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From the Washington Post:

By Associated Press January 30 at 11:44 PM
NEW YORK — The Latest on Ravi Ragbir, an immigrant activist facing deportation who was ordered freed from detention (all times local):

An immigrant activist who was freed from detention as he fights deportation has attended President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address.

Ravi Ragbir (RAH’-vee RAHG’-beer) was in the audience Tuesday night as Trump called on Congress to “set politics aside” and overhaul the nation’s immigration system.

Ragbir said afterward that it was difficult to see the reaction from people in the room who “totally bought into what he was saying.”

A judge in New York ordered Ragbir released from detention on Monday.

… Ragbir was invited to the speech as a guest of U.S. Rep. Yvette Clarke of Brooklyn, who didn’t attend.

 
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  1. Ragbir said afterward that it was difficult to see the reaction from people in the room who “totally bought into what he was saying.

    Hey asshole, if it was that difficult, you should have stayed home. No one made you attend.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @ScarletNumber

    No. He should have gone home to his own country.

  2. Seize him!
    Also, I like the phonetic assistance, with a name apparently lacking any truly foreign sounds, and with good vowel-consonant balance. All Ragbir’s consonants are fully aspirated? Really? Hindi has five R’s, I guess we got lucky and there was no need to explain where our tongue tips should trill. Ever see the tones of a Chinese newsmaker’s name denoted? Ever gotten help with “Zbigniew” or heard that it means “Dispeller of Anger” and is therefore the best name for a diplomat ever in spite of its foreboding spelling?

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross

    God forbid anyone would mispronounce the crook's name.

    Also note how the whole WaPo item never mentions why Ragbir is up for deportation, i.e. that he's a convicted criminal. They shade it to make it appear he's being deported, and that he has been 'detained', for his 'work' as an immigration activist.

    A purer example of narrative maintenance you're not likely to find.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @peterike
    @J.Ross


    Also, I like the phonetic assistance,

     

    Didn't all that start in the 1980s during Iran-Contra, when newsreaders suddenly started saying "Kneee-ca-raaaaa-guaaaaaaa" instead of "Nicaragua"? This was an early instance of virtue signalling, and my guess was meant as a jab at Reagan.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  3. One of the funniest moments for me was when President Trump announced the lowest unemployment rate for blacks in history (in contrast to the Obama years) and the camera panned to show the Congressional Black Caucasus members sitting in sullen, scowling silence.

    The same story for the Hispanics, except the camera panned to show only ONE Hispanic congressman (also with the same sour look).

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @Twinkie

    Of course they were scowling. They've all made careers out of getting welfare for their constituents so that they don't have to work.

  4. Ragbir was invited to the speech as a guest of U.S. Rep. Yvette Clarke of Brooklyn, who didn’t attend.

    So he was invited to go by someone who refused to go? WTF was Yvette doing? Was this some weird protest where she refuses to show up but sends a criminal to taunt Trump?

  5. @ScarletNumber

    Ragbir said afterward that it was difficult to see the reaction from people in the room who “totally bought into what he was saying.
     
    Hey asshole, if it was that difficult, you should have stayed home. No one made you attend.

    Replies: @Kylie

    No. He should have gone home to his own country.

  6. @J.Ross
    Seize him!
    Also, I like the phonetic assistance, with a name apparently lacking any truly foreign sounds, and with good vowel-consonant balance. All Ragbir's consonants are fully aspirated? Really? Hindi has five R's, I guess we got lucky and there was no need to explain where our tongue tips should trill. Ever see the tones of a Chinese newsmaker's name denoted? Ever gotten help with "Zbigniew" or heard that it means "Dispeller of Anger" and is therefore the best name for a diplomat ever in spite of its foreboding spelling?

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @peterike

    God forbid anyone would mispronounce the crook’s name.

    Also note how the whole WaPo item never mentions why Ragbir is up for deportation, i.e. that he’s a convicted criminal. They shade it to make it appear he’s being deported, and that he has been ‘detained’, for his ‘work’ as an immigration activist.

    A purer example of narrative maintenance you’re not likely to find.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Olorin

  7. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross

    God forbid anyone would mispronounce the crook's name.

    Also note how the whole WaPo item never mentions why Ragbir is up for deportation, i.e. that he's a convicted criminal. They shade it to make it appear he's being deported, and that he has been 'detained', for his 'work' as an immigration activist.

    A purer example of narrative maintenance you're not likely to find.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross


    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

     

    Very true. The same thing happens, as you noted, when western media try to provide 'guidelines' to pronouncing Chinese names and words, which in reality require very accurate replication of tones to make them meaningful.

    It's indeed a form of signalling both multiculti virtue, and that the speaker is a 'World Citizen' who know the Real Names of places and people, and who is busy planning an amazing trip to 'Roma' and 'Firenze'.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    , @Olorin
    @J.Ross

    Accurate.

    I figured it was a WaPo/Bezos trial balloon for moving toward presenting all texts in IPA.

    No, not India Pale Ale.

    http://www.ipachart.com/

    Though I thought it seemed very racist that they didn't similarly transphoneme-ulate Yvette Clarke's name. What with black Americans' taste for nonstandard orthography.

    https://blacksnob.com/2009/05/26/whats-in-a-really-ghetto-name-a-lot-of-foolishness-unconventional-wisdom-guest-post/

    But I guess Dems are getting ready to throw blacks under the bus for larger and more tractable voter demographics.

  8. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Olorin

    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

    Very true. The same thing happens, as you noted, when western media try to provide ‘guidelines’ to pronouncing Chinese names and words, which in reality require very accurate replication of tones to make them meaningful.

    It’s indeed a form of signalling both multiculti virtue, and that the speaker is a ‘World Citizen’ who know the Real Names of places and people, and who is busy planning an amazing trip to ‘Roma’ and ‘Firenze’.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    How well versed in "western media" are you really? Are you using "western" as a pretentious synonym for Anglo/American or are you really fluent in all "western" languages and a reader of news in all these languages?

    , @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    same thing [fake sensitivity] happens ... when western media try to provide ‘guidelines’ to pronouncing Chinese names and words
     
    Have you noticed how ALL newscasters insist in pronouncing Bei-Jing as Bei-ZHing with a glide sound as in French fromAGE or Russian BreZHnev?

    The actual Mandarin pronunciation of the "j" sound is quite close to the "j" in jungle.

    This bizarre COLLECTIVE AFFECTATION seems to have started when Nixon re-opened relations with China and a bunch of "Moscow correspondents" were repurposed and posted to "BeiZHing." Most of them had only pidgin Russian but were used to saying BreZHnev on a daily basis.

    Now, junior network staffers/staffettes with a knowledge of basic Mandarin dare not notice that the emperor has no clothes.

    (N.B.: Mandarin does have a sound transliterated as ZH in "Pinyin," but this sound is pronounced more like dj, e.g. Zhang is pronounced Djang.)

    Replies: @larry lurker

  9. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross


    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

     

    Very true. The same thing happens, as you noted, when western media try to provide 'guidelines' to pronouncing Chinese names and words, which in reality require very accurate replication of tones to make them meaningful.

    It's indeed a form of signalling both multiculti virtue, and that the speaker is a 'World Citizen' who know the Real Names of places and people, and who is busy planning an amazing trip to 'Roma' and 'Firenze'.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    How well versed in “western media” are you really? Are you using “western” as a pretentious synonym for Anglo/American or are you really fluent in all “western” languages and a reader of news in all these languages?

  10. You know society is splintering when the newspapers now insert phonetic guides to pronunciation for the weird, alien names of the people they report on whilst intimating those same people are as American as apple pie. These notes are understandable and acceptable for an article about some zany dictator in Chechnya or the chieftain of some cannibals in Papua New Guinea, but in this context, the very fact such nonsense was deemed necessary gives the lie to the suggestion the guy belongs here. What’s more, had he been at least so decent as to immigrate legally and graciously the way so many did back in the day, he’d long since have adopted a reasonable name to show a bona fides to assimilate and garner acceptance as an American. If Chaim Witz and Lily Chauchoin could become Gene Simmons and Claudette Colbert, this dick-knuckle could at least be Ronny Rogers or some damn thing.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    Splintering is right - you know that you've got no more assimilation going on when the immigrants don't bother to change their unpronounceable names anymore. They no longer care whether any Americans can pronounce it or not, as they will not need to deal with any.

    It used to be that Orientals would pick an old-fashioned American name that may or may not come somewhat close to the sound of their names. In fact, I know of, but haven't met yet, a girl who picked the name "Sweetie" as her Engligh name! Even the other Chinese girls found it pretty funny.

    BTW, at least some of the Chinese ladies that I've run into still pick an American word for the kids' "English" names, but now they are doing that last-name for first-lane thing just like the trend! Haha, Chinese Tyler, Benson, Smith ... etc. Kudos for fitting in, but I'd really call you an American if you'd have named the boy after a man of the cloth, called him Amos Moses.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Sgt. Joe Friday

    , @Anon
    @Autochthon

    As other commenters have noted, Ravi Ragbir is not a difficult name to pronounce, not to mention that the "pronunciation guide" is idiotic. In fact Mr. Ragbir has, I think, shortened at least his first name.

    I was going to say that your other examples were in showbiz, but let's face it, this guy is too. I should expect more from him in the way of entertainment.

  11. @Autochthon
    You know society is splintering when the newspapers now insert phonetic guides to pronunciation for the weird, alien names of the people they report on whilst intimating those same people are as American as apple pie. These notes are understandable and acceptable for an article about some zany dictator in Chechnya or the chieftain of some cannibals in Papua New Guinea, but in this context, the very fact such nonsense was deemed necessary gives the lie to the suggestion the guy belongs here. What's more, had he been at least so decent as to immigrate legally and graciously the way so many did back in the day, he'd long since have adopted a reasonable name to show a bona fides to assimilate and garner acceptance as an American. If Chaim Witz and Lily Chauchoin could become Gene Simmons and Claudette Colbert, this dick-knuckle could at least be Ronny Rogers or some damn thing.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon

    Splintering is right – you know that you’ve got no more assimilation going on when the immigrants don’t bother to change their unpronounceable names anymore. They no longer care whether any Americans can pronounce it or not, as they will not need to deal with any.

    It used to be that Orientals would pick an old-fashioned American name that may or may not come somewhat close to the sound of their names. In fact, I know of, but haven’t met yet, a girl who picked the name “Sweetie” as her Engligh name! Even the other Chinese girls found it pretty funny.

    BTW, at least some of the Chinese ladies that I’ve run into still pick an American word for the kids’ “English” names, but now they are doing that last-name for first-lane thing just like the trend! Haha, Chinese Tyler, Benson, Smith … etc. Kudos for fitting in, but I’d really call you an American if you’d have named the boy after a man of the cloth, called him Amos Moses.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Plenty of Indians in the UK have temple/mosque names as well as their pub names. I know one whose “official” name is Sota whose “real-life” name is Charlie Taxidriver.

    , @Sgt. Joe Friday
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I have done business for many years in places like Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore and it's always amused me that the business people there - who have common Chinese surnames like Deng, Wong, Lim, Tan, etc. etc - use given names for business like Sandy, Dicky, George, Wendy, Mary Ellen, etc. etc.

    Although I've got to say my favorite belongs to a young man who goes by the name "Spark Wang."

  12. OMG, he’s a scofflaw AND a SnowFlake.

  13. Ravi Ragbir (RAH’-vee RAHG’-beer)

    Just in case you thought it was pronounced RAG-hed. Is it WaPo policy to phonetically render all non-Anglo names?

  14. I don’t see how an everyday illegal that qualifies for this potential deal could oppose it. The Dems are going to have an issue on their hands.

  15. Maybe the fake news showed him in his seat at some point with no name banner on the screen. But I don’t think he was ever on TV. So except for immigration-focused people, who would even know this scumbag was there? What’s the point of inviting a troll guest if nobody knows about it?

  16. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    Splintering is right - you know that you've got no more assimilation going on when the immigrants don't bother to change their unpronounceable names anymore. They no longer care whether any Americans can pronounce it or not, as they will not need to deal with any.

    It used to be that Orientals would pick an old-fashioned American name that may or may not come somewhat close to the sound of their names. In fact, I know of, but haven't met yet, a girl who picked the name "Sweetie" as her Engligh name! Even the other Chinese girls found it pretty funny.

    BTW, at least some of the Chinese ladies that I've run into still pick an American word for the kids' "English" names, but now they are doing that last-name for first-lane thing just like the trend! Haha, Chinese Tyler, Benson, Smith ... etc. Kudos for fitting in, but I'd really call you an American if you'd have named the boy after a man of the cloth, called him Amos Moses.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Sgt. Joe Friday

    Plenty of Indians in the UK have temple/mosque names as well as their pub names. I know one whose “official” name is Sota whose “real-life” name is Charlie Taxidriver.

  17. this SOTU was a triumph for the Establishment, for the media, for the globalists, for Big Business…it was a cuck-out of MASSIVE proportions by Trump….

    LOL @ you all celebrating this cuck-out..

  18. Just in case you thought it was pronounced RAG-hed. Is it WaPo policy to phonetically render all non-Anglo names?

  19. @Twinkie
    One of the funniest moments for me was when President Trump announced the lowest unemployment rate for blacks in history (in contrast to the Obama years) and the camera panned to show the Congressional Black Caucasus members sitting in sullen, scowling silence.

    The same story for the Hispanics, except the camera panned to show only ONE Hispanic congressman (also with the same sour look).

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

    Of course they were scowling. They’ve all made careers out of getting welfare for their constituents so that they don’t have to work.

  20. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    You know society is splintering when the newspapers now insert phonetic guides to pronunciation for the weird, alien names of the people they report on whilst intimating those same people are as American as apple pie. These notes are understandable and acceptable for an article about some zany dictator in Chechnya or the chieftain of some cannibals in Papua New Guinea, but in this context, the very fact such nonsense was deemed necessary gives the lie to the suggestion the guy belongs here. What's more, had he been at least so decent as to immigrate legally and graciously the way so many did back in the day, he'd long since have adopted a reasonable name to show a bona fides to assimilate and garner acceptance as an American. If Chaim Witz and Lily Chauchoin could become Gene Simmons and Claudette Colbert, this dick-knuckle could at least be Ronny Rogers or some damn thing.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon

    As other commenters have noted, Ravi Ragbir is not a difficult name to pronounce, not to mention that the “pronunciation guide” is idiotic. In fact Mr. Ragbir has, I think, shortened at least his first name.

    I was going to say that your other examples were in showbiz, but let’s face it, this guy is too. I should expect more from him in the way of entertainment.

  21. @J.Ross
    Seize him!
    Also, I like the phonetic assistance, with a name apparently lacking any truly foreign sounds, and with good vowel-consonant balance. All Ragbir's consonants are fully aspirated? Really? Hindi has five R's, I guess we got lucky and there was no need to explain where our tongue tips should trill. Ever see the tones of a Chinese newsmaker's name denoted? Ever gotten help with "Zbigniew" or heard that it means "Dispeller of Anger" and is therefore the best name for a diplomat ever in spite of its foreboding spelling?

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @peterike

    Also, I like the phonetic assistance,

    Didn’t all that start in the 1980s during Iran-Contra, when newsreaders suddenly started saying “Kneee-ca-raaaaa-guaaaaaaa” instead of “Nicaragua”? This was an early instance of virtue signalling, and my guess was meant as a jab at Reagan.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @peterike

    Married with Children named its TV reporter Miranda Veracruz de la Hoya Cardenal who of course pronounced her own name with a lot of verve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

  22. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    Splintering is right - you know that you've got no more assimilation going on when the immigrants don't bother to change their unpronounceable names anymore. They no longer care whether any Americans can pronounce it or not, as they will not need to deal with any.

    It used to be that Orientals would pick an old-fashioned American name that may or may not come somewhat close to the sound of their names. In fact, I know of, but haven't met yet, a girl who picked the name "Sweetie" as her Engligh name! Even the other Chinese girls found it pretty funny.

    BTW, at least some of the Chinese ladies that I've run into still pick an American word for the kids' "English" names, but now they are doing that last-name for first-lane thing just like the trend! Haha, Chinese Tyler, Benson, Smith ... etc. Kudos for fitting in, but I'd really call you an American if you'd have named the boy after a man of the cloth, called him Amos Moses.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Sgt. Joe Friday

    I have done business for many years in places like Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore and it’s always amused me that the business people there – who have common Chinese surnames like Deng, Wong, Lim, Tan, etc. etc – use given names for business like Sandy, Dicky, George, Wendy, Mary Ellen, etc. etc.

    Although I’ve got to say my favorite belongs to a young man who goes by the name “Spark Wang.”

  23. Delighted to hear that Ragbir had a difficult evening.
    Justin Trudeau is struggling too:

    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/category/laugh-of-the-day/

    Still not tired of winning!

  24. There’s a real simple solution to his dilemma: He has to go back.

  25. @J.Ross
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Olorin

    Accurate.

    I figured it was a WaPo/Bezos trial balloon for moving toward presenting all texts in IPA.

    No, not India Pale Ale.

    http://www.ipachart.com/

    Though I thought it seemed very racist that they didn’t similarly transphoneme-ulate Yvette Clarke’s name. What with black Americans’ taste for nonstandard orthography.

    https://blacksnob.com/2009/05/26/whats-in-a-really-ghetto-name-a-lot-of-foolishness-unconventional-wisdom-guest-post/

    But I guess Dems are getting ready to throw blacks under the bus for larger and more tractable voter demographics.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @J.Ross


    My point was, this is both virtue signalling fake sensitivity and also Bull Nye style fake learning. Hindi has the most scientific writing system of any major language and it takes more than an ACcent deNOted by capitaliZAtion to introDUCE it properly.

     

    Very true. The same thing happens, as you noted, when western media try to provide 'guidelines' to pronouncing Chinese names and words, which in reality require very accurate replication of tones to make them meaningful.

    It's indeed a form of signalling both multiculti virtue, and that the speaker is a 'World Citizen' who know the Real Names of places and people, and who is busy planning an amazing trip to 'Roma' and 'Firenze'.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    same thing [fake sensitivity] happens … when western media try to provide ‘guidelines’ to pronouncing Chinese names and words

    Have you noticed how ALL newscasters insist in pronouncing Bei-Jing as Bei-ZHing with a glide sound as in French fromAGE or Russian BreZHnev?

    The actual Mandarin pronunciation of the “j” sound is quite close to the “j” in jungle.

    This bizarre COLLECTIVE AFFECTATION seems to have started when Nixon re-opened relations with China and a bunch of “Moscow correspondents” were repurposed and posted to “BeiZHing.” Most of them had only pidgin Russian but were used to saying BreZHnev on a daily basis.

    Now, junior network staffers/staffettes with a knowledge of basic Mandarin dare not notice that the emperor has no clothes.

    (N.B.: Mandarin does have a sound transliterated as ZH in “Pinyin,” but this sound is pronounced more like dj, e.g. Zhang is pronounced Djang.)

    • Replies: @larry lurker
    @Anonymous


    Have you noticed how ALL newscasters insist in pronouncing Bei-Jing as Bei-ZHing with a glide sound as in French fromAGE or Russian BreZHnev?

    The actual Mandarin pronunciation of the “j” sound is quite close to the “j” in jungle.
     
    It's just a hyperforeignism. They do it with the "j" in Taj Mahal too. "Huh, looks foreign. I think 'j' is pronounced 'zh' in foreign languages."

    I saw a Mandarin instructor who introduced Pinyin by first reminding you that "Pinyin is not English. It's also not French."

    I think the sound represented in Pinyin by "r" is the closest thing Mandarin has to /ʒ/ (French "j").
  27. @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    same thing [fake sensitivity] happens ... when western media try to provide ‘guidelines’ to pronouncing Chinese names and words
     
    Have you noticed how ALL newscasters insist in pronouncing Bei-Jing as Bei-ZHing with a glide sound as in French fromAGE or Russian BreZHnev?

    The actual Mandarin pronunciation of the "j" sound is quite close to the "j" in jungle.

    This bizarre COLLECTIVE AFFECTATION seems to have started when Nixon re-opened relations with China and a bunch of "Moscow correspondents" were repurposed and posted to "BeiZHing." Most of them had only pidgin Russian but were used to saying BreZHnev on a daily basis.

    Now, junior network staffers/staffettes with a knowledge of basic Mandarin dare not notice that the emperor has no clothes.

    (N.B.: Mandarin does have a sound transliterated as ZH in "Pinyin," but this sound is pronounced more like dj, e.g. Zhang is pronounced Djang.)

    Replies: @larry lurker

    Have you noticed how ALL newscasters insist in pronouncing Bei-Jing as Bei-ZHing with a glide sound as in French fromAGE or Russian BreZHnev?

    The actual Mandarin pronunciation of the “j” sound is quite close to the “j” in jungle.

    It’s just a hyperforeignism. They do it with the “j” in Taj Mahal too. “Huh, looks foreign. I think ‘j’ is pronounced ‘zh’ in foreign languages.”

    I saw a Mandarin instructor who introduced Pinyin by first reminding you that “Pinyin is not English. It’s also not French.”

    I think the sound represented in Pinyin by “r” is the closest thing Mandarin has to /ʒ/ (French “j”).

  28. @peterike
    @J.Ross


    Also, I like the phonetic assistance,

     

    Didn't all that start in the 1980s during Iran-Contra, when newsreaders suddenly started saying "Kneee-ca-raaaaa-guaaaaaaa" instead of "Nicaragua"? This was an early instance of virtue signalling, and my guess was meant as a jab at Reagan.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Married with Children named its TV reporter Miranda Veracruz de la Hoya Cardenal who of course pronounced her own name with a lot of verve.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @ScarletNumber

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1RlWqY5kww

    , @EdwardM
    @ScarletNumber

    I think years ago Saturday Night Live used to parody this. A Hispanic would speak in ordinary unaccented English except when he got a word like Guatemala he would say, "Whaaaat-ey-MALLL-ahh." I suppose such a skit would never fly today.

    They do this on Al Jazeera too. Western-educated Arabs with minimal accents turn on the conspicuous ethnicity when pronouncing Arabic words, e.g., guttural "Baaaaa-CHAYEN" or "CHAAA-tr" for those countries.

  29. @ScarletNumber
    @peterike

    Married with Children named its TV reporter Miranda Veracruz de la Hoya Cardenal who of course pronounced her own name with a lot of verve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

  30. @ScarletNumber
    @peterike

    Married with Children named its TV reporter Miranda Veracruz de la Hoya Cardenal who of course pronounced her own name with a lot of verve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @EdwardM

    I think years ago Saturday Night Live used to parody this. A Hispanic would speak in ordinary unaccented English except when he got a word like Guatemala he would say, “Whaaaat-ey-MALLL-ahh.” I suppose such a skit would never fly today.

    They do this on Al Jazeera too. Western-educated Arabs with minimal accents turn on the conspicuous ethnicity when pronouncing Arabic words, e.g., guttural “Baaaaa-CHAYEN” or “CHAAA-tr” for those countries.

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