The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Implicit Bias and African Witchcraft
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times:

We’re All a Little Biased, Even if We Don’t Know It
Emily Badger OCT. 5, 2016

One of the newest chew toys in the presidential campaign is “implicit bias,” a term Mike Pence repeatedly took exception to in the vice-presidential debate on Tuesday.

Police officers hear all this badmouthing, said Mr. Pence, Donald J. Trump’s running mate, in response to a question about whether society demands too much of law enforcement. They hear politicians painting them with one broad brush, with disdain, with automatic cries of implicit bias. He criticized Hillary Clinton for saying, in the first presidential debate, that everyone experiences implicit bias. He suggested a black police officer who shoots a black civilian could not logically experience such bias.

“Senator, please,” Mr. Pence said, addressing his Democratic opponent, Tim Kaine, “enough of this seeking every opportunity to demean law enforcement broadly by making the accusation of implicit bias every time tragedy occurs.”

The concept, in his words, came across as an insult, a put-down on par with branding police as racists. Many Americans may hear it as academic code for “racist.”

Science!

But that connotation does not line up with scientific research on what implicit bias is and how it really operates.

Researchers in this growing field say it isn’t just white police officers, but all of us, who have biases that are subconscious, hidden even to ourselves.

Implicit bias is the mind’s way of making uncontrolled and automatic associations between two concepts very quickly. In many forms, implicit bias is a healthy human adaptation — it’s among the mental tools that help you mindlessly navigate your commute each morning. It crops up in contexts far beyond policing and race (if you make the rote assumption that fruit stands have fresher produce, that’s implicit bias). But the same process can also take the form of unconsciously associating certain identities, like African-American, with undesirable attributes, like violence.

The science of how this submerged bias affects your actions is still a work in progress; studies have found a link between the biases and specific actions in some situations but not others. But because this bias is a function of universal human psychology, researchers say, we all experience it — and you can’t exactly get “rid” of it.

Well-intentioned people may also hold implicit biases that run counter to their stated values. That’s why it’s hard to square Mr. Pence’s description with the science. To broach implicit bias isn’t to impugn someone’s values; it’s to recognize that our values compete on an unconscious level with all the stereotypes we absorb from the world around us. And even black police officers aren’t immune to internalizing them.

“These types of cultural biases are like smog in the air,” Jennifer Richeson, a Yale psychologist, wrote in an email, citing an analogy often used by a former president of Spelman College, Beverly Daniel Tatum. “To live and grow up in our culture, then, is to ‘take in’ these cultural messages and biases and do so largely unconsciously.”

In the context of race, implicit bias is considered a particularly important idea because it acknowledges forces beyond bigotry that perpetuate inequality. If we talk less about it, as Mr. Pence suggested — this “really has got to stop,” he said Tuesday night — we lose vocabulary that allows us to confront racial disparities without focusing on the character of individual people.

“You’re removing the language that allows you talk about the mechanism of inequality,” said Phillip Atiba Goff, the president of the Center for Policing Equity at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a professor there. “If you take away that language, what that means is inequality gets stronger and justice gets weaker. It really gets that serious.”

We’ve certainly taken away the ability to talk about inequality in propensity for violence. The hatefacts simply don’t come up in the article. I wouldn’t be surprised if they never came up in Ms. Badger’s brain.

My new column in Taki’s, “From Orwell to Gladwell and Back,” discusses how controlling vocabulary helps control thought.

In police training, Mr. Goff has watched officers using other kinds of mental shortcuts in which they assume “active shooters” must be men.

Okay.

The challenge, he argues, isn’t to eliminate biases, but to try to interrupt them so we can act more often in ways that line up with our values. Researchers, though, still have a lot to learn about how to do that. …

For now, laboratory simulations don’t easily translate to the real world, and it’s hard to convert beliefs into behaviors. It’s unclear how well nascent police training programs work. And police officers are not the only ones facing implicit-bias training — this fall, the home-sharing company Airbnb announced it planned to offer such a program to its hosts. It’s not clear that will work, either.

Tony Greenwald, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, said training can even backfire, as a result of another tendency we have: People who attend programs like these may falsely believe they’ve rooted out their biases and so don’t need to worry about them any more.

“Just wanting to eliminate implicit bias is not sufficient,” Mr. Greenwald said. “You can’t unlearn implicit biases. We live in a society and culture where the influences that create these are so strong and pervasive, that we’re not going to get rid of those influences in any short period.”

The late anthropologist Henry Harpending studied during his years in the African bush the widespread belief in Africa in witchcraft and evil spells.

On his West Hunter blog, Henry observed how the most distinctively African aspect of the widespread belief in witchcraft is that a rival can project malevolent forces vast distances against you without his even consciously willing it:

A colleague pointed out a few weeks ago, after hearing this story, that if [a belief in witchcraft] is nearly pan-African then perhaps some of it came to the New World. Prominent and not so prominent talkers from the American Black population come out with similar theories of vague and invisible forces that are oppressing people, like “institutional racism” and “white privilege.”

Our intellectual discourse has been Africanized enough that the Democratic nominee in the current year is running against the evil spell menace of “implicit bias” and “systemic racism.”

 
Hide 121 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Folk magic and the occult aren’t very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America. “Implicit bias” and “systemic racism” aren’t examples of magic and witchcraft per se, but examples of an attempt to monopolize magic and the supernatural, like Catholicism or modern science.

    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @Anonymous

    Yes. I once read a complete & thorough demolition of the African origins of black slave customs. Many of them came from rural England. They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR. It was in a magazine article Before Internet, so no URL.

    Thanks to the edit feature, I found one example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_the_broom

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Bill

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    "Folk magic and the occult aren’t very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America."

    That doesn't mean that africans didn't also bring their own superstitions with them.

    , @Antonymous
    @Anonymous

    "[African American] Folk magic and the occult aren’t very remote or due to African influence. "

    Sure they're not. Look up voodoo and santeria - the origins are West Indies, a.k.a. west African slave culture. Bantu animism, evil eye, and animal sacrifice are African traditions brought by slaves, then given a semi-Christian overlay. Can you find any evidence of pentagrams and Victorian occultism in voodoo? That's more your wiccans, pagans, and Anton Levay types.

  2. I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    “Implicit bias” is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    “Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?”

    “What implicit bias? I’m not a racist.”

    “I’m sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it.”

    “So — I have implicit bias?!”

    “Yes.”

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There’s more, I will return to the topic …..

    • Replies: @Jim Sweeney
    @SPMoore8

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    , @boogerbently
    @SPMoore8

    "Researchers in this growing field say it isn’t just white police officers, but all of us, who have biases that are subconscious, hidden even to ourselves."

    Sort of like that subtle, barely noticeable, BLM slogan: "Kill All Whites" ??

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SPMoore8


    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that…
     
    Renny Descartes was a drunken fart:
    "I drink, therefore I am."


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_f_p0CgPeyA
    , @stillCARealist
    @SPMoore8

    What does the term "coeds" actually mean? Is is just "female students"? Maybe it just means "girls".

    I don't know how implicit bias and louche behavior intersect, but "bed coeds" is a phrase that needs to be erased from your grown-up, grandfatherly, well-educated vocabulary. It demeans both men and women.

    Replies: @guest, @No_0ne

    , @Anonymous
    @SPMoore8

    Having some familiarity with Philosophy and its Ethics branch, I would be interested in understanding better what your friend meant. I'm not quite able to grasp it from your examples. Could you elaborate on his viewpoint? Did he offer some examples.

    Replies: @Abe

    , @WowJustWow
    @SPMoore8

    The kafkatrap comes in many insidious forms: http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=2122

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @res

    , @thinkingabout it
    @SPMoore8

    Come on. It's blatantly obvious this inherent bias which negatively affects you, which happened without your knowledge, is just modernized secularized original sin.

    Such a hideous concept.

    Replies: @SPMoore8

  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Our intellectual discourse has been Africanized enough that the Democratic nominee in the current year is running against the evil spell menace of “implicit bias” and “systemic racism.”

    Incidentally, it’s not just Hillary with this magical or occult connection. As you’ve blogged about, Trump was strongly influenced by “The Power of Positive Thinking”, which is based on occult magic. Mitch Horowitz wrote a fantastic cultural history on “Occult America” that’s worth checking out:

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for posting that video. Horowitz seems to have written the book I have been hoping someone had written. Smart guy too.

  4. Dirk Dagger [AKA "oarsman:regatta"] says: • Website

    Hate-facts is hate-facts is hate-facts. Get it?

    The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case of Duane Buck, a convicted Texas murderer sentenced to die after a psychologist testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black.

    Buck shot and killed his ex-girlfriend in front of her three children while she begged for her life. He killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and he shot his own stepsister, Phyllis Taylor, who survived the horrific night.

    Taylor was at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, supporting Buck’s attempt to win a new sentencing hearing. “I pray that it be converted to life,” she said, “because I know who he is, and on that particular day, he was under the influence of drugs.”

    To sentence a defendant to death under Texas law, a jury must unanimously agree that the defendant poses a future danger. In this case, Buck’s own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck was generally not violent, but that he was more likely to commit violent acts in the future because he is black.

    Supreme Court Hears ‘Indefensible’ Death Penalty Case Where Race Linked To Violence – Nina Totenbeg, NPR

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dirk Dagger


    Buck’s own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano,
     
    Didn't his li'l sis monitor a debate recently?
    , @BenKenobi
    @Dirk Dagger

    The reverse psychology defense!

    "Your Honour, my client must be locked up because his black skin guarantees he will reoffend!"

    "Not guilty!"

    , @Wilmingtonian
    @Dirk Dagger

    Guess the identity of the Supreme Court justice who thinks that the fact that the defendant's own lawyer introduced the hate-concept makes it even more obvious that the defendant shouldn't swing. Yes, that's right, it's the sometime dean of Harvard Law School, Elena Kagan.

    Gotta love the Mutt-and-Jeff quality of the abolition-of-capital-punishment bar/lobby. "You can't execute this man, somebody told a jury of stump-toothed inbred Texas rednecks that he's a danger to the public because he's black!" "Yes, his own expert psychological witness, hired by his own lawyer, did." "But that makes it even worse! Even idiot hillbillies know the prosecutor is probably exaggerating the murderer's future dangerousness, but if the defense does it, they're going to lap it up!" Um.

    Also, neither the prog media accounts nor the briefs to the Supreme Court seem to have anything to say about the racial composition of the jury. The crime and the trial took place in that notorious white-supremacist redoubt, Houston. Gonna go out on a limb and guess this wasn't the proverbial "all-white jury" conspiring at the lynching.

  5. OT: I was listening to Sam Harris’ podcast today where he talks about political correctness. He is a liberal who has had some scrapes with SJWs and Salon-types over his views on Islam. Anyway he was talking about racism and PC for an hour and he mentioned the bell curve. He said he hadn’t read it even though he has a Ph.D in neuroscience. He made the point about some knowledge not being worth having, and so he didn’t really bother. He clearly hadn’t thought about it too much. I think his views are indicative of a lot of well educated people. It’s unfortunate that he hadn’t even really considered about the occamite explanation for stereotypes and racial inequality.

    • Replies: @Emblematic
    @anon930

    Are we saying occamite now?

    , @biz
    @anon930

    It is an understatement to say that Sam Harris has had "some scrapes" with SJWs and Salon. Rather they have been hounding him for several years now, sending death threats, etc. It has completely dominated his life. Harris has transitioned from someone who is mostly concerned with the future of AI and other neuroscience issues to someone who is mostly concerned with the scourge of PC and what he calls the Regressive Left. Harris has even started to push back against BLM which led to an extremely rude encounter with comedian Hannibal Burress.

    I think Harris' trajectory is a preview of what will happen to many scientifically-minded people, who were liberals by default because conservatives embraced anti-intellectual nonsense like creationism and climate denial for so long, but now that liberals are being insane and directly threatening the exercise of thought itself these people will break from liberalism.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @anon930

    , @SMK
    @anon930

    Sam Harris, arguably the world's sanest liberal, is excoriated as a "bigot" and 'racist" for telling the truth about Islam, i.e., the problem is the nature of Islam per se, the fundamental tenets of the Koran and other sacred texts, including the doctrine of Jihad, as espoused by the prophet and a majority of Muslims today and over the last 14 centuries, not the "perversion" of a "religion of peace" (George W. Bush) by a tiny fraction of "extremisst" and "radicals" who commit acts of terrorism and violence that most Muslims condemn and repudiate. If only Republicans and "truconservatives" were as honest and realistic and courageous.

    In response to such aspersions, he can say that "Islam is a religion, not a race," as did Richard Dawkins. But they will never tell the truth about race even if they cryptically believe the races are inherently different is respect to average intelligence, etc.

    Replies: @biz

  6. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @Jim Sweeney

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    I'm glad you asked me that question, since it ties into our deleted discussion of gaslighting yesterday.

    "Gaslighting" connotes an attempt to drive someone insane by manipulating the physical environment, as in the film Gaslight in 1944, however I have seen it in many other contexts as well, for example, several Perry Mason episodes.

    However, in the abstract, "Gaslighting" represents an attempt by one party (e.g., a man) to dictate the nature of reality to another (e.g., a woman). Thus, in this scenario, the man has the football and gets to tell the woman what reality is. So, for example, if a woman refuses to sleep with a man, then he gets to tell her that she has a problem, and of course she wants to understand what her problem is, and finally he concedes to sleeping with her in order to show her what her problem is, and so on. It seems to me that this remains a popular gambit among certain types. Thus manipulation, "guilt trips", and "head games" all fall under the general rubric.

    However, "gaslighting", because of the abstraction, is now applied to almost any male female interaction, thus, a man explaining anything to a woman is "mansplaining" or even "gaslighting", while any attempt or success, by a man, at making a woman feel guilty, inadequate, at fault, to blame, etc. is construed as "gaslighting", as well as virtually any criticism. Also "gaslighting" has been expanded to encompass any and all forms of deceit (thus, any reality-based response to the query "Do I look fat in this?" is intrinsically "gaslighting") and, in the opinion of some, any disagreement with a woman can also be included.

    Thus the term is becoming so expansive as to be meaningless.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  7. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    “Researchers in this growing field say it isn’t just white police officers, but all of us, who have biases that are subconscious, hidden even to ourselves.”

    Sort of like that subtle, barely noticeable, BLM slogan: “Kill All Whites” ??

  8. The war on noticing has now become supernatural…

  9. Implicit bias is the newest way lefties try to explain the fact that black law enforcement officers aren’t any kinder or gentler with potentially violent black suspects than white ones. It’s just something in the atmosphere that makes them act like racist whites, not that that black officers actually know anything about criminal blacks that gives them a good reason to be on guard when out on the streets.

  10. Implying the belief in ‘witchcraft’ is some foreign African influence makes me chuckle. It’s a like day-old vegetarian claiming they never ate meat.

  11. I don’t have an implicit bias problem at all.

    I’m explicitly biased…

    • Replies: @Michelle
    @Dr. X

    That reminds me of my dear departed Grandma saying that she did not care for Blacks as a race, but liked them as individuals. "All my prejudices are learned", she used to say.

  12. @anon930
    OT: I was listening to Sam Harris' podcast today where he talks about political correctness. He is a liberal who has had some scrapes with SJWs and Salon-types over his views on Islam. Anyway he was talking about racism and PC for an hour and he mentioned the bell curve. He said he hadn't read it even though he has a Ph.D in neuroscience. He made the point about some knowledge not being worth having, and so he didn't really bother. He clearly hadn't thought about it too much. I think his views are indicative of a lot of well educated people. It's unfortunate that he hadn't even really considered about the occamite explanation for stereotypes and racial inequality.

    Replies: @Emblematic, @biz, @SMK

    Are we saying occamite now?

  13. @Anonymous
    Folk magic and the occult aren't very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America. "Implicit bias" and "systemic racism" aren't examples of magic and witchcraft per se, but examples of an attempt to monopolize magic and the supernatural, like Catholicism or modern science.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEaqL6OyCX4

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Mr. Anon, @Antonymous

    Yes. I once read a complete & thorough demolition of the African origins of black slave customs. Many of them came from rural England. They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR. It was in a magazine article Before Internet, so no URL.

    Thanks to the edit feature, I found one example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_the_broom

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @WhatEvvs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunning_folk_in_Britain


    The cunning folk in Britain were professional or semi-professional practitioners of magic in Britain, active from the Medieval period through to the early twentieth century. As cunning folk, they practised folk magic – also known as "low magic" – although often combined with elements of "high" or ceremonial magic, which they learned through the study of grimoires.[1] Primarily using spells and charms as a part of their profession, they were most commonly employed to use their magic in order to combat malevolent witchcraft, to locate criminals, missing persons or stolen property, for fortune telling, for healing, for treasure hunting and to influence people to fall in love.
     
    , @Bill
    @WhatEvvs


    They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR.
     
    Probably because they didn't have Purell.
  14. Prominent and not so prominent talkers from the American Black population come out with similar theories of vague and invisible forces that are oppressing people, like “institutional racism” and “white privilege.”
    —–
    I don’t know if the belief in these all pervasive forces are a form of traditional sub-saharan african belief. ”Implicit bias” is some kin of socio-natural substance that permeates the universe. It can act through “bodies”. The person being acted through is not necessarily responsible for the harm. At least that’s how the kinder, gentler progressive phlogistonologists describe that elusive but pervasive substance and the way it acts on people, err bodies.

    The sub-saharan explanation for evil is that actual people are actively doing something to harm other actual people. The evil doers are very often close family members. Caribbeans and black africans know exactly what I’m talking about here.

    It seems to me that african-americans have had that particular sub-saharan cultural baggage excised out of them. Is it typical for a black american to blame their problems on their aunt or uncle or cousin or even little sister engaging in witchcraft ?

  15. Our intellectual discourse has been Africanized enough that the Democratic nominee in the current year is running against the evil spell menace of “implicit bias” and “systemic racism.”
    —–
    But feminists in this current_year and beyond have railed against “male gaze”, “institutional sexism”, “structural transmisogyny” and the like for ages.

    Africanization of the political discourse would be more like “white people kill young black men to do magic with the organs so that they can harm black people” or “white people are actual vampires and they suck the blood out of black people in hospitals ” or “white people be doing magic to turn black men gay so they can steal our fine black sisters”. It’d be much dumber.

    African-americans definitely blame white people for everything. But they whole “witchcraft 24/7” thing has been washed out of them, I think.

  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @WhatEvvs
    @Anonymous

    Yes. I once read a complete & thorough demolition of the African origins of black slave customs. Many of them came from rural England. They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR. It was in a magazine article Before Internet, so no URL.

    Thanks to the edit feature, I found one example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_the_broom

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Bill

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunning_folk_in_Britain

    The cunning folk in Britain were professional or semi-professional practitioners of magic in Britain, active from the Medieval period through to the early twentieth century. As cunning folk, they practised folk magic – also known as “low magic” – although often combined with elements of “high” or ceremonial magic, which they learned through the study of grimoires.[1] Primarily using spells and charms as a part of their profession, they were most commonly employed to use their magic in order to combat malevolent witchcraft, to locate criminals, missing persons or stolen property, for fortune telling, for healing, for treasure hunting and to influence people to fall in love.

  17. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that…

    Renny Descartes was a drunken fart:
    “I drink, therefore I am.”

  18. @Dirk Dagger
    Hate-facts is hate-facts is hate-facts. Get it?

    The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case of Duane Buck, a convicted Texas murderer sentenced to die after a psychologist testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black.

    Buck shot and killed his ex-girlfriend in front of her three children while she begged for her life. He killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and he shot his own stepsister, Phyllis Taylor, who survived the horrific night.

    Taylor was at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, supporting Buck's attempt to win a new sentencing hearing. "I pray that it be converted to life," she said, "because I know who he is, and on that particular day, he was under the influence of drugs."

    To sentence a defendant to death under Texas law, a jury must unanimously agree that the defendant poses a future danger. In this case, Buck's own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck was generally not violent, but that he was more likely to commit violent acts in the future because he is black.

    Supreme Court Hears 'Indefensible' Death Penalty Case Where Race Linked To Violence - Nina Totenbeg, NPR
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BenKenobi, @Wilmingtonian

    Buck’s own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano,

    Didn’t his li’l sis monitor a debate recently?

  19. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    What does the term “coeds” actually mean? Is is just “female students”? Maybe it just means “girls”.

    I don’t know how implicit bias and louche behavior intersect, but “bed coeds” is a phrase that needs to be erased from your grown-up, grandfatherly, well-educated vocabulary. It demeans both men and women.

    • Replies: @guest
    @stillCARealist

    I think you know what "co-ed" means.

    , @No_0ne
    @stillCARealist

    Very sexist and misogynist. Institutionally patriarchal, too. Probably xenophobic as well.

  20. Many Americans may hear it as academic code for “racist.” But that connotation does not line up with scientific research on what implicit bias is and how it really operates.

    Since your “implicit bias” can get you sent to reeducation camp, I mean diversity training, and also get your business sued, “most Americans” can be forgiven for not properly observing the “scientific” distinction between implicit bias and racism.

  21. @Dirk Dagger
    Hate-facts is hate-facts is hate-facts. Get it?

    The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case of Duane Buck, a convicted Texas murderer sentenced to die after a psychologist testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black.

    Buck shot and killed his ex-girlfriend in front of her three children while she begged for her life. He killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and he shot his own stepsister, Phyllis Taylor, who survived the horrific night.

    Taylor was at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, supporting Buck's attempt to win a new sentencing hearing. "I pray that it be converted to life," she said, "because I know who he is, and on that particular day, he was under the influence of drugs."

    To sentence a defendant to death under Texas law, a jury must unanimously agree that the defendant poses a future danger. In this case, Buck's own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck was generally not violent, but that he was more likely to commit violent acts in the future because he is black.

    Supreme Court Hears 'Indefensible' Death Penalty Case Where Race Linked To Violence - Nina Totenbeg, NPR
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BenKenobi, @Wilmingtonian

    The reverse psychology defense!

    “Your Honour, my client must be locked up because his black skin guarantees he will reoffend!”

    “Not guilty!”

    • LOL: 415 reasons
  22. @Jim Sweeney
    @SPMoore8

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    I’m glad you asked me that question, since it ties into our deleted discussion of gaslighting yesterday.

    “Gaslighting” connotes an attempt to drive someone insane by manipulating the physical environment, as in the film Gaslight in 1944, however I have seen it in many other contexts as well, for example, several Perry Mason episodes.

    However, in the abstract, “Gaslighting” represents an attempt by one party (e.g., a man) to dictate the nature of reality to another (e.g., a woman). Thus, in this scenario, the man has the football and gets to tell the woman what reality is. So, for example, if a woman refuses to sleep with a man, then he gets to tell her that she has a problem, and of course she wants to understand what her problem is, and finally he concedes to sleeping with her in order to show her what her problem is, and so on. It seems to me that this remains a popular gambit among certain types. Thus manipulation, “guilt trips”, and “head games” all fall under the general rubric.

    However, “gaslighting”, because of the abstraction, is now applied to almost any male female interaction, thus, a man explaining anything to a woman is “mansplaining” or even “gaslighting”, while any attempt or success, by a man, at making a woman feel guilty, inadequate, at fault, to blame, etc. is construed as “gaslighting”, as well as virtually any criticism. Also “gaslighting” has been expanded to encompass any and all forms of deceit (thus, any reality-based response to the query “Do I look fat in this?” is intrinsically “gaslighting”) and, in the opinion of some, any disagreement with a woman can also be included.

    Thus the term is becoming so expansive as to be meaningless.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @SPMoore8


    “Gaslighting” connotes an attempt to drive someone insane by manipulating the physical environment, as in the film Gaslight in 1944…
     
    Gaslight Village, yesterday's fun today!
    Vo-de-oh-do, vo-de-oh-do, oh, oh!


    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslight_Village

    (Appleknockers of a certain vintage will recognize the catchiest TV jingle ever. Can't find a link to it, sadly.)
  23. @Anonymous
    Folk magic and the occult aren't very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America. "Implicit bias" and "systemic racism" aren't examples of magic and witchcraft per se, but examples of an attempt to monopolize magic and the supernatural, like Catholicism or modern science.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEaqL6OyCX4

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Mr. Anon, @Antonymous

    “Folk magic and the occult aren’t very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America.”

    That doesn’t mean that africans didn’t also bring their own superstitions with them.

  24. “But that connotation does not line up with scientific research on what implicit bias is and how it really operates.

    Researchers in this growing field say it isn’t just white police officers, but all of us, who have biases that are subconscious, hidden even to ourselves.”

    Here is a very informative documentary on these researchers and their scientific findings:

    Matthew Hopkins

  25. For now, laboratory simulations don’t easily translate to the real world,

    Just a minor glitch, folks. Just “for now.”

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @PiltdownMan

    Haha. Yeah, or this one:


    "The science of how this submerged bias affects your actions is still a work in progress"
     
    = We're just making up the "science" as we go, but we already know the conclusions we want.
  26. Jack Hanson says:

    I have more faith in voodoo than I do social science, to be honest with you Steve.

    If someone kills a chicken, paints a gris gris, and chants I can reasonably expect someone is going to be “ridden” in voodoo.

    Whether or not it’s some sort of hysteria or someone is actually possessed by a spiritual force is another question. The repeatability is there though.

    Not so with social science. I think it’s amazing and expected that the answer to the repeatability crisis because the experts lied was for the experts to cry “Trust us!”

  27. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    Having some familiarity with Philosophy and its Ethics branch, I would be interested in understanding better what your friend meant. I’m not quite able to grasp it from your examples. Could you elaborate on his viewpoint? Did he offer some examples.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Anonymous


    Having some familiarity with Philosophy and its Ethics branch, I would be interested in understanding better what your friend meant. I’m not quite able to grasp it from your examples. Could you elaborate on his viewpoint? Did he offer some examples.
     
    I very much like the analogy of SPMoore's "drunk philosopher" friend, even if it is only a partial account of reality (which is ironic given that the whole point of the analogy is to point out every philosophical account of reality has been/cannot help but be- partial).

    I think many very good examples would come to mind if you recalled the various philosophical schools of the classical world (Epicureans, Cynics, Stoics, Platonists, pre-Socratics). Each of these schools was very broad by modern philosophical standards, incorporating elements of science, cosmology, theology, and ethics all at once, and yet while having their incisive points ignoring or out-right distorting those parts of reality not congenial to them.

    In modern philosophy Positivists (Popper, early Wittgenstein) come to mind in their insistence that subjective areas of reality (beauty, morality) are outside the bounds of proper philosophy ("of that which we cannot speak we must remain silent"). More exact to your point, consider how the whole line of liberal ethics from Benton to Mills to Rawls considers only the individual and leaves out the collective (community, nation, religious denomination) as an object of moral concern. Thus you keep getting these recurring moral philosophic circle jerks where the public philosopher in question entirely misses the point. Is it OK to insult Islam (a collective) through, say, putting on a Draw Mahomet day? The liberal moral philosopher cannot admit there is a collective called "Islam" in play here (as that would then entail admitting there is a collective called "Christendom," which may or may not be entitled to such interests as not having the bray of the muezzin echo in its streets 5 times/day, or choosing Sunday as one of its weekly days of rest rather than Friday), so he lamely frames the issue as one of the right of the Mahomet caricaturist to freedom of speech vs. that of individual Muslims to be free of "Islamophobia". Or how weenies like Obama support BLM-aligned football players not standing up for the national anthem as they have the individual right to freedom of speech, while denying the nation as a collective has any competing rights, even while implicitly acknowledging the existence of said collective without which the protest does not even make sense.

  28. The concept, in his words, came across as an insult, a put-down on par with branding police as racists. Many Americans may hear it as academic code for “racist.”

    But that connotation does not line up with scientific research on what implicit bias is and how it really operates.

    You are the NYT. You have told us hundreds of times that implicit bias is in fact racism.

  29. I don’t think “implicit bias” has anything to do with “witchcraft” or “magic.” The only connection is that “implicit bias” is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept, but in that respect it is no different than many of the concepts we find in psychology to account for, or to describe, human action.

    However “witchcraft” and “magic” are not invisible concepts, they are attempts to alter the behavior of invisible agents who affect our lives, be it spirits, ghosts, elves, up to and including (to the most cynical) gods or God or what have you. Thus witchcraft and magic are better off being tied to modern manifestations of invisible agency such as we find in many conspiracy theories, daycare satanic rituals, and so on.

    While writers like Theodore Dalrymple and modern history have made it clear that is has been commonly believed that the president of Zaire could turn himself into a tiger, or that an enemy of Papa Doc Duvalier could turn himself into a black dog, these kinds of things are not limited to African or people of African origin. The same has been believed about the “familiars” in other cultures at other times.

    “Implicit Bias” is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    @SPMoore8

    “Implicit Bias” is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.
    -----
    I agree. It's a stupid concept but there's nothing particularly sub-saharan african about it.
    "Implicit bias" is like that "ambient homophobia" that supposedly took hold of Omar Mateen's brown body last summer.

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    , @Daniel Williams
    @SPMoore8


    I don’t think “implicit bias” has anything to do with “witchcraft” or “magic.” The only connection is that “implicit bias” is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept ...
     
    The real similarity between witchcraft and institutional racism that in civilizations organized around either system, no evil happens without someone being responsible for it.

    To people who believe in witchcraft, anytime someone gets sick, it's because he is bewitched. And if he bewitched, someone—some witch—is responsible. No one may know exactly who, but the truth always comes out and they have ways of determining these things.

    Same with our society. Shit doesn't just happen. If a cop shoots a black guy, it wasn't an accident, or a mistake, or an error in judgment (although if the same cop were to shoot a white guy, we would understood that bad things sometimes happen) it's evidence that the cop was racist. If the cop was black, well, then society itself must be racist. There's simply no other reasonable explanation.

    Eventually, when society is all black, they'll go back to blaming the universe itself when someone dies. You know, witchcraft.
    , @guest
    @SPMoore8

    But say the "implicit bias" they're talking about doesn't exist. If black bodies aren't being oppressed by the Man as they imagine, just like Papa Doc couldn't actually metamorphosize, then what's the difference? Their psychobabble concepts might as well be witchcraft.

    Your point, if I can guess it, is that it's unlike witchcraft because users of the term don't actually believe in it, and are only using it to win arguments. I don't agree. They may not believe in psychobabble persay, or this particular form of it, but they are true believers in Demonic Racism.

  30. @Dr. X
    I don't have an implicit bias problem at all.

    I'm explicitly biased...

    Replies: @Michelle

    That reminds me of my dear departed Grandma saying that she did not care for Blacks as a race, but liked them as individuals. “All my prejudices are learned”, she used to say.

  31. @SPMoore8
    I don't think "implicit bias" has anything to do with "witchcraft" or "magic." The only connection is that "implicit bias" is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept, but in that respect it is no different than many of the concepts we find in psychology to account for, or to describe, human action.

    However "witchcraft" and "magic" are not invisible concepts, they are attempts to alter the behavior of invisible agents who affect our lives, be it spirits, ghosts, elves, up to and including (to the most cynical) gods or God or what have you. Thus witchcraft and magic are better off being tied to modern manifestations of invisible agency such as we find in many conspiracy theories, daycare satanic rituals, and so on.

    While writers like Theodore Dalrymple and modern history have made it clear that is has been commonly believed that the president of Zaire could turn himself into a tiger, or that an enemy of Papa Doc Duvalier could turn himself into a black dog, these kinds of things are not limited to African or people of African origin. The same has been believed about the "familiars" in other cultures at other times.

    "Implicit Bias" is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Daniel Williams, @guest

    “Implicit Bias” is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.
    —–
    I agree. It’s a stupid concept but there’s nothing particularly sub-saharan african about it.
    “Implicit bias” is like that “ambient homophobia” that supposedly took hold of Omar Mateen’s brown body last summer.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @ogunsiron

    "Ambient homophobia" -- I like that. It sounds like one of those brain-eating microbes.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  32. Someone should ask Hillary what her implicit biases are.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Foreign Expert

    Her bias: that all of Bill's conquests were Bimbos, narcissists, weaklings, trashy nobodies, whose lives deserved to be destroyed, or at least ridiculed. And, she assumed that all women who are losers, are the kind that stand by their man while baking cookies, not like she, who went to law school and all.

    , @fish
    @Foreign Expert


    Someone should ask Hillary what her implicit biases are.
     
    She is overtly biased towards being the President!


    Which I think should be an immediate DQ.
  33. My gripe with the concept of “implicit bias” is that it appears to be term invoked by the Left without any recognition of its reflexive nature, an ignorance that the affliction could equally apply to themselves. Used by a speaker, the term is invoked on the assumption that it only applies to thee but not to me.

    For example, Tim Kaine’s use of the term to describe the police ignores the fact that those critical of the police could themselves be guilty of an “implicitly biased” belief that the police erroneously single out blacks. Or carrying it even further, Kaine ignores the fact that he himself might hold an “implicit bias” that Pence is the one who’s “implicitly biased.”

    It’s turtles all the way down, folks.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  34. @ogunsiron
    @SPMoore8

    “Implicit Bias” is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.
    -----
    I agree. It's a stupid concept but there's nothing particularly sub-saharan african about it.
    "Implicit bias" is like that "ambient homophobia" that supposedly took hold of Omar Mateen's brown body last summer.

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    “Ambient homophobia” — I like that. It sounds like one of those brain-eating microbes.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @SPMoore8

    "“Ambient homophobia” — I like that. It sounds like one of those brain-eating microbes."

    Or an electronic music genre.

  35. Police officers hear all this badmouthing, said Mr. Pence, Donald J. Trump’s running mate, in response to a question about whether society demands too much of law enforcement. They hear politicians painting them with one broad brush, with disdain, with automatic cries of implicit bias. He criticized Hillary Clinton for saying, in the first presidential debate, that everyone experiences implicit bias. He suggested a black police officer who shoots a black civilian could not logically experience such bias.

    It would be refreshing to have a politician occassionally pull some innovative social science report out of the hat and use it as a rebuttal. I’m pretty sure that a good politician can weave together a compelling sound bite from the Veil of Darkness studies on police bias:

    Testing for Racial Profiling With the Veil-of-Darkness Method

    The “veil-of-darkness” method is an innovative and low-cost approach that circumvents many of the benchmarking issues that arise in testing for racial profiling. Changes in natural lighting are used to establish a presumptively more race-neutral benchmark on the assumption that after dark, police suffer an impaired ability to detect motorists’ race. Applying the veil-of-darkness method to vehicle stops by the Syracuse (NY) police between 2006 and 2009 and examining differences among officers assigned to specialized traffic units and crime-suppression units, we found that African Americans were no more likely to be stopped during daylight than during darkness, indicating no racial bias.

    Frankly, I think the audience would be pleased to listen to a description of the novel methodology. It would be a good story and drive home the point in a way that the opponent couldn’t immediately rebut.

  36. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    The kafkatrap comes in many insidious forms: http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=2122

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @WowJustWow

    This is very good: it means that many people have been trying to come up with words to describe this phenomenon and "kafkatrap" is a good addition to the lexicon. However the underlying psychic somersault is I think very old; it was, e.g., certainly an element in the trials of Joan of Arc. The challenge would be to bring all of these names together and clarify them.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @res
    @WowJustWow

    Thanks for that. "Kafkatrap" is a useful addition to thinking about and articulating observations of the world. I especially liked the detailed typology (though it will take some work to remember it). Good comment thread there as well.

  37. There’s another word for “implicit bias.” It’s called “experience.”

    • Agree: ogunsiron
  38. Implicit bias, white privilege, institutional racism, yada, yada, yada, every time some Leftist throws this at me I respond with the question “What is the unit of measurement? How can you know something like [Leftist concept] exists if you can’t measure it, how can you know whether you’re making progress unless you can measure the phenomenon?”

    This usually throws them off the track and they got lost in the weeds and instead of arguing with them about the concept and battling through their logic immunity shields I get to appear as though I’m intrigued by their inanity and make them look bad when they show that they have no clue what they’re talking about and are only engaged in moral posturing.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
    @TangoMan

    Racism is measured in Trayvons. Where'd you go to college?

    Replies: @iffen

    , @ogunsiron
    @TangoMan

    We need more acerbic ridiculing of the IheartScience! cargo cultist crowd

    , @guest
    @TangoMan

    I don't think it could be measured, but even if it could, they'd pull the conversation down to subatomic racism, quantum racism, or whatever level will allow them to escape accountability. Imagine if the colorblind society were actually an admirable goal, and that we could measure whether we were getting closer to or farther away from it. Would social scientists want to bother? Would politicians, civil "servants," journalists, etc.? Would anyone currently making a living off racial strive want such a thing?

    Hell, no.

  39. @WowJustWow
    @SPMoore8

    The kafkatrap comes in many insidious forms: http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=2122

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @res

    This is very good: it means that many people have been trying to come up with words to describe this phenomenon and “kafkatrap” is a good addition to the lexicon. However the underlying psychic somersault is I think very old; it was, e.g., certainly an element in the trials of Joan of Arc. The challenge would be to bring all of these names together and clarify them.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SPMoore8

    It is a standard element of all witch trials since time immemorial that denial of guilt is itself evidence of guilt. Of course confession is also evidence of guilt - the whole point of a witch trial is that the outcome is predetermined and there is NO path to exoneration.

  40. @SPMoore8
    I don't think "implicit bias" has anything to do with "witchcraft" or "magic." The only connection is that "implicit bias" is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept, but in that respect it is no different than many of the concepts we find in psychology to account for, or to describe, human action.

    However "witchcraft" and "magic" are not invisible concepts, they are attempts to alter the behavior of invisible agents who affect our lives, be it spirits, ghosts, elves, up to and including (to the most cynical) gods or God or what have you. Thus witchcraft and magic are better off being tied to modern manifestations of invisible agency such as we find in many conspiracy theories, daycare satanic rituals, and so on.

    While writers like Theodore Dalrymple and modern history have made it clear that is has been commonly believed that the president of Zaire could turn himself into a tiger, or that an enemy of Papa Doc Duvalier could turn himself into a black dog, these kinds of things are not limited to African or people of African origin. The same has been believed about the "familiars" in other cultures at other times.

    "Implicit Bias" is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Daniel Williams, @guest

    I don’t think “implicit bias” has anything to do with “witchcraft” or “magic.” The only connection is that “implicit bias” is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept …

    The real similarity between witchcraft and institutional racism that in civilizations organized around either system, no evil happens without someone being responsible for it.

    To people who believe in witchcraft, anytime someone gets sick, it’s because he is bewitched. And if he bewitched, someone—some witch—is responsible. No one may know exactly who, but the truth always comes out and they have ways of determining these things.

    Same with our society. Shit doesn’t just happen. If a cop shoots a black guy, it wasn’t an accident, or a mistake, or an error in judgment (although if the same cop were to shoot a white guy, we would understood that bad things sometimes happen) it’s evidence that the cop was racist. If the cop was black, well, then society itself must be racist. There’s simply no other reasonable explanation.

    Eventually, when society is all black, they’ll go back to blaming the universe itself when someone dies. You know, witchcraft.

  41. @TangoMan
    Implicit bias, white privilege, institutional racism, yada, yada, yada, every time some Leftist throws this at me I respond with the question "What is the unit of measurement? How can you know something like [Leftist concept] exists if you can't measure it, how can you know whether you're making progress unless you can measure the phenomenon?"

    This usually throws them off the track and they got lost in the weeds and instead of arguing with them about the concept and battling through their logic immunity shields I get to appear as though I'm intrigued by their inanity and make them look bad when they show that they have no clue what they're talking about and are only engaged in moral posturing.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @ogunsiron, @guest

    Racism is measured in Trayvons. Where’d you go to college?

    • LOL: TangoMan, BB753
    • Replies: @iffen
    @Daniel Williams

    Racism is measured in Trayvons.

    Mini and mega-Hitlers sure had a short lifetime.

    Replies: @guest

  42. … if you make the rote assumption that fruit stands have fresher produce, that’s implicit bias …

    Even if a federal agency (say, the Department of Agriculture) painstakingly compiled an annual report demonstrating that produce from fruit stands is more likely to be fresh than produce from other sources?

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Daniel Williams

    Heaven forbid that your personal and specific experience, e.g. that fruit stands have fresher produce than chain grocery stores, influence your assumptions used in decision-making. You are expected (required?) to go through life without any preconceived notions about any situations you encounter. Life is to be experienced as random outcomes. All those learning experiences will just expose you to inconvenient facts--getting in the way of living a bias-free life!

    Replies: @guest

  43. “Implicit bias” is a new term for “stereotype.” The problem with “stereotype” is it connotes “probably unfairly derived, but sometimes accurate.”

    The brain is good at dividing groups of things into subgroups and intuiting general (probabilistic) properties of the subgroups, then acting on that information. Good in the sense that we need not be aware of the process.

    In short, there’s nothing controversial about what the researchers are trying to prove exists. I’m sure it does. The real fight is whether these biases are valid; I’m sure they often are. This observation is helpful for understanding but not for influencing the “conversation.” Who has the stones to say in public, “Sure, cops pull over blacks more often than whites, but they’re right to”?

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Alan Mercer

    The prominent Nigerian author and novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has said, the only problem with stereotypes isn’t that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete.

  44. @stillCARealist
    @SPMoore8

    What does the term "coeds" actually mean? Is is just "female students"? Maybe it just means "girls".

    I don't know how implicit bias and louche behavior intersect, but "bed coeds" is a phrase that needs to be erased from your grown-up, grandfatherly, well-educated vocabulary. It demeans both men and women.

    Replies: @guest, @No_0ne

    I think you know what “co-ed” means.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
  45. Implicit bias seems less African and more Christian: it is the progressive analogue of original sin. It’s working so well now for the same reason it’s always worked on whites, whatever that is.

    Matthew 5:28: But I tell you that anyone who looks at a person of color through the lens of experience and statistics has already committed racism in his heart.

  46. @TangoMan
    Implicit bias, white privilege, institutional racism, yada, yada, yada, every time some Leftist throws this at me I respond with the question "What is the unit of measurement? How can you know something like [Leftist concept] exists if you can't measure it, how can you know whether you're making progress unless you can measure the phenomenon?"

    This usually throws them off the track and they got lost in the weeds and instead of arguing with them about the concept and battling through their logic immunity shields I get to appear as though I'm intrigued by their inanity and make them look bad when they show that they have no clue what they're talking about and are only engaged in moral posturing.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @ogunsiron, @guest

    We need more acerbic ridiculing of the IheartScience! cargo cultist crowd

  47. Speaking of black magic, I read a book once called “Alien Powers,” by Kenneth Minogue. It’s a lot about Marxism, but also about ideologies in general. A lot of them, for whatever reason, end up being grand conspiracy theories, which might as well be bedtime stories about the noble fight against the demons or body-snatchers trying to rule the world.

    People who pride themselves on being coldly rational in the field of religion, for instance, fall prey to weird, mystical explanations in politics. Possibly because they have no transcendent beliefs and tend towards nihilism. Nihilists are suckers.

  48. @SPMoore8
    @Jim Sweeney

    Could you be more explicit as to the bedding of coeds?

    I'm glad you asked me that question, since it ties into our deleted discussion of gaslighting yesterday.

    "Gaslighting" connotes an attempt to drive someone insane by manipulating the physical environment, as in the film Gaslight in 1944, however I have seen it in many other contexts as well, for example, several Perry Mason episodes.

    However, in the abstract, "Gaslighting" represents an attempt by one party (e.g., a man) to dictate the nature of reality to another (e.g., a woman). Thus, in this scenario, the man has the football and gets to tell the woman what reality is. So, for example, if a woman refuses to sleep with a man, then he gets to tell her that she has a problem, and of course she wants to understand what her problem is, and finally he concedes to sleeping with her in order to show her what her problem is, and so on. It seems to me that this remains a popular gambit among certain types. Thus manipulation, "guilt trips", and "head games" all fall under the general rubric.

    However, "gaslighting", because of the abstraction, is now applied to almost any male female interaction, thus, a man explaining anything to a woman is "mansplaining" or even "gaslighting", while any attempt or success, by a man, at making a woman feel guilty, inadequate, at fault, to blame, etc. is construed as "gaslighting", as well as virtually any criticism. Also "gaslighting" has been expanded to encompass any and all forms of deceit (thus, any reality-based response to the query "Do I look fat in this?" is intrinsically "gaslighting") and, in the opinion of some, any disagreement with a woman can also be included.

    Thus the term is becoming so expansive as to be meaningless.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “Gaslighting” connotes an attempt to drive someone insane by manipulating the physical environment, as in the film Gaslight in 1944…

    Gaslight Village, yesterday’s fun today!
    Vo-de-oh-do, vo-de-oh-do, oh, oh!

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslight_Village

    (Appleknockers of a certain vintage will recognize the catchiest TV jingle ever. Can’t find a link to it, sadly.)

  49. @SPMoore8
    I don't think "implicit bias" has anything to do with "witchcraft" or "magic." The only connection is that "implicit bias" is an invisible (and non-falsifiable) concept, but in that respect it is no different than many of the concepts we find in psychology to account for, or to describe, human action.

    However "witchcraft" and "magic" are not invisible concepts, they are attempts to alter the behavior of invisible agents who affect our lives, be it spirits, ghosts, elves, up to and including (to the most cynical) gods or God or what have you. Thus witchcraft and magic are better off being tied to modern manifestations of invisible agency such as we find in many conspiracy theories, daycare satanic rituals, and so on.

    While writers like Theodore Dalrymple and modern history have made it clear that is has been commonly believed that the president of Zaire could turn himself into a tiger, or that an enemy of Papa Doc Duvalier could turn himself into a black dog, these kinds of things are not limited to African or people of African origin. The same has been believed about the "familiars" in other cultures at other times.

    "Implicit Bias" is just a reality football concept not much different from a lot of psychiatric psychobabble back in the old days.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Daniel Williams, @guest

    But say the “implicit bias” they’re talking about doesn’t exist. If black bodies aren’t being oppressed by the Man as they imagine, just like Papa Doc couldn’t actually metamorphosize, then what’s the difference? Their psychobabble concepts might as well be witchcraft.

    Your point, if I can guess it, is that it’s unlike witchcraft because users of the term don’t actually believe in it, and are only using it to win arguments. I don’t agree. They may not believe in psychobabble persay, or this particular form of it, but they are true believers in Demonic Racism.

  50. @TangoMan
    Implicit bias, white privilege, institutional racism, yada, yada, yada, every time some Leftist throws this at me I respond with the question "What is the unit of measurement? How can you know something like [Leftist concept] exists if you can't measure it, how can you know whether you're making progress unless you can measure the phenomenon?"

    This usually throws them off the track and they got lost in the weeds and instead of arguing with them about the concept and battling through their logic immunity shields I get to appear as though I'm intrigued by their inanity and make them look bad when they show that they have no clue what they're talking about and are only engaged in moral posturing.

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @ogunsiron, @guest

    I don’t think it could be measured, but even if it could, they’d pull the conversation down to subatomic racism, quantum racism, or whatever level will allow them to escape accountability. Imagine if the colorblind society were actually an admirable goal, and that we could measure whether we were getting closer to or farther away from it. Would social scientists want to bother? Would politicians, civil “servants,” journalists, etc.? Would anyone currently making a living off racial strive want such a thing?

    Hell, no.

  51. @SPMoore8
    @ogunsiron

    "Ambient homophobia" -- I like that. It sounds like one of those brain-eating microbes.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    ““Ambient homophobia” — I like that. It sounds like one of those brain-eating microbes.”

    Or an electronic music genre.

  52. Implicit bias is the new buzzword huh? I guess structural racism, White Privilege and colorblind denial of past injustice were all too stupid to make it past the smell test? This attempt to criminalize the High Crime of Noticing was old thirty years ago, and now it just stinks like desperation.
    Discrimination is the basis for reason. Browbeating people until they’re stupid is the worst plan since little Timmy poked the Tiger at the Zoo. Fact is, only the Leftist voter base is dumb enough to be Grubered. Gruber is the bottom of the Snake Oil Barrel.
    Whether its the IQ test, the Bell Curve, statistical analysis in general or just plain observable reality, we’ve reached a point where WE DON’T CARE. WE REALLY DON’T CARE. NO REALLY, SHUT UP CAUSE WE REALLY DO NOT C A R E !

  53. Implicit bias: perfect because it can be measured, with difficulty under “scientific” conditions, but never under real world conditions. (By the way do these implicit bias studies suffer from the same reproducibility crisis as the rest of social psychology, where 95% of the field is a flaming ruin?)

    Therefore being against obsessing about it is “anti-science.”

    Further perfect because it can’t ever be removed. Cue studies showing that implicit bias persists even after 100 hours of sensitivity training.

    Further perfect because it explains why society remains racist even after no one but the kookiest of kooks will ever say any overt racist thing or take any overt racist action. SEE? Doesn’t matter if 99% of non minority people bend over backwards to never say or do anything that could be vaguely construed as racist, society remains evil, racist and backwards.

    Instead of taking MLK’s words to heart (“content of his character”) we can proceed in making popular culture even more vapid and backwards and insulting and degrading.

    Fuck this country we deserve the morons running we get it for not having the common sense to run these hucksters out of town on a rail.

  54. @Alan Mercer
    "Implicit bias" is a new term for "stereotype." The problem with "stereotype" is it connotes "probably unfairly derived, but sometimes accurate."

    The brain is good at dividing groups of things into subgroups and intuiting general (probabilistic) properties of the subgroups, then acting on that information. Good in the sense that we need not be aware of the process.

    In short, there's nothing controversial about what the researchers are trying to prove exists. I'm sure it does. The real fight is whether these biases are valid; I'm sure they often are. This observation is helpful for understanding but not for influencing the "conversation." Who has the stones to say in public, "Sure, cops pull over blacks more often than whites, but they're right to"?

    Replies: @CCZ

    The prominent Nigerian author and novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has said, the only problem with stereotypes isn’t that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete.

  55. I suppose that the fight against bias is only the present outbreak of an underlying Puritan urge, like the fight against sexuality in the Victorian Age or the fight against alcohol around 1900.
    At one point the Puritan must accept that reality is stronger than his urges to suppress it. And Ms. Badger seems to be near to this point.
    That said, the Puritan suppression of people’s wish for alcohol didn’t survive overall, but did survive in Scandinavia. So may the suppression of bias survive in single countries.

  56. I fight hard against my implicit notion that old white women commit less crime than young white men, but it´s like my subconscious always wins.
    In the end implicit bias is one of the main properties of life itself. Even protozoons do it when they react differently to other protozoons, depending on which kind of protozoon they expect. Implicit bias is another word for information, or to speak philosophically of being.

  57. But the same process can also take the form of unconsciously associating certain identities, like African-American, with undesirable attributes, like violence.

    More Orwellian inversion.

    Given that in America black males – who represent about 6.5% of the population – commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association – forcing yourself not to notice – would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @NickG


    Given that in America black males – who represent about 6.5% of the population – commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association – forcing yourself not to notice – would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.
     
    Apt description, but taken further:

    Forcing yourself not to notice in the wrong part of town could be named "suicide-by-Black death wish".

    Noticing implicitly or otherwise or defending yourself explicitly is simple self-preservation, an activity frowned upon by liberals. The degree of awareness, as another mentioned above, is measured in Travons, Michael Browns and #blm riots.

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity. Selling themselves down the river and for what? It's 6%. Properly tamped down, no one would notice a thing except for the newfound peace and quiet. Hispanics and Muslims are going to do it sooner or later in this century, we should save them the trouble.

    Don't knock implicit bias. It is after all why the Clintons live where they do. They have a nerve promulgating the term.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @BB753

    , @guest
    @NickG

    Who says bias isn't reality-based? That's the real trick. Prejudice is a good thing, but they make you think all prejudice is bad prejudice. All bias is unfair bias. All privilege is unearned privilege. All racism is irrational racism.

    Which is horse poopy. They probably admitted much in their papers and articles, or just enough to give them wiggle room. But it's hard for us, on the outside, to argue otherwise. Because we end up sounding like Gordon Gecko defending greed.

  58. Anonymous [AKA "dlmencken"] says:

    “The challenge, he argues, isn’t to eliminate biases, but to try to interrupt them so we can act more often in ways that line up with our values. ”

    A perfect case study is Bill’s implicit bias to doink bimbos. As long as he performed coitus interruptus and came on the dress he could claim it lined up with his values and he did not have sex with another woman.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Anonymous


    so we can act more often in ways that line up with our values
     
    Values that will be made clear upon completion of a 2-week tour in re-education camp.
  59. At the risk of opening the obvious can of worms, systemic bias is not an African idea, but a thoroughly European one.
    Marxists were/are not interested in the particular, but only in ethereal ‘world-historical’ forces.
    As one commented noted, African neuroses are less complicated, usually iolving little demons, such as the Tokalosh who can be kept at bay by a few house bricks under the bed legs, and the occasional ritual slaughter.
    European neuroses, on the other hand are sophisticated and resilient.

  60. @PiltdownMan

    For now, laboratory simulations don’t easily translate to the real world,
     
    Just a minor glitch, folks. Just "for now."

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Haha. Yeah, or this one:

    “The science of how this submerged bias affects your actions is still a work in progress”

    = We’re just making up the “science” as we go, but we already know the conclusions we want.

  61. This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of “original sin” type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin. Any unscrupulous huckster will be able, on a whim, to point his finger at you and say that you have implicit bias. What will your defense be then, since you’ve already accepted your fallen nature?

    This is basically a blank check for whatever they say you owe them, whenever they say it. It also guarantees that it will never stop. Like those cult people or the Communist leaders who can always point the finger at a wrecker, saboteur or even unconscious offender as being the reason why the Rapture or perfect prosperity never happened. This way, they will never have to account for the deficiencies in their methods and prescribed worldviews.

    Pence should have rolled with it and said that victimizing people for who they are is doubly wrong, so we must work with the idea of implicit bias existing and being unsolvable. Therefore, immigration must be completely halted and every immigrant or descendant of immigrant who is prone to being victimized by the implicit bias should be repatriated for their own good and psychological wellbeing.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Romanian

    I think the real question is whether, if we can't find a way to get rid of racist implicit biases, they are hardwired into our brains. In that case, why did we evolve to associate blackness with violence?

    , @Tracy
    @Romanian


    This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of “original sin” type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin.
     
    In classical Christianity (Catholicism and Orthodoxy), the stain of original sin is removed formally by Baptism.

    If I'm understanding things correctly, people are misunderstanding what Mr. Sailer is trying to say. He's not saying that implicit bias (which is just a fancy way of saying that we react subconsciously to things we've picked up on life) is an African idea, some notion that got carried over to the US on slave ships or something; he's saying that the concept is used in the same ways accusations of witchcraft once were in Europe, and are now used in Africa today. In other words, hurling accusations of implicit bias is the witch hunt du jour.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  62. @NickG

    But the same process can also take the form of unconsciously associating certain identities, like African-American, with undesirable attributes, like violence.
     
    More Orwellian inversion.

    Given that in America black males - who represent about 6.5% of the population - commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association - forcing yourself not to notice - would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @guest

    Given that in America black males – who represent about 6.5% of the population – commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association – forcing yourself not to notice – would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.

    Apt description, but taken further:

    Forcing yourself not to notice in the wrong part of town could be named “suicide-by-Black death wish”.

    Noticing implicitly or otherwise or defending yourself explicitly is simple self-preservation, an activity frowned upon by liberals. The degree of awareness, as another mentioned above, is measured in Travons, Michael Browns and #blm riots.

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity. Selling themselves down the river and for what? It’s 6%. Properly tamped down, no one would notice a thing except for the newfound peace and quiet. Hispanics and Muslims are going to do it sooner or later in this century, we should save them the trouble.

    Don’t knock implicit bias. It is after all why the Clintons live where they do. They have a nerve promulgating the term.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Jim Christian

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity.

    Homosexuals are 1% of society and look at how we bent ourselves into pretzels to stroke their vanity.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @BB753
    @Jim Christian

    Except, this 6% of the population ( or less, perhaps 4%, to exclude old and/or decent Blacks) constitute the shock troops, the brownshirts of the Democratic Party and indeed of the very regime we live under.
    Our man Soros has spent a lot of money organizing these vibrant "youfs" into the BLM movement, also known as the "Schwartze Sturmabteilung", yet he's still looking far and wide for a worthy black and needless to say gay Roehm to energize and lead them. Obnoxious black lesbians majoring in Queer and Black studies just won't do to keep those boots firmly on the streets.

    Replies: @Bill

  63. @Jim Christian
    @NickG


    Given that in America black males – who represent about 6.5% of the population – commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association – forcing yourself not to notice – would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.
     
    Apt description, but taken further:

    Forcing yourself not to notice in the wrong part of town could be named "suicide-by-Black death wish".

    Noticing implicitly or otherwise or defending yourself explicitly is simple self-preservation, an activity frowned upon by liberals. The degree of awareness, as another mentioned above, is measured in Travons, Michael Browns and #blm riots.

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity. Selling themselves down the river and for what? It's 6%. Properly tamped down, no one would notice a thing except for the newfound peace and quiet. Hispanics and Muslims are going to do it sooner or later in this century, we should save them the trouble.

    Don't knock implicit bias. It is after all why the Clintons live where they do. They have a nerve promulgating the term.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @BB753

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity.

    Homosexuals are 1% of society and look at how we bent ourselves into pretzels to stroke their vanity.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @TangoMan

    And trannies are maybe 0.05% of the population and everybody is coming down on North Carolina like a ton of bricks because of them. We used to tell these people to STFU and get on with their lives, now we re-order our society completely.

  64. @Romanian
    This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of "original sin" type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin. Any unscrupulous huckster will be able, on a whim, to point his finger at you and say that you have implicit bias. What will your defense be then, since you've already accepted your fallen nature?

    This is basically a blank check for whatever they say you owe them, whenever they say it. It also guarantees that it will never stop. Like those cult people or the Communist leaders who can always point the finger at a wrecker, saboteur or even unconscious offender as being the reason why the Rapture or perfect prosperity never happened. This way, they will never have to account for the deficiencies in their methods and prescribed worldviews.

    Pence should have rolled with it and said that victimizing people for who they are is doubly wrong, so we must work with the idea of implicit bias existing and being unsolvable. Therefore, immigration must be completely halted and every immigrant or descendant of immigrant who is prone to being victimized by the implicit bias should be repatriated for their own good and psychological wellbeing.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Tracy

    I think the real question is whether, if we can’t find a way to get rid of racist implicit biases, they are hardwired into our brains. In that case, why did we evolve to associate blackness with violence?

  65. Homosexuals are 1% of society and look at how we bent ourselves into pretzels to stroke their vanity.

    Heh, don’t forget the Trannie-boys now. The Alphabet Soup of Sexual Depravity is maybe 2 or 3% (not the ten they claim), how did THEY get so much power? We gave it to them. They’re another crew that should be told to shut up.

  66. @SPMoore8
    I once had a heavy drinking philosopher friend who once explained to me that the fundamental truth of philosophy, especially as it pertains to ethics, is that reality is a football, and the key is to ensure that you argue in such a way that you always can keep possession of it.

    "Implicit bias" is just a way of saying that the person wielding it has possession of the reality-football.

    "Did it ever occur to you that that the way you act is because of your implicit bias?"

    "What implicit bias? I'm not a racist."

    "I'm sorry, smh, the key to implicit bias is that you are unaware of it. In fact, to the extent that you are unaware of it is the proof of the extent to which you are a victim of it."

    "So --- I have implicit bias?!"

    "Yes."

    (BTW, the same strategy has been used to bed coeds for over a century.)

    There's more, I will return to the topic .....

    Replies: @Jim Sweeney, @boogerbently, @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist, @Anonymous, @WowJustWow, @thinkingabout it

    Come on. It’s blatantly obvious this inherent bias which negatively affects you, which happened without your knowledge, is just modernized secularized original sin.

    Such a hideous concept.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @thinkingabout it

    You have a point there; the original sin is the sin of pride, which can be construed as not recognizing your subservience to whoever is telling you what your problem is.

  67. I wonder what a SJW would say if I were to deny my implicit bias as I would, say, a Freudian interpretation of my dreams by a psychotherapist. If I claimed to have no implicit bias, and my interlocutor were to say, “yes, you do” and I still denied it, would we be in a “no means yes” situation? The more I deny, the more it is true? I suppose the same would apply to a prospective sexual conquest ( a coed).

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @The Uncovenanted

    The SJW would refuse to budge and would "smh" and say that "you just don't get it". All of these are simply mental wrestling moves designed to get you to have the other person explain it all to you.

    As for "co-eds" (my mother was one in the 1930's and never let anyone forget it) is synonymous with young women in college, because that's the typical setting for this kind of manipulation, as you can glean from talking to women who came of age in the '30's, '40's, '50's, and even early '60's, or by reading the commentary of people like Dorothy Parker or Sylvia Plath, or even just by watching "Where the Boys Are." BTW, Manson's Family and the Symbionese Liberation Army were put together the same way.

  68. @Jim Christian
    @NickG


    Given that in America black males – who represent about 6.5% of the population – commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association – forcing yourself not to notice – would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.
     
    Apt description, but taken further:

    Forcing yourself not to notice in the wrong part of town could be named "suicide-by-Black death wish".

    Noticing implicitly or otherwise or defending yourself explicitly is simple self-preservation, an activity frowned upon by liberals. The degree of awareness, as another mentioned above, is measured in Travons, Michael Browns and #blm riots.

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity. Selling themselves down the river and for what? It's 6%. Properly tamped down, no one would notice a thing except for the newfound peace and quiet. Hispanics and Muslims are going to do it sooner or later in this century, we should save them the trouble.

    Don't knock implicit bias. It is after all why the Clintons live where they do. They have a nerve promulgating the term.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @BB753

    Except, this 6% of the population ( or less, perhaps 4%, to exclude old and/or decent Blacks) constitute the shock troops, the brownshirts of the Democratic Party and indeed of the very regime we live under.
    Our man Soros has spent a lot of money organizing these vibrant “youfs” into the BLM movement, also known as the “Schwartze Sturmabteilung”, yet he’s still looking far and wide for a worthy black and needless to say gay Roehm to energize and lead them. Obnoxious black lesbians majoring in Queer and Black studies just won’t do to keep those boots firmly on the streets.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @BB753

    The brown shirts were a reaction to the communist street fighters. The threat isn't so much that Soros's street fighters will "win." What would they win, and who would they beat? They are nothing. Less than nothing. The threat is that they will call forth real brown shirts. The Nazis were powerful because they mobilized relatively normal, intelligent, skilled, competent white people. If you're going to bet which way Weimerica is going next, you're going to bet in a brown shirt direction.

    It may be fun to call the rich Jew a Nazi, but that's not what he is.

  69. @Dirk Dagger
    Hate-facts is hate-facts is hate-facts. Get it?

    The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case of Duane Buck, a convicted Texas murderer sentenced to die after a psychologist testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black.

    Buck shot and killed his ex-girlfriend in front of her three children while she begged for her life. He killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and he shot his own stepsister, Phyllis Taylor, who survived the horrific night.

    Taylor was at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, supporting Buck's attempt to win a new sentencing hearing. "I pray that it be converted to life," she said, "because I know who he is, and on that particular day, he was under the influence of drugs."

    To sentence a defendant to death under Texas law, a jury must unanimously agree that the defendant poses a future danger. In this case, Buck's own lawyer hired psychologist Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck was generally not violent, but that he was more likely to commit violent acts in the future because he is black.

    Supreme Court Hears 'Indefensible' Death Penalty Case Where Race Linked To Violence - Nina Totenbeg, NPR
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BenKenobi, @Wilmingtonian

    Guess the identity of the Supreme Court justice who thinks that the fact that the defendant’s own lawyer introduced the hate-concept makes it even more obvious that the defendant shouldn’t swing. Yes, that’s right, it’s the sometime dean of Harvard Law School, Elena Kagan.

    Gotta love the Mutt-and-Jeff quality of the abolition-of-capital-punishment bar/lobby. “You can’t execute this man, somebody told a jury of stump-toothed inbred Texas rednecks that he’s a danger to the public because he’s black!” “Yes, his own expert psychological witness, hired by his own lawyer, did.” “But that makes it even worse! Even idiot hillbillies know the prosecutor is probably exaggerating the murderer’s future dangerousness, but if the defense does it, they’re going to lap it up!” Um.

    Also, neither the prog media accounts nor the briefs to the Supreme Court seem to have anything to say about the racial composition of the jury. The crime and the trial took place in that notorious white-supremacist redoubt, Houston. Gonna go out on a limb and guess this wasn’t the proverbial “all-white jury” conspiring at the lynching.

  70. @anon930
    OT: I was listening to Sam Harris' podcast today where he talks about political correctness. He is a liberal who has had some scrapes with SJWs and Salon-types over his views on Islam. Anyway he was talking about racism and PC for an hour and he mentioned the bell curve. He said he hadn't read it even though he has a Ph.D in neuroscience. He made the point about some knowledge not being worth having, and so he didn't really bother. He clearly hadn't thought about it too much. I think his views are indicative of a lot of well educated people. It's unfortunate that he hadn't even really considered about the occamite explanation for stereotypes and racial inequality.

    Replies: @Emblematic, @biz, @SMK

    It is an understatement to say that Sam Harris has had “some scrapes” with SJWs and Salon. Rather they have been hounding him for several years now, sending death threats, etc. It has completely dominated his life. Harris has transitioned from someone who is mostly concerned with the future of AI and other neuroscience issues to someone who is mostly concerned with the scourge of PC and what he calls the Regressive Left. Harris has even started to push back against BLM which led to an extremely rude encounter with comedian Hannibal Burress.

    I think Harris’ trajectory is a preview of what will happen to many scientifically-minded people, who were liberals by default because conservatives embraced anti-intellectual nonsense like creationism and climate denial for so long, but now that liberals are being insane and directly threatening the exercise of thought itself these people will break from liberalism.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @biz

    I remember Harris from some years ago as being someone who was in the vanguard of the New Atheism, which I interpret largely as a reaction to 9/11. The underlying idea is that belief in God causes all of these terrible things, so that we have to get people to recognize there is no god and therefore there will be no more irrational violence, as well, as, incidentally, any more opposition to positive things like abortion, stem cell research, LGBT rights, etc. etc.

    The bridge too far for Harris, IIRC, had to do with his rationalization of some Israeli activity in Gaza, which he refused to condemn, and, while he has always been sharply critical of Islam, he has not been as critical (or critical at all?) of Judaism, Israel, or Zionism.

    And that's how neo-conservatism got started, as well.

    Replies: @guest, @biz, @anon930

    , @anon930
    @biz

    Yeah, it's clear he's really pissed off by political correctness, mainly because of what he sees as liberal naivete towards islam, but he hasn't quite put it together yet. In his gut I think he knows the SJWs are dangerously wrong, but he doesn't like the right for all the typical reasons one doesn't like the right. He seems pretty hawkish tho, so he's no friend of the iSteve crowd. But at least he's growing more angry at the SJWs.

  71. @TangoMan
    @Jim Christian

    Astounding that for a lousy 6% of the population, the other 65% (us White folks and the rest really, Hispanics and Asians) are willing to tolerate so much harm for racial sensitivity.

    Homosexuals are 1% of society and look at how we bent ourselves into pretzels to stroke their vanity.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    And trannies are maybe 0.05% of the population and everybody is coming down on North Carolina like a ton of bricks because of them. We used to tell these people to STFU and get on with their lives, now we re-order our society completely.

    • Agree: 415 reasons
  72. On his West Hunter blog, Henry observed how the most distinctively African aspect of the widespread belief in witchcraft is that a rival can project malevolent forces vast distances against you without his even consciously willing it:

    A colleague pointed out a few weeks ago, after hearing this story, that if [a belief in witchcraft] is nearly pan-African then perhaps some of it came to the New World. Prominent and not so prominent talkers from the American Black population come out with similar theories of vague and invisible forces that are oppressing people, like “institutional racism” and “white privilege.”

    I think it was the privileged old fat white leftist academic Peggy McIntosh who first coined the phrase, “white privilege.”

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @J1234

    At the very least Peggy McIntosh coined the idea of the "invisible backpack" (stuffed with privilege, no doubt, as well as all the money that belongs to everyone else.) I wonder if airport security is able to see those things with those new machines they've got.

  73. Come now Steve, in the late 19th Century, a certain subset of European Goyim discovered the world was secretly controlled by a small cabal of Jewish Bankers for their own malicious ends. [Before that, I believe it was controlled by the Free Masons.]

    Obviously, after WWII, there are certain problems with this “theory”, but if you can cast the Elders as the Evil White Capitalist Christian Patriarchs, enslaving us all through their occult powers of heterosexist and racist supremacy, I think you can still run with a version of it.

    Further, you could see why White Capitalist Christians would undoubtedly have divided loyalty to the Sun People, unless they were willing to confess to being subliminally part of the International Conspiracy and willing to atone for their sins.

    Moreover, no one is even going to complain about “cultural appropriation”.

  74. But the same process can also take the form of unconsciously associating certain identities, like African-American, with undesirable attributes, like violence.

    Of course, it’s well known that there is no worse example of a man harboring implicit bias than Jesse Jackson:

    “There is nothing more painful to me … than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery, then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved.”

    Or is that explicit bias?

    Anyway, something must be done about the man. He needs some serious diversity training.

  75. The unconscious mind is Bayesian. Thus, to the extent African Americans are statistically more likely to commit crime, and people see this, this fact will manifest itself in implicit bias tests.

    To the extent people grow up without experience with various groups, but rather see them only via TV and movies, would then have ‘less bias’, why lots of Europeans I know think America is especially biased: they have no experience with reality here. Indeed, they might think most A-A are computer programmers (Die Hard), white trust-funders on Wall Street homicidal (Law and Order).

  76. @Daniel Williams
    @TangoMan

    Racism is measured in Trayvons. Where'd you go to college?

    Replies: @iffen

    Racism is measured in Trayvons.

    Mini and mega-Hitlers sure had a short lifetime.

    • Replies: @guest
    @iffen

    There are 6 million Trayvons to a Hitler.

  77. SMK says: • Website
    @anon930
    OT: I was listening to Sam Harris' podcast today where he talks about political correctness. He is a liberal who has had some scrapes with SJWs and Salon-types over his views on Islam. Anyway he was talking about racism and PC for an hour and he mentioned the bell curve. He said he hadn't read it even though he has a Ph.D in neuroscience. He made the point about some knowledge not being worth having, and so he didn't really bother. He clearly hadn't thought about it too much. I think his views are indicative of a lot of well educated people. It's unfortunate that he hadn't even really considered about the occamite explanation for stereotypes and racial inequality.

    Replies: @Emblematic, @biz, @SMK

    Sam Harris, arguably the world’s sanest liberal, is excoriated as a “bigot” and ‘racist” for telling the truth about Islam, i.e., the problem is the nature of Islam per se, the fundamental tenets of the Koran and other sacred texts, including the doctrine of Jihad, as espoused by the prophet and a majority of Muslims today and over the last 14 centuries, not the “perversion” of a “religion of peace” (George W. Bush) by a tiny fraction of “extremisst” and “radicals” who commit acts of terrorism and violence that most Muslims condemn and repudiate. If only Republicans and “truconservatives” were as honest and realistic and courageous.

    In response to such aspersions, he can say that “Islam is a religion, not a race,” as did Richard Dawkins. But they will never tell the truth about race even if they cryptically believe the races are inherently different is respect to average intelligence, etc.

    • Replies: @biz
    @SMK

    Agree with your comment, except let's be careful. The statement that “Islam is a religion, not a race” is entirely correct, and an entirely appropriate rejoinder to the idiots and liars who claim that to oppose Islamic doctrine is "racist."

    That all stands apart from the question of HBD in regard to races.

    Replies: @SMK

  78. @WowJustWow
    @SPMoore8

    The kafkatrap comes in many insidious forms: http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=2122

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @res

    Thanks for that. “Kafkatrap” is a useful addition to thinking about and articulating observations of the world. I especially liked the detailed typology (though it will take some work to remember it). Good comment thread there as well.

  79. Oh Come ON Steve. The Zietgiest (“spirit of the times”)? Class consciousness and the activity of anti-revolutionary reactionary breakers? Struggle Sessions? Not to mention original sin or Divine Providence…. There is NO need to resort to smirking theories about Africanization to discuss conspiracy theories of broad based malevolent and subtle forces.

    It is actually clear that all this Lefty PC crap owes more to German philosophy and European Marxism than any goofy African witch doctor ideas of screwing virgins to cure aids or eating the flesh of albinos etc. This sort of smirking, smug, David Duke-esque dumb-assery does nothing to lend credibility to the very real issues the Alt Right and Race Realists need to deal with.

    It is one thing for dumbo Storm front Kluxer types to comment on your site, its another for you to stoop to their level. Implicit Bias lends itself to many critiques without resort to emberassing theories of it being a result of African Witchdoctorism translated thru hundreds of years of African Diaspora in the US. Jeesh.

    • Agree: Bill
    • Replies: @guest
    @Regular Joe

    Take your wet blanket home with you, spoilsport.

  80. @Anonymous
    Folk magic and the occult aren't very remote or due to African influence. They were part of the cultural landscape in 19th century America. "Implicit bias" and "systemic racism" aren't examples of magic and witchcraft per se, but examples of an attempt to monopolize magic and the supernatural, like Catholicism or modern science.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEaqL6OyCX4

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @Mr. Anon, @Antonymous

    “[African American] Folk magic and the occult aren’t very remote or due to African influence. ”

    Sure they’re not. Look up voodoo and santeria – the origins are West Indies, a.k.a. west African slave culture. Bantu animism, evil eye, and animal sacrifice are African traditions brought by slaves, then given a semi-Christian overlay. Can you find any evidence of pentagrams and Victorian occultism in voodoo? That’s more your wiccans, pagans, and Anton Levay types.

  81. Slate just had an article on this. I left a comment there about the asymmetry of whites being called out to overcome even their implicit biases while African-Americans can never be expected to exercise even the slightest bit of judgement. The Slate mods swiftly deleted it.

  82. @thinkingabout it
    @SPMoore8

    Come on. It's blatantly obvious this inherent bias which negatively affects you, which happened without your knowledge, is just modernized secularized original sin.

    Such a hideous concept.

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    You have a point there; the original sin is the sin of pride, which can be construed as not recognizing your subservience to whoever is telling you what your problem is.

  83. @J1234

    On his West Hunter blog, Henry observed how the most distinctively African aspect of the widespread belief in witchcraft is that a rival can project malevolent forces vast distances against you without his even consciously willing it:

    A colleague pointed out a few weeks ago, after hearing this story, that if [a belief in witchcraft] is nearly pan-African then perhaps some of it came to the New World. Prominent and not so prominent talkers from the American Black population come out with similar theories of vague and invisible forces that are oppressing people, like “institutional racism” and “white privilege.”
     
    I think it was the privileged old fat white leftist academic Peggy McIntosh who first coined the phrase, "white privilege."

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    At the very least Peggy McIntosh coined the idea of the “invisible backpack” (stuffed with privilege, no doubt, as well as all the money that belongs to everyone else.) I wonder if airport security is able to see those things with those new machines they’ve got.

  84. @biz
    @anon930

    It is an understatement to say that Sam Harris has had "some scrapes" with SJWs and Salon. Rather they have been hounding him for several years now, sending death threats, etc. It has completely dominated his life. Harris has transitioned from someone who is mostly concerned with the future of AI and other neuroscience issues to someone who is mostly concerned with the scourge of PC and what he calls the Regressive Left. Harris has even started to push back against BLM which led to an extremely rude encounter with comedian Hannibal Burress.

    I think Harris' trajectory is a preview of what will happen to many scientifically-minded people, who were liberals by default because conservatives embraced anti-intellectual nonsense like creationism and climate denial for so long, but now that liberals are being insane and directly threatening the exercise of thought itself these people will break from liberalism.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @anon930

    I remember Harris from some years ago as being someone who was in the vanguard of the New Atheism, which I interpret largely as a reaction to 9/11. The underlying idea is that belief in God causes all of these terrible things, so that we have to get people to recognize there is no god and therefore there will be no more irrational violence, as well, as, incidentally, any more opposition to positive things like abortion, stem cell research, LGBT rights, etc. etc.

    The bridge too far for Harris, IIRC, had to do with his rationalization of some Israeli activity in Gaza, which he refused to condemn, and, while he has always been sharply critical of Islam, he has not been as critical (or critical at all?) of Judaism, Israel, or Zionism.

    And that’s how neo-conservatism got started, as well.

    • Replies: @guest
    @SPMoore8

    More likely New Atheism (those are ironic capitalizations) was an Internet Thing. I can't rule 9/11 out, but it's gotta be as a doublethink situation. Only one side of the War on Terror is allowed to be criticized, and that's not the side that's clearly religiously motivated. I have noticed the "religion causes all war" argument repeated ad nauseam, but I wouldn't take that as evidence of an essential post-911 connection to the rise of snarky atheistic identification. Because most of the New Atheist Brights--Dawkins, Dennett, Hitchens, etc.--are (/were) evasive on Islam. Harris is the only one who really takes it to the Aloha Snackbars.

    They bring up war so often because it sounds worse than standing in the way of vacuuming fetuses out of women. They are allowed to criticize Muslims for throwing homos off of roofs, however, because right now they are outranked on the grievance chart.

    , @biz
    @SPMoore8

    Well that's just incorrect.

    Harris' collision course with Islam and Islam's useful idiots stems from him recognizing the (obvious) connection between Islamic terrorism and religious belief. As with other interests of his, he came at it from a neuroscience perspective, considering the connection between beliefs and actions. Useful idiots such as Glenn Greenwald, Juan Cole, and many others deny the connection between religious belief and terrorism. They claim that terrorism is simply a political expression, an act of desperation, or in some cases an act of male bonding. This is, of course, not supported by the data that shows that many Islamic terrorists have money, education, and other traits that rule out desperation, and make very sincere declarations of their faith as the motivation for their actions.

    This is why first Islam's useful idiots, and then SJWs in general, can't stand Harris, because he is a liberal (or possibly former liberal) who recognizes that one culture in the world produces monsters and a distinct lack of human flourishing because of its belief system.

    Replies: @anon930

    , @anon930
    @SPMoore8

    Yeah, Hitchens went from co-authoring a book with Edward Said about I/P called "Blaming the Victim" to basically being a neocon on foreign policy.

  85. @The Uncovenanted
    I wonder what a SJW would say if I were to deny my implicit bias as I would, say, a Freudian interpretation of my dreams by a psychotherapist. If I claimed to have no implicit bias, and my interlocutor were to say, "yes, you do" and I still denied it, would we be in a "no means yes" situation? The more I deny, the more it is true? I suppose the same would apply to a prospective sexual conquest ( a coed).

    Replies: @SPMoore8

    The SJW would refuse to budge and would “smh” and say that “you just don’t get it”. All of these are simply mental wrestling moves designed to get you to have the other person explain it all to you.

    As for “co-eds” (my mother was one in the 1930’s and never let anyone forget it) is synonymous with young women in college, because that’s the typical setting for this kind of manipulation, as you can glean from talking to women who came of age in the ’30’s, ’40’s, ’50’s, and even early ’60’s, or by reading the commentary of people like Dorothy Parker or Sylvia Plath, or even just by watching “Where the Boys Are.” BTW, Manson’s Family and the Symbionese Liberation Army were put together the same way.

  86. To paraphrase: Don’t be defensive about the term “implicit bias” and believe some kooky conspiracy theory about how it’s an academic code word for “racist”. It can be about something innocuous like buying fresh fruit from a fruit stand. Tim Kaine is quite interested in how the police choose the freshest apples and oranges. Feel better? Now, let me explain how “implicit bias” is an important code word for “racist”.

  87. @Foreign Expert
    Someone should ask Hillary what her implicit biases are.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @fish

    Her bias: that all of Bill’s conquests were Bimbos, narcissists, weaklings, trashy nobodies, whose lives deserved to be destroyed, or at least ridiculed. And, she assumed that all women who are losers, are the kind that stand by their man while baking cookies, not like she, who went to law school and all.

  88. I believe this video may force us to conclude that absolutely everyone suffers from the plague of implicit bias when it’s keying off of reality:

  89. @NickG

    But the same process can also take the form of unconsciously associating certain identities, like African-American, with undesirable attributes, like violence.
     
    More Orwellian inversion.

    Given that in America black males - who represent about 6.5% of the population - commit 50% of murders, and that there are similar disparities across the spectrum of crime; NOT making the association - forcing yourself not to notice - would be to exhibit bias. Being aware of this would be to be reality based.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @guest

    Who says bias isn’t reality-based? That’s the real trick. Prejudice is a good thing, but they make you think all prejudice is bad prejudice. All bias is unfair bias. All privilege is unearned privilege. All racism is irrational racism.

    Which is horse poopy. They probably admitted much in their papers and articles, or just enough to give them wiggle room. But it’s hard for us, on the outside, to argue otherwise. Because we end up sounding like Gordon Gecko defending greed.

  90. @Foreign Expert
    Someone should ask Hillary what her implicit biases are.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @fish

    Someone should ask Hillary what her implicit biases are.

    She is overtly biased towards being the President!

    Which I think should be an immediate DQ.

  91. Lets just face it. Leftism, liberalism, progressive, Marxism and social justice all have one thing in common. People with the irrational belief they can change reality by changing words and popular opinion. The New Normal is just losers who want you to accept the fact that they suck without blaming them. Whether their problems are genetic, or based on lack of responsibility is not the crux of the issue. They just want you to accept the suck. If we all accept the suck, they’ll feel better. What’s the worst that could happen? Extinction? Death seems like a small price to pay for feeling better when you’re a cretinous passive aggressive loser. That’s probably why I joined the Alt-Right. Being nice is too high a price to pay for being a loser. Death is right out of the question.

  92. @SPMoore8
    @biz

    I remember Harris from some years ago as being someone who was in the vanguard of the New Atheism, which I interpret largely as a reaction to 9/11. The underlying idea is that belief in God causes all of these terrible things, so that we have to get people to recognize there is no god and therefore there will be no more irrational violence, as well, as, incidentally, any more opposition to positive things like abortion, stem cell research, LGBT rights, etc. etc.

    The bridge too far for Harris, IIRC, had to do with his rationalization of some Israeli activity in Gaza, which he refused to condemn, and, while he has always been sharply critical of Islam, he has not been as critical (or critical at all?) of Judaism, Israel, or Zionism.

    And that's how neo-conservatism got started, as well.

    Replies: @guest, @biz, @anon930

    More likely New Atheism (those are ironic capitalizations) was an Internet Thing. I can’t rule 9/11 out, but it’s gotta be as a doublethink situation. Only one side of the War on Terror is allowed to be criticized, and that’s not the side that’s clearly religiously motivated. I have noticed the “religion causes all war” argument repeated ad nauseam, but I wouldn’t take that as evidence of an essential post-911 connection to the rise of snarky atheistic identification. Because most of the New Atheist Brights–Dawkins, Dennett, Hitchens, etc.–are (/were) evasive on Islam. Harris is the only one who really takes it to the Aloha Snackbars.

    They bring up war so often because it sounds worse than standing in the way of vacuuming fetuses out of women. They are allowed to criticize Muslims for throwing homos off of roofs, however, because right now they are outranked on the grievance chart.

  93. @SPMoore8
    @biz

    I remember Harris from some years ago as being someone who was in the vanguard of the New Atheism, which I interpret largely as a reaction to 9/11. The underlying idea is that belief in God causes all of these terrible things, so that we have to get people to recognize there is no god and therefore there will be no more irrational violence, as well, as, incidentally, any more opposition to positive things like abortion, stem cell research, LGBT rights, etc. etc.

    The bridge too far for Harris, IIRC, had to do with his rationalization of some Israeli activity in Gaza, which he refused to condemn, and, while he has always been sharply critical of Islam, he has not been as critical (or critical at all?) of Judaism, Israel, or Zionism.

    And that's how neo-conservatism got started, as well.

    Replies: @guest, @biz, @anon930

    Well that’s just incorrect.

    Harris’ collision course with Islam and Islam’s useful idiots stems from him recognizing the (obvious) connection between Islamic terrorism and religious belief. As with other interests of his, he came at it from a neuroscience perspective, considering the connection between beliefs and actions. Useful idiots such as Glenn Greenwald, Juan Cole, and many others deny the connection between religious belief and terrorism. They claim that terrorism is simply a political expression, an act of desperation, or in some cases an act of male bonding. This is, of course, not supported by the data that shows that many Islamic terrorists have money, education, and other traits that rule out desperation, and make very sincere declarations of their faith as the motivation for their actions.

    This is why first Islam’s useful idiots, and then SJWs in general, can’t stand Harris, because he is a liberal (or possibly former liberal) who recognizes that one culture in the world produces monsters and a distinct lack of human flourishing because of its belief system.

    • Replies: @anon930
    @biz

    Yeah, I mean from an immigration perspective it doesn't really matter what's motivating Muslims to behave badly, it just matters that the recent past suggests letting in large numbers of Muslims into a western country is bad for the people already living there. It shouldn't matter if the grievances are political (as Greenwald et. al suggest) or theological (as Harris suggests), either way Muslims make for trouble, and there isn't any evidence that the possible causes of all this allahuakhbaring are going away. Time to pick up the drawbridge, and stop inviting the world.

    Replies: @biz, @TheJester

  94. @Daniel Williams

    ... if you make the rote assumption that fruit stands have fresher produce, that’s implicit bias ...
     
    Even if a federal agency (say, the Department of Agriculture) painstakingly compiled an annual report demonstrating that produce from fruit stands is more likely to be fresh than produce from other sources?

    Replies: @Forbes

    Heaven forbid that your personal and specific experience, e.g. that fruit stands have fresher produce than chain grocery stores, influence your assumptions used in decision-making. You are expected (required?) to go through life without any preconceived notions about any situations you encounter. Life is to be experienced as random outcomes. All those learning experiences will just expose you to inconvenient facts–getting in the way of living a bias-free life!

    • Replies: @guest
    @Forbes

    The upshot is that if you do go through life without preconceived notions you're much more easily controlled. Our overlords have enough to do; no need to make life harder for them.

  95. @Anonymous
    "The challenge, he argues, isn’t to eliminate biases, but to try to interrupt them so we can act more often in ways that line up with our values. "

    A perfect case study is Bill's implicit bias to doink bimbos. As long as he performed coitus interruptus and came on the dress he could claim it lined up with his values and he did not have sex with another woman.

    Replies: @Forbes

    so we can act more often in ways that line up with our values

    Values that will be made clear upon completion of a 2-week tour in re-education camp.

  96. @Anonymous

    Our intellectual discourse has been Africanized enough that the Democratic nominee in the current year is running against the evil spell menace of “implicit bias” and “systemic racism.”
     
    Incidentally, it's not just Hillary with this magical or occult connection. As you've blogged about, Trump was strongly influenced by "The Power of Positive Thinking", which is based on occult magic. Mitch Horowitz wrote a fantastic cultural history on "Occult America" that's worth checking out:

    https://www.amazon.com/Occult-America-Seances-Circles-History/dp/0553385151

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOe1yt8HWp0

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    Thanks for posting that video. Horowitz seems to have written the book I have been hoping someone had written. Smart guy too.

  97. @biz
    @anon930

    It is an understatement to say that Sam Harris has had "some scrapes" with SJWs and Salon. Rather they have been hounding him for several years now, sending death threats, etc. It has completely dominated his life. Harris has transitioned from someone who is mostly concerned with the future of AI and other neuroscience issues to someone who is mostly concerned with the scourge of PC and what he calls the Regressive Left. Harris has even started to push back against BLM which led to an extremely rude encounter with comedian Hannibal Burress.

    I think Harris' trajectory is a preview of what will happen to many scientifically-minded people, who were liberals by default because conservatives embraced anti-intellectual nonsense like creationism and climate denial for so long, but now that liberals are being insane and directly threatening the exercise of thought itself these people will break from liberalism.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @anon930

    Yeah, it’s clear he’s really pissed off by political correctness, mainly because of what he sees as liberal naivete towards islam, but he hasn’t quite put it together yet. In his gut I think he knows the SJWs are dangerously wrong, but he doesn’t like the right for all the typical reasons one doesn’t like the right. He seems pretty hawkish tho, so he’s no friend of the iSteve crowd. But at least he’s growing more angry at the SJWs.

  98. @WhatEvvs
    @Anonymous

    Yes. I once read a complete & thorough demolition of the African origins of black slave customs. Many of them came from rural England. They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR. It was in a magazine article Before Internet, so no URL.

    Thanks to the edit feature, I found one example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_the_broom

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Bill

    They were very superstitious in rural England before the IR.

    Probably because they didn’t have Purell.

  99. @stillCARealist
    @SPMoore8

    What does the term "coeds" actually mean? Is is just "female students"? Maybe it just means "girls".

    I don't know how implicit bias and louche behavior intersect, but "bed coeds" is a phrase that needs to be erased from your grown-up, grandfatherly, well-educated vocabulary. It demeans both men and women.

    Replies: @guest, @No_0ne

    Very sexist and misogynist. Institutionally patriarchal, too. Probably xenophobic as well.

  100. @BB753
    @Jim Christian

    Except, this 6% of the population ( or less, perhaps 4%, to exclude old and/or decent Blacks) constitute the shock troops, the brownshirts of the Democratic Party and indeed of the very regime we live under.
    Our man Soros has spent a lot of money organizing these vibrant "youfs" into the BLM movement, also known as the "Schwartze Sturmabteilung", yet he's still looking far and wide for a worthy black and needless to say gay Roehm to energize and lead them. Obnoxious black lesbians majoring in Queer and Black studies just won't do to keep those boots firmly on the streets.

    Replies: @Bill

    The brown shirts were a reaction to the communist street fighters. The threat isn’t so much that Soros’s street fighters will “win.” What would they win, and who would they beat? They are nothing. Less than nothing. The threat is that they will call forth real brown shirts. The Nazis were powerful because they mobilized relatively normal, intelligent, skilled, competent white people. If you’re going to bet which way Weimerica is going next, you’re going to bet in a brown shirt direction.

    It may be fun to call the rich Jew a Nazi, but that’s not what he is.

  101. @SMK
    @anon930

    Sam Harris, arguably the world's sanest liberal, is excoriated as a "bigot" and 'racist" for telling the truth about Islam, i.e., the problem is the nature of Islam per se, the fundamental tenets of the Koran and other sacred texts, including the doctrine of Jihad, as espoused by the prophet and a majority of Muslims today and over the last 14 centuries, not the "perversion" of a "religion of peace" (George W. Bush) by a tiny fraction of "extremisst" and "radicals" who commit acts of terrorism and violence that most Muslims condemn and repudiate. If only Republicans and "truconservatives" were as honest and realistic and courageous.

    In response to such aspersions, he can say that "Islam is a religion, not a race," as did Richard Dawkins. But they will never tell the truth about race even if they cryptically believe the races are inherently different is respect to average intelligence, etc.

    Replies: @biz

    Agree with your comment, except let’s be careful. The statement that “Islam is a religion, not a race” is entirely correct, and an entirely appropriate rejoinder to the idiots and liars who claim that to oppose Islamic doctrine is “racist.”

    That all stands apart from the question of HBD in regard to races.

    • Replies: @SMK
    @biz

    I agree, obviously, and I wasn't implying otherwise. That said, however, the nature of Islam is racial in the sense that nearly all Muslims are non-European, overwhelmingly Arabs from North African and the Middle-East and also Persians and Turks and Afghans and Pakistanis and Somalis and other blacks from Africa and the U.S. and Canada and Western Europe. The feral young males who molested and assaulted hundreds of women and girls in Cologne and Hamburg and other German cities and who commit 90% of rapes in Sweden are motivated not only by the misogyny of Islam but also driven by IQs that are half-way between Africans and Europeans. Although Islam gives their crimes against women and girls a moral pretext and justification. what percentage would have committed such acts even if they weren't Muslims?

    Replies: @biz

  102. @Romanian
    This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of "original sin" type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin. Any unscrupulous huckster will be able, on a whim, to point his finger at you and say that you have implicit bias. What will your defense be then, since you've already accepted your fallen nature?

    This is basically a blank check for whatever they say you owe them, whenever they say it. It also guarantees that it will never stop. Like those cult people or the Communist leaders who can always point the finger at a wrecker, saboteur or even unconscious offender as being the reason why the Rapture or perfect prosperity never happened. This way, they will never have to account for the deficiencies in their methods and prescribed worldviews.

    Pence should have rolled with it and said that victimizing people for who they are is doubly wrong, so we must work with the idea of implicit bias existing and being unsolvable. Therefore, immigration must be completely halted and every immigrant or descendant of immigrant who is prone to being victimized by the implicit bias should be repatriated for their own good and psychological wellbeing.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Tracy

    This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of “original sin” type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin.

    In classical Christianity (Catholicism and Orthodoxy), the stain of original sin is removed formally by Baptism.

    If I’m understanding things correctly, people are misunderstanding what Mr. Sailer is trying to say. He’s not saying that implicit bias (which is just a fancy way of saying that we react subconsciously to things we’ve picked up on life) is an African idea, some notion that got carried over to the US on slave ships or something; he’s saying that the concept is used in the same ways accusations of witchcraft once were in Europe, and are now used in Africa today. In other words, hurling accusations of implicit bias is the witch hunt du jour.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Tracy


    In other words, hurling accusations of implicit bias is the witch hunt du jour.

     

    Yes. Nearly all of the SJW/cultural Marxist BS makes sense if you interpret it as a heresy of true Christianity. Human beings are inherently religious. When they abandon God, they find substitutes.
  103. @biz
    @SPMoore8

    Well that's just incorrect.

    Harris' collision course with Islam and Islam's useful idiots stems from him recognizing the (obvious) connection between Islamic terrorism and religious belief. As with other interests of his, he came at it from a neuroscience perspective, considering the connection between beliefs and actions. Useful idiots such as Glenn Greenwald, Juan Cole, and many others deny the connection between religious belief and terrorism. They claim that terrorism is simply a political expression, an act of desperation, or in some cases an act of male bonding. This is, of course, not supported by the data that shows that many Islamic terrorists have money, education, and other traits that rule out desperation, and make very sincere declarations of their faith as the motivation for their actions.

    This is why first Islam's useful idiots, and then SJWs in general, can't stand Harris, because he is a liberal (or possibly former liberal) who recognizes that one culture in the world produces monsters and a distinct lack of human flourishing because of its belief system.

    Replies: @anon930

    Yeah, I mean from an immigration perspective it doesn’t really matter what’s motivating Muslims to behave badly, it just matters that the recent past suggests letting in large numbers of Muslims into a western country is bad for the people already living there. It shouldn’t matter if the grievances are political (as Greenwald et. al suggest) or theological (as Harris suggests), either way Muslims make for trouble, and there isn’t any evidence that the possible causes of all this allahuakhbaring are going away. Time to pick up the drawbridge, and stop inviting the world.

    • Replies: @biz
    @anon930

    For immigration, no, it doesn't matter what the cause of the bad behavior is.

    But for other important questions it does matter, such as perhaps most importantly how we deal with terrorism. Greenwald et al. would say that Islamic terrorism happens because of legitimate grievances (tm) that they have against America and the West. If we would just stop doing anything militarily, and pay massive reparations to the Muslim world, make concessions in our countries such as making our women cover up, and stop supporting non-Muslims like Israel, East Timor, and the Thai government, terrorism would stop. In contrast, Harris would say (correctly) that they have been attacking and enslaving non-Muslims for 1400 years, since long before America existed, and the religious instructions for terrorism and war against infidels can be found spelled out very plainly in the Koran and the Hadith as well as in the manifestos of the terrorists themselves; and therefore terrorism is not connected to, and would not stop in the absence of, various terrestrial political issues including our attempts to defend ourselves militarily.

    The hilarious thing to me is that many people who comment on this website are so utterly masochistic that they actually take the obviously false Greenwaldian viewpoint, and claim that in the absence of various supposed grievances (drone attacks, support for Israel, promotion of gay rights) Islamists would be leaving us alone. This requires a profound cultivated ignorance of the past two millennia of world history.

    Replies: @anon930

    , @TheJester
    @anon930

    Circa 1937, the historian Hilaire Bulloc wrote an insightful essay on Islam as a Christian heresy rather than as a new religion. Of course, Mohammed thought the same of Christianity.

    https://www.ewtn.com/library/HOMELIBR/HERESY4.TXT

    The upshot is that two competing universal theologies such as Christianity and Islam cannot peacefully coexist when each consider the other a threatening heresy. They compete for the same religious, social, and political space.

    The hostitilty between Christianity and Islam is similar to the historic hostility between socialists and communists. One has to go.

  104. @SPMoore8
    @biz

    I remember Harris from some years ago as being someone who was in the vanguard of the New Atheism, which I interpret largely as a reaction to 9/11. The underlying idea is that belief in God causes all of these terrible things, so that we have to get people to recognize there is no god and therefore there will be no more irrational violence, as well, as, incidentally, any more opposition to positive things like abortion, stem cell research, LGBT rights, etc. etc.

    The bridge too far for Harris, IIRC, had to do with his rationalization of some Israeli activity in Gaza, which he refused to condemn, and, while he has always been sharply critical of Islam, he has not been as critical (or critical at all?) of Judaism, Israel, or Zionism.

    And that's how neo-conservatism got started, as well.

    Replies: @guest, @biz, @anon930

    Yeah, Hitchens went from co-authoring a book with Edward Said about I/P called “Blaming the Victim” to basically being a neocon on foreign policy.

  105. @Anonymous
    @SPMoore8

    Having some familiarity with Philosophy and its Ethics branch, I would be interested in understanding better what your friend meant. I'm not quite able to grasp it from your examples. Could you elaborate on his viewpoint? Did he offer some examples.

    Replies: @Abe

    Having some familiarity with Philosophy and its Ethics branch, I would be interested in understanding better what your friend meant. I’m not quite able to grasp it from your examples. Could you elaborate on his viewpoint? Did he offer some examples.

    I very much like the analogy of SPMoore’s “drunk philosopher” friend, even if it is only a partial account of reality (which is ironic given that the whole point of the analogy is to point out every philosophical account of reality has been/cannot help but be- partial).

    I think many very good examples would come to mind if you recalled the various philosophical schools of the classical world (Epicureans, Cynics, Stoics, Platonists, pre-Socratics). Each of these schools was very broad by modern philosophical standards, incorporating elements of science, cosmology, theology, and ethics all at once, and yet while having their incisive points ignoring or out-right distorting those parts of reality not congenial to them.

    In modern philosophy Positivists (Popper, early Wittgenstein) come to mind in their insistence that subjective areas of reality (beauty, morality) are outside the bounds of proper philosophy (“of that which we cannot speak we must remain silent”). More exact to your point, consider how the whole line of liberal ethics from Benton to Mills to Rawls considers only the individual and leaves out the collective (community, nation, religious denomination) as an object of moral concern. Thus you keep getting these recurring moral philosophic circle jerks where the public philosopher in question entirely misses the point. Is it OK to insult Islam (a collective) through, say, putting on a Draw Mahomet day? The liberal moral philosopher cannot admit there is a collective called “Islam” in play here (as that would then entail admitting there is a collective called “Christendom,” which may or may not be entitled to such interests as not having the bray of the muezzin echo in its streets 5 times/day, or choosing Sunday as one of its weekly days of rest rather than Friday), so he lamely frames the issue as one of the right of the Mahomet caricaturist to freedom of speech vs. that of individual Muslims to be free of “Islamophobia”. Or how weenies like Obama support BLM-aligned football players not standing up for the national anthem as they have the individual right to freedom of speech, while denying the nation as a collective has any competing rights, even while implicitly acknowledging the existence of said collective without which the protest does not even make sense.

  106. @iffen
    @Daniel Williams

    Racism is measured in Trayvons.

    Mini and mega-Hitlers sure had a short lifetime.

    Replies: @guest

    There are 6 million Trayvons to a Hitler.

  107. @Regular Joe
    Oh Come ON Steve. The Zietgiest ("spirit of the times")? Class consciousness and the activity of anti-revolutionary reactionary breakers? Struggle Sessions? Not to mention original sin or Divine Providence.... There is NO need to resort to smirking theories about Africanization to discuss conspiracy theories of broad based malevolent and subtle forces.

    It is actually clear that all this Lefty PC crap owes more to German philosophy and European Marxism than any goofy African witch doctor ideas of screwing virgins to cure aids or eating the flesh of albinos etc. This sort of smirking, smug, David Duke-esque dumb-assery does nothing to lend credibility to the very real issues the Alt Right and Race Realists need to deal with.

    It is one thing for dumbo Storm front Kluxer types to comment on your site, its another for you to stoop to their level. Implicit Bias lends itself to many critiques without resort to emberassing theories of it being a result of African Witchdoctorism translated thru hundreds of years of African Diaspora in the US. Jeesh.

    Replies: @guest

    Take your wet blanket home with you, spoilsport.

  108. @Forbes
    @Daniel Williams

    Heaven forbid that your personal and specific experience, e.g. that fruit stands have fresher produce than chain grocery stores, influence your assumptions used in decision-making. You are expected (required?) to go through life without any preconceived notions about any situations you encounter. Life is to be experienced as random outcomes. All those learning experiences will just expose you to inconvenient facts--getting in the way of living a bias-free life!

    Replies: @guest

    The upshot is that if you do go through life without preconceived notions you’re much more easily controlled. Our overlords have enough to do; no need to make life harder for them.

  109. @SPMoore8
    @WowJustWow

    This is very good: it means that many people have been trying to come up with words to describe this phenomenon and "kafkatrap" is a good addition to the lexicon. However the underlying psychic somersault is I think very old; it was, e.g., certainly an element in the trials of Joan of Arc. The challenge would be to bring all of these names together and clarify them.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It is a standard element of all witch trials since time immemorial that denial of guilt is itself evidence of guilt. Of course confession is also evidence of guilt – the whole point of a witch trial is that the outcome is predetermined and there is NO path to exoneration.

  110. @anon930
    @biz

    Yeah, I mean from an immigration perspective it doesn't really matter what's motivating Muslims to behave badly, it just matters that the recent past suggests letting in large numbers of Muslims into a western country is bad for the people already living there. It shouldn't matter if the grievances are political (as Greenwald et. al suggest) or theological (as Harris suggests), either way Muslims make for trouble, and there isn't any evidence that the possible causes of all this allahuakhbaring are going away. Time to pick up the drawbridge, and stop inviting the world.

    Replies: @biz, @TheJester

    For immigration, no, it doesn’t matter what the cause of the bad behavior is.

    But for other important questions it does matter, such as perhaps most importantly how we deal with terrorism. Greenwald et al. would say that Islamic terrorism happens because of legitimate grievances ™ that they have against America and the West. If we would just stop doing anything militarily, and pay massive reparations to the Muslim world, make concessions in our countries such as making our women cover up, and stop supporting non-Muslims like Israel, East Timor, and the Thai government, terrorism would stop. In contrast, Harris would say (correctly) that they have been attacking and enslaving non-Muslims for 1400 years, since long before America existed, and the religious instructions for terrorism and war against infidels can be found spelled out very plainly in the Koran and the Hadith as well as in the manifestos of the terrorists themselves; and therefore terrorism is not connected to, and would not stop in the absence of, various terrestrial political issues including our attempts to defend ourselves militarily.

    The hilarious thing to me is that many people who comment on this website are so utterly masochistic that they actually take the obviously false Greenwaldian viewpoint, and claim that in the absence of various supposed grievances (drone attacks, support for Israel, promotion of gay rights) Islamists would be leaving us alone. This requires a profound cultivated ignorance of the past two millennia of world history.

    • LOL: anon930
    • Replies: @anon930
    @biz


    legitimate grievances ™
     
    lol
  111. SMK says: • Website
    @biz
    @SMK

    Agree with your comment, except let's be careful. The statement that “Islam is a religion, not a race” is entirely correct, and an entirely appropriate rejoinder to the idiots and liars who claim that to oppose Islamic doctrine is "racist."

    That all stands apart from the question of HBD in regard to races.

    Replies: @SMK

    I agree, obviously, and I wasn’t implying otherwise. That said, however, the nature of Islam is racial in the sense that nearly all Muslims are non-European, overwhelmingly Arabs from North African and the Middle-East and also Persians and Turks and Afghans and Pakistanis and Somalis and other blacks from Africa and the U.S. and Canada and Western Europe. The feral young males who molested and assaulted hundreds of women and girls in Cologne and Hamburg and other German cities and who commit 90% of rapes in Sweden are motivated not only by the misogyny of Islam but also driven by IQs that are half-way between Africans and Europeans. Although Islam gives their crimes against women and girls a moral pretext and justification. what percentage would have committed such acts even if they weren’t Muslims?

    • Replies: @biz
    @SMK

    I agree that the mean IQ is a potential problem socially, but I really think the religious ideology is a much worse problem and the real crux of the matter.

    These terrorists that we often get who are of middle-to-upper class Pakistani origin, for example, probably have three digit IQs. It didn't stop them from leaving their comfortable office and professional jobs to seek martyr's paradise.

    Replies: @SMK, @SMK

  112. @Tracy
    @Romanian


    This implicit bias thing is crazy, because it is a sort of “original sin” type of argumentation. No matter how much you try and how much you sacrifice, you can never expiate the sin.
     
    In classical Christianity (Catholicism and Orthodoxy), the stain of original sin is removed formally by Baptism.

    If I'm understanding things correctly, people are misunderstanding what Mr. Sailer is trying to say. He's not saying that implicit bias (which is just a fancy way of saying that we react subconsciously to things we've picked up on life) is an African idea, some notion that got carried over to the US on slave ships or something; he's saying that the concept is used in the same ways accusations of witchcraft once were in Europe, and are now used in Africa today. In other words, hurling accusations of implicit bias is the witch hunt du jour.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    In other words, hurling accusations of implicit bias is the witch hunt du jour.

    Yes. Nearly all of the SJW/cultural Marxist BS makes sense if you interpret it as a heresy of true Christianity. Human beings are inherently religious. When they abandon God, they find substitutes.

  113. The liberal moral philosopher cannot admit there is a collective called “Islam” in play here (as that would then entail admitting there is a collective called “Christendom,” which may or may not be entitled to such interests as not having the bray of the muezzin echo in its streets 5 times/day, or choosing Sunday as one of its weekly days of rest rather than Friday), so he lamely frames the issue as one of the right of the Mahomet caricaturist to freedom of speech vs. that of individual Muslims to be free of “Islamophobia”.

    Abe — I just used my ‘Agree’, so allow me to say ‘excellent analysis’.

  114. @biz
    @anon930

    For immigration, no, it doesn't matter what the cause of the bad behavior is.

    But for other important questions it does matter, such as perhaps most importantly how we deal with terrorism. Greenwald et al. would say that Islamic terrorism happens because of legitimate grievances (tm) that they have against America and the West. If we would just stop doing anything militarily, and pay massive reparations to the Muslim world, make concessions in our countries such as making our women cover up, and stop supporting non-Muslims like Israel, East Timor, and the Thai government, terrorism would stop. In contrast, Harris would say (correctly) that they have been attacking and enslaving non-Muslims for 1400 years, since long before America existed, and the religious instructions for terrorism and war against infidels can be found spelled out very plainly in the Koran and the Hadith as well as in the manifestos of the terrorists themselves; and therefore terrorism is not connected to, and would not stop in the absence of, various terrestrial political issues including our attempts to defend ourselves militarily.

    The hilarious thing to me is that many people who comment on this website are so utterly masochistic that they actually take the obviously false Greenwaldian viewpoint, and claim that in the absence of various supposed grievances (drone attacks, support for Israel, promotion of gay rights) Islamists would be leaving us alone. This requires a profound cultivated ignorance of the past two millennia of world history.

    Replies: @anon930

    legitimate grievances ™

    lol

  115. I’ll ask about implicit bias radials at the tire shop when I’m in for an extricable alignment.

  116. “Implicit bias” appears to be just another phrase for inductive reasoning … the process of forming generalizations about life from experience. This is practically necessary for assessing risk and safely navigating our way through the world. Generalizations keeps us from eating poisoned food, getting run over by cars, or (if you are a female) getting raped in dark alleys. Call it prudence.

    Inductive reasoning is occasionally criticized for not offering absolute, concrete proof about how the world works since there are always exceptions to generalizations … which is why we call them generalizations. But, what’s the alternative?

    Example 1: You see a gruff-looking group of bikers wearing bandanas and leather jackets with “Hells Angels” emblems. They are grouped around your new sports car parked on the street. Is it rational for you to keep a close eye on your car? Of course! Maybe the gruff-looking bikers are a group of ministers who like to dress up and cut loose on Saturday afternoons once in awhile. This is a logical possibility … but highly unlikely.

    Example 2: You are walking down the street and see a group of Black males coming your way. They have that gangsta look about them. Is it rational for you to cross the street to avoid them? Of course! However, they might be serene members of the chess club at a local high school. This is a logical possibility … but highly unlikely.

    Example 3: You are a policeman cruising a Black neighborhood known as a haven for gangbangers and drugs. The gangbangers are usually armed and engage in pervasive Black-on-Black violence. You make a traffic stop. It is rational to be on your guard with your hand close to your weapon? Of course! That prudence might be what keeps you alive.

    SJWs often put themselves at risk by trying to purge themselves of “implicit bias”. They refuse to form generalizations and calculate risk as they navigate the world because the generalizations are inconsistent with their ideologies. From the news: A vacationing woman (a vocal feminist) roams an isolated beach in Columbia by herself and is raped … and, a woman hitchhikes across India by herself in work trucks and is raped. Perhaps these people can’t be helped. Their ideological purity makes them their own worst enemies. They also infect society with their bad judgment.

  117. @SMK
    @biz

    I agree, obviously, and I wasn't implying otherwise. That said, however, the nature of Islam is racial in the sense that nearly all Muslims are non-European, overwhelmingly Arabs from North African and the Middle-East and also Persians and Turks and Afghans and Pakistanis and Somalis and other blacks from Africa and the U.S. and Canada and Western Europe. The feral young males who molested and assaulted hundreds of women and girls in Cologne and Hamburg and other German cities and who commit 90% of rapes in Sweden are motivated not only by the misogyny of Islam but also driven by IQs that are half-way between Africans and Europeans. Although Islam gives their crimes against women and girls a moral pretext and justification. what percentage would have committed such acts even if they weren't Muslims?

    Replies: @biz

    I agree that the mean IQ is a potential problem socially, but I really think the religious ideology is a much worse problem and the real crux of the matter.

    These terrorists that we often get who are of middle-to-upper class Pakistani origin, for example, probably have three digit IQs. It didn’t stop them from leaving their comfortable office and professional jobs to seek martyr’s paradise.

    • Replies: @SMK
    @biz

    Your'e right about terrorists, generally (e.g., the 9/11 mass-murderers), but I was referring to low-IQ street criminals. I agree with you that religion is more crucial than race in respect to immigration from North Africa and the Middle-East. But that doesn't mean that race is negligible. Hypothetically, the transformation of France into an Arab-majority country would be a disaster for the native French population even if the Arabs were not Muslims but rather Hindus or whatever. But the irreversible transformation of France into a Muslim-majority country will be far more pernicious.

    , @SMK
    @biz

    Yes, the destruction of France by Islam and Arabs is inexorable even if Muslim immigration were ended tomorrow -which will never happen, of course, given the evil and insanity of the ruling-elites and governing-classes -given the disparate birth-rates of French and Muslim women. The transformation of France into a Muslim-ruled nation would simply take longer.

  118. @anon930
    @biz

    Yeah, I mean from an immigration perspective it doesn't really matter what's motivating Muslims to behave badly, it just matters that the recent past suggests letting in large numbers of Muslims into a western country is bad for the people already living there. It shouldn't matter if the grievances are political (as Greenwald et. al suggest) or theological (as Harris suggests), either way Muslims make for trouble, and there isn't any evidence that the possible causes of all this allahuakhbaring are going away. Time to pick up the drawbridge, and stop inviting the world.

    Replies: @biz, @TheJester

    Circa 1937, the historian Hilaire Bulloc wrote an insightful essay on Islam as a Christian heresy rather than as a new religion. Of course, Mohammed thought the same of Christianity.

    https://www.ewtn.com/library/HOMELIBR/HERESY4.TXT

    The upshot is that two competing universal theologies such as Christianity and Islam cannot peacefully coexist when each consider the other a threatening heresy. They compete for the same religious, social, and political space.

    The hostitilty between Christianity and Islam is similar to the historic hostility between socialists and communists. One has to go.

  119. Implicit bias is the Coalition of the Left Fringe groups equivalent to race realism to the Coalition of the Right Fringe groups. Both are rooted in fantasy.

  120. SMK says: • Website
    @biz
    @SMK

    I agree that the mean IQ is a potential problem socially, but I really think the religious ideology is a much worse problem and the real crux of the matter.

    These terrorists that we often get who are of middle-to-upper class Pakistani origin, for example, probably have three digit IQs. It didn't stop them from leaving their comfortable office and professional jobs to seek martyr's paradise.

    Replies: @SMK, @SMK

    Your’e right about terrorists, generally (e.g., the 9/11 mass-murderers), but I was referring to low-IQ street criminals. I agree with you that religion is more crucial than race in respect to immigration from North Africa and the Middle-East. But that doesn’t mean that race is negligible. Hypothetically, the transformation of France into an Arab-majority country would be a disaster for the native French population even if the Arabs were not Muslims but rather Hindus or whatever. But the irreversible transformation of France into a Muslim-majority country will be far more pernicious.

  121. SMK says: • Website
    @biz
    @SMK

    I agree that the mean IQ is a potential problem socially, but I really think the religious ideology is a much worse problem and the real crux of the matter.

    These terrorists that we often get who are of middle-to-upper class Pakistani origin, for example, probably have three digit IQs. It didn't stop them from leaving their comfortable office and professional jobs to seek martyr's paradise.

    Replies: @SMK, @SMK

    Yes, the destruction of France by Islam and Arabs is inexorable even if Muslim immigration were ended tomorrow -which will never happen, of course, given the evil and insanity of the ruling-elites and governing-classes -given the disparate birth-rates of French and Muslim women. The transformation of France into a Muslim-ruled nation would simply take longer.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS