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Is Mexican Mediocrity a Defense Against a Mass Influx of Gringo Retirees?
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Despite Mexico’s problems, it does not suffer, objectively, from Tragic Dirt. It’s not Mali, it’s one of the nicer pieces of landscape on earth due to much of it being at enough altitude to mitigate its tropical latitude. But Mexicans don’t seem all that intent on maximizing the potential of their homeland through civic-minded improvements.

I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico. In 1967, I visited with my parents the Lake Chapala colony of American retirees (where Fred Reed lives). So the idea of retiring to Mexico has been around for a long time.

In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.

Here’s an article by an aging American surfer girl who semi-retired to Mazatlan in Mexico in 2006. She lives on $1200 per month.

She doesn’t mention crime, which exploded in Mexico in 2007 when the PAN government declared war on the cartels. Mazatlan, which seemed pretty safe when I was there in 1982, is in Sinaloa, which has been bad news for the last 14 years. But the article is otherwise informative. From CNBC:

64-year-old retiree who left the U.S. for Mexico: 7 downsides of living in a beach town for $1,200 per month

Published Tue, Apr 6 202111:01 AM EDTUpdated Wed, Apr 7 20219:25 PM EDT
Janet Blaser
@WHYWELEFTAMERICA

Janet Blaser moved to Mazatlán, Mexico in 2006, after falling in love with the beach town during a vacation

… I have absolutely no regrets. I wanted an adventure, and boy, am I having one!

But there are challenges.

1. The weather can get really hot and humid …

2. Unbelievably high noise levels

If you’ve been to Mexico, you know that noise levels are often through the roof. Speaking of roofs, in many towns, “watchdogs” are kept there, and they bark all the time — at nothing or at everything.

In many parts of Mexico, people keep dogs on their rooftops, both as a kind of early warning system and for convenience.

I can remember walking through a residential neighborhood in Acapulco late at night in 1979 and one dog started barking and you could hear the dogs barking spread block by block until you could hear dogs over a radius of about a mile barking.

And then there are the parties, for birthdays, quinceneras, religious and other holidays. Often these events include rented speakers as big as refrigerators set up in the street in front of their (and your) house. You might find your street blocked by a bounce house or funeral memorial for a day … or three.

Strolling musicians are common and can be lovely, but sometimes you might prefer a quiet conversation at dinner or listening to waves at the beach instead of a 10-piece, horn-heavy band.

In Mazatlán, open-air taxis, called pulmonias, have gigantic sound systems with speakers that blast music as they make their way through the neighborhoods. While ostensibly there are city sound ordinances, they’re rarely, if ever, enforced.

What to do? Pack earplugs.

3. Expect some disappointments when shopping …

4. Figuring out the norms
No matter how long you live in another country, you’ll always be, at heart, a native of wherever you’re from, and so there are layers upon layers of unrealized cultural norms just waiting to be discovered.

Being an immigrant is a constant lesson in humility and often embarrassment. It can be little things like shopping etiquette, when and how much to tip, where to park, or more significant things that can cause offense or problems.

This article would have made the NYT instead of CNBC if it was instead about how awful gringos are to Mexican immigrants by expecting them to know American norms.

Trash pick-up is one example. In most Mexican towns, garbage is simply piled on certain street corners in whatever plastic bags or boxes one has handy. No one “oversees” the process, and it’s often a sticky, stinky mess. Why don’t they use garbage cans? Don’t ask.

Mail is also notoriously unreliable, and utility and other companies hire their own couriers to deliver monthly bills. Property taxes often must be paid in person at a bank or city office.

Bewildering and frustrating to Americans, but normal life for the locals.

5. The language thing

Unless you speak Spanish fluently, communication may be challenging. In cities with expat populations or lots of tourism, many locals will speak English. But it behooves you to at least learn some Spanish if you really want to assimilate into your new community. …

Seems fair. There are various foreign countries where a huge fraction of the population speaks the global superlanguage of English, but Mexico isn’t one of them. Mexicans like Spanish and don’t mind not being world-class in language.

6. Trash, littering and other environmental issues

Every time Tucker Carlson mentions that Latino immigrants litter a lot, he almost gets canceled. The Woke are aghast that anyone could possible imagine that Mexicans tend to litter more.

In Mazatlán, unfortunately, littering is alive and well. People throw trash out the windows of busses and cars, leave piles of it on the beaches, use plastics like there’s no tomorrow. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve sat on my surfboard watching empty potato chip bags and Styrofoam plates swirl by. (My weekends include a couple of hours cleaning up my favorite beach.)

There are no vehicle emission requirements, and a pinkish-grey haze of pollution often sits on the horizon.

Smog in Mexico City was horrific until the 2000s when NAFTA allowed American used cars with catalytic converters to be sold in Mexico. This drove up the price of used cars in L.A., but for the first time in a generation, residents of Mexico City could see the 3 snow-capped volcanos on their horizon.

The city has no recycling pick-up — just one overloaded recycling center. Very few restaurants or food vendors use biodegradable containers because they’re so expensive or just unavailable; Styrofoam is the go-to for food to-go. This is changing, but it’s been very slow and unsteady.

In many Mexican towns, city water (e.g. for the toilet, sink, washer) can be shut off at any time, for days on end — with no warning. One learns to appreciate simple things like clean running water or running water in general.

7. You will get lonely …

 
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  1. haha, love this article. I tell everybody the Spanish invaded first and grabbed Mexico because you grab the best first. The English pirates a hundred years later had to settle for the USA.

    I think mexicans make all their toilets stop up when you flush your toilet paper to keep out the gringos. What I can’t figure out is why mexicans in Texas also have toilets that do not allow the paper to be flushed while all the white people in Texas are allowed to flush theirs, RACISM!!!

    • Replies: @haole3
    @haole3

    The same strategy is used in US public schools, crapastic, hahaha. Keep the whites out by making the public schools so bad that whites cant send their kids there. Have Kill Haole Day a couple times a year.

    , @Anonymous
    @haole3

    The Spanish as you say may have grabbed the best land first, but they also grabbed the land with the most natives on it, when compared with what would become the USA. Look at a population density map for North America circa 1492, southern Mexico had a large Amerindian population at the time compared with northern Mex and the USA.
    That's a big factor in why most modern Mexicans still have Indian blood flowing through their veins compared with most Americans/Canadians. That and the English usually brought their own women with them as oppsed to the male Spaniards who tending to cohabitate/rape/marry the native women rather than bring their own.
    Too bad Mexico didn't encourage mass Euro immigration like the US, Brazil and Argentina did in the early 1900s when its pop was only 15 million, a castizo Chile-like country would probably be less dangerous, corrupt and dirty than what they've got now. It still wouldn't be as dynamic as the US because it's got that Latin/Catholic cultural base with its dolce vita mindset, but still.

  2. lol. The old lady did what lots of feminazis do: travelled to an exotic locale to cure her ennui and pretend she would be a different person—-and discovered she was still the same lonely, bitter, unnatural, boring woman she was back home.

    Eat Pray Love is the fantasy. Cat lady is the reality.

    • LOL: Mike Tre, TWS
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    But you can do the cat lady who goes surfing daily in Mazatlan thing for $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    , @Jimi
    @R.G. Camara

    Read the article. She has children and grandchildren that regularly visit her.

    Retiring on the beach after a lifetime of raising children is awesome.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @R.G. Camara

    "Cat lady is the reality."

    Not in this case, more "adventurous grandma". The hippy-dippy Earth Mother types can actually carry this off quite well, albeit with the occasional major collateral damage.

    I knew a woman who had taken her divorce money and her small daughter, changed her name to something like "Crystal Rivers" and gone to Thailand/Cambodia until all the cash had gone and her daughter was a teenager. Charming lady albeit she believed in all kinds of nonsense.

    OTOH there are plenty of hard-faced childless women "doing" India and the Far East.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G. Camara

    "Cat lady is the reality."

    No, the reality is not cat lady. The last of the cat ladies are dying off; they are being replaced by dog moms. The reality is the male love of dogs -- foul, deceitful creatures -- is blinding males to the creepy dog mom reality. Wake up!

  3. Your theory would make sense except that other nations (e.g. Italy) not in danger of a foreign rush also exhibit casual attitudes towards public hygiene and orderliness.

    It’s not deliberate; the average Mexican is fine living in worse conditions than his Yankee neighbors to the north, because to the former, the worry and work ain’t worth it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    Lots of people from Northern Europe retired to Spain during the era when it vastly upgraded itself.

    Replies: @JMcG, @PiltdownMan, @Gordo

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G. Camara

    Wake up!

  4. Ha, I was just thinking about the littering thing today. One could say it’s just cultural, not genetic, as Americans used to be quite the litterbugs when I was young, at least many friends of mine in HS years.

    A couple of tree guys with a couple of Mexican* hands was working next door, and I paid them a few bucks to get them to use the their telescoping pole saw on a couple of limbs that were blocking sunlight from our proposed garden site. Well, they were good guys all. The one who knew the most about trees spoke great English but was Hispanic himself. I remember he was drinking a Coke as he walked about telling me stuff about the trees. An hour later when I went to get my bow saw, I noticed his empty Coke can in the firewood pile.

    Listen, I don’t begrudge the guy any, and I’m not at all sore about it. It’s just that an American would either ask you where the trash is, or carry it out to throw in the back of his truck**, or at least hand you the can with nothing said. I mean, just, why? It’s a Mexican thing.

    Don’t even ask me about littering in China. You don’t have to, as I’ll tell you: We were at this house in which the front faced an 8 ft alley that was “the street”. A kid threw down a bottle there, about 50 ft from the corner, where the trash gets collected, except it’s not in bags there either, just a big messy pile. Well, the Dad shouted at the kid something to the effect of “get that trash off my street.” I just looked at him and said “what’s the damn difference?” (No, he didn’t know English.)

    .

    * They could have been Guatemalan – how do I know?

    ** A friend of mine had a boat on a trailer locked to his big American car for something like a year or two, having lost the key to the padlock at the hitch. That was his mobile trash dispensary for awhile.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's definitely cultural.

    Basically, when a society is given non-biodegradeable goods, especially in an urban environment on a scale it has never had before (which means everyone, everywhere) it has to learn that the cup you've just thrown on the ground is going to melt away into the mud.

    After some generations or a very concerted campaign (including trash pick up infrastructure) though, the littering drops to near nil.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Rural people are always litterbugs. Why shouldn't they be? It's a big world with only a few scattered people.

    It takes city living to appreciate the problems with this.

    , @Supply and Demand
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Stories of pre-development China have little to do with what it’s like here now. When I exit my apartment in Dalian at 6:30 am to hit the gym, there’s usually a jumpsuited Ayi broom mob followed by an old man on either side of the road bagging the refuse.

    I imagine there may still be the unpaved trash alley in rural Shandong or Shaanxi maybe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman


    * They could have been Guatemalan – how do I know?
     
    Aspect ratio is a good guide.

    There's a reason Guat rhymes with Squat.

    Replies: @Jack D

  5. anonymous[954] • Disclaimer says:

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.

    Retirees don’t seem like much of a cost to the Mexican nation though. They don’t reproduce, so they don’t really dispossess Mexicans of their homeland, destroy their ethnicity, or threaten their sovereignty. They presumably pay for their own health care. They bring free dollars into Mexico from abroad and generally do not work, so they literally create jobs for ethnic Mexicans rather than compete against them for jobs. They presumably also don’t generally compete against Mexican men for securing Mexican women of child bearing age.

    What’s not to like?

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @anonymous

    Very good points, each and every one.


    Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.
     
    Steve said that? It's almost like he doesn't know Mexicans. They like their country just the way it is, and they'd change it if they wanted to. Has nothing to do with Americans, though it's also painfully true that the "Freebies for Migrants" culture which has taken over the USA is a powerful draw for the useless component of all third-world countries.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @fitzhamilton
    @anonymous

    The Mexicans are very canny people. They have a strict system of real estate classification that forbids outright ownership of property by foreigners in some of the choicest tourist and retirement areas. I think the rule is no outright ownership 30km from the coasts, and 100km from the international borders.

    Meaning that if you want to own property in these zones, and you are not married to a Mexican or intent on gaining citizenship (not easy to do) you must set up a fiduciary trust with a Mexican bank who will hold the title for you. I think this is why so many foreign retirees congregate inland around places like Guadalajara, where they can actually hold direct title to property.. The Mexicans have set up this firewall to prevent foreign capital from flooding their best markets, disenfranchising the locals.

    We could take a page from their book viz. Chinese, Saudi (etc.) money flooding places like California or Colorado, driving values through the stratosphere making ownership difficult to impossible for anyone but plutocrats..

    There are also dangers in the Mexican legal system, where foreigners have been legally defrauded by the locals. This is a common trend worldwide: legal systems tend to favor locals over foreigners in disputes. If say you end up getting divorced from your native spouse, or in a dispute with native business partners, do not expect the native courts to treat you well.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    , @BGKB
    @anonymous

    Retirees can still rape kids in Mexico thanks to the little blue pill

    Israeli Moosh was busted with having 6 child slave farms between Mexico & Brazil

    " From their base in “little Israel” Moosh is reported to have run similar clubs exploiting drugs and children in Cartagena, Bogotá, Medellín, Ecuador, Mexico and Brazil."


    https://israelpalestinenews.org/ex-israeli-soldier-heading-child-prostitution-ring-spanning-latin-america-deported-colombia/

  6. 216 says: • Website

    There is something admirable about Mexico’s insistence on doing things their way, and not sucking up to the US or its cultural influences. Not since the Veracruz Incident has the US removed one of their governments, something most Latin American countries can’t claim.

    Violent crime could be defended against if Mexico did adopt the US practice of shall-issue concealed carry handguns, instead of reserving this to the connected elite.

  7. @R.G. Camara
    Your theory would make sense except that other nations (e.g. Italy) not in danger of a foreign rush also exhibit casual attitudes towards public hygiene and orderliness.

    It's not deliberate; the average Mexican is fine living in worse conditions than his Yankee neighbors to the north, because to the former, the worry and work ain't worth it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    Lots of people from Northern Europe retired to Spain during the era when it vastly upgraded itself.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Steve Sailer

    From what I saw in Italy, everyone south of the Sahara wants to move there. And try to sell counterfeit crap to tourists.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Steve Sailer


    Nobody wants to move to Italy?
     
    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.

    https://i.imgur.com/wfiRsTF.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dutch Boy

    , @Gordo
    @Steve Sailer

    Practically the entire Scottish ruling class have villas in Tuscany.

  8. @R.G. Camara
    lol. The old lady did what lots of feminazis do: travelled to an exotic locale to cure her ennui and pretend she would be a different person----and discovered she was still the same lonely, bitter, unnatural, boring woman she was back home.

    Eat Pray Love is the fantasy. Cat lady is the reality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jimi, @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb

    But you can do the cat lady who goes surfing daily in Mazatlan thing for $1200 per month.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @Steve Sailer

    True, but retired surfer babe weighed the risks/benefits and decided the relatively low cost/high personal benefit of living and surfing in Mazatlan outweighs the higher risk to safety, security, and other "intangibles" of developed American society that she left behind. She enumerated a list of items that are the QOL downsides of her present life. Something tells me that, as she gets older, she'll start to think more about healthcare and senior care there in Mazatlan/Mexico, and may decide to repatriate herself back. Didn't read the article; does she have kids that can care for her as she becomes older and less physically fit/frail? Or is she childless and will need to depend on the kindness/generosity of her Mexican neighbors, and healthcare workers? She seems content with her choice; others would not accept the same trade-offs; YMMV. Anyway, didn't see a pic of her in the thread, so here she is:

    https://yucatanmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/whyleftauthor800x500.jpg

  9. Very, very important new thread by Wesley Yang. Explains one mechanism by which Whites are being made to go extinct. (And it is working like a charm.)

    • Replies: @216
    @Anon

    It should behoove all elected GOP politicians to:

    -Abolish affirmative action

    -Drastically reduce the number of foreign students

    -Demand partisan quotas in humanities/social sciences (for any institution taking fed coin, liberals must go Hillsdale)

    -Impose "civilian control of academia", implement some kind of political commissar/civilian review board for all hiring and promotions

    -Make the Regents board an elected position

    -Defund athletics

    -Shrink the number of students to German levels per capita

    While we're at it:

    -Reimpose sex-segregated dorms

    -Reimpose Greek/Latin

    -Export surplus academics to the Third World

    -Force the Ivies to become Protestant again, and force Georgetown to be Catholic

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Sick of Orcs

    , @Rob
    @Anon

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Polistra, @Peter Akuleyev, @Flip

    , @Wade Hampton
    @Anon

    As stupid as our Ruling Class is today, it's going to get even stupider.

    , @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anon

    How many of the 32% remaining whites are Jews? I'd bet 16%, at least half. So that's 16% white?

    I don't see how whites "flow easily" out of that.

    I see the future a little different. Basically whites will be cleansed out of urban areas. Replaced in high functioning academics / high power careers by Indians, Asians, and light skinned mixed race people. Upper middle class whites are too soft to compete anyways, their kids are usually a total waste of space. Karens will stop being promoted. Urban whites have very little reproduction and many white men race mix with Asians.

    There will be a massive downwardly mobile slide for formerly middle and working class people. This is already happening too.

    In the end gentile whites will be largely confined to rural America. Alot more poverty, alot more Christian. Perhaps the rump of white America will mix with Hispanics somewhat.

    Replies: @Anon

  10. We interrupt this broadcast for a special news bulletin.

    The president’s son is even more of a train wreck than you thought.

    https://mol.im/a/9445105 Daily Mail has the details.

    Warning: Don’t click during mealtime.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Polistra

    Hunter Biden is a character straight out of Caligula's court of hangers-on. I'm surprised his father hasn't disowned him. Normally, a sane father would keep a sociopathic snake like Hunter at a distance, but Joe doesn't have the sense God gave a goat.

    Hunter is the single worst presidential offspring ever, and that includes John Adams' worthless alcoholic son Charles. Not a single one of them has behaved more vilely than Hunter.

    Replies: @John Up North

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Polistra

    The tl;dr for this is basically what you already knew if you've been following actual news at all (as opposed to the simulacrum of news put out by the major media to mislead you): the President's son is a spoiled, depraved, self-pitying addict. Helpfully for the Narrative, the media skip over the family political corruption aspects of the story to focus on the salacious sex-and-drugs stuff.

    The only two new pieces of information are:

    1) The Daily Mail had a forensic expert confirm that the data from Hunter's laptop are authentic (which any half-attentive observer already knew), and less obviously,

    2) Hunter Biden's teeth are fake.

  11. Fred Reed appears happy about the squalor.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Redneck farmer

    Fred Reed is also literally blind.

  12. This excerpt along with the musings by Fred Reed about his ex-patriate new homeland have me bringing up this point I make regularly to Mr. Reed and ex-patriate commenters here:

    Here’s an article by an aging American surfer girl who semi-retired to Mazatlan in Mexico in 2006. She lives on $1200 per month.

    See, that’s all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit … blah, blah, blah… Yeah, you can get a lady to clean the house for 10 bucks a week, a guy does the laundry for 5 bucks. your place is right on the beach for $450 a month, and so on… (For guys, you can get a girlfriend for the low, low rate of $___ too) … all on that SS check or some small pension or royalties.

    As Peak Stupidity noted long ago, in the post “Down to the Banana Republics … went Fred Reed”, once the dollar goes down the toilet, you will be living in Mexico as a MEXICAN, not as a well-off gringo. When that $1,500 SS check is worth the same amount of Pesos, YOU may be the one doing someone’s laundry or cleaning someone’s house, just to survive.

    If you do this sort of thing, and it’s VERY TEMPTING, especially for single men, then get most of your money out of US Dollars! Too soon is better than too late.

    • Agree: haole3, Adam Smith
    • Replies: @haole3
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Arkansas will always be cheaper than california. Mexico will always be cheaper than the USA. If the dollar collapses prices will rise in the USA and I figure more old gringos will be moving to Mexico, just the house wont have a pool and they will sweep their own floor.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Nikolai Vladivostok
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That would be a problem for people on a fixed US pension but not so much for self-funded retirees. Shares hedge against inflation to an extent and holding some overseas shares softens currency risk.
    This is not financial advice, do your own research etc.

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Achmed E. Newman


    See, that’s all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit … blah, blah, blah…
     
    There are multiple reserve currencies. The dollar is just one of them, forming $6.7T out of $11.7T worth of foreign exchange reserves worldwide:

    http://data.imf.org/?sk=E6A5F467-C14B-4AA8-9F6D-5A09EC4E62A4

    We’re not taxing the world. When the dollar’s exchange rate falls, dollar prices increase. For instance, in yen terms, oil prices have gone up just over 6x since 1973, when the first oil shock occurred. In dollar terms, they've gone up 20x.

    Reserve currency status is overrated. The Swiss certainly fought it every chance they got, because it made their export goods unaffordable and increased unemployment. At one point, they imposed a 41% tax on foreign deposits.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-22/swiss-history-of-negative-interest-rates-is-ugly

    They’re still fighting it today, with a -0.75% central bank rate.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-swiss-snb-rates/swiss-central-bank-defends-negative-interest-rates-idUSKCN11L0N7

    If you’re interested, a Quora essay explains why having a currency that is the biggest component of other countries’ rainy day funds is not a benefit at all:

    https://www.quora.com/What-happens-if-the-U-S-dollar-loses-its-status-as-the-worlds-major-reserve-currency/answers/82129987

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  13. Oh yeah, the noise. Some people wouldn’t mind. I would. That’d be the worst thing from all the lady wrote about… well, besides having the town shot up in the Drug War.

  14. @haole3
    haha, love this article. I tell everybody the Spanish invaded first and grabbed Mexico because you grab the best first. The English pirates a hundred years later had to settle for the USA.

    I think mexicans make all their toilets stop up when you flush your toilet paper to keep out the gringos. What I can't figure out is why mexicans in Texas also have toilets that do not allow the paper to be flushed while all the white people in Texas are allowed to flush theirs, RACISM!!!

    Replies: @haole3, @Anonymous

    The same strategy is used in US public schools, crapastic, hahaha. Keep the whites out by making the public schools so bad that whites cant send their kids there. Have Kill Haole Day a couple times a year.

  15. Much of the advice Janet Blaser gives in this article could be applied to expat lives in just about any country that’s reputed to be a ‘good deal’ for retirement. I don’t think it’s all that specific to Mexico. Lots of people also ‘retire’ to SE Asian countries for many of the same reasons Blaser gives, and run into similar problems.

    In Hong Kong many expats try to construct ‘get away from the ratrace’ lifestyles by moving to villages out in the countryside. This has a lot of advantages that are similar to the ones Blaser describes: lower cost, a bigger flat (or even a house), often pretty-to-spectacular landscapes/views, a more relaxed pace, etc.

    But even though HK is a very orderly place, lots of village-life annoyances are lurking. Villages here can also be incredibly noisy, so if you think you’re signing up for non-stop tranquility, you’ve got another think coming. They’re also typically quite remote in public transport terms, and even getting to a bus or mini-bus stop may require a longish and unpleasant walk.

    If you buy a car, you need someplace to park it. This may seem simple enough out in the countryside where there’s lots of space, but this is where the local mores and unwritten rules come into effect: you’ll find that there is no such thing as ‘free space’ in a HK village where you can casually leave your car. If you try this, you’ll find your windshield caved in soon enough.

    And finally, the typical village trash/littering may seem trivial at first, but it’s the kind of thing that grinds down the joy of your day-to-day life with its ubiquitousness. I’ve noticed this in villages/small towns in many countries, including the USA: often the more magnificent the physical setting, the more trashy the villages. The contrast starts as an annoyance, but eventually feels tragic and depressing.

    Expat life can be very rewarding, but it’s not for everyone.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I agree with everything in this post, and the answer to most of these questions is lack of money and lack of education.

    Why do they use any available bag or box for trash instead of a trash bin? Simply too expensive, and they would get stolen.

    Even though the shopping malls are glossy, apparently stylish, and thronged with people, when you dig a bit deeper, you find that most of the merchandise for sale is overpriced tat.

    You might be able to buy an electric rice cooker very easily, but try looking for an electric pressure cooker and you will probably be out of luck in all but a very few selected outlets in major cities.

    Here in Ecuador everybody has a cell phone, but I have never seen an iPhone for sale. Just too expensive.

    But the middle classes do their best. Here in Ecuador local buses have helpful signs posted inside saying inspirational things like: "Please do not throw your trash out of the window."

    Additionally I agree that these issues are generic to expatriate life anywhere in the Hispanic world and probably in other countries too.

    Nothing at all to do with trying to create an environment that is hostile to American retirees and expatriates.

    And why the hell would you not want to learn to speak Spanish if you're going to live in a Spanish-speaking country?

  16. @Achmed E. Newman
    This excerpt along with the musings by Fred Reed about his ex-patriate new homeland have me bringing up this point I make regularly to Mr. Reed and ex-patriate commenters here:

    Here’s an article by an aging American surfer girl who semi-retired to Mazatlan in Mexico in 2006. She lives on $1200 per month.
     
    See, that's all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit ... blah, blah, blah... Yeah, you can get a lady to clean the house for 10 bucks a week, a guy does the laundry for 5 bucks. your place is right on the beach for $450 a month, and so on... (For guys, you can get a girlfriend for the low, low rate of $___ too) ... all on that SS check or some small pension or royalties.

    As Peak Stupidity noted long ago, in the post "Down to the Banana Republics ... went Fred Reed", once the dollar goes down the toilet, you will be living in Mexico as a MEXICAN, not as a well-off gringo. When that $1,500 SS check is worth the same amount of Pesos, YOU may be the one doing someone's laundry or cleaning someone's house, just to survive.

    If you do this sort of thing, and it's VERY TEMPTING, especially for single men, then get most of your money out of US Dollars! Too soon is better than too late.

    Replies: @haole3, @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Johann Ricke

    Arkansas will always be cheaper than california. Mexico will always be cheaper than the USA. If the dollar collapses prices will rise in the USA and I figure more old gringos will be moving to Mexico, just the house wont have a pool and they will sweep their own floor.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @haole3

    Haole, if you're interested in prepper/SHTF stuff, the novel called The Mandibles by one Lionel Shriver (a she) has it where the Mexicans have built border controls to keep the Gringos out, the economy is so bad here!

  17. @R.G. Camara
    lol. The old lady did what lots of feminazis do: travelled to an exotic locale to cure her ennui and pretend she would be a different person----and discovered she was still the same lonely, bitter, unnatural, boring woman she was back home.

    Eat Pray Love is the fantasy. Cat lady is the reality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jimi, @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb

    Read the article. She has children and grandchildren that regularly visit her.

    Retiring on the beach after a lifetime of raising children is awesome.

    • Agree: Ed
  18. Mexico is hell on earth and the argumemt that it is not always boils down to “it’s not Salvador or Honduras,” but if we scaled those up they would be Mexico.

    • Agree: Polistra
  19. I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic.

    I never understood this theory of Steve’s. While a certain amount of territory policing and lashing out against perceived interlopers like Asian shopkeepers or anyone middle class and up occurs in black neighbourhoods that’s more due to some denizens not having the same internal or external controls over expressing their resentments.

    It’s hardly a case that a whole country like Mexico or rather it’s rural peripheries are conspiring to be sociologically so dire by American standards because people are concerned with American retirees displacing them like some English expats retirees have to some extent in some Spanish towns. It’s not a thought that has ever occurred to anyone. It’s hard to get people to react to something that hasn’t happened.

    Self-sustaining downward social and economic spirals are sometimes things that conservatives resist admitting exist but they do.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Altai

    I never understood this theory of Steve’s.

    Maybe he's trolling his readers?

    Mexico has a stack of laws that are designed to keep foreigners corralled and relatively harmless.

    Example: Only Mexican citizens can own land along the coasts, for example; the retirees on the Sea of Cortez have long-term leases to the land their houses sit on. That lease may or may not be transferable.

    Example: Any foreigner who gets even slightly involved in Mexican politics can be deported with minimal fuss - there will not be any mass gatherings of outsiders on the Zocalo in DF like the mass anti-immigration rallies of Mexicans in LA a few years back.

    I wish the US could such laws. Littering and other cultural artifacts are merely icing on the cake.

    , @stillCARealist
    @Altai

    It's a theory that's easily extended to CA, namely, that if our state were well-governed, the population would be 100 million and climbing. Nobody wants that many people here, so we elect idiots and knaves who make it unappealing to the bulk of the world's middle class.

    Ultimately it's only a bit true. Mostly people elect corrupt Democrats here because they want the free stuff that Democrats promise.

    Does anyone ever make the connection between, "I can't stand this stifling bureaucracy!" and "Look at this great gov't job I have where I don't really have much to do!" ???

    , @TWS
    @Altai

    I think Steve is so rational that he cannot imagine a nation that can't solve simple problems if it really wanted to.

  20. 216 says: • Website
    @Anon
    Very, very important new thread by Wesley Yang. Explains one mechanism by which Whites are being made to go extinct. (And it is working like a charm.)

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180795223117824

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180796615626758

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180798079373314

    Replies: @216, @Rob, @Wade Hampton, @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    It should behoove all elected GOP politicians to:

    -Abolish affirmative action

    -Drastically reduce the number of foreign students

    -Demand partisan quotas in humanities/social sciences (for any institution taking fed coin, liberals must go Hillsdale)

    -Impose “civilian control of academia”, implement some kind of political commissar/civilian review board for all hiring and promotions

    -Make the Regents board an elected position

    -Defund athletics

    -Shrink the number of students to German levels per capita

    While we’re at it:

    -Reimpose sex-segregated dorms

    -Reimpose Greek/Latin

    -Export surplus academics to the Third World

    -Force the Ivies to become Protestant again, and force Georgetown to be Catholic

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @216

    216 4 President!

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @216

    You're assuming there are two major opposing parties but it is not so.

    Demoshits push radical communism.
    Recucklicans briefly oppose Demoshits before always throwing the fight.

    Pro-wrestling should be envious of these jobbers if they ain't already.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  21. One of your sillier ideas. Mexico has been violent since the Aztecs were torturing children for the power of the their tears and is as organized and well-run as you’d expect a country run by Mexicans to be. Occam’s wooden spoon

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @bigduke6


    One of your sillier ideas. Mexico has been violent since the Aztecs were torturing children for the power of the their tears and is as organized and well-run as you’d expect a country run by Mexicans to be. Occam’s wooden spoon
     
    Having worked with a lot of Latinos, their peasant mindset is branded into their culture.
    They might try to imitate those who they, deep down, feel are their betters, and try to act like social peers, but they almost always fold their cards when push comes to shove.

    It’s a collective mindset. Sad but true.

    https://youtu.be/ZZvT2r828QY
  22. I would imagine the Donkey Shows more than make up for the littering, crime, public utilities, etc.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  23. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    Lots of people from Northern Europe retired to Spain during the era when it vastly upgraded itself.

    Replies: @JMcG, @PiltdownMan, @Gordo

    From what I saw in Italy, everyone south of the Sahara wants to move there. And try to sell counterfeit crap to tourists.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @JMcG

    Don’t kid yourself, everyone south of the Sahara wants to move to Germany. Italy is just a way station.

  24. I’m sorry, but this ex-surfer doesn’t actually make the case for why she would leave the land of her ancestors, America, for Mexico. Not understanding the whole thing.

    I suppose, and perhaps Steve could back me up, is that IF one would desire a warm beach town, especially with the atmosphere to retire to, might it be suggested that they try…the Colony? As in, Malibu colony? Sparsely populated, exclusive taste, warm weather pretty much all year round, don’t have to worry about the language thing (unless one hangs out a lot with the illegals). Can’t beat it.

    Malibu. It’s just that good, and it’s American. They also still have trailer parks for trailers.

    Also, one might want to consider retiring to the beach cities a la, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach. On the East Coast, one could attempt to retire on the Gulf Coast, a la Tampa/Clearwater area.

    And of course there’s also Hawaii. Nice tropical breezes, plenty of sun and sand.

    Mazatlan was well known to Hollywood stars as far back as the early ’30’s, when John Ford, John Wayne, Ward Bond, and Henry Fonda took fishing boat trips thru Mazatlan’s coast, which often ended in drinking binges in the town afterwards.

    But again, if one desires a beach city for retirement, there’s always Malibu (which tends to be much safer crimewise, than Mexico in general.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    How exactly can someone afford to live in Malibu?

    Rent is $4,800/month for a 1-bedroom.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/malibu-ca

    Manhattan Beach is $2,800/month.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/manhattan-beach-ca

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. Anon[284] • Disclaimer says:
    @Polistra
    We interrupt this broadcast for a special news bulletin.

    The president's son is even more of a train wreck than you thought.

    https://mol.im/a/9445105 Daily Mail has the details.

    Warning: Don't click during mealtime.

    Replies: @Anon, @Almost Missouri

    Hunter Biden is a character straight out of Caligula’s court of hangers-on. I’m surprised his father hasn’t disowned him. Normally, a sane father would keep a sociopathic snake like Hunter at a distance, but Joe doesn’t have the sense God gave a goat.

    Hunter is the single worst presidential offspring ever, and that includes John Adams’ worthless alcoholic son Charles. Not a single one of them has behaved more vilely than Hunter.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Anon

    I'm afraid Hunter may not be with us much longer. It seems to me that most of these guys who have horrific drug problems don't make it out of their 50s because of the inevitable overdose.

    ER doctors in LA frequently treat middle age people showing up in cardiac arrest because of too much blow and booze which they can no longer handle due to the fact that they're no longer 25.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Jack D, @Polistra

  26. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but this ex-surfer doesn't actually make the case for why she would leave the land of her ancestors, America, for Mexico. Not understanding the whole thing.

    I suppose, and perhaps Steve could back me up, is that IF one would desire a warm beach town, especially with the atmosphere to retire to, might it be suggested that they try...the Colony? As in, Malibu colony? Sparsely populated, exclusive taste, warm weather pretty much all year round, don't have to worry about the language thing (unless one hangs out a lot with the illegals). Can't beat it.

    Malibu. It's just that good, and it's American. They also still have trailer parks for trailers.

    Also, one might want to consider retiring to the beach cities a la, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach. On the East Coast, one could attempt to retire on the Gulf Coast, a la Tampa/Clearwater area.

    And of course there's also Hawaii. Nice tropical breezes, plenty of sun and sand.

    Mazatlan was well known to Hollywood stars as far back as the early '30's, when John Ford, John Wayne, Ward Bond, and Henry Fonda took fishing boat trips thru Mazatlan's coast, which often ended in drinking binges in the town afterwards.

    But again, if one desires a beach city for retirement, there's always Malibu (which tends to be much safer crimewise, than Mexico in general.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

    $1200 per month.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    Right, I assumed when I read it her primary reason for moving to Mexico was not being able to afford the lifestyle she wanted in California. She puts up with all the bad stuff she mentions because she can live near the beach in Mexico. She mentions cheap health care, but if she starts having serious health problems she will be back in the U.S. quickly.

    Replies: @notsaying, @Reverend Goody

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, admittedly, I don't know what trailer parks rent per month. Also, did mention that there's FL's Gulf Coast, Tampa/Clearwater area and the like. Lots of retirees there, and FL's cost of living is considerably less than CA's. Especially now that FL has that new $15 per hr minimum wage increase.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    Also, Malibu apparently has a number of trailer parks. When one thinks of double wides and trailers, they tend to think it’s fairly affordable a la Hillbilly Elegy. So renting a trailer park in Malibu in theory should be considerably less than a standard rental place.

    From an LA Times article from 2011:

    In Malibu, even mobile homes command premium prices

    BY LAUREN BEALE, LOS ANGELES TIMES
    AUG. 27, 2011 12 AM PT

    “The difference is in a park where you are leasing the land,” he said. “You pay the property tax rate only on the home. The owner of park pays the property taxes on the land.”

    Rental rates on lots in the Malibu parks range from about $1,000 to $2,800 a month.”

    Granted, some trailer rentals are pricey, but the article explains that it’s possible to rent at an affordable rate—-starting at $1,000 per month. So it’s very much possible . Unless of course the rates have increased since then and are more astronomical. But at least according to the article, at the time, $1,000 per month was quite double for renting in a trailer park to enjoy the beach lifestyle par excellence that is known as Malibu.

  27. So the idea of retiring to Mexico has been around for a long time.

    Two of Minnesota’s gifts to the mountains there have been former Gov Ventura and Gear Daddies’ frontman Martin Zellar. The latter is somewhat ironic in that his income derives primarily from that Zamboni song you hear between periods at hockey rinks– few of which are in Mexico.

    Trash pick-up is one example. In most Mexican towns, garbage is simply piled on certain street corners in whatever plastic bags or boxes one has handy.

    And this differs from South Philadelphia in that… ?

    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.

    One of whom was Mike Smith, singer and keyboardist of the Dave Clark Five. Unfortunately, he was paralyzed after suffering a fall while fixing the perimeter of his villa. Would he have fared better had it happened in Surrey or Kent?

    On the other side of the tropics, something “vaguely” (rather than “terribly”) iStevey– Ceyl on, Sailer!:

    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’

    “Caroline” and “deSilva” suggest, in quadriconfessional Serendip, that both have a Christian background. Well, then, act like it, ladies!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar


    ...hockey rinks– few of which are in Mexico.
     
    Their entire league plays in a single shopping mall, which it shares with an Apple Store and a Cinemex. (Not to be confused with Cinemax or Cineplex.)

    I don't know whether to root for the Astronomers or the Stone Heads. I'll skip the Priests, as I doubt they mean padres.


    https://news.sportslogos.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/mexican-hockey-league-200x200.png
    , @PiltdownMan
    @Reg Cæsar


    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’
     
    Jurie reverses decision by jury.
    , @epebble
    @Reg Cæsar

    You think you have problems in South Philly? This is Portland, OR:

    https://kgw.com/embeds/video/283-2eac987c-c323-420c-8e8a-29606733bc7a/iframe?jwsource=cl

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  28. @haole3
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Arkansas will always be cheaper than california. Mexico will always be cheaper than the USA. If the dollar collapses prices will rise in the USA and I figure more old gringos will be moving to Mexico, just the house wont have a pool and they will sweep their own floor.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Haole, if you’re interested in prepper/SHTF stuff, the novel called The Mandibles by one Lionel Shriver (a she) has it where the Mexicans have built border controls to keep the Gringos out, the economy is so bad here!

  29. So this lady moved to Mexico and then was surprised that it was exactly like you’d expect Mexico to be?

    All those things she complains about are why you can live in paradise dor $1200.

  30. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    Lots of people from Northern Europe retired to Spain during the era when it vastly upgraded itself.

    Replies: @JMcG, @PiltdownMan, @Gordo

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan



    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

     

    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.
     
    Questa è la fine del quartiere!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @fitzhamilton

    , @Dutch Boy
    @PiltdownMan

    Lot's of Italy is gorgeous (e.g., the Lake district where Mr. Clooney dwells). By no coincidence, California is starting to look more and more like Mexico, with trash and noise levels through the roof. Even the beautiful city of San Diego is now a trash pile and homeless encampment (LA and SF here we come). There is no prospect that this will change anytime soon and , indeed, the good people of SD have ensured that things will get worse by electing a homosexual Filipino as mayor.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Right, I assumed when I read it her primary reason for moving to Mexico was not being able to afford the lifestyle she wanted in California. She puts up with all the bad stuff she mentions because she can live near the beach in Mexico. She mentions cheap health care, but if she starts having serious health problems she will be back in the U.S. quickly.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Barnard

    Yes, her paradise requires a backup. I am sure she has a health plan that would be completely inadequate if she really got sick. Her backup plan would be to move in with her adult children.

    If I lived in a third world country I think I would really dislike the expats who alternatively complain about how awful some things are then rave about how wonderful it is there, who want everything cheap and always have America to run home to when things hit the fan.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Reverend Goody
    @Barnard

    Better idea...........forget about being a cutesy surfing granny. Live modestly in a lower cost of living area of America. Health insurance doesn't work in Mexico.

    In fact, visiting Mexico is a bad idea. If you get sick or injured, you're on your own.

  32. @anonymous

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.
     
    Retirees don’t seem like much of a cost to the Mexican nation though. They don’t reproduce, so they don’t really dispossess Mexicans of their homeland, destroy their ethnicity, or threaten their sovereignty. They presumably pay for their own health care. They bring free dollars into Mexico from abroad and generally do not work, so they literally create jobs for ethnic Mexicans rather than compete against them for jobs. They presumably also don’t generally compete against Mexican men for securing Mexican women of child bearing age.

    What’s not to like?

    Replies: @Polistra, @fitzhamilton, @BGKB

    Very good points, each and every one.

    Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.

    Steve said that? It’s almost like he doesn’t know Mexicans. They like their country just the way it is, and they’d change it if they wanted to. Has nothing to do with Americans, though it’s also painfully true that the “Freebies for Migrants” culture which has taken over the USA is a powerful draw for the useless component of all third-world countries.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Polistra


    It’s almost like he doesn’t know Mexicans. They like their country just the way it is, and they’d change it if they wanted to.
     
    Just remember: they're not sending their best, which means their best are left in Mexico.
  33. @Reg Cæsar

    So the idea of retiring to Mexico has been around for a long time.

     

    Two of Minnesota's gifts to the mountains there have been former Gov Ventura and Gear Daddies' frontman Martin Zellar. The latter is somewhat ironic in that his income derives primarily from that Zamboni song you hear between periods at hockey rinks-- few of which are in Mexico.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/68/d9/6b/68d96b0ca13fb2190b40983e81ab11f5.png


    Trash pick-up is one example. In most Mexican towns, garbage is simply piled on certain street corners in whatever plastic bags or boxes one has handy.

     

    And this differs from South Philadelphia in that... ?


    https://www.inquirer.com/resizer/dxgoUhCzCbFPs3CFb9cDaR2QFso=/800x533/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/pmn/PB7X3GTVLVFORHVWUHQJN6J7KU.jpg


    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.
     
    One of whom was Mike Smith, singer and keyboardist of the Dave Clark Five. Unfortunately, he was paralyzed after suffering a fall while fixing the perimeter of his villa. Would he have fared better had it happened in Surrey or Kent?


    On the other side of the tropics, something "vaguely" (rather than "terribly") iStevey-- Ceyl on, Sailer!:

    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’

    "Caroline" and "deSilva" suggest, in quadriconfessional Serendip, that both have a Christian background. Well, then, act like it, ladies!


    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fd2cff099333c5a90f53f3504e85b90d17563810/0_70_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?width=700&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=e65c756ac877040e0779e819404d3f6a

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @PiltdownMan, @epebble

    …hockey rinks– few of which are in Mexico.

    Their entire league plays in a single shopping mall, which it shares with an Apple Store and a Cinemex. (Not to be confused with Cinemax or Cineplex.)

    I don’t know whether to root for the Astronomers or the Stone Heads. I’ll skip the Priests, as I doubt they mean padres.

  34. @PiltdownMan
    @Steve Sailer


    Nobody wants to move to Italy?
     
    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.

    https://i.imgur.com/wfiRsTF.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dutch Boy

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.

    Questa è la fine del quartiere!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lake Como is amazing.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Reg Cæsar

    , @fitzhamilton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Italy is beautiful, the food is incredible (better on average than in France), and the Italians - though crazy - are fascinating and a lot of fun.. Much more fun than the Germans, who are no fun at all outside of Bavaria.

    But the entire place is psychically caked under 4,000 years of layered stultification, corruption and decadence. It's an exhausted country, in an even greater demographic death spiral than the rest of Europe.

    The first dozen times I visited, I was overawed by all the astonishing beauty. Italy utterly seduced me.

    These last few trips, I've began to feel as if the entire country is one great open air necropolis of exquisitely beautiful mausoleums full of desiccated corpses, inhabited by elegant zombies.

    It's been like finding Snow White, repeatedly kissing her, then realizing she's not merely asleep, but truly dead..

    All of Europe is taking on this pall for me, Italy is just the furthest gone.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Beelzebub

  35. I taught at the Tec de Monterey (ITESM) campus in Cd. Obregon back in the 90’s. I’ve also lived a couple years in Guatemala, and have been to every country in Central American and all over most of South America. To me, Mexico and Guatemala are magical. I’ve been all over the world, I think 68 countries all told, and lived in eight countries for at least a year, and they are easily two of my favorite places to be exiled.

    One of the main charms is that if you get away from a few tourist epicenters like Cancun, there are very few gringos.. And the few gringos you do happen to meet there away from the beaten path tend to be the most interesting sort.. You need to be interested to be interesting, after all, and all 95% of anglophone and European tourists are really interested in is getting drunk on the beach and maybe scoring some weed. Those people might take a day trip to Chitzen Itza with a guide. After you get away from that close ambit, you’re free of the knuckleheads, and in a completely different universe.

    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

    Everything Boomer surfer chick says is true.. Except that I was never lonely there. I was always with people. If you speak Spanish, and willing to drink beer with campesinos, it is not hard to get intimate with people there. What you need to understand is that Latin America is still a peasant culture. People still live with barnyard animals in their homes, they slaughter and eat the whole animal, and they grow their own food. And that food is very, very good. Every part of Mexico is different, and it is one of the best places in the world to eat.

    Time and social interaction are entirely different there – in Edward Hall’s terms, they are high context and polychronic, we are low context and monochronic. If a Mexican says to show up for dinner or a party at seven, don’t expect anyone to show up until at least eight, or for the party to really get started until nine. You get there at seven, you’ll be sitting there on the couch for an hour alone.. This explains much of organizational inefficiency there. They’re up at dawn working like draft animals until dusk (with a long siesta in the heat in between), but they are organizing their time and resources like medieval peasants.

    It’s also – and this should be self evident, but I did not understand this until I lived there – deeply indigenous. The Europeans are in charge – they have most of the power, land and money. But the Indians are the soul of the place, and they are not monolithic. Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    There’s only a veneer of Europe overlaying things down there. It’s deeply mestizo to the degree that Spanish and Christianity – Catholicism and Pentecostalism – permeates everything, but all of that is deeply intermingled with atavistic aboriginal stuff.. Some of it very, very strange. There are demons and spirits – and I mean this very literally – everywhere. If you want to see the devil, you can find him in Mexico. He’s very real, and will be very pleased to meet you.. But where sin abounds, grace often abides, and God is often making strange startling appearances, too..

    The battle down there, like everywhere, has two sides. It just tends to be less muddled and cloaked in beige anodyne corporate hypocrisies like it is up here in gringoland. A lot of people like hypocrisy, they like their suburban commutes and corporate cubicles. It all makes them feel safe and secure. Those sorts of people should stay out of Mexico. They wouldn’t like it, and they aren’t wanted there.. Like Steve suggests, the Mexicans want to keep the vast majority of us north of the Rio Grande..

    Our manifest destiny now being to turn California, Texas and everything else we took in 1848 back over to them in the very near future, anyhow.. Now that the 19th Century Anglo demographic boom that created this country has fizzled into cultural vacuity, collapse and decadence, many Mexicans are sure it’s just a matter of time, probably a few decades. One of my students once bluntly told me “We’re going to beat you with babies, teacher, not with bombs.”

    Most Mexican cities and towns have an “Avenida de los Niños Héroes” ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ni%C3%B1os_H%C3%A9roes ) just as ours all have Boulevards dedicated to Martin Luther King.

    The heroic kids in question were military cadets at the Federal Military Academy in Mexico City who died defending it from the Marines (“the Halls of Montezuma”) on September 13, 1847. The last of them heroically jumping from the academy’s walls, his shoulders draped with the Mexican flag. The 13th is a national holiday in Mexico, and I have been told that someday they will be avenged.

    I have typed too long here, I could write a book, but will spare y0u.

    Mexicans and Latin Americans are used to defeat. But I would never count them down, or underestimate their tenacity.. Or their potential.

    I will say in closing that if I had to bet on whose national hero, whose national myth and vision has a greater future and power, my money isn’t on the ideological heirs and descendants of MLK. My money is all in on los niños de los Ninos Heroes de Chapultepec.

    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @fitzhamilton


    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

     

    This is extremely well-observed and stated. I know exactly what you mean.

    You know you've turned the corner from 'casually spending some time overseas' to long-term -- maybe lifetime -- expat when you realize you're often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren't from your own culture.

    I won't comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it's both.


    I could write a book
     
    Maybe you should. I'd look forward to reading it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble, @donut

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @fitzhamilton

    Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    This was my observation as well. In a place like Cancun the Aztecs (managers from the DF) bossing around the Maya workers seem almost as foreign as the gringos. In Europe or Africa the tribal tensions tend to be on the surface. In Mexico they are more repressed but clearly still there.

    , @Gordo
    @fitzhamilton


    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..
     
    Bombs, like guns, are only effective if you have the willpower to use them.

    We have substantial and capable armed forces here in the UK and over 200 hydrogen bombs but we are being invaded by Sub-Saharan African and South Asians and nothing is done to stop this.
  36. @Reg Cæsar

    So the idea of retiring to Mexico has been around for a long time.

     

    Two of Minnesota's gifts to the mountains there have been former Gov Ventura and Gear Daddies' frontman Martin Zellar. The latter is somewhat ironic in that his income derives primarily from that Zamboni song you hear between periods at hockey rinks-- few of which are in Mexico.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/68/d9/6b/68d96b0ca13fb2190b40983e81ab11f5.png


    Trash pick-up is one example. In most Mexican towns, garbage is simply piled on certain street corners in whatever plastic bags or boxes one has handy.

     

    And this differs from South Philadelphia in that... ?


    https://www.inquirer.com/resizer/dxgoUhCzCbFPs3CFb9cDaR2QFso=/800x533/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/pmn/PB7X3GTVLVFORHVWUHQJN6J7KU.jpg


    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.
     
    One of whom was Mike Smith, singer and keyboardist of the Dave Clark Five. Unfortunately, he was paralyzed after suffering a fall while fixing the perimeter of his villa. Would he have fared better had it happened in Surrey or Kent?


    On the other side of the tropics, something "vaguely" (rather than "terribly") iStevey-- Ceyl on, Sailer!:

    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’

    "Caroline" and "deSilva" suggest, in quadriconfessional Serendip, that both have a Christian background. Well, then, act like it, ladies!


    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fd2cff099333c5a90f53f3504e85b90d17563810/0_70_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?width=700&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=e65c756ac877040e0779e819404d3f6a

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @PiltdownMan, @epebble

    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’

    Jurie reverses decision by jury.

  37. Rob says:
    @Anon
    Very, very important new thread by Wesley Yang. Explains one mechanism by which Whites are being made to go extinct. (And it is working like a charm.)

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180795223117824

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180796615626758

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180798079373314

    Replies: @216, @Rob, @Wade Hampton, @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Rob


    When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?
     
    I think this helps keep things in perspective and is probably what lets the presidents of HYP sleep soundly at night.

    https://i.imgur.com/0UDodeZ.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Polistra
    @Rob

    Harvard is much larger than Yale or Princeton and the breadth and excellence of its graduate departments are generally unchallenged except perhaps by Berkeley. Obviously there are exceptions, but the generalization is broadly accurate.

    However, traditionally those in the know would always prefer Y&P for undergraduate education. Harvard has tried to address this demerit in various ways over the past few decades but the jury is out as to how successful they've been.

    Replies: @RAZ

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Rob

    Harvard’s reputation has benefited tremendously from America’s obsession with business and entrepreneurship. Harvard has a world class business school, Yale and Princeton do not (although Yale is trying). Stanford’s reputation has also benefited from minting MBAs. U Penn less so, probably because everyone knows the business school as “Wharton”.

    , @Flip
    @Rob


    Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation?
     
    Wash U. has come up a lot in the world. It used to be a mediocre regional school that was easy to get into but has upgraded due to substantial endowment funds raised (a lot from the Danforth family of Ralston Purina) and by appealing to East Coast Jews.

    Replies: @RAZ

  38. Porfirio Díaz, the long-time president/dictator of Mexico who was overthrown in the 1910 revolution, is credited with the aphorism –

    “Poor Mexico! So far from God, so close to the United States!”

    There’s a sentiment on which both nations can agree.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Crawfurdmuir

    Noticed that you are scarce around here lately.
    Please remedy this, with my compliments.

    Hope all's well, &c.

  39. anon[305] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic.
     
    I never understood this theory of Steve's. While a certain amount of territory policing and lashing out against perceived interlopers like Asian shopkeepers or anyone middle class and up occurs in black neighbourhoods that's more due to some denizens not having the same internal or external controls over expressing their resentments.

    It's hardly a case that a whole country like Mexico or rather it's rural peripheries are conspiring to be sociologically so dire by American standards because people are concerned with American retirees displacing them like some English expats retirees have to some extent in some Spanish towns. It's not a thought that has ever occurred to anyone. It's hard to get people to react to something that hasn't happened.

    Self-sustaining downward social and economic spirals are sometimes things that conservatives resist admitting exist but they do.

    Replies: @anon, @stillCARealist, @TWS

    I never understood this theory of Steve’s.

    Maybe he’s trolling his readers?

    Mexico has a stack of laws that are designed to keep foreigners corralled and relatively harmless.

    Example: Only Mexican citizens can own land along the coasts, for example; the retirees on the Sea of Cortez have long-term leases to the land their houses sit on. That lease may or may not be transferable.

    Example: Any foreigner who gets even slightly involved in Mexican politics can be deported with minimal fuss – there will not be any mass gatherings of outsiders on the Zocalo in DF like the mass anti-immigration rallies of Mexicans in LA a few years back.

    I wish the US could such laws. Littering and other cultural artifacts are merely icing on the cake.

  40. Dollar Vigilante makes a pretty good case for Mexico:

    https://lbry.tv/@DollarVigilante:b/Avoid-the-Consequences-VIDEO-720p:4

    I mean, who doesn’t want to go for walks, talking about banksters, beer flu, and crypto with your funny chihuahua that likes to eat tacos and give kisses?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    "chihuahua"

    I would run into trouble in Mexico with the dogs on rooftops situation. If I lived there I would be packing and those barking rooftop dogs would be too much of a temptation. Will useless American white men fall in love with rooftop dogs as they have for the Roof Top Korean?

  41. @Rob
    @Anon

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Polistra, @Peter Akuleyev, @Flip

    When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    I think this helps keep things in perspective and is probably what lets the presidents of HYP sleep soundly at night.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I doubt that refers to undergraduate degree.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Bardon Kaldian

  42. @Anon
    @Polistra

    Hunter Biden is a character straight out of Caligula's court of hangers-on. I'm surprised his father hasn't disowned him. Normally, a sane father would keep a sociopathic snake like Hunter at a distance, but Joe doesn't have the sense God gave a goat.

    Hunter is the single worst presidential offspring ever, and that includes John Adams' worthless alcoholic son Charles. Not a single one of them has behaved more vilely than Hunter.

    Replies: @John Up North

    I’m afraid Hunter may not be with us much longer. It seems to me that most of these guys who have horrific drug problems don’t make it out of their 50s because of the inevitable overdose.

    ER doctors in LA frequently treat middle age people showing up in cardiac arrest because of too much blow and booze which they can no longer handle due to the fact that they’re no longer 25.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @John Up North

    Don't you know that drugs don't result in cardiac arrest and that death occurs from oxygen deprivation resulting from a police officer sliding his knee around your general "neck area"?

    The MD expert witness in Minneapolis just told me so.

    , @Jack D
    @John Up North

    Rapper DMX just went in this exact way. They managed to get his heart restarted but too much time had passed and he was a veg so they unplugged him. And I think he was exactly 50.

    , @Polistra
    @John Up North

    OTOH, Hunter looks a thousand times better than he did just a few years ago. Suntan, new hair, new teeth, whatnot. For that matter, his dad looks better than he did a few years ago too. Good surgeons!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  43. @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan



    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

     

    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.
     
    Questa è la fine del quartiere!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @fitzhamilton

    Lake Como is amazing.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Steve Sailer

    Lago di Garda, not far away, is also beautiful and offers the additional benefit of not being crammed with tourists.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Lake Como is amazing.

     

    You're replying to someone who spent 30 years in St Paul!


    https://www.cardcow.com/images/set479/card00185_fr.jpg


    http://greatruns.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Lake-Como-St.-Paul.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  44. If you want mexico with English speakers, go to the Philippines.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Foreign Expert


    If you want mexico with English speakers, go to the Philippines.
     
    I believe the murder rate in the PI is also far lower than Mexico's.
  45. @Rob
    @Anon

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Polistra, @Peter Akuleyev, @Flip

    Harvard is much larger than Yale or Princeton and the breadth and excellence of its graduate departments are generally unchallenged except perhaps by Berkeley. Obviously there are exceptions, but the generalization is broadly accurate.

    However, traditionally those in the know would always prefer Y&P for undergraduate education. Harvard has tried to address this demerit in various ways over the past few decades but the jury is out as to how successful they’ve been.

    • Replies: @RAZ
    @Polistra

    Lawrence Summers had wanted to address the undergrad problem when he was President. But he was pushed out as President for musing on about why higher level physical sciences/engineering were dominated by men and whether there were innate mail attribute reasons for this. If he had handled this differently and mused on instead about whether there were innate female attributes for why they dominated some of the softer social sciences he might've been ok.

    But don't we know know that male and female are just social constructs?

    Summers was actually well supported AT THAT TIME by undergrads as they saw him trying to address their needs. If he had said now what he said then the woke crowd would have been on him stat and he'd be out like that.

  46. anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    @Rob


    When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?
     
    I think this helps keep things in perspective and is probably what lets the presidents of HYP sleep soundly at night.

    https://i.imgur.com/0UDodeZ.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    I doubt that refers to undergraduate degree.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @anonymous

    I doubt it, too, but the relevant point is that from the viewpoint of the leadership in big universities, reputation among aspiring high school seniors is not terribly important or a big worry.

    That takes care of itself, as long as they have strong graduate and research programs, or even hire big name professors onto their roster even after they've made their name.

    The reputation among those who aspire to an undergraduate slot follows from that, and not the other way around.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @anonymous

    Over 70% of Nobel laureates employed by these universities either didn't study at them at all, or are basically semi-retired, their achievements long past their prime.

    As you have trophy wives, you got also trophy Nobels.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lake Como is amazing.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Reg Cæsar

    Lago di Garda, not far away, is also beautiful and offers the additional benefit of not being crammed with tourists.

  48. @fitzhamilton
    I taught at the Tec de Monterey (ITESM) campus in Cd. Obregon back in the 90's. I've also lived a couple years in Guatemala, and have been to every country in Central American and all over most of South America. To me, Mexico and Guatemala are magical. I've been all over the world, I think 68 countries all told, and lived in eight countries for at least a year, and they are easily two of my favorite places to be exiled.

    One of the main charms is that if you get away from a few tourist epicenters like Cancun, there are very few gringos.. And the few gringos you do happen to meet there away from the beaten path tend to be the most interesting sort.. You need to be interested to be interesting, after all, and all 95% of anglophone and European tourists are really interested in is getting drunk on the beach and maybe scoring some weed. Those people might take a day trip to Chitzen Itza with a guide. After you get away from that close ambit, you're free of the knuckleheads, and in a completely different universe.

    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn't have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it's nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it's much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don't understand.

    Everything Boomer surfer chick says is true.. Except that I was never lonely there. I was always with people. If you speak Spanish, and willing to drink beer with campesinos, it is not hard to get intimate with people there. What you need to understand is that Latin America is still a peasant culture. People still live with barnyard animals in their homes, they slaughter and eat the whole animal, and they grow their own food. And that food is very, very good. Every part of Mexico is different, and it is one of the best places in the world to eat.

    Time and social interaction are entirely different there - in Edward Hall's terms, they are high context and polychronic, we are low context and monochronic. If a Mexican says to show up for dinner or a party at seven, don't expect anyone to show up until at least eight, or for the party to really get started until nine. You get there at seven, you'll be sitting there on the couch for an hour alone.. This explains much of organizational inefficiency there. They're up at dawn working like draft animals until dusk (with a long siesta in the heat in between), but they are organizing their time and resources like medieval peasants.

    It's also - and this should be self evident, but I did not understand this until I lived there - deeply indigenous. The Europeans are in charge - they have most of the power, land and money. But the Indians are the soul of the place, and they are not monolithic. Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    There's only a veneer of Europe overlaying things down there. It's deeply mestizo to the degree that Spanish and Christianity - Catholicism and Pentecostalism - permeates everything, but all of that is deeply intermingled with atavistic aboriginal stuff.. Some of it very, very strange. There are demons and spirits - and I mean this very literally - everywhere. If you want to see the devil, you can find him in Mexico. He's very real, and will be very pleased to meet you.. But where sin abounds, grace often abides, and God is often making strange startling appearances, too..

    The battle down there, like everywhere, has two sides. It just tends to be less muddled and cloaked in beige anodyne corporate hypocrisies like it is up here in gringoland. A lot of people like hypocrisy, they like their suburban commutes and corporate cubicles. It all makes them feel safe and secure. Those sorts of people should stay out of Mexico. They wouldn't like it, and they aren't wanted there.. Like Steve suggests, the Mexicans want to keep the vast majority of us north of the Rio Grande..

    Our manifest destiny now being to turn California, Texas and everything else we took in 1848 back over to them in the very near future, anyhow.. Now that the 19th Century Anglo demographic boom that created this country has fizzled into cultural vacuity, collapse and decadence, many Mexicans are sure it's just a matter of time, probably a few decades. One of my students once bluntly told me "We're going to beat you with babies, teacher, not with bombs."

    Most Mexican cities and towns have an "Avenida de los Niños Héroes" ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ni%C3%B1os_H%C3%A9roes ) just as ours all have Boulevards dedicated to Martin Luther King.

    The heroic kids in question were military cadets at the Federal Military Academy in Mexico City who died defending it from the Marines ("the Halls of Montezuma") on September 13, 1847. The last of them heroically jumping from the academy's walls, his shoulders draped with the Mexican flag. The 13th is a national holiday in Mexico, and I have been told that someday they will be avenged.

    I have typed too long here, I could write a book, but will spare y0u.

    Mexicans and Latin Americans are used to defeat. But I would never count them down, or underestimate their tenacity.. Or their potential.

    I will say in closing that if I had to bet on whose national hero, whose national myth and vision has a greater future and power, my money isn't on the ideological heirs and descendants of MLK. My money is all in on los niños de los Ninos Heroes de Chapultepec.

    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Peter Akuleyev, @Gordo

    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

    This is extremely well-observed and stated. I know exactly what you mean.

    You know you’ve turned the corner from ‘casually spending some time overseas’ to long-term — maybe lifetime — expat when you realize you’re often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren’t from your own culture.

    I won’t comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it’s both.

    I could write a book

    Maybe you should. I’d look forward to reading it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist



    You know you’ve turned the corner from ‘casually spending some time overseas’ to long-term — maybe lifetime — expat when you realize you’re often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren’t from your own culture.
     
    I won’t comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it’s both.
     
    It is neither. It is deluded and pathetic.
    , @epebble
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying;

    It is admirable. It is called immigrating and naturalizing.

    , @donut
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English." When I lived in Brooklyn I used to hang out at a Bodega between the subway and my apt. It seems that most of the Bodegas were owned by Yemenis . One day about 6 of them were going at it for about 20 min. in Arabic . After they dispersed one guy came into the store and said "all this talk outside ? It was about one chicken". They had been arguing about dinner the whole time .

    Replies: @photondancer

  49. Mazatlan gets hot. Up in tierra templada, like Cuernavaca, the temperature is always like spring. So, if you aren’t a surfer, settle at higher altitudes.

    Ecuador is considered an even better retirement destination than Mexico. My own preference is the Aegean. The Greek islands are wonderful — check out Kos! And if you are a true cosmopolitan, check out Bodrum, Turkey.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cato

    I went to Bodrum. It's like Santa Barbara with more varied scenery. I swam to Kos from a boat anchored a few hundred yards offshore. The Mediterranean in late May was colder than I expected and I was very glad to get to the rocky, isolated beach. I finally warmed up enough to swim back to the boat, rather than to wander into inhabited Greece in swim trunks and no passport.

    Replies: @black sea

  50. Anonymous[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @fitzhamilton


    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

     

    This is extremely well-observed and stated. I know exactly what you mean.

    You know you've turned the corner from 'casually spending some time overseas' to long-term -- maybe lifetime -- expat when you realize you're often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren't from your own culture.

    I won't comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it's both.


    I could write a book
     
    Maybe you should. I'd look forward to reading it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble, @donut

    You know you’ve turned the corner from ‘casually spending some time overseas’ to long-term — maybe lifetime — expat when you realize you’re often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren’t from your own culture.

    I won’t comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it’s both.

    It is neither. It is deluded and pathetic.

  51. @anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I doubt that refers to undergraduate degree.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Bardon Kaldian

    I doubt it, too, but the relevant point is that from the viewpoint of the leadership in big universities, reputation among aspiring high school seniors is not terribly important or a big worry.

    That takes care of itself, as long as they have strong graduate and research programs, or even hire big name professors onto their roster even after they’ve made their name.

    The reputation among those who aspire to an undergraduate slot follows from that, and not the other way around.

  52. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @fitzhamilton


    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

     

    This is extremely well-observed and stated. I know exactly what you mean.

    You know you've turned the corner from 'casually spending some time overseas' to long-term -- maybe lifetime -- expat when you realize you're often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren't from your own culture.

    I won't comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it's both.


    I could write a book
     
    Maybe you should. I'd look forward to reading it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble, @donut

    whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying;

    It is admirable. It is called immigrating and naturalizing.

  53. @Foreign Expert
    If you want mexico with English speakers, go to the Philippines.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    If you want mexico with English speakers, go to the Philippines.

    I believe the murder rate in the PI is also far lower than Mexico’s.

  54. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but this ex-surfer doesn't actually make the case for why she would leave the land of her ancestors, America, for Mexico. Not understanding the whole thing.

    I suppose, and perhaps Steve could back me up, is that IF one would desire a warm beach town, especially with the atmosphere to retire to, might it be suggested that they try...the Colony? As in, Malibu colony? Sparsely populated, exclusive taste, warm weather pretty much all year round, don't have to worry about the language thing (unless one hangs out a lot with the illegals). Can't beat it.

    Malibu. It's just that good, and it's American. They also still have trailer parks for trailers.

    Also, one might want to consider retiring to the beach cities a la, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach. On the East Coast, one could attempt to retire on the Gulf Coast, a la Tampa/Clearwater area.

    And of course there's also Hawaii. Nice tropical breezes, plenty of sun and sand.

    Mazatlan was well known to Hollywood stars as far back as the early '30's, when John Ford, John Wayne, Ward Bond, and Henry Fonda took fishing boat trips thru Mazatlan's coast, which often ended in drinking binges in the town afterwards.

    But again, if one desires a beach city for retirement, there's always Malibu (which tends to be much safer crimewise, than Mexico in general.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123

    How exactly can someone afford to live in Malibu?

    Rent is $4,800/month for a 1-bedroom.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/malibu-ca

    Manhattan Beach is $2,800/month.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/manhattan-beach-ca

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The only places where living near the beach in Southern California is semi-affordable is where the water's really cold.

    I'm thinking of Oxnard, but that's probably 20 years out of date.

    Some Quentin Tarantino movies are set in a long gone South Bay that's kind of cheap, but people figured out that places like Torrance are near the beach a long time ago.

  55. @Achmed E. Newman
    This excerpt along with the musings by Fred Reed about his ex-patriate new homeland have me bringing up this point I make regularly to Mr. Reed and ex-patriate commenters here:

    Here’s an article by an aging American surfer girl who semi-retired to Mazatlan in Mexico in 2006. She lives on $1200 per month.
     
    See, that's all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit ... blah, blah, blah... Yeah, you can get a lady to clean the house for 10 bucks a week, a guy does the laundry for 5 bucks. your place is right on the beach for $450 a month, and so on... (For guys, you can get a girlfriend for the low, low rate of $___ too) ... all on that SS check or some small pension or royalties.

    As Peak Stupidity noted long ago, in the post "Down to the Banana Republics ... went Fred Reed", once the dollar goes down the toilet, you will be living in Mexico as a MEXICAN, not as a well-off gringo. When that $1,500 SS check is worth the same amount of Pesos, YOU may be the one doing someone's laundry or cleaning someone's house, just to survive.

    If you do this sort of thing, and it's VERY TEMPTING, especially for single men, then get most of your money out of US Dollars! Too soon is better than too late.

    Replies: @haole3, @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Johann Ricke

    That would be a problem for people on a fixed US pension but not so much for self-funded retirees. Shares hedge against inflation to an extent and holding some overseas shares softens currency risk.
    This is not financial advice, do your own research etc.

  56. @216
    @Anon

    It should behoove all elected GOP politicians to:

    -Abolish affirmative action

    -Drastically reduce the number of foreign students

    -Demand partisan quotas in humanities/social sciences (for any institution taking fed coin, liberals must go Hillsdale)

    -Impose "civilian control of academia", implement some kind of political commissar/civilian review board for all hiring and promotions

    -Make the Regents board an elected position

    -Defund athletics

    -Shrink the number of students to German levels per capita

    While we're at it:

    -Reimpose sex-segregated dorms

    -Reimpose Greek/Latin

    -Export surplus academics to the Third World

    -Force the Ivies to become Protestant again, and force Georgetown to be Catholic

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Sick of Orcs

    216 4 President!

  57. If you want to retire in Mexico, you don’t have to move, you just have to wait.

    • LOL: photondancer
    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Charles St. Charles

    Fantastic!

    Thanks for that (will steal/liberate).

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Charles St. Charles

    • Tragic LOL

  58. @Reg Cæsar

    So the idea of retiring to Mexico has been around for a long time.

     

    Two of Minnesota's gifts to the mountains there have been former Gov Ventura and Gear Daddies' frontman Martin Zellar. The latter is somewhat ironic in that his income derives primarily from that Zamboni song you hear between periods at hockey rinks-- few of which are in Mexico.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/68/d9/6b/68d96b0ca13fb2190b40983e81ab11f5.png


    Trash pick-up is one example. In most Mexican towns, garbage is simply piled on certain street corners in whatever plastic bags or boxes one has handy.

     

    And this differs from South Philadelphia in that... ?


    https://www.inquirer.com/resizer/dxgoUhCzCbFPs3CFb9cDaR2QFso=/800x533/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/pmn/PB7X3GTVLVFORHVWUHQJN6J7KU.jpg


    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.
     
    One of whom was Mike Smith, singer and keyboardist of the Dave Clark Five. Unfortunately, he was paralyzed after suffering a fall while fixing the perimeter of his villa. Would he have fared better had it happened in Surrey or Kent?


    On the other side of the tropics, something "vaguely" (rather than "terribly") iStevey-- Ceyl on, Sailer!:

    ‘Mrs World’ arrested for grabbing crown from head of ‘Mrs Sri Lanka’

    "Caroline" and "deSilva" suggest, in quadriconfessional Serendip, that both have a Christian background. Well, then, act like it, ladies!


    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fd2cff099333c5a90f53f3504e85b90d17563810/0_70_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?width=700&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=e65c756ac877040e0779e819404d3f6a

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @PiltdownMan, @epebble

    You think you have problems in South Philly? This is Portland, OR:

    https://kgw.com/embeds/video/283-2eac987c-c323-420c-8e8a-29606733bc7a/iframe?jwsource=cl

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @epebble

    Yeah, but your picture shows breakdown in Portland. In Philly, that's what it looks like when everything's working!

    Replies: @JMcG

  59. @Achmed E. Newman
    This excerpt along with the musings by Fred Reed about his ex-patriate new homeland have me bringing up this point I make regularly to Mr. Reed and ex-patriate commenters here:

    Here’s an article by an aging American surfer girl who semi-retired to Mazatlan in Mexico in 2006. She lives on $1200 per month.
     
    See, that's all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit ... blah, blah, blah... Yeah, you can get a lady to clean the house for 10 bucks a week, a guy does the laundry for 5 bucks. your place is right on the beach for $450 a month, and so on... (For guys, you can get a girlfriend for the low, low rate of $___ too) ... all on that SS check or some small pension or royalties.

    As Peak Stupidity noted long ago, in the post "Down to the Banana Republics ... went Fred Reed", once the dollar goes down the toilet, you will be living in Mexico as a MEXICAN, not as a well-off gringo. When that $1,500 SS check is worth the same amount of Pesos, YOU may be the one doing someone's laundry or cleaning someone's house, just to survive.

    If you do this sort of thing, and it's VERY TEMPTING, especially for single men, then get most of your money out of US Dollars! Too soon is better than too late.

    Replies: @haole3, @Nikolai Vladivostok, @Johann Ricke

    See, that’s all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit … blah, blah, blah…

    There are multiple reserve currencies. The dollar is just one of them, forming $6.7T out of $11.7T worth of foreign exchange reserves worldwide:

    http://data.imf.org/?sk=E6A5F467-C14B-4AA8-9F6D-5A09EC4E62A4

    We’re not taxing the world. When the dollar’s exchange rate falls, dollar prices increase. For instance, in yen terms, oil prices have gone up just over 6x since 1973, when the first oil shock occurred. In dollar terms, they’ve gone up 20x.

    Reserve currency status is overrated. The Swiss certainly fought it every chance they got, because it made their export goods unaffordable and increased unemployment. At one point, they imposed a 41% tax on foreign deposits.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-22/swiss-history-of-negative-interest-rates-is-ugly

    They’re still fighting it today, with a -0.75% central bank rate.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-swiss-snb-rates/swiss-central-bank-defends-negative-interest-rates-idUSKCN11L0N7

    If you’re interested, a Quora essay explains why having a currency that is the biggest component of other countries’ rainy day funds is not a benefit at all:

    https://www.quora.com/What-happens-if-the-U-S-dollar-loses-its-status-as-the-worlds-major-reserve-currency/answers/82129987

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Johann Ricke

    Sorry for the late reply, Mr. Ricke. I've written this same reply to someone with the very point you are making recently, so hopefully I can explain here better:

    I don't think that it's particularly that having the Reserve currency makes the currency stronger, but that having a strong currency makes it appropriate for the, or, as you say, one of, the Reserve currencies. The American dollar used to be very appropriate as it was backed by something real back in the day. If trading between nations goes even further away from the dollar, the fact that these green piece of paper (really mostly digits in computers) is backed by squat-all may come into the forefront of the minds of money men.

    It's psychological, part-ways. The US dollar still has this undeserved reputation of being good money. How long will it last?

    Anyway, thanks for the interesting reply. (I used to be a big ZeroHedge reader, but it's been a while.)

  60. @JMcG
    @Steve Sailer

    From what I saw in Italy, everyone south of the Sahara wants to move there. And try to sell counterfeit crap to tourists.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    Don’t kid yourself, everyone south of the Sahara wants to move to Germany. Italy is just a way station.

  61. jon says:

    2. Unbelievably high noise levels

    Apparently, appreciation of peace and quiet is a “White thing.” Traveling around Asia, I have run in to all of the noise things she complains about. Even the East Asians aren’t immune – a hiking trail by my house has solar powered lights, and on each pole is a big speaker that blasts music 24/7, because that’s what you go into the woods for …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @jon

    That's hilarious.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @jon


    Even the East Asians aren’t immune

     

    Hong Kong has hundreds of miles of well-kept and often spectacular hiking trails. But on most hikes you'll meet hikers (often elderly) carrying along surprisingly large radios/portable speakers blasting out Chinese opera or Cantopop. People here say that too much quiet makes them feel lonely and down.

    Replies: @jon

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @jon

    Well, to be fair, when I climbed Tai Shan, I started at about midnight in order to see the sunrise. There were way stations every so often that were open all night with lights. This was actually comforting. Because I wasn't climbing to see the stars or for the wilderness, but to get to the top. It's a completely different mentality.

  62. @fitzhamilton
    I taught at the Tec de Monterey (ITESM) campus in Cd. Obregon back in the 90's. I've also lived a couple years in Guatemala, and have been to every country in Central American and all over most of South America. To me, Mexico and Guatemala are magical. I've been all over the world, I think 68 countries all told, and lived in eight countries for at least a year, and they are easily two of my favorite places to be exiled.

    One of the main charms is that if you get away from a few tourist epicenters like Cancun, there are very few gringos.. And the few gringos you do happen to meet there away from the beaten path tend to be the most interesting sort.. You need to be interested to be interesting, after all, and all 95% of anglophone and European tourists are really interested in is getting drunk on the beach and maybe scoring some weed. Those people might take a day trip to Chitzen Itza with a guide. After you get away from that close ambit, you're free of the knuckleheads, and in a completely different universe.

    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn't have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it's nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it's much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don't understand.

    Everything Boomer surfer chick says is true.. Except that I was never lonely there. I was always with people. If you speak Spanish, and willing to drink beer with campesinos, it is not hard to get intimate with people there. What you need to understand is that Latin America is still a peasant culture. People still live with barnyard animals in their homes, they slaughter and eat the whole animal, and they grow their own food. And that food is very, very good. Every part of Mexico is different, and it is one of the best places in the world to eat.

    Time and social interaction are entirely different there - in Edward Hall's terms, they are high context and polychronic, we are low context and monochronic. If a Mexican says to show up for dinner or a party at seven, don't expect anyone to show up until at least eight, or for the party to really get started until nine. You get there at seven, you'll be sitting there on the couch for an hour alone.. This explains much of organizational inefficiency there. They're up at dawn working like draft animals until dusk (with a long siesta in the heat in between), but they are organizing their time and resources like medieval peasants.

    It's also - and this should be self evident, but I did not understand this until I lived there - deeply indigenous. The Europeans are in charge - they have most of the power, land and money. But the Indians are the soul of the place, and they are not monolithic. Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    There's only a veneer of Europe overlaying things down there. It's deeply mestizo to the degree that Spanish and Christianity - Catholicism and Pentecostalism - permeates everything, but all of that is deeply intermingled with atavistic aboriginal stuff.. Some of it very, very strange. There are demons and spirits - and I mean this very literally - everywhere. If you want to see the devil, you can find him in Mexico. He's very real, and will be very pleased to meet you.. But where sin abounds, grace often abides, and God is often making strange startling appearances, too..

    The battle down there, like everywhere, has two sides. It just tends to be less muddled and cloaked in beige anodyne corporate hypocrisies like it is up here in gringoland. A lot of people like hypocrisy, they like their suburban commutes and corporate cubicles. It all makes them feel safe and secure. Those sorts of people should stay out of Mexico. They wouldn't like it, and they aren't wanted there.. Like Steve suggests, the Mexicans want to keep the vast majority of us north of the Rio Grande..

    Our manifest destiny now being to turn California, Texas and everything else we took in 1848 back over to them in the very near future, anyhow.. Now that the 19th Century Anglo demographic boom that created this country has fizzled into cultural vacuity, collapse and decadence, many Mexicans are sure it's just a matter of time, probably a few decades. One of my students once bluntly told me "We're going to beat you with babies, teacher, not with bombs."

    Most Mexican cities and towns have an "Avenida de los Niños Héroes" ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ni%C3%B1os_H%C3%A9roes ) just as ours all have Boulevards dedicated to Martin Luther King.

    The heroic kids in question were military cadets at the Federal Military Academy in Mexico City who died defending it from the Marines ("the Halls of Montezuma") on September 13, 1847. The last of them heroically jumping from the academy's walls, his shoulders draped with the Mexican flag. The 13th is a national holiday in Mexico, and I have been told that someday they will be avenged.

    I have typed too long here, I could write a book, but will spare y0u.

    Mexicans and Latin Americans are used to defeat. But I would never count them down, or underestimate their tenacity.. Or their potential.

    I will say in closing that if I had to bet on whose national hero, whose national myth and vision has a greater future and power, my money isn't on the ideological heirs and descendants of MLK. My money is all in on los niños de los Ninos Heroes de Chapultepec.

    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Peter Akuleyev, @Gordo

    Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    This was my observation as well. In a place like Cancun the Aztecs (managers from the DF) bossing around the Maya workers seem almost as foreign as the gringos. In Europe or Africa the tribal tensions tend to be on the surface. In Mexico they are more repressed but clearly still there.

  63. @anonymous

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.
     
    Retirees don’t seem like much of a cost to the Mexican nation though. They don’t reproduce, so they don’t really dispossess Mexicans of their homeland, destroy their ethnicity, or threaten their sovereignty. They presumably pay for their own health care. They bring free dollars into Mexico from abroad and generally do not work, so they literally create jobs for ethnic Mexicans rather than compete against them for jobs. They presumably also don’t generally compete against Mexican men for securing Mexican women of child bearing age.

    What’s not to like?

    Replies: @Polistra, @fitzhamilton, @BGKB

    The Mexicans are very canny people. They have a strict system of real estate classification that forbids outright ownership of property by foreigners in some of the choicest tourist and retirement areas. I think the rule is no outright ownership 30km from the coasts, and 100km from the international borders.

    Meaning that if you want to own property in these zones, and you are not married to a Mexican or intent on gaining citizenship (not easy to do) you must set up a fiduciary trust with a Mexican bank who will hold the title for you. I think this is why so many foreign retirees congregate inland around places like Guadalajara, where they can actually hold direct title to property.. The Mexicans have set up this firewall to prevent foreign capital from flooding their best markets, disenfranchising the locals.

    We could take a page from their book viz. Chinese, Saudi (etc.) money flooding places like California or Colorado, driving values through the stratosphere making ownership difficult to impossible for anyone but plutocrats..

    There are also dangers in the Mexican legal system, where foreigners have been legally defrauded by the locals. This is a common trend worldwide: legal systems tend to favor locals over foreigners in disputes. If say you end up getting divorced from your native spouse, or in a dispute with native business partners, do not expect the native courts to treat you well.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @fitzhamilton

    Chinese money isn't driving up home prices in Colorado. That would be white boomers.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  64. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ha, I was just thinking about the littering thing today. One could say it's just cultural, not genetic, as Americans used to be quite the litterbugs when I was young, at least many friends of mine in HS years.

    A couple of tree guys with a couple of Mexican* hands was working next door, and I paid them a few bucks to get them to use the their telescoping pole saw on a couple of limbs that were blocking sunlight from our proposed garden site. Well, they were good guys all. The one who knew the most about trees spoke great English but was Hispanic himself. I remember he was drinking a Coke as he walked about telling me stuff about the trees. An hour later when I went to get my bow saw, I noticed his empty Coke can in the firewood pile.

    Listen, I don't begrudge the guy any, and I'm not at all sore about it. It's just that an American would either ask you where the trash is, or carry it out to throw in the back of his truck**, or at least hand you the can with nothing said. I mean, just, why? It's a Mexican thing.

    Don't even ask me about littering in China. You don't have to, as I'll tell you: We were at this house in which the front faced an 8 ft alley that was "the street". A kid threw down a bottle there, about 50 ft from the corner, where the trash gets collected, except it's not in bags there either, just a big messy pile. Well, the Dad shouted at the kid something to the effect of "get that trash off my street." I just looked at him and said "what's the damn difference?" (No, he didn't know English.)

    .

    * They could have been Guatemalan - how do I know?

    ** A friend of mine had a boat on a trailer locked to his big American car for something like a year or two, having lost the key to the padlock at the hitch. That was his mobile trash dispensary for awhile.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @Anonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Bill Jones

    It’s definitely cultural.

    Basically, when a society is given non-biodegradeable goods, especially in an urban environment on a scale it has never had before (which means everyone, everywhere) it has to learn that the cup you’ve just thrown on the ground is going to melt away into the mud.

    After some generations or a very concerted campaign (including trash pick up infrastructure) though, the littering drops to near nil.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Boomthorkell

    Cutting down on littering is very much a social construct, but it's now considered unthinkably racist to criticize Mexicans for their littering.

  65. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s not just about living cheap. Mexico and other Latin American countries have a lot going for them in terms of freedom.

    America straight up sucks now. In Europe, they have freedoms we do not, like freedom to get treated for cancer if you aren’t rich or have top-of-the-line insurance. In Europe they also have the right to be forgotten online and better defamation laws to prevent media bullying of ordinary people. In Latin America they have a lot of religious freedom to create communes and such (lots of English speaking Mennonites and Mormons in Mexico). They also have freedom of entrepreneurship, without a million little bureaucrats involved in every step. In Asia they have the freedom to be tribal and chauvinistic in defense of your ethnic group. They also have the freedom to be told the rules and expectations up front, rather than the recent American practice of destroying a person’s life first, then informing them and the world of the latest statutes in Racism Code secondarily. In Africa they have the freedom to live as nature designed.

    In America the only freedom we have left is guns, but only the street thugs dare use them.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  66. You imagine too much intentionality in the actions of foreigners. They are not us. When they play loud music, burn rubbish or let their half-dozen dogs bark all night, gringos could not be further from their minds.
    WEIRD people don’t know how weird we are. That’s Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (until recently). Our high trust, universalist brains work differently to all other peoples, and both your confusion about why anyone would litter and our collective, looming extinction relate to our unique mindset.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Nikolai Vladivostok


    our collective, looming extinction relate[s] to our unique mindset.
     
    Please explain.

    Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok

  67. @Rob
    @Anon

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Polistra, @Peter Akuleyev, @Flip

    Harvard’s reputation has benefited tremendously from America’s obsession with business and entrepreneurship. Harvard has a world class business school, Yale and Princeton do not (although Yale is trying). Stanford’s reputation has also benefited from minting MBAs. U Penn less so, probably because everyone knows the business school as “Wharton”.

  68. @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan



    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

     

    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.
     
    Questa è la fine del quartiere!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @fitzhamilton

    Italy is beautiful, the food is incredible (better on average than in France), and the Italians – though crazy – are fascinating and a lot of fun.. Much more fun than the Germans, who are no fun at all outside of Bavaria.

    But the entire place is psychically caked under 4,000 years of layered stultification, corruption and decadence. It’s an exhausted country, in an even greater demographic death spiral than the rest of Europe.

    The first dozen times I visited, I was overawed by all the astonishing beauty. Italy utterly seduced me.

    These last few trips, I’ve began to feel as if the entire country is one great open air necropolis of exquisitely beautiful mausoleums full of desiccated corpses, inhabited by elegant zombies.

    It’s been like finding Snow White, repeatedly kissing her, then realizing she’s not merely asleep, but truly dead..

    All of Europe is taking on this pall for me, Italy is just the furthest gone.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @fitzhamilton

    When we visited Italy in 2016, it was covered in trash, graffiti, and beggars. The tourist attractions display unparalleled beauty from the past, and nature never disappoints, but that country isn't a place that I'd feel comfortable raising children in. Too crowded, too foreign (middle easterners and Africans), too decrepit.
    The food was good, but France was better. Italian meals are short on meat and high on salt.

    , @Beelzebub
    @fitzhamilton

    I agree. I've only been to Scotland, Portugal, and Italy but I had the same impression. It seemed to me that everyone was living off of all the relics of the past--the churches, the castles, etc., but the people all seemed sort of empty and tired. It was as if they'd given up in a way.

  69. Anonymous[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Ha, I was just thinking about the littering thing today. One could say it's just cultural, not genetic, as Americans used to be quite the litterbugs when I was young, at least many friends of mine in HS years.

    A couple of tree guys with a couple of Mexican* hands was working next door, and I paid them a few bucks to get them to use the their telescoping pole saw on a couple of limbs that were blocking sunlight from our proposed garden site. Well, they were good guys all. The one who knew the most about trees spoke great English but was Hispanic himself. I remember he was drinking a Coke as he walked about telling me stuff about the trees. An hour later when I went to get my bow saw, I noticed his empty Coke can in the firewood pile.

    Listen, I don't begrudge the guy any, and I'm not at all sore about it. It's just that an American would either ask you where the trash is, or carry it out to throw in the back of his truck**, or at least hand you the can with nothing said. I mean, just, why? It's a Mexican thing.

    Don't even ask me about littering in China. You don't have to, as I'll tell you: We were at this house in which the front faced an 8 ft alley that was "the street". A kid threw down a bottle there, about 50 ft from the corner, where the trash gets collected, except it's not in bags there either, just a big messy pile. Well, the Dad shouted at the kid something to the effect of "get that trash off my street." I just looked at him and said "what's the damn difference?" (No, he didn't know English.)

    .

    * They could have been Guatemalan - how do I know?

    ** A friend of mine had a boat on a trailer locked to his big American car for something like a year or two, having lost the key to the padlock at the hitch. That was his mobile trash dispensary for awhile.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @Anonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Bill Jones

    Rural people are always litterbugs. Why shouldn’t they be? It’s a big world with only a few scattered people.

    It takes city living to appreciate the problems with this.

  70. @Boomthorkell
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's definitely cultural.

    Basically, when a society is given non-biodegradeable goods, especially in an urban environment on a scale it has never had before (which means everyone, everywhere) it has to learn that the cup you've just thrown on the ground is going to melt away into the mud.

    After some generations or a very concerted campaign (including trash pick up infrastructure) though, the littering drops to near nil.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Cutting down on littering is very much a social construct, but it’s now considered unthinkably racist to criticize Mexicans for their littering.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
  71. @jon

    2. Unbelievably high noise levels
     
    Apparently, appreciation of peace and quiet is a "White thing." Traveling around Asia, I have run in to all of the noise things she complains about. Even the East Asians aren't immune - a hiking trail by my house has solar powered lights, and on each pole is a big speaker that blasts music 24/7, because that's what you go into the woods for ...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Chrisnonymous

    That’s hilarious.

  72. @jon

    2. Unbelievably high noise levels
     
    Apparently, appreciation of peace and quiet is a "White thing." Traveling around Asia, I have run in to all of the noise things she complains about. Even the East Asians aren't immune - a hiking trail by my house has solar powered lights, and on each pole is a big speaker that blasts music 24/7, because that's what you go into the woods for ...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Chrisnonymous

    Even the East Asians aren’t immune

    Hong Kong has hundreds of miles of well-kept and often spectacular hiking trails. But on most hikes you’ll meet hikers (often elderly) carrying along surprisingly large radios/portable speakers blasting out Chinese opera or Cantopop. People here say that too much quiet makes them feel lonely and down.

    • Replies: @jon
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Yep, in Korea all the Ajosshis (old Korean guys) like to hike around with a hand-held radio (and a bottle of soju).

  73. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lake Como is amazing.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Reg Cæsar

    Lake Como is amazing.

    You’re replying to someone who spent 30 years in St Paul!

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, it' true, you can find your own piece of paradise almost anywhere, certainly in St. Paul Minnesota. The postcard you've posted looks quite old and depicts a "Japanese Garden" that has acquired some very verdant plants and sculpture over the years:

    https://comofriends.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Japanesegardenrainbridge.jpg

    then there's the addition of the beautiful "Ordway Japanese Garden" too:

    https://minnevangelist.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ordway-japanese-garden-3-600x800.jpg

    One cannot omit the beautiful "Sunken Gardens" within the Margaret McNeely conservatory at Como Park:

    https://comofriends.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/springflowershow2021centerstat.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  74. Anonymous[878] • Disclaimer says:
    @Nikolai Vladivostok
    You imagine too much intentionality in the actions of foreigners. They are not us. When they play loud music, burn rubbish or let their half-dozen dogs bark all night, gringos could not be further from their minds.
    WEIRD people don't know how weird we are. That's Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (until recently). Our high trust, universalist brains work differently to all other peoples, and both your confusion about why anyone would litter and our collective, looming extinction relate to our unique mindset.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    our collective, looming extinction relate[s] to our unique mindset.

    Please explain.

    • Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok
    @Anonymous

    High intake of non-WEIRD migrants with whom we struggle to compete as we play by different rules.
    Hard to explain in a short comment. I wrote an article about what WEIRD means here:
    https://sovietmen.wordpress.com/2020/09/08/they-are-not-us/
    and why we are losing our WEIRD culture here:
    https://sovietmen.wordpress.com/2021/03/16/becoming-less-weird/

  75. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    How exactly can someone afford to live in Malibu?

    Rent is $4,800/month for a 1-bedroom.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/malibu-ca

    Manhattan Beach is $2,800/month.

    https://www.zumper.com/rent-research/manhattan-beach-ca

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The only places where living near the beach in Southern California is semi-affordable is where the water’s really cold.

    I’m thinking of Oxnard, but that’s probably 20 years out of date.

    Some Quentin Tarantino movies are set in a long gone South Bay that’s kind of cheap, but people figured out that places like Torrance are near the beach a long time ago.

  76. @Cato
    Mazatlan gets hot. Up in tierra templada, like Cuernavaca, the temperature is always like spring. So, if you aren't a surfer, settle at higher altitudes.

    Ecuador is considered an even better retirement destination than Mexico. My own preference is the Aegean. The Greek islands are wonderful -- check out Kos! And if you are a true cosmopolitan, check out Bodrum, Turkey.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I went to Bodrum. It’s like Santa Barbara with more varied scenery. I swam to Kos from a boat anchored a few hundred yards offshore. The Mediterranean in late May was colder than I expected and I was very glad to get to the rocky, isolated beach. I finally warmed up enough to swim back to the boat, rather than to wander into inhabited Greece in swim trunks and no passport.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Steve Sailer

    In Bodrum you can get a pretty nice home for around $100, 000. Because of the large population of tourists and expat retirees, a lot of local people speak English. But if you retire there, you better be OK with the heat.

    Replies: @Cato

  77. @Charles St. Charles
    If you want to retire in Mexico, you don’t have to move, you just have to wait.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Almost Missouri

    Fantastic!

    Thanks for that (will steal/liberate).

  78. @Anon
    Very, very important new thread by Wesley Yang. Explains one mechanism by which Whites are being made to go extinct. (And it is working like a charm.)

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180795223117824

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180796615626758

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180798079373314

    Replies: @216, @Rob, @Wade Hampton, @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    As stupid as our Ruling Class is today, it’s going to get even stupider.

  79. @epebble
    @Reg Cæsar

    You think you have problems in South Philly? This is Portland, OR:

    https://kgw.com/embeds/video/283-2eac987c-c323-420c-8e8a-29606733bc7a/iframe?jwsource=cl

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah, but your picture shows breakdown in Portland. In Philly, that’s what it looks like when everything’s working!

    • LOL: donut
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    There was a trash strike in Philly back in the mid eighties. My job required that I occasionally visited basements in that pit of despair. The black families almost universally responded to the trash strike by opening their basement door and throwing the bags of trash down the stairs. The cellars would be packed floor to ceiling with rotting garbage.
    The south Philly Italians designated an empty lot in their neighborhood and the trash would get piled there.

  80. @Steve Sailer
    @Cato

    I went to Bodrum. It's like Santa Barbara with more varied scenery. I swam to Kos from a boat anchored a few hundred yards offshore. The Mediterranean in late May was colder than I expected and I was very glad to get to the rocky, isolated beach. I finally warmed up enough to swim back to the boat, rather than to wander into inhabited Greece in swim trunks and no passport.

    Replies: @black sea

    In Bodrum you can get a pretty nice home for around $100, 000. Because of the large population of tourists and expat retirees, a lot of local people speak English. But if you retire there, you better be OK with the heat.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @black sea

    Well, heat compared to Karadeniz, but not heat compared to Texas, and anyway only uncomfortable heat during part of July and August (but not uncomfortable if you are lounging on the beach). May can be a bit chilly for swimming (as Steve said, the water is cold), June is great, September through November are beautiful. From December to April, it won't freeze, but you will need some heat in your home.

    I think the current cost of a decent home on the Bodrum peninsula is higher than $100K. Depends on your standards, of course, but demand has risen since COVID-19, since all of Kadıköy has decided that Bodrum is the place to escape to. Which actually makes Bodrum real estate a good investment, regardless of the cost.

    There are lots of towns on the Bodrum peninsula, and my favorites are Yalıkavak and Torba. I would be willing to retire in either, as well as in Bodrum itself. But the Greek islands are pretty amazing, too, especially Kos.

  81. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.

    This is not true. Mexican mediocrity is the price of having a country predominately populated by Indios and Meztizos with their lower IQs. There is a European overclass which attempts to direct the country, but there’s only so much they can do with a country full of stupid people.

    I’ve spent a lot of my working life in Mexico City. I love the country, its people and its history. I might even want to live there someday.

    But let me tell you a little story. The Mexican Country head of my company showed a nighttime photo from space of the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. part of the Gulf was heavily stellated with the lights of oil rigs. The Mexican part was completely dark. He said (joking ruefully) that God gave all the oil to the Americans. PEMEX is a nationalized company that politicians use as a slush fund to keep the locals paid off and happy. No possibility of actually maximizing the cash flow by investing some of the profits in capital improvements as would be done in the U.S.

    Another typical Mexican joke is that when God divided up North America, he gave the part with all the good roads to the Gringos.

    As Derb (I think) said, culture is downstream from genetics. The reason Mexico is the way it is is that it is full of Mexicans. It’s not a choice.

  82. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Well, admittedly, I don’t know what trailer parks rent per month. Also, did mention that there’s FL’s Gulf Coast, Tampa/Clearwater area and the like. Lots of retirees there, and FL’s cost of living is considerably less than CA’s. Especially now that FL has that new $15 per hr minimum wage increase.

  83. @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    Right, I assumed when I read it her primary reason for moving to Mexico was not being able to afford the lifestyle she wanted in California. She puts up with all the bad stuff she mentions because she can live near the beach in Mexico. She mentions cheap health care, but if she starts having serious health problems she will be back in the U.S. quickly.

    Replies: @notsaying, @Reverend Goody

    Yes, her paradise requires a backup. I am sure she has a health plan that would be completely inadequate if she really got sick. Her backup plan would be to move in with her adult children.

    If I lived in a third world country I think I would really dislike the expats who alternatively complain about how awful some things are then rave about how wonderful it is there, who want everything cheap and always have America to run home to when things hit the fan.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @notsaying

    Here in Ecuador you can have the government healthcare plan for $77 a month for retirees with no co-pays or deductibles, or you can splash out and get a private insurance for $125 (Humana) to $225 per month with no more than $1,000 of deductible.

    If you are willing to accept a $5,000 deductible, you can have coverage of up to a million dollars for $125 a month at 70 years of age.

    A million dollars goes a long way in a country where medical costs are about 10% of the US, so this would be equivalent to about coverage of $10 million.

  84. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @fitzhamilton


    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it’s nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it’s much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don’t understand.

     

    This is extremely well-observed and stated. I know exactly what you mean.

    You know you've turned the corner from 'casually spending some time overseas' to long-term -- maybe lifetime -- expat when you realize you're often more comfortable and feel better amongst people who aren't from your own culture.

    I won't comment on whether this phenomenon is admirable or horrifying; maybe it's both.


    I could write a book
     
    Maybe you should. I'd look forward to reading it.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @epebble, @donut

    “I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English.” When I lived in Brooklyn I used to hang out at a Bodega between the subway and my apt. It seems that most of the Bodegas were owned by Yemenis . One day about 6 of them were going at it for about 20 min. in Arabic . After they dispersed one guy came into the store and said “all this talk outside ? It was about one chicken”. They had been arguing about dinner the whole time .

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @donut

    I see this all the time too. Don't know what it is about Arab men but they don't seem to be able to talk about anything without it looking like a big brangle to onlookers.

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Nobody wants to move to Italy?

    Lots of people from Northern Europe retired to Spain during the era when it vastly upgraded itself.

    Replies: @JMcG, @PiltdownMan, @Gordo

    Practically the entire Scottish ruling class have villas in Tuscany.

  86. @Redneck farmer
    Fred Reed appears happy about the squalor.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Fred Reed is also literally blind.

  87. @fitzhamilton
    I taught at the Tec de Monterey (ITESM) campus in Cd. Obregon back in the 90's. I've also lived a couple years in Guatemala, and have been to every country in Central American and all over most of South America. To me, Mexico and Guatemala are magical. I've been all over the world, I think 68 countries all told, and lived in eight countries for at least a year, and they are easily two of my favorite places to be exiled.

    One of the main charms is that if you get away from a few tourist epicenters like Cancun, there are very few gringos.. And the few gringos you do happen to meet there away from the beaten path tend to be the most interesting sort.. You need to be interested to be interesting, after all, and all 95% of anglophone and European tourists are really interested in is getting drunk on the beach and maybe scoring some weed. Those people might take a day trip to Chitzen Itza with a guide. After you get away from that close ambit, you're free of the knuckleheads, and in a completely different universe.

    I spent most of the Obama years in small towns and villages in Latin America and South East Asia. It was bliss. I didn't have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English. Idiocy in a second language is always easier to take, it's nowhere near as personal, often at least interesting in its novelty, and if you really want to you it's much easier to tune out, nod along, or just beg off pretending you don't understand.

    Everything Boomer surfer chick says is true.. Except that I was never lonely there. I was always with people. If you speak Spanish, and willing to drink beer with campesinos, it is not hard to get intimate with people there. What you need to understand is that Latin America is still a peasant culture. People still live with barnyard animals in their homes, they slaughter and eat the whole animal, and they grow their own food. And that food is very, very good. Every part of Mexico is different, and it is one of the best places in the world to eat.

    Time and social interaction are entirely different there - in Edward Hall's terms, they are high context and polychronic, we are low context and monochronic. If a Mexican says to show up for dinner or a party at seven, don't expect anyone to show up until at least eight, or for the party to really get started until nine. You get there at seven, you'll be sitting there on the couch for an hour alone.. This explains much of organizational inefficiency there. They're up at dawn working like draft animals until dusk (with a long siesta in the heat in between), but they are organizing their time and resources like medieval peasants.

    It's also - and this should be self evident, but I did not understand this until I lived there - deeply indigenous. The Europeans are in charge - they have most of the power, land and money. But the Indians are the soul of the place, and they are not monolithic. Mexico is a mosaic of tribes. The Aztecs in the middle dominate and rule. The Navajo and Yaqui were still shooting people in the north into the late sixties.. And the Maya in the south still are fighting a very low grade civil war, today. This subterranean tribalism courses through everything, and finds expression in the inter cartel conflicts..

    There's only a veneer of Europe overlaying things down there. It's deeply mestizo to the degree that Spanish and Christianity - Catholicism and Pentecostalism - permeates everything, but all of that is deeply intermingled with atavistic aboriginal stuff.. Some of it very, very strange. There are demons and spirits - and I mean this very literally - everywhere. If you want to see the devil, you can find him in Mexico. He's very real, and will be very pleased to meet you.. But where sin abounds, grace often abides, and God is often making strange startling appearances, too..

    The battle down there, like everywhere, has two sides. It just tends to be less muddled and cloaked in beige anodyne corporate hypocrisies like it is up here in gringoland. A lot of people like hypocrisy, they like their suburban commutes and corporate cubicles. It all makes them feel safe and secure. Those sorts of people should stay out of Mexico. They wouldn't like it, and they aren't wanted there.. Like Steve suggests, the Mexicans want to keep the vast majority of us north of the Rio Grande..

    Our manifest destiny now being to turn California, Texas and everything else we took in 1848 back over to them in the very near future, anyhow.. Now that the 19th Century Anglo demographic boom that created this country has fizzled into cultural vacuity, collapse and decadence, many Mexicans are sure it's just a matter of time, probably a few decades. One of my students once bluntly told me "We're going to beat you with babies, teacher, not with bombs."

    Most Mexican cities and towns have an "Avenida de los Niños Héroes" ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ni%C3%B1os_H%C3%A9roes ) just as ours all have Boulevards dedicated to Martin Luther King.

    The heroic kids in question were military cadets at the Federal Military Academy in Mexico City who died defending it from the Marines ("the Halls of Montezuma") on September 13, 1847. The last of them heroically jumping from the academy's walls, his shoulders draped with the Mexican flag. The 13th is a national holiday in Mexico, and I have been told that someday they will be avenged.

    I have typed too long here, I could write a book, but will spare y0u.

    Mexicans and Latin Americans are used to defeat. But I would never count them down, or underestimate their tenacity.. Or their potential.

    I will say in closing that if I had to bet on whose national hero, whose national myth and vision has a greater future and power, my money isn't on the ideological heirs and descendants of MLK. My money is all in on los niños de los Ninos Heroes de Chapultepec.

    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Peter Akuleyev, @Gordo

    I doubt our bombs will be any real match for all those babies..

    Bombs, like guns, are only effective if you have the willpower to use them.

    We have substantial and capable armed forces here in the UK and over 200 hydrogen bombs but we are being invaded by Sub-Saharan African and South Asians and nothing is done to stop this.

  88. @Anonymous
    @Nikolai Vladivostok


    our collective, looming extinction relate[s] to our unique mindset.
     
    Please explain.

    Replies: @Nikolai Vladivostok

    High intake of non-WEIRD migrants with whom we struggle to compete as we play by different rules.
    Hard to explain in a short comment. I wrote an article about what WEIRD means here:
    https://sovietmen.wordpress.com/2020/09/08/they-are-not-us/
    and why we are losing our WEIRD culture here:
    https://sovietmen.wordpress.com/2021/03/16/becoming-less-weird/

    • Thanks: Mark G.
  89. @Charles St. Charles
    If you want to retire in Mexico, you don’t have to move, you just have to wait.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Almost Missouri

    • Tragic LOL

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  90. @anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    I doubt that refers to undergraduate degree.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Bardon Kaldian

    Over 70% of Nobel laureates employed by these universities either didn’t study at them at all, or are basically semi-retired, their achievements long past their prime.

    As you have trophy wives, you got also trophy Nobels.

    • Agree: utu
  91. I imagine that a Swiss citizen, visiting the US, views the relative disorder and litter here the way we view Mexico.

  92. @Reg Cæsar
    @epebble

    Yeah, but your picture shows breakdown in Portland. In Philly, that's what it looks like when everything's working!

    Replies: @JMcG

    There was a trash strike in Philly back in the mid eighties. My job required that I occasionally visited basements in that pit of despair. The black families almost universally responded to the trash strike by opening their basement door and throwing the bags of trash down the stairs. The cellars would be packed floor to ceiling with rotting garbage.
    The south Philly Italians designated an empty lot in their neighborhood and the trash would get piled there.

  93. There are various foreign countries where a huge fraction of the population speaks the global superlanguage of English….

    Yeah, you’d like to think that, but go a few kilometers out of town … even in major cities, it is hit and miss. I had a big laugh one day in a Hypermarché in Western France, when a couple (probably from Ramstein AFB) kept asking the locals if any spoke English, and at best got a few works of apology, but no across the board. (yes, I finally helped).

    Smog in Mexico City was horrific until the 2000s when NAFTA allowed American used cars with catalytic converters to be sold in Mexico. This drove up the price of used cars in L.A., but for the first time in a generation, residents of Mexico City could see the 3 snow-capped volcanos on their horizon.

    I used to occasionally pull alert duty in the ‘80s at March AFB, and on most days one could not see the hills behind San Bernardino, but some nights it might rain, and you could literally smell the concrete being eaten away and you’d greet the sunrise as it came over hills you could see.

  94. @R.G. Camara
    lol. The old lady did what lots of feminazis do: travelled to an exotic locale to cure her ennui and pretend she would be a different person----and discovered she was still the same lonely, bitter, unnatural, boring woman she was back home.

    Eat Pray Love is the fantasy. Cat lady is the reality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jimi, @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Cat lady is the reality.”

    Not in this case, more “adventurous grandma”. The hippy-dippy Earth Mother types can actually carry this off quite well, albeit with the occasional major collateral damage.

    I knew a woman who had taken her divorce money and her small daughter, changed her name to something like “Crystal Rivers” and gone to Thailand/Cambodia until all the cash had gone and her daughter was a teenager. Charming lady albeit she believed in all kinds of nonsense.

    OTOH there are plenty of hard-faced childless women “doing” India and the Far East.

  95. I began reading with an open mind, because I often think about retiring elsewhere these days.

    But that sounds like Hell on Earth.

  96. @fitzhamilton
    @anonymous

    The Mexicans are very canny people. They have a strict system of real estate classification that forbids outright ownership of property by foreigners in some of the choicest tourist and retirement areas. I think the rule is no outright ownership 30km from the coasts, and 100km from the international borders.

    Meaning that if you want to own property in these zones, and you are not married to a Mexican or intent on gaining citizenship (not easy to do) you must set up a fiduciary trust with a Mexican bank who will hold the title for you. I think this is why so many foreign retirees congregate inland around places like Guadalajara, where they can actually hold direct title to property.. The Mexicans have set up this firewall to prevent foreign capital from flooding their best markets, disenfranchising the locals.

    We could take a page from their book viz. Chinese, Saudi (etc.) money flooding places like California or Colorado, driving values through the stratosphere making ownership difficult to impossible for anyone but plutocrats..

    There are also dangers in the Mexican legal system, where foreigners have been legally defrauded by the locals. This is a common trend worldwide: legal systems tend to favor locals over foreigners in disputes. If say you end up getting divorced from your native spouse, or in a dispute with native business partners, do not expect the native courts to treat you well.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    Chinese money isn’t driving up home prices in Colorado. That would be white boomers.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @JohnPlywood

    But it does exist, and that it exists is a problem.

    So, props to Mexico and China for having sensible land policies in the context of foreign ownership.

    The issue of prices rising from local purchases can partially be offset by abolishing property taxes on primary residencies (helping keep people rooted down and not affected by changing prices if they've paid of their home), and new home development. Another possible idea is states restricting migration from other states. That would be a great rabbit hole.

  97. @Rob
    @Anon

    How many of these colored folk are Asians? Come to think of it, how many are Whites pretending to be non-White? If these are real nons, I do not envy Yale the hit its reputation is going to take in the coming years. If it has not happened already. When I was a kid, people talked about Harvard-Yale-Princeton. It seems that Harvard has pulled ahead of the other two in recent years. Say, the past twenty. Do Yale and Princeton still have strong reputations with the sort of careers that people who also have the option of going to Harvard consider worthwhile?

    Reputations of schools that are out of line with their SAT scores are interesting to me. Washington University in St Louis had (haven’t looked in a long time) one of the highest undergrad SAT averages around. But no one says, ‘Harvard Yale Princeton MIT Stanford and Washington University in St
    Louis.’ Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation? I guess it is possible that it does, and I am just a prole, but it certainly does not have the cultural cachet of even the lesser Ivies, like Brown. I have heard WUiSL is a safety school for people applying to Ivies, so are the Ivies that good at figuring out which kids are going to perform at their test score level and which ones are not? That would be impressive, actually,

    Anyone know?

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Polistra, @Peter Akuleyev, @Flip

    Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation?

    Wash U. has come up a lot in the world. It used to be a mediocre regional school that was easy to get into but has upgraded due to substantial endowment funds raised (a lot from the Danforth family of Ralston Purina) and by appealing to East Coast Jews.

    • Replies: @RAZ
    @Flip

    At least when my kids were in high school looking at schools Wash U was notable for being one of the few schools giving merit aid, not just need aid. So the middle range of the non poor (who would be scholarshipped somewhere) and non wealthy (to whom the cost didn't matter) found the school appealing and drove up its rating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  98. I don’t know you guys, I am not an American & don’t even think of retirement (or a retired life) – but I’ve always found puzzling the very idea of retiring to some other country (including Mexico).

    US is so huge & rich country, with so many space & freedom, you can simply find a nice place to live decently within your own culture, without going to some godforsaken shitholes full of strange customs, and not infrequently crime & diseases- and even more, aliens.

    Why would you spend your, say, 60s and 70s in an alien land, populated by people you simply do not belong to?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Why would you spend your, say, 60s and 70s in an alien land, populated by people you simply do not belong to?

    Some people are xenophiles. I was thinking about this earlier, and recalling some books I read as a child by David Dodge.

    David Dodge was a writer of mysteries back in the 1930's and 1940's. After mustering out of the US Navy in 1945 he took his wife, 5 year old child and decided to drive from California to Guatamala City on the Pan-American highway. It turned out to be not as simple as expected. So he wrote a book about it.

    This was "How Green Was My Father" about the time in Mexico, and another one "How Lost Was My Weekend" about living in Guatamala. Later on he took the family to Peru, which led to another book "The Crazy Glasspecker". They traveled down the Amazon in the late 1940's, leading to "20,000 Leagues Behind the 8 Ball". Later the moved to France, where he wrote "To Catch A Thief" - Hitchcock turned that into a movie. There is another book about Turkey.

    Dodge just like to travel. He once said that most writers travel to get material for stories, while he wrote stories to get money to travel. In his 60's, he and his wife settled in Mexico, they died there and were buried there.

    One of the interesting things about his first two or three travel books: many of the cultural aspects of Latin America he wrote about before 1950 are still there. Invited to a party at 8:00 PM, he and his wife show up on time, only to find they are the only guests and the hostess is vexed at them. About an hour later someone else shows up, much to the relief of everyone.

    Going to a nightclub in Rio in Brazil they arrive at 9:00 PM or so, find a few people and a tiny combo tinkling away. Dodge is miffed, this is Brazilian night life? Over the next few hours bands swap in and out, each one bigger than the last, while more customers arrive, until by around 4:00 AM or so there's a huge orchestra filling every nook in the place, every table has too many people at it, the dance floor is jammed...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Dodge_(novelist)

    Returning to your question, some people just have itchy feet. Many if not most Americans are descended from such people. I think real expats are a pretty small minority, but with hundreds of millions of Americans even that tiny fraction adds up to a lot of people.

    , @JMcG
    @Bardon Kaldian

    In the US, moving from somewhere like Boston to a place like Tennessee or North Carolina can be as unsettling as moving to a foreign country. People often do it for better weather or lower taxes, but if there’s no enclave of like minded people there, you probably wouldn’t be happy.
    The locals probably won’t be thrilled either.
    The US is hugely divided and is getting worse.
    Folks see outsiders retiring to a nice place to escape the nest they’ve helped foul and don’t like it one bit.

  99. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ha, I was just thinking about the littering thing today. One could say it's just cultural, not genetic, as Americans used to be quite the litterbugs when I was young, at least many friends of mine in HS years.

    A couple of tree guys with a couple of Mexican* hands was working next door, and I paid them a few bucks to get them to use the their telescoping pole saw on a couple of limbs that were blocking sunlight from our proposed garden site. Well, they were good guys all. The one who knew the most about trees spoke great English but was Hispanic himself. I remember he was drinking a Coke as he walked about telling me stuff about the trees. An hour later when I went to get my bow saw, I noticed his empty Coke can in the firewood pile.

    Listen, I don't begrudge the guy any, and I'm not at all sore about it. It's just that an American would either ask you where the trash is, or carry it out to throw in the back of his truck**, or at least hand you the can with nothing said. I mean, just, why? It's a Mexican thing.

    Don't even ask me about littering in China. You don't have to, as I'll tell you: We were at this house in which the front faced an 8 ft alley that was "the street". A kid threw down a bottle there, about 50 ft from the corner, where the trash gets collected, except it's not in bags there either, just a big messy pile. Well, the Dad shouted at the kid something to the effect of "get that trash off my street." I just looked at him and said "what's the damn difference?" (No, he didn't know English.)

    .

    * They could have been Guatemalan - how do I know?

    ** A friend of mine had a boat on a trailer locked to his big American car for something like a year or two, having lost the key to the padlock at the hitch. That was his mobile trash dispensary for awhile.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @Anonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Bill Jones

    Stories of pre-development China have little to do with what it’s like here now. When I exit my apartment in Dalian at 6:30 am to hit the gym, there’s usually a jumpsuited Ayi broom mob followed by an old man on either side of the road bagging the refuse.

    I imagine there may still be the unpaved trash alley in rural Shandong or Shaanxi maybe.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    Pre-development, my ass - it was 4 years ago, S&D. No doubt they are getting their act together though in this, but perhaps you don't see what's behind your shiny neighborhood in Dalian.

  100. @216
    @Anon

    It should behoove all elected GOP politicians to:

    -Abolish affirmative action

    -Drastically reduce the number of foreign students

    -Demand partisan quotas in humanities/social sciences (for any institution taking fed coin, liberals must go Hillsdale)

    -Impose "civilian control of academia", implement some kind of political commissar/civilian review board for all hiring and promotions

    -Make the Regents board an elected position

    -Defund athletics

    -Shrink the number of students to German levels per capita

    While we're at it:

    -Reimpose sex-segregated dorms

    -Reimpose Greek/Latin

    -Export surplus academics to the Third World

    -Force the Ivies to become Protestant again, and force Georgetown to be Catholic

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Sick of Orcs

    You’re assuming there are two major opposing parties but it is not so.

    Demoshits push radical communism.
    Recucklicans briefly oppose Demoshits before always throwing the fight.

    Pro-wrestling should be envious of these jobbers if they ain’t already.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Sick of Orcs

    The function of Republicans is to act as the pawl on the Democrats come-along.
    They are there to ensure no slipping back while the Dems gather their strength for the next leftward heave.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Sick of Orcs

  101. @Polistra
    @Rob

    Harvard is much larger than Yale or Princeton and the breadth and excellence of its graduate departments are generally unchallenged except perhaps by Berkeley. Obviously there are exceptions, but the generalization is broadly accurate.

    However, traditionally those in the know would always prefer Y&P for undergraduate education. Harvard has tried to address this demerit in various ways over the past few decades but the jury is out as to how successful they've been.

    Replies: @RAZ

    Lawrence Summers had wanted to address the undergrad problem when he was President. But he was pushed out as President for musing on about why higher level physical sciences/engineering were dominated by men and whether there were innate mail attribute reasons for this. If he had handled this differently and mused on instead about whether there were innate female attributes for why they dominated some of the softer social sciences he might’ve been ok.

    But don’t we know know that male and female are just social constructs?

    Summers was actually well supported AT THAT TIME by undergrads as they saw him trying to address their needs. If he had said now what he said then the woke crowd would have been on him stat and he’d be out like that.

  102. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Much of the advice Janet Blaser gives in this article could be applied to expat lives in just about any country that's reputed to be a 'good deal' for retirement. I don't think it's all that specific to Mexico. Lots of people also 'retire' to SE Asian countries for many of the same reasons Blaser gives, and run into similar problems.

    In Hong Kong many expats try to construct 'get away from the ratrace' lifestyles by moving to villages out in the countryside. This has a lot of advantages that are similar to the ones Blaser describes: lower cost, a bigger flat (or even a house), often pretty-to-spectacular landscapes/views, a more relaxed pace, etc.

    But even though HK is a very orderly place, lots of village-life annoyances are lurking. Villages here can also be incredibly noisy, so if you think you're signing up for non-stop tranquility, you've got another think coming. They're also typically quite remote in public transport terms, and even getting to a bus or mini-bus stop may require a longish and unpleasant walk.

    If you buy a car, you need someplace to park it. This may seem simple enough out in the countryside where there's lots of space, but this is where the local mores and unwritten rules come into effect: you'll find that there is no such thing as 'free space' in a HK village where you can casually leave your car. If you try this, you'll find your windshield caved in soon enough.

    And finally, the typical village trash/littering may seem trivial at first, but it's the kind of thing that grinds down the joy of your day-to-day life with its ubiquitousness. I've noticed this in villages/small towns in many countries, including the USA: often the more magnificent the physical setting, the more trashy the villages. The contrast starts as an annoyance, but eventually feels tragic and depressing.

    Expat life can be very rewarding, but it's not for everyone.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I agree with everything in this post, and the answer to most of these questions is lack of money and lack of education.

    Why do they use any available bag or box for trash instead of a trash bin? Simply too expensive, and they would get stolen.

    Even though the shopping malls are glossy, apparently stylish, and thronged with people, when you dig a bit deeper, you find that most of the merchandise for sale is overpriced tat.

    You might be able to buy an electric rice cooker very easily, but try looking for an electric pressure cooker and you will probably be out of luck in all but a very few selected outlets in major cities.

    Here in Ecuador everybody has a cell phone, but I have never seen an iPhone for sale. Just too expensive.

    But the middle classes do their best. Here in Ecuador local buses have helpful signs posted inside saying inspirational things like: “Please do not throw your trash out of the window.”

    Additionally I agree that these issues are generic to expatriate life anywhere in the Hispanic world and probably in other countries too.

    Nothing at all to do with trying to create an environment that is hostile to American retirees and expatriates.

    And why the hell would you not want to learn to speak Spanish if you’re going to live in a Spanish-speaking country?

  103. @donut
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "I didn’t have to listen to idiots spew nonsense in English." When I lived in Brooklyn I used to hang out at a Bodega between the subway and my apt. It seems that most of the Bodegas were owned by Yemenis . One day about 6 of them were going at it for about 20 min. in Arabic . After they dispersed one guy came into the store and said "all this talk outside ? It was about one chicken". They had been arguing about dinner the whole time .

    Replies: @photondancer

    I see this all the time too. Don’t know what it is about Arab men but they don’t seem to be able to talk about anything without it looking like a big brangle to onlookers.

  104. @notsaying
    @Barnard

    Yes, her paradise requires a backup. I am sure she has a health plan that would be completely inadequate if she really got sick. Her backup plan would be to move in with her adult children.

    If I lived in a third world country I think I would really dislike the expats who alternatively complain about how awful some things are then rave about how wonderful it is there, who want everything cheap and always have America to run home to when things hit the fan.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Here in Ecuador you can have the government healthcare plan for $77 a month for retirees with no co-pays or deductibles, or you can splash out and get a private insurance for $125 (Humana) to $225 per month with no more than $1,000 of deductible.

    If you are willing to accept a $5,000 deductible, you can have coverage of up to a million dollars for $125 a month at 70 years of age.

    A million dollars goes a long way in a country where medical costs are about 10% of the US, so this would be equivalent to about coverage of $10 million.

  105. It makes me laugh that people in the United States regard Walmart as declasse when you can go there and buy things like an iPhone or an Instapot which are regarded as luxury brands and subject to hefty import taxes anywhere else in the world.

    Anywhere in the world can order these kind of things from Amazon.com and have them shipped overseas, but the end price will probably end up more than double what it would be in the United States and therefore out of the financial reach of most members of the working population.

    People in the United States simply don’t realize that a great deal of their relative wealth compared to many nations is simply a function of the US dollar being a reserve currency and them being paid in US dollars.

    A person doing exactly the same job in the United States as in another country, for example an airline pilot flying the exact same airplane, could be earning two or three times the salary of their equivalent in another country, simply due to being paid in dollars.

    This is why so many people want to come to the United States to earn dollars that they can send back to their home country, buy real estate, and then later retire in luxury on social security paid in dollars.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @Jonathan Mason

    And it’s not just third world countries. Much of Europe has less purchasing power and nothing like Walmart, never mind the VAT. I’m not blind to all of the downsides of living in the Empire, but we do have some pleasant little perks. You could almost say our cheap consumer gizmos are the modern day equivalent of bread and circuses.

    Regarding the trash and litter, I suspect it’s both cultural and genetic. There was a time in recent history when White Americans littered quite a bit until there was a campaign to change our behavior. Do Mestizos have the minimal level of conscientiousness to respond as well to a similar campaign? Maybe not, but at the same time that doesn’t mean Mexico can’t improve. “Garbage in garbage can; makes sense.”*

    The violence is of course bad, but if the US legalized drugs Mexico would quickly become a lot less violent.

    If the Mestizos in the US are any indication - and recall, they’re “not sending their best” - Mexico has the potential to be a much better craptastic country than it currently is. Hey, it’s something. I’m HBD but I have zero hate, and even some admiration, for Mexicans in Mexico. They’re not Africa, they’re not Muslim and they’re not cucked. Craptastic indeed.

    *
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZgtEdFAg3s

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Beelzebub
    @Jonathan Mason

    You hit the nail on the head Mr. Mason. Exactly. I've been telling people this for years, but people don't listen. Immigrants come here for dollars--they don't come here for the culture or to become Americans. They come here to earn in dollars so they can send what they earn out of the country as quickly as possible using a money transfer service. That's a lot of money that's just skimmed right off the top of almost every community in the US. That's money that's being earned here but that never recirculates here to help the local economy where the money is earned.

  106. @Polistra
    @anonymous

    Very good points, each and every one.


    Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.
     
    Steve said that? It's almost like he doesn't know Mexicans. They like their country just the way it is, and they'd change it if they wanted to. Has nothing to do with Americans, though it's also painfully true that the "Freebies for Migrants" culture which has taken over the USA is a powerful draw for the useless component of all third-world countries.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    It’s almost like he doesn’t know Mexicans. They like their country just the way it is, and they’d change it if they wanted to.

    Just remember: they’re not sending their best, which means their best are left in Mexico.

  107. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Also, Malibu apparently has a number of trailer parks. When one thinks of double wides and trailers, they tend to think it’s fairly affordable a la Hillbilly Elegy. So renting a trailer park in Malibu in theory should be considerably less than a standard rental place.

    From an LA Times article from 2011:

    In Malibu, even mobile homes command premium prices

    BY LAUREN BEALE, LOS ANGELES TIMES
    AUG. 27, 2011 12 AM PT

    “The difference is in a park where you are leasing the land,” he said. “You pay the property tax rate only on the home. The owner of park pays the property taxes on the land.”

    Rental rates on lots in the Malibu parks range from about $1,000 to $2,800 a month.”

    Granted, some trailer rentals are pricey, but the article explains that it’s possible to rent at an affordable rate—-starting at $1,000 per month. So it’s very much possible . Unless of course the rates have increased since then and are more astronomical. But at least according to the article, at the time, $1,000 per month was quite double for renting in a trailer park to enjoy the beach lifestyle par excellence that is known as Malibu.

  108. @jon

    2. Unbelievably high noise levels
     
    Apparently, appreciation of peace and quiet is a "White thing." Traveling around Asia, I have run in to all of the noise things she complains about. Even the East Asians aren't immune - a hiking trail by my house has solar powered lights, and on each pole is a big speaker that blasts music 24/7, because that's what you go into the woods for ...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Chrisnonymous

    Well, to be fair, when I climbed Tai Shan, I started at about midnight in order to see the sunrise. There were way stations every so often that were open all night with lights. This was actually comforting. Because I wasn’t climbing to see the stars or for the wilderness, but to get to the top. It’s a completely different mentality.

  109. @Polistra
    We interrupt this broadcast for a special news bulletin.

    The president's son is even more of a train wreck than you thought.

    https://mol.im/a/9445105 Daily Mail has the details.

    Warning: Don't click during mealtime.

    Replies: @Anon, @Almost Missouri

    The tl;dr for this is basically what you already knew if you’ve been following actual news at all (as opposed to the simulacrum of news put out by the major media to mislead you): the President’s son is a spoiled, depraved, self-pitying addict. Helpfully for the Narrative, the media skip over the family political corruption aspects of the story to focus on the salacious sex-and-drugs stuff.

    The only two new pieces of information are:

    1) The Daily Mail had a forensic expert confirm that the data from Hunter’s laptop are authentic (which any half-attentive observer already knew), and less obviously,

    2) Hunter Biden’s teeth are fake.

  110. @Altai

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic.
     
    I never understood this theory of Steve's. While a certain amount of territory policing and lashing out against perceived interlopers like Asian shopkeepers or anyone middle class and up occurs in black neighbourhoods that's more due to some denizens not having the same internal or external controls over expressing their resentments.

    It's hardly a case that a whole country like Mexico or rather it's rural peripheries are conspiring to be sociologically so dire by American standards because people are concerned with American retirees displacing them like some English expats retirees have to some extent in some Spanish towns. It's not a thought that has ever occurred to anyone. It's hard to get people to react to something that hasn't happened.

    Self-sustaining downward social and economic spirals are sometimes things that conservatives resist admitting exist but they do.

    Replies: @anon, @stillCARealist, @TWS

    It’s a theory that’s easily extended to CA, namely, that if our state were well-governed, the population would be 100 million and climbing. Nobody wants that many people here, so we elect idiots and knaves who make it unappealing to the bulk of the world’s middle class.

    Ultimately it’s only a bit true. Mostly people elect corrupt Democrats here because they want the free stuff that Democrats promise.

    Does anyone ever make the connection between, “I can’t stand this stifling bureaucracy!” and “Look at this great gov’t job I have where I don’t really have much to do!” ???

  111. @fitzhamilton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Italy is beautiful, the food is incredible (better on average than in France), and the Italians - though crazy - are fascinating and a lot of fun.. Much more fun than the Germans, who are no fun at all outside of Bavaria.

    But the entire place is psychically caked under 4,000 years of layered stultification, corruption and decadence. It's an exhausted country, in an even greater demographic death spiral than the rest of Europe.

    The first dozen times I visited, I was overawed by all the astonishing beauty. Italy utterly seduced me.

    These last few trips, I've began to feel as if the entire country is one great open air necropolis of exquisitely beautiful mausoleums full of desiccated corpses, inhabited by elegant zombies.

    It's been like finding Snow White, repeatedly kissing her, then realizing she's not merely asleep, but truly dead..

    All of Europe is taking on this pall for me, Italy is just the furthest gone.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Beelzebub

    When we visited Italy in 2016, it was covered in trash, graffiti, and beggars. The tourist attractions display unparalleled beauty from the past, and nature never disappoints, but that country isn’t a place that I’d feel comfortable raising children in. Too crowded, too foreign (middle easterners and Africans), too decrepit.
    The food was good, but France was better. Italian meals are short on meat and high on salt.

  112. @R.G. Camara
    lol. The old lady did what lots of feminazis do: travelled to an exotic locale to cure her ennui and pretend she would be a different person----and discovered she was still the same lonely, bitter, unnatural, boring woman she was back home.

    Eat Pray Love is the fantasy. Cat lady is the reality.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jimi, @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Cat lady is the reality.”

    No, the reality is not cat lady. The last of the cat ladies are dying off; they are being replaced by dog moms. The reality is the male love of dogs — foul, deceitful creatures — is blinding males to the creepy dog mom reality. Wake up!

  113. @R.G. Camara
    Your theory would make sense except that other nations (e.g. Italy) not in danger of a foreign rush also exhibit casual attitudes towards public hygiene and orderliness.

    It's not deliberate; the average Mexican is fine living in worse conditions than his Yankee neighbors to the north, because to the former, the worry and work ain't worth it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb

    Wake up!

  114. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Dollar Vigilante makes a pretty good case for Mexico:

    https://lbry.tv/@DollarVigilante:b/Avoid-the-Consequences-VIDEO-720p:4

    I mean, who doesn't want to go for walks, talking about banksters, beer flu, and crypto with your funny chihuahua that likes to eat tacos and give kisses?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “chihuahua”

    I would run into trouble in Mexico with the dogs on rooftops situation. If I lived there I would be packing and those barking rooftop dogs would be too much of a temptation. Will useless American white men fall in love with rooftop dogs as they have for the Roof Top Korean?

  115. Dumbo says: • Website

    Is Mexican Mediocrity a Defense Against a Mass Influx of Gringo Retirees?

    This is one of Steve’s silliest theories. No, they are just like that. However, I do know of quite a few Americans retirees who moved to Mexico (and I don’t mean Fred Reed), and they seem happy.

    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.

    But Spain (or any country) should be mostly for the Spanish, not for rich old gringo retirees buying homes and increasing the price of properties. Of course they did it for the money, but, perhaps they should be more like Mexico and keep things as they are. It’s not the job of other countries to upgrade themselves to “First World Standards” (whatever that means) just for the sake of old boomer retired gringos. This is really just another form of globalization or “diversity”.

    If I was Spanish, I wouldn’t want the country becoming filled with rich old Englishmen, or German, or Chinese, or Jews, or Russians buying everything. Money is not everything.

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Dumbo

    In Hemingway’s Hills Like White Elephants, the story takes place in a train station in the middle of nowhere on a hot summer day. He describes the drips of condensation running down a cold pitcher of beer. It sounded like the best place on earth to me as a teenager.
    Now, they have fat chavs all over the place and jerks wearing Patagucci doing the Camino who couldn’t give a toss about San Sebastián or Christ himself.
    Ireland was 1000% better when the roads were crap.
    Jackson Hole was 1000% better before it became NYC/LA in Wyoming.
    All the good places have been sold for a bowl of pottage.

    , @Jack D
    @Dumbo

    I think you are projecting your own feelings and not that of the Spanish. Under Franco, Spain used to be the way that you described and it was a very poor place where people had very constrained lives.

    Now Spain feels like it is part of Europe and the wider Western world - young people take internships in London, there is a modern subway paid for with EU $, the tourists bring in a lot of cash, etc. Yes, some places were (before Covid) just overrun with tour buses full of Chinese and such but now that they are (temporarily) gone they wish that they would come back and spend their money again. I don't think that one Spaniard in 100 (under the age of 80) wishes that it would go back to the old way and they could all be poor as church mice again.

  116. I’ve been living in Mexico for 8 years. In my part of the country, there are a lot of Mexicans from all over the country who have moved here, plus a fair amount of gringos.

    On purpose, I chose to rent in areas where Mexicans live (instead of the gringo enclaves), and I have 2 degrees in Spanish and am fairly fluent. If a Mexican talks to me in English, I usually answer in Spanish, that way we both learn.

    The few gringos I run into are mostly very standoffish, probably because down here, you are looked at with some suspicion. Kind of like, “why the hell are you down here?” Maybe I also look more unkempt than the average. I don’t know and don’t really care.

    There is a lot of partying and noise,, but I have always gotten in conflict with neighbors in the States for playing my sounds too loud, so I could care less if there’s a party next door that goes on until 4AM. I chose to rent free-standing houses so I can play my sounds as loud as I want.

    Most of the people I know in the States are afraid of coming to Mexico. It’s a combination of the crime they hear about and the “backward” nature of the country that they are afraid of or uncomfortable with.

    A few years ago, they stopped mail delivery and there is private delivery of the water bill and the electricity bill, but Mexico has fiber optic internet and very fast speeds to many areas (including mine) and the monthly price for both land lines and cellular is extremely cheap. The US telecom monopolies are so horrendous.

    The dentists down here (and the eye specialists and other medical personnel) are about 1/6th or more of the costs in the US. There are a ton of labs, too, and you can get any kind of test you want at any time.

    There is and has been a bit of creep from the US in regard to female attitudes, the china flu masking crap, the vaccine nonsense, and some laws here and there, but by and large your privacy is respected and it is looser.

    There are a few people we know who have been here for over 20 years. Some own their homes. Mexico changed the law years ago to allow gringos to buy real estate including by the sea. It’s no longer a 99 year lease or whatever it was.

    There are it’s true many different customs that you can inadvertently (or not) cross or violate, but Mexicans are by and large a courteous people, and they will cut you some slack.

    By and large, I have been very happy here, although I have been thinking recently of doing a bit more outreach to other ex-pats as well as more interaction with Mexicans than I have been so far.

    After all is said, it’s a daily relief to be in Mexico and watching all the real bad crazy crap that’s happening in the US. P.S., there are about 5 blacks in my area, of which I know 3. Mexicans don’t like the blacks very much, it’s just a fact of life, but if they stay cool, they are tolerated.

    That’s my Common Man commentary on Mexico. I’m very happy that few gringos come here and hope it continues to be that way.

    • Agree: haole3
    • Replies: @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Let me just add a Part II.

    Although Mexico has seen the encroachment of the big box stores (WalMart, Home Depot, Smart & Final, Costco, Sam's Club, Office Depot, Office Max), there are still thousands of mom & pop stores of all kinds.

    From medium-size groceries to butchers to every type of business.

    I find this extremely refreshing. It reminds me of how San Francisco used to be in the early 60s where you had mixed use in every single neighborhood, and you had the auto shop next to the mansion, the shack next to the villa.

    And here you have even a level below the small business: the street vendor. This kind of commerce is extremely positive to see and experience.

    And I mentioned it in passing before, but you can not discount the medical services that are available for pennies on the dollar in Mexico. And medical techniques not always available in the US.

    I have noted since I have been here, the enormous toss and turn of small businesses here. They open, they thrive, they close. It is terrific to see and to participate in. Such vibrant commerce.

    This all is just one more part of this grand country that one can enjoy and participate in. But my first comment was incomplete and so, here is another part.

    If I think of more, I'll post Part III.

    Replies: @restless94110

  117. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    But you can do the cat lady who goes surfing daily in Mazatlan thing for $1200 per month.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    True, but retired surfer babe weighed the risks/benefits and decided the relatively low cost/high personal benefit of living and surfing in Mazatlan outweighs the higher risk to safety, security, and other “intangibles” of developed American society that she left behind. She enumerated a list of items that are the QOL downsides of her present life. Something tells me that, as she gets older, she’ll start to think more about healthcare and senior care there in Mazatlan/Mexico, and may decide to repatriate herself back. Didn’t read the article; does she have kids that can care for her as she becomes older and less physically fit/frail? Or is she childless and will need to depend on the kindness/generosity of her Mexican neighbors, and healthcare workers? She seems content with her choice; others would not accept the same trade-offs; YMMV. Anyway, didn’t see a pic of her in the thread, so here she is:

  118. @PiltdownMan
    @Steve Sailer


    Nobody wants to move to Italy?
     
    George Clooney did. It looks nice there.

    https://i.imgur.com/wfiRsTF.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dutch Boy

    Lot’s of Italy is gorgeous (e.g., the Lake district where Mr. Clooney dwells). By no coincidence, California is starting to look more and more like Mexico, with trash and noise levels through the roof. Even the beautiful city of San Diego is now a trash pile and homeless encampment (LA and SF here we come). There is no prospect that this will change anytime soon and , indeed, the good people of SD have ensured that things will get worse by electing a homosexual Filipino as mayor.

  119. @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    Right, I assumed when I read it her primary reason for moving to Mexico was not being able to afford the lifestyle she wanted in California. She puts up with all the bad stuff she mentions because she can live near the beach in Mexico. She mentions cheap health care, but if she starts having serious health problems she will be back in the U.S. quickly.

    Replies: @notsaying, @Reverend Goody

    Better idea………..forget about being a cutesy surfing granny. Live modestly in a lower cost of living area of America. Health insurance doesn’t work in Mexico.

    In fact, visiting Mexico is a bad idea. If you get sick or injured, you’re on your own.

  120. The word of mouth I hear is that Costa Rica is the hospitable, south-of-the-border place to retire, with a decent trade-off in quality of life and cost of living. What do other commenters hear from talks?

  121. anon[315] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    I don't know you guys, I am not an American & don't even think of retirement (or a retired life) - but I've always found puzzling the very idea of retiring to some other country (including Mexico).

    US is so huge & rich country, with so many space & freedom, you can simply find a nice place to live decently within your own culture, without going to some godforsaken shitholes full of strange customs, and not infrequently crime & diseases- and even more, aliens.

    Why would you spend your, say, 60s and 70s in an alien land, populated by people you simply do not belong to?

    Replies: @anon, @JMcG

    Why would you spend your, say, 60s and 70s in an alien land, populated by people you simply do not belong to?

    Some people are xenophiles. I was thinking about this earlier, and recalling some books I read as a child by David Dodge.

    David Dodge was a writer of mysteries back in the 1930’s and 1940’s. After mustering out of the US Navy in 1945 he took his wife, 5 year old child and decided to drive from California to Guatamala City on the Pan-American highway. It turned out to be not as simple as expected. So he wrote a book about it.

    This was “How Green Was My Father” about the time in Mexico, and another one “How Lost Was My Weekend” about living in Guatamala. Later on he took the family to Peru, which led to another book “The Crazy Glasspecker”. They traveled down the Amazon in the late 1940’s, leading to “20,000 Leagues Behind the 8 Ball”. Later the moved to France, where he wrote “To Catch A Thief” – Hitchcock turned that into a movie. There is another book about Turkey.

    Dodge just like to travel. He once said that most writers travel to get material for stories, while he wrote stories to get money to travel. In his 60’s, he and his wife settled in Mexico, they died there and were buried there.

    One of the interesting things about his first two or three travel books: many of the cultural aspects of Latin America he wrote about before 1950 are still there. Invited to a party at 8:00 PM, he and his wife show up on time, only to find they are the only guests and the hostess is vexed at them. About an hour later someone else shows up, much to the relief of everyone.

    Going to a nightclub in Rio in Brazil they arrive at 9:00 PM or so, find a few people and a tiny combo tinkling away. Dodge is miffed, this is Brazilian night life? Over the next few hours bands swap in and out, each one bigger than the last, while more customers arrive, until by around 4:00 AM or so there’s a huge orchestra filling every nook in the place, every table has too many people at it, the dance floor is jammed…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Dodge_(novelist)

    Returning to your question, some people just have itchy feet. Many if not most Americans are descended from such people. I think real expats are a pretty small minority, but with hundreds of millions of Americans even that tiny fraction adds up to a lot of people.

    • Thanks: Bardon Kaldian
  122. @Bardon Kaldian
    I don't know you guys, I am not an American & don't even think of retirement (or a retired life) - but I've always found puzzling the very idea of retiring to some other country (including Mexico).

    US is so huge & rich country, with so many space & freedom, you can simply find a nice place to live decently within your own culture, without going to some godforsaken shitholes full of strange customs, and not infrequently crime & diseases- and even more, aliens.

    Why would you spend your, say, 60s and 70s in an alien land, populated by people you simply do not belong to?

    Replies: @anon, @JMcG

    In the US, moving from somewhere like Boston to a place like Tennessee or North Carolina can be as unsettling as moving to a foreign country. People often do it for better weather or lower taxes, but if there’s no enclave of like minded people there, you probably wouldn’t be happy.
    The locals probably won’t be thrilled either.
    The US is hugely divided and is getting worse.
    Folks see outsiders retiring to a nice place to escape the nest they’ve helped foul and don’t like it one bit.

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Thanks: Bardon Kaldian
  123. @Dumbo

    Is Mexican Mediocrity a Defense Against a Mass Influx of Gringo Retirees?
     
    This is one of Steve's silliest theories. No, they are just like that. However, I do know of quite a few Americans retirees who moved to Mexico (and I don't mean Fred Reed), and they seem happy.

    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.
     
    But Spain (or any country) should be mostly for the Spanish, not for rich old gringo retirees buying homes and increasing the price of properties. Of course they did it for the money, but, perhaps they should be more like Mexico and keep things as they are. It's not the job of other countries to upgrade themselves to "First World Standards" (whatever that means) just for the sake of old boomer retired gringos. This is really just another form of globalization or "diversity".

    If I was Spanish, I wouldn't want the country becoming filled with rich old Englishmen, or German, or Chinese, or Jews, or Russians buying everything. Money is not everything.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Jack D

    In Hemingway’s Hills Like White Elephants, the story takes place in a train station in the middle of nowhere on a hot summer day. He describes the drips of condensation running down a cold pitcher of beer. It sounded like the best place on earth to me as a teenager.
    Now, they have fat chavs all over the place and jerks wearing Patagucci doing the Camino who couldn’t give a toss about San Sebastián or Christ himself.
    Ireland was 1000% better when the roads were crap.
    Jackson Hole was 1000% better before it became NYC/LA in Wyoming.
    All the good places have been sold for a bowl of pottage.

  124. @Altai

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic.
     
    I never understood this theory of Steve's. While a certain amount of territory policing and lashing out against perceived interlopers like Asian shopkeepers or anyone middle class and up occurs in black neighbourhoods that's more due to some denizens not having the same internal or external controls over expressing their resentments.

    It's hardly a case that a whole country like Mexico or rather it's rural peripheries are conspiring to be sociologically so dire by American standards because people are concerned with American retirees displacing them like some English expats retirees have to some extent in some Spanish towns. It's not a thought that has ever occurred to anyone. It's hard to get people to react to something that hasn't happened.

    Self-sustaining downward social and economic spirals are sometimes things that conservatives resist admitting exist but they do.

    Replies: @anon, @stillCARealist, @TWS

    I think Steve is so rational that he cannot imagine a nation that can’t solve simple problems if it really wanted to.

  125. I read the article a couple of days ago, which included a picture of the pile of trash on the author’s street. Mexicans and littering are a real thing which is obvious to anyone who has been there.

    Myself and my better half are going to Mexico next month to visit the baroque cathedrals in the 16th century towns of Leon, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende. Six nights in a nice hotel plus airfare from Tijuana for two is $530. I’m my own tour guide down there, and the uncertainty of what could happen makes it rather exciting.

    • Replies: @anon
    @petit bourgeois

    going to Mexico next month to visit the baroque cathedrals in the 16th century towns of Leon, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende.

    Some of those cathedrals have restored their original 16th century organs, it would be worth while to go hear them played. Typically an organ was built in Spain, then transported to the church in question. So they are historical instruments in various ways.

    The state of Guanajuato looks pretty calm from the outside, a lot like Zacatecas.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

  126. @Achmed E. Newman
    Ha, I was just thinking about the littering thing today. One could say it's just cultural, not genetic, as Americans used to be quite the litterbugs when I was young, at least many friends of mine in HS years.

    A couple of tree guys with a couple of Mexican* hands was working next door, and I paid them a few bucks to get them to use the their telescoping pole saw on a couple of limbs that were blocking sunlight from our proposed garden site. Well, they were good guys all. The one who knew the most about trees spoke great English but was Hispanic himself. I remember he was drinking a Coke as he walked about telling me stuff about the trees. An hour later when I went to get my bow saw, I noticed his empty Coke can in the firewood pile.

    Listen, I don't begrudge the guy any, and I'm not at all sore about it. It's just that an American would either ask you where the trash is, or carry it out to throw in the back of his truck**, or at least hand you the can with nothing said. I mean, just, why? It's a Mexican thing.

    Don't even ask me about littering in China. You don't have to, as I'll tell you: We were at this house in which the front faced an 8 ft alley that was "the street". A kid threw down a bottle there, about 50 ft from the corner, where the trash gets collected, except it's not in bags there either, just a big messy pile. Well, the Dad shouted at the kid something to the effect of "get that trash off my street." I just looked at him and said "what's the damn difference?" (No, he didn't know English.)

    .

    * They could have been Guatemalan - how do I know?

    ** A friend of mine had a boat on a trailer locked to his big American car for something like a year or two, having lost the key to the padlock at the hitch. That was his mobile trash dispensary for awhile.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell, @Anonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Bill Jones

    * They could have been Guatemalan – how do I know?

    Aspect ratio is a good guide.

    There’s a reason Guat rhymes with Squat.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Bill Jones

    Very good. Now can you tell me how to tell a Guatemalan from a Honduran?

  127. @Sick of Orcs
    @216

    You're assuming there are two major opposing parties but it is not so.

    Demoshits push radical communism.
    Recucklicans briefly oppose Demoshits before always throwing the fight.

    Pro-wrestling should be envious of these jobbers if they ain't already.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    The function of Republicans is to act as the pawl on the Democrats come-along.
    They are there to ensure no slipping back while the Dems gather their strength for the next leftward heave.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Bill Jones

    That’s a great analogy, I’ll be using that if you don’t mind.

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Bill Jones

    Agree. Rs also act as 'heat sinks' for outrage, they are pro-wrasslin' heels through and through.

  128. anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @petit bourgeois
    I read the article a couple of days ago, which included a picture of the pile of trash on the author's street. Mexicans and littering are a real thing which is obvious to anyone who has been there.

    Myself and my better half are going to Mexico next month to visit the baroque cathedrals in the 16th century towns of Leon, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende. Six nights in a nice hotel plus airfare from Tijuana for two is $530. I'm my own tour guide down there, and the uncertainty of what could happen makes it rather exciting.

    Replies: @anon

    going to Mexico next month to visit the baroque cathedrals in the 16th century towns of Leon, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende.

    Some of those cathedrals have restored their original 16th century organs, it would be worth while to go hear them played. Typically an organ was built in Spain, then transported to the church in question. So they are historical instruments in various ways.

    The state of Guanajuato looks pretty calm from the outside, a lot like Zacatecas.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @anon

    This trip is about "where can I go in Mexico that I've never been before" because you can spend a lifetime bouncing around the various states. I wanted to check out Guanjuato after seeing this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zw1ztGnKNg&ab_channel=MonsterEnergy

    I've been to the cathedral a few times in Morelia and it is magnificent (tallest bell towers in Mexico that wake you up every morning at 6 a.m.). The organ there was imported from Germany in the early 1900's and has something like over 4,000 pipes/flutes. At the time it was imported it was the largest organ in the Western Hemisphere. Unfortunately, I've never heard it played but I know they have an organ festival in Morelia every year.

  129. @John Up North
    @Anon

    I'm afraid Hunter may not be with us much longer. It seems to me that most of these guys who have horrific drug problems don't make it out of their 50s because of the inevitable overdose.

    ER doctors in LA frequently treat middle age people showing up in cardiac arrest because of too much blow and booze which they can no longer handle due to the fact that they're no longer 25.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Jack D, @Polistra

    Don’t you know that drugs don’t result in cardiac arrest and that death occurs from oxygen deprivation resulting from a police officer sliding his knee around your general “neck area”?

    The MD expert witness in Minneapolis just told me so.

  130. @Bill Jones
    @Sick of Orcs

    The function of Republicans is to act as the pawl on the Democrats come-along.
    They are there to ensure no slipping back while the Dems gather their strength for the next leftward heave.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Sick of Orcs

    That’s a great analogy, I’ll be using that if you don’t mind.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
  131. @anon
    @petit bourgeois

    going to Mexico next month to visit the baroque cathedrals in the 16th century towns of Leon, Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende.

    Some of those cathedrals have restored their original 16th century organs, it would be worth while to go hear them played. Typically an organ was built in Spain, then transported to the church in question. So they are historical instruments in various ways.

    The state of Guanajuato looks pretty calm from the outside, a lot like Zacatecas.

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    This trip is about “where can I go in Mexico that I’ve never been before” because you can spend a lifetime bouncing around the various states. I wanted to check out Guanjuato after seeing this video:

    I’ve been to the cathedral a few times in Morelia and it is magnificent (tallest bell towers in Mexico that wake you up every morning at 6 a.m.). The organ there was imported from Germany in the early 1900’s and has something like over 4,000 pipes/flutes. At the time it was imported it was the largest organ in the Western Hemisphere. Unfortunately, I’ve never heard it played but I know they have an organ festival in Morelia every year.

  132. @John Up North
    @Anon

    I'm afraid Hunter may not be with us much longer. It seems to me that most of these guys who have horrific drug problems don't make it out of their 50s because of the inevitable overdose.

    ER doctors in LA frequently treat middle age people showing up in cardiac arrest because of too much blow and booze which they can no longer handle due to the fact that they're no longer 25.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Jack D, @Polistra

    Rapper DMX just went in this exact way. They managed to get his heart restarted but too much time had passed and he was a veg so they unplugged him. And I think he was exactly 50.

  133. @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman


    * They could have been Guatemalan – how do I know?
     
    Aspect ratio is a good guide.

    There's a reason Guat rhymes with Squat.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Very good. Now can you tell me how to tell a Guatemalan from a Honduran?

  134. @Dumbo

    Is Mexican Mediocrity a Defense Against a Mass Influx of Gringo Retirees?
     
    This is one of Steve's silliest theories. No, they are just like that. However, I do know of quite a few Americans retirees who moved to Mexico (and I don't mean Fred Reed), and they seem happy.

    In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.
     
    But Spain (or any country) should be mostly for the Spanish, not for rich old gringo retirees buying homes and increasing the price of properties. Of course they did it for the money, but, perhaps they should be more like Mexico and keep things as they are. It's not the job of other countries to upgrade themselves to "First World Standards" (whatever that means) just for the sake of old boomer retired gringos. This is really just another form of globalization or "diversity".

    If I was Spanish, I wouldn't want the country becoming filled with rich old Englishmen, or German, or Chinese, or Jews, or Russians buying everything. Money is not everything.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Jack D

    I think you are projecting your own feelings and not that of the Spanish. Under Franco, Spain used to be the way that you described and it was a very poor place where people had very constrained lives.

    Now Spain feels like it is part of Europe and the wider Western world – young people take internships in London, there is a modern subway paid for with EU $, the tourists bring in a lot of cash, etc. Yes, some places were (before Covid) just overrun with tour buses full of Chinese and such but now that they are (temporarily) gone they wish that they would come back and spend their money again. I don’t think that one Spaniard in 100 (under the age of 80) wishes that it would go back to the old way and they could all be poor as church mice again.

  135. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @jon


    Even the East Asians aren’t immune

     

    Hong Kong has hundreds of miles of well-kept and often spectacular hiking trails. But on most hikes you'll meet hikers (often elderly) carrying along surprisingly large radios/portable speakers blasting out Chinese opera or Cantopop. People here say that too much quiet makes them feel lonely and down.

    Replies: @jon

    Yep, in Korea all the Ajosshis (old Korean guys) like to hike around with a hand-held radio (and a bottle of soju).

  136. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @bigduke6
    One of your sillier ideas. Mexico has been violent since the Aztecs were torturing children for the power of the their tears and is as organized and well-run as you'd expect a country run by Mexicans to be. Occam's wooden spoon

    Replies: @Anonymous

    One of your sillier ideas. Mexico has been violent since the Aztecs were torturing children for the power of the their tears and is as organized and well-run as you’d expect a country run by Mexicans to be. Occam’s wooden spoon

    Having worked with a lot of Latinos, their peasant mindset is branded into their culture.
    They might try to imitate those who they, deep down, feel are their betters, and try to act like social peers, but they almost always fold their cards when push comes to shove.

    It’s a collective mindset. Sad but true.

  137. @restless94110
    I've been living in Mexico for 8 years. In my part of the country, there are a lot of Mexicans from all over the country who have moved here, plus a fair amount of gringos.

    On purpose, I chose to rent in areas where Mexicans live (instead of the gringo enclaves), and I have 2 degrees in Spanish and am fairly fluent. If a Mexican talks to me in English, I usually answer in Spanish, that way we both learn.

    The few gringos I run into are mostly very standoffish, probably because down here, you are looked at with some suspicion. Kind of like, "why the hell are you down here?" Maybe I also look more unkempt than the average. I don't know and don't really care.

    There is a lot of partying and noise,, but I have always gotten in conflict with neighbors in the States for playing my sounds too loud, so I could care less if there's a party next door that goes on until 4AM. I chose to rent free-standing houses so I can play my sounds as loud as I want.

    Most of the people I know in the States are afraid of coming to Mexico. It's a combination of the crime they hear about and the "backward" nature of the country that they are afraid of or uncomfortable with.

    A few years ago, they stopped mail delivery and there is private delivery of the water bill and the electricity bill, but Mexico has fiber optic internet and very fast speeds to many areas (including mine) and the monthly price for both land lines and cellular is extremely cheap. The US telecom monopolies are so horrendous.

    The dentists down here (and the eye specialists and other medical personnel) are about 1/6th or more of the costs in the US. There are a ton of labs, too, and you can get any kind of test you want at any time.

    There is and has been a bit of creep from the US in regard to female attitudes, the china flu masking crap, the vaccine nonsense, and some laws here and there, but by and large your privacy is respected and it is looser.

    There are a few people we know who have been here for over 20 years. Some own their homes. Mexico changed the law years ago to allow gringos to buy real estate including by the sea. It's no longer a 99 year lease or whatever it was.

    There are it's true many different customs that you can inadvertently (or not) cross or violate, but Mexicans are by and large a courteous people, and they will cut you some slack.

    By and large, I have been very happy here, although I have been thinking recently of doing a bit more outreach to other ex-pats as well as more interaction with Mexicans than I have been so far.

    After all is said, it's a daily relief to be in Mexico and watching all the real bad crazy crap that's happening in the US. P.S., there are about 5 blacks in my area, of which I know 3. Mexicans don't like the blacks very much, it's just a fact of life, but if they stay cool, they are tolerated.

    That's my Common Man commentary on Mexico. I'm very happy that few gringos come here and hope it continues to be that way.

    Replies: @restless94110

    Let me just add a Part II.

    Although Mexico has seen the encroachment of the big box stores (WalMart, Home Depot, Smart & Final, Costco, Sam’s Club, Office Depot, Office Max), there are still thousands of mom & pop stores of all kinds.

    From medium-size groceries to butchers to every type of business.

    I find this extremely refreshing. It reminds me of how San Francisco used to be in the early 60s where you had mixed use in every single neighborhood, and you had the auto shop next to the mansion, the shack next to the villa.

    And here you have even a level below the small business: the street vendor. This kind of commerce is extremely positive to see and experience.

    And I mentioned it in passing before, but you can not discount the medical services that are available for pennies on the dollar in Mexico. And medical techniques not always available in the US.

    I have noted since I have been here, the enormous toss and turn of small businesses here. They open, they thrive, they close. It is terrific to see and to participate in. Such vibrant commerce.

    This all is just one more part of this grand country that one can enjoy and participate in. But my first comment was incomplete and so, here is another part.

    If I think of more, I’ll post Part III.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part III:

    Yes, as the gringo lady from Mazatlan complains, Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere--behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to. Because, because Mexico is a country with a lot of poor people, a lot of poor people want to steal, burgle, and rob you. Dogs help to maybe mitigate that. Somewhat.

    I've had a couple of cats that just showed up since I got here. One of them showed up at my door one day with a collar on and then showed up the next day without the collar. He was a great mouser and I kept an open window for him to come and go. I'm pretty sure the old caballero next door poisoned him, but one day he was gone. I mourned him for a few weeks.

    Now thee is a black female who showed up. She's had 3 litters so far (there are 4 toms around). She's not a house cat, that was settled a year ago, but her offspring has either been taken and sold or has migrated off to somewhere else.

    Where I lived before, there was a Finnish Hound that had been hit by a car and run off and disappeared for over a year. Suddenly he was back. A smart, smart animal. I got to walking him every day, first with a leash and then without. He understand and obeyed my commands. He had an "understanding" with the dogs we walked by, even the pit bulls, though I did have to intercede with two of them (pit bulls are poison).

    His best buddy from across the street was a mangy thing that looked like a desiccated yak called Pistón. This guy was the top dog in the entire hood and he had a way about him. We became friends because I would feed him in the mornings. He had never been washed ever I don't think but he just existed and survived.

    My Finnish Hound finally died. The ticks got to him, but also his hips started to give out (common with Dalmatians, German Shepherds, Finnish Hounds). The moment he died, all of the dogs in the neighborhood came to our house. They knew.

    I had never been a dog person ever until coming to Mexico.

    In our new house, after a few weeks (and despite our landlord's promises of giving us some of his Labrador pups from his rancho) I threw a beef bone to a renegade street dog and suddenly he and his brother became our dogs. One is a Dalmatian and is the top dog, the other is the shaggy white dog I threw the bone to.

    They guard our place and have an uneasy relationship with the cat and its offspring.

    There are hundreds of dogs all around us. Mexicans use their dogs for protection and for companionship. They also release dogs to fend for themselves. Official government efforts to curtail street dogs are ineffective. They came for Pistón a few years ago and he hid out until they cam no more.

    Although I have never been a dog person, the attitude and customs in Mexico are emblematic of a country that is maybe 2 generations behind the United States. It is freer, wilder as the US used to be.

    We can only hope that Mexico does not continue to follow the insane US and that instead the US regresses to the customs of Mexico.

    Part IV to follow.

    Replies: @restless94110, @Reg Cæsar

  138. @Flip
    @Rob


    Perhaps because that is a long phrase, but why doesn’t WUiSL not have a very strong reputation?
     
    Wash U. has come up a lot in the world. It used to be a mediocre regional school that was easy to get into but has upgraded due to substantial endowment funds raised (a lot from the Danforth family of Ralston Purina) and by appealing to East Coast Jews.

    Replies: @RAZ

    At least when my kids were in high school looking at schools Wash U was notable for being one of the few schools giving merit aid, not just need aid. So the middle range of the non poor (who would be scholarshipped somewhere) and non wealthy (to whom the cost didn’t matter) found the school appealing and drove up its rating.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @RAZ

    Right, Washington U. of St. Louis gave out a lot of National Merit Scholarships in the 1970s. That finally boosted its reputation. Now its problem is that because there are various Washington colleges, it has to include "St. Louis" in its title.

    Replies: @Flip

  139. @Supply and Demand
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Stories of pre-development China have little to do with what it’s like here now. When I exit my apartment in Dalian at 6:30 am to hit the gym, there’s usually a jumpsuited Ayi broom mob followed by an old man on either side of the road bagging the refuse.

    I imagine there may still be the unpaved trash alley in rural Shandong or Shaanxi maybe.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Pre-development, my ass – it was 4 years ago, S&D. No doubt they are getting their act together though in this, but perhaps you don’t see what’s behind your shiny neighborhood in Dalian.

  140. @Bill Jones
    @Sick of Orcs

    The function of Republicans is to act as the pawl on the Democrats come-along.
    They are there to ensure no slipping back while the Dems gather their strength for the next leftward heave.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Sick of Orcs

    Agree. Rs also act as ‘heat sinks’ for outrage, they are pro-wrasslin’ heels through and through.

  141. @Johann Ricke
    @Achmed E. Newman


    See, that’s all fine while the US Dollar is still the world reserve currency and people still have full faith and credit … blah, blah, blah…
     
    There are multiple reserve currencies. The dollar is just one of them, forming $6.7T out of $11.7T worth of foreign exchange reserves worldwide:

    http://data.imf.org/?sk=E6A5F467-C14B-4AA8-9F6D-5A09EC4E62A4

    We’re not taxing the world. When the dollar’s exchange rate falls, dollar prices increase. For instance, in yen terms, oil prices have gone up just over 6x since 1973, when the first oil shock occurred. In dollar terms, they've gone up 20x.

    Reserve currency status is overrated. The Swiss certainly fought it every chance they got, because it made their export goods unaffordable and increased unemployment. At one point, they imposed a 41% tax on foreign deposits.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-22/swiss-history-of-negative-interest-rates-is-ugly

    They’re still fighting it today, with a -0.75% central bank rate.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-swiss-snb-rates/swiss-central-bank-defends-negative-interest-rates-idUSKCN11L0N7

    If you’re interested, a Quora essay explains why having a currency that is the biggest component of other countries’ rainy day funds is not a benefit at all:

    https://www.quora.com/What-happens-if-the-U-S-dollar-loses-its-status-as-the-worlds-major-reserve-currency/answers/82129987

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Sorry for the late reply, Mr. Ricke. I’ve written this same reply to someone with the very point you are making recently, so hopefully I can explain here better:

    I don’t think that it’s particularly that having the Reserve currency makes the currency stronger, but that having a strong currency makes it appropriate for the, or, as you say, one of, the Reserve currencies. The American dollar used to be very appropriate as it was backed by something real back in the day. If trading between nations goes even further away from the dollar, the fact that these green piece of paper (really mostly digits in computers) is backed by squat-all may come into the forefront of the minds of money men.

    It’s psychological, part-ways. The US dollar still has this undeserved reputation of being good money. How long will it last?

    Anyway, thanks for the interesting reply. (I used to be a big ZeroHedge reader, but it’s been a while.)

  142. @RAZ
    @Flip

    At least when my kids were in high school looking at schools Wash U was notable for being one of the few schools giving merit aid, not just need aid. So the middle range of the non poor (who would be scholarshipped somewhere) and non wealthy (to whom the cost didn't matter) found the school appealing and drove up its rating.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right, Washington U. of St. Louis gave out a lot of National Merit Scholarships in the 1970s. That finally boosted its reputation. Now its problem is that because there are various Washington colleges, it has to include “St. Louis” in its title.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Steve Sailer

    I've always thought they should change the name to Eliot (the founder) or Danforth (the primary benefactor and former Chancellor) to avoid confusion.

  143. @Jonathan Mason
    It makes me laugh that people in the United States regard Walmart as declasse when you can go there and buy things like an iPhone or an Instapot which are regarded as luxury brands and subject to hefty import taxes anywhere else in the world.

    Anywhere in the world can order these kind of things from Amazon.com and have them shipped overseas, but the end price will probably end up more than double what it would be in the United States and therefore out of the financial reach of most members of the working population.

    People in the United States simply don't realize that a great deal of their relative wealth compared to many nations is simply a function of the US dollar being a reserve currency and them being paid in US dollars.

    A person doing exactly the same job in the United States as in another country, for example an airline pilot flying the exact same airplane, could be earning two or three times the salary of their equivalent in another country, simply due to being paid in dollars.

    This is why so many people want to come to the United States to earn dollars that they can send back to their home country, buy real estate, and then later retire in luxury on social security paid in dollars.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @Beelzebub

    And it’s not just third world countries. Much of Europe has less purchasing power and nothing like Walmart, never mind the VAT. I’m not blind to all of the downsides of living in the Empire, but we do have some pleasant little perks. You could almost say our cheap consumer gizmos are the modern day equivalent of bread and circuses.

    Regarding the trash and litter, I suspect it’s both cultural and genetic. There was a time in recent history when White Americans littered quite a bit until there was a campaign to change our behavior. Do Mestizos have the minimal level of conscientiousness to respond as well to a similar campaign? Maybe not, but at the same time that doesn’t mean Mexico can’t improve. “Garbage in garbage can; makes sense.”*

    The violence is of course bad, but if the US legalized drugs Mexico would quickly become a lot less violent.

    If the Mestizos in the US are any indication – and recall, they’re “not sending their best” – Mexico has the potential to be a much better craptastic country than it currently is. Hey, it’s something. I’m HBD but I have zero hate, and even some admiration, for Mexicans in Mexico. They’re not Africa, they’re not Muslim and they’re not cucked. Craptastic indeed.

    *

    • Agree: haole3
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous Jew

    Texas has apparently made a fair amount of progress against littering with its Don't Mess with Texas ad campaign.

  144. @Anon
    Very, very important new thread by Wesley Yang. Explains one mechanism by which Whites are being made to go extinct. (And it is working like a charm.)

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180795223117824

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180796615626758

    https://www.twitter.com/wesyang/status/1380180798079373314

    Replies: @216, @Rob, @Wade Hampton, @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    How many of the 32% remaining whites are Jews? I’d bet 16%, at least half. So that’s 16% white?

    I don’t see how whites “flow easily” out of that.

    I see the future a little different. Basically whites will be cleansed out of urban areas. Replaced in high functioning academics / high power careers by Indians, Asians, and light skinned mixed race people. Upper middle class whites are too soft to compete anyways, their kids are usually a total waste of space. Karens will stop being promoted. Urban whites have very little reproduction and many white men race mix with Asians.

    There will be a massive downwardly mobile slide for formerly middle and working class people. This is already happening too.

    In the end gentile whites will be largely confined to rural America. Alot more poverty, alot more Christian. Perhaps the rump of white America will mix with Hispanics somewhat.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com


    There will be a massive downwardly mobile slide for formerly middle and working class people. This is already happening too.
     
    Why? What would the mechanism for that be?
  145. @John Up North
    @Anon

    I'm afraid Hunter may not be with us much longer. It seems to me that most of these guys who have horrific drug problems don't make it out of their 50s because of the inevitable overdose.

    ER doctors in LA frequently treat middle age people showing up in cardiac arrest because of too much blow and booze which they can no longer handle due to the fact that they're no longer 25.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Jack D, @Polistra

    OTOH, Hunter looks a thousand times better than he did just a few years ago. Suntan, new hair, new teeth, whatnot. For that matter, his dad looks better than he did a few years ago too. Good surgeons!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    I suspect Jill Biden is an expert at finding the right plastic surgeons.

    Back in the 1970s, Joe Biden looked like he was going to be played in his biopic by John Cazale.

  146. @Polistra
    @John Up North

    OTOH, Hunter looks a thousand times better than he did just a few years ago. Suntan, new hair, new teeth, whatnot. For that matter, his dad looks better than he did a few years ago too. Good surgeons!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I suspect Jill Biden is an expert at finding the right plastic surgeons.

    Back in the 1970s, Joe Biden looked like he was going to be played in his biopic by John Cazale.

  147. @Anonymous Jew
    @Jonathan Mason

    And it’s not just third world countries. Much of Europe has less purchasing power and nothing like Walmart, never mind the VAT. I’m not blind to all of the downsides of living in the Empire, but we do have some pleasant little perks. You could almost say our cheap consumer gizmos are the modern day equivalent of bread and circuses.

    Regarding the trash and litter, I suspect it’s both cultural and genetic. There was a time in recent history when White Americans littered quite a bit until there was a campaign to change our behavior. Do Mestizos have the minimal level of conscientiousness to respond as well to a similar campaign? Maybe not, but at the same time that doesn’t mean Mexico can’t improve. “Garbage in garbage can; makes sense.”*

    The violence is of course bad, but if the US legalized drugs Mexico would quickly become a lot less violent.

    If the Mestizos in the US are any indication - and recall, they’re “not sending their best” - Mexico has the potential to be a much better craptastic country than it currently is. Hey, it’s something. I’m HBD but I have zero hate, and even some admiration, for Mexicans in Mexico. They’re not Africa, they’re not Muslim and they’re not cucked. Craptastic indeed.

    *
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZgtEdFAg3s

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Texas has apparently made a fair amount of progress against littering with its Don’t Mess with Texas ad campaign.

  148. @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anon

    How many of the 32% remaining whites are Jews? I'd bet 16%, at least half. So that's 16% white?

    I don't see how whites "flow easily" out of that.

    I see the future a little different. Basically whites will be cleansed out of urban areas. Replaced in high functioning academics / high power careers by Indians, Asians, and light skinned mixed race people. Upper middle class whites are too soft to compete anyways, their kids are usually a total waste of space. Karens will stop being promoted. Urban whites have very little reproduction and many white men race mix with Asians.

    There will be a massive downwardly mobile slide for formerly middle and working class people. This is already happening too.

    In the end gentile whites will be largely confined to rural America. Alot more poverty, alot more Christian. Perhaps the rump of white America will mix with Hispanics somewhat.

    Replies: @Anon

    There will be a massive downwardly mobile slide for formerly middle and working class people. This is already happening too.

    Why? What would the mechanism for that be?

  149. @black sea
    @Steve Sailer

    In Bodrum you can get a pretty nice home for around $100, 000. Because of the large population of tourists and expat retirees, a lot of local people speak English. But if you retire there, you better be OK with the heat.

    Replies: @Cato

    Well, heat compared to Karadeniz, but not heat compared to Texas, and anyway only uncomfortable heat during part of July and August (but not uncomfortable if you are lounging on the beach). May can be a bit chilly for swimming (as Steve said, the water is cold), June is great, September through November are beautiful. From December to April, it won’t freeze, but you will need some heat in your home.

    I think the current cost of a decent home on the Bodrum peninsula is higher than $100K. Depends on your standards, of course, but demand has risen since COVID-19, since all of Kadıköy has decided that Bodrum is the place to escape to. Which actually makes Bodrum real estate a good investment, regardless of the cost.

    There are lots of towns on the Bodrum peninsula, and my favorites are Yalıkavak and Torba. I would be willing to retire in either, as well as in Bodrum itself. But the Greek islands are pretty amazing, too, especially Kos.

  150. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s true that Hispanic immigrants litter. And they poach without a license or following the bag limit and catch size rules. This is anti-social behavior. But as someone who has spent 90% of my adult life in South Texas, they have their good points, too. When it is over 90 degrees, I stop to help people with car trouble. The only people who reciprocate in South Texas are Mexican (black dude in a nice SUV helped once.)

    Meanwhile, White people drive by at top speed, blowing dirt in your face. That is anti-social behavior, too. Mexican neighbors mind their business in a way White neighbors don’t (the men anyway- I dont know of any ethnicity where the women mind their business.) And sometimes you hire them and they just steal your supplies and disappear.

    I don’t like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians or any other shitholers.

    The real question is this: why are Texas Hispanics so much better behaved than West Coast Hispanics? I haven’t lived in California, but a lot of COPS was filmed in Riverside while it was still on the air. The behavior is quite different from Texas Hispanics. They also don’t have radical politics in super-majority schools in Texas. I suspect that Californians treating them as “the help” (personal servant class) has bred serious resentment. Also the fact that being a pinko piece of shit is how to get ahead in Cali, so they follow the winners. We should figure this out soon. For everyone who doesn’t yet have a lot of Mexicans and Central Americans in their area, pray for the Texas kind and not the California kind.

    • Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    You're not just getting Hispanics. Indians are flooding into the USA now too.

    Canada has had the opposite - we had only "highly skilled" immigrants for years (false, but that was the narrative we believed) - but in the past 5 years we've started getting Africans, mexicans, Arabs, all kinds of dregs of the third world. Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    The USA is now getting all kinds of weird foreigners, from Indians to Arabs to Africans.

    The eventual plan is to totally swamp formerly white nations. We're taking so many non whites in Canada that it doesn't matter. USA will follow the same path

    Replies: @anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    , @anon
    @Anonymous


    I don’t like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians
     
    Or unlucky, in that if some of these other groups were invading the country like Mexicans are doing, people would be more likely to have mobilized against it. In other words, there wouldn’t be immigration at the levels we are suffering.

    Replies: @Polistra

  151. @Anonymous
    It's true that Hispanic immigrants litter. And they poach without a license or following the bag limit and catch size rules. This is anti-social behavior. But as someone who has spent 90% of my adult life in South Texas, they have their good points, too. When it is over 90 degrees, I stop to help people with car trouble. The only people who reciprocate in South Texas are Mexican (black dude in a nice SUV helped once.)

    Meanwhile, White people drive by at top speed, blowing dirt in your face. That is anti-social behavior, too. Mexican neighbors mind their business in a way White neighbors don't (the men anyway- I dont know of any ethnicity where the women mind their business.) And sometimes you hire them and they just steal your supplies and disappear.

    I don't like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians or any other shitholers.

    The real question is this: why are Texas Hispanics so much better behaved than West Coast Hispanics? I haven't lived in California, but a lot of COPS was filmed in Riverside while it was still on the air. The behavior is quite different from Texas Hispanics. They also don't have radical politics in super-majority schools in Texas. I suspect that Californians treating them as "the help" (personal servant class) has bred serious resentment. Also the fact that being a pinko piece of shit is how to get ahead in Cali, so they follow the winners. We should figure this out soon. For everyone who doesn't yet have a lot of Mexicans and Central Americans in their area, pray for the Texas kind and not the California kind.

    Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com, @anon

    You’re not just getting Hispanics. Indians are flooding into the USA now too.

    Canada has had the opposite – we had only “highly skilled” immigrants for years (false, but that was the narrative we believed) – but in the past 5 years we’ve started getting Africans, mexicans, Arabs, all kinds of dregs of the third world. Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    The USA is now getting all kinds of weird foreigners, from Indians to Arabs to Africans.

    The eventual plan is to totally swamp formerly white nations. We’re taking so many non whites in Canada that it doesn’t matter. USA will follow the same path

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com


    Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.
     
    What is bad about Punjabis?
    , @Anonymous
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    Who is we? The government of Canada? The government of the U.S.A. ? Occupied by people who hate you. Your identity is not defined by your tyrannical government.

    Ignore the government. Get into prepping, get into a parallel society of mutual benefit by your own European people. The bad guys won before you were born. Accept that, throw your shitty leaf flag in the trash and create some loyalties that actually mean something.

    Cancel every corporate luxury you gave, invest in your people. Make friends who think like you, and buy and sell from them instead of our corporate enemies. Secede, at least in your mind and with your money and labor.

    I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out. Let the dead (shitholer immigrants) bury the dead (Canada, USA.) We can outlast them.

    Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    , @Anonymous
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    Can you offer a more detailed post on Punjabis?

  152. anon[226] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    It's true that Hispanic immigrants litter. And they poach without a license or following the bag limit and catch size rules. This is anti-social behavior. But as someone who has spent 90% of my adult life in South Texas, they have their good points, too. When it is over 90 degrees, I stop to help people with car trouble. The only people who reciprocate in South Texas are Mexican (black dude in a nice SUV helped once.)

    Meanwhile, White people drive by at top speed, blowing dirt in your face. That is anti-social behavior, too. Mexican neighbors mind their business in a way White neighbors don't (the men anyway- I dont know of any ethnicity where the women mind their business.) And sometimes you hire them and they just steal your supplies and disappear.

    I don't like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians or any other shitholers.

    The real question is this: why are Texas Hispanics so much better behaved than West Coast Hispanics? I haven't lived in California, but a lot of COPS was filmed in Riverside while it was still on the air. The behavior is quite different from Texas Hispanics. They also don't have radical politics in super-majority schools in Texas. I suspect that Californians treating them as "the help" (personal servant class) has bred serious resentment. Also the fact that being a pinko piece of shit is how to get ahead in Cali, so they follow the winners. We should figure this out soon. For everyone who doesn't yet have a lot of Mexicans and Central Americans in their area, pray for the Texas kind and not the California kind.

    Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com, @anon

    I don’t like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians

    Or unlucky, in that if some of these other groups were invading the country like Mexicans are doing, people would be more likely to have mobilized against it. In other words, there wouldn’t be immigration at the levels we are suffering.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @anon

    Depends on exactly where you live, I guess. Where I am we have been flooded by all of the above, and with a vengeance. And I moved to my current locale largely to get away from them. Keep moving? We're running out of habitable space, particularly if you want basic services.

  153. Steve Sailer:

    “In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there.”

    This is true. Spain is a unique country, because it was a Third World country that managed to become a First World nation in less than two generations. That is extremely remarkable, because as a general rule, Third World countries don’t become First World ones because the nymber of hurdles that must be overcome are gargantuan: you need to create an industrial base, raise the educational level of the population high enough that they can use and produce witht that industrial base, an educated class with enough quality and numbers to form a managerial class(because it is the managerial class that finally pushes the wages of the working man from high-end Third World- think Chile or Poland to First World, by both creating businesses and adding complexity to goods and services, which raise prices and thus wages), political institutions that are both stable and flexible, and a judicial system that is free from corruption and with effective laws. It’s quite a chore. It’s a chore that even Hercules would find daunting.

    But Spain did it. They did it. in the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s, there was the “Spanish miracle”. Their economy grew for over 30 years at a rate of 8.5% a year with neglegible population growth. The economy quadrupled in size, and so did GDP per capita. How did they do it? Nobody knows. Some say that, being in Europe, Spain benefitted from massive loans from British and German banks at a discounted rate due to intra-European policiies. Others argue that Spain was never truly a Third World country. That it was always a highly cultured and sophisticated European power that had gone through 300 years of hell, from losing their colonial empire to being invaded by Napoleon, to then having a long period of civil war and lots of internal strife with seccession movements. That is, Spain was never “really” a Third World country, but a highly sophisticated western European country that had been so beaten down from centiries of losing lands and gold, being invaded multiple times and having social unrest at home, that they assumed a temporary mantle of Third World country. Once the foreign invasions and internal political struggles ended, Spain quickly sky-rocketed to what it actually was: one of the historical Great Powers.

    Hemingway lived in Spain for a long time, and he did so during the time when Spain was at the absolute lowest points of it’s history. And yet, he always called Spain a “great nation”. He marveled at the sophisticated dress and mannerisms of Madrilenos, at the orderliness and cultural sophistication of Catalans, etc.

    Having said that, I don’t thinl Mexico can become another Spain. Spain has *significantly* more of what economists call “human capital”. Spaniards, for the most part, tend to be a higher grade of human beings than Mexicans.

    • Disagree: haole3
    • Replies: @haole3
    @Rockford Tyson


    Spaniards, for the most part, tend to be a higher grade of human beings than Mexicans.
     
    Mexico is a mixed race country. One of those races is mostly Spanish. If Mexico is, let's say 10% Spanish that is about 13 million people to fill the managerial class. I think the percentage is higher. This is why mexico is better off than Guatemala but less well off than Chile and Argentina.

    The question for mixed race countries is can they let the more capable people succeed while not getting the poorer peoples angry and jealous. The US is failing at this. So are most mixed race countries. When I read about the mexican revolution and the mexican war of indepenence the books seem to try real hard to say those were episodes of class warfare, but class is another way of saying race so really they were race wars. Entonces Mexico is a country with a history of race warfare but currently the white minority is given enough power to keep the place kind of operating but they aren't allowed to dominate. It's at a midpoint of the Rhodesia to Zimbabwe spectrum. It works for Mexico and they have tried both ends of the mixed race spectrum, Spanish domination and native anarchy. The US isn't at a point of equilibrium on this scale.
  154. anonymous[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    You're not just getting Hispanics. Indians are flooding into the USA now too.

    Canada has had the opposite - we had only "highly skilled" immigrants for years (false, but that was the narrative we believed) - but in the past 5 years we've started getting Africans, mexicans, Arabs, all kinds of dregs of the third world. Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    The USA is now getting all kinds of weird foreigners, from Indians to Arabs to Africans.

    The eventual plan is to totally swamp formerly white nations. We're taking so many non whites in Canada that it doesn't matter. USA will follow the same path

    Replies: @anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    What is bad about Punjabis?

  155. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    You're not just getting Hispanics. Indians are flooding into the USA now too.

    Canada has had the opposite - we had only "highly skilled" immigrants for years (false, but that was the narrative we believed) - but in the past 5 years we've started getting Africans, mexicans, Arabs, all kinds of dregs of the third world. Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    The USA is now getting all kinds of weird foreigners, from Indians to Arabs to Africans.

    The eventual plan is to totally swamp formerly white nations. We're taking so many non whites in Canada that it doesn't matter. USA will follow the same path

    Replies: @anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Who is we? The government of Canada? The government of the U.S.A. ? Occupied by people who hate you. Your identity is not defined by your tyrannical government.

    Ignore the government. Get into prepping, get into a parallel society of mutual benefit by your own European people. The bad guys won before you were born. Accept that, throw your shitty leaf flag in the trash and create some loyalties that actually mean something.

    Cancel every corporate luxury you gave, invest in your people. Make friends who think like you, and buy and sell from them instead of our corporate enemies. Secede, at least in your mind and with your money and labor.

    I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out. Let the dead (shitholer immigrants) bury the dead (Canada, USA.) We can outlast them.

    • Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    I fully agree with your comment, but disagree with the I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out.

    I have never met another dissident, I've been in religious circles, secular conservative circles, gun ranges. I've always been looking but nobody will let you down more than a conservative, gentile white man.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  156. the Lake Chapala colony of American retirees (where Fred Reed lives)

    Fred lives in an ethnic (white?) enclave and doesn’t melt into the Mestizo melting pot?
    Is he a racist or something?

  157. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Let me just add a Part II.

    Although Mexico has seen the encroachment of the big box stores (WalMart, Home Depot, Smart & Final, Costco, Sam's Club, Office Depot, Office Max), there are still thousands of mom & pop stores of all kinds.

    From medium-size groceries to butchers to every type of business.

    I find this extremely refreshing. It reminds me of how San Francisco used to be in the early 60s where you had mixed use in every single neighborhood, and you had the auto shop next to the mansion, the shack next to the villa.

    And here you have even a level below the small business: the street vendor. This kind of commerce is extremely positive to see and experience.

    And I mentioned it in passing before, but you can not discount the medical services that are available for pennies on the dollar in Mexico. And medical techniques not always available in the US.

    I have noted since I have been here, the enormous toss and turn of small businesses here. They open, they thrive, they close. It is terrific to see and to participate in. Such vibrant commerce.

    This all is just one more part of this grand country that one can enjoy and participate in. But my first comment was incomplete and so, here is another part.

    If I think of more, I'll post Part III.

    Replies: @restless94110

    Part III:

    Yes, as the gringo lady from Mazatlan complains, Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere–behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to. Because, because Mexico is a country with a lot of poor people, a lot of poor people want to steal, burgle, and rob you. Dogs help to maybe mitigate that. Somewhat.

    I’ve had a couple of cats that just showed up since I got here. One of them showed up at my door one day with a collar on and then showed up the next day without the collar. He was a great mouser and I kept an open window for him to come and go. I’m pretty sure the old caballero next door poisoned him, but one day he was gone. I mourned him for a few weeks.

    Now thee is a black female who showed up. She’s had 3 litters so far (there are 4 toms around). She’s not a house cat, that was settled a year ago, but her offspring has either been taken and sold or has migrated off to somewhere else.

    Where I lived before, there was a Finnish Hound that had been hit by a car and run off and disappeared for over a year. Suddenly he was back. A smart, smart animal. I got to walking him every day, first with a leash and then without. He understand and obeyed my commands. He had an “understanding” with the dogs we walked by, even the pit bulls, though I did have to intercede with two of them (pit bulls are poison).

    His best buddy from across the street was a mangy thing that looked like a desiccated yak called Pistón. This guy was the top dog in the entire hood and he had a way about him. We became friends because I would feed him in the mornings. He had never been washed ever I don’t think but he just existed and survived.

    My Finnish Hound finally died. The ticks got to him, but also his hips started to give out (common with Dalmatians, German Shepherds, Finnish Hounds). The moment he died, all of the dogs in the neighborhood came to our house. They knew.

    I had never been a dog person ever until coming to Mexico.

    In our new house, after a few weeks (and despite our landlord’s promises of giving us some of his Labrador pups from his rancho) I threw a beef bone to a renegade street dog and suddenly he and his brother became our dogs. One is a Dalmatian and is the top dog, the other is the shaggy white dog I threw the bone to.

    They guard our place and have an uneasy relationship with the cat and its offspring.

    There are hundreds of dogs all around us. Mexicans use their dogs for protection and for companionship. They also release dogs to fend for themselves. Official government efforts to curtail street dogs are ineffective. They came for Pistón a few years ago and he hid out until they cam no more.

    Although I have never been a dog person, the attitude and customs in Mexico are emblematic of a country that is maybe 2 generations behind the United States. It is freer, wilder as the US used to be.

    We can only hope that Mexico does not continue to follow the insane US and that instead the US regresses to the customs of Mexico.

    Part IV to follow.

    • Thanks: Another Canadian, BB753
    • Replies: @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part IV:

    There is no Part IV, because it is clear that no one on Unz gives a shit what life is like for Americans in Mexico.

    Enjoy life in Estados Unidos, suckers. :)

    Replies: @utu, @fitzhamilton, @restless94110

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @restless94110


    ...Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere–behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to.
     
    While between trains in Madrid, I strolled the neighborhood around the station. Except for the dogs not being loose, it was much the same. In Huelva, they were loose. One had to be careful when walking near a bush, lest one wake the residents therebehind.

    This was during the World's Fair/Olympic summer. Maybe it's changed since.

    Replies: @restless94110

  158. Anonymous[231] • Disclaimer says:
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    You're not just getting Hispanics. Indians are flooding into the USA now too.

    Canada has had the opposite - we had only "highly skilled" immigrants for years (false, but that was the narrative we believed) - but in the past 5 years we've started getting Africans, mexicans, Arabs, all kinds of dregs of the third world. Punjabis are the most vile creatures on the planet, imo.

    The USA is now getting all kinds of weird foreigners, from Indians to Arabs to Africans.

    The eventual plan is to totally swamp formerly white nations. We're taking so many non whites in Canada that it doesn't matter. USA will follow the same path

    Replies: @anonymous, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Can you offer a more detailed post on Punjabis?

  159. @fitzhamilton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Italy is beautiful, the food is incredible (better on average than in France), and the Italians - though crazy - are fascinating and a lot of fun.. Much more fun than the Germans, who are no fun at all outside of Bavaria.

    But the entire place is psychically caked under 4,000 years of layered stultification, corruption and decadence. It's an exhausted country, in an even greater demographic death spiral than the rest of Europe.

    The first dozen times I visited, I was overawed by all the astonishing beauty. Italy utterly seduced me.

    These last few trips, I've began to feel as if the entire country is one great open air necropolis of exquisitely beautiful mausoleums full of desiccated corpses, inhabited by elegant zombies.

    It's been like finding Snow White, repeatedly kissing her, then realizing she's not merely asleep, but truly dead..

    All of Europe is taking on this pall for me, Italy is just the furthest gone.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Beelzebub

    I agree. I’ve only been to Scotland, Portugal, and Italy but I had the same impression. It seemed to me that everyone was living off of all the relics of the past–the churches, the castles, etc., but the people all seemed sort of empty and tired. It was as if they’d given up in a way.

  160. @Jonathan Mason
    It makes me laugh that people in the United States regard Walmart as declasse when you can go there and buy things like an iPhone or an Instapot which are regarded as luxury brands and subject to hefty import taxes anywhere else in the world.

    Anywhere in the world can order these kind of things from Amazon.com and have them shipped overseas, but the end price will probably end up more than double what it would be in the United States and therefore out of the financial reach of most members of the working population.

    People in the United States simply don't realize that a great deal of their relative wealth compared to many nations is simply a function of the US dollar being a reserve currency and them being paid in US dollars.

    A person doing exactly the same job in the United States as in another country, for example an airline pilot flying the exact same airplane, could be earning two or three times the salary of their equivalent in another country, simply due to being paid in dollars.

    This is why so many people want to come to the United States to earn dollars that they can send back to their home country, buy real estate, and then later retire in luxury on social security paid in dollars.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @Beelzebub

    You hit the nail on the head Mr. Mason. Exactly. I’ve been telling people this for years, but people don’t listen. Immigrants come here for dollars–they don’t come here for the culture or to become Americans. They come here to earn in dollars so they can send what they earn out of the country as quickly as possible using a money transfer service. That’s a lot of money that’s just skimmed right off the top of almost every community in the US. That’s money that’s being earned here but that never recirculates here to help the local economy where the money is earned.

  161. @Anonymous
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    Who is we? The government of Canada? The government of the U.S.A. ? Occupied by people who hate you. Your identity is not defined by your tyrannical government.

    Ignore the government. Get into prepping, get into a parallel society of mutual benefit by your own European people. The bad guys won before you were born. Accept that, throw your shitty leaf flag in the trash and create some loyalties that actually mean something.

    Cancel every corporate luxury you gave, invest in your people. Make friends who think like you, and buy and sell from them instead of our corporate enemies. Secede, at least in your mind and with your money and labor.

    I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out. Let the dead (shitholer immigrants) bury the dead (Canada, USA.) We can outlast them.

    Replies: @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    I fully agree with your comment, but disagree with the I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out.

    I have never met another dissident, I’ve been in religious circles, secular conservative circles, gun ranges. I’ve always been looking but nobody will let you down more than a conservative, gentile white man.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com

    Here you go. The first one has basically no leftists. Not sure about the second, it might be a mix.

    https://beartariatimes.com/

    https://permies.com/

  162. Anonymous[131] • Disclaimer says:
    @haole3
    haha, love this article. I tell everybody the Spanish invaded first and grabbed Mexico because you grab the best first. The English pirates a hundred years later had to settle for the USA.

    I think mexicans make all their toilets stop up when you flush your toilet paper to keep out the gringos. What I can't figure out is why mexicans in Texas also have toilets that do not allow the paper to be flushed while all the white people in Texas are allowed to flush theirs, RACISM!!!

    Replies: @haole3, @Anonymous

    The Spanish as you say may have grabbed the best land first, but they also grabbed the land with the most natives on it, when compared with what would become the USA. Look at a population density map for North America circa 1492, southern Mexico had a large Amerindian population at the time compared with northern Mex and the USA.
    That’s a big factor in why most modern Mexicans still have Indian blood flowing through their veins compared with most Americans/Canadians. That and the English usually brought their own women with them as oppsed to the male Spaniards who tending to cohabitate/rape/marry the native women rather than bring their own.
    Too bad Mexico didn’t encourage mass Euro immigration like the US, Brazil and Argentina did in the early 1900s when its pop was only 15 million, a castizo Chile-like country would probably be less dangerous, corrupt and dirty than what they’ve got now. It still wouldn’t be as dynamic as the US because it’s got that Latin/Catholic cultural base with its dolce vita mindset, but still.

    • Agree: haole3
  163. @Steve Sailer
    @RAZ

    Right, Washington U. of St. Louis gave out a lot of National Merit Scholarships in the 1970s. That finally boosted its reputation. Now its problem is that because there are various Washington colleges, it has to include "St. Louis" in its title.

    Replies: @Flip

    I’ve always thought they should change the name to Eliot (the founder) or Danforth (the primary benefactor and former Chancellor) to avoid confusion.

  164. @JohnPlywood
    @fitzhamilton

    Chinese money isn't driving up home prices in Colorado. That would be white boomers.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    But it does exist, and that it exists is a problem.

    So, props to Mexico and China for having sensible land policies in the context of foreign ownership.

    The issue of prices rising from local purchases can partially be offset by abolishing property taxes on primary residencies (helping keep people rooted down and not affected by changing prices if they’ve paid of their home), and new home development. Another possible idea is states restricting migration from other states. That would be a great rabbit hole.

  165. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Lake Como is amazing.

     

    You're replying to someone who spent 30 years in St Paul!


    https://www.cardcow.com/images/set479/card00185_fr.jpg


    http://greatruns.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Lake-Como-St.-Paul.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Yes, it’ true, you can find your own piece of paradise almost anywhere, certainly in St. Paul Minnesota. The postcard you’ve posted looks quite old and depicts a “Japanese Garden” that has acquired some very verdant plants and sculpture over the years:

    then there’s the addition of the beautiful “Ordway Japanese Garden” too:

    One cannot omit the beautiful “Sunken Gardens” within the Margaret McNeely conservatory at Como Park:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Hack

    Nagasaki has been the Sister City since 1954, one of the earliest such pairings.

  166. Hey Steve – don’t you miss Gustavo Arellano’s spicy blog that he used to have here at UNZ? I’ve suggested to Ron Unz that he should try and lure him back – maybe he’ll listen to you? His unique ‘south of the border” look at the world and especially the US wa a huge hit here and would make me (and undoubtedly others here) really crack up. I’m sure that he could offer his own .02 cent opinion here in regard to your thread here. Also, although I usually comment over at Anatoly Karlin’s blog, and as far a I remember he’s never banned me from commenting there, I’ve left at least 15 comments over at your blog and have never been excluded – isn’t it time to lift my temporary blog status here that always entails a short (but irritable) trip to “your comment is awaiting moderation” purgatory stage? As you can see, I like reading your blog too. 🙂

  167. Well, when you’ve made no other provision for your later years, there’s always Mexico. Naturally, there will be a few inconveniences…

  168. What’s he doing with a “white “ first name?

  169. @anonymous

    I have a vague theory that Mexicans fear that gringos would overwhelm their country if it weren’t so craptastic. Mexican mediocrity is a price Mexicans are willing to pay to keep tens of millions of Americans from retiring to Mexico.
     
    Retirees don’t seem like much of a cost to the Mexican nation though. They don’t reproduce, so they don’t really dispossess Mexicans of their homeland, destroy their ethnicity, or threaten their sovereignty. They presumably pay for their own health care. They bring free dollars into Mexico from abroad and generally do not work, so they literally create jobs for ethnic Mexicans rather than compete against them for jobs. They presumably also don’t generally compete against Mexican men for securing Mexican women of child bearing age.

    What’s not to like?

    Replies: @Polistra, @fitzhamilton, @BGKB

    Retirees can still rape kids in Mexico thanks to the little blue pill

    Israeli Moosh was busted with having 6 child slave farms between Mexico & Brazil

    ” From their base in “little Israel” Moosh is reported to have run similar clubs exploiting drugs and children in Cartagena, Bogotá, Medellín, Ecuador, Mexico and Brazil.”

    https://israelpalestinenews.org/ex-israeli-soldier-heading-child-prostitution-ring-spanning-latin-america-deported-colombia/

  170. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part III:

    Yes, as the gringo lady from Mazatlan complains, Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere--behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to. Because, because Mexico is a country with a lot of poor people, a lot of poor people want to steal, burgle, and rob you. Dogs help to maybe mitigate that. Somewhat.

    I've had a couple of cats that just showed up since I got here. One of them showed up at my door one day with a collar on and then showed up the next day without the collar. He was a great mouser and I kept an open window for him to come and go. I'm pretty sure the old caballero next door poisoned him, but one day he was gone. I mourned him for a few weeks.

    Now thee is a black female who showed up. She's had 3 litters so far (there are 4 toms around). She's not a house cat, that was settled a year ago, but her offspring has either been taken and sold or has migrated off to somewhere else.

    Where I lived before, there was a Finnish Hound that had been hit by a car and run off and disappeared for over a year. Suddenly he was back. A smart, smart animal. I got to walking him every day, first with a leash and then without. He understand and obeyed my commands. He had an "understanding" with the dogs we walked by, even the pit bulls, though I did have to intercede with two of them (pit bulls are poison).

    His best buddy from across the street was a mangy thing that looked like a desiccated yak called Pistón. This guy was the top dog in the entire hood and he had a way about him. We became friends because I would feed him in the mornings. He had never been washed ever I don't think but he just existed and survived.

    My Finnish Hound finally died. The ticks got to him, but also his hips started to give out (common with Dalmatians, German Shepherds, Finnish Hounds). The moment he died, all of the dogs in the neighborhood came to our house. They knew.

    I had never been a dog person ever until coming to Mexico.

    In our new house, after a few weeks (and despite our landlord's promises of giving us some of his Labrador pups from his rancho) I threw a beef bone to a renegade street dog and suddenly he and his brother became our dogs. One is a Dalmatian and is the top dog, the other is the shaggy white dog I threw the bone to.

    They guard our place and have an uneasy relationship with the cat and its offspring.

    There are hundreds of dogs all around us. Mexicans use their dogs for protection and for companionship. They also release dogs to fend for themselves. Official government efforts to curtail street dogs are ineffective. They came for Pistón a few years ago and he hid out until they cam no more.

    Although I have never been a dog person, the attitude and customs in Mexico are emblematic of a country that is maybe 2 generations behind the United States. It is freer, wilder as the US used to be.

    We can only hope that Mexico does not continue to follow the insane US and that instead the US regresses to the customs of Mexico.

    Part IV to follow.

    Replies: @restless94110, @Reg Cæsar

    Part IV:

    There is no Part IV, because it is clear that no one on Unz gives a shit what life is like for Americans in Mexico.

    Enjoy life in Estados Unidos, suckers. 🙂

    • Replies: @utu
    @restless94110

    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.

    Replies: @restless94110

    , @fitzhamilton
    @restless94110

    It's just that they mostly don't understand. How could they? You have to want to. You have to want to know.

    We're trapped by our prosperity, our ignorance and our arrogance up here. We're riding our petroleum boom down off the peak, and in the absence of a miracle, we're going to be worse off than the Mexicans in a couple of decades when all that sweet crude, gas and coal is brunt off into the sky.. I mean, hopefully the carbon dioxide takes the chill off the solar minimum and softens the next coming ice age.. But we'll still be grasping the shards of our obsolete technology in the wasted shells of our desolate crumbling mcmansions, without a clue about what to do with ourselves.

    While the wily Mexican peasants will still be contentedly feeding their chickens, growing their frijoles, chilis and maiz.

    I wrote earlier in this thread that the Mexicans are used to defeat. That's part of the secret of their tenacity and strength. We're so used to winning, that we will not know how to deal with our looming loss. It will destroy us.

    I came back home from Guatemala three years ago, and I've been wandering about the country in my RV, then sitting down here this past plague year in Florida, watching the country spool off into daft insanity.. It's just exhausting.

    That so many of us look down our noses at the campesinos, and criticize them for things like littering - which, you know is annoying.. But that's what peasants do. There hasn't been plastic glass or metal for them to discard until about a generation or so ago. Everything they are used to throwing out used to just biodegrade - they're used to compost piles, not trash cans..

    But dumb gringos don't get stuff like that. We think it's because they're lazy and stupid. But we're the stupid ones, really. Our great grandparents didn't know what to do with it all, either. We're the ones who invented and manufactured the trash, not them.

    We give them trash, and they just don't know what to do with it. They'll learn, in time, after we've corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. Then they'll be just like us, disenchanted materialistic twits, narcissistic narked neurotic and numb.

    Anyway, I am enjoying your stories, restless. Thanks for telling them. You've stirred some memories in me.. a yearning.

    I'm sitting in the pines just off I75 here feeling the stir of that ache, that sad gladness you feel when the thunder storm approaches across the Navajoa valley with a great rush of cool wind cutting the humidity, throwing great curtains of grey rain in grey veils rent with lightening..

    You've made me homesick.. Wishing I were out drinking mezcal on the veranda of my Mexican home, anticipating the rain..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiFwquTr8sM

    I haven't felt it in a while.. The tug to return. I've just made a resolution. Thanks.

    Replies: @utu, @restless94110

    , @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part V: In Mexico: Odds & Ends

    - Walls, Bars, and Fences: Many if not most of the homes have thick walls of varying height, sometimes topped by wrought-iron fencing, and often bars on the windows and doors. I like this enclosed-feeling architecture. It promotes privacy and gives a sense of some security and safety.

    - Pochos & Chilangos: Mexicans do have attitude towards the chilangos--those who come from Mexico City (they are considered to be a bit arrogant and full of themselves)--the pochos--those that went to the US and then return, either on a visit or permanently (in general, Mexicans can tend to feel that chicanos in the US are slumming it when they come back to visit Mexico or when their kids come back and visit, kind of like they don't know what's it really like to be a Mexican in Mexico or have forgotten.

    There is also a strong curiosity and interest in anyone who does not have white skin, they will openly ask if the person is an "indio" which to some Mexicans just means a Mexican. My daughter is 50% Chocktaw Native American and got that question constantly when she was down for a visit. It's not really a diss, but race is constantly mentioned here (don't tell Megan M.).

    - Garbage pick up/Water: A truck will come by irregularly. We just had one here at 7AM for the first time in 5 weeks. It's a combo of not enough trucks and some strikes that go on with the workers. They do ask for a "tip" but only gringos go for it. Water is at times intermittent and of low pressure. This is mainly due to sources (either wells or reservoirs or in some cases a de-salination plant), and the remedy for many is to buy a 50 to 200 gallon personal reservoir and then mount it either on the roof or build a wooden stand for it. That way there is flow even when the water is off and also the pressure is better. Both these things are inconvenient, but not that serious once you are used to them.

    I also learned the hard way to never flush toilet paper. Mexican sewage pipes can't handle it. This is also a "custom" that is easy to adapt to.

    And it didn't used to be as good as it is now. Even 25 years ago when I was here for a few days they had primitive baños that were little better than a country outhouse and just as filthy. The country has come a long long way in the 21st century. I was sincerely surprised when I saw it again when I got here this last time.

    This ends my engrossing account of some aspects of Mexican life.

    Enjoy.

  171. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part IV:

    There is no Part IV, because it is clear that no one on Unz gives a shit what life is like for Americans in Mexico.

    Enjoy life in Estados Unidos, suckers. :)

    Replies: @utu, @fitzhamilton, @restless94110

    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    @utu


    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.
     
    I would rather go to Estados Unidos and determine why some US twit (i.e., you) thinks that direct talk is anger.

    It's not anger, twit. I could care less what you think about what I say.

    It's true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit. If that sounds angry to you? You are a beta fool.

    It's just what's true, mate. Who cares if I say what I say?

    No one. So why attribute "anger" to it?

    How stupid. How transparent that saying I am "angry" is all about the feels. In other words, this is a female thing. it's not about the logic or the reason. It's about the feels. It's about the "anger".

    Are you a man? Are you sure you are? Why are you acting like a female? Cringing about the "anger."

    What horseshit.

    Mexicans don't go for that, gringo. They have some balls left. Don't come to Mexico unless you do, too. Go to your room, sit in the corner, and weep over my "anger." Be happy in the new Amerika.

    Replies: @utu

  172. @Rockford Tyson
    Steve Sailer:

    "In contrast to Mexico, Spain really upgraded itself over the last 50 or so years to First World standards, and a huge number of Northern Europeans took up residence there."

    This is true. Spain is a unique country, because it was a Third World country that managed to become a First World nation in less than two generations. That is extremely remarkable, because as a general rule, Third World countries don't become First World ones because the nymber of hurdles that must be overcome are gargantuan: you need to create an industrial base, raise the educational level of the population high enough that they can use and produce witht that industrial base, an educated class with enough quality and numbers to form a managerial class(because it is the managerial class that finally pushes the wages of the working man from high-end Third World- think Chile or Poland to First World, by both creating businesses and adding complexity to goods and services, which raise prices and thus wages), political institutions that are both stable and flexible, and a judicial system that is free from corruption and with effective laws. It's quite a chore. It's a chore that even Hercules would find daunting.

    But Spain did it. They did it. in the 1950's, 60's and 70's, there was the "Spanish miracle". Their economy grew for over 30 years at a rate of 8.5% a year with neglegible population growth. The economy quadrupled in size, and so did GDP per capita. How did they do it? Nobody knows. Some say that, being in Europe, Spain benefitted from massive loans from British and German banks at a discounted rate due to intra-European policiies. Others argue that Spain was never truly a Third World country. That it was always a highly cultured and sophisticated European power that had gone through 300 years of hell, from losing their colonial empire to being invaded by Napoleon, to then having a long period of civil war and lots of internal strife with seccession movements. That is, Spain was never "really" a Third World country, but a highly sophisticated western European country that had been so beaten down from centiries of losing lands and gold, being invaded multiple times and having social unrest at home, that they assumed a temporary mantle of Third World country. Once the foreign invasions and internal political struggles ended, Spain quickly sky-rocketed to what it actually was: one of the historical Great Powers.

    Hemingway lived in Spain for a long time, and he did so during the time when Spain was at the absolute lowest points of it's history. And yet, he always called Spain a "great nation". He marveled at the sophisticated dress and mannerisms of Madrilenos, at the orderliness and cultural sophistication of Catalans, etc.

    Having said that, I don't thinl Mexico can become another Spain. Spain has *significantly* more of what economists call "human capital". Spaniards, for the most part, tend to be a higher grade of human beings than Mexicans.

    Replies: @haole3

    Spaniards, for the most part, tend to be a higher grade of human beings than Mexicans.

    Mexico is a mixed race country. One of those races is mostly Spanish. If Mexico is, let’s say 10% Spanish that is about 13 million people to fill the managerial class. I think the percentage is higher. This is why mexico is better off than Guatemala but less well off than Chile and Argentina.

    The question for mixed race countries is can they let the more capable people succeed while not getting the poorer peoples angry and jealous. The US is failing at this. So are most mixed race countries. When I read about the mexican revolution and the mexican war of indepenence the books seem to try real hard to say those were episodes of class warfare, but class is another way of saying race so really they were race wars. Entonces Mexico is a country with a history of race warfare but currently the white minority is given enough power to keep the place kind of operating but they aren’t allowed to dominate. It’s at a midpoint of the Rhodesia to Zimbabwe spectrum. It works for Mexico and they have tried both ends of the mixed race spectrum, Spanish domination and native anarchy. The US isn’t at a point of equilibrium on this scale.

  173. @anon
    @Anonymous


    I don’t like what the politicians are doing to us (erasing our say in government via immigration) but Mr. Unz is correct that we are probably the luckiest Western country in this regard. I will take Latin Americans over Chinese, Africans, Arabs, Pakis and Indians
     
    Or unlucky, in that if some of these other groups were invading the country like Mexicans are doing, people would be more likely to have mobilized against it. In other words, there wouldn’t be immigration at the levels we are suffering.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Depends on exactly where you live, I guess. Where I am we have been flooded by all of the above, and with a vengeance. And I moved to my current locale largely to get away from them. Keep moving? We’re running out of habitable space, particularly if you want basic services.

  174. @Mr. Hack
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, it' true, you can find your own piece of paradise almost anywhere, certainly in St. Paul Minnesota. The postcard you've posted looks quite old and depicts a "Japanese Garden" that has acquired some very verdant plants and sculpture over the years:

    https://comofriends.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Japanesegardenrainbridge.jpg

    then there's the addition of the beautiful "Ordway Japanese Garden" too:

    https://minnevangelist.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ordway-japanese-garden-3-600x800.jpg

    One cannot omit the beautiful "Sunken Gardens" within the Margaret McNeely conservatory at Como Park:

    https://comofriends.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/springflowershow2021centerstat.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Nagasaki has been the Sister City since 1954, one of the earliest such pairings.

  175. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part III:

    Yes, as the gringo lady from Mazatlan complains, Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere--behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to. Because, because Mexico is a country with a lot of poor people, a lot of poor people want to steal, burgle, and rob you. Dogs help to maybe mitigate that. Somewhat.

    I've had a couple of cats that just showed up since I got here. One of them showed up at my door one day with a collar on and then showed up the next day without the collar. He was a great mouser and I kept an open window for him to come and go. I'm pretty sure the old caballero next door poisoned him, but one day he was gone. I mourned him for a few weeks.

    Now thee is a black female who showed up. She's had 3 litters so far (there are 4 toms around). She's not a house cat, that was settled a year ago, but her offspring has either been taken and sold or has migrated off to somewhere else.

    Where I lived before, there was a Finnish Hound that had been hit by a car and run off and disappeared for over a year. Suddenly he was back. A smart, smart animal. I got to walking him every day, first with a leash and then without. He understand and obeyed my commands. He had an "understanding" with the dogs we walked by, even the pit bulls, though I did have to intercede with two of them (pit bulls are poison).

    His best buddy from across the street was a mangy thing that looked like a desiccated yak called Pistón. This guy was the top dog in the entire hood and he had a way about him. We became friends because I would feed him in the mornings. He had never been washed ever I don't think but he just existed and survived.

    My Finnish Hound finally died. The ticks got to him, but also his hips started to give out (common with Dalmatians, German Shepherds, Finnish Hounds). The moment he died, all of the dogs in the neighborhood came to our house. They knew.

    I had never been a dog person ever until coming to Mexico.

    In our new house, after a few weeks (and despite our landlord's promises of giving us some of his Labrador pups from his rancho) I threw a beef bone to a renegade street dog and suddenly he and his brother became our dogs. One is a Dalmatian and is the top dog, the other is the shaggy white dog I threw the bone to.

    They guard our place and have an uneasy relationship with the cat and its offspring.

    There are hundreds of dogs all around us. Mexicans use their dogs for protection and for companionship. They also release dogs to fend for themselves. Official government efforts to curtail street dogs are ineffective. They came for Pistón a few years ago and he hid out until they cam no more.

    Although I have never been a dog person, the attitude and customs in Mexico are emblematic of a country that is maybe 2 generations behind the United States. It is freer, wilder as the US used to be.

    We can only hope that Mexico does not continue to follow the insane US and that instead the US regresses to the customs of Mexico.

    Part IV to follow.

    Replies: @restless94110, @Reg Cæsar

    …Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere–behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to.

    While between trains in Madrid, I strolled the neighborhood around the station. Except for the dogs not being loose, it was much the same. In Huelva, they were loose. One had to be careful when walking near a bush, lest one wake the residents therebehind.

    This was during the World’s Fair/Olympic summer. Maybe it’s changed since.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    @Reg Cæsar

    The dogs in Mexico, most of them, their bark is worse than their bite.

    Countless times I have stared down other dogs. Other times I have thrown rocks at those that are too aggressive, something I learned from Mexicans. And I few times--when a dog attacked my dog, and my dog did not seem to be doing well in the encounter--I have stomped the shit out of the attacking dog.

    And yes, it was a rash thing to do. But it was a visceral thing to do. And even the dog in question seemed to be surprised (to my good fortune).

    However, the point remains: dogs in Mexico are subservient to Mexican people. They can bark and snarl all they want, but they cower when confronted by a human.

    The only breed I have had my sketchy encounters with were: Dobermans, Pit bulls, and German Shepherds. The German Shepherds I could talk to. The Dobermans remained chained and I never had to deal with. The Pit bulls you had to immediately go into aggressive with. They have a feral savage attitude to them. They are the worst.

    My Finnish Hound--related to German Shepherds, a little smaller, and definitely tamer--was such a fine fine animal . Never a dog person, but I became one in the presence of this animal.

    And then I got to know the other good dogs surrounding. Chapita, the tiny female with a mind of her own; Pistón ,the desiccated yak-like dog, the quintessential Mexican dog, who had survived for years and was the top dog. My dog and he got along so well.

    The German Shepherds up at the nursery used to come out when we walked by and i would talk to them and tell them to calm down. They would follow us back to the house until their owner came for them to take them back.

    Suddenly they were gone.I asked the owner what had happened.He said one had died and the other had been stolen. I'm not sure I believe that.

    All I know is that I learned the ways of dogs while walking my Finnish Hound in Mexico, and I am a better person for it.

    I say this as I listen to my two current dogs barking at the other dogs in the street and the neighboring yards at midnight.

  176. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:
    @Smarter Than Unz dot Com
    @Anonymous

    I fully agree with your comment, but disagree with the I know of huge groups forming along these lines, one only needs to seek them out.

    I have never met another dissident, I've been in religious circles, secular conservative circles, gun ranges. I've always been looking but nobody will let you down more than a conservative, gentile white man.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Here you go. The first one has basically no leftists. Not sure about the second, it might be a mix.

    https://beartariatimes.com/

    https://permies.com/

  177. @utu
    @restless94110

    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.

    Replies: @restless94110

    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.

    I would rather go to Estados Unidos and determine why some US twit (i.e., you) thinks that direct talk is anger.

    It’s not anger, twit. I could care less what you think about what I say.

    It’s true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit. If that sounds angry to you? You are a beta fool.

    It’s just what’s true, mate. Who cares if I say what I say?

    No one. So why attribute “anger” to it?

    How stupid. How transparent that saying I am “angry” is all about the feels. In other words, this is a female thing. it’s not about the logic or the reason. It’s about the feels. It’s about the “anger”.

    Are you a man? Are you sure you are? Why are you acting like a female? Cringing about the “anger.”

    What horseshit.

    Mexicans don’t go for that, gringo. They have some balls left. Don’t come to Mexico unless you do, too. Go to your room, sit in the corner, and weep over my “anger.” Be happy in the new Amerika.

    • Replies: @utu
    @restless94110

    "It’s true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit." - So if you knew it why did you write in the first place. You threw a tantrum that nobody responded to your part III. Just like a child in a sandbox. Probably you are drunk which is chief entertainment among the loser back home expats. Drink more and write less.

    Replies: @restless94110

  178. @Reg Cæsar
    @restless94110


    ...Mexico is a country of dogs. They are literally everywhere–behind the gates and fences of the houses, on the streets. Even the convenience stores have open bins of dog food. Everyone has dogs.

    And they bark. All day and all night.

    And you want them to.
     
    While between trains in Madrid, I strolled the neighborhood around the station. Except for the dogs not being loose, it was much the same. In Huelva, they were loose. One had to be careful when walking near a bush, lest one wake the residents therebehind.

    This was during the World's Fair/Olympic summer. Maybe it's changed since.

    Replies: @restless94110

    The dogs in Mexico, most of them, their bark is worse than their bite.

    Countless times I have stared down other dogs. Other times I have thrown rocks at those that are too aggressive, something I learned from Mexicans. And I few times–when a dog attacked my dog, and my dog did not seem to be doing well in the encounter–I have stomped the shit out of the attacking dog.

    And yes, it was a rash thing to do. But it was a visceral thing to do. And even the dog in question seemed to be surprised (to my good fortune).

    However, the point remains: dogs in Mexico are subservient to Mexican people. They can bark and snarl all they want, but they cower when confronted by a human.

    The only breed I have had my sketchy encounters with were: Dobermans, Pit bulls, and German Shepherds. The German Shepherds I could talk to. The Dobermans remained chained and I never had to deal with. The Pit bulls you had to immediately go into aggressive with. They have a feral savage attitude to them. They are the worst.

    My Finnish Hound–related to German Shepherds, a little smaller, and definitely tamer–was such a fine fine animal . Never a dog person, but I became one in the presence of this animal.

    And then I got to know the other good dogs surrounding. Chapita, the tiny female with a mind of her own; Pistón ,the desiccated yak-like dog, the quintessential Mexican dog, who had survived for years and was the top dog. My dog and he got along so well.

    The German Shepherds up at the nursery used to come out when we walked by and i would talk to them and tell them to calm down. They would follow us back to the house until their owner came for them to take them back.

    Suddenly they were gone.I asked the owner what had happened.He said one had died and the other had been stolen. I’m not sure I believe that.

    All I know is that I learned the ways of dogs while walking my Finnish Hound in Mexico, and I am a better person for it.

    I say this as I listen to my two current dogs barking at the other dogs in the street and the neighboring yards at midnight.

  179. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part IV:

    There is no Part IV, because it is clear that no one on Unz gives a shit what life is like for Americans in Mexico.

    Enjoy life in Estados Unidos, suckers. :)

    Replies: @utu, @fitzhamilton, @restless94110

    It’s just that they mostly don’t understand. How could they? You have to want to. You have to want to know.

    We’re trapped by our prosperity, our ignorance and our arrogance up here. We’re riding our petroleum boom down off the peak, and in the absence of a miracle, we’re going to be worse off than the Mexicans in a couple of decades when all that sweet crude, gas and coal is brunt off into the sky.. I mean, hopefully the carbon dioxide takes the chill off the solar minimum and softens the next coming ice age.. But we’ll still be grasping the shards of our obsolete technology in the wasted shells of our desolate crumbling mcmansions, without a clue about what to do with ourselves.

    While the wily Mexican peasants will still be contentedly feeding their chickens, growing their frijoles, chilis and maiz.

    I wrote earlier in this thread that the Mexicans are used to defeat. That’s part of the secret of their tenacity and strength. We’re so used to winning, that we will not know how to deal with our looming loss. It will destroy us.

    I came back home from Guatemala three years ago, and I’ve been wandering about the country in my RV, then sitting down here this past plague year in Florida, watching the country spool off into daft insanity.. It’s just exhausting.

    That so many of us look down our noses at the campesinos, and criticize them for things like littering – which, you know is annoying.. But that’s what peasants do. There hasn’t been plastic glass or metal for them to discard until about a generation or so ago. Everything they are used to throwing out used to just biodegrade – they’re used to compost piles, not trash cans..

    But dumb gringos don’t get stuff like that. We think it’s because they’re lazy and stupid. But we’re the stupid ones, really. Our great grandparents didn’t know what to do with it all, either. We’re the ones who invented and manufactured the trash, not them.

    We give them trash, and they just don’t know what to do with it. They’ll learn, in time, after we’ve corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. Then they’ll be just like us, disenchanted materialistic twits, narcissistic narked neurotic and numb.

    Anyway, I am enjoying your stories, restless. Thanks for telling them. You’ve stirred some memories in me.. a yearning.

    I’m sitting in the pines just off I75 here feeling the stir of that ache, that sad gladness you feel when the thunder storm approaches across the Navajoa valley with a great rush of cool wind cutting the humidity, throwing great curtains of grey rain in grey veils rent with lightening..

    You’ve made me homesick.. Wishing I were out drinking mezcal on the veranda of my Mexican home, anticipating the rain..

    I haven’t felt it in a while.. The tug to return. I’ve just made a resolution. Thanks.

    • Replies: @utu
    @fitzhamilton


    "We give them trash, and they just don’t know what to do with it. They’ll learn, in time, after we’ve corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. "
     
    Why don't you go to India where you could even more strongly demonstrate and protest against "our sick decadent [and cretinous] obsessions" by freely defecating on the streets.

    Replies: @fitzhamilton

    , @restless94110
    @fitzhamilton

    Thanks very much for your response. And yes, I enjoyed very much your earlier comment. You obviously know because you have lived in Hispanic countries.

    I agree with so much of what you write, but it's beyond my energies just now to comment on every single one of them. But I will also say that I think at times you are simultaneously a bit too pessimistic and too didactic about things down here and the people thereof.

    I do not believe that these countries will cave in to the US lunacy. I think what is more likely to happen is that the US will get "spanked" economically and militarily, and that will cause a grip of changes to the US's personality.

    While it is fascinating that you are in the country in an RV and experiencing and living the very best of it you can, I have absolutely no desire to do the same. There are way too many things that need to change in America before I'd want to come back there--I have no homesickness for BLM, Antifa, reparations, insane doctrine, etc., etc. Those issues and more are effective in completely obliterating any desire to return.

    I also think you may have perhaps misread a slight bit the traditions and customs of the paisas down here. I think they are more modern than you describe, but there is more family, more tradition, more custom, more homogenity than there is in the US. That's why I say that Mexico is 2 to 3 generations behind the US. And now that I know more about them, I think they may always be--they'll never catch up and that's a good thing.

    There is more to say, but I have a thick chop in the cast iron pan and I want to listen to more Michael Saylor videos (that guy is on to something).

    I wish you the best. You obviously could easily live here in Mexico and Central America. Enjoy your stay in the US. Come back to one of the best places to live in the world when you please.

    In your honor, I will post a Part V: Gates & Fences, and Mexican/Gringo (Gabacho) relations in the next few days.

  180. @restless94110
    @utu


    OK, skip to part V and describe how mental health services in Mexico are working for you in controlling your temper.
     
    I would rather go to Estados Unidos and determine why some US twit (i.e., you) thinks that direct talk is anger.

    It's not anger, twit. I could care less what you think about what I say.

    It's true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit. If that sounds angry to you? You are a beta fool.

    It's just what's true, mate. Who cares if I say what I say?

    No one. So why attribute "anger" to it?

    How stupid. How transparent that saying I am "angry" is all about the feels. In other words, this is a female thing. it's not about the logic or the reason. It's about the feels. It's about the "anger".

    Are you a man? Are you sure you are? Why are you acting like a female? Cringing about the "anger."

    What horseshit.

    Mexicans don't go for that, gringo. They have some balls left. Don't come to Mexico unless you do, too. Go to your room, sit in the corner, and weep over my "anger." Be happy in the new Amerika.

    Replies: @utu

    “It’s true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit.” – So if you knew it why did you write in the first place. You threw a tantrum that nobody responded to your part III. Just like a child in a sandbox. Probably you are drunk which is chief entertainment among the loser back home expats. Drink more and write less.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    @utu


    You threw a tantrum that nobody responded to your part III
     
    Um, saying that no one responded to my Part III is throwing a tantrum?

    Please get help for your affliction. Someone who says "no one is responding to my Part III, therefore that's it for my writing on this subject" is "throwing a tantrum?"

    In what universe do you live? Oh. Yeah. The female universe of the "feels."

    Johnny get angry, johnny get mad, give me the biggest lecture I ever had. I want a cave man, I want a bad man......

    Do you need a cave man, utu?

    Why are you saying I had a tantrum? Babies have tantrums.

    What is wrong with you, honey? You're a mess (Marlene Dietrich to Orson Welles in A Touch of Evil)
  181. @fitzhamilton
    @restless94110

    It's just that they mostly don't understand. How could they? You have to want to. You have to want to know.

    We're trapped by our prosperity, our ignorance and our arrogance up here. We're riding our petroleum boom down off the peak, and in the absence of a miracle, we're going to be worse off than the Mexicans in a couple of decades when all that sweet crude, gas and coal is brunt off into the sky.. I mean, hopefully the carbon dioxide takes the chill off the solar minimum and softens the next coming ice age.. But we'll still be grasping the shards of our obsolete technology in the wasted shells of our desolate crumbling mcmansions, without a clue about what to do with ourselves.

    While the wily Mexican peasants will still be contentedly feeding their chickens, growing their frijoles, chilis and maiz.

    I wrote earlier in this thread that the Mexicans are used to defeat. That's part of the secret of their tenacity and strength. We're so used to winning, that we will not know how to deal with our looming loss. It will destroy us.

    I came back home from Guatemala three years ago, and I've been wandering about the country in my RV, then sitting down here this past plague year in Florida, watching the country spool off into daft insanity.. It's just exhausting.

    That so many of us look down our noses at the campesinos, and criticize them for things like littering - which, you know is annoying.. But that's what peasants do. There hasn't been plastic glass or metal for them to discard until about a generation or so ago. Everything they are used to throwing out used to just biodegrade - they're used to compost piles, not trash cans..

    But dumb gringos don't get stuff like that. We think it's because they're lazy and stupid. But we're the stupid ones, really. Our great grandparents didn't know what to do with it all, either. We're the ones who invented and manufactured the trash, not them.

    We give them trash, and they just don't know what to do with it. They'll learn, in time, after we've corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. Then they'll be just like us, disenchanted materialistic twits, narcissistic narked neurotic and numb.

    Anyway, I am enjoying your stories, restless. Thanks for telling them. You've stirred some memories in me.. a yearning.

    I'm sitting in the pines just off I75 here feeling the stir of that ache, that sad gladness you feel when the thunder storm approaches across the Navajoa valley with a great rush of cool wind cutting the humidity, throwing great curtains of grey rain in grey veils rent with lightening..

    You've made me homesick.. Wishing I were out drinking mezcal on the veranda of my Mexican home, anticipating the rain..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiFwquTr8sM

    I haven't felt it in a while.. The tug to return. I've just made a resolution. Thanks.

    Replies: @utu, @restless94110

    “We give them trash, and they just don’t know what to do with it. They’ll learn, in time, after we’ve corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. ”

    Why don’t you go to India where you could even more strongly demonstrate and protest against “our sick decadent [and cretinous] obsessions” by freely defecating on the streets.

    • Replies: @fitzhamilton
    @utu

    Have you been to India? I have. They don't defecate in the streets. The cows do, but not the people. There are latrines where lower caste "homeless" Indians, who for the most part aren't truly homeless, go to do their business. I've hung out with them, and realized that the way they live - the way that the Indians organize their society - is on the surface a bit inscrutable.

    There's a lot going on there that you'd need to inhabit humbly for years to truly understand, but even after spending one year there, I realized that they are inhabiting an entirely different cosmological universe than we do.

    I would in fact like to go back.. There are many similar places I've been fortunate enough to experience - like rural Latin America, rural Anatolia and Egypt, rural South East Asia, rural Switzerland France Italy Spain, even rural America - where people live in much more atavistic relationship to the land and hence to one another, with traditional cosmological frames of belief and understanding, that seem much saner and healthier to me than our deracinated technologically revolutionary society, where we're alienated from the natural world that sustains us, completely caught up in this fever dream that we we are somehow radically separated from nature, believing we can subdue and transcend it through the magic of our technology.

    The water table in the South West is running dry. So are the oil wells. The day of our reckoning approaches. Maybe learning from people who live simpler, less technologically driven lives might be wise.. Instead of sneering at them, like you do.

    You're a bit of an ingnorant arrogant tool if you think you are somehow ontologically superior to the Indians just because you're blessed with indoor plumbing. Are you a plumber who grows his own PVC pipe in his backyard?

    No, you're just an insufferable empty headed troll insulting people in a combox.

    Replies: @utu

  182. @utu
    @restless94110

    "It’s true. what I wrote: No one in the US gives a shit." - So if you knew it why did you write in the first place. You threw a tantrum that nobody responded to your part III. Just like a child in a sandbox. Probably you are drunk which is chief entertainment among the loser back home expats. Drink more and write less.

    Replies: @restless94110

    You threw a tantrum that nobody responded to your part III

    Um, saying that no one responded to my Part III is throwing a tantrum?

    Please get help for your affliction. Someone who says “no one is responding to my Part III, therefore that’s it for my writing on this subject” is “throwing a tantrum?”

    In what universe do you live? Oh. Yeah. The female universe of the “feels.”

    Johnny get angry, johnny get mad, give me the biggest lecture I ever had. I want a cave man, I want a bad man……

    Do you need a cave man, utu?

    Why are you saying I had a tantrum? Babies have tantrums.

    What is wrong with you, honey? You’re a mess (Marlene Dietrich to Orson Welles in A Touch of Evil)

  183. @fitzhamilton
    @restless94110

    It's just that they mostly don't understand. How could they? You have to want to. You have to want to know.

    We're trapped by our prosperity, our ignorance and our arrogance up here. We're riding our petroleum boom down off the peak, and in the absence of a miracle, we're going to be worse off than the Mexicans in a couple of decades when all that sweet crude, gas and coal is brunt off into the sky.. I mean, hopefully the carbon dioxide takes the chill off the solar minimum and softens the next coming ice age.. But we'll still be grasping the shards of our obsolete technology in the wasted shells of our desolate crumbling mcmansions, without a clue about what to do with ourselves.

    While the wily Mexican peasants will still be contentedly feeding their chickens, growing their frijoles, chilis and maiz.

    I wrote earlier in this thread that the Mexicans are used to defeat. That's part of the secret of their tenacity and strength. We're so used to winning, that we will not know how to deal with our looming loss. It will destroy us.

    I came back home from Guatemala three years ago, and I've been wandering about the country in my RV, then sitting down here this past plague year in Florida, watching the country spool off into daft insanity.. It's just exhausting.

    That so many of us look down our noses at the campesinos, and criticize them for things like littering - which, you know is annoying.. But that's what peasants do. There hasn't been plastic glass or metal for them to discard until about a generation or so ago. Everything they are used to throwing out used to just biodegrade - they're used to compost piles, not trash cans..

    But dumb gringos don't get stuff like that. We think it's because they're lazy and stupid. But we're the stupid ones, really. Our great grandparents didn't know what to do with it all, either. We're the ones who invented and manufactured the trash, not them.

    We give them trash, and they just don't know what to do with it. They'll learn, in time, after we've corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. Then they'll be just like us, disenchanted materialistic twits, narcissistic narked neurotic and numb.

    Anyway, I am enjoying your stories, restless. Thanks for telling them. You've stirred some memories in me.. a yearning.

    I'm sitting in the pines just off I75 here feeling the stir of that ache, that sad gladness you feel when the thunder storm approaches across the Navajoa valley with a great rush of cool wind cutting the humidity, throwing great curtains of grey rain in grey veils rent with lightening..

    You've made me homesick.. Wishing I were out drinking mezcal on the veranda of my Mexican home, anticipating the rain..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiFwquTr8sM

    I haven't felt it in a while.. The tug to return. I've just made a resolution. Thanks.

    Replies: @utu, @restless94110

    Thanks very much for your response. And yes, I enjoyed very much your earlier comment. You obviously know because you have lived in Hispanic countries.

    I agree with so much of what you write, but it’s beyond my energies just now to comment on every single one of them. But I will also say that I think at times you are simultaneously a bit too pessimistic and too didactic about things down here and the people thereof.

    I do not believe that these countries will cave in to the US lunacy. I think what is more likely to happen is that the US will get “spanked” economically and militarily, and that will cause a grip of changes to the US’s personality.

    While it is fascinating that you are in the country in an RV and experiencing and living the very best of it you can, I have absolutely no desire to do the same. There are way too many things that need to change in America before I’d want to come back there–I have no homesickness for BLM, Antifa, reparations, insane doctrine, etc., etc. Those issues and more are effective in completely obliterating any desire to return.

    I also think you may have perhaps misread a slight bit the traditions and customs of the paisas down here. I think they are more modern than you describe, but there is more family, more tradition, more custom, more homogenity than there is in the US. That’s why I say that Mexico is 2 to 3 generations behind the US. And now that I know more about them, I think they may always be–they’ll never catch up and that’s a good thing.

    There is more to say, but I have a thick chop in the cast iron pan and I want to listen to more Michael Saylor videos (that guy is on to something).

    I wish you the best. You obviously could easily live here in Mexico and Central America. Enjoy your stay in the US. Come back to one of the best places to live in the world when you please.

    In your honor, I will post a Part V: Gates & Fences, and Mexican/Gringo (Gabacho) relations in the next few days.

  184. @restless94110
    @restless94110

    Part IV:

    There is no Part IV, because it is clear that no one on Unz gives a shit what life is like for Americans in Mexico.

    Enjoy life in Estados Unidos, suckers. :)

    Replies: @utu, @fitzhamilton, @restless94110

    Part V: In Mexico: Odds & Ends

    – Walls, Bars, and Fences: Many if not most of the homes have thick walls of varying height, sometimes topped by wrought-iron fencing, and often bars on the windows and doors. I like this enclosed-feeling architecture. It promotes privacy and gives a sense of some security and safety.

    – Pochos & Chilangos: Mexicans do have attitude towards the chilangos–those who come from Mexico City (they are considered to be a bit arrogant and full of themselves)–the pochos–those that went to the US and then return, either on a visit or permanently (in general, Mexicans can tend to feel that chicanos in the US are slumming it when they come back to visit Mexico or when their kids come back and visit, kind of like they don’t know what’s it really like to be a Mexican in Mexico or have forgotten.

    There is also a strong curiosity and interest in anyone who does not have white skin, they will openly ask if the person is an “indio” which to some Mexicans just means a Mexican. My daughter is 50% Chocktaw Native American and got that question constantly when she was down for a visit. It’s not really a diss, but race is constantly mentioned here (don’t tell Megan M.).

    – Garbage pick up/Water: A truck will come by irregularly. We just had one here at 7AM for the first time in 5 weeks. It’s a combo of not enough trucks and some strikes that go on with the workers. They do ask for a “tip” but only gringos go for it. Water is at times intermittent and of low pressure. This is mainly due to sources (either wells or reservoirs or in some cases a de-salination plant), and the remedy for many is to buy a 50 to 200 gallon personal reservoir and then mount it either on the roof or build a wooden stand for it. That way there is flow even when the water is off and also the pressure is better. Both these things are inconvenient, but not that serious once you are used to them.

    I also learned the hard way to never flush toilet paper. Mexican sewage pipes can’t handle it. This is also a “custom” that is easy to adapt to.

    And it didn’t used to be as good as it is now. Even 25 years ago when I was here for a few days they had primitive baños that were little better than a country outhouse and just as filthy. The country has come a long long way in the 21st century. I was sincerely surprised when I saw it again when I got here this last time.

    This ends my engrossing account of some aspects of Mexican life.

    Enjoy.

    • Thanks: BB753
  185. @utu
    @fitzhamilton


    "We give them trash, and they just don’t know what to do with it. They’ll learn, in time, after we’ve corrupted them and made them cretinous bourgeois like ourselves, with all our sick decadent obsessions. "
     
    Why don't you go to India where you could even more strongly demonstrate and protest against "our sick decadent [and cretinous] obsessions" by freely defecating on the streets.

    Replies: @fitzhamilton

    Have you been to India? I have. They don’t defecate in the streets. The cows do, but not the people. There are latrines where lower caste “homeless” Indians, who for the most part aren’t truly homeless, go to do their business. I’ve hung out with them, and realized that the way they live – the way that the Indians organize their society – is on the surface a bit inscrutable.

    There’s a lot going on there that you’d need to inhabit humbly for years to truly understand, but even after spending one year there, I realized that they are inhabiting an entirely different cosmological universe than we do.

    I would in fact like to go back.. There are many similar places I’ve been fortunate enough to experience – like rural Latin America, rural Anatolia and Egypt, rural South East Asia, rural Switzerland France Italy Spain, even rural America – where people live in much more atavistic relationship to the land and hence to one another, with traditional cosmological frames of belief and understanding, that seem much saner and healthier to me than our deracinated technologically revolutionary society, where we’re alienated from the natural world that sustains us, completely caught up in this fever dream that we we are somehow radically separated from nature, believing we can subdue and transcend it through the magic of our technology.

    The water table in the South West is running dry. So are the oil wells. The day of our reckoning approaches. Maybe learning from people who live simpler, less technologically driven lives might be wise.. Instead of sneering at them, like you do.

    You’re a bit of an ingnorant arrogant tool if you think you are somehow ontologically superior to the Indians just because you’re blessed with indoor plumbing. Are you a plumber who grows his own PVC pipe in his backyard?

    No, you’re just an insufferable empty headed troll insulting people in a combox.

    • Replies: @utu
    @fitzhamilton


    Half of India couldn’t access a toilet 5 years ago. Modi built 110M latrines – but will people use them? (October 5, 2019)
    https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/05/asia/india-modi-open-defecation-free-intl-hnk-scli

    Nazar Khalid, research fellow at the Research Institute for Compassionate Economics (RICE), said the government focused too much on building toilets and failed to make sure people actually used them. The government also didn’t ensure the new toilets were properly maintained, he added, with sewage properly disposed of.

    The World Health Organization estimated that Modi’s Clean India campaign could help prevent the deaths of 300,000 people from diarrhea and protein-energy malnutrition between 2014 and this October.
     
  186. @fitzhamilton
    @utu

    Have you been to India? I have. They don't defecate in the streets. The cows do, but not the people. There are latrines where lower caste "homeless" Indians, who for the most part aren't truly homeless, go to do their business. I've hung out with them, and realized that the way they live - the way that the Indians organize their society - is on the surface a bit inscrutable.

    There's a lot going on there that you'd need to inhabit humbly for years to truly understand, but even after spending one year there, I realized that they are inhabiting an entirely different cosmological universe than we do.

    I would in fact like to go back.. There are many similar places I've been fortunate enough to experience - like rural Latin America, rural Anatolia and Egypt, rural South East Asia, rural Switzerland France Italy Spain, even rural America - where people live in much more atavistic relationship to the land and hence to one another, with traditional cosmological frames of belief and understanding, that seem much saner and healthier to me than our deracinated technologically revolutionary society, where we're alienated from the natural world that sustains us, completely caught up in this fever dream that we we are somehow radically separated from nature, believing we can subdue and transcend it through the magic of our technology.

    The water table in the South West is running dry. So are the oil wells. The day of our reckoning approaches. Maybe learning from people who live simpler, less technologically driven lives might be wise.. Instead of sneering at them, like you do.

    You're a bit of an ingnorant arrogant tool if you think you are somehow ontologically superior to the Indians just because you're blessed with indoor plumbing. Are you a plumber who grows his own PVC pipe in his backyard?

    No, you're just an insufferable empty headed troll insulting people in a combox.

    Replies: @utu

    Half of India couldn’t access a toilet 5 years ago. Modi built 110M latrines – but will people use them? (October 5, 2019)
    https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/05/asia/india-modi-open-defecation-free-intl-hnk-scli

    Nazar Khalid, research fellow at the Research Institute for Compassionate Economics (RICE), said the government focused too much on building toilets and failed to make sure people actually used them. The government also didn’t ensure the new toilets were properly maintained, he added, with sewage properly disposed of.

    The World Health Organization estimated that Modi’s Clean India campaign could help prevent the deaths of 300,000 people from diarrhea and protein-energy malnutrition between 2014 and this October.

  187. @Crawfurdmuir
    Porfirio Díaz, the long-time president/dictator of Mexico who was overthrown in the 1910 revolution, is credited with the aphorism -

    "Poor Mexico! So far from God, so close to the United States!"

    There's a sentiment on which both nations can agree.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Noticed that you are scarce around here lately.
    Please remedy this, with my compliments.

    Hope all’s well, &c.

  188. • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1389578081447329799

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  189. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1389637226536095753

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1389716523632168961

  190. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1389578081447329799

    Replies: @MEH 0910

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