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In Defense of Simone Biles
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iSteve commenter Gamecock Jerry writes:

My wife is a former Olympic gymnast (from [an Eastern European country]) and we were discussing this today. I was shocked how sympathetic she was to Simone. She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.

She’s 24, which is old for a female gymnast. Maybe she would have lived up to the hype if the Olympics had been held in 2020 when she was a year younger.

Her routines are sometimes so extraordinarily difficult that the governing authorities have decided not to give her extra points for her hardest stunts because they are too dangerous.

Simone had reduced the difficulty of her routines while performing and this was causing her to make mistakes on easier stuff.

I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t.

Hopefully she can regroup before the individual events.

Okay, now back to the hair.

In general, judged events have a tendency to get more and more dangerous as competitors try ever more extreme stunts. Among the well-informed, there’s a particular concern about women competitors injuring themselves trying to land crazy aerials because they are not as sturdily built.

NOTE: To all commenters, sorry about being slow with moderation today. Unfortunately, moderation will likely be slow for the next week.

 
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  1. Steve quotes Gamecok Jerry as saying:

    I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t.

    I was one of the most cautious boys I knew as a child: no climbing trees or jumping off the high board for me.

    But even so… yeah, I did a few things that were stupid.

    But I swear that when I imploded that light bulb I really had things completely under control. At least, Dad bought my story… sort of.

  2. She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.

    Yes this.

    It’s not fun trying to get into the bathtub when you have a slipped disk. Next time you may just break your neck because of a bad decision made during a 1/200 s time quantum.

  3. She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.

    Fear means afraid of getting hurt badly.
    If true for Simone Biles then perhaps she avoided an injury that would have screwed her up for the rest of her life. Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip. We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    • Agree: Cortes, follyofwar
    • Replies: @follyofwar
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that's why many NFL players are quitting early. They know what happens to middle aged players who now suffer dementia or, like like Earl Campbell, now live in a wheel chair. Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @William Badwhite

    , @Rosie
    @Clyde


    Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip.
     
    Quite. Gymnastics is particularly problematic over the long haul. I have a girlfriend who lives in constant pain because of it. It's not severe, miserable pain, but it does curtail her choices for physical activity. I suspect she is a great deal less healthy now than she would have been had she never done gymnastics.

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    I have made it a point to put my kids in lifetime sports that will keep you social and active for the rest of your life.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Barnard, @Stan d Mute

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Clyde


    permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip
     
    Or quadriplegic:

    On July 3, 1980, two weeks before the Moscow Olympics, Mukhina was practising the pass containing

    the Thomas salto when she under-rotated the salto, and crash-landed on her chin, snapping her spine and leaving her quadriplegic.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    Two other girls have had accidents leaving them quadriplegic, to my knowledge. There may be more.

    Biles was 100% right. The team leadership that handled this has a collective IQ of 22. The Larry Nassar situation doesn't seem so mysterious after all.

    Replies: @Clyde

    , @Veteran Aryan
    @Clyde


    We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.
     
    I've viewed that fight repeatedly, and I'm convinced that McGregor fractured his leg bones earlier in the fight while executing a leg kick. Just seconds before it folds over, McGregor executes another kick and you can see his ankle pop. Then, when he steps back on it, it folds over. But it was already broken, even though he denies that.
  4. I was one of the most cautious boys I knew as a child: no climbing trees or jumping off the high board for me.

    I climbed trees all the time like a regular Tarzan. I was cautious but I did once try jumping out of a tree holding an umbrella to break my fall like a parachute. I saw this done in a cartoon. I jumped from 6 ft high, I did not get hurt. When I was a college boy I tried to jump onto a moving train headed back to the city. It was just leaving the station. I was rudely repelled back onto the ground. I thought, “WTF that wasn’t supposed to happen. They do this in the movies all the time.”

  5. If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    • Agree: Ed, TWS, AceDeuce, Kylie, Dnought
    • Troll: Supply and Demand
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Dave Pinsen

    Sometimes reality hits us at the worst possible moment.

    , @Morton's toes
    @Dave Pinsen

    There was a guy who retired in the middle of an NFL game a few years ago and the boos outnumbered the cheers about a million to one from fans and players.

    Criticizing Simone Biles is like criticizing Tom Brady. (Who by the way ain't going to quit in the middle of a game because of shaky nerves.)

    Replies: @EdwardM

    , @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    , @Supply and Demand
    @Dave Pinsen

    “Discretion is the better part of Valor” were words written by a white man.

    Replies: @james wilson

    , @JimDandy
    @Dave Pinsen

    And let's not forget that Biles was doing her best Cassius Clay "I'm the greatest" impersonation leading up to these games, telling everyone she was the best there is with a "sorry-not-sorry" strut and saying that if she was a man no one would even blink at such cockiness. But, like you say, when it comes down to it, she's not a man, is she?

    She's not entirely to blame. The woke media massively contributed to her ego inflation, entitlement, and delusions of infallibility. The Ivy League is filled with crumbling strong black women like her.

    , @Anon
    @Dave Pinsen

    It's kind of like when Oliver McCall and Roberto Duran just flipped out mid-fight. And those weren't team sports.

    , @Truth
    @Dave Pinsen


    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.
     
    Participate in the Olympics being the operative phrase here.
    , @James Speaks
    @Dave Pinsen

    It is possible to simultaneously dislike the athlete and respect her decision.

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Dave Pinsen

    I realize that pro football is very dangerous, but Brady has an offensive line to protect him. Biles doesn't have anything between her and the floor, or the apparatus, if she misses by a hair.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julissa_Gomez

    In another comment I referenced Elena Mukhina, who also became paraplegic as a result of a mistake.

    Get over it. I don't believe in turning Biles into a heroine, but she's also not the devil, or a coward. Separate what she did from the hype.

    , @Anon
    @Dave Pinsen

    In fairness, we don’t know what psychic scars were left by digital vaginal/anal rape by Larry Nassar and how inextricably tied they are to Olympic hopes and dreams. Nassar’s sexually assaults became more brazen at championship and Olympic competitions. McKayla Maroney was especially targeted by Nassar and said when talking about it: “I question if my gymnastics career was really worth it because of the stuff I'm dealing with now.”

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/simone-biles-speaks-larry-nassar-140756388.html

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/women-describe-sexually-abused-larry-nassar-article-1.3763038

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  6. Really?

    So we’re just going to overlook the bedazzled GOAT on all her uniforms?

    How about reading the latest post on Blind Gossip?

    Oh she’ll be back for the Individual Competitions…give it a day or two before the announcement is made

    Even if this is true…which it is…it still means she took a spot from a girl because of sponsorship money

    You should gracefully bow out BEFORE the Olympics if this is your problem

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  7. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    Sometimes reality hits us at the worst possible moment.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  8. My previous comments being said…

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them…Encourages their Narcissim…Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media…Which Knows About Biles’ predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

    • Agree: tyrone, PaceLaw, Sick of Orcs
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Thoughts


    My previous comments being said…

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them…Encourages their Narcissim…Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media…Which Knows About Biles’ predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

     

    Isn't there always a fresh All-American cherub in gymnastics that the Press hypes going into every Summer Olympics who is destined for the Wheaties box? It's a natural thing since the fraction of people who care to know anything about competitive gymnastics save for a few weeks every four years is infinitesimal, so the Press - and particularly the networks covering the games - have free reign to do some pre-games marketing of their television product by having in-depth soft focus pieces about the gold medal hopeful.

    It's just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so "All-American" now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something. (You suspect their parents might vote Republican) Biles, by contrast, was raised by her grandfather and his wife after being abandoned by her parents and is therefore a victim of white supremacist America - she's overcome that, so she is more interesting and deserving. The Olympics is a sort of orgy of nationalism, and nationalism for the legacy American population is verboten, but a new nationalism under DIE is normative - Biles is a BLACK GIRL first, a member of the Black nation, and the USA on the leotard is an incidental formality necessitated by circumstance.

    The interesting thing of note that Steve is commenting on via twitter is that it seems that the burden of having to represent the fortunes of magic Americans probably weighed heavier on Biles than the burden of representing the United States.

    Replies: @keypusher, @Paperback Writer

  9. Generally- professional sport is not good for your health. For wallet yes, sometimes, but for health- no.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

  10. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    There was a guy who retired in the middle of an NFL game a few years ago and the boos outnumbered the cheers about a million to one from fans and players.

    Criticizing Simone Biles is like criticizing Tom Brady. (Who by the way ain’t going to quit in the middle of a game because of shaky nerves.)

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Morton's toes

    No, Simone Biles is black so she is above criticism.

    Will any mainstream sports talk show host or columnist even mildly criticize her for her craven, selfish grandstanding?

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  11. I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @AndrewR

    They (female journalists) would say that, wouldn't they?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Thoughts
    @AndrewR

    Deep down inside, women want to get back to Kitchen, Kids and Husband

    That's what's behind all this 'I have ANXIETY!' b.s. with All Women

    I don't blame them...it's not fair to make women have 3 jobs 1) compete with men in the workforce 2) wife 3) mother

    It's no surprise this is happening after Simone found her football soulmate (they are cute together)

    She should have retired and gotten married

    , @Up2Drew
    @AndrewR

    So in 2021 America, this is what passes for "bravery", huh?

    , @JimDandy
    @AndrewR

    It's amazing. If the American team had won the gold with her, it would have resulted in less approbation for Biles than she is getting for quitting. Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars. The days of Kerri Strug are long gone, and Biles statues will be popping up all over America.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Paperback Writer

    , @the one they call Desanex
    @AndrewR

    War is peace.
    Freedom is slavery.
    Chicken-livered, yellow-bellied cowardice is courage.
    https://i.postimg.cc/vTymxd0m/chicken-livered.jpg

    , @Publius 2
    @AndrewR

    The women of our society, collectively, need to be told to shut up.

    No jobs for white men.

  12. Still, why not retire or do less difficult routines?

  13. @Bardon Kaldian
    Generally- professional sport is not good for your health. For wallet yes, sometimes, but for health- no.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian, bomag
    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Jimbo
    @Steve Sailer

    I was playing with a guy once who accidentally stepped in the hole when he was getting his ball and sprained his ankle. We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Abolish_public_education

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Steve Sailer

    An alligator could take your hand, too.

    Replies: @jb

    , @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    Or a from a golf club swung by your wife.

    , @follyofwar
    @Steve Sailer

    Pro golf is more dangerous for fans than it is for players. Many have been hit in the head by stray drives travelling at over 100 miles per hour. And what ball is harder than a golf ball?

    I often wonder why more pro golfers don't collapse from the mid-summer heat, which sometimes reaches 100 degrees. Plus, they have to wear long pants and cannot ride in carts.

    , @Dan Smith
    @Steve Sailer

    I spoke with a guy about a golf course in rural Wisconsin we both had played and he told me he witnessed the death there of a golfer who had contacted a hornets nest while searching for a lost ball. Apparently he wasn’t known to be allergic, just got stung too many times. No EpiPen and medical help too far away.

    , @The Alarmist
    @Steve Sailer

    Where I mostly play, losing a hand to Mr. Mexico’s gator is high on the list, but in general, I think getting hit by someone else’s drive is a higher order of risk than being struck by lightning. Once, on a fairly long fairway that spanned a valley between tee and green, I looked back from the green to see if the ladies playing behind us might be close enough to hit us from their lie on the downslope, but was given the show of a lifetime, because they parked their cart uphill from their lie. Moments later, the cart started rolling, right over the top of one, and a half-second later you could hear her scream; about 180 yards, I guess, so I was clearly safer than she (she lived, BTW, but broke a leg) in that moment.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Morton's toes
    @Steve Sailer

    Lee Trevino got struck a glancing blow by a lightening bolt with no permanent repercussions. The next time he was paired with Nicklaus he snuck a rubber snake into the grass and pulled it up dangling off his clubhead and taunted Nicklaus with it. It might be the funniest 60 seconds in the history of golf.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Brutusale
    @Steve Sailer

    Freddy Couples' back disagrees.

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Steve Sailer


    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.
     
    ANYTHING to make the game exciting is welcome.
    , @njguy73
    @Steve Sailer

    OK, I'll be the guy to bring baseball into the discussion.

    Fernando Tatis, Jr. may be the hottest young shortstop in the game, but he's not going to be expected to make more acrobatic plays as time goes on. If, when he's 30, he loses a step, the Padres will just move him to center field, assuming they still have Manny Machado at third.

    Gymnastics doesn't have "young player skills" and "old player skills." Could it? Should it? There was an NY Times mag article about possibly making gymnastics something that over-25s could still do at the Olympic level. Like it was before Olga and Nadia.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Steve Sailer

    Tennis players do OK.

    It's hard on the knees but knee replacement surgery nowadays is awesome.

    Karsten Braasch's career earnings were $1.5M.

    Djokovic: $430M

    Nadal: Djokovic +$50M

    Federer: Nadal + $530M

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Steve Sailer

    Unless you're Tiger Woods, who spent the first couple of decades of his career swinging for the fences.

    Speaking of odd injuries to golfers, I've been told Ernie Els, with the most efficient looking swing of anybody, apparently injured his knee way more badly than he let on getting on/off a boat. I wonder if the injury tweaked him every swing he took after that.

    And as commenters have been pointing out, it's that little yip or tweak that can ruin you. Simone is a mature woman now and it's easy to imagine somewhere in her head she's starting to worry about throwing her heavier frame in the air and coming down wrong.

    God bless her. She's going to marry well and do just fine.

  14. “I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t.”

    Yeah, I can totally relate, except not exactly in a physical fashion.

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true.

    If somehow I ever get to meet him in heaven, I am going to punch him right in the nose.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Unexpected ...

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Did you see him in a dream?

    Was it like the movie "Nightmare on Elm Street?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCVh4lBfW-c

    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTc1mDieQI8

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Alarmist

    , @Pop Warner
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true.
     
    He'll tell you you should have practiced scales more before attempting his more difficult sonatas
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    "If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true."

    You must play the clarinet. Always secure that reed after you slobber all over it, amirite?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  15. anon[428] • Disclaimer says:

    The spin is working overtime to make this failure a positive thing. Ala Martha Stewart, who turned her felony prison sentence into a personal growth project.

    But the network ran examples of her deteriorating performance beginning at the trials in St Louis.

    She was making errors, but the announcers, at the time minimized them. They were determined that she become the greatest of all time regardless. If NBC were allowed to judge the event, she would have won. But alas, they demand plausibility in judging.

    She had to take herself out because no one else would dare to. The announcers didn’t believe their lying eyes.

  16. Couple of precedents from boxing. Oliver McCall quit, weeping (but standing) against Lennox Lewis in a rematch. And who could forget ‘No mas’ Roberto Duran, also in a rematch, walking away from Sugar Ray Leonard. Maybe even Sonny Liston quitting on his stool in the first Clay/Ali fight. Ms Biles wasn’t getting thumped at the time of her vapours, true. But feeling the cloak of invincibility slip must be shocking for a super hero. Amazingly, both McCall and Duran had around 30 more fights over the next 20 years after their vapours.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @TyRade

    Mike Tyson biting Evander Holyfield's ear off is perhaps best explained as Tyson wanting to get out of the whupping he was headed for without damaging his He-So-Crazy reputation.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @PaceLaw

  17. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    They (female journalists) would say that, wouldn’t they?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Dan Hayes

    Kudos for the Mandy Rice-Davies reference.

  18. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t."

    Yeah, I can totally relate, except not exactly in a physical fashion.

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn't believe me, and yet it's true.

    If somehow I ever get to meet him in heaven, I am going to punch him right in the nose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123, @Pop Warner, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Unexpected …

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Steve Sailer

    Unexpectorated....

  19. In general, playing sports at a highly competitive level is really dangerous to your body.

    You really have to ask yourself if the potential for wealth&fame is worth the possibility of a devastating lifelong injury.

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    For the overwhelming majority of people, it’s not really worth it to play sports beyond the amateur level. Amateur sports are much safer, if somewhat more boring. Once you start playing at a competitive level, the possibility of a permanent injury is much too high. If you do a Risk-Reward analysis, you’ll find that you’re better off walking away.

    I’m not saying Tom Brady should’ve walked away. I’m saying that the hundreds of potential Tom Bradys who got I injured badly and washed out back in HS( or college) should’ve walked.

    Of course, you’re not allowed to say any of this. Coaches, parents, fans, schools, advertisers, and the media would rather see young people play their hearts out on the field. For society, entertainment comes first.

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat&lethargic masses), it’d be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding&strengthening ritual.

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    • Agree: Rosie
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

     

    This is a good point. I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

    I was watching the highlights of one of the swimming events today, in which the winner was an Australian girl. Her shoulders were incredibly -- almost grotesquely -- broad, and her upper chest muscles bulged out like a male bodybuilder's, with no visible breasts at all.

    What are young women like this swimmer -- and gymnasts like Simone Biles -- doing to their bodies? It might be construed as being worth it if you win the Olympic gold, but what about the hundreds or thousands more like them, in each sport, around the world, who will never win or get famous?

    And that's not even mentioning the drugs . . . .

    Replies: @vhrm, @Anonymous

    , @Captain Tripps
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat & lethargic masses), it’d be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding & strengthening ritual.
     
    An excellent comment JW123, but, unfortunately, until we get to Gattica, and TPTB can determine those insanely talented in the womb, the best sorting process is the one we have now, with the attendant risks.
    , @Bill
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).
     
    I wonder who would benefit and who would be hurt by increasing local social cohesion?
    , @Rosie
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds.
     
    It can be really hard not to get caught up in the competition when you believe your child has as much potential as the next kid. Thanks for reminding me what's at stake.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  20. I do wonder if it’s related to not being on Adderall – does anyone know Biles’ current status regarding that drug? Is it now banned?

    I was amazed to find amphetamines (Adderall/Ritalin) prescribed for ADHD, I guess it can improve concentration but it surely improves performance/strength and gives advantage.

    I don’t have a problem with Biles or Osaka dropping out. But we’ve had Black Sportsperson Magic thrown at us for so long a bit of Schadenfreude is surely in order.

    We should not forget though that it’s not black people making every advert multiethnic, every TV murderer white and the detectives black or female*, and boosting every black athlete.

    * when ITV created a “real life” retelling of the Pembrokeshire Murders case, where two different elderly couples were slaughtered in the 1980s, they added a black lady detective, although the chances of a black Detective Inspector at Haverfordwest in the 1980s was approximately zero (if there HAD been, she’d have been identified by name and given a leading role).

    ” Wilkins’ sidekick, Ella Richards is not based on any one real person, but is a composite of various different people on Steve Wilkins’ team, with Riley describing her as an amalgamation of a few different real-life people and their roles.”

    • Replies: @guest
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Adderall is illegal in Japan. I can’t imagine it would be impossible to smuggle some in for the sake of an Olympic athlete, but there is that.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  21. @TyRade
    Couple of precedents from boxing. Oliver McCall quit, weeping (but standing) against Lennox Lewis in a rematch. And who could forget 'No mas' Roberto Duran, also in a rematch, walking away from Sugar Ray Leonard. Maybe even Sonny Liston quitting on his stool in the first Clay/Ali fight. Ms Biles wasn't getting thumped at the time of her vapours, true. But feeling the cloak of invincibility slip must be shocking for a super hero. Amazingly, both McCall and Duran had around 30 more fights over the next 20 years after their vapours.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Mike Tyson biting Evander Holyfield’s ear off is perhaps best explained as Tyson wanting to get out of the whupping he was headed for without damaging his He-So-Crazy reputation.

    • Agree: black sea, TWS
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKPMVex-UKk

    Joke.

    Question: What is Mike Tyson's favorite food?
    Answer: Ear of corn.

    , @PaceLaw
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, to be fair to Iron Mike, I believe his excuse was that Holyfield was using his head/headbutting him and that caused him to act out by biting off his ear. If you are a fan of boxing at all from the late 90s to early aughts, then you will recall that Holyfield’s head was a lethal weapon.
    https://youtu.be/v8y-dRy5NOM

    Replies: @JimDandy

  22. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t."

    Yeah, I can totally relate, except not exactly in a physical fashion.

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn't believe me, and yet it's true.

    If somehow I ever get to meet him in heaven, I am going to punch him right in the nose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123, @Pop Warner, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Did you see him in a dream?

    Was it like the movie “Nightmare on Elm Street?”

    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ha ha ha, you so funny! You funny guy! Me love you long time!!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @The Alarmist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

     

    No, you hear the Second Movement (Andante) from Haydn’s Symphony 94 in G Major....


    https://youtu.be/TCzjfr5IkGI

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  23. Her routines are sometimes so extraordinarily difficult that the governing authorities have decided not to give her extra points for her hardest stunts because they are too dangerous.

    This happened to Surya Bonaly as well. Who has since settled down to a bourgeois life in Minnesota, of all places.

    Jerry Rice’s training regimen was so extreme it was hidden from the press and public, lest fools try to imitate him.

  24. @Steve Sailer
    @TyRade

    Mike Tyson biting Evander Holyfield's ear off is perhaps best explained as Tyson wanting to get out of the whupping he was headed for without damaging his He-So-Crazy reputation.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @PaceLaw

    Joke.

    Question: What is Mike Tyson’s favorite food?
    Answer: Ear of corn.

  25. There was a stretch, from seventeen to twenty-seven when I was utterly fearless. Something clicked at twenty-seven an I became a nervous nelly. I get anxiety driving over a long high bridge. I recall the disdain I felt back in the day for a fellow in his fourties that was jittery like I am now.

    Judge not others, lest ye, yourself be judged. There, but for the grace of God, and all that.

    • Agree: PaceLaw, Cortes, Dnought
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Old Prude

    Late 40s I started getting uncomfortable on jets.

    Airports make a lot of money selling $12 drinks to jittery fliers who are about to board.

    Replies: @PaceLaw

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Old Prude

    Interesting, because findings of developmental psychologists agree that men become mature somewhere around the 27 to 30 year period of their lives. I remember when I became essentially the current "me" - 28.

    Perhaps Confucius, as usual, was mostly right ....

    At fifteen my mind was set on learning.
    At thirty my character had been formed.
    At forty I had no more perplexities.
    At fifty I knew the Mandate of Heaven.
    At sixty I was at ease with with whatever I heard.
    At seventy I could follow my heart's desire without transgressing moral principles.

    Replies: @MGB, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    There must be many jobs which can only be done by the young (or the lacking in imagination). I asked a barman whose stories usually related to his time as a scaffolder (earning far more than in his new job) why he’d changed direction and he answered that he lost his nerve as he approached 40 and could no longer work at the heights he had previously. Such intimations of mortality have been recognised since at least Biblical times:


    Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:” (Ecclesiastes, KJV)

    Part of growing up and older.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Joe Stalin

  26. @JohnnyWalker123
    In general, playing sports at a highly competitive level is really dangerous to your body.

    You really have to ask yourself if the potential for wealth&fame is worth the possibility of a devastating lifelong injury.

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    For the overwhelming majority of people, it's not really worth it to play sports beyond the amateur level. Amateur sports are much safer, if somewhat more boring. Once you start playing at a competitive level, the possibility of a permanent injury is much too high. If you do a Risk-Reward analysis, you'll find that you're better off walking away.

    I'm not saying Tom Brady should've walked away. I'm saying that the hundreds of potential Tom Bradys who got I injured badly and washed out back in HS( or college) should've walked.

    Of course, you're not allowed to say any of this. Coaches, parents, fans, schools, advertisers, and the media would rather see young people play their hearts out on the field. For society, entertainment comes first.

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat&lethargic masses), it'd be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding&strengthening ritual.

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Captain Tripps, @Bill, @Rosie

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    This is a good point. I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

    I was watching the highlights of one of the swimming events today, in which the winner was an Australian girl. Her shoulders were incredibly — almost grotesquely — broad, and her upper chest muscles bulged out like a male bodybuilder’s, with no visible breasts at all.

    What are young women like this swimmer — and gymnasts like Simone Biles — doing to their bodies? It might be construed as being worth it if you win the Olympic gold, but what about the hundreds or thousands more like them, in each sport, around the world, who will never win or get famous?

    And that’s not even mentioning the drugs . . . .

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

     

    Except for the massive steroid era of the 80s Eastern Block that messed up some women it's a non-issue.
    It's downright depressing how quickly "gainz" disappear once you stop (or substantially decrease) training for men and women alike.

    The biggest problem, just like with guys, is that it's very easy to get fat when you stop training and suddenly have to eat half as much as you've been used to for much of your life.

    , @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Female swimmer shoulders recover to normal physique, readily. I used to see it in college with female swimmers in/out season. The body is more plastic with physique than you think.

  27. @Old Prude
    There was a stretch, from seventeen to twenty-seven when I was utterly fearless. Something clicked at twenty-seven an I became a nervous nelly. I get anxiety driving over a long high bridge. I recall the disdain I felt back in the day for a fellow in his fourties that was jittery like I am now.

    Judge not others, lest ye, yourself be judged. There, but for the grace of God, and all that.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @Cortes

    Late 40s I started getting uncomfortable on jets.

    Airports make a lot of money selling $12 drinks to jittery fliers who are about to board.

    • Replies: @PaceLaw
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, not to mention the amount that airlines make in booze they sell in-flight to soothe and pacify customers just to get through the horrendous ordeal of flying in today’s world.

  28. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Did you see him in a dream?

    Was it like the movie "Nightmare on Elm Street?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCVh4lBfW-c

    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTc1mDieQI8

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Alarmist

    Ha ha ha, you so funny! You funny guy! Me love you long time!!

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The leader of the free world.

    https://twitter.com/SaraGonzalesTX/status/1419423364838473732

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anon, @the one they call Desanex, @Stan d Mute

  29. @Old Prude
    There was a stretch, from seventeen to twenty-seven when I was utterly fearless. Something clicked at twenty-seven an I became a nervous nelly. I get anxiety driving over a long high bridge. I recall the disdain I felt back in the day for a fellow in his fourties that was jittery like I am now.

    Judge not others, lest ye, yourself be judged. There, but for the grace of God, and all that.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @Cortes

    Interesting, because findings of developmental psychologists agree that men become mature somewhere around the 27 to 30 year period of their lives. I remember when I became essentially the current “me” – 28.

    Perhaps Confucius, as usual, was mostly right ….

    At fifteen my mind was set on learning.
    At thirty my character had been formed.
    At forty I had no more perplexities.
    At fifty I knew the Mandate of Heaven.
    At sixty I was at ease with with whatever I heard.
    At seventy I could follow my heart’s desire without transgressing moral principles.

    • Thanks: europeasant
    • Replies: @MGB
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Confucius, or the band 'Morphine'?


    On 6-6-66 I was little I didn't know shit
    and on 7-7-77 eleven years later still don't know any better
    by 8-8-88 it's way too late for me to change
    and by 9-9-99 I hope I'm sittin' on the back porch drinkin' red wine
    singin' Ohhhhhh
    French Fries with Pepper!
     
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "At twenty, I cared what others thought of me.

    "At forty, I no longer cared what others thought of me.

    "At sixty, I realized that others weren't thinking of me all along."


    Not Confucius, but someone more modern. Can't [ahem] think of him, however.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Ragno

  30. My guess is that Biles’ problem is physical and would be trivial but makes doing her routines more dangerous than she’s comfortable with – more medals might be nice but if the risk of a broken neck is too high then why bother.

    But being hyper physically aware of minor glitches doesn’t get any sympathy so she’s playing the mental health card because being crazy is now a sign of high status and a cue for the female dominated media to fawn and coo…

    I wonder if the lack of a live audience might be a factor too, a bunch of people applauding and cheering might help provide an adrenaline rush she needs to do her best.

    Judged events often have competitors who do significantly worse or better in front of a live crowd. I haven’t followed her career to know where she fits in there…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cliff arroyo

    Great athletes often thrive off big, intense crowds: e.g., Babe Ruth had spectacular statistics in the World Series both as a pitcher and a hitter. Michael Jordan across 6 NBA Finals averaged 34 points per game and won the MVP award all 6 times.

  31. Forget Simone a second. There are many sports in which stars can develop psychological issues and find themselves unable to do simple things they’d been doing all their lives.

    One minute, Steve Blass was a star pitcher shutting down the Orioles in Game 7 of the World Series, and the next he just couldn’t get the ball over the plate to save his life.

    One minute, Ian Baker-Finch was the world’s best golfer, and the next he was missing putts that even a 5 year old would have sunk.

    One day, for no reason at all, second baseman Chuck Knoblauch found he couldn’t make routine throws to first base.

    Ernie Els kept a psychotherapist’s number on his cell phone. As great as he was, he needed constant reassurance that he wasn’t terrible.

    What’s in an athlete’s head can ruin him or her.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Astorian

    Lots of pro golfers employs sports psychologists. The richest tend to employ an entourage of a psychologist, a swing coach, and a nutritionist, as well as a caddy. Tiger Woods got into his terrible accident recently because he's kind of a loner and like to drive himself, but also is a really bad driver.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @TyRade

    Mike Tyson biting Evander Holyfield's ear off is perhaps best explained as Tyson wanting to get out of the whupping he was headed for without damaging his He-So-Crazy reputation.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @PaceLaw

    Well, to be fair to Iron Mike, I believe his excuse was that Holyfield was using his head/headbutting him and that caused him to act out by biting off his ear. If you are a fan of boxing at all from the late 90s to early aughts, then you will recall that Holyfield’s head was a lethal weapon.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @PaceLaw

    Lennox Lewis, who was no fan of Tyson, essentially said that Tyson had good reason to bite Holyfield who, as you pointed out, was a notorious cheater-by-headbutt. I also agree with Steve that Tyson's decision was influenced by the fact that he was going to lose that fight, anyway.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  33. @Steve Sailer
    @Old Prude

    Late 40s I started getting uncomfortable on jets.

    Airports make a lot of money selling $12 drinks to jittery fliers who are about to board.

    Replies: @PaceLaw

    Yes, not to mention the amount that airlines make in booze they sell in-flight to soothe and pacify customers just to get through the horrendous ordeal of flying in today’s world.

  34. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    I was playing with a guy once who accidentally stepped in the hole when he was getting his ball and sprained his ankle. We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jimbo


    We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess…
     
    Could happen. When you check the next Bobby Fischer and he tips the concrete table over onto you.

    https://assets.chicagoparkdistrict.com/s3fs-public/styles/16_9_50_width/public/images/facilities/chess.jpg

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Jimbo

    The blogger noted golf’s most common, long shot mortal danger.

    When I was a youngster, I hit a par three pitch into the near side of the lake. I trudged through the mud, at the shoreline, to retrieve my ball. I stepped into a mud hole, up to my chin. A few inches deeper and I would have been reported as missing. Also, during those years, there were occasions when I would cross a busy highway in order to retrieve balls that I had horribly sliced/driven (OB).

    I read that Romney has tweeted a message of support for SB. My funniest memories of the ‘16 election were when Trump:

    • blasted Romney for being a “choker” (once and always).

    • attributed Cruz’s Maine, GOP primary win to the liar having been born in Canada.

  35. The defense of Biles is a fitting metaphor for the guilt ridden white man’s defense of blacks as a group in general. (would you have defended Peyton Manning had he decided not to play in a Superbowl because the pressure was too great? he was a lot older than 24 in the 4 he played in)

    We see where that gets us.

  36. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    Deep down inside, women want to get back to Kitchen, Kids and Husband

    That’s what’s behind all this ‘I have ANXIETY!’ b.s. with All Women

    I don’t blame them…it’s not fair to make women have 3 jobs 1) compete with men in the workforce 2) wife 3) mother

    It’s no surprise this is happening after Simone found her football soulmate (they are cute together)

    She should have retired and gotten married

  37. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ha ha ha, you so funny! You funny guy! Me love you long time!!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    The leader of the free world.

    • LOL: follyofwar
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrWoG8IckyE

    , @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm sure that Snopes has already debunked this - debunked, I tell you! while the usual suspects in the Mediocre $tream Media are pointing out multiple squirrels.

    Pathetic all around.

    Replies: @res

    , @the one they call Desanex
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I groaned and griped
    Till Nursie came to do me;
    My butt’s been wiped!
    I feel just like a new me!

    Powdered and dyped;
    I simply have to shout it—
    MY BUTT’S BEEN WIPED!
    Lest anybody doubt it!

    , @Stan d Mute
    @JohnnyWalker123

    If you believe that, at his age, he hasn’t been strolling around the White House with a packed Depends, you haven’t yet spent enough time around geezers..

    The challenge for those who work in that environment is in containing your disgust response when he shuffles past your open office door. You pray that he doesn’t decide to come inside, sit down, and chat.

  38. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @mmack

    John Fitch, the American racing partner of the guy who flew into the stands at the 24-hours of Le Mans in 1955 in their magnesium Mercedes and burned scores of spectators to death, had an incredibly constructive response to the catastrophe: he invented the Fitch Barrier system of trash cans filled with increasing amounts of sand in front of bridge abutments and other immovable barriers that have since saved thousand of lives.

    His ancestor, Jon Fitch, was one of the inventors of the steam ship.

    Replies: @mmack, @Jack D

    , @Technite78
    @mmack

    Nikki Lauda pulled into the pits early in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix because he considered it too dangerous (due to heavy rain causing flooding of the track). It's entirely possible that he forfeited a Championship due to that decision; however he was still recovering from a horrific accident that nearly killed him and would leave him disfigured and requiring multiple surgeries. Very few people questioned his bravery given the situation.

    It's quite a sports story... reasonably well recounted in "Rush" (2013).

    Replies: @black sea, @mmack

    , @Truth
    @mmack


    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward.
     
    Skill, not sport.
    , @petit bourgeois
    @mmack

    I can relate to sanctioning bodies cancelling races out of safety concerns. Last month the Southern California Timing Association cancelled land speed racing at El Mirage dry lake because of excessive heat (111-112F). The rules require drivers to be in racing suits and motorcyclists to be in full leathers and everyone is helmeted.

    Although I am bummed I didn't get to race, I understand the safety concerns. You can't have people trying to get into the 200 MPH club in that kind of heat or someone is going to get hurt or die.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @mmack

    "[Ken] Warby’s record has stood for an astonishing 34 years, despite many attempts to beat it. Dozens of racers have died trying. In fact, the race to beat the world water speed record is considered to be perhaps the most hazardous in the professional sporting world, with an approximate fatality rate of 85% for all racers since 1940 (ladies don’t marry a boat racer unless you’re prepared for some serious heart break)."


    https://www.boatcoversdirect.com/boat-lovers/resources/the-worlds-fastest-boat-and-the-race-for-the-water-speed-record/



    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aYrafKbTqV4


    (Who would have been "Queen Mother" in September, 1952? Elizabeth II's mother or grandmother?)

    , @Anon
    @mmack

    After the death of Roland Ratzenberger during qualifying at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix at Imola, Ayrton Senna was upset and wanted to quit the race. He told his girlfriend Adriane Galisteu over the phone that he didn’t feel like racing the next day. As she said, “He told me he did not want to race. He had never spoken like that.”

    Senna died the next day at the Tamburello Curve, veering off and hitting the concrete retaining wall. It was a survivable crash but for the front wheel flying off and striking him in the head (it was pre-wheel tethers).

    Btw, I like IndyCar as well— my favorite— and hope to make it down to the Nashville race August 8th.

    , @gebrauchshund
    @mmack

    Niki Lauda at the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Retired from the race after two laps because he thought it was too dangerous, due to heavy rain and difficulties he was having from injuries sustained earlier in the season. It was the final race of the season and he was leading in championship points. James Hunt finished the race in third place, allowing him to win the championship by one point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  39. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    An alligator could take your hand, too.

    • Agree: The Alarmist
    • Replies: @jb
    @Ron Mexico

    I saw a sign once next to a really nasty looking water hazard in the middle of a quite respectable Southern golf course that said "Warning: alligators, snakes, and spiders." No idea if people went prospecting for lost balls anyway.

  40. I’m no Olympic athlete but listening to your ‘gut’ is probably a good idea. If Nick Wallenda doesn’t feel right about walking a tightrope 500 feet above the sidewalk he’s within his rights to say ‘not today’. If Lewis Hamilton doesn’t like the feel of his race car or the condition of the track same thing. Its their call and no one can be 100% all the time.

    Naomi Osaka’s situation is a bit different. Pulling out because she was ‘depressed’ is silly. Her mood could have changed by the time of or during her next match. At worst she would have just lost which happens to every tennis player. She was in no danger but has done her reputation enormous harm.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @UNIT472

    "If Lewis Hamilton doesn’t like the feel of his race car or the condition of the track same thing. Its their call and no one can be 100% all the time."

    Lewis Hamilton is under contact to Mercedes. He can pull the car off the track if he doesn't want to race but Mercedes can fire him and put another driver in the car. There are more drivers hungry enough to risk everything in F1/IndyCar/NASCAR/Sports Cars than there are available seats. Unless the sanctioning body says "No Race Today Folks", like CART did at Texas Motor Speedway in 2001, the condition of the track isn't his call. If his team decides it's too dangerous they can withdraw the car. And that's happened before.

    In my earlier post I noted some examples in racing of where someone stopped in the middle of a race or a sanctioning body cancelled a race due to concerns over safety. Your post reminded me of two other instances, both from F1:

    1) Niki Lauda in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Anyone who has seen the movie Rush may remember this incident. Lauda and James Hunt battled back and forth between themselves for the 1976 F1 season. The last race of the year was in Japan. Lauda had a 3 point advantage on Hunt, but the weather that day was atrocious, with rain and fog. There were arguments between the drivers and organizers on if the race should go on. It started in the rain and Lauda pulled in after two laps. Hunt held on to win the World Championship. Of course Lauda was almost literally burned to a crisp in a horrible accident at Nurburgring earlier that season, so it's understandable even he had limits. Niki came back in 1977 to retake the F1 World Championship, retired after 1979, came back into F1 in the 1980s, and won the 1984 F1 World Championship.

    2) The 2005 United States Grand Prix fiasco. This was more multiple teams saying "No way, no how!". Back then Michelin and Bridgestone were tire suppliers to F1. The US Grand Prix was at Indianapolis on the road course built within the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The cars run the opposite direction of the Indy 500 traffic and use part of the oval's Turn One. It turns out that Michelin missed the set up for their tires and cars using Michelin tires started having blowouts running through Turn One (The road course's Turn Thirteen). Bridgestone didn't have the issue since their Firestone division provided tires for the IndyCar series and could tell Bridgestone what sort of compound to use for Indianapolis.

    Michelin determined their tires had at best a ten lap life span before they failed. F1 didn't allow tire changes during races back then. Michelin and the teams using them asked IMS and FIA to add a chicane (a sharp turn) into Turn Thirteen to slow the cars down and save the tires. Bridgestone and the FIA refused to alter the course after qualifying and said the teams could slow going through Turn Thirteen or come in for an emergency tire change (the only type allowed during a race back then). Or they could use a different tire and suffer a penalty for altering the car after qualifying.

    Race day morning came, the cars lined up and rolled off the grid for the parade lap, and when the cars came back to line up for the start, the Michelin shod cars rolled into the pits and stopped. Six cars total started the race and per Wiki: "By lap 10, many of the estimated 100,000 to 130,000 attendees had begun to leave the grandstands. Thousands of fans were reported to have gone to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway ticket office to demand refunds, and police were called to keep the peace. Boos were heard throughout the race, and some upset fans threw beer cans and water bottles on the track."

    I heard stories of angry fans roaming the grounds and parking lots of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway looking to beat the crap out of anyone even remotely involved in F1. Again, stories, but . . .

    Michelin had to refund ticket purchases for 2005 US Grand Prix attendees. It killed F1 in the US for years.

    , @Morton's toes
    @UNIT472

    Osaka's stated reason for pulling out was mangled but an approximate translation is:

    it is not worth it if I have to deal with the pigs journalists at a post-match conference.

    Before withdrawing she gave the tournament officials an ultimatum--no more stupid press conferences or I'm walking. When they said "no" then she walked.

    If we knew the real story it is more probably: she withdrew because she was playing bad and knew she would not turn it around before the next match. She is still playing bad. In her next performance upswing all will be forgotten--she is considered cuter than a Williams. In New York and Los Angeles. She may be finished in Tokyo as a marketing quasar.

  41. @Astorian
    Forget Simone a second. There are many sports in which stars can develop psychological issues and find themselves unable to do simple things they'd been doing all their lives.

    One minute, Steve Blass was a star pitcher shutting down the Orioles in Game 7 of the World Series, and the next he just couldn't get the ball over the plate to save his life.

    One minute, Ian Baker-Finch was the world's best golfer, and the next he was missing putts that even a 5 year old would have sunk.

    One day, for no reason at all, second baseman Chuck Knoblauch found he couldn't make routine throws to first base.

    Ernie Els kept a psychotherapist's number on his cell phone. As great as he was, he needed constant reassurance that he wasn't terrible.

    What's in an athlete's head can ruin him or her.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Lots of pro golfers employs sports psychologists. The richest tend to employ an entourage of a psychologist, a swing coach, and a nutritionist, as well as a caddy. Tiger Woods got into his terrible accident recently because he’s kind of a loner and like to drive himself, but also is a really bad driver.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Steve Sailer


    Tiger Woods got into his terrible accident recently because he’s kind of a loner and like to drive himself, but also is a really bad driver.
     
    Coming down the hill, he hit the median, bounced back to the outside of the curve, and accelerated off of the road. To me, that implies a little more than "bad driver."
  42. @cliff arroyo
    My guess is that Biles' problem is physical and would be trivial but makes doing her routines more dangerous than she's comfortable with - more medals might be nice but if the risk of a broken neck is too high then why bother.

    But being hyper physically aware of minor glitches doesn't get any sympathy so she's playing the mental health card because being crazy is now a sign of high status and a cue for the female dominated media to fawn and coo...

    I wonder if the lack of a live audience might be a factor too, a bunch of people applauding and cheering might help provide an adrenaline rush she needs to do her best.

    Judged events often have competitors who do significantly worse or better in front of a live crowd. I haven't followed her career to know where she fits in there...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Great athletes often thrive off big, intense crowds: e.g., Babe Ruth had spectacular statistics in the World Series both as a pitcher and a hitter. Michael Jordan across 6 NBA Finals averaged 34 points per game and won the MVP award all 6 times.

  43. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    John Fitch, the American racing partner of the guy who flew into the stands at the 24-hours of Le Mans in 1955 in their magnesium Mercedes and burned scores of spectators to death, had an incredibly constructive response to the catastrophe: he invented the Fitch Barrier system of trash cans filled with increasing amounts of sand in front of bridge abutments and other immovable barriers that have since saved thousand of lives.

    His ancestor, Jon Fitch, was one of the inventors of the steam ship.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Steve Sailer

    Out of tragedy can come good. Interesting story and a historic lineage.

    Researching the tragedy of the 1955 Le Mans race I saw where a Mercedes team engineer went over to the Jaguar team manager and asked him to withdraw his team out of respect for those lost in the accident. The Jaguar team manager refused.

    , @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    The deaths were not from burning magnesium. The Mercedes disintegrated and various pieces - the engine, the radiator, the front suspension, the hood, etc. each mowed thru the crowd for a swath of up to 100 yards and cut down rows of people.

    The magnesium rear section of the car landed on the embankment and the burning fuel tank did ignite the chassis, which showered the crowd with sparks and probably caused some injuries, but this is not what killed people. The French firemen, being unfamiliar with burning magnesium, poured water on the fire which only made it worse.

  44. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The leader of the free world.

    https://twitter.com/SaraGonzalesTX/status/1419423364838473732

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anon, @the one they call Desanex, @Stan d Mute

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  45. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    “Discretion is the better part of Valor” were words written by a white man.

    • Replies: @james wilson
    @Supply and Demand

    It could have been written by many a man routinely invoved in dangerous undertakings.

  46. Her routines are sometimes so extraordinarily difficult that the governing authorities have decided not to give her extra points for her hardest stunts because they are too dangerous.

    Oh good, egalitarian limpwrists are tamping down excellence.

    Again.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Sick of Orcs


    Oh good, egalitarian limpwrists are tamping down excellence.

    Again.
     
    Heck, let's bring back bull-jumping, I say.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Bull-leaping-fresco-1.jpg

    Replies: @MGB

  47. @Old Prude
    There was a stretch, from seventeen to twenty-seven when I was utterly fearless. Something clicked at twenty-seven an I became a nervous nelly. I get anxiety driving over a long high bridge. I recall the disdain I felt back in the day for a fellow in his fourties that was jittery like I am now.

    Judge not others, lest ye, yourself be judged. There, but for the grace of God, and all that.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bardon Kaldian, @Cortes

    There must be many jobs which can only be done by the young (or the lacking in imagination). I asked a barman whose stories usually related to his time as a scaffolder (earning far more than in his new job) why he’d changed direction and he answered that he lost his nerve as he approached 40 and could no longer work at the heights he had previously. Such intimations of mortality have been recognised since at least Biblical times:


    Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:” (Ecclesiastes, KJV)

    Part of growing up and older.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Cortes

    Teenaged YAA used to take risks on a motorcycle that I shudder to think of now - overtaking long vehicles on blind bends, racing on roads with drystone walls (I lost control just as we came to a common and fought the bike for 100 yards over bumpy ground before coming off - unhurt - all watched by half a dozen bemused hikers. Fifty yards sooner I'd have been smashed or dead).

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Cortes

    It can happen..

    In my 60s I developed a fear of driving over high bridges in the Jacksonville estuary area, after feeling faint and dizzy one day driving over the bridge in very hot weather.

    After this time I would drive for miles around to avoid certain Bridges. When I did have to drive over a bridge I would grip the wheel tightly and stare straight ahead looking neither left nor right.

    It was not so much the fear of the height, but the fear that I would become dizzy and lose control of the car.

    So I lost my chance of winning any more gold medals in motorized ski jumping.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Cortes


    BELOIT, Wis.—A high school dropout who became a billionaire roofing company executive and one of the nation’s richest people died Friday after falling through his garage roof.

    Hendricks was checking on construction on his garage roof in the town of Rock about 10 p.m. Thursday when he fell through, Rock County Sheriff’s Department commander Troy Knudson said.

    He suffered massive head injuries and died in surgery Friday at Rockford Memorial Hospital in Winnebago County, Ill., according to his company and county authorities.

    https://www.twincities.com/2007/12/21/roofing-company-billionaire-dies-after-falling-through-roof/
     
  48. Some of these athletes are over hyped. With incessant talk and interviews instead of showing more and different sporting events.

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Or a from a golf club swung by your wife.

  50. @Clyde

    She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.
     
    Fear means afraid of getting hurt badly.
    If true for Simone Biles then perhaps she avoided an injury that would have screwed her up for the rest of her life. Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip. We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Rosie, @Paperback Writer, @Veteran Aryan

    Perhaps that’s why many NFL players are quitting early. They know what happens to middle aged players who now suffer dementia or, like like Earl Campbell, now live in a wheel chair. Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @follyofwar

    "Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier".

    Any person is one horseback ride from paralysis--ask Christopher Reeve.

    Life's a bitch.

    , @William Badwhite
    @follyofwar


    Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.
     
    Generally true, but the risk can be greatly reduced. Shazier insisted on leading with the top of his head when he tackled - thus putting tremendous pressure on his spine. He had terrible fundamentals and paid a high price for it.

    There is a reason football coaches from a young age tell kids "see what you hit".
  51. The regime is using blacks as human shields to cover for their ever more brazen depredations.

    When not using them in the depredations themselves. It’s no wonder that it’s wearing on them.

    • Replies: @Gaspar DeLaFunk
    @Desiderius

    You'll notice those two young men who were so cruelly murdered do not have their names and faces plastered all over the evening news,with David Muir tearfully saluting them.
    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  52. I’m not as up to speed on her story as I probably should be before commenting; nevertheless …

    I heard she dropped from the team events, but planned to stay in the individual events, which struck me as consistent with my personal life experiences involving blacks, who tend to not be good team players. Sure, they play on teams, but they almost always seek personal stardom before team results. There’s a reason you don’t see many black faces in pictures of special forces operators, and that is because they cannot be trusted to NOT take a shot when it would expose the larger team to danger.

    I’ve seen recent reporting that she will also stay out of the individual all-around events. Was she shamed out of that because of the optics? I dunno.

    The next big issue is the fact that she kept another promising young gymnast from qualifying for a spot on the team; if it really is all about her and just her, then I guess that is OK. Solopsism 101. Why didn’t she have these doubts four weeks earlier, when she was comparatively the same age and “frailty.” Is Gamecock Jerry’s wife a narcissist too?

  53. @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    There must be many jobs which can only be done by the young (or the lacking in imagination). I asked a barman whose stories usually related to his time as a scaffolder (earning far more than in his new job) why he’d changed direction and he answered that he lost his nerve as he approached 40 and could no longer work at the heights he had previously. Such intimations of mortality have been recognised since at least Biblical times:


    Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:” (Ecclesiastes, KJV)

    Part of growing up and older.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Joe Stalin

    Teenaged YAA used to take risks on a motorcycle that I shudder to think of now – overtaking long vehicles on blind bends, racing on roads with drystone walls (I lost control just as we came to a common and fought the bike for 100 yards over bumpy ground before coming off – unhurt – all watched by half a dozen bemused hikers. Fifty yards sooner I’d have been smashed or dead).

    • Thanks: Cortes
  54. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Pro golf is more dangerous for fans than it is for players. Many have been hit in the head by stray drives travelling at over 100 miles per hour. And what ball is harder than a golf ball?

    I often wonder why more pro golfers don’t collapse from the mid-summer heat, which sometimes reaches 100 degrees. Plus, they have to wear long pants and cannot ride in carts.

  55. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    So in 2021 America, this is what passes for “bravery”, huh?

  56. I had an IT teacher in grad school who would break up the three-hour sessions with stories about his personal life. One day, he mentioned that his daughter pursued gymnastics, but at a certain point, he made her quit. This was met with groans of disappointment from the female members of the class: “But it’s her dream!

    He explained:
    “One, she’s good, but she’s not good enough to ever have a future in it.”
    “Two, it’s really expensive.”
    “And three, don’t forget, you people are watching the best gymnasts in the world on TV. I’ve been to a hundred amateur meets. And I’ve seen some girls really get hurt.”

  57. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    I spoke with a guy about a golf course in rural Wisconsin we both had played and he told me he witnessed the death there of a golfer who had contacted a hornets nest while searching for a lost ball. Apparently he wasn’t known to be allergic, just got stung too many times. No EpiPen and medical help too far away.

  58. If she were to say something like “I regret and disavow all the hype about me, I’m dropping the GOAT nonsense” I’d have great sympathy. But no, she eagerly buys into it. And the pliant white liberal media celebrates her every move (“she wins… GOAT! she chokes… how brave!!) I continue to enjoy the smash-up.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  59. The sympathetic reaction defense of Biles’ treason by Gamecock Jerry’s wife is just more proof that a final solution to the femoid problem is urgently necessary.

    Let’s be clear about what happened: Biles cost us a gold medal. We are NOT in the lead and this is an urgent national crisis. Our sporting prestige is on the line: https://olympics.com/tokyo-2020/olympic-games/en/results/all-sports/medal-standings.htm

    Then we have Boomer Steve’s apology for failing to moderate comments:

    NOTE: To all commenters, sorry about being slow with moderation today. Unfortunately, moderation will likely be slow for the next week.

    Earth to Boomers (spiritual femoids?): there is NO NEED to moderate comments. The purpose of the internet is the encouragement and proliferation of powerful takes.

    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
  60. I snow ski quite a bit. I’m usually good to ski from the minute the slopes open until closing time, but sometimes I leave early – partly because of physical exhaustion but mostly because of mental exhaustion. If my head isn’t in the right place, concentrating on and controlling every muscle fiber in my body, I could miss a turn and go tumbling down a mountain at a faster rate than I’d care to – perhaps permanently ruining a knee or God-knows-what.

    No one is watching or judging me, except possibly my wife and kids, who don’t really care much if we leave early. Given the far greater risks faced by gymnasts, who perform stunts most of us would never dare to try, it’s understandable. It sucks when it happens in the middle of one of the most watched sporting competitions in the world, but there you go. It takes courage to make that decision, knowing you’ll be heavily judged and criticized for it.

    If Simone Biles were obnoxiously political in the manner of Colin Kaepernick or Naomi Osaka or a thousand other black athletes I’d be reveling in her forfeiture. But sfaik she isn’t, so I won’t.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Wilkey


    If Simone Biles were obnoxiously political in the manner of Colin Kaepernick or Naomi Osaka or a thousand other black athletes I’d be reveling in her forfeiture.
     
    My friend, I'm thinking a hobby might be quite advantageous to you at this juntcure in life. Philatelism maybe?
    , @vhrm
    @Wilkey


    If my head isn’t in the right place, concentrating on and controlling every muscle fiber in my body, I could miss a turn and go tumbling down a mountain at a faster rate than I’d care to – perhaps permanently ruining a knee or God-knows-what.
     
    Apparently they call it "the twisties" in gymnastics.

    Gymnasts have described the twisties as a kind of mental block.

    In some sports a sudden mental block - like the "yips" in golf - may cost you a missed putt, or a lost game.

    In gymnastics, it can cause a person to lose their sense of space and dimension as they're in the air, causing them to lose control of their body and do extra twists or flips that they hadn't intended. In the worst cases, they can find themselves suddenly unable to land safely.
    ...
    Another ex-gymnast, Catherine Burns, compared it to being on a motorway and suddenly losing your muscle memory of how to drive.

    "You're moving way too fast, you're totally lost, you're trying to think but you know you don't usually have to think to do these manoeuvres, you just feel them and do them," she tweeted. "It's not only scary and unnerving, it's incredibly dangerous even if you're doing basic gymnastics."
    ...
    The twisties can also lead to serious injury.

    Former gymnast Jacoby Miles wrote on Instagram after one particularly bad bout of the twisties mid-air, she broke her neck on landing.

    "It only took one time of getting lost... in the air for me to break my neck and leave me paralysed, most likely for life," she wrote.

    "I'm so so glad [Biles] decided to not continue until she's mentally recovered."

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-57986166
     
    I've hurt myself (lightly to moderately) in moments of inattention or overthinking like this: walking, snowboarding, and lifting weights (fortunately in a squat rack w/ safeties in place or it could've been worse).

    You got to know when to hold 'em, Know when to fold 'em.
  61. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Where I mostly play, losing a hand to Mr. Mexico’s gator is high on the list, but in general, I think getting hit by someone else’s drive is a higher order of risk than being struck by lightning. Once, on a fairly long fairway that spanned a valley between tee and green, I looked back from the green to see if the ladies playing behind us might be close enough to hit us from their lie on the downslope, but was given the show of a lifetime, because they parked their cart uphill from their lie. Moments later, the cart started rolling, right over the top of one, and a half-second later you could hear her scream; about 180 yards, I guess, so I was clearly safer than she (she lived, BTW, but broke a leg) in that moment.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Alarmist

    My dad almost fell off the famous (but not to him) cliff on the 8th hole at Pebble Beach. He was just walking up the uphill fairway oblivious to the 100 foot tall vertical cliff 10 feet ahead when I shouted to him.

  62. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    Nikki Lauda pulled into the pits early in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix because he considered it too dangerous (due to heavy rain causing flooding of the track). It’s entirely possible that he forfeited a Championship due to that decision; however he was still recovering from a horrific accident that nearly killed him and would leave him disfigured and requiring multiple surgeries. Very few people questioned his bravery given the situation.

    It’s quite a sports story… reasonably well recounted in “Rush” (2013).

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Technite78

    Nikki Lauda had balls the size of grapefruit.

    Six weeks after his horrific and near fatal crash, he was racing again. His wounds hadn't yet properly healed, but he thought it best to get back to racing as soon as possible. There are some interesting interviews with him on YouTube. Very unusual guy.

    , @mmack
    @Technite78

    Yes, I remembered that story after I posted and added an update: https://www.unz.com/isteve/in-defense-of-simone-biles/#comment-4807287

    And Niki went on to win two more World Driving Championships (1977 and 1984).

  63. Piers Morgan, predictably, absolutely eviscerates Ms. Biles in today’s daily Mail column.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9835069/PIERS-MORGAN-Sorry-Simone-boast-GOAT-selfishly-quit.html

    If you want to hear the case against her by someone who met her and interviewed her a couple of years ago., here it is.

    To me his most interesting point is asking why the hell she was scrolling through Twitter at the Olympic games when she should be concentrating on her sporting performance and should have turned off her phone.

    Another is what about her responsibility to sponsors who have paid her large amounts of money.

    But on the other hand athletes CAN have panic attacks that are simply not under their control.

    One has to take into account that people like Simone Biles and Naomi Osaka are not well educated and are not professional communicators, and their attempts to explain themselves when things go wrong may inadvertently make things worse.

    If I was a top professional sports person, I would never give any kind of interview to anybody. Once you lose your mystique, it is gone forever.

    By managing to die early, George Orwell maintains the distinction of having no extant voice or video recording, but he remains relevant, perhaps because of that.

    • Replies: @Deckin
    @Jonathan Mason

    https://youtu.be/PGuKyBimFvM

  64. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Did you see him in a dream?

    Was it like the movie "Nightmare on Elm Street?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCVh4lBfW-c

    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTc1mDieQI8

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Alarmist

    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

    No, you hear the Second Movement (Andante) from Haydn’s Symphony 94 in G Major….

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Alarmist

    Nice.

  65. I was going to attempt a comment but I’m just not in the right headspace right now.

  66. The left’s reaction to Biles failing to live up to their expectations is a great study in emergent behavior within the Progressive hive. Now they are blaming Larry Nassar for her failure.

    https://twitter.com/search?q=%22Larry%20Nassar%22&src=trend_click&vertical=trends

    When prophesies fail…

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @The Z Blog


    Now they are blaming Larry Nassar for her failure.
     
    Why would you ever doubt that the HBD Mitten would figure prominently?

    I have been telling you guys for decades that Detriot was just a dry run. They are going to Detriotify you next.
  67. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t."

    Yeah, I can totally relate, except not exactly in a physical fashion.

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn't believe me, and yet it's true.

    If somehow I ever get to meet him in heaven, I am going to punch him right in the nose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123, @Pop Warner, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true.

    He’ll tell you you should have practiced scales more before attempting his more difficult sonatas

  68. @Dan Hayes
    @AndrewR

    They (female journalists) would say that, wouldn't they?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Kudos for the Mandy Rice-Davies reference.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
  69. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    And let’s not forget that Biles was doing her best Cassius Clay “I’m the greatest” impersonation leading up to these games, telling everyone she was the best there is with a “sorry-not-sorry” strut and saying that if she was a man no one would even blink at such cockiness. But, like you say, when it comes down to it, she’s not a man, is she?

    She’s not entirely to blame. The woke media massively contributed to her ego inflation, entitlement, and delusions of infallibility. The Ivy League is filled with crumbling strong black women like her.

  70. @Thoughts
    My previous comments being said...

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them...Encourages their Narcissim...Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media...Which Knows About Biles' predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    My previous comments being said…

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them…Encourages their Narcissim…Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media…Which Knows About Biles’ predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

    Isn’t there always a fresh All-American cherub in gymnastics that the Press hypes going into every Summer Olympics who is destined for the Wheaties box? It’s a natural thing since the fraction of people who care to know anything about competitive gymnastics save for a few weeks every four years is infinitesimal, so the Press – and particularly the networks covering the games – have free reign to do some pre-games marketing of their television product by having in-depth soft focus pieces about the gold medal hopeful.

    It’s just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so “All-American” now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something. (You suspect their parents might vote Republican) Biles, by contrast, was raised by her grandfather and his wife after being abandoned by her parents and is therefore a victim of white supremacist America – she’s overcome that, so she is more interesting and deserving. The Olympics is a sort of orgy of nationalism, and nationalism for the legacy American population is verboten, but a new nationalism under DIE is normative – Biles is a BLACK GIRL first, a member of the Black nation, and the USA on the leotard is an incidental formality necessitated by circumstance.

    The interesting thing of note that Steve is commenting on via twitter is that it seems that the burden of having to represent the fortunes of magic Americans probably weighed heavier on Biles than the burden of representing the United States.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)


    It’s just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so “All-American” now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something.
     
    Biles was the most amazing gymnast I ever saw. I remember watching a few years ago, being impressed by the others, and then she'd do her thing and it was like she was from a different planet. She'd be a megastar if she was black, white, or purple.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayre%27s_law



    "In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake." By way of corollary, it adds: "That is why academic politics are so bitter."
     
  71. @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    There must be many jobs which can only be done by the young (or the lacking in imagination). I asked a barman whose stories usually related to his time as a scaffolder (earning far more than in his new job) why he’d changed direction and he answered that he lost his nerve as he approached 40 and could no longer work at the heights he had previously. Such intimations of mortality have been recognised since at least Biblical times:


    Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:” (Ecclesiastes, KJV)

    Part of growing up and older.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Joe Stalin

    It can happen..

    In my 60s I developed a fear of driving over high bridges in the Jacksonville estuary area, after feeling faint and dizzy one day driving over the bridge in very hot weather.

    After this time I would drive for miles around to avoid certain Bridges. When I did have to drive over a bridge I would grip the wheel tightly and stare straight ahead looking neither left nor right.

    It was not so much the fear of the height, but the fear that I would become dizzy and lose control of the car.

    So I lost my chance of winning any more gold medals in motorized ski jumping.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  72. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Lee Trevino got struck a glancing blow by a lightening bolt with no permanent repercussions. The next time he was paired with Nicklaus he snuck a rubber snake into the grass and pulled it up dangling off his clubhead and taunted Nicklaus with it. It might be the funniest 60 seconds in the history of golf.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Morton's toes

    I think being hit by lightning in 1975 damaged Trevino for a number of years but he came back to win his 6th major at age 43 in 1984.

    I should try to find out if anybody ever wrote the screenplay for a Trevino biopic. His career arc fits the 5-act standard structure for screenplays perfectly. How's Michael Pena's golf swing?

  73. The most sympathetic scenario I can conceive of, which I also think quite plausible, is that in that bad vault Simone realized or was a bit scared by the fact that she lost her body awareness in the air, which is paramount to gymnastics and probably scary when you’re accustomed to knowing exactly where you are when flipping and spinning.
    In that, she realized that she would then be a liability to the team, because she was just off and not going to perform well. So, let the alternate take over and see what she can do.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Clemsnman

    So more of a cognitive issue than a mental/emotional issue?

  74. Sorry,I don’t watch sports but I do get bits of it from regular news, so I’m obviously not an expert, but I recall reading a theory that simply being a world class gymnast permanently damages your body.

    Simone Biles like other great gymnasts is physically tiny, she is only 4’8”. The theory is that they are not great gymnasts because they are genetically small, and that small size gives them an advantage. Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake. If that’s how it works, then gymnasts are inherently injured without even obviously breaking anything.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Alfa158

    I think they are typically short because this establishes a lower center of gravity.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    , @Truth
    @Alfa158


    Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?
     
    Not verified.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yvQyqcuCJI
    , @Jack D
    @Alfa158

    I think this could be easily verified. Pediatricians plot a child's grown on a percentile curve. Most children (absent disease or trauma) start out at a certain percentile and pretty much stay near that same percentile until they are done growing. Wilt Chamberlain was 6 feet tall when he was 10 years old. If gymnasts started out in the 90th percentile in height but ended up in the 20th percentile this would be known by now.

  75. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The leader of the free world.

    https://twitter.com/SaraGonzalesTX/status/1419423364838473732

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anon, @the one they call Desanex, @Stan d Mute

    I’m sure that Snopes has already debunked this – debunked, I tell you! while the usual suspects in the Mediocre $tream Media are pointing out multiple squirrels.

    Pathetic all around.

    • Replies: @res
    @anon

    LOL! In reality they have labeled the claim "Unproven."
    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/did-biden-say-my-butts-been-wiped/
    Usually that means Snopes has decided even they can't lie sufficiently to deny something, but I can't tell for sure what he said.

    Whatever he said, the video clip does not inspire confidence. Though the larger context is more reasonable.

    P.S. Not sure this is a hill worth dying on.

  76. @Jonathan Mason
    Piers Morgan, predictably, absolutely eviscerates Ms. Biles in today's daily Mail column.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9835069/PIERS-MORGAN-Sorry-Simone-boast-GOAT-selfishly-quit.html

    If you want to hear the case against her by someone who met her and interviewed her a couple of years ago., here it is.

    To me his most interesting point is asking why the hell she was scrolling through Twitter at the Olympic games when she should be concentrating on her sporting performance and should have turned off her phone.

    Another is what about her responsibility to sponsors who have paid her large amounts of money.

    But on the other hand athletes CAN have panic attacks that are simply not under their control.

    One has to take into account that people like Simone Biles and Naomi Osaka are not well educated and are not professional communicators, and their attempts to explain themselves when things go wrong may inadvertently make things worse.

    If I was a top professional sports person, I would never give any kind of interview to anybody. Once you lose your mystique, it is gone forever.

    By managing to die early, George Orwell maintains the distinction of having no extant voice or video recording, but he remains relevant, perhaps because of that.

    Replies: @Deckin

  77. anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:

    It doesn’t take a gymnast to be sympathetic to Simone Biles. The media does this at every Olympics so people would watch. They hype up an athlete to the heavens and make it sound like the Olympics is just a coronation for their lifetime achievement, ignoring the fact that they still have to compete like everyone else. Most of them invariably cannot live up to the hype due to the added pressure. Biles was able to somewhat hide under the shadow of Michael Phelps in the 2016 Games, but this time she is the biggest star, I can’t imagine the pressure. It makes Phelps’ achievement in Beijing all the more impressive, even if swimming is not gymnastics.

    Elite sports are 50% mental, 50% physical, this is especially true for precision sports like gymnastics and figure skating. Gymnastics is even more dangerous than figure skating. For the women’s, each apparatus requires tumbling passes where one little mistake could paralyze you for life, like the Chinese gymnast at the 1998 Goodwill Games with the vault. Age also makes a difference. 24 is old for gymnastics. I recall in the 2000 games when practically every gymnast on the US women’s team had had some kind of surgery, many multiple, with steel plates in their ankles, knees, hips etc. and none of them were older than 20! Imagine what it’ll be like when they are 50, or 80? Gymnastics is at least 50% courage, that’s why they can only do this when they’re young and stupid. But kudos to the female gymnast from Uzbekistan who did her last vault at these games at 46. Truly amazing.

    That said, not a good month for black sports “heroes”, or the white run media that tries to make them into heroes. First with the 3 black soccer players on the English soccer team, then Naomi Osaka, now Simone Biles. But fret not, they’ll find more. All eyes will be on Alison Felix next week, it’ll be like Simone who? Part of me is happy that Simone is sticking it to NBC and the media, prioritizing her own health and safety over their ratings. They were just using her. Some people say she’s still the GOAT, some say she’s a loser and a coward, I think she’s just human like the rest of us, not a machine.

  78. @YetAnotherAnon
    I do wonder if it's related to not being on Adderall - does anyone know Biles' current status regarding that drug? Is it now banned?

    I was amazed to find amphetamines (Adderall/Ritalin) prescribed for ADHD, I guess it can improve concentration but it surely improves performance/strength and gives advantage.

    I don't have a problem with Biles or Osaka dropping out. But we've had Black Sportsperson Magic thrown at us for so long a bit of Schadenfreude is surely in order.

    We should not forget though that it's not black people making every advert multiethnic, every TV murderer white and the detectives black or female*, and boosting every black athlete.


    * when ITV created a "real life" retelling of the Pembrokeshire Murders case, where two different elderly couples were slaughtered in the 1980s, they added a black lady detective, although the chances of a black Detective Inspector at Haverfordwest in the 1980s was approximately zero (if there HAD been, she'd have been identified by name and given a leading role).

    https://images.immediate.co.uk/production/volatile/sites/3/2021/01/the_pembrokeshire_murders_ep1_29-0520989.jpg


    " Wilkins’ sidekick, Ella Richards is not based on any one real person, but is a composite of various different people on Steve Wilkins’ team, with Riley describing her as an amalgamation of a few different real-life people and their roles."
     

    Replies: @guest

    Adderall is illegal in Japan. I can’t imagine it would be impossible to smuggle some in for the sake of an Olympic athlete, but there is that.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @guest

    Well if you've been on even a lowish dose of amphetamine for maybe a dozen years, IMHO taking that away may well affect your confidence.

  79. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    It’s kind of like when Oliver McCall and Roberto Duran just flipped out mid-fight. And those weren’t team sports.

  80. “judged events have a tendency to get more and more dangerous”

    That wouldn’t be necessary for gymnastics if they treated more as an art than a sport. Which I think is what most people want.

    Why has it been such a popular event for so long? Not, I wager, because contestants were turning into little munchkin tanks that that can take a pounding. Rather because it is or was one Olympic sport that showed off feminine grace, charm, and beauty. Like ballet.

    Not so much anymore.

    Same thing with ice skating, which is obsessed with how many spins a girl can do in the air, which is at most just the climax of the galaxy hole experience. Made irrelevant if it were done by some monster-thighed broad.

  81. “NOTE: To all commenters, sorry about being slow with moderation today. Unfortunately, moderation will likely be slow for the next week.”

    It’s understandable – those trillions of poisonous spike proteins exact a cumulative toll on energy reservoirs and cognition. Take your time, old man.

  82. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    Simone Biles GOAT leotard she’s wearing (wore) at the Tokyo Olympics:

  83. It is an awful thought, but did the US gymnasts perform better when they had the pervy doctor giving them relaxing massages?

  84. Rumor has it that she got the covid shot and she has serious physical issues as a result.

  85. Oh gawd, Sailer, really? Biles, who was taken in by a White family and housed and fed there so she could continue training, has utterly erased them from her history and proclaimed herself a blacketty black supporter of BLM, as well as the ‘GOAT.’ If she genuinely had physical concerns, the time to confront them was before accepting a place on the Olympic team. This was merely to protect her perceived ‘reputation,’ not her health. Stop projecting your own over-active boomer hypochondria onto others.

    I’m absolutely thrilled that Numerica’s team was beaten by the Russians. And I hope Biles continues to live in her own head, like Osaka. Neither of these individuals are White, neither of them are attractive, and they just barely qualify as women. Hope to see them both beaten soundly and repeatedly by attractive White women, who go on to quit their ‘sport’ and bear healthy White children.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  86. Related:

    Stressful trying to live up to people’s inflated because detached from reality expectations.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Desiderius

    If you look up statistics for worldwide gymnastic competitions then Biles really does dominate the sport, personally having won more gold medals than any other woman gymnast in history. Indeed more than most countries have in a century of international competition. The media obvious loves to push the black girl magic angle since it aligns with their politics, but there is a solid argument for her being the top competitor in her sport's history even if the average journo conflates Olympic medal count with other international competition victories.

    , @prime noticer
    @Desiderius

    "My wife read some article today about Simone Biles being the most decorated Olympian in history"

    they are probably referencing her world championships, championships. which i believe might be accurate. maybe she has the most.

    but, world championships were sporadic back in the day, and they didn't have them regularly until the 80s, and not yearly until the 90s or so. so the old gymnasts would have a lot fewer appearances.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Artistic_Gymnastics_Championships

    , @Wilkey
    @Desiderius

    The chart he posts only shows Olympic medals. It excludes the equivalent world championships which are held in all non-Olympic years, at which Biles has won quite a few medals, including 19 golds.

    She supposedly is the most decorated American gymnast in history, of either sex, but given that Americans have been far from dominant in gymnastics for most of the sport's history that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Desiderius

    "If you look at this tweet and think "Wait, how is this supposed to be a W?" then you might not be too far gone."

    There's a twitter account called "Shaniqua Posting Her Delusions".

    @deludedshaniqwa

  87. @Alfa158
    Sorry,I don’t watch sports but I do get bits of it from regular news, so I’m obviously not an expert, but I recall reading a theory that simply being a world class gymnast permanently damages your body.

    Simone Biles like other great gymnasts is physically tiny, she is only 4’8”. The theory is that they are not great gymnasts because they are genetically small, and that small size gives them an advantage. Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake. If that’s how it works, then gymnasts are inherently injured without even obviously breaking anything.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?

    Replies: @black sea, @Truth, @Jack D

    I think they are typically short because this establishes a lower center of gravity.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @black sea


    I think they are typically short because this establishes a lower center of gravity.
     
    See this:

    Moment of inertia - Wikipedia
    The moment of inertia, otherwise known as the mass moment of inertia, angular mass, second moment of mass, or most accurately, rotational inertia, of a rigid body is a quantity that determines the torque needed for a desired angular acceleration about a rotational axis, akin to how mass determines the force needed for a desired acceleration.It depends on the body's mass distribution and the ...
     
    It is difficult to rotate barbells with 50# on each end. It is doubly difficult if you double the mass, but quadruply difficult if you double the length. (I=mr^2) Short gymnasts can tumble more efficiently for the same reason Peggy Fleming would pull in her arms in a spin, and also break my heart. I really had a thing for her.
  88. The comment moderation slowdown? Welcome to my world. My comments routinely await moderation for hours on end after dozens of of others are published. Someone really should explain how the system works. Have some of us proven to be so reckless as to warrant special scrutiny?

    Anyway, just last month, Simone Biles’ brother was set free when his triple-murder trial ended in a court-ordered dismissal. A prior proceeding had ended in a mistrial; the star witness for the prosecution didn’t show up for the second one. Maybe that circumstance contributed to her mental/emotional turmoil. I haven’t heard it mentioned much.

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @I, Libertine

    Ten hours and counting.

    , @Greta Handel
    @I, Libertine

    Here’s the rub:


    The comment moderation slowdown? Welcome to my world. My comments routinely await moderation for hours on end after dozens of of others are published. Someone really should explain how the system works. Have some of us proven to be so reckless as to warrant special scrutiny?
     
    Well, all I can say is … don’t take it personally.

    Mr. Sailer, as we both know, will not explain this.

  89. This is a sad example of what has been done to America by the prestiege media, or (((leftists))), or whatever you want to call the powers-that-be.

    The Olympics, like almost every other aspect of life these days beyond quotidian activities with one’s immediate inner circle, has become a vehicle for deconstructing, dissolving and replacing non-black societies and their achievements with the new and improved Africanized model. So yeah, these days I see Naomi Osaka, Simone Biles, and the BLM kneelers as my rivals and enemies; I’m happy to see them go down, and see the media’s Brave New World of black dominance and nonblack submission get pushed just a bit further into the future.

    Not unrelated is that large, stable majorities of both blacks and whites reported race relations as being good from 2001 to 2013 or so, and since then the figures have plunged.

  90. @Clyde

    She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.
     
    Fear means afraid of getting hurt badly.
    If true for Simone Biles then perhaps she avoided an injury that would have screwed her up for the rest of her life. Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip. We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Rosie, @Paperback Writer, @Veteran Aryan

    Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip.

    Quite. Gymnastics is particularly problematic over the long haul. I have a girlfriend who lives in constant pain because of it. It’s not severe, miserable pain, but it does curtail her choices for physical activity. I suspect she is a great deal less healthy now than she would have been had she never done gymnastics.

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    I have made it a point to put my kids in lifetime sports that will keep you social and active for the rest of your life.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Rosie

    The only sport that really fits that category is tennis and participation is plummeting in the United States so its time may be going going gone.

    Dr Amen (the bestselling brain doctor who is spooked by brain knocking in any form) promotes ping pong! I suppose that is an excellent answer if you happen to be Chinese.

    Track & Field is probably the way to go but it is very iffy as a social activity. You probably have the critical mass for that only in the big big cities.

    Dr Amen's book is sporadically excellent but I don't think he has enough original material to make a whole book out of it. Skim often.

    https://www.amazon.com/Making-Good-Brain-Great-Performance/dp/1400082099

    Replies: @Rosie

    , @Barnard
    @Rosie

    If she is going to have long term pain and injuries from gymnastics, the damage to her body has already been done by the years of long grueling practices and workouts. Skipping the last few hours of competition isn't going to mitigate that in the slightest. The risk of some freak serious injury during competition was minuscule and really only could have happened during the vault. If that was her concern skip the vault do the other events.

    This is getting pathetic. Simone Biles quit because she was jittery primarily because they wouldn't let her have the performance enhancing adderall she was taking in Rio. She is a quitter and should not be celebrated. The historic purpose of the Olympics has been about celebrating great achievement in sport. Biles isn't the greatest in any way.

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Rosie


    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.
     
    Not only youth sports, but also a lot of the jobs where men are unfairly paid more than women (because women aren’t crazy enough to accept the jobs mainly)..
  91. @Sick of Orcs

    Her routines are sometimes so extraordinarily difficult that the governing authorities have decided not to give her extra points for her hardest stunts because they are too dangerous.

     

    Oh good, egalitarian limpwrists are tamping down excellence.

    Again.

    Replies: @Rosie

    Oh good, egalitarian limpwrists are tamping down excellence.

    Again.

    Heck, let’s bring back bull-jumping, I say.

    • Agree: flyingtiger
    • LOL: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @MGB
    @Rosie

    No, to sports involving animals. Not a single woman I know (wife included) who were into equestrian sports as kids/adolescents, does not have a serious back problem.

    Replies: @Rosie

  92. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Participate in the Olympics being the operative phrase here.

  93. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward.

    Skill, not sport.

  94. @Wilkey
    I snow ski quite a bit. I’m usually good to ski from the minute the slopes open until closing time, but sometimes I leave early - partly because of physical exhaustion but mostly because of mental exhaustion. If my head isn’t in the right place, concentrating on and controlling every muscle fiber in my body, I could miss a turn and go tumbling down a mountain at a faster rate than I’d care to - perhaps permanently ruining a knee or God-knows-what.

    No one is watching or judging me, except possibly my wife and kids, who don’t really care much if we leave early. Given the far greater risks faced by gymnasts, who perform stunts most of us would never dare to try, it’s understandable. It sucks when it happens in the middle of one of the most watched sporting competitions in the world, but there you go. It takes courage to make that decision, knowing you’ll be heavily judged and criticized for it.

    If Simone Biles were obnoxiously political in the manner of Colin Kaepernick or Naomi Osaka or a thousand other black athletes I’d be reveling in her forfeiture. But sfaik she isn’t, so I won’t.

    Replies: @Truth, @vhrm

    If Simone Biles were obnoxiously political in the manner of Colin Kaepernick or Naomi Osaka or a thousand other black athletes I’d be reveling in her forfeiture.

    My friend, I’m thinking a hobby might be quite advantageous to you at this juntcure in life. Philatelism maybe?

  95. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Freddy Couples’ back disagrees.

  96. jb says:

    It turns out there is a name for what happened to Biles: the twisties! (Which in other sports is usually called the yips).

    Although at a much lower level, something similar happened to me in high school: in the middle of my senior year I suddenly found myself getting lost in the air when I tried to perform the most difficult move in my floor exercise routine (although interestingly, I could still do it reliably on the trampoline). Of course, as a random high school gymnast I could just shrug, pull the move from the routine, and accept my reduced scores. It didn’t really matter, even to me. Biles though is in an entirely different position!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @jb

    Older golfers often develop the yips on the putting green, like Sam Snead and Ben Hogan.

  97. @Cortes
    @Old Prude

    There must be many jobs which can only be done by the young (or the lacking in imagination). I asked a barman whose stories usually related to his time as a scaffolder (earning far more than in his new job) why he’d changed direction and he answered that he lost his nerve as he approached 40 and could no longer work at the heights he had previously. Such intimations of mortality have been recognised since at least Biblical times:


    Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:” (Ecclesiastes, KJV)

    Part of growing up and older.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jonathan Mason, @Joe Stalin

    BELOIT, Wis.—A high school dropout who became a billionaire roofing company executive and one of the nation’s richest people died Friday after falling through his garage roof.

    Hendricks was checking on construction on his garage roof in the town of Rock about 10 p.m. Thursday when he fell through, Rock County Sheriff’s Department commander Troy Knudson said.

    He suffered massive head injuries and died in surgery Friday at Rockford Memorial Hospital in Winnebago County, Ill., according to his company and county authorities.

    https://www.twincities.com/2007/12/21/roofing-company-billionaire-dies-after-falling-through-roof/

    • Thanks: Cortes
  98. It’s supposed to be hard.

  99. MGB says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    @Old Prude

    Interesting, because findings of developmental psychologists agree that men become mature somewhere around the 27 to 30 year period of their lives. I remember when I became essentially the current "me" - 28.

    Perhaps Confucius, as usual, was mostly right ....

    At fifteen my mind was set on learning.
    At thirty my character had been formed.
    At forty I had no more perplexities.
    At fifty I knew the Mandate of Heaven.
    At sixty I was at ease with with whatever I heard.
    At seventy I could follow my heart's desire without transgressing moral principles.

    Replies: @MGB, @Reg Cæsar

    Confucius, or the band ‘Morphine’?

    On 6-6-66 I was little I didn’t know shit
    and on 7-7-77 eleven years later still don’t know any better
    by 8-8-88 it’s way too late for me to change
    and by 9-9-99 I hope I’m sittin’ on the back porch drinkin’ red wine
    singin’ Ohhhhhh
    French Fries with Pepper!

  100. @Rosie
    @Clyde


    Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip.
     
    Quite. Gymnastics is particularly problematic over the long haul. I have a girlfriend who lives in constant pain because of it. It's not severe, miserable pain, but it does curtail her choices for physical activity. I suspect she is a great deal less healthy now than she would have been had she never done gymnastics.

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    I have made it a point to put my kids in lifetime sports that will keep you social and active for the rest of your life.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Barnard, @Stan d Mute

    The only sport that really fits that category is tennis and participation is plummeting in the United States so its time may be going going gone.

    Dr Amen (the bestselling brain doctor who is spooked by brain knocking in any form) promotes ping pong! I suppose that is an excellent answer if you happen to be Chinese.

    Track & Field is probably the way to go but it is very iffy as a social activity. You probably have the critical mass for that only in the big big cities.

    Dr Amen’s book is sporadically excellent but I don’t think he has enough original material to make a whole book out of it. Skim often.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Morton's toes


    The only sport that really fits that category is tennis and participation is plummeting in the United States so its time may be going going gone.
     
    Shame. I wonder what the deal is with that. You only need two people; every park has a tennis court; mixed groups can play doubles; equipment is easy to own and store. What's not to like?
  101. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The leader of the free world.

    https://twitter.com/SaraGonzalesTX/status/1419423364838473732

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anon, @the one they call Desanex, @Stan d Mute

    I groaned and griped
    Till Nursie came to do me;
    My butt’s been wiped!
    I feel just like a new me!

    Powdered and dyped;
    I simply have to shout it—
    MY BUTT’S BEEN WIPED!
    Lest anybody doubt it!

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  102. @Rosie
    @Sick of Orcs


    Oh good, egalitarian limpwrists are tamping down excellence.

    Again.
     
    Heck, let's bring back bull-jumping, I say.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Bull-leaping-fresco-1.jpg

    Replies: @MGB

    No, to sports involving animals. Not a single woman I know (wife included) who were into equestrian sports as kids/adolescents, does not have a serious back problem.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @MGB

    I was just kidding, bro! I totally agree.

  103. @JohnnyWalker123
    In general, playing sports at a highly competitive level is really dangerous to your body.

    You really have to ask yourself if the potential for wealth&fame is worth the possibility of a devastating lifelong injury.

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    For the overwhelming majority of people, it's not really worth it to play sports beyond the amateur level. Amateur sports are much safer, if somewhat more boring. Once you start playing at a competitive level, the possibility of a permanent injury is much too high. If you do a Risk-Reward analysis, you'll find that you're better off walking away.

    I'm not saying Tom Brady should've walked away. I'm saying that the hundreds of potential Tom Bradys who got I injured badly and washed out back in HS( or college) should've walked.

    Of course, you're not allowed to say any of this. Coaches, parents, fans, schools, advertisers, and the media would rather see young people play their hearts out on the field. For society, entertainment comes first.

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat&lethargic masses), it'd be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding&strengthening ritual.

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Captain Tripps, @Bill, @Rosie

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat & lethargic masses), it’d be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding & strengthening ritual.

    An excellent comment JW123, but, unfortunately, until we get to Gattica, and TPTB can determine those insanely talented in the womb, the best sorting process is the one we have now, with the attendant risks.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  104. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

     

    This is a good point. I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

    I was watching the highlights of one of the swimming events today, in which the winner was an Australian girl. Her shoulders were incredibly -- almost grotesquely -- broad, and her upper chest muscles bulged out like a male bodybuilder's, with no visible breasts at all.

    What are young women like this swimmer -- and gymnasts like Simone Biles -- doing to their bodies? It might be construed as being worth it if you win the Olympic gold, but what about the hundreds or thousands more like them, in each sport, around the world, who will never win or get famous?

    And that's not even mentioning the drugs . . . .

    Replies: @vhrm, @Anonymous

    I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

    Except for the massive steroid era of the 80s Eastern Block that messed up some women it’s a non-issue.
    It’s downright depressing how quickly “gainz” disappear once you stop (or substantially decrease) training for men and women alike.

    The biggest problem, just like with guys, is that it’s very easy to get fat when you stop training and suddenly have to eat half as much as you’ve been used to for much of your life.

  105. anon[191] • Disclaimer says:

    OT?

    https://nypost.com/2021/07/27/olympic-medalist-hayden-wildes-ex-girlfriend-says-she-regrets-breakup/

    The one-time girlfriend of New Zealand triathlete Hayden Wilde made a bittersweet confession when the Olympian won the bronze medal on Sunday.“I regret breaking up with you,” the unnamed woman gushed to 1 News when asked about Wilde’s victory. “I’m so proud of Hayden, just like all the work he’s obviously done to get there, it’s just amazing.”

    “I went to primary school with him and he’s grown so much; and yeah, real proud,” she added.

    “Grown so much”, wow, girl, what changed when he got that Bronze? lol, she wishes she could have been waiting for him at the finish line, in order to get busy with him ASAP. Unhappily this is how some girls wind up as a kind of Alpha widow.

    Anyway, obvious Red Pill truth on display at the Olympics.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @anon

    She presumably broke up with him because he was just training, training, training all day long.

  106. We had a gathering of in-laws and outlaws in our home yesterday. One guest was the daughter of Mrs. Enemy of Earth’s nephew. She is a college athlete. She mentioned she had looked into the situation with Ms. Biles. The source of her information was not divulged. She stated the problem was that Biles’ routines were so advanced the judges did not know how to score them and were giving her lower scores “to keep things fair for the other athletes.” Biles apparently withdrew because she knew she would not receive fair scoring. I smelled bullshit and did not pay much attention to anything else she said.

    I could care less about the Olympics. It’s a waste of time and money.

  107. @UNIT472
    I'm no Olympic athlete but listening to your 'gut' is probably a good idea. If Nick Wallenda doesn't feel right about walking a tightrope 500 feet above the sidewalk he's within his rights to say 'not today'. If Lewis Hamilton doesn't like the feel of his race car or the condition of the track same thing. Its their call and no one can be 100% all the time.

    Naomi Osaka's situation is a bit different. Pulling out because she was 'depressed' is silly. Her mood could have changed by the time of or during her next match. At worst she would have just lost which happens to every tennis player. She was in no danger but has done her reputation enormous harm.

    Replies: @mmack, @Morton's toes

    “If Lewis Hamilton doesn’t like the feel of his race car or the condition of the track same thing. Its their call and no one can be 100% all the time.”

    Lewis Hamilton is under contact to Mercedes. He can pull the car off the track if he doesn’t want to race but Mercedes can fire him and put another driver in the car. There are more drivers hungry enough to risk everything in F1/IndyCar/NASCAR/Sports Cars than there are available seats. Unless the sanctioning body says “No Race Today Folks”, like CART did at Texas Motor Speedway in 2001, the condition of the track isn’t his call. If his team decides it’s too dangerous they can withdraw the car. And that’s happened before.

    In my earlier post I noted some examples in racing of where someone stopped in the middle of a race or a sanctioning body cancelled a race due to concerns over safety. Your post reminded me of two other instances, both from F1:

    1) Niki Lauda in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Anyone who has seen the movie Rush may remember this incident. Lauda and James Hunt battled back and forth between themselves for the 1976 F1 season. The last race of the year was in Japan. Lauda had a 3 point advantage on Hunt, but the weather that day was atrocious, with rain and fog. There were arguments between the drivers and organizers on if the race should go on. It started in the rain and Lauda pulled in after two laps. Hunt held on to win the World Championship. Of course Lauda was almost literally burned to a crisp in a horrible accident at Nurburgring earlier that season, so it’s understandable even he had limits. Niki came back in 1977 to retake the F1 World Championship, retired after 1979, came back into F1 in the 1980s, and won the 1984 F1 World Championship.

    2) The 2005 United States Grand Prix fiasco. This was more multiple teams saying “No way, no how!”. Back then Michelin and Bridgestone were tire suppliers to F1. The US Grand Prix was at Indianapolis on the road course built within the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The cars run the opposite direction of the Indy 500 traffic and use part of the oval’s Turn One. It turns out that Michelin missed the set up for their tires and cars using Michelin tires started having blowouts running through Turn One (The road course’s Turn Thirteen). Bridgestone didn’t have the issue since their Firestone division provided tires for the IndyCar series and could tell Bridgestone what sort of compound to use for Indianapolis.

    Michelin determined their tires had at best a ten lap life span before they failed. F1 didn’t allow tire changes during races back then. Michelin and the teams using them asked IMS and FIA to add a chicane (a sharp turn) into Turn Thirteen to slow the cars down and save the tires. Bridgestone and the FIA refused to alter the course after qualifying and said the teams could slow going through Turn Thirteen or come in for an emergency tire change (the only type allowed during a race back then). Or they could use a different tire and suffer a penalty for altering the car after qualifying.

    Race day morning came, the cars lined up and rolled off the grid for the parade lap, and when the cars came back to line up for the start, the Michelin shod cars rolled into the pits and stopped. Six cars total started the race and per Wiki: “By lap 10, many of the estimated 100,000 to 130,000 attendees had begun to leave the grandstands. Thousands of fans were reported to have gone to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway ticket office to demand refunds, and police were called to keep the peace. Boos were heard throughout the race, and some upset fans threw beer cans and water bottles on the track.”

    I heard stories of angry fans roaming the grounds and parking lots of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway looking to beat the crap out of anyone even remotely involved in F1. Again, stories, but . . .

    Michelin had to refund ticket purchases for 2005 US Grand Prix attendees. It killed F1 in the US for years.

  108. After the last Olympics it came out that S. Biles claims she has ADD and takes a medication. This made her calmer and more focused. She, or her doctors, did the paperwork and it was approved. It is an unfair advantage in gymnastics where being focused is a key. Maybe they told her to cut it out in Tokyo and it made her nervous.

    Biles is an example of a modern legally drugged Olympian winner, all it takes is a diagnosis and a friendly evaluation – and that is always given to athletes from certain countries, after all it is mostly Canadians and Brits in charge. Another example of this are the Norwegian skiers who supposedly massively suffer from asthma and are allowed steroid medication, at the last Olympics around 50% of them had an asthma exception.

    I have always said that one of the secret Western weapons is the willingness to do endless paperwork. Others often don’t bother, it is not exactly sportsmanlike in most cultures.

  109. @Alfa158
    Sorry,I don’t watch sports but I do get bits of it from regular news, so I’m obviously not an expert, but I recall reading a theory that simply being a world class gymnast permanently damages your body.

    Simone Biles like other great gymnasts is physically tiny, she is only 4’8”. The theory is that they are not great gymnasts because they are genetically small, and that small size gives them an advantage. Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake. If that’s how it works, then gymnasts are inherently injured without even obviously breaking anything.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?

    Replies: @black sea, @Truth, @Jack D

    Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?

    Not verified.

  110. There can never be any resolution because there are always two sides to the argument.

    1. Biles is past her best, but has difficulty accepting this, and when she realized she was not going to win a gold medal, she just quit. Bad sportsmanship and letting down her whole team, compounded by falsely claiming that she has mental health problems.

    2. Unreasonable pressure on aging star to succeed from third parties such as trainers, management, and sponsors has led to her having mental health problems. She went to the Olympics hoping that she could put in one last top rated performance, but she couldn’t pull it off so she spoke out publicly about her mental health problems to explain to her fans that she was not just a quitter, but that she was genuinely sorry she could not continue to compete.

    People will believe what they want to believe.

  111. the main reasons to be sympathetic:
    1) she has delivered for the national team many times. that’s the MAIN reason she’s not being torn to shreds. if somebody else had done this, look out
    2) if she’s not in the game mentally, gymnastics are too dangerous to do

    the main reasons to not be sympathetic:
    1) who the heck does this? a new and TERRIBLE feature of America 2.0. the blubbering American who ducks out of their obligations due to feelings.

    she’s not obligated to try to compete and win? oh yes she is. anybody on that team is. she deliberately went thru the entire process so she could occupy a spot on that team that somebody else should have, and then on the DAY she needs to most deliver for the team, she pulls an America 2.0 blubbering surrender job.

    when has the best person on a national team EVER pulled this kind of thing? the day of my event at the olympics and oh, my feelings, i just can’t do it. as far as i know, NEVER. maybe it’s a woman thing, but i go back to the 70s games, and i don’t remember this ever happening before.

  112. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    It’s amazing. If the American team had won the gold with her, it would have resulted in less approbation for Biles than she is getting for quitting. Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars. The days of Kerri Strug are long gone, and Biles statues will be popping up all over America.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @JimDandy

    "Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars."

    https://blindgossip.com/they-call-her-queen-b/

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @Paperback Writer
    @JimDandy

    You seem obsessed with her. What's up with that?

    Replies: @JimDandy

  113. Anonymous[696] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/hurricaneross/status/1420279987312148482?s=20

    Stressful trying to live up to people’s inflated because detached from reality expectations.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prime noticer, @Wilkey, @YetAnotherAnon

    If you look up statistics for worldwide gymnastic competitions then Biles really does dominate the sport, personally having won more gold medals than any other woman gymnast in history. Indeed more than most countries have in a century of international competition. The media obvious loves to push the black girl magic angle since it aligns with their politics, but there is a solid argument for her being the top competitor in her sport’s history even if the average journo conflates Olympic medal count with other international competition victories.

  114. @Desiderius
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/hurricaneross/status/1420279987312148482?s=20

    Stressful trying to live up to people’s inflated because detached from reality expectations.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prime noticer, @Wilkey, @YetAnotherAnon

    “My wife read some article today about Simone Biles being the most decorated Olympian in history”

    they are probably referencing her world championships, championships. which i believe might be accurate. maybe she has the most.

    but, world championships were sporadic back in the day, and they didn’t have them regularly until the 80s, and not yearly until the 90s or so. so the old gymnasts would have a lot fewer appearances.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Artistic_Gymnastics_Championships

  115. There is no need to defend her. The only person she could have hurt is the alternate she kept off the team at the Olympic trials. She is the one that did all the training and did all the sacrificing. She owes nothing to anybody.

  116. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    I can relate to sanctioning bodies cancelling races out of safety concerns. Last month the Southern California Timing Association cancelled land speed racing at El Mirage dry lake because of excessive heat (111-112F). The rules require drivers to be in racing suits and motorcyclists to be in full leathers and everyone is helmeted.

    Although I am bummed I didn’t get to race, I understand the safety concerns. You can’t have people trying to get into the 200 MPH club in that kind of heat or someone is going to get hurt or die.

  117. She cheated a more willing competitor out of a spot on the Olympic gymnastic team. It’s All About Her. “Nuff said.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    ANYTHING to make the game exciting is welcome.

  119. At the risk of repeating what may have already been said here, as I was huffing and puffing through a session I asked my trainer how gymnasts (in this instance, male) could somehow fly, bounce and tumble through the air and not be killed.

    How they fearlessly go through aerobatic maneuvers without a hitch?

    What he told me surprised me, though I had heard this before.

    He said they start out at about age 3 just as they can walk on their own. They are (via coaches, preschool, and who know?) selected and “trained” in various routines at these early ages.

    He said, “they learn to do these things when they are young enough to be fully flexible with soft bones and the fun loving confidence of youth.” So by the time you see them in the Olympics some of these little girls (and some guys) have been performing on this apparatus for 20 years or more. They aren’t scared because they know they can do it and not get hurt.

    With Biles, she may be hitting the end of that road. Slight weight gain, less flexibility and perhaps slight loss of speed, coupled with the occasional mistake, might signal to her that she is now becoming a mere mortal. Peter Pan has finally grown up.

  120. @Steve Sailer
    @mmack

    John Fitch, the American racing partner of the guy who flew into the stands at the 24-hours of Le Mans in 1955 in their magnesium Mercedes and burned scores of spectators to death, had an incredibly constructive response to the catastrophe: he invented the Fitch Barrier system of trash cans filled with increasing amounts of sand in front of bridge abutments and other immovable barriers that have since saved thousand of lives.

    His ancestor, Jon Fitch, was one of the inventors of the steam ship.

    Replies: @mmack, @Jack D

    Out of tragedy can come good. Interesting story and a historic lineage.

    Researching the tragedy of the 1955 Le Mans race I saw where a Mercedes team engineer went over to the Jaguar team manager and asked him to withdraw his team out of respect for those lost in the accident. The Jaguar team manager refused.

  121. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    OK, I’ll be the guy to bring baseball into the discussion.

    Fernando Tatis, Jr. may be the hottest young shortstop in the game, but he’s not going to be expected to make more acrobatic plays as time goes on. If, when he’s 30, he loses a step, the Padres will just move him to center field, assuming they still have Manny Machado at third.

    Gymnastics doesn’t have “young player skills” and “old player skills.” Could it? Should it? There was an NY Times mag article about possibly making gymnastics something that over-25s could still do at the Olympic level. Like it was before Olga and Nadia.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @njguy73

    Ballet is tough to do past 30.

  122. @Rosie
    @Clyde


    Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip.
     
    Quite. Gymnastics is particularly problematic over the long haul. I have a girlfriend who lives in constant pain because of it. It's not severe, miserable pain, but it does curtail her choices for physical activity. I suspect she is a great deal less healthy now than she would have been had she never done gymnastics.

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    I have made it a point to put my kids in lifetime sports that will keep you social and active for the rest of your life.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Barnard, @Stan d Mute

    If she is going to have long term pain and injuries from gymnastics, the damage to her body has already been done by the years of long grueling practices and workouts. Skipping the last few hours of competition isn’t going to mitigate that in the slightest. The risk of some freak serious injury during competition was minuscule and really only could have happened during the vault. If that was her concern skip the vault do the other events.

    This is getting pathetic. Simone Biles quit because she was jittery primarily because they wouldn’t let her have the performance enhancing adderall she was taking in Rio. She is a quitter and should not be celebrated. The historic purpose of the Olympics has been about celebrating great achievement in sport. Biles isn’t the greatest in any way.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  123. @Jimbo
    @Steve Sailer

    I was playing with a guy once who accidentally stepped in the hole when he was getting his ball and sprained his ankle. We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Abolish_public_education

    We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess…

    Could happen. When you check the next Bobby Fischer and he tips the concrete table over onto you.

  124. One woman I know (who was a serious gymnast in her youth) said she wouldn’t be at all surprised if Simone wasn’t quietly being paid $ to back out of the competition.
    I thought it sounded somewhat contrived until a 5th grade spelling bee contestant anonymously announced that he was being pressured into throwing a recent spelling competition!

  125. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "I think most of us can think back on things we did as kids and think wtf was i thinking. We weren’t."

    Yeah, I can totally relate, except not exactly in a physical fashion.

    If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn't believe me, and yet it's true.

    If somehow I ever get to meet him in heaven, I am going to punch him right in the nose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JohnnyWalker123, @Pop Warner, @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true.”

    You must play the clarinet. Always secure that reed after you slobber all over it, amirite?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    "You must play the clarinet."


    I always love how naive the internet is.

    COMMENDATORE: Don Giovanni!
    A cenar teco,
    M'invitasti,
    E son venuto.

    DON: Non l'avrei giammai creduto,
    Ma faro quel che potro.
    Leporello! Una altra cena!
    Fa che subito si porti!

    LEPORELLO: Ah, padron, ah padron...
    Ah padron, siam tutti morti.

    DON: VANNE DICO!!!

    COMMENDATORE: Ferma, un po'.

  126. @Steve Sailer
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Unexpected ...

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Unexpectorated….

  127. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Old Prude

    Interesting, because findings of developmental psychologists agree that men become mature somewhere around the 27 to 30 year period of their lives. I remember when I became essentially the current "me" - 28.

    Perhaps Confucius, as usual, was mostly right ....

    At fifteen my mind was set on learning.
    At thirty my character had been formed.
    At forty I had no more perplexities.
    At fifty I knew the Mandate of Heaven.
    At sixty I was at ease with with whatever I heard.
    At seventy I could follow my heart's desire without transgressing moral principles.

    Replies: @MGB, @Reg Cæsar

    “At twenty, I cared what others thought of me.

    “At forty, I no longer cared what others thought of me.

    “At sixty, I realized that others weren’t thinking of me all along.”

    Not Confucius, but someone more modern. Can’t [ahem] think of him, however.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/06/08/00/29341028-8397361-image-m-52_1591572652095.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Ragno
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sixty hit me like the world's slowest-motion car crash. At first it didn't matter; soon enough, I refused to let it matter, and how desperate is that? But now I've come to terms with reality (the joke's on me, and there's not a damn thing I can do about it), only the sting in the tail's knowing that Western civ isn't likely to outlive me by very long is the coldest comfort imaginable. I'll make sure to keep the light on for you, fellas.

  128. NOTE: To all commenters, sorry about being slow with moderation today. Unfortunately, moderation will likely be slow for the next week.

    What’s going on?

  129. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    “[Ken] Warby’s record has stood for an astonishing 34 years, despite many attempts to beat it. Dozens of racers have died trying. In fact, the race to beat the world water speed record is considered to be perhaps the most hazardous in the professional sporting world, with an approximate fatality rate of 85% for all racers since 1940 (ladies don’t marry a boat racer unless you’re prepared for some serious heart break).”

    https://www.boatcoversdirect.com/boat-lovers/resources/the-worlds-fastest-boat-and-the-race-for-the-water-speed-record/

    (Who would have been “Queen Mother” in September, 1952? Elizabeth II’s mother or grandmother?)

  130. @JohnnyWalker123
    In general, playing sports at a highly competitive level is really dangerous to your body.

    You really have to ask yourself if the potential for wealth&fame is worth the possibility of a devastating lifelong injury.

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    For the overwhelming majority of people, it's not really worth it to play sports beyond the amateur level. Amateur sports are much safer, if somewhat more boring. Once you start playing at a competitive level, the possibility of a permanent injury is much too high. If you do a Risk-Reward analysis, you'll find that you're better off walking away.

    I'm not saying Tom Brady should've walked away. I'm saying that the hundreds of potential Tom Bradys who got I injured badly and washed out back in HS( or college) should've walked.

    Of course, you're not allowed to say any of this. Coaches, parents, fans, schools, advertisers, and the media would rather see young people play their hearts out on the field. For society, entertainment comes first.

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat&lethargic masses), it'd be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding&strengthening ritual.

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Captain Tripps, @Bill, @Rosie

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    I wonder who would benefit and who would be hurt by increasing local social cohesion?

  131. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    It is possible to simultaneously dislike the athlete and respect her decision.

  132. Glad to see you are coming round.

    Gymnastics is a risky sport. Imagine hitting your head on one of those bars. Or landing wrong. You could end up a quadriplegic, like this girl:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    If she wasn’t feeling 100%, she did the right thing.

    But – I think that the announcement was horribly handled. “Not fun”? They should have made a terse announcement that Biles wasn’t fit to compete, and she should have made herself scarce.

    This entire episode fits into the current weakmindedness that SJW’s valorize. But Biles had legitimate reasons to bow out.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Paperback Writer

    Let's cut to the chase with this theory.

    If she wasn't feeling up to the task, then the proper thing to do would have been to state so plainly, apologize to the team and the fans, and retire gracefully.

    She did precisely none of that. She claimed it was a mental health issue and she tried to make herself into a suffering hero, and she has not announced she is leaving the sport.

    Why did she do that? You have stated that it was the media, coaches, and handlers pushing her to make certain statements, but there is no evidence supporting that other than your conjecture.

    On the other hand, there is ample circumstantial evidence suggesting that she is trying to parley her decreased ability to compete into a sinecure by latching onto the "mental health" cause célèbre. Not unlike Colin Kaepernick with his knee-taking and Prince Harry with his fake exposés of the royal family.

    If there is anything honorable or defensible in this, I fail to see it.

  133. @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    I realize that pro football is very dangerous, but Brady has an offensive line to protect him. Biles doesn’t have anything between her and the floor, or the apparatus, if she misses by a hair.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julissa_Gomez

    In another comment I referenced Elena Mukhina, who also became paraplegic as a result of a mistake.

    Get over it. I don’t believe in turning Biles into a heroine, but she’s also not the devil, or a coward. Separate what she did from the hype.

    • Agree: Escher
  134. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Tennis players do OK.

    It’s hard on the knees but knee replacement surgery nowadays is awesome.

    Karsten Braasch’s career earnings were $1.5M.

    Djokovic: $430M

    Nadal: Djokovic +$50M

    Federer: Nadal + $530M

  135. @UNIT472
    I'm no Olympic athlete but listening to your 'gut' is probably a good idea. If Nick Wallenda doesn't feel right about walking a tightrope 500 feet above the sidewalk he's within his rights to say 'not today'. If Lewis Hamilton doesn't like the feel of his race car or the condition of the track same thing. Its their call and no one can be 100% all the time.

    Naomi Osaka's situation is a bit different. Pulling out because she was 'depressed' is silly. Her mood could have changed by the time of or during her next match. At worst she would have just lost which happens to every tennis player. She was in no danger but has done her reputation enormous harm.

    Replies: @mmack, @Morton's toes

    Osaka’s stated reason for pulling out was mangled but an approximate translation is:

    it is not worth it if I have to deal with the pigs journalists at a post-match conference.

    Before withdrawing she gave the tournament officials an ultimatum–no more stupid press conferences or I’m walking. When they said “no” then she walked.

    If we knew the real story it is more probably: she withdrew because she was playing bad and knew she would not turn it around before the next match. She is still playing bad. In her next performance upswing all will be forgotten–she is considered cuter than a Williams. In New York and Los Angeles. She may be finished in Tokyo as a marketing quasar.

  136. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    If Biles had decided not to participate in the Olympics this time for the reasons above, that would be one thing; quitting in the middle is something else.

    Imagine if Tom Brady decided not to come out in the second half of the Super Bowl because he was 43, which is old for football, and he realized he could get clobbered by a 300lbs defensive end. No one would have defended him.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Morton's toes, @mmack, @Supply and Demand, @JimDandy, @Anon, @Truth, @James Speaks, @Paperback Writer, @Anon

    In fairness, we don’t know what psychic scars were left by digital vaginal/anal rape by Larry Nassar and how inextricably tied they are to Olympic hopes and dreams. Nassar’s sexually assaults became more brazen at championship and Olympic competitions. McKayla Maroney was especially targeted by Nassar and said when talking about it: “I question if my gymnastics career was really worth it because of the stuff I’m dealing with now.”

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/simone-biles-speaks-larry-nassar-140756388.html

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/women-describe-sexually-abused-larry-nassar-article-1.3763038

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Anon

    What's with these girls letting Nassar get away with this for so many years? They or their parents didn't have the courage to report him or go public if their accusations were summarily dismissed? None of them asked to have a chaperon during their exams or treatments? It seems like it must have taken the passivity of scores of young women and their parents for him to get away with what he did for so long.

  137. Sample headlines:

    2020 Tokyo Olympics: Why Simone Biles withdrawing from team final is most courageous move she’s ever landed

    Simone Biles is a role model for prioritizing her own mental health over an Olympic medal

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Roger

    I, too, have prioritized my own mental health over an Olympic medal. But no fawning headlines for me. Figures.

    However, are we sure her failure wasn't an instance of witchcraft? #BlackGirlMagic

  138. @black sea
    @Alfa158

    I think they are typically short because this establishes a lower center of gravity.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    I think they are typically short because this establishes a lower center of gravity.

    See this:

    Moment of inertia – Wikipedia
    The moment of inertia, otherwise known as the mass moment of inertia, angular mass, second moment of mass, or most accurately, rotational inertia, of a rigid body is a quantity that determines the torque needed for a desired angular acceleration about a rotational axis, akin to how mass determines the force needed for a desired acceleration.It depends on the body’s mass distribution and the …

    It is difficult to rotate barbells with 50# on each end. It is doubly difficult if you double the mass, but quadruply difficult if you double the length. (I=mr^2) Short gymnasts can tumble more efficiently for the same reason Peggy Fleming would pull in her arms in a spin, and also break my heart. I really had a thing for her.

  139. @Jimbo
    @Steve Sailer

    I was playing with a guy once who accidentally stepped in the hole when he was getting his ball and sprained his ankle. We all agreed that such an injury was quite impressive, akin to breaking your leg playing chess...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Abolish_public_education

    The blogger noted golf’s most common, long shot mortal danger.

    When I was a youngster, I hit a par three pitch into the near side of the lake. I trudged through the mud, at the shoreline, to retrieve my ball. I stepped into a mud hole, up to my chin. A few inches deeper and I would have been reported as missing. Also, during those years, there were occasions when I would cross a busy highway in order to retrieve balls that I had horribly sliced/driven (OB).

    [MORE]

    I read that Romney has tweeted a message of support for SB. My funniest memories of the ‘16 election were when Trump:

    • blasted Romney for being a “choker” (once and always).

    • attributed Cruz’s Maine, GOP primary win to the liar having been born in Canada.

  140. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    War is peace.
    Freedom is slavery.
    Chicken-livered, yellow-bellied cowardice is courage.

  141. The issue isn’t with the girl who washed her hands of the risk at the last possible moment. It shows the same weakness/resolve as a racing driver who refuses to start a race and retires on the spot. It’s not a heroic move, but you can respect the self-assertion and resolve.

    The problem is with the media that insists on representing such a move as the bravest thing ever simply and solely because a negress did it. It’s nothing more or less than another example of the negro worship now endemic in our State/Media culture. Somehow the negress who quit is more laudable than the competitors who stuck it out.

  142. @JohnnyWalker123
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The leader of the free world.

    https://twitter.com/SaraGonzalesTX/status/1419423364838473732

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @anon, @the one they call Desanex, @Stan d Mute

    If you believe that, at his age, he hasn’t been strolling around the White House with a packed Depends, you haven’t yet spent enough time around geezers..

    The challenge for those who work in that environment is in containing your disgust response when he shuffles past your open office door. You pray that he doesn’t decide to come inside, sit down, and chat.

  143. @Desiderius
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/hurricaneross/status/1420279987312148482?s=20

    Stressful trying to live up to people’s inflated because detached from reality expectations.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prime noticer, @Wilkey, @YetAnotherAnon

    The chart he posts only shows Olympic medals. It excludes the equivalent world championships which are held in all non-Olympic years, at which Biles has won quite a few medals, including 19 golds.

    She supposedly is the most decorated American gymnast in history, of either sex, but given that Americans have been far from dominant in gymnastics for most of the sport’s history that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Wilkey

    that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    I'm told the top rank are all doing tricks no one did last century.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo

  144. @MGB
    @Rosie

    No, to sports involving animals. Not a single woman I know (wife included) who were into equestrian sports as kids/adolescents, does not have a serious back problem.

    Replies: @Rosie

    I was just kidding, bro! I totally agree.

  145. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/AtlantaLiberal/status/1420214866405695488?s=20

    The regime is using blacks as human shields to cover for their ever more brazen depredations.

    https://twitter.com/LATSeema/status/1420143285935300608?s=20

    When not using them in the depredations themselves. It's no wonder that it's wearing on them.

    Replies: @Gaspar DeLaFunk

    You’ll notice those two young men who were so cruelly murdered do not have their names and faces plastered all over the evening news,with David Muir tearfully saluting them.
    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Gaspar DeLaFunk

    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    The salted John Lewis claimed that people were yelling that at him (and spitting on him) as Nancy Pelosi led him past a Tea Party rally, but video showed it didn't happen. Is there any evidence that the black Capitol police officer is telling the truth?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  146. @Wilkey
    @Desiderius

    The chart he posts only shows Olympic medals. It excludes the equivalent world championships which are held in all non-Olympic years, at which Biles has won quite a few medals, including 19 golds.

    She supposedly is the most decorated American gymnast in history, of either sex, but given that Americans have been far from dominant in gymnastics for most of the sport's history that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    I’m told the top rank are all doing tricks no one did last century.

    • Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Ralph L

    Similar to diving, the top ranked women are doing dives Greg Louganis wasn't doing.

  147. Anon[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    After the death of Roland Ratzenberger during qualifying at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix at Imola, Ayrton Senna was upset and wanted to quit the race. He told his girlfriend Adriane Galisteu over the phone that he didn’t feel like racing the next day. As she said, “He told me he did not want to race. He had never spoken like that.”

    Senna died the next day at the Tamburello Curve, veering off and hitting the concrete retaining wall. It was a survivable crash but for the front wheel flying off and striking him in the head (it was pre-wheel tethers).

    Btw, I like IndyCar as well— my favorite— and hope to make it down to the Nashville race August 8th.

  148. From twitter: @ZolbarSakusun
    my personal theory is that someone may have touched her hair

  149. Every year some unfortunate teenage girls end up getting paralyzed or even die during gymnastics practice:

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @anon


    Every year some unfortunate teenage girls end up getting paralyzed or even die during gymnastics practice:
     
    And that’s exactly why we need to institute the Draft for women. Once all the pretty white girls are quadriplegic, at long last the colored girls will get white men who pay attention to their hair.

    Replies: @Truth

  150. @Ron Mexico
    @Steve Sailer

    An alligator could take your hand, too.

    Replies: @jb

    I saw a sign once next to a really nasty looking water hazard in the middle of a quite respectable Southern golf course that said “Warning: alligators, snakes, and spiders.” No idea if people went prospecting for lost balls anyway.

  151. @mmack
    @Dave Pinsen

    About the closest equivalent I can think of from my favorite sport (auto racing) is the case of Rodger Ward. He won the Indianapolis 500 twice (1959, 1962), won the National Championship for Indy Cars, and had a career spanning nearly twenty years. During the 1966 Indianapolis 500 he pulled his car into the pits, shut the engine off, and climbed out. The car was running fine, Rodger was done with racing. At the 500 Victory Banquet the next night he admitted he was quitting because racing wasn’t any fun to him anymore.

    I’ve seen a race canceled by the drivers and the sanctioning body because it was deemed too dangerous. In 2001 the old CART sanctioning body was due to run its version of IndyCar at Texas Motor Speedway. The Firestone Firehawk 600 was scheduled for April 29th. During practice for the race drivers complained of dizziness and disorientation. It turns out at the speeds they were running and with the track design they were pulling G forces astronauts and fighter pilots experience without specialized flight suits. Some drivers even greyed or blacked out momentarily while driving, and there was a non-fatal crash. They qualified the field but in the time between qualifying on the 28th and race day the drivers, medical staff, and CART deemed the race unsafe. The problem was they announced the cancellation race day morning while fans were in the grandstands settling in to watch the race. Fans were very upset and I remember a picture that ran on TV, newspapers, and the web of a group of fans holding up a homemade sign that read:

    Cowards
    Aren’t
    Racing
    Today.

    It cost CART money and prestige it couldn’t afford to lose during its fight against the Indy Racing League.

    Outside of Mercedes at Le Mans pulling their cars out during the 1955 race after the disastrous crash involving one of their cars that killed 80+ people, and 1999 when one of their CLR racers went airborne and flipped off the racetrack (thankfully no fatalities), I don’t recall other examples where a team or driver said “Nope, too dangerous, gotta stop”.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Technite78, @Truth, @petit bourgeois, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon, @gebrauchshund

    Niki Lauda at the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Retired from the race after two laps because he thought it was too dangerous, due to heavy rain and difficulties he was having from injuries sustained earlier in the season. It was the final race of the season and he was leading in championship points. James Hunt finished the race in third place, allowing him to win the championship by one point.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @gebrauchshund

    Ron Howard's race car movie is about that.

  152. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "At twenty, I cared what others thought of me.

    "At forty, I no longer cared what others thought of me.

    "At sixty, I realized that others weren't thinking of me all along."


    Not Confucius, but someone more modern. Can't [ahem] think of him, however.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Ragno

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I had no idea Churchill was a "roust". Whatever that is.

  153. She also has a veritable legion of leeches sucking her dry financially at every turn. Lots of people making lots of money off Simone. Imagine being a child and realizing you’re dragging your entire extended family along for the ride.

  154. @Ralph L
    @Wilkey

    that still leaves her far from being the greatest ever.

    I'm told the top rank are all doing tricks no one did last century.

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Similar to diving, the top ranked women are doing dives Greg Louganis wasn’t doing.

  155. @Wilkey
    I snow ski quite a bit. I’m usually good to ski from the minute the slopes open until closing time, but sometimes I leave early - partly because of physical exhaustion but mostly because of mental exhaustion. If my head isn’t in the right place, concentrating on and controlling every muscle fiber in my body, I could miss a turn and go tumbling down a mountain at a faster rate than I’d care to - perhaps permanently ruining a knee or God-knows-what.

    No one is watching or judging me, except possibly my wife and kids, who don’t really care much if we leave early. Given the far greater risks faced by gymnasts, who perform stunts most of us would never dare to try, it’s understandable. It sucks when it happens in the middle of one of the most watched sporting competitions in the world, but there you go. It takes courage to make that decision, knowing you’ll be heavily judged and criticized for it.

    If Simone Biles were obnoxiously political in the manner of Colin Kaepernick or Naomi Osaka or a thousand other black athletes I’d be reveling in her forfeiture. But sfaik she isn’t, so I won’t.

    Replies: @Truth, @vhrm

    If my head isn’t in the right place, concentrating on and controlling every muscle fiber in my body, I could miss a turn and go tumbling down a mountain at a faster rate than I’d care to – perhaps permanently ruining a knee or God-knows-what.

    Apparently they call it “the twisties” in gymnastics.

    Gymnasts have described the twisties as a kind of mental block.

    In some sports a sudden mental block – like the “yips” in golf – may cost you a missed putt, or a lost game.

    In gymnastics, it can cause a person to lose their sense of space and dimension as they’re in the air, causing them to lose control of their body and do extra twists or flips that they hadn’t intended. In the worst cases, they can find themselves suddenly unable to land safely.

    Another ex-gymnast, Catherine Burns, compared it to being on a motorway and suddenly losing your muscle memory of how to drive.

    “You’re moving way too fast, you’re totally lost, you’re trying to think but you know you don’t usually have to think to do these manoeuvres, you just feel them and do them,” she tweeted. “It’s not only scary and unnerving, it’s incredibly dangerous even if you’re doing basic gymnastics.”

    The twisties can also lead to serious injury.

    Former gymnast Jacoby Miles wrote on Instagram after one particularly bad bout of the twisties mid-air, she broke her neck on landing.

    “It only took one time of getting lost… in the air for me to break my neck and leave me paralysed, most likely for life,” she wrote.

    “I’m so so glad [Biles] decided to not continue until she’s mentally recovered.”

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-57986166

    I’ve hurt myself (lightly to moderately) in moments of inattention or overthinking like this: walking, snowboarding, and lifting weights (fortunately in a squat rack w/ safeties in place or it could’ve been worse).

    You got to know when to hold ’em, Know when to fold ’em.

    • Thanks: Cortes
  156. @Morton's toes
    @Dave Pinsen

    There was a guy who retired in the middle of an NFL game a few years ago and the boos outnumbered the cheers about a million to one from fans and players.

    Criticizing Simone Biles is like criticizing Tom Brady. (Who by the way ain't going to quit in the middle of a game because of shaky nerves.)

    Replies: @EdwardM

    No, Simone Biles is black so she is above criticism.

    Will any mainstream sports talk show host or columnist even mildly criticize her for her craven, selfish grandstanding?

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @EdwardM

    I don't pay attention to mainstream sports commentators -- life's too short - but people I agree with 99% on Twitter have made fools of themselves criticizing her. The comparisons with Tom Brady are especially idiotic.

    It lessens my respect for them. (Oh well, they're all con artists, more or less, so no big loss.)

    But in the real world...it's possible to keep your mouth shut once in a while. Or to reverse course, as Steve has done, when the facts warrant.

  157. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The exception is golf. Getting hit by lightning is the main health risk.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Ron Mexico, @Mike Tre, @follyofwar, @Dan Smith, @The Alarmist, @Morton's toes, @Brutusale, @Sick of Orcs, @njguy73, @Paperback Writer, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Unless you’re Tiger Woods, who spent the first couple of decades of his career swinging for the fences.

    Speaking of odd injuries to golfers, I’ve been told Ernie Els, with the most efficient looking swing of anybody, apparently injured his knee way more badly than he let on getting on/off a boat. I wonder if the injury tweaked him every swing he took after that.

    And as commenters have been pointing out, it’s that little yip or tweak that can ruin you. Simone is a mature woman now and it’s easy to imagine somewhere in her head she’s starting to worry about throwing her heavier frame in the air and coming down wrong.

    God bless her. She’s going to marry well and do just fine.

  158. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "At twenty, I cared what others thought of me.

    "At forty, I no longer cared what others thought of me.

    "At sixty, I realized that others weren't thinking of me all along."


    Not Confucius, but someone more modern. Can't [ahem] think of him, however.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Ragno

    Sixty hit me like the world’s slowest-motion car crash. At first it didn’t matter; soon enough, I refused to let it matter, and how desperate is that? But now I’ve come to terms with reality (the joke’s on me, and there’s not a damn thing I can do about it), only the sting in the tail’s knowing that Western civ isn’t likely to outlive me by very long is the coldest comfort imaginable. I’ll make sure to keep the light on for you, fellas.

  159. anon[291] • Disclaimer says:

    Biles was slipping. She made mistakes the US Olympic Trials, Olympic qualification, and the Team event this week.

    The US press ignored her mistakes.

    Then she faltered and quit. I’m fine with that.

    But after the fact, the mental health excuse was concocted and the US press are trying to pitch it as a victory.

    Athletes have always gotten old, their performance worsened, and they lost, decided retire, needed to retire, or were forced to retire. That was just what happened.

    The mental health thing has been big in golf this year. Bubba Watson took time off. Then talked about it as a mental health thing. It was favorably received. Then others spoke up. WTF! Call it what you want but it used to be called bad nerves.

    Biles was losing. She quit, and the US team did better without her.

    Performance pressure is a huge part of sports. The best at their best thrive on it.
    When aging athletes slip, it is hardly a surprise.
    There are some extreme, well known cases of performance anxiety, but this seems routine.

    The fact she and the press want to invert what we all saw with our lying eyes and pitch it as heroic is an impressive act of spin.

    Also, it has hurt advertising, and nbc has had to make advertising concessions due to low ratings. They are drowning her in teflon. Gaslighting a defeat as a moral and personal victory is great if you can pull it off.

    I’ve already seen a teamwork themed gymnastic team clothing ad.

    Myself…I’m using the Covid Mulligan for all its worth.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Willie Mays started notably declining in his final season at age 42. In the World Series he fell down in the outfield and never played again.

    It's hard to tell how long you can keep going. It's crazy that Tom Brady wins a Super Bowl at 43, but age will come even for his pretty soon.

    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

  160. @anon
    Biles was slipping. She made mistakes the US Olympic Trials, Olympic qualification, and the Team event this week.

    The US press ignored her mistakes.

    Then she faltered and quit. I'm fine with that.

    But after the fact, the mental health excuse was concocted and the US press are trying to pitch it as a victory.

    Athletes have always gotten old, their performance worsened, and they lost, decided retire, needed to retire, or were forced to retire. That was just what happened.

    The mental health thing has been big in golf this year. Bubba Watson took time off. Then talked about it as a mental health thing. It was favorably received. Then others spoke up. WTF! Call it what you want but it used to be called bad nerves.

    Biles was losing. She quit, and the US team did better without her.

    Performance pressure is a huge part of sports. The best at their best thrive on it.
    When aging athletes slip, it is hardly a surprise.
    There are some extreme, well known cases of performance anxiety, but this seems routine.

    The fact she and the press want to invert what we all saw with our lying eyes and pitch it as heroic is an impressive act of spin.

    Also, it has hurt advertising, and nbc has had to make advertising concessions due to low ratings. They are drowning her in teflon. Gaslighting a defeat as a moral and personal victory is great if you can pull it off.

    I've already seen a teamwork themed gymnastic team clothing ad.

    Myself...I'm using the Covid Mulligan for all its worth.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Willie Mays started notably declining in his final season at age 42. In the World Series he fell down in the outfield and never played again.

    It’s hard to tell how long you can keep going. It’s crazy that Tom Brady wins a Super Bowl at 43, but age will come even for his pretty soon.

    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer


    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

     

    Yes, that would have been very sensible indeed, and Biles could have stepped away far more gracefully. But this approach could never be allowed, because the media must treat her as a superhuman (i.e. ultimately non-human) Slay Queen whose every action is stunning, brave, and epoch-defining.
    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    A major problem for her might have been Japan's traditional inflexibility for "black folk's problems."

    I don’t think adderall or Ritalin should be allowed in Olympic events. Can’t take drugs as a crutch for fundamental weakness. Mental toughness is an important criteria for Olympic athletes. Those drugs enhance mental focus for the average person, and make those who ordinarily couldn’t compete, competitive.

    Actually, I’d call it a no-brainer. If she can’t compete without focus-enhancing drugs, she shouldn’t have been there. She should be doing commercials for Adderall.

    https://youtu.be/1PkV9vWJwSM

  161. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Willie Mays started notably declining in his final season at age 42. In the World Series he fell down in the outfield and never played again.

    It's hard to tell how long you can keep going. It's crazy that Tom Brady wins a Super Bowl at 43, but age will come even for his pretty soon.

    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

    Yes, that would have been very sensible indeed, and Biles could have stepped away far more gracefully. But this approach could never be allowed, because the media must treat her as a superhuman (i.e. ultimately non-human) Slay Queen whose every action is stunning, brave, and epoch-defining.

  162. I want to know the backstory about how the guy ended up married to an Eastern European Olympian.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  163. You may be right and gymnastics is a young person’s game. If this is true (it probably is) the time for Biles to have considered this was BEFORE she left down her whole team and cost the US its gold medal. The WRONG time to make this decision is right in the middle of a vault with the whole world watching and your team counting on you.

    Sure vaulting can be very dangerous but Biles has been doing this since she was a wee pickaninny. You or I would be scared shitless and would fall flat on our faces and break our necks but it’s all muscle memory to her – she has put in her 10,000 hours.

    If she wasn’t doing well in practice she should have pulled out then but not right in the middle of a competition. All the bullshit about this was my personal decision is pure selfishness – she was competing in a team event and she let down her team. If a white man did this he would be treated like Benedict Arnold but as a blaque female whatever she does has to be rationalized.

    Today I was at the Vince Lombardi rest stop on the NJ Turnpike (what a fate to have a toilet named in your memory and on the wall is printed one of his quotes:

    It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.

    But that was the old America. In the New America we say,

    It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you can find someone else to blame and in the meantime take some mental health time off.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D

    You didn't get the point that Gamecock Jerry's wife was making.

    Maybe you should read a little before you shoot off your mouth about something you know nothing of.

    She's not a tennis player. She's not even a QB with an offensive line to protect her. She's just one person who could, if she misjudges, become crippled for life. Several top rank gymnasts have. Google it, Jack D. When gymnasts' minds get confused, they can get into accidents and become quadriplegic.

    How would that have looked? Not very good, and the team wouldn't have gotten any medal. And, do you really care about that gold medal? Nah, you don't. You just want to beat up on a black chick because you're enraged at all the rest of the shit that's going down. Newsflash: we all are, but not all of us have allowed the situation to drive us nuts, as it appears to have driven you nuts.

    Do you care that Katy Ledecky fucked up and came in fifth? No.

    You say she should have pulled out - you have no fucking clue what kind of pressure she was under to repeat. None whatever. If anything I think she gave it a game fight and realized she couldn't do it.

    It's not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled. The people who run our society think the rest of America is woke and it's not. They should have furnished a simple, graceful apology and bundled her off-stage. She stayed on the floor and said "it wasn't fun" because they told her to. How do I know this? Because I've worked in this field. The athletes are cattle. They do what they are told to do.


    Sure vaulting can be very dangerous but Biles has been doing this since she was a wee pickaninny.
     
    Stay classy.

    Replies: @Jack D

  164. This article backs up Mrs. Gamecock Jerry:

  165. @I, Libertine
    The comment moderation slowdown? Welcome to my world. My comments routinely await moderation for hours on end after dozens of of others are published. Someone really should explain how the system works. Have some of us proven to be so reckless as to warrant special scrutiny?

    Anyway, just last month, Simone Biles' brother was set free when his triple-murder trial ended in a court-ordered dismissal. A prior proceeding had ended in a mistrial; the star witness for the prosecution didn't show up for the second one. Maybe that circumstance contributed to her mental/emotional turmoil. I haven't heard it mentioned much.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Greta Handel

    Ten hours and counting.

  166. @Alfa158
    Sorry,I don’t watch sports but I do get bits of it from regular news, so I’m obviously not an expert, but I recall reading a theory that simply being a world class gymnast permanently damages your body.

    Simone Biles like other great gymnasts is physically tiny, she is only 4’8”. The theory is that they are not great gymnasts because they are genetically small, and that small size gives them an advantage. Rather the intense physical stress of training to be great gymnasts when they are children damages their bone growth and leaves them small. The bone ends where growth occurs are damaged by the heavy stresses and impacts. In particular the judging standard of sticking landings on dismounts, instead of absorbing the landing as you naturally would, takes its toll on your body. The human body is not designed to spend hours at a time practicing at pounding itself into the floor like a human tent stake. If that’s how it works, then gymnasts are inherently injured without even obviously breaking anything.

    Anybody here know if that theory is verified ?

    Replies: @black sea, @Truth, @Jack D

    I think this could be easily verified. Pediatricians plot a child’s grown on a percentile curve. Most children (absent disease or trauma) start out at a certain percentile and pretty much stay near that same percentile until they are done growing. Wilt Chamberlain was 6 feet tall when he was 10 years old. If gymnasts started out in the 90th percentile in height but ended up in the 20th percentile this would be known by now.

  167. @Jack D
    You may be right and gymnastics is a young person's game. If this is true (it probably is) the time for Biles to have considered this was BEFORE she left down her whole team and cost the US its gold medal. The WRONG time to make this decision is right in the middle of a vault with the whole world watching and your team counting on you.

    Sure vaulting can be very dangerous but Biles has been doing this since she was a wee pickaninny. You or I would be scared shitless and would fall flat on our faces and break our necks but it's all muscle memory to her - she has put in her 10,000 hours.

    If she wasn't doing well in practice she should have pulled out then but not right in the middle of a competition. All the bullshit about this was my personal decision is pure selfishness - she was competing in a team event and she let down her team. If a white man did this he would be treated like Benedict Arnold but as a blaque female whatever she does has to be rationalized.

    Today I was at the Vince Lombardi rest stop on the NJ Turnpike (what a fate to have a toilet named in your memory and on the wall is printed one of his quotes:


    It's not whether you get knocked down, it's whether you get up.
     
    But that was the old America. In the New America we say,

    It's not whether you get knocked down, it's whether you can find someone else to blame and in the meantime take some mental health time off.
     

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    You didn’t get the point that Gamecock Jerry’s wife was making.

    Maybe you should read a little before you shoot off your mouth about something you know nothing of.

    She’s not a tennis player. She’s not even a QB with an offensive line to protect her. She’s just one person who could, if she misjudges, become crippled for life. Several top rank gymnasts have. Google it, Jack D. When gymnasts’ minds get confused, they can get into accidents and become quadriplegic.

    How would that have looked? Not very good, and the team wouldn’t have gotten any medal. And, do you really care about that gold medal? Nah, you don’t. You just want to beat up on a black chick because you’re enraged at all the rest of the shit that’s going down. Newsflash: we all are, but not all of us have allowed the situation to drive us nuts, as it appears to have driven you nuts.

    Do you care that Katy Ledecky fucked up and came in fifth? No.

    You say she should have pulled out – you have no fucking clue what kind of pressure she was under to repeat. None whatever. If anything I think she gave it a game fight and realized she couldn’t do it.

    It’s not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled. The people who run our society think the rest of America is woke and it’s not. They should have furnished a simple, graceful apology and bundled her off-stage. She stayed on the floor and said “it wasn’t fun” because they told her to. How do I know this? Because I’ve worked in this field. The athletes are cattle. They do what they are told to do.

    Sure vaulting can be very dangerous but Biles has been doing this since she was a wee pickaninny.

    Stay classy.

    • Troll: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer


    It’s not her fault
     
    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Paperback Writer

  168. @gebrauchshund
    @mmack

    Niki Lauda at the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Retired from the race after two laps because he thought it was too dangerous, due to heavy rain and difficulties he was having from injuries sustained earlier in the season. It was the final race of the season and he was leading in championship points. James Hunt finished the race in third place, allowing him to win the championship by one point.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Ron Howard’s race car movie is about that.

  169. NOTE: To all commenters, sorry about being slow with moderation today. Unfortunately, moderation will likely be slow for the next week.

    We shall hope that this is because you have decided that 100% of the media/government propaganda is bullshit and that you have decided to get out of your closet and go live the remainder of your life as a free man.

  170. @njguy73
    @Steve Sailer

    OK, I'll be the guy to bring baseball into the discussion.

    Fernando Tatis, Jr. may be the hottest young shortstop in the game, but he's not going to be expected to make more acrobatic plays as time goes on. If, when he's 30, he loses a step, the Padres will just move him to center field, assuming they still have Manny Machado at third.

    Gymnastics doesn't have "young player skills" and "old player skills." Could it? Should it? There was an NY Times mag article about possibly making gymnastics something that over-25s could still do at the Olympic level. Like it was before Olga and Nadia.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Ballet is tough to do past 30.

  171. @jb
    It turns out there is a name for what happened to Biles: the twisties! (Which in other sports is usually called the yips).

    Although at a much lower level, something similar happened to me in high school: in the middle of my senior year I suddenly found myself getting lost in the air when I tried to perform the most difficult move in my floor exercise routine (although interestingly, I could still do it reliably on the trampoline). Of course, as a random high school gymnast I could just shrug, pull the move from the routine, and accept my reduced scores. It didn't really matter, even to me. Biles though is in an entirely different position!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Older golfers often develop the yips on the putting green, like Sam Snead and Ben Hogan.

  172. @JohnnyWalker123
    In general, playing sports at a highly competitive level is really dangerous to your body.

    You really have to ask yourself if the potential for wealth&fame is worth the possibility of a devastating lifelong injury.

    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

    For the overwhelming majority of people, it's not really worth it to play sports beyond the amateur level. Amateur sports are much safer, if somewhat more boring. Once you start playing at a competitive level, the possibility of a permanent injury is much too high. If you do a Risk-Reward analysis, you'll find that you're better off walking away.

    I'm not saying Tom Brady should've walked away. I'm saying that the hundreds of potential Tom Bradys who got I injured badly and washed out back in HS( or college) should've walked.

    Of course, you're not allowed to say any of this. Coaches, parents, fans, schools, advertisers, and the media would rather see young people play their hearts out on the field. For society, entertainment comes first.

    Rather than emphasizing insanely competitive athletics for a few (and spectatorship for the fat&lethargic masses), it'd be healthier if everyone was encouraged to play sports at an amateur level. Not for money, fame, or the thrill of winning. Instead, common people should be encouraged to play for fun, fitness, and friendship. Almost like a community bonding&strengthening ritual.

    Safe&boring amateur sports for everyone > High-risk competitive sports for a few (and inactivity for the masses of fans).

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Captain Tripps, @Bill, @Rosie

    Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds.

    It can be really hard not to get caught up in the competition when you believe your child has as much potential as the next kid. Thanks for reminding me what’s at stake.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Rosie

    True.

    My learning experience came a few years after the end of HS. I started meeting lots of former football players (from my HS) whose injuries had not healed with time. A lot of them had been told they'd have to live with their injuries for life. Some were still seeing therapists and getting surgeries.

    At that point, it gradually became clear the extent to which even competitive HS sports can be destructive to one's body. Then I did more reading on the subject....

    For what it's worth, I don't think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.

    My above points mostly apply to the kids who over-train year-round. Always going to practices, games, private strength&skills coaches, travel teams, scouting events. If you're more casual, I'd bet the probability of lifelong injuries is lower. Though the probability of an athletic scholarship is lower too.

    You're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    If you don't push your kids into intensive year-round athletics, you don't get the athletic scholarship or opportunity to go pro. If you do, you have to deal with the potential for injuries.

    For what it's worth, it's only a fraction of highly competitive athletes who get hurt badly. The problem is that your odds of going pro are just so low that you might not be able to justify the decision, especially when you look at the time&money investment. It's not just injuries that make sports a bad deal for many.

    Replies: @Rosie

  173. Couldnt care less about gymnastics or for that matter a lot of those olympic sports. Maybe if the woman did it in the nude I would watch.

  174. @Morton's toes
    @Rosie

    The only sport that really fits that category is tennis and participation is plummeting in the United States so its time may be going going gone.

    Dr Amen (the bestselling brain doctor who is spooked by brain knocking in any form) promotes ping pong! I suppose that is an excellent answer if you happen to be Chinese.

    Track & Field is probably the way to go but it is very iffy as a social activity. You probably have the critical mass for that only in the big big cities.

    Dr Amen's book is sporadically excellent but I don't think he has enough original material to make a whole book out of it. Skim often.

    https://www.amazon.com/Making-Good-Brain-Great-Performance/dp/1400082099

    Replies: @Rosie

    The only sport that really fits that category is tennis and participation is plummeting in the United States so its time may be going going gone.

    Shame. I wonder what the deal is with that. You only need two people; every park has a tennis court; mixed groups can play doubles; equipment is easy to own and store. What’s not to like?

  175. @Clemsnman
    The most sympathetic scenario I can conceive of, which I also think quite plausible, is that in that bad vault Simone realized or was a bit scared by the fact that she lost her body awareness in the air, which is paramount to gymnastics and probably scary when you're accustomed to knowing exactly where you are when flipping and spinning.
    In that, she realized that she would then be a liability to the team, because she was just off and not going to perform well. So, let the alternate take over and see what she can do.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    So more of a cognitive issue than a mental/emotional issue?

  176. @Morton's toes
    @Steve Sailer

    Lee Trevino got struck a glancing blow by a lightening bolt with no permanent repercussions. The next time he was paired with Nicklaus he snuck a rubber snake into the grass and pulled it up dangling off his clubhead and taunted Nicklaus with it. It might be the funniest 60 seconds in the history of golf.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I think being hit by lightning in 1975 damaged Trevino for a number of years but he came back to win his 6th major at age 43 in 1984.

    I should try to find out if anybody ever wrote the screenplay for a Trevino biopic. His career arc fits the 5-act standard structure for screenplays perfectly. How’s Michael Pena’s golf swing?

  177. What’s not to like?

    I don’t believe anybody knows the answer to this.

    1. it can be rough for beginners (like golf, like skiing; unlike billiards, unlike bowling). Maybe 50-100 hours before a person with average balance and reflexes and coordination does not feel like a spaz.

    2. professional women’s tennis is unwatchable with the screeching and yelling and grunting. Muting the audio is required.

    3. the american men’s pros are dreadful v. Djokovic, Federer & Nadal. In the hay day of tennis (the “boom”) Conners and McEnroe and Evert were in the finals of the U. S. Open all the time. Lendl and Navratilova and Seles migrated here permanent.

    I love the sport but do not care much for the culture. I don’t think this is anomalous though because I also do not care much for the culture of any other activity I participate in. Except for unz.com. Mr Unz is solid!

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Morton's toes


    1. it can be rough for beginners (like golf, like skiing; unlike billiards, unlike bowling). Maybe 50-100 hours before a person with average balance and reflexes and coordination does not feel like a spaz.
     
    This seems rather easy to solve. Kids go on vacations to learn a sport (e.g. volleyball camp). Why not adults? Or the whole family for that matter?

    Replies: @Morton's toes

  178. Anonymous[735] • Disclaimer says:

    Yeah, no. The time to make that decision was 6 months ago. Another girl lost her spot to this narcissist.

    It is okay to be a conscientious objector to a war your government is fighting. It is not okay to enlist, get deployed, then decide mid gun battle that this just ain’t really “your thing” and go AWOL. People get shot for desertion, justifiably.

    She could have changed her routine by substituting a simple handspring back tuck for whatever wild quadruple flip she had planned to show off with. That substitution would not be dangerous in the least for an athlete like that. Inexcusable.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    But would an easy, safe pass score as many points for the team as letting the alternate do her best?

    People don't know when they are going to get too old. It can happen suddenly.

  179. @The Alarmist
    @Steve Sailer

    Where I mostly play, losing a hand to Mr. Mexico’s gator is high on the list, but in general, I think getting hit by someone else’s drive is a higher order of risk than being struck by lightning. Once, on a fairly long fairway that spanned a valley between tee and green, I looked back from the green to see if the ladies playing behind us might be close enough to hit us from their lie on the downslope, but was given the show of a lifetime, because they parked their cart uphill from their lie. Moments later, the cart started rolling, right over the top of one, and a half-second later you could hear her scream; about 180 yards, I guess, so I was clearly safer than she (she lived, BTW, but broke a leg) in that moment.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My dad almost fell off the famous (but not to him) cliff on the 8th hole at Pebble Beach. He was just walking up the uphill fairway oblivious to the 100 foot tall vertical cliff 10 feet ahead when I shouted to him.

  180. res says:
    @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm sure that Snopes has already debunked this - debunked, I tell you! while the usual suspects in the Mediocre $tream Media are pointing out multiple squirrels.

    Pathetic all around.

    Replies: @res

    LOL! In reality they have labeled the claim “Unproven.”
    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/did-biden-say-my-butts-been-wiped/
    Usually that means Snopes has decided even they can’t lie sufficiently to deny something, but I can’t tell for sure what he said.

    Whatever he said, the video clip does not inspire confidence. Though the larger context is more reasonable.

    P.S. Not sure this is a hill worth dying on.

  181. @The Z Blog
    The left's reaction to Biles failing to live up to their expectations is a great study in emergent behavior within the Progressive hive. Now they are blaming Larry Nassar for her failure.

    https://twitter.com/search?q=%22Larry%20Nassar%22&src=trend_click&vertical=trends

    When prophesies fail...

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Now they are blaming Larry Nassar for her failure.

    Why would you ever doubt that the HBD Mitten would figure prominently?

    I have been telling you guys for decades that Detriot was just a dry run. They are going to Detriotify you next.

  182. @Anonymous
    Yeah, no. The time to make that decision was 6 months ago. Another girl lost her spot to this narcissist.

    It is okay to be a conscientious objector to a war your government is fighting. It is not okay to enlist, get deployed, then decide mid gun battle that this just ain't really "your thing" and go AWOL. People get shot for desertion, justifiably.

    She could have changed her routine by substituting a simple handspring back tuck for whatever wild quadruple flip she had planned to show off with. That substitution would not be dangerous in the least for an athlete like that. Inexcusable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    But would an easy, safe pass score as many points for the team as letting the alternate do her best?

    People don’t know when they are going to get too old. It can happen suddenly.

  183. @Rosie
    @Clyde


    Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip.
     
    Quite. Gymnastics is particularly problematic over the long haul. I have a girlfriend who lives in constant pain because of it. It's not severe, miserable pain, but it does curtail her choices for physical activity. I suspect she is a great deal less healthy now than she would have been had she never done gymnastics.

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    I have made it a point to put my kids in lifetime sports that will keep you social and active for the rest of your life.

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Barnard, @Stan d Mute

    Besides that, I wonder how much of the opioid crisis has its roots in youth sports injuries.

    Not only youth sports, but also a lot of the jobs where men are unfairly paid more than women (because women aren’t crazy enough to accept the jobs mainly)..

  184. @PaceLaw
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, to be fair to Iron Mike, I believe his excuse was that Holyfield was using his head/headbutting him and that caused him to act out by biting off his ear. If you are a fan of boxing at all from the late 90s to early aughts, then you will recall that Holyfield’s head was a lethal weapon.
    https://youtu.be/v8y-dRy5NOM

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Lennox Lewis, who was no fan of Tyson, essentially said that Tyson had good reason to bite Holyfield who, as you pointed out, was a notorious cheater-by-headbutt. I also agree with Steve that Tyson’s decision was influenced by the fact that he was going to lose that fight, anyway.

    • Agree: PaceLaw
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @JimDandy

    I have a tendency to think (1) that people who are deeply involved and massively invested in very intensive and rather peculiar sports like Olympic female gymnastics and high-stakes men's heavyweight boxing might actually have an avenue of insight into certain types of intense experience (non-stop training from a pathologically young age, tyrannical and behaviorally manipulative coaches) that the rest of us don't experience --- pathways to insanity that we're not primed to understand as laymen, and so maybe we should give them a pass and admit that possibly they know a thing or two about their interior world that we don't.

    So this Simone person whom I've never really ever heard of before, sort of gets a complimentary pass in my book. Besides, she's probably surrounded with agents and handlers who are really calling all the shots for her.



    (1) Said a guy who has a long-standing personal vendetta against a 250-years-old dead composer.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  185. @anon
    Every year some unfortunate teenage girls end up getting paralyzed or even die during gymnastics practice:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTOBtPvnNGs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWK1tP8JsOA

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Every year some unfortunate teenage girls end up getting paralyzed or even die during gymnastics practice:

    And that’s exactly why we need to institute the Draft for women. Once all the pretty white girls are quadriplegic, at long last the colored girls will get white men who pay attention to their hair.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Stan d Mute

    ...When all you have is a hammer...

  186. @Morton's toes

    What’s not to like?
     
    I don't believe anybody knows the answer to this.

    1. it can be rough for beginners (like golf, like skiing; unlike billiards, unlike bowling). Maybe 50-100 hours before a person with average balance and reflexes and coordination does not feel like a spaz.

    2. professional women's tennis is unwatchable with the screeching and yelling and grunting. Muting the audio is required.

    3. the american men's pros are dreadful v. Djokovic, Federer & Nadal. In the hay day of tennis (the "boom") Conners and McEnroe and Evert were in the finals of the U. S. Open all the time. Lendl and Navratilova and Seles migrated here permanent.

    I love the sport but do not care much for the culture. I don't think this is anomalous though because I also do not care much for the culture of any other activity I participate in. Except for unz.com. Mr Unz is solid!

    Replies: @Rosie

    1. it can be rough for beginners (like golf, like skiing; unlike billiards, unlike bowling). Maybe 50-100 hours before a person with average balance and reflexes and coordination does not feel like a spaz.

    This seems rather easy to solve. Kids go on vacations to learn a sport (e.g. volleyball camp). Why not adults? Or the whole family for that matter?

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Rosie

    I somehow forgot Steffi Graf in my list of tennis big shots who emigrated to the United States. Back in the day when the United States was the center of the tennis universe which it has not even been close since Pete Sampras sailed off.

  187. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/06/08/00/29341028-8397361-image-m-52_1591572652095.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I had no idea Churchill was a “roust”. Whatever that is.

  188. @Paperback Writer
    Glad to see you are coming round.

    Gymnastics is a risky sport. Imagine hitting your head on one of those bars. Or landing wrong. You could end up a quadriplegic, like this girl:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    If she wasn't feeling 100%, she did the right thing.

    But - I think that the announcement was horribly handled. "Not fun"? They should have made a terse announcement that Biles wasn't fit to compete, and she should have made herself scarce.

    This entire episode fits into the current weakmindedness that SJW's valorize. But Biles had legitimate reasons to bow out.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Let’s cut to the chase with this theory.

    If she wasn’t feeling up to the task, then the proper thing to do would have been to state so plainly, apologize to the team and the fans, and retire gracefully.

    She did precisely none of that. She claimed it was a mental health issue and she tried to make herself into a suffering hero, and she has not announced she is leaving the sport.

    Why did she do that? You have stated that it was the media, coaches, and handlers pushing her to make certain statements, but there is no evidence supporting that other than your conjecture.

    On the other hand, there is ample circumstantial evidence suggesting that she is trying to parley her decreased ability to compete into a sinecure by latching onto the “mental health” cause célèbre. Not unlike Colin Kaepernick with his knee-taking and Prince Harry with his fake exposés of the royal family.

    If there is anything honorable or defensible in this, I fail to see it.

    • Troll: Paperback Writer
  189. @Gaspar DeLaFunk
    @Desiderius

    You'll notice those two young men who were so cruelly murdered do not have their names and faces plastered all over the evening news,with David Muir tearfully saluting them.
    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    The salted John Lewis claimed that people were yelling that at him (and spitting on him) as Nancy Pelosi led him past a Tea Party rally, but video showed it didn’t happen. Is there any evidence that the black Capitol police officer is telling the truth?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Harry Baldwin

    Not "salted," but "sainted."

  190. @JimDandy
    @PaceLaw

    Lennox Lewis, who was no fan of Tyson, essentially said that Tyson had good reason to bite Holyfield who, as you pointed out, was a notorious cheater-by-headbutt. I also agree with Steve that Tyson's decision was influenced by the fact that he was going to lose that fight, anyway.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I have a tendency to think (1) that people who are deeply involved and massively invested in very intensive and rather peculiar sports like Olympic female gymnastics and high-stakes men’s heavyweight boxing might actually have an avenue of insight into certain types of intense experience (non-stop training from a pathologically young age, tyrannical and behaviorally manipulative coaches) that the rest of us don’t experience — pathways to insanity that we’re not primed to understand as laymen, and so maybe we should give them a pass and admit that possibly they know a thing or two about their interior world that we don’t.

    So this Simone person whom I’ve never really ever heard of before, sort of gets a complimentary pass in my book. Besides, she’s probably surrounded with agents and handlers who are really calling all the shots for her.

    (1) Said a guy who has a long-standing personal vendetta against a 250-years-old dead composer.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    So this Simone person whom I’ve never really ever heard of before...


    K. Thx.

  191. @Harry Baldwin
    @Gaspar DeLaFunk

    We have to listen to a BLM DC cop crying that somebody called him n#[email protected]!

    The salted John Lewis claimed that people were yelling that at him (and spitting on him) as Nancy Pelosi led him past a Tea Party rally, but video showed it didn't happen. Is there any evidence that the black Capitol police officer is telling the truth?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Not “salted,” but “sainted.”

  192. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @JimDandy

    I have a tendency to think (1) that people who are deeply involved and massively invested in very intensive and rather peculiar sports like Olympic female gymnastics and high-stakes men's heavyweight boxing might actually have an avenue of insight into certain types of intense experience (non-stop training from a pathologically young age, tyrannical and behaviorally manipulative coaches) that the rest of us don't experience --- pathways to insanity that we're not primed to understand as laymen, and so maybe we should give them a pass and admit that possibly they know a thing or two about their interior world that we don't.

    So this Simone person whom I've never really ever heard of before, sort of gets a complimentary pass in my book. Besides, she's probably surrounded with agents and handlers who are really calling all the shots for her.



    (1) Said a guy who has a long-standing personal vendetta against a 250-years-old dead composer.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    So this Simone person whom I’ve never really ever heard of before

    K. Thx.

  193. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    "If I told you that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart once tried to kill me, you probably wouldn’t believe me, and yet it’s true."

    You must play the clarinet. Always secure that reed after you slobber all over it, amirite?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “You must play the clarinet.”

    I always love how naive the internet is.

    COMMENDATORE: Don Giovanni!
    A cenar teco,
    M’invitasti,
    E son venuto.

    DON: Non l’avrei giammai creduto,
    Ma faro quel che potro.
    Leporello! Una altra cena!
    Fa che subito si porti!

    LEPORELLO: Ah, padron, ah padron…
    Ah padron, siam tutti morti.

    DON: VANNE DICO!!!

    COMMENDATORE: Ferma, un po’.

  194. @Supply and Demand
    @Dave Pinsen

    “Discretion is the better part of Valor” were words written by a white man.

    Replies: @james wilson

    It could have been written by many a man routinely invoved in dangerous undertakings.

  195. @JimDandy
    @AndrewR

    It's amazing. If the American team had won the gold with her, it would have resulted in less approbation for Biles than she is getting for quitting. Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars. The days of Kerri Strug are long gone, and Biles statues will be popping up all over America.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Paperback Writer

    “Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars.”

    https://blindgossip.com/they-call-her-queen-b/

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Kylie

    That article is ludicrous - the implication that she was saving it up for the individuals has, obviously, been disproven. She didn't compete. Her (Asian) teammate won.

    It's so stupid (she pulled out of the team, but would compete in the individuals) is so dumb it's hard to believe anyone who reads a website dedicated to exploring human intelligence would subscribe to it.

  196. @Technite78
    @mmack

    Nikki Lauda pulled into the pits early in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix because he considered it too dangerous (due to heavy rain causing flooding of the track). It's entirely possible that he forfeited a Championship due to that decision; however he was still recovering from a horrific accident that nearly killed him and would leave him disfigured and requiring multiple surgeries. Very few people questioned his bravery given the situation.

    It's quite a sports story... reasonably well recounted in "Rush" (2013).

    Replies: @black sea, @mmack

    Nikki Lauda had balls the size of grapefruit.

    Six weeks after his horrific and near fatal crash, he was racing again. His wounds hadn’t yet properly healed, but he thought it best to get back to racing as soon as possible. There are some interesting interviews with him on YouTube. Very unusual guy.

  197. @anon
    OT?


    https://nypost.com/2021/07/27/olympic-medalist-hayden-wildes-ex-girlfriend-says-she-regrets-breakup/

    The one-time girlfriend of New Zealand triathlete Hayden Wilde made a bittersweet confession when the Olympian won the bronze medal on Sunday.“I regret breaking up with you,” the unnamed woman gushed to 1 News when asked about Wilde’s victory. “I’m so proud of Hayden, just like all the work he’s obviously done to get there, it’s just amazing.”
     

    “I went to primary school with him and he’s grown so much; and yeah, real proud,” she added.
     
    "Grown so much", wow, girl, what changed when he got that Bronze? lol, she wishes she could have been waiting for him at the finish line, in order to get busy with him ASAP. Unhappily this is how some girls wind up as a kind of Alpha widow.

    Anyway, obvious Red Pill truth on display at the Olympics.

    Replies: @Pericles

    She presumably broke up with him because he was just training, training, training all day long.

  198. @Roger
    Sample headlines:

    2020 Tokyo Olympics: Why Simone Biles withdrawing from team final is most courageous move she's ever landed

    Simone Biles is a role model for prioritizing her own mental health over an Olympic medal

    Replies: @Pericles

    I, too, have prioritized my own mental health over an Olympic medal. But no fawning headlines for me. Figures.

    However, are we sure her failure wasn’t an instance of witchcraft? #BlackGirlMagic

  199. @Clyde

    She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.
     
    Fear means afraid of getting hurt badly.
    If true for Simone Biles then perhaps she avoided an injury that would have screwed her up for the rest of her life. Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip. We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Rosie, @Paperback Writer, @Veteran Aryan

    permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip

    Or quadriplegic:

    On July 3, 1980, two weeks before the Moscow Olympics, Mukhina was practising the pass containing

    the Thomas salto when she under-rotated the salto, and crash-landed on her chin, snapping her spine and leaving her quadriplegic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    Two other girls have had accidents leaving them quadriplegic, to my knowledge. There may be more.

    Biles was 100% right. The team leadership that handled this has a collective IQ of 22. The Larry Nassar situation doesn’t seem so mysterious after all.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Paperback Writer


    On July 3, 1980, two weeks before the Moscow Olympics, Mukhina was practising the pass containing
    the Thomas salto when she under-rotated the salto, and crash-landed on her chin, snapping her spine and leaving her quadriplegic.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina
     
    What a sad story for Mukhina. How many girls below the Olympics level get seriously hurt doing gymnastics? By seriously I mean a neck, spine or a joint or a limb is ruined for life. Even girl's soccer gets lots of injuries every year. Particularly heading the ball

    Heading a soccer ball harms women more than men, study finds
    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/heading...
    Jul 31, 2018 · Heading a soccer ball nay damage the brains of women more than men, a new study using MRI finds. It may explain why female soccer players have more concussions.
     
  200. @follyofwar
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that's why many NFL players are quitting early. They know what happens to middle aged players who now suffer dementia or, like like Earl Campbell, now live in a wheel chair. Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @William Badwhite

    “Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier”.

    Any person is one horseback ride from paralysis–ask Christopher Reeve.

    Life’s a bitch.

  201. @EdwardM
    @Morton's toes

    No, Simone Biles is black so she is above criticism.

    Will any mainstream sports talk show host or columnist even mildly criticize her for her craven, selfish grandstanding?

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    I don’t pay attention to mainstream sports commentators — life’s too short – but people I agree with 99% on Twitter have made fools of themselves criticizing her. The comparisons with Tom Brady are especially idiotic.

    It lessens my respect for them. (Oh well, they’re all con artists, more or less, so no big loss.)

    But in the real world…it’s possible to keep your mouth shut once in a while. Or to reverse course, as Steve has done, when the facts warrant.

  202. @Technite78
    @mmack

    Nikki Lauda pulled into the pits early in the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix because he considered it too dangerous (due to heavy rain causing flooding of the track). It's entirely possible that he forfeited a Championship due to that decision; however he was still recovering from a horrific accident that nearly killed him and would leave him disfigured and requiring multiple surgeries. Very few people questioned his bravery given the situation.

    It's quite a sports story... reasonably well recounted in "Rush" (2013).

    Replies: @black sea, @mmack

    Yes, I remembered that story after I posted and added an update: https://www.unz.com/isteve/in-defense-of-simone-biles/#comment-4807287

    And Niki went on to win two more World Driving Championships (1977 and 1984).

  203. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    A few athletes succeed and become superstars. However, a FAR greater number injure themselves badly for life, and never attain much wealth or fame. Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds. That is the sad reality of competitive athletics.

     

    This is a good point. I also wonder how many Olympic-quality female athletes in sports such as gymnastics and swimming, even if they are never severely injured, ever regain anything resembling a normal physique.

    I was watching the highlights of one of the swimming events today, in which the winner was an Australian girl. Her shoulders were incredibly -- almost grotesquely -- broad, and her upper chest muscles bulged out like a male bodybuilder's, with no visible breasts at all.

    What are young women like this swimmer -- and gymnasts like Simone Biles -- doing to their bodies? It might be construed as being worth it if you win the Olympic gold, but what about the hundreds or thousands more like them, in each sport, around the world, who will never win or get famous?

    And that's not even mentioning the drugs . . . .

    Replies: @vhrm, @Anonymous

    Female swimmer shoulders recover to normal physique, readily. I used to see it in college with female swimmers in/out season. The body is more plastic with physique than you think.

  204. @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D

    You didn't get the point that Gamecock Jerry's wife was making.

    Maybe you should read a little before you shoot off your mouth about something you know nothing of.

    She's not a tennis player. She's not even a QB with an offensive line to protect her. She's just one person who could, if she misjudges, become crippled for life. Several top rank gymnasts have. Google it, Jack D. When gymnasts' minds get confused, they can get into accidents and become quadriplegic.

    How would that have looked? Not very good, and the team wouldn't have gotten any medal. And, do you really care about that gold medal? Nah, you don't. You just want to beat up on a black chick because you're enraged at all the rest of the shit that's going down. Newsflash: we all are, but not all of us have allowed the situation to drive us nuts, as it appears to have driven you nuts.

    Do you care that Katy Ledecky fucked up and came in fifth? No.

    You say she should have pulled out - you have no fucking clue what kind of pressure she was under to repeat. None whatever. If anything I think she gave it a game fight and realized she couldn't do it.

    It's not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled. The people who run our society think the rest of America is woke and it's not. They should have furnished a simple, graceful apology and bundled her off-stage. She stayed on the floor and said "it wasn't fun" because they told her to. How do I know this? Because I've worked in this field. The athletes are cattle. They do what they are told to do.


    Sure vaulting can be very dangerous but Biles has been doing this since she was a wee pickaninny.
     
    Stay classy.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s not her fault

    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Jack D

    They put Tyson in the penitentiary for date rape so there's one black swan. Also his ex-wife was on the cover of People magazine calling him a wife beater.

    Hmmmm. I think Mike Tyson might now be my favorite negro.

    https://static.toiimg.com/thumb/msid-77460625,imgsize-109659,width-400,resizemode-4/77460625.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D


    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

     

    Sure, troll. Lots of situations.

    But you cherrypicked from this:


    It’s not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled.
     
    I repeat: it's not her fault that OTHER PEOPLE did their jobs badly, misjudging what most normal people think. They should have said quite simply that Biles wasn't in a fit condition to compete, and removed her. Instead they played the woke "mental health" card and inadvertently undercut her.

    And BTW, Simone Biles isn't "black people" anymore than you are "Jewish people" and you're responsible for the shit Jonathan Greenblatt and Abraham Foxman say. Simone Biles is Simone Biles. She's responsible for herself, and she did the right thing.

    Literally everyone with any experience in this field is defending her decision. You're a hate-filled jackass.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  205. @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer


    It’s not her fault
     
    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Paperback Writer

    They put Tyson in the penitentiary for date rape so there’s one black swan. Also his ex-wife was on the cover of People magazine calling him a wife beater.

    Hmmmm. I think Mike Tyson might now be my favorite negro.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Morton's toes

    Ironically, Tyson actually was railroaded in both of those instances, albeit by fellow black people.

  206. @Steve Sailer
    @mmack

    John Fitch, the American racing partner of the guy who flew into the stands at the 24-hours of Le Mans in 1955 in their magnesium Mercedes and burned scores of spectators to death, had an incredibly constructive response to the catastrophe: he invented the Fitch Barrier system of trash cans filled with increasing amounts of sand in front of bridge abutments and other immovable barriers that have since saved thousand of lives.

    His ancestor, Jon Fitch, was one of the inventors of the steam ship.

    Replies: @mmack, @Jack D

    The deaths were not from burning magnesium. The Mercedes disintegrated and various pieces – the engine, the radiator, the front suspension, the hood, etc. each mowed thru the crowd for a swath of up to 100 yards and cut down rows of people.

    The magnesium rear section of the car landed on the embankment and the burning fuel tank did ignite the chassis, which showered the crowd with sparks and probably caused some injuries, but this is not what killed people. The French firemen, being unfamiliar with burning magnesium, poured water on the fire which only made it worse.

  207. @The Alarmist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    If Mozart tries to kill you in your dreams, do you wake up humming the melody of Symphony 40 in G minor?

     

    No, you hear the Second Movement (Andante) from Haydn’s Symphony 94 in G Major....


    https://youtu.be/TCzjfr5IkGI

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Nice.

  208. My South African Afrikaner wife was a fiercely competitive school gymnast back in the 80s and some idotarian of a sports surgeon saw fit to remove the cartilage from her knees after one of many sports injuries.

    She’s going to have to have knee replacements. She’s already had one hip replaced. She’s 57. She will have mobility problems when she’s a bit older.

    Her younger 52 year old sister who was a Springbok (SA national team) trampolinist has so many scars and from surgery due to broken bones it is shocking. She recently went to a new GP and he assumed she was in a long term abusive relationship. She played along with it for a bit and said ‘My husband says I just won’t listen’. This caused us all much mirth.

  209. @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer


    It’s not her fault
     
    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

    Replies: @Morton's toes, @Paperback Writer

    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

    Sure, troll. Lots of situations.

    But you cherrypicked from this:

    It’s not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled.

    I repeat: it’s not her fault that OTHER PEOPLE did their jobs badly, misjudging what most normal people think. They should have said quite simply that Biles wasn’t in a fit condition to compete, and removed her. Instead they played the woke “mental health” card and inadvertently undercut her.

    And BTW, Simone Biles isn’t “black people” anymore than you are “Jewish people” and you’re responsible for the shit Jonathan Greenblatt and Abraham Foxman say. Simone Biles is Simone Biles. She’s responsible for herself, and she did the right thing.

    Literally everyone with any experience in this field is defending her decision. You’re a hate-filled jackass.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Paperback Writer

    Give it up. She's not going to date you, man.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  210. It’s a good thing Biles doesn’t have this guy for a coach!

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/video/other/german-judo-athlete-is-slapped-by-coach-in-pre-fight-ritual/vi-AAMFE

    Most of the hardest hits to the head I ever took while playing high school football were the helmet-to-helmet shots we gave each other during the pregame warmup frenzy.

  211. @Paperback Writer
    @Clyde


    permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip
     
    Or quadriplegic:

    On July 3, 1980, two weeks before the Moscow Olympics, Mukhina was practising the pass containing

    the Thomas salto when she under-rotated the salto, and crash-landed on her chin, snapping her spine and leaving her quadriplegic.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    Two other girls have had accidents leaving them quadriplegic, to my knowledge. There may be more.

    Biles was 100% right. The team leadership that handled this has a collective IQ of 22. The Larry Nassar situation doesn't seem so mysterious after all.

    Replies: @Clyde

    On July 3, 1980, two weeks before the Moscow Olympics, Mukhina was practising the pass containing
    the Thomas salto when she under-rotated the salto, and crash-landed on her chin, snapping her spine and leaving her quadriplegic.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elena_Mukhina

    What a sad story for Mukhina. How many girls below the Olympics level get seriously hurt doing gymnastics? By seriously I mean a neck, spine or a joint or a limb is ruined for life. Even girl’s soccer gets lots of injuries every year. Particularly heading the ball

    Heading a soccer ball harms women more than men, study finds
    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/heading…
    Jul 31, 2018 · Heading a soccer ball nay damage the brains of women more than men, a new study using MRI finds. It may explain why female soccer players have more concussions.

  212. @Desiderius
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/hurricaneross/status/1420279987312148482?s=20

    Stressful trying to live up to people’s inflated because detached from reality expectations.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prime noticer, @Wilkey, @YetAnotherAnon

    “If you look at this tweet and think “Wait, how is this supposed to be a W?” then you might not be too far gone.”

    There’s a twitter account called “Shaniqua Posting Her Delusions”.

    @deludedshaniqwa

  213. @Clyde

    She said as you get older you start to fear the routines that when you were 16 you didn’t even think about.
     
    Fear means afraid of getting hurt badly.
    If true for Simone Biles then perhaps she avoided an injury that would have screwed her up for the rest of her life. Better not to win an Olympic medal than to suffer such an injury. Such as one that leaves you with a permanent limp or a broken, busted up ankle, knee or hip. We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Rosie, @Paperback Writer, @Veteran Aryan

    We saw the freak injury that happened to Conner Mcgregor two weeks ago.

    I’ve viewed that fight repeatedly, and I’m convinced that McGregor fractured his leg bones earlier in the fight while executing a leg kick. Just seconds before it folds over, McGregor executes another kick and you can see his ankle pop. Then, when he steps back on it, it folds over. But it was already broken, even though he denies that.

  214. @Stan d Mute
    @anon


    Every year some unfortunate teenage girls end up getting paralyzed or even die during gymnastics practice:
     
    And that’s exactly why we need to institute the Draft for women. Once all the pretty white girls are quadriplegic, at long last the colored girls will get white men who pay attention to their hair.

    Replies: @Truth

    …When all you have is a hammer…

  215. @Steve Sailer
    @Astorian

    Lots of pro golfers employs sports psychologists. The richest tend to employ an entourage of a psychologist, a swing coach, and a nutritionist, as well as a caddy. Tiger Woods got into his terrible accident recently because he's kind of a loner and like to drive himself, but also is a really bad driver.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    Tiger Woods got into his terrible accident recently because he’s kind of a loner and like to drive himself, but also is a really bad driver.

    Coming down the hill, he hit the median, bounced back to the outside of the curve, and accelerated off of the road. To me, that implies a little more than “bad driver.”

  216. @Morton's toes
    @Jack D

    They put Tyson in the penitentiary for date rape so there's one black swan. Also his ex-wife was on the cover of People magazine calling him a wife beater.

    Hmmmm. I think Mike Tyson might now be my favorite negro.

    https://static.toiimg.com/thumb/msid-77460625,imgsize-109659,width-400,resizemode-4/77460625.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Ironically, Tyson actually was railroaded in both of those instances, albeit by fellow black people.

  217. @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D


    Is there ANY situation in which black people have agency and what they do is actually their own fault?

     

    Sure, troll. Lots of situations.

    But you cherrypicked from this:


    It’s not her fault that the announcement was written by jackasses and the whole thing was badly handled.
     
    I repeat: it's not her fault that OTHER PEOPLE did their jobs badly, misjudging what most normal people think. They should have said quite simply that Biles wasn't in a fit condition to compete, and removed her. Instead they played the woke "mental health" card and inadvertently undercut her.

    And BTW, Simone Biles isn't "black people" anymore than you are "Jewish people" and you're responsible for the shit Jonathan Greenblatt and Abraham Foxman say. Simone Biles is Simone Biles. She's responsible for herself, and she did the right thing.

    Literally everyone with any experience in this field is defending her decision. You're a hate-filled jackass.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Give it up. She’s not going to date you, man.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @JimDandy

    Ya got there first, I see.

  218. @guest
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Adderall is illegal in Japan. I can’t imagine it would be impossible to smuggle some in for the sake of an Olympic athlete, but there is that.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Well if you’ve been on even a lowish dose of amphetamine for maybe a dozen years, IMHO taking that away may well affect your confidence.

  219. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Willie Mays started notably declining in his final season at age 42. In the World Series he fell down in the outfield and never played again.

    It's hard to tell how long you can keep going. It's crazy that Tom Brady wins a Super Bowl at 43, but age will come even for his pretty soon.

    What the media should have done with Biles is play up that the one-year delay in the Olympics had lowered her chances of repeating, so that it would be great thing if she could do triumph at age 24.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    A major problem for her might have been Japan’s traditional inflexibility for “black folk’s problems.”

    I don’t think adderall or Ritalin should be allowed in Olympic events. Can’t take drugs as a crutch for fundamental weakness. Mental toughness is an important criteria for Olympic athletes. Those drugs enhance mental focus for the average person, and make those who ordinarily couldn’t compete, competitive.

    Actually, I’d call it a no-brainer. If she can’t compete without focus-enhancing drugs, she shouldn’t have been there. She should be doing commercials for Adderall.

  220. @Rosie
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Imagine being in your early 20s and being a washed-up, ex-athlete who will spend the rest of his life on pain meds.
     
    It can be really hard not to get caught up in the competition when you believe your child has as much potential as the next kid. Thanks for reminding me what's at stake.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    True.

    My learning experience came a few years after the end of HS. I started meeting lots of former football players (from my HS) whose injuries had not healed with time. A lot of them had been told they’d have to live with their injuries for life. Some were still seeing therapists and getting surgeries.

    At that point, it gradually became clear the extent to which even competitive HS sports can be destructive to one’s body. Then I did more reading on the subject….

    For what it’s worth, I don’t think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.

    My above points mostly apply to the kids who over-train year-round. Always going to practices, games, private strength&skills coaches, travel teams, scouting events. If you’re more casual, I’d bet the probability of lifelong injuries is lower. Though the probability of an athletic scholarship is lower too.

    You’re damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

    If you don’t push your kids into intensive year-round athletics, you don’t get the athletic scholarship or opportunity to go pro. If you do, you have to deal with the potential for injuries.

    For what it’s worth, it’s only a fraction of highly competitive athletes who get hurt badly. The problem is that your odds of going pro are just so low that you might not be able to justify the decision, especially when you look at the time&money investment. It’s not just injuries that make sports a bad deal for many.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @JohnnyWalker123


    For what it’s worth, I don’t think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.
     
    It helps if you don't do the same sport year round. It's better for your body, and you get most of the same benefits you'd get from year-round training in one sport, i.e. letters of recommendation from coaches, friendships, health and physical confidence, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  221. @I, Libertine
    The comment moderation slowdown? Welcome to my world. My comments routinely await moderation for hours on end after dozens of of others are published. Someone really should explain how the system works. Have some of us proven to be so reckless as to warrant special scrutiny?

    Anyway, just last month, Simone Biles' brother was set free when his triple-murder trial ended in a court-ordered dismissal. A prior proceeding had ended in a mistrial; the star witness for the prosecution didn't show up for the second one. Maybe that circumstance contributed to her mental/emotional turmoil. I haven't heard it mentioned much.

    Replies: @I, Libertine, @Greta Handel

    Here’s the rub:

    The comment moderation slowdown? Welcome to my world. My comments routinely await moderation for hours on end after dozens of of others are published. Someone really should explain how the system works. Have some of us proven to be so reckless as to warrant special scrutiny?

    Well, all I can say is … don’t take it personally.

    Mr. Sailer, as we both know, will not explain this.

    • Thanks: I, Libertine
  222. @follyofwar
    @Clyde

    Perhaps that's why many NFL players are quitting early. They know what happens to middle aged players who now suffer dementia or, like like Earl Campbell, now live in a wheel chair. Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @William Badwhite

    Any NFL player is one hit away from paralysis. Ask Steeler linebacker Ryan Shazier.

    Generally true, but the risk can be greatly reduced. Shazier insisted on leading with the top of his head when he tackled – thus putting tremendous pressure on his spine. He had terrible fundamentals and paid a high price for it.

    There is a reason football coaches from a young age tell kids “see what you hit”.

  223. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Rosie

    True.

    My learning experience came a few years after the end of HS. I started meeting lots of former football players (from my HS) whose injuries had not healed with time. A lot of them had been told they'd have to live with their injuries for life. Some were still seeing therapists and getting surgeries.

    At that point, it gradually became clear the extent to which even competitive HS sports can be destructive to one's body. Then I did more reading on the subject....

    For what it's worth, I don't think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.

    My above points mostly apply to the kids who over-train year-round. Always going to practices, games, private strength&skills coaches, travel teams, scouting events. If you're more casual, I'd bet the probability of lifelong injuries is lower. Though the probability of an athletic scholarship is lower too.

    You're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    If you don't push your kids into intensive year-round athletics, you don't get the athletic scholarship or opportunity to go pro. If you do, you have to deal with the potential for injuries.

    For what it's worth, it's only a fraction of highly competitive athletes who get hurt badly. The problem is that your odds of going pro are just so low that you might not be able to justify the decision, especially when you look at the time&money investment. It's not just injuries that make sports a bad deal for many.

    Replies: @Rosie

    For what it’s worth, I don’t think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.

    It helps if you don’t do the same sport year round. It’s better for your body, and you get most of the same benefits you’d get from year-round training in one sport, i.e. letters of recommendation from coaches, friendships, health and physical confidence, etc.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Rosie

    Yeah. If you play different sports throughout the year, that's probably healthier. From my experience, the athletes most likely to be seriously injured are either playing year-round (like baseball players with the travel teams) or participating in a very brutal sport (football, wrestling, hockey).

    College admissions are really competitive these days. So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university. For example, I know a family that trained their daughter to be a Crew coxswain since she was in junior high. She was able to use that to get into an Ivy League university. That's a huge reason why parents like to train their kids on a year-round schedule.

    Also, pro sports recruiting scouts are increasingly expecting young people to demonstrate athletic potential at a young age. If you're not able to push your kid to his physical ceiling during his teen years, he might not even get the chance to enter the draft. Meanwhile, your kid will be competing against other kids who were training at a young age and, therefore, outclass him.

    A lot of what affluent parents are doing these days is basically zero-sum competitions that help their children, but make society worse off. Like pushing a kid to start SAT prep at age 13.

    Replies: @Rosie, @black sea

  224. @Rosie
    @JohnnyWalker123


    For what it’s worth, I don’t think your kids should quit sports. Far from it.
     
    It helps if you don't do the same sport year round. It's better for your body, and you get most of the same benefits you'd get from year-round training in one sport, i.e. letters of recommendation from coaches, friendships, health and physical confidence, etc.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Yeah. If you play different sports throughout the year, that’s probably healthier. From my experience, the athletes most likely to be seriously injured are either playing year-round (like baseball players with the travel teams) or participating in a very brutal sport (football, wrestling, hockey).

    College admissions are really competitive these days. So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university. For example, I know a family that trained their daughter to be a Crew coxswain since she was in junior high. She was able to use that to get into an Ivy League university. That’s a huge reason why parents like to train their kids on a year-round schedule.

    Also, pro sports recruiting scouts are increasingly expecting young people to demonstrate athletic potential at a young age. If you’re not able to push your kid to his physical ceiling during his teen years, he might not even get the chance to enter the draft. Meanwhile, your kid will be competing against other kids who were training at a young age and, therefore, outclass him.

    A lot of what affluent parents are doing these days is basically zero-sum competitions that help their children, but make society worse off. Like pushing a kid to start SAT prep at age 13.

    • Agree: Rosie
    • Replies: @Rosie
    @JohnnyWalker123


    but make society worse off.
     
    And destroy childhood, which is short enough as it is!
    , @black sea
    @JohnnyWalker123


    So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university.
     
    They'd be much better off simply urging their kid to get a part-time job in high school and save for college. Much higher probability of success. Plus, innate talent is a great discriminator. In high school a friend of mine was one of the best basketball players in the state, and was offered a scholarship at UNC, among other schools. He didn't talk about basketball much; he wasn't the type of kid to spend his every waking moment at the gym; and I don't think basketball was really anything more than a hobby for him.

    Anyway, he ultimately chose the Naval Academy over UNC.
  225. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Rosie

    Yeah. If you play different sports throughout the year, that's probably healthier. From my experience, the athletes most likely to be seriously injured are either playing year-round (like baseball players with the travel teams) or participating in a very brutal sport (football, wrestling, hockey).

    College admissions are really competitive these days. So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university. For example, I know a family that trained their daughter to be a Crew coxswain since she was in junior high. She was able to use that to get into an Ivy League university. That's a huge reason why parents like to train their kids on a year-round schedule.

    Also, pro sports recruiting scouts are increasingly expecting young people to demonstrate athletic potential at a young age. If you're not able to push your kid to his physical ceiling during his teen years, he might not even get the chance to enter the draft. Meanwhile, your kid will be competing against other kids who were training at a young age and, therefore, outclass him.

    A lot of what affluent parents are doing these days is basically zero-sum competitions that help their children, but make society worse off. Like pushing a kid to start SAT prep at age 13.

    Replies: @Rosie, @black sea

    but make society worse off.

    And destroy childhood, which is short enough as it is!

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  226. @Anon
    @Dave Pinsen

    In fairness, we don’t know what psychic scars were left by digital vaginal/anal rape by Larry Nassar and how inextricably tied they are to Olympic hopes and dreams. Nassar’s sexually assaults became more brazen at championship and Olympic competitions. McKayla Maroney was especially targeted by Nassar and said when talking about it: “I question if my gymnastics career was really worth it because of the stuff I'm dealing with now.”

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/simone-biles-speaks-larry-nassar-140756388.html

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/women-describe-sexually-abused-larry-nassar-article-1.3763038

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    What’s with these girls letting Nassar get away with this for so many years? They or their parents didn’t have the courage to report him or go public if their accusations were summarily dismissed? None of them asked to have a chaperon during their exams or treatments? It seems like it must have taken the passivity of scores of young women and their parents for him to get away with what he did for so long.

  227. @AndrewR
    I doubt anyone really cares that she made this choice. But the horde of female journalists applauding her is really bizarre. At least one said that this was more impressive than winning gold medals.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Thoughts, @Up2Drew, @JimDandy, @the one they call Desanex, @Publius 2

    The women of our society, collectively, need to be told to shut up.

    No jobs for white men.

  228. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Rosie

    Yeah. If you play different sports throughout the year, that's probably healthier. From my experience, the athletes most likely to be seriously injured are either playing year-round (like baseball players with the travel teams) or participating in a very brutal sport (football, wrestling, hockey).

    College admissions are really competitive these days. So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university. For example, I know a family that trained their daughter to be a Crew coxswain since she was in junior high. She was able to use that to get into an Ivy League university. That's a huge reason why parents like to train their kids on a year-round schedule.

    Also, pro sports recruiting scouts are increasingly expecting young people to demonstrate athletic potential at a young age. If you're not able to push your kid to his physical ceiling during his teen years, he might not even get the chance to enter the draft. Meanwhile, your kid will be competing against other kids who were training at a young age and, therefore, outclass him.

    A lot of what affluent parents are doing these days is basically zero-sum competitions that help their children, but make society worse off. Like pushing a kid to start SAT prep at age 13.

    Replies: @Rosie, @black sea

    So lots of parents figure if they get their kid to specialize in a particular athletic position, they can ride that into a good university.

    They’d be much better off simply urging their kid to get a part-time job in high school and save for college. Much higher probability of success. Plus, innate talent is a great discriminator. In high school a friend of mine was one of the best basketball players in the state, and was offered a scholarship at UNC, among other schools. He didn’t talk about basketball much; he wasn’t the type of kid to spend his every waking moment at the gym; and I don’t think basketball was really anything more than a hobby for him.

    Anyway, he ultimately chose the Naval Academy over UNC.

  229. @Rosie
    @Morton's toes


    1. it can be rough for beginners (like golf, like skiing; unlike billiards, unlike bowling). Maybe 50-100 hours before a person with average balance and reflexes and coordination does not feel like a spaz.
     
    This seems rather easy to solve. Kids go on vacations to learn a sport (e.g. volleyball camp). Why not adults? Or the whole family for that matter?

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    I somehow forgot Steffi Graf in my list of tennis big shots who emigrated to the United States. Back in the day when the United States was the center of the tennis universe which it has not even been close since Pete Sampras sailed off.

  230. @JimDandy
    @Paperback Writer

    Give it up. She's not going to date you, man.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Ya got there first, I see.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  231. @JimDandy
    @AndrewR

    It's amazing. If the American team had won the gold with her, it would have resulted in less approbation for Biles than she is getting for quitting. Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars. The days of Kerri Strug are long gone, and Biles statues will be popping up all over America.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Paperback Writer

    You seem obsessed with her. What’s up with that?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Paperback Writer

    Haha! Says the guy who pens lengthy, passionate screeds defending her honor. I'm obsessed with the cult of black infallibility. You're obsessed with Biles. Don't get confused.

  232. @Kylie
    @JimDandy

    "Her teammates reportedly hate her, consider her an attention-sucking diva, and say she did it do focus on individual events and sponsor dollars."

    https://blindgossip.com/they-call-her-queen-b/

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    That article is ludicrous – the implication that she was saving it up for the individuals has, obviously, been disproven. She didn’t compete. Her (Asian) teammate won.

    It’s so stupid (she pulled out of the team, but would compete in the individuals) is so dumb it’s hard to believe anyone who reads a website dedicated to exploring human intelligence would subscribe to it.

  233. @Paperback Writer
    @JimDandy

    You seem obsessed with her. What's up with that?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Haha! Says the guy who pens lengthy, passionate screeds defending her honor. I’m obsessed with the cult of black infallibility. You’re obsessed with Biles. Don’t get confused.

    • Troll: Paperback Writer
  234. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Thoughts


    My previous comments being said…

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them…Encourages their Narcissim…Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media…Which Knows About Biles’ predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

     

    Isn't there always a fresh All-American cherub in gymnastics that the Press hypes going into every Summer Olympics who is destined for the Wheaties box? It's a natural thing since the fraction of people who care to know anything about competitive gymnastics save for a few weeks every four years is infinitesimal, so the Press - and particularly the networks covering the games - have free reign to do some pre-games marketing of their television product by having in-depth soft focus pieces about the gold medal hopeful.

    It's just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so "All-American" now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something. (You suspect their parents might vote Republican) Biles, by contrast, was raised by her grandfather and his wife after being abandoned by her parents and is therefore a victim of white supremacist America - she's overcome that, so she is more interesting and deserving. The Olympics is a sort of orgy of nationalism, and nationalism for the legacy American population is verboten, but a new nationalism under DIE is normative - Biles is a BLACK GIRL first, a member of the Black nation, and the USA on the leotard is an incidental formality necessitated by circumstance.

    The interesting thing of note that Steve is commenting on via twitter is that it seems that the burden of having to represent the fortunes of magic Americans probably weighed heavier on Biles than the burden of representing the United States.

    Replies: @keypusher, @Paperback Writer

    It’s just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so “All-American” now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something.

    Biles was the most amazing gymnast I ever saw. I remember watching a few years ago, being impressed by the others, and then she’d do her thing and it was like she was from a different planet. She’d be a megastar if she was black, white, or purple.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @keypusher

    Watch out, keypusher, Jim Dandy may come for your hide.

  235. @keypusher
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)


    It’s just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so “All-American” now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something.
     
    Biles was the most amazing gymnast I ever saw. I remember watching a few years ago, being impressed by the others, and then she'd do her thing and it was like she was from a different planet. She'd be a megastar if she was black, white, or purple.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Watch out, keypusher, Jim Dandy may come for your hide.

  236. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Thoughts


    My previous comments being said…

    There is a problem with the Media Hyping these Girls.

    The Media Hypes them…Encourages their Narcissim…Feeds their Natural Psychopathy (cuz media bosses know what they are dealing with with blacks)

    All with the Full Knowledge of a Win Win Situation

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ===> if she wins use it as an example of Blacks Are Better than Whites

    Feed Biles Narc Personality ====> if she drops out like a coward, this helps feed white rage from people like me which in turn allows the Media to call Whites Racist

    The Root Problem is the Media…Which Knows About Biles’ predilection for Narcissim and Feeds It

     

    Isn't there always a fresh All-American cherub in gymnastics that the Press hypes going into every Summer Olympics who is destined for the Wheaties box? It's a natural thing since the fraction of people who care to know anything about competitive gymnastics save for a few weeks every four years is infinitesimal, so the Press - and particularly the networks covering the games - have free reign to do some pre-games marketing of their television product by having in-depth soft focus pieces about the gold medal hopeful.

    It's just that in current year, the producers of this stuff are bugmen and bugwomen, so "All-American" now has to match their conception of the emergent demographic majority of the USA in which black girls are *magic* and definitely morally and physically superior to the past gymnastics medal winners who were blonde midgets from Iowa from intact families or something. (You suspect their parents might vote Republican) Biles, by contrast, was raised by her grandfather and his wife after being abandoned by her parents and is therefore a victim of white supremacist America - she's overcome that, so she is more interesting and deserving. The Olympics is a sort of orgy of nationalism, and nationalism for the legacy American population is verboten, but a new nationalism under DIE is normative - Biles is a BLACK GIRL first, a member of the Black nation, and the USA on the leotard is an incidental formality necessitated by circumstance.

    The interesting thing of note that Steve is commenting on via twitter is that it seems that the burden of having to represent the fortunes of magic Americans probably weighed heavier on Biles than the burden of representing the United States.

    Replies: @keypusher, @Paperback Writer

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayre%27s_law

    “In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake.” By way of corollary, it adds: “That is why academic politics are so bitter.”

  237. I’m betting she makes a miraculous recovery, participates in the floor event, will be awarded the gold medal as required, and then the woke culture and media will go paroxysmal.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon

    Basically accurate, except it was the bronze, and in a different event. But still it is...historic!! Brave! I assume the judges were directed to give her a medal.

  238. @Anon
    I'm betting she makes a miraculous recovery, participates in the floor event, will be awarded the gold medal as required, and then the woke culture and media will go paroxysmal.

    Replies: @Anon

    Basically accurate, except it was the bronze, and in a different event. But still it is…historic!! Brave! I assume the judges were directed to give her a medal.

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How America was neoconned into World War IV
The JFK Assassination and the 9/11 Attacks?
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement