon, or is inevitable, I’m just saying anyone coming here to Steve’s HBD and politics blog is a Pollyanna if it isn’t on his or her mind as an ever-present possible outcome to our current national disputes.

    Originally in this thread some commenters were complaining (again) about Sailer not being more explicitly pro-White. But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.

    Since one can make historical analogies without being sloppy, what historical events in democracies would you describe as being tinderboxes comparable to today’s America?

    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.

    But the point is that many colonial Americans – even those who advocated peace or sat on the fence – not only saw war coming long before 1775, but helped to agitate for it. High-profile partisans existed who wished for war.

    You now claim that no such leaders are necessary in today’s environment, that war could possibly spring up from the streets spontaneously. Violence certainly could. Riots certainly have. But war needs organization and therefore leaders. Even decentralized guerrilla organizations require them.

    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?

    Sure. Published in 1968 by Garry Wills:

    Blurb: “Garry Wills toured the country to investigate preparations for the next long hot summer. he smeared new chemicals on his face, fired experimental guns, checked riot plans, talked with municipal officials, civil rights leaders, and black and white racists. In this alarming and disturbing book he tells why he fears America could be arming for catastrophe – the second civil war.

    Many other observers at the time held similar views. Race riots were happening in many of our cities. Crime was skyrocketing. We were losing a war. Inflation was beginning. Youth were rebelling against authority. Our politics seemed dysfunctional.

    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.

    But the violence always seems to come from only one racial quarter, who are not much greater in their share of the national population today than they were in the 1960s. Who fears Asian-Americans taking up arms in our streets? Even Hispanics seem less supportive of the violence we are seeing today than many pro-Soros white groups. I guess some Muslims and Indians might take up anti-white violence, but their numbers are fairly small.

    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up

    It’s a long way from any kind of open support for armed violence or independence. Frankly, we aren’t even up to 1960s-level violence yet, even if we are trending in that direction.

    But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.

    Frankly, some whites are among the most anti-white people I meet. But, yes, there is an alarming trend of anti-white attitudes among many minorities and immigrant groups. But do I think civil war is in our near future? Nope, not even close.

  145. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Pincher Martin


    Name a single U.S. public figure dedicated to separation or civil war today. Name the equivalent of, say, Samuel Adams.
     
    In the interest of not making a “sloppy historical analogy” I would caution that an agitator exactly like Samuel Adams may not be necessary: We may have created a tinderbox that starts differently than tinderboxes of yore.

    How you can seriously claim no one saw war coming in 1775 when the war was already upon them?
     
    I made no such claim. I did say that prior to 1775 there were far more fence-sitters and sleepwalkers than during and after. And I wrote that some still believed (briefly) that peace could still be salvaged after Lexington and Concord.

    Well, at this point, if some deluded segment of the white American population believes war is the answer
     
    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong) I detect from you is because you assume I think or advocate that pro-White Whites countenancing the possibility of war should proactively/preemptively initiate war. No, my view is more of an observer of precursors moving into place: war could start by the brazen acts of a relative few (of any side), compelling escalating reaction upon reaction.

    Yes, but the same could’ve been said of the 1960s, the late 1910s/early 1920s
     
    Was it said then, though? To the same extent “civil war” is mentioned in the MSM today?

    I would argue that the turmoil during the late sixties and early seventies was greater than anything we have experienced in the last five years. More violence. More deaths. More riots. Greater racial strife. Greater economic failures. Larger culture wars. That period had it all in spades.
     
    The racial demographic proportions are quite different now. One could say that the late ‘60s and early ‘70s (either 17- or 19-) are back, but with higher stakes for Whites.

    Without the advocacy of several leading Massachusetts citizens, it wouldn’t have meant anything.
     
    We have leading, or at least prominent, national politicians on both the left and right talking all sorts of spicy talk. “Advocacy” is heating up. Maybe not yet at the Sam Adams level, but it’s heating up.

    But relax, PM—I’m not saying civil war is likely anytime soon, or is inevitable, I’m just saying anyone coming here to Steve’s HBD and politics blog is a Pollyanna if it isn’t on his or her mind as an ever-present possible outcome to our current national disputes.

    Originally in this thread some commenters were complaining (again) about Sailer not being more explicitly pro-White. But they seem to not want to contemplate an obvious possible consequence to widespread public pro-White advocacy—overt war against Whites by anti-Whites.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Pincher Martin

    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong)….

    My annoyance comes mainly from the fact that I think many ideas from the nativist right are smart, useful and would help our country immensely. So I dislike sloppy and stupid talk of war when I don’t see many of these people using their full capabilities to explore all their political options.

    In 2016, we saw a man get elected to the highest office in the land who had no earthly reason being anywhere near the White House. He was a clown, a carnival barker. But to his credit, he ran on a handful of neglected political ideas and policies. He proved that even an unworthy vessel could win the highest office in the land with those ideas. They were no handicap to office. He then was nearly re-elected during a recession and pandemic. His vote total went up in all fifty states.

    If that doesn’t prove to the New Right there is a great untapped political potential out there for a different kind of politics, what will?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Pincher Martin

    This sounds sort of exciting, but I couldn't admit it to anyone I know

  146. @Pincher Martin
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    The annoyance (correct me if I’m wrong)....
     
    My annoyance comes mainly from the fact that I think many ideas from the nativist right are smart, useful and would help our country immensely. So I dislike sloppy and stupid talk of war when I don't see many of these people using their full capabilities to explore all their political options.

    In 2016, we saw a man get elected to the highest office in the land who had no earthly reason being anywhere near the White House. He was a clown, a carnival barker. But to his credit, he ran on a handful of neglected political ideas and policies. He proved that even an unworthy vessel could win the highest office in the land with those ideas. They were no handicap to office. He then was nearly re-elected during a recession and pandemic. His vote total went up in all fifty states.

    If that doesn't prove to the New Right there is a great untapped political potential out there for a different kind of politics, what will?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This sounds sort of exciting, but I couldn’t admit it to anyone I know

  147. @usNthem
    She’s tough talking the talk. It remains to be seen if she’ll tough walk the walk. Here’s hoping, as the hour grows ever late.

    Replies: @1John

    Yes, now we will see what she is made of, now we will see if she is committed in saving the Italian ethnicity. Three items she must do immediately:
    -1) close borders.
    -2) commence repatriations.
    -3) amend the Italian Constitution to state that Italy 🇮🇹 is the homeland of Italians in perpetuity & must be always no less than 95% of its demographics.
    If she does not, then, she will have betrayed the Italian People & Italians need to act quickly in saving Italy for Italians because the invasion is nonstop.

  148. @Anonymous
    @slumber_j

    I vê heard that’s phrase “ Africa begins at Naples “

    It s yet another example of whites believing the magic dirt and bad dirt theory . It s fundamentally not true .

    The reason Southern and Sicilian Italians look dark and swarthy is because these areas got invaded by dark and swarthy Arabs and Literally fu$&@ed up the White gene pool .

    The reverse is true - lots of beautiful White Nordic people in South Africa and Brazil .

    The Spanish colonialists in the new world Western Hemisphere had a bad dirt rule that no “ White” Spanish child born in the Western Hemisphere could serve in the Spanish colonial government because the new world had corrupt /bad dirt .

    It was a racial matter - Spanish authorities back in Spain fresh off the Reconquest of the Arab Moors and expulsion of the Js in 1492 we’re racially aware that White Spanish colonialists we’re having “ relations” with good looking Aztec ative women and their children were a bit off White.

    So the moral to this story is….

    There is no magic dirt or racially bad dirt . The way things are going Malmo Sweden will look , snell and act like Pakistan and Somalia in 80 years .

    Egyptian and Greek royals knew all this blood and race stuff 1,000 BC

    Why don t we ?

    Jr
    TPC Radio show

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The reason Southern and Sicilian Italians look dark and swarthy is because these areas got invaded by dark and swarthy Arabs and Literally fu$&@ed up the White gene pool .

    False

    https://italianthro.blogspot.com/p/italians101.html

    Idiot

  149. Anonymous[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @slumber_j
    @snootybaronet


    Actual Fascism was unique to Mussolini’s Italy
     
    I dunno: Franco's FET y de las JONS did call itself "Phalangist." But quibbles about nomenclature aside, the party was both essentially and superficially Fascist in pretty much every way I can think of--with a lot of Roman Catholicism and lip-service to Monarchism thrown in, but still...

    Replies: @snootybaronet, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    Fascism is the middle class asserting its self-interest in opposition to both radical revolution from below and to hereditary/aristocratic privilege from above. That’s all. It’s strange how much BS is written/spoken about this.

    Franco however was definitely on the side of hereditary/aristocratic privilege. He used the fascists to defeat the communists, but then thoroughly excluded them from power. During WWII he even had fascist leaders shot for showing insufficient loyalty to the regime.

  150. Italy 1915: births surviving: 1,109,183

    Italy, 1964: births surviving: 1,035,207

    Italy, 2021, births surviving: 399,431

    In the year 2020 88,345 babies were born to at least one foreign parent which makes up 21.8% of all newborns in that year

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