The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Is NASA Going Back to the Moon to Erase Stain of Only White Men Having Walked There?
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From Yahoo News:

Bezos v. Musk: The high-stakes legal disputes between the world’s two richest people

Roger Parloff·Contributor
Wed, October 13, 2021, 3:16 AM·17 min read

The spectacle of public sniping between the world’s two richest men, as they compete to shoot ever-larger rockets ever deeper into space, has been an irresistible one for media observers.

In recent months, SpaceX and Tesla (TSLA) CEO Elon Musk (net worth: \$224 billion, per Bloomberg) has traded barbs with Amazon (AMZN) and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos (net worth: \$189 billion) …

This article will peer beneath the insults to explain the facts and law surrounding the two high-stakes disputes that are currently generating most of the sparks between the men. One involves competition between SpaceX and Blue Origin for multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024—the first human moon landings in a half century.

Interesting … so NASA is going back to the moon to erase the moral stain of only white men ever having been there?

And, unlike in 1969 when NASA could get to the moon themselves, NASA is going to have to pay at least one of the world’s two richest white men to help get their women and astronauts of color to the moon?

 
Hide 161 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Daniel H says:

    Interesting … so NASA is going back to the moon to erase the moral stain of only white men ever having been there?

    That \$137 million that Tesla paid to the aggrieved contractor looks like chump change compared to what NASA intends on spending to assuage our national guilt.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    , @Jack D
  2. The reason no has gone back is because the Martians have bases on the moon and communicated to NASA that the Moon is theirs. They allowed that we could go anywhere else we wanted, just not the Moon.

    I swear it’s true. I read it on the internet.

    • Replies: @raga10
  3. If making RuPaul mission commander is what is required to get humanity back to the moon, I’m all in favor Steve.

  4. The recent all civilian amateur crew launched into orbit by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, didn’t have to do a thing. The rocket and space capsule is entirely automated. The “training” was mostly theater. Musk’s latest Rocket “the Starship” could be one of whitest creations of the 21st century. Who else would think to build the world’s largest rocket out of stainless steel. The lunar lander will be a modified Starship. Whatever optics the paying customer (NASA) wants will be obliged by SpaceX but anyone with a brain knows who created and built it. Yeah yeah there’s a few asians working for SpaceX, but the dream is White.

    • Replies: @Walker65
  5. Mr. Anon says:

    Interesting … so NASA is going back to the moon to erase the moral stain of only white men ever having been there?

    NASA feels that it has to go somewhere other than just Low Earth Orbit, and the Moon is a lot easier to get to than Mars. But, yes, the woman and POC thing is because the agency is ashamed of its past and (mostly continueing) unbearable whiteness.

    And, unlike in 1969 when NASA could get to the moon themselves, NASA is going to have to pay at least one of the world’s two richest white men to help get their women and astronauts of color to the moon?

    There is no difference between now and then. NASA doesn’t build rockets; it just assembles them. The big rockets that is: the Saturns, Shuttle, SLS. When it comes to other, smaller launchers, NASA just buys them. Bezos is pissed off that SpaceX got the contract to build the lunar lander rather than Blue Origin. But it will be built by one of them, just as the Apollo-era LEM was built by Grumman. During the Apollo era, NASA may have taken a stronger role in the design, but ultimately all the elements were purchased from and built by contractors.

  6. I have to hand it to Bezos for the publicity stunt of sending Captain James T. Kirk up into space!

    As a headline put it, “Where no man that old has gone before!”

    If only Nimoy were still alive and the dynamic duo could have gone together.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Wilkey
  7. 1969, an achievement of shared culture. 2021ish, an exercise in Narcissism, Psychopathy, and torch of Thrift.

  8. Oh, NASA is “returning” to the moon? But this time using BIPOC actors. This is great news. I’m sure they’ll get the special effects right this time. We may discover that BIPOCS have unique physiology that allows them to twerk on the moon, sans those bulky suits.

    • LOL: acementhead, AndrewR
    • Troll: jamie b.
    • Replies: @Kgaard
  9. And perhaps the moral stain of only white men having gotten it done.

    In 2019, I watched Todd Douglas Miller’s documentary Apollo 11, in an Imax movie theater. It has restored footage from the 70mm landscape format film that was shot at the time. It is one of the best documentaries I’ve seen.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, El Dato, Charon, 2BR, bruce county, ziggurat
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @ziggurat
  10. Mr. Anon says:
    @PiltdownMan

    It is one of the best documentaries I’ve seen.

    It is hands down the best documentary on Apollo that I’ve ever seen. Well worth watching

  11. I’m not sure how to wipe out the historical fact that even the idea of actually going to the moon in reality was conceived by white men, along with everything needed to get it done. But I expect a way to memory hole the details of who got it done will be found.

    Apollo Flight Controller 101: Every console explained

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  12. raga10 says:
    @Enemy of Earth

    Martians, or Nazis. Unless Martians are Nazis? That’s possible, I guess.

    I’m OK with Project Artemis, actually. I think it’s about time we took our Moon back from those pesky and potentially Nazi Martians, so if it takes a black woman to get us there again, so be it.

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
  13. I looked up Julius Caesar on Wiki, and discovered his last name is not pronounced Seezer, as I had known him for more than 50 years. Apparently it’s pronounced something like Kayzar (I’m an ear man and read neither music nor phonetics). Anyway, I want to sound like a smart guy at the bar, so I’m shouting out to Reg or whomever to give me the straight skinny on how to address the fella, and what he likes to drink.

  14. Anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:

    Going to the moon is very dangerous. That nobody died in the original moonshots was very, very lucky. Desire not to push this luck was one of the reasons the original program was cancelled.

  15. epebble says:
    @Neil Templeton

    Just pronounce it as Kaiser ( as in the Healthcare company).

  16. Koolbash says:

    What a brilliant idea!

    Convince the cash-strapped Feds to pay me hundreds of millions of dollars and justify it all by invoking diversity.

    What a brilliant racket!

    It sure sucks to be the American taxpayer!

    I am slowly beginning to understand why Musk and Bezos have hundreds of billions, yet I don’t have a single billion. Yet…

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @El Dato
  17. . . . Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon.

    The contracts don’t say you have to bring them back. That’s a pretty big loophole.

    They could also fulfill both contracts at once by placing Kamala Harris on the Moon.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  18. @Neil Templeton

    Pronounce is like “Yoolius Kyessar.”

    Standard Latin pronunciation.

  19. What about the “Old Negro Space Program”?

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • LOL: Old Prude, Joe Paluka
  20. @Neil Templeton

    “Julius Caesar” is the accepted, correct pronunciation in English for a name which in Latin is pronounced “Iulius Kaisar”. But we don’t speak Latin, we speak English, and in English Julius is correct. We don’t call Egypt “Kemet” any more either, and in English, we have our own words for things, like calling a place Germany instead of Deutschland.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Alfa158
  21. JimB says:

    NASA is going to have to pay at least one of the world’s two richest white men to help get their women and astronauts of color to the moon?

    Hahahaha!

  22. Anonymous[165] • Disclaimer says:

    Credit where it is due, Elon Musk is the highest achieving African-American in the land.

    • LOL: Joseph Doaks
    • Replies: @Charon
    , @Michigan Patriot
  23. El Dato says:
    @Anonymous

    System & reliability engineering has advanced a bit since then, so there is a good chance this will not disproportionately affect underrepresented minorities.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  24. El Dato says:
    @Koolbash

    Convince the cash-strapped Feds to

    “The Feds” may be many things, but “cash strapped” is definitely not one of them.

    • LOL: Charon
    • Replies: @epebble
  25. So much for colonizing space to escape Earth’s troubles.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • LOL: Yngvar, Gordo
  26. El Dato says:
    @Koolbash

    In 2018, something about Robert Henry Lawrence Jr.:

    SpaceX to Launch CubeSat Containing “Soul” of First African American Astronaut: The mysterious satellite is a collaboration between artist Tavares Strachan and Los Angeles County Museum of Art

    Now, IEEE Spectrum has learned that Enoch contains a 24-karat-gold canopic jar with a bust of Lawrence. Canopic jars were used by ancient Egyptians to house the organs of the deceased for use in the afterlife. This jar was blessed at a Shinto shrine in Japan and “recognized as a container for Lawrence’s soul,” according to the museum.

    “[Lawrence is] someone who has a mostly untold story, who I look at as a hero but who wasn’t necessarily considered one when I was a child in school,” says Tavares Strachan, the artist behind Enoch, in an interview with IEEE Spectrum.

    Although Guion Bluford Jr. was the first African American to reach space, on a space shuttle in 1983, Lawrence was the first black astronaut, selected for training in 1967. Just six months later [i.e. in 1967], Lawrence died in the crash of an F-104 Starfighter jet while teaching a junior pilot shuttle-landing techniques. [certainly not “shuttle-landing”, from Wikipedia: “He was flying backseat in an F-104 as the instructor pilot for flight test trainee Major Harvey Royer, who was learning the steep-descent glide technique. Royer made such an approach but flared too late.”]

    “A black guy doing space exploration with the U.S. government wasn’t a normal situation in 1960s America. He was traversing a very difficult time,” says Strachan. Strachan first learned about Lawrence while researching an earlier project on cultural invisibility—the tendency for minority figures to get written out of history. [?]

    The Enoch project began back in 2014, when Strachan was selected as one of the first artists to participate in LACMA’s Art + Technology lab. His initial idea was to conduct experiments with rockets made of glass and powered by fuel made from sugarcane grown in his native Bahamas [A glass A-4 with sounds very dangerous] However, a meeting with Gwynne Shotwell, president of SpaceX, a founding sponsor of the lab, encouraged Strachan to change focus.

    But behind the scenes, Strachan was thinking even bigger. Inspired by Egyptian artifacts at LACMA and the biblical figure of Enoch, who ascended directly to heaven without dying, Strachan wanted to fulfill Lawrence’s ambitions to travel into space.

    Although Spaceflight’s manifest says that Enoch will not have a radio transmitter on orbit, a blog post by Pumpkin notes that it will “carry some hi-tech tags that will simplify its tracking.” Strachan says he is planning a global project to allow schools around the world to follow Enoch’s progress: “Imagine a beacon of light that exists somewhere on campus and every time the satellite goes by, it lights up.”

    I find all of this appallingly tacky, if not positively out of a J.G. Ballard story where people get in contact with their Freudian substructure as they marvel at past spaceflight glories as they progress towards mental decay along the same arc as the one in “Heart of Darkness”.

    The Dead Astronaut, Memories of the Space Age and A Question of Re-entry fit right in.

  27. I hope the crew is made up entirely of hot Asian chicks who got 800 on the SAT.

  28. Another reason is that the Chinese plan to send men to the moon. The USA will be able to compete, but only if it borrows the money from China.

    • Agree: Gordo
  29. @PiltdownMan

    There are plenty of people who think Hidden Figures is a documentary.

  30. El Dato says:
    @Anonymous

    In this context, the following is most interesting:

    The Challenger Disaster: A Case of Subjective Engineering:

    From the archives: NASA’s resistance to probabilistic risk analysis contributed to the Challenger disaster

    NASA’s preference for a design approach to reliability to the exclusion of quantitative risk analysis was strengthened by a negative early brush with the field. According to Haggai Cohen, who during the Apollo days was NASA’s deputy chief engineer, NASA contracted with General Electric Co. in Daytona Beach, Fla., to do a “full numerical PRA [probabilistic risk assessment]” to assess the likelihood of success in landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth. The GE study indicated the chance of success was “less than 5 percent.” When the NASA Administrator was presented with the results, he felt that if made public, “the numbers could do irreparable harm, and he disbanded the effort,” Cohen said. “We studiously stayed away from [numerical risk assessment] as a result.”

    “That’s when we threw all that garbage out and got down to work,” Willoughby agreed. The study’s proponents, he said, contended “ ‘you build up confidence by statistical test programs. ’ We said, ‘No, go fly a kite, we’ll build up confidence by design.’ Testing gives you only a snapshot under particular conditions. Reality may not give you the same set of circumstances, and you can be lulled into a false sense of security or insecurity.”

    As a result, NASA adopted qualitative failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) as its principal means of identifying design features whose worst-case failure could lead to a catastrophe. The worst cases were ranked as Criticality 1 if they threatened the life of the crew members or the existence of the vehicle; Criticality 2 if they threatened the mission; and Criticality 3 for anything less. An R designated a redundant system [see “How NASA determined shuttle risk,”]. Quantitative techniques were limited to calculating the probability of the occurrence of an individual failure mode “if we had to present a rationale on how to live with a single failure point,” Cohen explained.

    etc.

    FMEA and FMECA are of course still the bread-and-butter of engineering risk analysis. Ask your neighbourhood nuclear power plant designer!

  31. NASA has run out of Germans.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  32. Pericles says:
    @Neil Templeton

    Better spend those dollas while dey worth sumfin, gnomesayin?

  33. @Daniel H

    SpaceX will get the job done for a fraction it cost NASA the first time

    Just look at the Space Shuttle, \$1.6 billion per launch, Falcon 9 or Falcon Heavy cost a fraction of that price, and Starship will be even cheaper

  34. Charon says:
    @Anonymous

    Also almost the only high-achieving..

    And true to his African roots, the man has learned not to be married! If Jeff Bezos had learned this, he’d be #1 right now instead of Avis Rent-a-Car.

    Question: what’s to stop any of Musk’s squeezes from making up a story and suing for billions? He must be paying them off mightily, because he surely knows he doesn’t want to face any of them in front of a jury. Sucks to be rich, right gentlemen?

  35. J.Ross says:
    @Neil Templeton

    And vinci is actually uinci (“winkie”). Latin had no J and no V.

  36. It is pretty shameful indeed that we took Jim Crow to the moon. And thus far, the only Star Trek actor taken to space is the White guy. For shame, for shame, for shame.

    I guess we can take some solace that America’s most successful private space venture is headed by an African rather than a Dr. Evil Mini-me©️.

  37. Wilkey says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Was anyone on the flight with Kirk wearing a red shirt?

  38. Dan says:

    When Hollywood gets around to remaking Apollo 13, the three astronauts (Lovell, Haise, and Swigert) will be black, female and gay.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  39. Apollo 11 and subsequent moon landings were not just amazing technological achievements, they were amazing achievements for individual humans. Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins and the subsequent crews represented the very best of the best of humanity. It required amazing skill and nerves to make the journey they did with the technology they had.

    Whoever the woman and person of color are, they won’t hold a candle to those men. We don’t recognize men like that in the current age.

    If the wokestronauts succeed it will be because more advanced technology mitigated for human failing.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Sparkylyle92
  40. Wilkey says:

    One involves competition between SpaceX and Blue Origin for multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024—the first human moon landings in a half century.

    God we live in stupid times. Never have I ever wanted a NASA mission to actually fail, until now.

    Yammering about “diversity” is just a strategy the rich and powerful use to manipulate minorities and women. The estronauts and the blackstronauts will get nothing but the risk of actually going to the moon, and some nice sponsorship gigs when (if) they return, and the aerospace industry will get \$100 billion or more in government contracts for a pointless mission.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @res
    , @Alfa158
  41. Spud Boy says:

    Yeah, I’m sure if we were landing on the moon for the first time now, we’d have a handicapped, black female trans lesbian cancer survivor be the one to represent humanity.

    I started watching the Netflix documentary “Countdown” about the Inspiration4 mission to space. I had to gag when they starting talking about the diversity of the crew–cancer survivor, black female, blah blah blah. I bailed when it turned into a human interest story.

  42. Tom F. says:

    Gil Scott Heron, complaining 51 years too soon. (2 min.)

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  43. Gordo says:

    Interesting … so NASA is going back to the moon to erase the moral stain of only white men ever having been there?

    Fate has a strange way of taking a hand, not that I wish them ill luck…

    • Replies: @Neuday
  44. @Dan

    Hollywood made a Neil Armstrong biopic a couple of years ago, First Man, and it was extremely respectful.

    • Replies: @Tom F.
    , @Jack D
    , @El Dato
  45. G. Poulin says:

    Maybe we’ll get lucky, and the Moonbat Mission will get Apollo 13’d halfway there.

  46. Tom F. says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Q: What is the difference between Neil Armstrong and Michael Jackson?

    A: One is a moonwalker, and the other is a child molester!

    • Replies: @Truth
  47. El Dato says:
    @Charon

    Blacks in space are always so zany!

    • Replies: @Tetra
    , @nokangaroos
  48. Anonymous[165] • Disclaimer says:

    Musk strikes me as an anti-white leftist type, someone very much onboard with the “agenda”. I don’t know why people on the right rate him so much.

  49. Rob McX says:

    Remember all those people claiming NASA faked it all? There’s an idea. Think of all the money they’d save by putting the diverse “astronauts” down in the Arizona desert for a few hours instead of the pointless exercise of sending them to the moon.

  50. Jack D says:

    multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024

    Really? Do the contracts specify this? No white men allowed on board? Not even a pretense that they are going to select the best person for the job regardless of race? I guess they don’t feel that they don’t have to hide it any more – that selection in America now is based on race and gender (again).

    • Replies: @Neuday
    , @Mr. Anon
    , @Gordo
  51. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It was extremely dull. Armstrong was a very modest man and not interested in being a hero. When he came back he accepted a teaching position in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Cincinnati. This does not lend itself well to movie treatment.

  52. Jack D says:
    @Daniel H

    They haven’t paid it yet. They will surely appeal and such excessive jury awards are almost always reduced on appeal.

  53. The Myth of Catherine Johnson

    The elimination of White Males in NASA History

    White Genocide is very real

  54. Who cares–Captain Kirk is going to outer space.

    Beam me up, Scotty!

  55. Neuday says:
    @Gordo

    You’d think that after the Challenger disaster NASA would think twice about putting making space flight a PR stunt.

    • Agree: Gordo, Old Prude
  56. Neuday says:
    @Jack D

    Not even a pretense that they are going to select the best person for the job regardless of race? I guess they don’t feel that they don’t have to hide it any more – that selection in America now is based on race and gender (again).

    Selecting the best person for the job is indistinguishable from White Supremacy, hence Affirmative Action.

  57. Mr. Anon says:
    @El Dato

    It’s not surprising. White people also engage in this kind of thing, and to a much greater degree. To a lot of liberals, space and space exploration has become some kind of religion.

  58. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack D

    multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024

    Really? Do the contracts specify this?

    No contracts are necessary. Artemis will be a NASA owned vehicle, and NASA makes the crew selection. And – yes – they will do it if they ever go (which is not a given). That formulation “first woman and first person of color” is in most every piece of NASA propaganda, both for external and internal consumption. Even the DoD and NASA, agencies we once thought relatively immune from wokeness, are becoming completely woke. And it started even before Brandon moved into that rest home on Pennsylvania Avenue.

  59. Gordo says:
    @Jack D

    There should be a trans person on board, we should campaign for that. Seriously.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  60. Conner says:

    Go back to the moon?

  61. @Peter Lund

    Germany is running out of Germans too.

    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
  62. Luke Lea says:

    Going to the moon again is risky. There is a huge downside for failure (another sign of America’s decline) but very little upside for success (repeating a half-century old feat).

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Jack D
  63. One involves competition between SpaceX and Blue Origin for multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024—the first human moon landings in a half century.

    That is only part of the mission. The other part is to remove the American flags left there by the Deplorables.

    “First Black Woman on the Moon” sounds like sarcasm to me, like “Black Wall Street.”

  64. Truth says:

    Is NASA Going Back to the Moon to Erase Stain of Only White Men Having Walked There?

    You mean going to the moon. One can’t go back somewhere he has never been.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  65. Alfa158 says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Julius is part of his family name. Like his other friends, I just call him by his first name, Gaius.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  66. Truth says:
    @Tom F.

    I can fairly well assure you that Armstong has molested more children than Jackson.

    • LOL: Tom F.
  67. res says:
    @Wilkey

    So what approach do you think NASA will take to check the diversity boxes? White woman and black man? Asian woman?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  68. Jack D says:
    @Luke Lea

    very little upside for success (repeating a half-century old feat)

    Steve has hit upon the explanation. We need to go back to the moon to erase the Stain of Whiteness. The Apollo program is tainted because it was done almost exclusively by white men, which puts the lie to the idea that white men NEED diversity in order to succeed. Hell, not only were they white men, some of them were ACTUAL Nazis.

    We can’t retcon history (although we can sure try – you see actually black people were the ones who got us to the moon but they were HIDDEN FIGURES – if you ask a school kid today who was the more important figure in the space program – Katherine Johnson or Wernher von Braun, the answer would be, who is Werner?) but the new images of a DIVERSE control room and women and blacks frolicking on the surface of the moon will replace those old terrible images of a control room filled with (almost) nothing but white men wearing white shirts and skinny ties.

    Of course, as you say, this has tremendous potential to backfire. But no worries, if it does, it’s not going to be portrayed as women and blacks not having the Right Stuff. It will be spun in a completely different fashion. It will be the fault of some white guy – Musk or Bezos. It will turn out that the mission failed because they were corrupt and had groped women and called blacks by the N-word.

    You know the Left has won (or thinks they have won) because they no longer even bother to hide their desire to literally remove white men from their pedestals.

    The biggest challenge will be to develop a helmet that does not interfere with the black lady astronauts hairdos.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @babu
  69. Alfa158 says:
    @Wilkey

    I think Steve is on to something, they do actually want to return to the moon for the specific purpose of erasing the disgrace of Apollo having been the accomplishment of a bunch of White men in ties, most of them smokers, and a few literally Nazis. There is no scientific or commercial reason for returning to the Moon unless we figure out in the next 50 years or so how to make fusion reactors that use Helium-3.

  70. Matttt says:
    @Neil Templeton

    Latin has dialects. In English Latin (including Law Latin and Medical Latin) his name is pronounced the way it’s normally heard. In Church Latin, it is pronounced Yioolioos Cheh-zar. In (reconstructed) Classical Latin, it’s pronounced as you say.

    Know your audience. If you’re talking about a legal document, use English Latin; if you’re praying or singing a song in Latin, use Church Latin; if you’re in an academic setting (except law or medical school), use Classical Latin.

  71. One involves competition between SpaceX and Blue Origin for multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts

    That kind of money can only mean that NASA intends to put a public school on the moon. The first, women moonwalkers will be credentialed babysitters.

    AD will be fine with that so long as those schools accept vouchers and aren’t overrun by Martian minoritarians.

  72. Anonymous[844] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    A single tiny piece of space debris travelling at high speed is all it would take. Or a sudden large solar flare. It won’t matter matter how good your engineering is.

    Imagine the PR disaster if the whole world gets to watch your black-female astronauts asphyxiate to death in HD.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    , @Cloudbuster
  73. Old Prude says:
    @Neil Templeton

    “NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon.”

    This is why I turn the channel or the page whenever I see or hear “The first {insert aggrieved non-white/and or homosexual} to do X…”

    Who is interested in anyone “accomplishing” something through entitlement. What would be so very special about these random females and POCs being picked to land on the moon just because they have a vagina and/or dark skin? Any random person, any old lady off the street, or Congolese refugee could do the task. Lame.

    “We didn’t pick the best for the landing because he had a pecker, the pecker-wood (and he wasn’t using it to bugger boys, another strike against him…).

    Oh, and who is going to shoot these lottery winners to the moon and bring them back home? A bunch of white guys…

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  74. Woman off to the Moon!

    Russians Too!

  75. @Anonymous

    Going to the moon is very dangerous. That nobody died in the original moonshots was very, very lucky.

    Yeah, lucky they didn’t actually go to the moon 😉

    • Replies: @El Dato
  76. @Tom F.

    Gil Scott Heron, complaining 51 years too soon. (2 min.)

    Because Whitey was looking up in sky in exuberance then, contemplating their great accomplishment.

    • Replies: @Tom F.
  77. @Anonymous

    Going to the moon with with the knowledge and materials that existed the better part of a century ago clearly wasn’t very dangerous since all nine of the manned Apollo missions came back intact. (Apollos 8 and 10 orbited, 11 and 12 landed, 13 had trouble but got home, and 14, 15, 16 and 17 landed.)

    More importantly (and surprisingly), all 27 of those men who left the protective magnetic layers of the earth’s atmosphere returned in perfect health. None of them developed at the time, or soon after, or ever, the cancerous lesions all over their bodies that one might expect to result from spending a period of a few days up to a week and a half in the full glare of the sun’s heat and all the universe’s radiation.

    So apparently those thick linen suits and half an inch of lead shielding Nasa used did the trick. Problem solved. They got all the important stuff right, the very first time around. (Good thing too, since the cameras were rolling and live! Yes, that was very, very lucky no one ever slipped down a ladder, or got a hole in a suit. No national embarrassments or tragedies while the world watched.)

    Which makes you wonder why they’re now having so much trouble – already at least a billion dollars’ worth – figuring out how to build the spacesuits for the next lunar mission. We know they already built them perfectly the first time, back before most people were ever born, since all 27 of those crewmen came back in flawless health. So what’s the big mystery? Why is replicating a feat that was achieved more than half a dozen times long ago such an immense challenge?

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/nasa-making-1-billion-space-210421075.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Peter Lund
  78. Walker65 says:
    @George Taylor

    That rocket looks like something on the cover of a 50’s sci-fi magazine. It’t the culmination of a dream that goes way back.

  79. Jack D says:
    @res

    It depends on whether the crew will actually have to (or have the ability to) fly the ship – if it can all be done by remote control then they can diverse it up as much as they want. If someone has to be on board who is actually competent then they will include at least 1 white man.

    As I mentioned before, they don’t even bother to hide that the main purpose of this mission is to “land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon”. It is literally the first thing that they say on their web page:

    https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis/

    Apollo was the White Man’s Moon Mission. This is the Women and People of Color’s Moon Mission. No attempt to hide this – they are proud of it.

    Here is the initial team:

    https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis-team/

    They have said that at least 1 of the two who land on the moon will be a woman – maybe a black woman as a twofer. I’m betting the other one will be a white guy in case anything goes wrong.

  80. Jack D says:
    @Alfa158

    I call him “Guy” for short.

  81. El Dato says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The landing was overly dramatic though, also with the huge crater out of a lovecraftian moon fantasy.

  82. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    The biggest challenge will be to develop a helmet that does not interfere with the black lady astronauts hairdos.

    You had those huge helmet in “Alien” and “Outland”. Those should do the trick.

    Interesting that the lone black guy in the mining town actually turned out to be Judas.

    • Replies: @Tom F.
    , @Jack D
  83. babu says:

    From the great Gil Scott-Heron:

    A rat done bit my sister Nell.
    (with Whitey on the moon)
    Her face and arms began to swell.
    (and Whitey’s on the moon)
    I can’t pay no doctor bill.
    (but Whitey’s on the moon)
    Ten years from now I’ll be payin’ still.
    (while Whitey’s on the moon)
    The man jus’ upped my rent las’ night.
    (’cause Whitey’s on the moon)
    No hot water, no toilets, no lights.
    (but Whitey’s on the moon)
    I wonder why he’s uppi’ me?
    (’cause Whitey’s on the moon?)
    I was already payin’ ‘im fifty a week.
    (with Whitey on the moon)
    Taxes takin’ my whole damn check,
    Junkies makin’ me a nervous wreck,
    The price of food is goin’ up,
    An’ as if all that shit wasn’t enough
    A rat done bit my sister Nell.
    (with Whitey on the moon)
    Her face an’ arm began to swell.
    (but Whitey’s on the moon)
    Was all that money I made las’ year
    (for Whitey on the moon?)
    How come there ain’t no money here?
    (Hm! Whitey’s on the moon)
    Y’know I jus’ ’bout had my fill
    (of Whitey on the moon)
    I think I’ll sen’ these doctor bills,
    Airmail special
    (to Whitey on the moon)

  84. babu says:
    @Jack D

    It can never backfire. On the movie set everything is preplanned and then edited.

  85. Tom F. says:
    @El Dato

    You had those huge helmet in “Alien” and “Outland”. Those should do the trick.

    I like the way you think. ‘Alien’ (1979) helmet was ‘borrowed with the best intentions’ by ‘Outland’ (1981). ‘Alien 4: Resurrection’ (1997) then borrowed ‘Outland’s’ trick of ‘save yourself by breaking the glass and having the bad guy sucked out into the vacuum of space.’

    Would love to see a mash-up with ‘Predator’ falling in love with the black lady hair dids, and the female Predators get weaves and purple bejewled nails.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  86. Jack D says:
    @Sam Malone

    Yes, that was very, very lucky no one ever slipped down a ladder, or got a hole in a suit. No national embarrassments or tragedies while the world watched.)

    It was not luck. They picked the fittest, most qualified people in America thru a very rigorous process and then they had them practice the hell out of what they would be doing.

    Heinlein wrote:

    “Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded — here and there, now and then — are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.

    This is known as “bad luck.”

    If things go tits up (literally) the next time we go to the moon, it will be due to “bad luck” of exactly this sort.

  87. Jack D says:
    @Gordo

    Forget about transgender. They don’t even say that there will be gay people on the moon along with women and People of Color. What an insult to the LBGTXYZABC! community. Write your Congressperson!

  88. Tom F. says:
    @Joe Stalin

    Because Whitey was looking up in sky in exuberance then, contemplating their great accomplishment.

    Yes. Ultimate apartheid.

  89. Jack D says:
    @El Dato

    Movie space helmets have to have big, clear windows on the front so you can see the actor’s emotions. 90% of movie acting is done thru facial expressions. If you can’t see the facial expressions then you don’t have a movie.

    Reality:

    Hollywood:

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Joe Stalin
  90. Are they going to use the convertible?

  91. @Wilkey

    Shatner was disappointed he didn’t bump into any hot green chicks on that mission.

    • Replies: @Tom F.
  92. @Jack D

    Oh but it was luck – great luck – that nothing at all ever went wrong while the cameras were rolling during all those many missions. Mankind’s very first expeditions to another planetoid, and they were confident enough to be broadcasting live to the whole world! What certainty they possessed that nothing embarrassing or tragic would happen, even though here on earth even the fittest, most qualified people in America sometimes can slip or trip through no fault of their own.

    On the moon, in those bulky suits in low gravity, even the smallest of accidents or mildest of injuries could have left an astronaut asphyxiating. Or the most unlikely of mechanical problems could have prevented the lander from taking back off. But no, not even any minor problems or tiny moments of embarrassment. What luck those missions all had, and how lucky that Nasa knew it would be prudent to broadcast them in real time.

    And it was most definitely luck that the thick linen suits they wore and the tiny amount of lead shielding in their craft turned out to be entirely sufficient to guard against a week or more’s exposure to all the sun’s heat and all the universe’s radiation. Even more lucky considering that 1969-1972 coincided with the sun’s 11 year cycle of increased radiation emission. But none of those 27 men who left the atmosphere’s protective magnetic layers came back with cancers on their face, or cancer anywhere, and none of them died in the next few years, in fact they all maintained their health and died old men. It was almost like they never went, that’s how good those linen suits were!

    But now they’re having such trouble figuring out how to construct suits to safely contain the next astronauts.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @Joe Stalin
  93. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    Yeah, but, why not try to adapt them for real life?

    If you need to accomodate big hair as a requirement?

  94. Kgaard says:
    @Just another serf

    The movie “American Moon” from 2017 is very compelling, proposing that the US did not go to the moon the first time around. Some of the arguments in the movie seem airtight. It’s worth the 2-hour time investment.

  95. @Jack D

    Sorry, I didn’t realize my first version of this comment had gone through – the site told me I needed to wait, so I refined it in the meantime. I’m going to post this one anyway, since it’s better worded and more complete.

    Oh, but it was luck that their linen suits and their crafts’ tiny amount of lead shielding turned out to be entirely sufficient to fully protect human beings* against a week or more of exposure to all the sun’s heat and all the universe’s radiation. Even more luck is added in when you consider that 1969-1972 coincided with the sun’s 11 year cycle of increased radiation emission.

    None of those 27 men who exited low earth orbit, passed through the heavy radiation fields of the Van Allen Belts, and then entirely left the protective covering of the atmosphere’s magnetic layers came back with cancers on their face, or cancers anywhere, nor over the following months or years did any of them develop cancer or die early deaths. They all arrived back in good health with cheery smiles and went on to die old men. It was almost as if they’d never left the protected area of low earth orbit, that’s how good those linen suits turned out to be!

    But now in 2021, even after a billion-dollar 15-year program to construct suits to safely contain the next lunar astronauts, Nasa says it still is having trouble. How can that be, when we know that whatever they came up with in the late 1960s worked perfectly. Manned missions with a total of 27 crewmen circled the moon on nine different occasions – Nasa can’t say that it doesn’t have a large enough pool of data. And it can’t say that space or the moon have changed since December 1972. They solved all the problems back then.

    And it most definitely was luck – the greatest of luck – that nothing at all went wrong while the cameras were rolling during all those many missions. Mankind’s very first expeditions to another planetoid, and they were confident enough to be broadcasting live to the whole world! What certainty they must have possessed that nothing embarrassing or tragic would happen, though even on earth even the fittest, most qualified people in America are perfectly capable of sometimes slipping or tripping or suffering a small mishap, often through no fault of their own.

    On the moon even the smallest of accidents or mildest of injuries by just one of astronauts could easily have produced a horrific spectacle. Or the most unlikely of mechanical problems could have prevented the lander from taking back off. But no, never on the surface of the moon did even a minor problem or moment of embarrassment occur. Just men singing ‘lalala’ as the skipped merrily (yes, really) in between driving cars and hitting golf balls. What luck, and how lucky that Nasa knew it would be prudent to broadcast much of the missions in real time.

    * Humans evolved to live only on the earth’s surface, and as soon as we leave there it becomes clear what an incredibly delicate and sensitive organism we are, and how dependent we are on a specific and narrow range of environmental factors. For example, this is why pilots and stewardesses who fly frequently over many years have long been known to be at greater risk of developing skin cancer – the atmosphere at those altitudes provides less protection from space and solar radiation. Even ON earth, we all know we can be harmed by too much exposure to solar radiation if we don’t wear sunscreen. Yet none of the 27 men said to have left low earth orbit suffered any visible or reported health effects. Yes, those were some lucky linen suits.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  96. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    Not this shit again.

    Going to the moon with with the knowledge and materials that existed the better part of a century ago clearly wasn’t very dangerous since all nine of the manned Apollo missions came back intact.

    That’s the exact same thinking error that lead to double Shuttle loss. From a random short good run: derive system reliability. NOPE. Please revise basic assumptions. Do not go into high-stakes engineering before that.

    13 had trouble but got home

    By sheer luck. IIRC if they had done course correction half an hour before the incident, it would have been all over.

    So apparently those thick linen suits and half an inch of lead shielding Nasa used did the trick.

    Apparently you are under the delusion that space is highly radioactive. Well, there definitely was no “lead shielding”, that’s not how it is done (you want aluminum, or polyethylene shielding, which doesn’t shower you with secondary radiation, although it doesn’t work all that well). I fact. just don’t do shielding. Just get through the Van Allen belt quickly, do the trip when the sun isn’t flaring and just accept cosmic radiation as the cost of business. Don’t stay too long outside Earth’s magnetosphere. Voilà. That’s also why long trips to Mars are going to be a bit problematic, complete with radiation safe spaces that need to be carried along at great cost, and once on mars you are not even proteced by any planetary magentic field or atmosphere. Sucks. In fact, as no-one knows what cosmic radiation over extended periods does to a human body, except that it will wreck it hard, it’s going to be interesting.

    We know they already built them perfectly the first time

    Nothing in those things was “perfect”, they were one-shot contraptions in which you could barely move wround. It worked at the time but that’s all.

    Why is replicating a feat that was achieved more than half a dozen times long ago such an immense challenge?

    It’s the basic difference between doing a “moonshot” running on Rube Goldberg devices that is actually secretly a russian roulette and doing something reliably, controllably and repeatably that you don’t want to blow up every second week.

    And that’s even before management problems come into it.

    What’s why the moon hoax people? They are even worse than all the people who became suddenly virologists and specialists in human immunitary response in the last 2 years while perusing the Internet from the toilet seat. Because that space engineering stuff can readily obtained and is not in flux or in any way uncertain.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  97. @The Alarmist

    All white men to the back of the photo, make way for women and minorities. That’s what this picture is implying.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  98. @Jack D

    If you can’t see the facial expressions then you don’t have a movie.

    Which is why all those Hollywood helmets have lights inside to illuminate the face for the camera!

  99. “One small strep for a man, one giant grippe for mankind.”

  100. Anonymous[110] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tom F.

    Those helmets were designed by famous French cartoonist Moebius.

    There was a lot of talent in Scott’s little B-movie.

  101. Rob McX says:
    @Sam Malone

    But now they’re having such trouble figuring out how to construct suits to safely contain the next astronauts.

    We’re gonna need a bigger suit.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  102. G. Poulin says:
    @Anonymous

    I dunno, could be entertaining to see how each actornaut responds to the disaster. The gay guy will be screaming hysterically, the feminist will be blaming the patriarchy, and the black guy will be looting the supplies. Oops, wait … I’m perpetuating negative stereotypes again. Shame on me.

  103. Old Prude says:
    @Old Prude

    If the ladies or negroes built their own rockets and shot them to the moon and back, I would be impressed. That ain’t NEVER gonna happen. Ever.

    If the Chinese have their act together, they would include a Chinese woman on their lunar landing, and stiff NASA thier beloved DIE mission.

  104. Jack D says:
    @Rob McX

    PAYPAL ME

    ASHLEIGHTHELION

    It’s funny, Ashleigh reminds me of some African jungle beast, but it’s not a lion.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  105. Jack D says:
    @Sam Malone

    But now in 2021, even after a billion-dollar 15-year program to construct suits to safely contain the next lunar astronauts, Nasa says it still is having trouble.

    Guess they are going to need another billion. Just for the space suits. What a shame. Hey, isn’t space a kind of “infrastructure”?

    You’re right. See the issue is this – white men, especially back in those days, were expendable. It was nothing for a few thousand of them to be machine gunned on some beach in Normandy or on a Pacific island on a single day. They’d send your mom a telegram and she’d put a gold star in her front window and that was that. So if they got cancer from space sooner than they would have gotten it from smoking two packs of unfiltered Lucky Strikes a day, no big deal.

    But women and People of Color are precious. Sometimes they are even named Precious, that’s how precious they are. Black Lives Matter! (except when other black people are killing them, but put that aside). If a single black life were to come to an end while he or she was in the hands of the Man as a result of a defective space suit, then there would be many Peaceful Demonstrations as well as a very large settlement for that person’s family. So they have to be real extra careful when they build these new space suits.

    Also, if you google Nasa “diversity and inclusion”, you’ll get 800,000 hits. What they aren’t telling you is that it is \$100 million to actually work on the space suits and \$900 million for the Diversity Coordinators.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
  106. @Anonymous

    Amen ; brother ! South African ” power ” put forth to the whole world to see !

  107. @Sam Malone

    Oh but it was luck – great luck – that nothing at all ever went wrong while the cameras were rolling during all those many missions. Mankind’s very first expeditions to another planetoid, and they were confident enough to be broadcasting live to the whole world!

    Apollo 12 was the first mission to use the color camera on the lunar surface. About 42 minutes into telecasting the first EVA, astronaut Alan Bean inadvertently pointed the camera at the Sun while preparing to mount it on the tripod. The Sun’s extreme brightness burned out the video pickup tube, rendering the camera useless. When the camera was returned to Earth, it was shipped to Westinghouse, and they were able to get an image on the section of the tube that wasn’t damaged.[38] Procedures were re-written in order to prevent such damage in the future, including the addition of a lens cap to protect the tube when the camera was repositioned off the MESA.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_TV_camera

  108. jamie b. says:
    @Kgaard

    And aliens built the pyramids.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/10/10/virginia-community-college-name-change-race/

    It’s truly sad that some people can’t accept the simple but wonderful fact that humans are capable of greatness.

    • Replies: @jamie b.
  109. Pretty cool detective work!

  110. @Jack D

    Could’ve made the meager Donner Party a feast.

  111. It’s too bad that sending mass to the moon is so darn expensive.

    There’s a lot of people–for instance everyone who put a BLM yard sign–whom i’d like to send to the moon. But sending them all is prohibitively expensive. However …. Africa is within budget!

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  112. One involves competition between SpaceX and Blue Origin for multibillion-dollar NASA Artemis contracts to take the first woman and first person of color to the moon by 2024—the first human moon landings in a half century.

    There’s zero chance they’ll be planting the rainbow flag on the moon in 2024.

  113. ziggurat says:
    @PiltdownMan

    It is a great documentary. I think it’s still playing at my local museum. Maybe I’ll watch it again this weekend. It was really that good.

  114. @Jack D

    So the WWII generation running Nasa viewed the lunar astronauts as more or less expendable? Got any evidence of that? Did the top-flight astronauts selected know they were in on that deal too?

    The purpose of the moon landings was primarily political, to inspire a world audience and demonstrate that the American way of life could produce tangible achievements to match and exceed the Soviet Union’s. That purpose would have been defeated by live broadcasts of the astronauts meeting tragedy on the surface of the moon or at any point in the mission. So your claim here that actually safety never really mattered anyway and it wasn’t crucial for the crews to survive is obviously flimsy and insincere.

    It’s a flippant attempt to distract from my main point, which you can’t answer, suggesting that the unfailing run of luck those nine manned lunar missions had in taking 27 men beyond the safety of low earth orbit and brining them all back alive in perfect health which then held for decades deserves more scrutiny.

  115. @Cloudbuster

    Alright, that’s about all of this maudlin astronaut worship I can take. The moon landings were a brazen fake as anyone with a brain should realize. The fastest path to reality is to watch the Apollo 11 press conference on Youtube. Collins says in answer to a question, “I don’t remember ever seeing stars.” Think about this. Space station astronauts rave about how bright and colorful the stars are in space, but these guys couldn’t even see them on the dark side of the moon. They had to say this to cover for not taking a single photo of stars from the moon or deep space. That’s because the technology to fake a stellar view didn’t exist.
    And look at the astronauts body language during this press conference. The conquering heros were looking down, staring at their hands and generally looking like schoolboys caught peeking at the girls’ bathroom. Don’t take my word for, watch the video. For the rest of his life, on the few times Armstrong could be persuaded to talk publicly, he could barely keep from crying. I’d cry too if I knew I’d go down in history as the world’s greatest liar. 200 billion in today’s money, most of it stolen. Just like Vietnam, just like Afghanistan, a “great and shining lie”.

  116. “NASA: We’re sending a white woman and a black man to the moon.”

    Great. The first zero-gravity rape in space.

  117. El Dato says:
    @Neil Templeton

    While I enjoyed the extravagance of putting Spaceman in a Tesla roadster on a one-way trip to the asteroid belt, it was redolent of cultured decadence. Prowess and decadence: Prowadence??

    Survival of the Richest: The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind

    Ultimately, according to the technosolutionist orthodoxy, the human future climaxes by uploading our consciousness to a computer or, perhaps better, accepting that technology itself is our evolutionary successor. Like members of a gnostic cult, we long to enter the next transcendent phase of our development, shedding our bodies and leaving them behind, along with our sins and troubles.

    The mental gymnastics required for such a profound role reversal between humans and machines all depend on the underlying assumption that humans suck. Let’s either change them or get away from them, forever.

    Thus, we get tech billionaires launching electric cars into space — as if this symbolizes something more than one billionaire’s capacity for corporate promotion. And if a few people do reach escape velocity and somehow survive in a bubble on Mars — despite our inability to maintain such a bubble even here on Earth in either of two multibillion-dollar Biosphere trials — the result will be less a continuation of the human diaspora than a lifeboat for the elite.

  118. @El Dato

    The profile called for a 25-degree dive (the average airliner’s glide slope is inclined about three degrees) and an airspeed of 330 mph, with thrust at idle power and landing gear, flaps, and speed brakes all fully extended. The idea was to land a fast-moving machine from which the will to fly had been largely removed.

    During one approach, according to the official Air Force summary, “the aircraft contacted the runway left of centerline, approximately 2,200 feet from the approach end. Both main gears collapsed on the runway on first contact, and the canopy shattered. The fuselage dragged on the runway for 214 feet before the aircraft again became airborne. It subsequently touched down at the 4,000 foot mark, veered to the left and departed the runway at the 4,235 foot mark.” Its underside blazing from the first impact, the F-104 veered off the runway and began to come apart. Both pilots ejected. Royer, badly injured, survived. Lawrence got out, but his parachute failed to deploy fully.

    The two men were preparing for a new era in which pilots—military pilots—would take the high ground of space. Lawrence already was among a small cadre of exceptional fighter pilots training to be the first Air Force astronauts. If things had gone according to plan, they would have lived and worked aboard the space station well before any NASA astronaut or Russian cosmonaut set foot inside a Skylab or Salyut.

    https://www.airspacemag.com/space/a-sudden-loss-of-altitude-14456179/?page=1

    Royer died last year at 83.

    https://www.villagenews.com/story/2020/10/22/community/harvey-john-royer/63826.html

  119. Old Prude says:
    @El Dato

    ” perusing the Internet from the toilet seat.” LOL.

  120. @Sick 'n Tired

    Notice too that those of apparent European descent are, at least from their perspective, on the left wing of the group.

  121. @El Dato

    It would have been funnier if you had said, “OMG, we’re not going there again, are we?”

    I’ll be satisfied we put men on the moon as soon as NASA complies with Rep. Shiela Jackson Lee’s request to have the Mars rover roll on over to the site to prove it.

  122. @AnotherDad

    However …. Africa is within budget!

    Do we send them ballistically (expensive), or would it suffice to palletize them and use LAPES?

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
  123. @Kgaard

    This question isn’t just for you but for all the moon landing conspiracists coming out of the woodwork: Truth, Just another serf, babu, The Alarmist, Sam Malone, etc. …

    If we never went to the moon, who put the laser retroreflectors there? Why do the present day’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s photos clearly show the moon landing sites of the Apollo program? Or is all that faked too? Or is the LRO real but the photos of the Apollo sites are fake? If the LRO is real and it is possible to send an orbiter around the moon, then why is it not possible to add men and a lander to an orbiter? Were the Soviet lunar projects faked as well? If not, why did the Soviets succeed while the US failed? Are all space flights fake, or just ones to the moon? Where exactly do credible and legitimate space flights end and fake and counterfeit ones begin? Ranger? Pioneer? Mariner? Voyager? Mercury? Gemini? Soyuz (1967)? Shenzhou (2003)? Crew Dragon (2020)? The International Space Station (2000)? The Tiangong Space Station (2021)? Vostok (1961–1963)? Voskhod (1964–1965)? The Space Shuttle (1981–2011)? Salyut (1971–1986)? Almaz (1974–1977)? Skylab (1973–1974)? Mir (1986–2000)? Tiangong (2012-2016)?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_crewed_spacecraft

    • Replies: @Truth
  124. I read that George Takei has expressed his consternation that the straight William Shatner was sent into space. Sulu want’s to be the first elderly gay Japanese-American who was on the first Star Trek to walk on the moon.

  125. Truth says:
    @Almost Missouri

    If we never went to the moon, who put the laser retroreflectors there?

    LOL, the LARGEST of these things is approximately 4′ by 2′ Old Sport.

    Why do the present day’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s photos clearly show the moon landing sites of the Apollo program? Or is all that faked too?

    Ok, you answered that question, and all of your subsequent questions as well. Not bad.

    Hey, just let an old drunk, explain it…

    Or a less-old, drunk…

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  126. @Sparkylyle92

    The surface of the Moon is brown, not gray.

    (You can google true color photos and videos from Soviet, Chinese or even NASA’s own robotic missions and see for yourself.)

    So yes, the Apollo missions were brazen fakes. (Though they did, most likely, put some classified drones on the moon; most likely of the classified military variety. Of course ICBM’s nullified any military advantage space travel ever had, so we’re not going back there ever.)

  127. Jack D says:
    @Sam Malone

    Why did they stop faking when it came to the shuttle?

    Another theory is that no one died (other than the Apollo 1 astronauts on the ground) in the moon program because, although risky, they were also highly competent (and in the case of Apollo 13, capable of improvising) but by the time of the shuttle we were no longer at peak competence and NASA was being run by bureaucratic ass coverers who were more concerned with PR (“send a school teacher to space”) than with safety.

  128. @Truth

    the LARGEST of these things is approximately 4′ by 2′

    So, … 4′ by 2′ things just sprout there by themselves?

    Or is all that faked too?

    Ok, you answered that question, and all of your subsequent questions as well.

    Okay, if you believe every space launch is fake, at what point do you believe the fakery starts? Orbit? Edge of the atmosphere? The launchpad? If I watched a rocket launch from Cape Canaveral, what was I seeing? If the rocket didn’t go into space, where did it go? Was it all a mass hallucination? Holographic projection? Since no one has ever created a such a holographic projection, why grab Occam’s Butterknife when all the component technologies of space flight exist?

    BTW, do you use GPS? How does that work if there are no GPS satellites in space? Even if you don’t use it, how does everyone else use it, without satellites? (In fact you do use it whether or not you realize it, every time you take an Uber, get a delivery, hear a traffic report, etc.)

    let an old drunk, explain it

    I don’t know if Buzz is drunk, but he’s answering the question of “Why did nobody go to the moon in such a long time?” by agreeing with the premise: “‘because we didn’t [go to the moon in such a long time]”, which he says is his question too. He probably knows perfectly well that the answer is that we didn’t go for such a long time because the government chose the Gil Scott-Heron course over the Werner von Braun course, but he also knows perfectly well that he can’t say that out loud, so instead his mind just goes into Crimestop reset mode.

    Or a less-old, drunk…

    Not sure how Don Pettit’s statement is supposed to prove your point. He’s saying the same thing I am saying: we had the capability, but we destroyed it. Unlike Buzz, his Crimestop merely makes him say “technology” rather than “human capital” to avoid being too clear about what the problem is, but the meaning is about the same.

    • Replies: @Truth
    , @Old Prude
  129. @The Alarmist

    That´s sooo 20th century – PADS is the name of the game (GPS-guided parafoil)

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  130. @Kgaard

    The movie “American Moon” from 2017 is very compelling, proposing that the US did not go to the moon the first time around.

    I assumed the creators of American Moon were implying that ALL the moon landings were faked. That assumption led me to question the author’s suggestion that the fraud arose from NASA’s eventual recognition that this just wasn’t possible. That’s almost a slightly acceptable reason for the fakery, given the decade of hype leading up to the deadline.

    But it sure doesn’t explain the subsequent faked landings. NASA and the government generally could have come up with a million reasons not to continue the program after the initial fabrication. Your thoughts or correction on my assumption? Thanks

  131. @Sam Malone

    the unfailing run of luck those nine manned lunar missions had in taking 27 men beyond the safety of low earth orbit and brining them all back alive in perfect health which then held for decades

    The Apollo program started in 1961. In 1967 they lost three men in the Apollo 1 fire. The program ended five years later. I’m not sure three deaths in eleven years is “an unfailing run of luck”. And this excludes the deaths such as those of Theodore C. Freeman, Charles Bassett, Elliot See, Clifton Williams, Michael J. Adams, and Robert H. Lawrence Jr. who were all killed during the Apollo program in ancillary projects (training and experimental flights), who were Apollo astronaut candidates had they lived. Including them, it would be at least nine deaths in eleven years. By contrast, the Soviets only lost four or five men in ten years, depending how you count, but then they never landed anyone on the moon.

    Or if you want to limit it to just famous deaths, I guess you could say that there were no deaths during the actual moon landing part of Apollo, but that’s just 1969-1972, so yes, it was a lucky run, but only for three years. The Space Shuttle program lost 14 astronauts in thirty years, but then you could say that the the first five years had an “unfailing run of luck”, and then 1988-2002 was a fourteen year “unfailing run of luck”, and then 2005-2011 was a six year “unfailing run of luck”. So depending how you frame it, three years of luck doesn’t look all that extraordinary.

    By the way, all of NASA’s prominent disasters (Apollo in 1967, Challenger in 1986, and Columbia in 2003) were on the Florida launchpad in late January. Cape Canaveral’s peculiar January humidity and freezing conditions definitely contributed to the latter two disasters (frozen O-ring, and ice damage to thermal tiles), while while electrical arcing on ethylene glycol antifreeze contributed to the former. So arguably, NASA could have saved all seventeen lives just by staying off the launchpad in late January, but that probably sounds too much like astrology to them (Beware the Ides of January!).

  132. @Sparkylyle92

    Same question for you as for the others: if the moon landings were fake, what is real?

  133. Truth says:
    @Almost Missouri

    My Friend, I could go point for point on this, but it’s absolutely ridic. and I have done it too many times.

    Pettit; We can’t recreate 1962 technology…

    WHAT FUCKING 1960’s TECHNOLOGY CAN’T BE RECREATED IN 2021?!?!

    Motorcyle Builder: “I’d really like to build a two-stroke engine”

    Another one: “Yeah that would be great, but all the Suzuki Water Buffalos are gone.”

    And you post a full picture of the moon which has a radius of 1,079 miles, and you see objects that are two feet by four feet on it? Dude, use your head.

    See ya.

  134. Old Prude says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Hey, Near Mo, don’t waste your time arguing with these no landing dopes. El Dato said it best: They are sitting on the john, key board in one hand, the other doing lord knows what, having a great time riding their hobby horse. You are just feeding their passions.

    OK fellas, you are right. The moon is made of cheese. Brie. The lander would have gotten stuck. QED.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  135. @nokangaroos

    Yeah, I’m a throwback to another generation. JPADS might be too gentle to make the point that we don’t want recidivists, we really don’t need much standoff in the home countries from where most of these folks come, and we really don’t need to worry much about dispersion of delivery.

    • Agree: nokangaroos
  136. @Old Prude

    don’t waste your time arguing with these no landing dopes.

    Yeah, I should have left Truth off the list since he’s merely a low IQ troll, but some of the other commenters have said interesting and intelligent things in the past. So I’m not really arguing with them; I just want to understand how an otherwise intelligent person believes something that is (to me) obviously absurd. You know, like where is the dividing line, where does reason end?

    It would be the same for me if a respected friend claimed to have been abducted by aliens. I wouldn’t argue against him (“No, you weren’t abducted by aliens, here are five reasons why!”), I would just want to learn how he came to this absurd (to me) belief, are there other jarring beliefs he has, do they have anything in common, etc. But apparently none of them want to say. Even in Truth’s case, he may not be particularly bright, but there is something likeable about him.

    • Replies: @Truth
  137. Nasa will never get back to the moon because they’re a shadow of their former self. 50 years ago, when only the smartest white men were hired to do the work, Nasa was one of the most high-tech and respected organizations in the world. Today, the white men who work there are more concerned with the color of their toenail polish than they are about doing any real work. Their lesbian ground crews are dreaming about what overalls they’re going to wear to the lesbian ball and the LGBTQ’s can’t decide what pronouns they want to be referred to the following week. No serious work can come out of such an organization which probably won’t exist a few years from today.

  138. Truth says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Yeah, I should have left Truth off the list since he’s merely a low IQ troll, but some of the other commenters have said interesting and intelligent things in the past.

    (LOL; let’s talk about someone while he’s in the room and pretend we aren’t talking to him. My stepmom used to do that when I was nine, great memories).

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  139. epebble says:
    @El Dato

    If you see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Launch_System#Funding

    They have only funded \$21.2 Billion (nominal) over 2011-2021 = \$23 B Present. At this rate, there won’t be a lunar landing till at least 2031. With the crises of 2020-21, there is even more budgetary pressure and the most likely path for the program is it may get cancelled in favor of a private sector project. May be SpaceX Starship.

  140. @Truth

    I should have left Truth off the list … but there is something likeable about him.

    (LOL; let’s talk about someone while he’s in the room and pretend we aren’t talking to him. My stepmom used to do that when I was nine, great memories).

    Lol. See what I mean?

  141. @Sparkylyle92

    Lol

    The aggressive idiocy of moon landing deniers is endlessly amusing.

  142. @Anonymous

    Imagine the PR disaster? I dunno, let’s ask Christa McAuliffe.

  143. @Sam Malone

    No, current space suits are actually pretty bad. It’s very hard to move inside them, especially if the astronauts need to use their fingers. They often end up with bleeding finger tips and missing nails.

    The problem here is the pressure differential between the inside and the outside of the suit. If we could make suits that didn’t change the internal volume no matter how the joints were moved, this problem would be gone. One way to compensate for the current poor suits is to use a lower internal pressure — which usually means the air the astronauts breathe has to be more or less pure oxygen, which in itself is bad. You can either run the entire space station/mission on that atmosphere or you can have your astronauts change to a “spacesuit atmosphere” before going out, both of which are problematic.

    (“Power steering” for the fingers might be a solution instead of using constant volume joints. Constant volume joins for the arms and legs are more or less a solved problem, I believe.)

    Another thing is that getting in and out of a suit is a slow and cumbersome affair, both on the ground and in space, and it is often a two-man job.

    A third thing is that they cost to much to produce.

    SpaceX properly has a solution more or less in place, at much lower cost than NASA. That might be why Elon Musk suggested they make them cheaper when the news of the billion dollar space suits came out.

  144. Well, most of the SLS is being built in Huntsville Alabama which is 30 percent black. May you, the metro area voted for Trump 8 percent. SLS is the system to go to the moon, and yes, they want a person of color this time because of Joe Blow Biden.

  145. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Malone

    So the WWII generation running Nasa viewed the lunar astronauts as more or less expendable? Got any evidence of that? Did the top-flight astronauts selected know they were in on that deal too?

    Yes. They were (almost) all veteran combat pilots. They knew it was dangerous. Mike Collins said that he figured his chances of returning were maybe 50%. He left the astronaut corps almost as soon as he returned to Earth. Mike Mullane, also a combat veteran (F-4 back-seater in Vietnam) and a shuttle astronaut wrote that he was scared s**tless every time he flew (especially on launch). When he stepped on the tarmac in Florida after his third and last flight he knelt down and kissed the ground knowing that he would never have to go into space again.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
$
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Commenting Disabled While in Translation Mode
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
The Hidden Information in Our Government Archives
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
How America was neoconned into World War IV