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From the New York Times:

Goldman Sachs, Ozy Media and a \$40 Million Conference Call Gone Wrong

The digital media company has raised eyebrows for its claims about its audience size for years. Then came the strange voice on the phone.

By Ben Smith
Sept. 26, 2021

This past winter, Goldman Sachs was closing in on a \$40 million investment in Ozy, a digital media company founded in 2013, and there seemed to be a lot of reasons to do the deal. Ozy boasted of a large audience for its general interest website, its newsletters and its videos, and the company had a charismatic chief executive, Carlos Watson, a onetime cable news anchor who had worked at Goldman Sachs early in his career. And, crucially, Ozy said it had a great relationship with YouTube, where many of its videos attracted more than a million views.

That’s what the Zoom videoconference on Feb. 2 that Ozy arranged between the Goldman Sachs asset management division and YouTube was supposed to be about. The scheduled participants included Alex Piper, the head of unscripted programming for YouTube Originals. He was running late and apologized to the Goldman Sachs team, saying he’d had trouble logging onto Zoom, and he suggested that the meeting be moved to a conference call, according to four people who were briefed on the meeting, all of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal details of a private discussion.

In other words, the person saying he was the Youtube executive Alex Piper apparently never showed his face on Zoom to Goldman Sachs, but instead, via audio or text or email, asked to switch to an audio-only conference call.

Once everyone had made the switch to an old-fashioned conference call, the guest told the bankers what they had been wanting to hear: that Ozy was a great success on YouTube, racking up significant views and ad dollars, and that Mr. Watson was as good a leader as he seemed to be. As he spoke, however, the man’s voice began to sound strange to the Goldman Sachs team, as though it might have been digitally altered, the four people said.

Is there a digital effect you can click on entitled Silicon Valley Executive? What does that sound like?

After the meeting, someone on the Goldman Sachs side reached out to Mr. Piper, not through the Gmail address that Mr. Watson had provided before the meeting, but through Mr. Piper’s assistant at YouTube. That’s when things got weird.

A confused Mr. Piper told the Goldman Sachs investor that he had never spoken with her before. Someone else, it seemed, had been playing the part of Mr. Piper on the call with Ozy.

When YouTube learned that someone had apparently impersonated one of their executives at a business meeting, its security team started an investigation, the company confirmed to me. The inquiry didn’t get far before a name emerged: Within days, Mr. Watson had apologized profusely to Goldman Sachs, saying the voice on the call belonged to Samir Rao, the co-founder and chief operating officer of Ozy, according to the four people.

Samir Rao doesn’t look much like Alex Piper, which may explain why he didn’t want to impersonate Piper in a video conference.

He probably should have risked video but worn both a mask and a shaded plastic visor.

In his apology to Goldman Sachs and in an email to me on Friday, Mr. Watson attributed the incident to a mental health crisis and shared what he said were details of Mr. Rao’s diagnosis.

“Samir is a valued colleague and a close friend,” Mr. Watson said. “I’m proud that we stood by him while he struggled, and we’re all glad to see him now thriving again.”

He added that Mr. Rao took time off from work after the call and is now back at Ozy. Mr. Rao did not reply to requests for comment.

Ozy was born in 2013 as a Gen X dream of what millennial media ought to be: earnest, policy-focused, inclusive, slickly sans-serif. Other ventures of the same era, Mic and Fusion, projected similar images.

Ozy’s public face was Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. In addition to his early-career stop at Goldman Sachs, he worked at McKinsey & Company and was an anchor on MSNBC for part of 2009. His co-founder, Mr. Rao, also came from Goldman Sachs, via Harvard.

Mr. Watson raised the money to start Ozy from a list of blue-chip friends. Laurene Powell Jobs, who had co-founded a college prep nonprofit with Mr. Watson in 1997, invested and joined the Ozy board. The Silicon Valley venture capitalist Ron Conway also invested, as did David Drummond, who was then Google’s chief legal officer.

In 2014, Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount. In 2019, Ozy also raised \$35 million from a group led by Mr. Lasry [co-owner of the NBA champion Milwaukee Bucks], a boon that included money from the media-focused investment bank LionTree and the radio and podcast company iHeart Media. The Ford Foundation, seeking to support a minority-led company, also backed it with grants, its president, [gay black] Darren Walker, said. The data service PitchBook reports that Ozy had raised more than \$83 million by April 2020 and valued itself at \$159 million….

… Ozy reached nearly 2.5 million people during some months in 2018, but only 230,000 people in June 2021 and 479,000 in July….

I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.

“I’ve never heard an explanation of Ozy that made sense to me,” said Brian Morrissey, the former editor in chief of Digiday, a publication covering digital media and the tech industry, who now writes The Rebooting, a newsletter focused on media businesses. He said he was struck by the company’s claims, adding, “then you do the gut check, and never once in my life has a piece of content from Ozy crossed into my world organically.”

I’ve never heard of Ozy until right now.

… On the channel, many videos have more than a million views but fewer than a hundred comments, an unusual ratio for YouTube that suggests the views aren’t coming from regular YouTube watchers, Mr. Urgo said. Other videos on the channel have fewer than a thousand views. …

While Mr. Watson often disavowed an interest in turning the company into a vehicle for his own broadcast talent, his genial style of interviewing has carried most of the shows

In other words, the black CEO is a pretty talented celebrity schmoozer, but he’s trying to get his gig valued at Silicon Valley multiples by claiming it’s a growth business rather than him just hustling up interviews. I bet, without any evidence, that he’s inspired by comedian/interviewer Byron Allen, who is said to be worth \$450 million due to various business deals that I can’t quite wrap my head around.

… The president of the Ford Foundation, Mr. Walker, said in an email that he had confidence in Ozy. “We need new media companies to challenge the status quo, shake things up, and go deep on the issues that matter most,” he said. “In an increasingly diverse world, it’s no coincidence that a company with co-founders of Black and Indian descent would be so successful.”

And Ozy did not allow the episode to curb its fund-raising efforts. In April, two months after Goldman Sachs walked away, the company raised another round of financing, two people familiar with the transaction said.

If Goldman Sachs is the smart money, investing in firms abandoned by Goldman makes you … what … the Really Smart Money?

 
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  1. There’s a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Greed?

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Anonymous

    , @JimB
    @Anon

    What? No grand jury and indictment for fraud? I guess NY AG Letitia James is too busy filing bogus charges against Trump and attending the MET gala to prosecute a brutha

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Anon


    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?
     
    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @dvorak

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Anon


    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?
     
    THANK YOU COME AGAIN!

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder
    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Anon

    The legal terms are fraud and criminal impersonation.

    Yet another AA scam, including playing the crazy card.

  2. I can’t be the only person waiting for Ellen Pao’s take on this…

    • LOL: Abe
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @DuanDiRen

    Pao v Rao - fight to the death, no bars held.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  3. @Anon
    There's a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimB, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Sick of Orcs, @Nicholas Stix

    Greed?

    • Agree: Captain Tripps
    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    How bad can greed be when put up against white supremacy??

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    Greed?
     
    Lol, you’d think with the amount of money involved they could hire a good impersonator. A former DEA S/A/C once told me that drug cartels will enlist people with photographic memories to act as phony informants to send investigators down time-consuming dead-end trails. But then again cartel operators are practical men who need practical solutions to problems. They didn’t go to Harvard and Stanford after all.
  4. slickly sans-serif

    No comment.

    • Agree: El Dato
  5. Mr. Rao took time off from work after the call and is now back at Ozy.

    Yes, it’s privilege, but it’s the new good kind of privilege, not the bad old kind. Besides we have many people [even here] telling us that Asians and Africans are still superior to white people [lower case please] and/or are just doing what white people have always done [insert anecdotes of your choice].

    • Agree: bomag, JackOH, GeneralRipper
    • LOL: Forbes, Charlotte
    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @Hangnail Hans

    “it’s the new good kind of privilege”

    Reminds of an article I read a decade or more ago: the author, a black female director of some nonprofit, was talking about mental health issues and work. Seems she herself had a condition which occasionally required fleeing her job and checking into a five star hotel for two or three days of pampering. The board of her organization was very understanding! I had the impression it was actually paying for these mini-vacations. She was an early example of a tired black woman, I guess.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  6. Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. In addition to his early-career stop at Goldman Sachs, he worked at McKinsey & Company and was an anchor on MSNBC for part of 2009. His co-founder, Mr. Rao, also came from Goldman Sachs, via Harvard.

    Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount. The Ford Foundation, seeking to support a minority-led company, also backed it with grants

    Now here’s something funny. I was going to say that young people today wouldn’t believe that most of these were august institutions before their names had been dragged through the mud so many times in recent decades.

    But the “funny” part is that young people believe they are still august institutions, and more: many young people believe these institutions are just now gaining credibility due to efforts such as those detailed in this article.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Hangnail Hans

    "Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. "

    I was going to say, "submitted without comment," but now I actually think just "huh" will suffice.

    , @Anon
    @Hangnail Hans

    Thus guy is yet another black elite law school graduate who seems never to have practiced law. They turn tail pretty fast when they learn that the hours are brutal, and partnership is a remaining bastion of meritocracy.

  7. Does the Ford Foundation actually care about ROI?

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @anon

    No evidence that it does.

    , @Half Canadian
    @anon

    They're a non-profit. As long as their endowment can pay the employees, they won't care.

  8. You’re so………… whiny

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @anon

    Steve does a great job of documenting the grift and making us laugh. If you don’t understand his sense of humor then maybe the site isn’t for you. Malcolm Gladwell didn’t understand Norm MacDonald’s sense of humor so you’ve got that going for you.

  9. “then you do the gut check, and never once in my life has a piece of content from Ozy crossed into my world organically.”

    Several images come to mind and they are all pretty organic.

  10. OT for later:

    Dutch PM receives extra security on high alert over fears of Moroccan Mafia kidnapping plot – media

    [MORE]

    Citing “well-informed sources” on Monday, Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported that suspicious “spotters” who are believed to be affiliated with the Moroccan Mafia, also known as the Mocro Mafia, were observed near Rutte and that he has subsequently been receiving extra security on high alert.

    De Telegraaf also reported that such spotters are commonly deployed by the mafia before an attack is set to take place, which could include kidnapping or even assassination. Spotters were deployed before the 2019 murder of lawyer Derk Wiersum, who was shot to death while working for a client who was a witness against the Moroccan Mafia, and the July 2021 murder of crime reporter Peter R. de Vries, according to the newspaper.

    In September 2019, Party for Freedom leader Geert Wilders – a member of the Netherlands’ House of Representatives – controversially questioned whether the government was “still the authority” or whether the Mocro Mafia had “become boss in this country,” and warned that the organization was “getting stronger and more violent every day.”

    It’s good that the Dutch are so hard on fascists and stronk on diversity otherwise there might be trouble and someone could get killed.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @El Dato

    What an embarrassment of a country. Letting Moroccans run roughshod over your country. Disgraceful.

  11. More interesting, why are the Goldingers still investing like it’s dot-con boom? Is it all the fresh money lying around, clogging the fire exit?

  12. Does Carlos Watson wear a turtleneck and speak in falsetto? Blond hair and a blank stare couldn’t hurt either.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Mike Tre

    And starting every sentence with "So...".

  13. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Greed?

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Anonymous

    How bad can greed be when put up against white supremacy??

  14. I had never heard of Ozy, either, until I started getting several e-mails per day from senders including “OZY Daily Dose,” “OZY Podcasts,” “OZY Presidential Daily Brief,” “OZY Weekender,” “OZY Global Dispatch,” and many others. I didn’t pay much attention, as they were part of the dozens of daily vaguely-news/politics-oriented spam messages I get daily. From the clickbait subject lines, they seemed left-wing. This piece is the first I have ever heard of the company other than these unwelcome messages. I finally got around to unsubscribing.

    Goldman Sachs should press charges for attempted fraud. (I know, I know, queue the snarky replies.)

  15. @Hangnail Hans

    Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. In addition to his early-career stop at Goldman Sachs, he worked at McKinsey & Company and was an anchor on MSNBC for part of 2009. His co-founder, Mr. Rao, also came from Goldman Sachs, via Harvard.
     

    Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount. The Ford Foundation, seeking to support a minority-led company, also backed it with grants
     
    Now here's something funny. I was going to say that young people today wouldn't believe that most of these were august institutions before their names had been dragged through the mud so many times in recent decades.

    But the "funny" part is that young people believe they are still august institutions, and more: many young people believe these institutions are just now gaining credibility due to efforts such as those detailed in this article.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anon

    “Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. ”

    I was going to say, “submitted without comment,” but now I actually think just “huh” will suffice.

  16. Mr. Watson attributed the incident to a mental health crisis and shared what he said were details of Mr. Rao’s diagnosis.

    Bwah HA HA HA HA!

    Apparently this is the default explanation for any failure, at this point.
    “I had to fraudulently impersonate a You Tube exec in an attempt to make my company look good…I have bad self esteem and an eating disorder. What are you some sort of hater?!?”

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  17. Looks like Youtube would kick them off.
    I wonder what Goldman has since discovered about the actions of these guys when they were employees.

  18. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Greed?

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Anonymous

    Greed?

    Lol, you’d think with the amount of money involved they could hire a good impersonator. A former DEA S/A/C once told me that drug cartels will enlist people with photographic memories to act as phony informants to send investigators down time-consuming dead-end trails. But then again cartel operators are practical men who need practical solutions to problems. They didn’t go to Harvard and Stanford after all.

  19. @Anon
    There's a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimB, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Sick of Orcs, @Nicholas Stix

    What? No grand jury and indictment for fraud? I guess NY AG Letitia James is too busy filing bogus charges against Trump and attending the MET gala to prosecute a brutha

  20. Always trust the Ford Foundation.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @fnn

    I had a brief acquaintance with a reputed bigshot at the Ford Foundation in the 1990s. He struck me as the stereotypical boomer-hippie-turned-boomer-yuppie upper-middle class left-liberal, as were so many people in that era.

    While he, and those like him at the time, generally seemed harmless and amiable, I can't help thinking that today's woke reign of terror is the inevitable fruit of yesterday's gormless liberalism.

  21. From the article you linked to on Allen:

    He also brought a high-profile legal case against two of the nation’s largest pay-TV distributors, Comcast and Charter Communications, alleging that racism was the reason his channels were not carried on those services.

    Perhaps he has been engaged in more subtle and discreet Jesse Jackson style shakedown threats to help build his empire. The article goes on to say he lost this case at the Supreme Court 9-0. We should be grateful to Allen for getting Chappaquiddick made, it sounded like he faced a lot of opposition in Hollywood. Other than that, he looks like a typical race hustler.

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @Barnard

    Should be noted that as recently as March 2020, the supes said asserting race was one of several factors motivating a company not to do business with the guy was not enough, race had to be the crucial and deciding factor.

    Bet they wouldn't rule that way today, or at least not 9-0.

  22. https://www.dnb.com/business-directory/company-profiles.ozy_media_inc.496ba42232a11a736d453fd6ce5c621e.html

    “In an increasingly diverse world, it’s no coincidence that a company with co-founders of Black and Indian descent would be so successful.”

    An ordinary firm with a revenue stream of the size reported by Dun & Bradstreet could be expected to employ about 10 people. Never been my line of work, but I think businesses of that size are usually financed by deposits-and-loans banks (local and regional), not securities underwriters in Manhattan.

  23. “I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.”
    The flexing!!! Well done! 😀

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Spect3r

    Yeah, that was a pretty good line. I don't mind being ribbed by the boss here either.

    Replies: @Spect3r

  24. Indians can be absurdly dishonest.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Anon

    Yes, my first thought is that Zoom, Teams, etc. is a godsend for IT departments. I'd heard many stories of phone screening a candidate from India for a programming job, only to meet a completely different person in a face to face interview. When I worked at MegaBank we had to keep updating our pool of technical questions so the body shops wouldn't pass the questions around to each other.

    The lip synching is a new one, I'll give you that.

  25. So a subcon con artist teams up with a Jamaican con artist to con people. Both of them filtered through the Jewish NPC factory sometimes known as Harvard. Gosh, who could have seen that coming?

    Our new Jewish-Asian ruling class is only just gettin’ started folks! Rocky shoals ahead.

  26. These two fellows give an impression of being greater talkers, who can temporarily fill high-end diversity slots, but both have poor follow-through in terms of actual job usefulness and profit generation. The New York Times article does not state it explicitly, but they both got washed out of Goldman Sachs fairly rapidly, and then one of them got washed out of McKinsey next. I bet the reporters who wrote this story suspected as much. 90% of the people who “quit” at Goldman Sachs actually got pushed out (not fired exactly, but encouraged to think hard about alternatives).

    The jig might be up for both of them now.

    Great find by Sailer to latch on to the hidden messages in this newspaper article! I bet the New York Times reporters were quietly thinking some of the same things, but knew better than to express such thoughts candidly in the New York Times. Or maybe these reporters live in a Woke religious fantasy. Hard to tell the true believers from the keep your head down and your mouth shut rationalists, same as back in Mao’s China.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @Peter Johnson

    "These two fellows give an impression of being greater talkers, who can temporarily fill high-end diversity slots, but both have poor follow-through in terms of actual job usefulness and profit generation."

    They also have poor follow-through in terms of scam completion and pigeon plucking.

    Replies: @Peter Johnson

  27. Carlos Watson attended Ransom Everglades School, a private college prep school in coconut grove that is 45% white, 37% Hispanic and only 4% black. Once again the talented 10th play on being black while living a very non-black life.

    https://www.niche.com/k12/ransom-everglades-school-coconut-grove-fl/students/

  28. Maybe this was all a plot to actually get themselves into the news, just like this?

    How many of us will now actually visit Ozy now? Not me for one, but still..

  29. When asked to comment on this giant porky, Mr Rao waggled his head and grinned like an idiot.

    http://www.myindianstory.com/?p=4074

  30. What were their concentrations at Harvard?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Goatweed

    Rhetoric and Public Speaking no doubt.

  31. Do you ever get the feeling that, in this age of the “Information Economy”, the “GIG Economy”, or the “post-Industrial Economy”, whatever we’re calling it now, that over half of what goes on, is some kind of scam or grift? Turns out there are a lot of selfish, arrogant, greedy people who think the new “economy” is jut a way to enrich themselves deceitfully. Almost like the digital age version of the subset of ruthless industrial age entrepreneurs who really were “robber barons”. Except there are 8 billion people on the planet, so many more folks in that subset now.

    I keep thinking of my old POTS (Plain Old Telephone System), invented and built out in the late 19th/early 20th century; originally designed simply to enable people to communicate over vast distances almost instantly, so you wouldn’t have to wait weeks or months for the letter to arrive to check on the health of Grandma or Grandpa, or find out what your son was doing in the Texas oil fields or the Oregon timber forests, or how your daughter was getting along at University; to be sure, the wealthy elite had their own purpose for it (for wealth enhancement), but it also had great social benefit for most. Now, 9 out of 10 phone calls I get are some type of scam/grift.

    Gee thanks, “information economy”.

    • Agree: Abe
    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Captain Tripps

    In the future, a Deep Neural Network AI will take the call and filter out those that will be recognizable scams.

    We will end up with a world where scammer AIs hosted on dedicated Bezoscloud hardware will talk to filter AI also hosted ondedicated Bezoscloud hardware 24/7/365 and Bezos will become immensly rich.

    Thus the Great Filter will be achieved. Praise be!

    Here is Greg Egan writing on this in "Permutation City" in '95


    Upstairs, in the bedroom that doubled as an office, Maria switched on her terminal and glanced at a summary of the twenty-one items of mail which had arrived since she'd last checked. All were classified as "Junk"; there was nothing from anyone she knew -- and nothing remotely like an offer of paid work. Camel's Eye, her screening software, had identified six pleas for donations from charities (all worthy causes, but Maria hardened her heart); five invitations to enter lotteries and competitions; seven retail catalogues (all of which boasted that they'd been tailored to her personality and "current lifestyle requirements" -- but Camel's Eye had assessed their contents and found nothing of interest); and three interactives. The "dumb" audio-visual mail was all in standard transparent data formats, but interactives were executable programs, machine code with heavily encrypted data, intentionally designed to be easier for a human to talk to than for screening software to examine and summarize. Camel's Eye had run all three interactives (on a doubly quarantined virtual machine -- a simulation of a computer running a simulation of a computer) and tried to fool them into thinking that they were making their pitch to the real Maria Deluca. Two sales programs -- superannuation and health insurance -- had fallen for it, but the third had somehow deduced its true environment and clammed up before disclosing anything. In theory, it was possible for Camel's Eye to analyze the program and figure out exactly what it would have said if it had been fooled; in practice, that could take weeks. The choice came down to trashing it blind, or talking to it in person. Maria ran the interactive. A man's face appeared on the terminal; "he" met her gaze and smiled warmly, and she suddenly realized that "he" bore a slight resemblance to Aden. Close enough to elicit a flicker of recognition which the mask of herself she'd set up for Camel's Eye would not have exhibited? Maria felt a mixture of annoyance and grudging admiration. She'd never shared an address with Aden -- but no doubt the data analysis agencies correlated credit card use in restaurants, or whatever, to pick up relationships which didn't involve cohabitation. Mapping useful connections between consumers had been going on for decades -- but employing the data in this way, as a reality test, was a new twist.

    The junk mail, now rightly convinced that it was talking to a human being, began the spiel it had refused to waste on her digital proxy. "Maria, I know your time is valuable, but I hope you can spare a few seconds to hear me out." It paused for a moment, to make her feel that her silence was some kind of assent. "I also know that you're a highly intelligent, discerning woman, with no interest whatsoever in the muddled, irrational superstitions of the past, the fairy tales that comforted humanity in its infancy." Maria guessed what was coming next; the interactive saw it on her face -- she hadn't bothered to hide behind any kind of filter -- and it rushed to get a hook in. "No truly intelligent person, though, ever dismisses an idea without taking the trouble to evaluate it -- skeptically, but fairly -- and here at the Church of the God Who Makes No Difference -- "

    Maria pointed two fingers at the interactive, and it died. She wondered if it was her mother who'd set the Church onto her, but that was unlikely. They must have targeted their new member's family automatically; if consulted, Francesca would have told them that they'd be wasting their time.

    Maria invoked Camel's Eye and told it, "Update my mask so it reacts as I did in that exchange."

    A brief silence followed. Maria imagined the synaptic weighting parameters being juggled in the mask's neural net, as the training algorithm hunted for values which would guarantee the required response. She thought: If I keep on doing this, the mask is going to end up as much like me as a fully fledged Copy. And what's the point of saving yourself from the tedium of talking to junk mail if ... you're not? It was a deeply unpleasant notion ... but masks were orders of magnitude less sophisticated than Copies; they had about as many neurons as the average goldfish -- organized in a far less human fashion. Worrying about their "experience" would be as ludicrous as feeling guilty about terminating junk mail.
     
    , @Jiminy
    @Captain Tripps

    Back in the day when our phone number was printed in the phone book, we would often get calls from the Indians trying to sell mobile phones. Several calls a day actually. I’d let them tell their story, and then I would reply that I’m aiming to be the last person in the country buying a mobile. One time the Indian abused me and called me a dickhead. He obviously had a good grasp of the English language. Another time I showed somebody how persistent these little buggars are by putting the phone in the fridge for a minute or so and went about my routine. After taking the phone out the woman was still yabbering on to herself. This guy should be selling used cars in Bombay- only driven once on Sundays by a little old lady type.

  32. Anon[260] • Disclaimer says:

    They’re using objective standards to judge this black body. That is so whiteness!

    Blacks in charge equals corruption. I wonder if dot Indians are the same?

    As philanthropists the widow Jobs, Ms. Bezos, and Lady Microsoft all seem to be winging it and making big fuckups. Bezos gave a bunch of money to HBCUs, no strings attached, and now there seem to be allegations of misuse due to lack of institutional controls at some of the schools.

    By the way, a million views on YouTube is not that rare, and you don’t get rich of of that. It’s a nice career for one person, and you can outsource editing and the like, and buy hardware.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anon

    Bezos gave a bunch of money to HBCUs, no strings attached,

    You could assist the private HBCUs by adding to their endowment with the proviso that they raise admissions standards and reduce the number of freshman matriculations. About 40% of the students admitted to those places never finish.

    (If state legislatures were responsible, there would be a similar reduction in HBCU enrollment implemented through administered reductions, closures, and mergers; ain't happenin', of course).

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

  33. Goldman Sachs

    Well, it’s just scammers trying to scam other scammers. In this case, Indians trying to scam Jews.

    In Spain they have a saying, “ladrón que roba a ladrón tiene 100 años de perdón”.
    (A thief who steals from another thief deserves 100 years of pardon).

  34. @DuanDiRen
    I can't be the only person waiting for Ellen Pao's take on this...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Pao v Rao – fight to the death, no bars held.

    • LOL: Captain Tripps
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Pao v Rao – fight to the death, no bars held.
     
    Now, now. Don't start a rao.
    The next thing you'll hear is the sound of ka-pao!

    Replies: @Anon

  35. I ran parts of the NYT story through Google Translate (Newspeak –> English)

    That’s when things got weird.

    That’s when things got Elizabeth-Holmes weird.

    Within days, Mr. Watson had apologized profusely to Goldman Sachs, saying the voice on the call belonged to Samir Rao, the co-founder and chief operating officer of Ozy, according to the four people.

    On the advice of his white-shoes legal team, Mr. Watson neither confirmed nor denied that he and Ozy’s COO Samir Rao conspired to have Rao impersonate the YouTube executive on the call.

    In his apology to Goldman Sachs and in an email to me on Friday, Mr. Watson attributed the incident to a mental health crisis and shared what he said were details of Mr. Rao’s diagnosis.

    “I am throwing my valued colleague and BFF Samir Rao, who is Indian, under the bus. But that takes time.”

    “Samir is a valued colleague and a close friend,” Mr. Watson said. “I’m proud that we stood by him while he struggled, and we’re all glad to see him now thriving again.”

    “I am throwing my valued colleague and BFF Samir Rao, who is Indian, under the bus. But that takes time.”

    He added that Mr. Rao took time off from work after the call and is now back at Ozy.

    Ozy’s white-shoes legal team, whose fees are paid from investors’ funds, are negotiating Mr. Rao’s severance package with Mr. Rao’s lawyers.

    Mr. Rao did not reply to requests for comment.

    Mr. Rao did not reply to requests for comment.

  36. You know, you read all this stuff, all these Millennials thinking everyone can make it big with a media “property” with all the other people reading everyone else’s stuff. Does anybody realize a real economy can’t run like this? Do any of them want to make anything? It’s the same with everyone selling gourmet hamburgers and craft beer to each other. It doesn’t work … oh, I mean once you can’t keep borrowing a metric shit-ton of money every year.

    See Peak Stupidity on “Thoughts from the coffee shop…”

    • Agree: El Dato, SafeNow
    • Thanks: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Achmed E. Newman

    John F. Smith, CEO of General Motors in the ‘90s had a great term for it when he warned about the perils of losing the ability to make things. He dubbed it the Shoeshine Economy. We think we can make a living by shining each other’s shoes.
    Oh, and most of that money isn’t being borrowed. Most of the trillions the government is handing out isn’t coming from selling bonds to investors. One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve. The government then hands out that Monopoly money and everyone agrees to pretend it’s real (well, at least for now).

    Replies: @Art Deco, @LP5

  37. … On the channel, many videos have more than a million views but fewer than a hundred comments, an unusual ratio for YouTube

    It is roughly 10% who comment on what they have watched on YT I’d say. Why are so many things 10%?

    So the two Ozy guys had completely duped those they were dealing with at Goldman Sachs, the firm they used to work for. I think that is about as likely as the ‘French Connection’ heroin that went missing from NYPD Property Clerk’s Office having done so without an inside assist.

    • Replies: @Adept
    @Sean


    On the channel, many videos have more than a million views but fewer than a hundred comments, an unusual ratio for YouTube
     
    Not anymore they don't. Maybe YouTube removed all of the fake/bot views, but most of their videos are down to single and double-digits now. https://www.youtube.com/c/ozy/videos
  38. When Holder blocked the Time Warner-Comcast Cable merger in 2015, there was a sudden flurry of investments in dubious media companies like Vice, Vox, and Buzzfeed. If you want to influence Dem politicians, invest tons of money in money-losing internet companies right ahead of a big election and then you might get your merger through next time.

  39. I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.

    I love it when Steve zings the commentariat.

  40. @Sean

    … On the channel, many videos have more than a million views but fewer than a hundred comments, an unusual ratio for YouTube
     
    It is roughly 10% who comment on what they have watched on YT I'd say. Why are so many things 10%?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZnronVFyDE&t=2s

    So the two Ozy guys had completely duped those they were dealing with at Goldman Sachs, the firm they used to work for. I think that is about as likely as the 'French Connection' heroin that went missing from NYPD Property Clerk's Office having done so without an inside assist.

    Replies: @Adept

    On the channel, many videos have more than a million views but fewer than a hundred comments, an unusual ratio for YouTube

    Not anymore they don’t. Maybe YouTube removed all of the fake/bot views, but most of their videos are down to single and double-digits now. https://www.youtube.com/c/ozy/videos

  41. @Anon
    There's a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimB, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Sick of Orcs, @Nicholas Stix

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Nah, it was because there is a shortage of his favored curry. -BADDUMP BUMP-

    Thank you, I'll be playing here all week...

    , @dvorak
    @Jenner Ickham Errican



    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?
     
    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.
     
    Chutney Chutzpah is right. Chutney Chutzpah works. Chutney Chutzpah clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.
  42. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Anon


    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?
     
    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @dvorak

    Nah, it was because there is a shortage of his favored curry. -BADDUMP BUMP-

    Thank you, I’ll be playing here all week…

  43. I think what gave it away was when he ended the call by saying this:

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  44. I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.

    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Steve could double them with some anti-vaccine posts..

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Dwight Schrute v The Computer:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTLzDNhBm-s

  45. @Captain Tripps
    Do you ever get the feeling that, in this age of the "Information Economy", the "GIG Economy", or the "post-Industrial Economy", whatever we're calling it now, that over half of what goes on, is some kind of scam or grift? Turns out there are a lot of selfish, arrogant, greedy people who think the new "economy" is jut a way to enrich themselves deceitfully. Almost like the digital age version of the subset of ruthless industrial age entrepreneurs who really were "robber barons". Except there are 8 billion people on the planet, so many more folks in that subset now.

    I keep thinking of my old POTS (Plain Old Telephone System), invented and built out in the late 19th/early 20th century; originally designed simply to enable people to communicate over vast distances almost instantly, so you wouldn't have to wait weeks or months for the letter to arrive to check on the health of Grandma or Grandpa, or find out what your son was doing in the Texas oil fields or the Oregon timber forests, or how your daughter was getting along at University; to be sure, the wealthy elite had their own purpose for it (for wealth enhancement), but it also had great social benefit for most. Now, 9 out of 10 phone calls I get are some type of scam/grift.

    Gee thanks, "information economy".

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jiminy

    In the future, a Deep Neural Network AI will take the call and filter out those that will be recognizable scams.

    We will end up with a world where scammer AIs hosted on dedicated Bezoscloud hardware will talk to filter AI also hosted ondedicated Bezoscloud hardware 24/7/365 and Bezos will become immensly rich.

    Thus the Great Filter will be achieved. Praise be!

    Here is Greg Egan writing on this in “Permutation City” in ’95

    [MORE]

    Upstairs, in the bedroom that doubled as an office, Maria switched on her terminal and glanced at a summary of the twenty-one items of mail which had arrived since she’d last checked. All were classified as “Junk”; there was nothing from anyone she knew — and nothing remotely like an offer of paid work. Camel’s Eye, her screening software, had identified six pleas for donations from charities (all worthy causes, but Maria hardened her heart); five invitations to enter lotteries and competitions; seven retail catalogues (all of which boasted that they’d been tailored to her personality and “current lifestyle requirements” — but Camel’s Eye had assessed their contents and found nothing of interest); and three interactives. The “dumb” audio-visual mail was all in standard transparent data formats, but interactives were executable programs, machine code with heavily encrypted data, intentionally designed to be easier for a human to talk to than for screening software to examine and summarize. Camel’s Eye had run all three interactives (on a doubly quarantined virtual machine — a simulation of a computer running a simulation of a computer) and tried to fool them into thinking that they were making their pitch to the real Maria Deluca. Two sales programs — superannuation and health insurance — had fallen for it, but the third had somehow deduced its true environment and clammed up before disclosing anything. In theory, it was possible for Camel’s Eye to analyze the program and figure out exactly what it would have said if it had been fooled; in practice, that could take weeks. The choice came down to trashing it blind, or talking to it in person. Maria ran the interactive. A man’s face appeared on the terminal; “he” met her gaze and smiled warmly, and she suddenly realized that “he” bore a slight resemblance to Aden. Close enough to elicit a flicker of recognition which the mask of herself she’d set up for Camel’s Eye would not have exhibited? Maria felt a mixture of annoyance and grudging admiration. She’d never shared an address with Aden — but no doubt the data analysis agencies correlated credit card use in restaurants, or whatever, to pick up relationships which didn’t involve cohabitation. Mapping useful connections between consumers had been going on for decades — but employing the data in this way, as a reality test, was a new twist.

    The junk mail, now rightly convinced that it was talking to a human being, began the spiel it had refused to waste on her digital proxy. “Maria, I know your time is valuable, but I hope you can spare a few seconds to hear me out.” It paused for a moment, to make her feel that her silence was some kind of assent. “I also know that you’re a highly intelligent, discerning woman, with no interest whatsoever in the muddled, irrational superstitions of the past, the fairy tales that comforted humanity in its infancy.” Maria guessed what was coming next; the interactive saw it on her face — she hadn’t bothered to hide behind any kind of filter — and it rushed to get a hook in. “No truly intelligent person, though, ever dismisses an idea without taking the trouble to evaluate it — skeptically, but fairly — and here at the Church of the God Who Makes No Difference — ”

    Maria pointed two fingers at the interactive, and it died. She wondered if it was her mother who’d set the Church onto her, but that was unlikely. They must have targeted their new member’s family automatically; if consulted, Francesca would have told them that they’d be wasting their time.

    Maria invoked Camel’s Eye and told it, “Update my mask so it reacts as I did in that exchange.”

    A brief silence followed. Maria imagined the synaptic weighting parameters being juggled in the mask’s neural net, as the training algorithm hunted for values which would guarantee the required response. She thought: If I keep on doing this, the mask is going to end up as much like me as a fully fledged Copy. And what’s the point of saving yourself from the tedium of talking to junk mail if … you’re not? It was a deeply unpleasant notion … but masks were orders of magnitude less sophisticated than Copies; they had about as many neurons as the average goldfish — organized in a far less human fashion. Worrying about their “experience” would be as ludicrous as feeling guilty about terminating junk mail.

    • Thanks: Captain Tripps, Gabe Ruth
  46. Tangentially OT: you can have a lot of fun with this new expose of the Ford Foundation:

    https://karlstack.substack.com/p/whistleblower-emails-reveal-partisan

  47. @Anon
    There's a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimB, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Sick of Orcs, @Nicholas Stix

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    THANK YOU COME AGAIN!

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder

  48. Relation to virulently anti-White Twitter personality Saira Rao, I wonder?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @West reanimator

    Rao is a common Indian surname. Get used to it. Hey, at least it isn't Muslim.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rao_(Indian_surname)

  49. Quelle surprise. You can take the gold chain man out of the low trust culture but you can’t take the low trust spivery out of the gold chain man. This is also why crypto was always doomed, stacked up and down with get rich quick spiv schemers a great many of them being ‘smart dynamic’ persons of immigrant origin or recent immigrant origin who learned the superior ethics of Gujarat. When all the shenanigans with di-fi and crypto implode there’s going to be a lot of Indian, Chinese, Jewish and Slavic names to read about.

    Making enough money to justify a \$40m Goldman investment on YouTube while running a proper company seems impossible to me and highly unstable. Once you have more than say 3 or 4 paid employees you have to be making insane numbers on videos to be making Goldman investment levels of capital. All that could be massively altered in the blink of an eye by any changes to the YouTube algorithms or ad revenue distribution. Were those revenues essential to their pitch?

    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Altai


    Quelle surprise. You can take the gold chain man out of the low trust culture but you can’t take the low trust spivery out of the gold chain man.
     
    Is Hinduism a gold chain culture?
  50. Of course it was an Indian, of course he was caught. As with the alien abduction movie advertised as nonfiction, or the nonsense analysis of Saint Floyd depending on slowing video down past the point of new information. Whereas the Chinese seem to be simply lazy or dilatory with their lying — lying because they are forced to by political realities — the Indians seem to be stupidly effortful, like they live in a sit com. If it weren’t for those darned kids. A nation of a billion and a half ten year olds in bath towel capes, ready to demonstrate flight off of the home roof, goggles in place. But don’t worry. These people are going to be our ruling class. Instead of wrecking our economy and killing people to deprive Iraq of imaginary weapons, they’ll just work out the math on an imaginary war and send us the bill. Jai Hind.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    The Chinese/East Asian strategy is to say as little as possible. Go about your business as quietly as possible. Fly under the radar. Socially cautious and hesitant to let anyone know what you're up to.

    Indians (as well as other "West Asian" tribes like Persians, Maronites, Italians, Armenians, Chaldeans, Bukharians, etc) are much more loquacious and effusive. As you said, very over the top. Almost like it's a game.

    Though the net effect of both types of Asians is the same - more corruption&malfeasance.

  51. @Achmed E. Newman
    You know, you read all this stuff, all these Millennials thinking everyone can make it big with a media "property" with all the other people reading everyone else's stuff. Does anybody realize a real economy can't run like this? Do any of them want to make anything? It's the same with everyone selling gourmet hamburgers and craft beer to each other. It doesn't work ... oh, I mean once you can't keep borrowing a metric shit-ton of money every year.

    See Peak Stupidity on "Thoughts from the coffee shop..."

    Replies: @Alfa158

    John F. Smith, CEO of General Motors in the ‘90s had a great term for it when he warned about the perils of losing the ability to make things. He dubbed it the Shoeshine Economy. We think we can make a living by shining each other’s shoes.
    Oh, and most of that money isn’t being borrowed. Most of the trillions the government is handing out isn’t coming from selling bonds to investors. One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve. The government then hands out that Monopoly money and everyone agrees to pretend it’s real (well, at least for now).

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alfa158

    One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Not true. See https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debttothepenny.htm

    'Intragovernmental holdings' of federal debt are 21% of the total. The Federal Reserve Banks hold about 18% and other outfits hold 3%.

    Replies: @epebble, @International Jew

    , @LP5
    @Alfa158

    Shoe shine boys factor into the American life in many ways.

    One example was the boy who shined Joseph Kennedy's shoes and reportedly offered him stock tips. Joe considered the source and decided it was time to get out of the market in 1929 before the inevitable crash. Variations of the story involve Bernard Baruch but less likely since not named Joe.

    Joe Pesci in Goodfellas was formerly a shoe shine boy and look how life turned out for his character.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  52. Mr. Watson .. a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School .. Mr. Rao, also from Harvard

    Baird men.

    It’s really something how some guys can walk away from their attempted, multi-million dollar con (what, not even wire fraud charges by the Manhatten district, US lawyer-attorney?). Ivy privilege.

    I don’t want to read any more complaints about how roving gangs of blacks, who walk out of Neiman Marcus with \$999 handbags, don’t get charged with shoplifting.

    • Replies: @lanskrim
    @Abolish_public_education

    Ozy media's white guy history podcaster is a Rhodes Scholar with a Harvard Law degree. That's gotta be a sweet gig. Probably has a whole team of producers and zero listeners.

  53. If Goldman Sachs is the smart money, investing in firms abandoned by Goldman makes you … what … the Really Smart Money?

    It makes you the Muppet smart enough to avoid GS commissions or engagement/retainer/success fees, but you are still a Muppet.

  54. @anon
    Does the Ford Foundation actually care about ROI?

    Replies: @Forbes, @Half Canadian

    No evidence that it does.

  55. An intriguing detail is that everyone involved appears to be tacitly agreeing to pretend that somehow Watson was unaware that Rao was working on getting a \$40 investment from Goldman, and didn’t know that his partner was impersonating a YouTube executive on a conference call.

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account, which means they could be someone in Tashkent or Upper Volta.
    I’m just a mid-wit, but even I have set a rule for myself that I don’t engage in any financial transaction, including e-bay purchases, above \$50, if they are with anyone communicating through an email account that is not from a business domain. Maybe it’s because if you scale my finances to Goldman’s, to them \$40M is under the \$50 cutoff?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alfa158

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account,

    I'm gonna guess they did think it was odd, which is why they contacted the man's secretary via her company e-mail rather than using gmail.

    , @Forbes
    @Alfa158

    The Goldman Sach's of the world are easy to scam when you're part of the fraternity/club/cult, i.e., you went to Harvard, Stanford, worked at McKinsey, etc.

    It's like showing your vax card--you're good to go, no need to check any further.

    To do so would be an insult. It's the same as the class system of any aristocracy--you never question the integrity of a Duke or an Earl or a Knight!

    , @Pixo
    @Alfa158

    The tacit agreement is because GS still hopes to salvage some of its investment. CEO going to jail for fraud doesn’t help.

  56. Also, I will have to keep “Conference Call Gone Wrong” for later.

  57. @Alfa158
    @Achmed E. Newman

    John F. Smith, CEO of General Motors in the ‘90s had a great term for it when he warned about the perils of losing the ability to make things. He dubbed it the Shoeshine Economy. We think we can make a living by shining each other’s shoes.
    Oh, and most of that money isn’t being borrowed. Most of the trillions the government is handing out isn’t coming from selling bonds to investors. One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve. The government then hands out that Monopoly money and everyone agrees to pretend it’s real (well, at least for now).

    Replies: @Art Deco, @LP5

    One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Not true. See https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debttothepenny.htm

    ‘Intragovernmental holdings’ of federal debt are 21% of the total. The Federal Reserve Banks hold about 18% and other outfits hold 3%.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Art Deco

    branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Also untrue. Federal Reserve, as a Central Bank, is an Apex bank i.e. a bank that can create and destroy money. It will be a dangerous situation if a government can create money (it has happened before). Hence, Federal Reserve is not a branch of government, though it works closely with the government. Central Banking is a mysterious skill - the process of creating and destroying money is akin to Quantum Mechanics. But, most definitely, it should not be done by the government if it has to work well.

    , @International Jew
    @Art Deco

    It's good to know that "only" 18% of the national debt has been turned into money! That's still a lot; the Fed's balance sheet is enormous, compared to what was normal before 2008.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  58. @Alfa158
    An intriguing detail is that everyone involved appears to be tacitly agreeing to pretend that somehow Watson was unaware that Rao was working on getting a $40 investment from Goldman, and didn’t know that his partner was impersonating a YouTube executive on a conference call.

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account, which means they could be someone in Tashkent or Upper Volta.
    I’m just a mid-wit, but even I have set a rule for myself that I don’t engage in any financial transaction, including e-bay purchases, above $50, if they are with anyone communicating through an email account that is not from a business domain. Maybe it’s because if you scale my finances to Goldman’s, to them $40M is under the $50 cutoff?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Forbes, @Pixo

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account,

    I’m gonna guess they did think it was odd, which is why they contacted the man’s secretary via her company e-mail rather than using gmail.

  59. This impersonation event illustrates how lying has become a philosophy, a pattern of thought, a habit of speech and behavior. There are two varieties. First, there is the planned lie, a scheme, such as this impersonation. Second, there is the extemporaneous lie. Many pundits on MSM and also regular people cannot think quickly enough to formulate the lie, and this is where “um” comes in handy. Or, “right?” to try to get the listener’s agreement. Someone once said that the hard part of being a liar is remembering what you have said. But another hard part is being quick enough to lie on the fly. Maybe there is a “deceitfulness” gene, maybe it is cultural. Probably both.

  60. Ozy’s public face was Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. …

    LOL.

    You were about to invest millions in some black guy, who doesn’t have a hit rap record?

    I thought Goldman Sachs is supposed to be the smart parasite.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    You were about to invest millions in some black guy, who doesn’t have a hit rap record?

     

    Jamaicans are more interested in melodies than are US blacks, to the point of stealing them. Whether legally ("Buffalo Soldier"/"Shortnin' Bread"*) or otherwise ("Chi Chi Man"/"Do You Hear What I Hear?")

    It's like our blacks saw the more hummable reggae as a threat to their careers after Motown left the Motor City.


    *Also borrowed by the Banana Splits for their theme song. Maybe it's the "Mandela Effect", but I remember the Splits "playing in the bright blue sun". And I'm not alone in this. Mondegreen, or anti-acid revision?

  61. Ivy League shysters? Say it isn’t so!

  62. Here’s the new competition for Ozy Media. They (Global Citizen) had a big deal in Central Park this past Saturday–which is exactly what Ozy Media had been doing the past 5 summers (I’d guess).

    Their schtick is “free” tickets, but you have to download their app, sign-up, and engage in activism (sign petitions), etc., and your level of activity entitles you to “free” tickets.

    It looks to me like woke-left Democrat party outreach to 20-somethings who historically show up the least in the voting booth.

    https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/about/who-we-are/

    IIRC, Ozy had a similar outing last summer (I think this year was rained-out), combining live music acts, celebrities, politicians, etc. More “We’re gonna save the world” bullshit.

    And both outfits get tons of corporate sponsors–big banks, big media, big you-name-it. Giant woke circle jerk.

  63. @Alfa158
    An intriguing detail is that everyone involved appears to be tacitly agreeing to pretend that somehow Watson was unaware that Rao was working on getting a $40 investment from Goldman, and didn’t know that his partner was impersonating a YouTube executive on a conference call.

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account, which means they could be someone in Tashkent or Upper Volta.
    I’m just a mid-wit, but even I have set a rule for myself that I don’t engage in any financial transaction, including e-bay purchases, above $50, if they are with anyone communicating through an email account that is not from a business domain. Maybe it’s because if you scale my finances to Goldman’s, to them $40M is under the $50 cutoff?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Forbes, @Pixo

    The Goldman Sach’s of the world are easy to scam when you’re part of the fraternity/club/cult, i.e., you went to Harvard, Stanford, worked at McKinsey, etc.

    It’s like showing your vax card–you’re good to go, no need to check any further.

    To do so would be an insult. It’s the same as the class system of any aristocracy–you never question the integrity of a Duke or an Earl or a Knight!

  64. @anon
    You're so............ whiny

    Replies: @Danindc

    Steve does a great job of documenting the grift and making us laugh. If you don’t understand his sense of humor then maybe the site isn’t for you. Malcolm Gladwell didn’t understand Norm MacDonald’s sense of humor so you’ve got that going for you.

  65. @Altai
    Quelle surprise. You can take the gold chain man out of the low trust culture but you can't take the low trust spivery out of the gold chain man. This is also why crypto was always doomed, stacked up and down with get rich quick spiv schemers a great many of them being 'smart dynamic' persons of immigrant origin or recent immigrant origin who learned the superior ethics of Gujarat. When all the shenanigans with di-fi and crypto implode there's going to be a lot of Indian, Chinese, Jewish and Slavic names to read about.

    Making enough money to justify a $40m Goldman investment on YouTube while running a proper company seems impossible to me and highly unstable. Once you have more than say 3 or 4 paid employees you have to be making insane numbers on videos to be making Goldman investment levels of capital. All that could be massively altered in the blink of an eye by any changes to the YouTube algorithms or ad revenue distribution. Were those revenues essential to their pitch?

    Replies: @Anon

    Quelle surprise. You can take the gold chain man out of the low trust culture but you can’t take the low trust spivery out of the gold chain man.

    Is Hinduism a gold chain culture?

  66. “ I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.”

    Yeah but your 45+ audience ranges from middle class tightwads to wealthy tightwads. Advertisers don’t care.

    Examples: Unz is worth millions but eats at Burger King
    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
    Jonathan Mason and Roatan Bill live in Latin America for the cheap property prices
    Derb does his own major home repairs like septic tank service in his 70s

    Nobody is an instagram influencer and randomly drops \$1000 on high margin heavily advertised products.

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pixo


    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
     
    You're completely wrong about this. I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru, not on a 2007 Camry. I would NEVER drive a 2007 Camry.

    But the rest is absolutely right. You could go broke trying to sell stuff to old white guys. This is why TV nowadays is all about vibrant People of Color. I see black secretaries driving Mercedes. Yes, they are crappy A-classes that are worse than Honda Civics but cost almost double, but it has a Mercedes emblem the size of a frisbee on the grill. For extra cost you can order an emblem that lights up.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Dube

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo

    I like the comment, Pixo, but there's another aspect to it that Jack D's reply didn't cover either. It's not just about being tightwads. Most of us in your category are smart enough not to fall for the hype. I not only wouldn't click on a single internet ad, but my eyes automatically avoid all of that crap. It's not like many of them are "$10 off on an oil change".

    Speaking of that, I change the oil in the vehicles myself too, as I had one place 20 years ago not tighten the filter. I'd already lost a couple of courts before I noticed the mess under there. I never went back to another oil change place and had only gone to that place because I was living somewhere without all my tools. I gotta sheepishly admit here that recently I left the filter slightly too loose - the FRAM ones you can hand-tighten - and thought I the old vehicle was burning oil... more than usual, that is!

  67. ‘In other words, the black CEO…’

    …is black. Never trust a black.

    It’s perhaps unfair but amusing to point out that Steve Sailer could be accused of pulling the same stunt he loves to decry in New York Times — burying the awkward but telling fact at the bottom of the article.

  68. @Alfa158
    An intriguing detail is that everyone involved appears to be tacitly agreeing to pretend that somehow Watson was unaware that Rao was working on getting a $40 investment from Goldman, and didn’t know that his partner was impersonating a YouTube executive on a conference call.

    It also surprises me that the giant brains who work at Goldman-Sachs didn’t notice anything odd about a business executive communicating with them through a g-mail account, which means they could be someone in Tashkent or Upper Volta.
    I’m just a mid-wit, but even I have set a rule for myself that I don’t engage in any financial transaction, including e-bay purchases, above $50, if they are with anyone communicating through an email account that is not from a business domain. Maybe it’s because if you scale my finances to Goldman’s, to them $40M is under the $50 cutoff?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Forbes, @Pixo

    The tacit agreement is because GS still hopes to salvage some of its investment. CEO going to jail for fraud doesn’t help.

  69. @Art Deco
    @Alfa158

    One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Not true. See https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debttothepenny.htm

    'Intragovernmental holdings' of federal debt are 21% of the total. The Federal Reserve Banks hold about 18% and other outfits hold 3%.

    Replies: @epebble, @International Jew

    branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Also untrue. Federal Reserve, as a Central Bank, is an Apex bank i.e. a bank that can create and destroy money. It will be a dangerous situation if a government can create money (it has happened before). Hence, Federal Reserve is not a branch of government, though it works closely with the government. Central Banking is a mysterious skill – the process of creating and destroying money is akin to Quantum Mechanics. But, most definitely, it should not be done by the government if it has to work well.

  70. @Hangnail Hans

    Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. In addition to his early-career stop at Goldman Sachs, he worked at McKinsey & Company and was an anchor on MSNBC for part of 2009. His co-founder, Mr. Rao, also came from Goldman Sachs, via Harvard.
     

    Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount. The Ford Foundation, seeking to support a minority-led company, also backed it with grants
     
    Now here's something funny. I was going to say that young people today wouldn't believe that most of these were august institutions before their names had been dragged through the mud so many times in recent decades.

    But the "funny" part is that young people believe they are still august institutions, and more: many young people believe these institutions are just now gaining credibility due to efforts such as those detailed in this article.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Anon

    Thus guy is yet another black elite law school graduate who seems never to have practiced law. They turn tail pretty fast when they learn that the hours are brutal, and partnership is a remaining bastion of meritocracy.

  71. If not an outright con job from Day One, it certainly has turned into one.

    And the smart boys (some) at Goldman Sachs fell for it, and others.

    Had these two grifters been White, GS and others would have yawned, impolitely. “No thanks.”

    I’d be willing to bet a small sum that these “millions” of YT “views” were mainly purchased from Vietnamese/Cambodian bot farms that create fake users for ginned up numbers on the Internet.

    A subcon and a Jamaican? What, no Lebanese?

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  72. I used to get spam e-mails from those ‘ozy’ shits.

    I hate them and anyone who advertises with them.

  73. As he spoke, however, the man’s voice began to sound strange to the Goldman Sachs team, as though it might have been digitally altered, the four people said.

    I’ve been wondering when we are going to enter the “deepfake” era, when it becomes possible to convincingly counterfeit a person over electronic voice and video communications, which can never be trusted ever again.. This quote made me think the article was going there, but no further explanation for the alteration was provided, so I don’t know if Piper’s voice was faked or if there was some other reason for the alteration.

  74. entitled Silicon Valley Executive

    In general, titled is a better term than entitled for this particular usage. But in this case…

    I’ve never heard of Ozy until right now.

    Me neither, unless one of their videos came up in our YouTube suggestion feed. But probably not, if this is typical of their œuvre:

    If Goldman Sachs is the smart money, investing in firms abandoned by Goldman makes you … what … the Really Smart Money?

    Per Baron Rothschild, investing in Portland and Seattle, Baltimore and St. Louis.

  75. @AnotherDad

    Ozy’s public face was Mr. Watson, the son of a working-class Jamaican family in Miami and a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School. ...
     
    LOL.

    You were about to invest millions in some black guy, who doesn't have a hit rap record?

    I thought Goldman Sachs is supposed to be the smart parasite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You were about to invest millions in some black guy, who doesn’t have a hit rap record?

    Jamaicans are more interested in melodies than are US blacks, to the point of stealing them. Whether legally (“Buffalo Soldier”/”Shortnin’ Bread”*) or otherwise (“Chi Chi Man“/”Do You Hear What I Hear?”)

    It’s like our blacks saw the more hummable reggae as a threat to their careers after Motown left the Motor City.

    *Also borrowed by the Banana Splits for their theme song. Maybe it’s the “Mandela Effect”, but I remember the Splits “playing in the bright blue sun”. And I’m not alone in this. Mondegreen, or anti-acid revision?

  76. @Buzz Mohawk

    I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.
     
    https://media.giphy.com/media/Q8Dubr4o23mSc/giphy.gif?cid=790b7611372e97cbe78a2840911cdf60e33271c5fdddbda5&rid=giphy.gif

    Replies: @pyrrhus, @Achmed E. Newman

    Steve could double them with some anti-vaccine posts..

  77. @Art Deco
    @Alfa158

    One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

    Not true. See https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debttothepenny.htm

    'Intragovernmental holdings' of federal debt are 21% of the total. The Federal Reserve Banks hold about 18% and other outfits hold 3%.

    Replies: @epebble, @International Jew

    It’s good to know that “only” 18% of the national debt has been turned into money! That’s still a lot; the Fed’s balance sheet is enormous, compared to what was normal before 2008.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

  78. I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.

    Thanks for the opening. This should seen, before returning to topic – “These Health Care Workers Would Rather Get Fired Than Get Vaccinated” – NYT Sept 27, 21:

    On Sunday at the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn, Gov. Kathy Hochul pushed back hard against the idea of religious exemptions to vaccination, urging worshipers to be “apostles” for the vaccine in order to “keep more people alive.”

    “God did answer our prayers,” she told the congregation. “He made the smartest men and women — the scientists, the doctors, the researchers — he made them come up with a vaccine. That is from God to us and we must say, ‘Thank you, God, thank you!’”

    “There are a lot of people out there who aren’t listening to God and what God wants,” she said as a gold necklace spelling “Vaxed” glinted from her chest.

  79. @anon
    Does the Ford Foundation actually care about ROI?

    Replies: @Forbes, @Half Canadian

    They’re a non-profit. As long as their endowment can pay the employees, they won’t care.

  80. @International Jew
    @Art Deco

    It's good to know that "only" 18% of the national debt has been turned into money! That's still a lot; the Fed's balance sheet is enormous, compared to what was normal before 2008.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    It is enormous, but it hasn’t had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I’m remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn’t drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren’t the people we used to be.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Art Deco


    “Truman wasn’t drawn from the best-and-the-brightest”
     
    He peddled that lie about being broke post-politics exquisitely. People are still quoting that nonsense. Actually he was Trump-like in trying to position his idiot daughter for a movie career (or singing? Something meretricious like that). “A politician who is poor is a poor politician”
    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Art Deco

    "He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics."

    That is some felicitous phrasing.

    , @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    In his 2008 book, "Bad Old Days: The Myth of the 1950s," historian Alan J. Levine wrote that Truman was a better man than almost any of his successors, as was Eisenhower. He wrote:

    "Perhaps it was only the appallingly low level of most of their successors that led to a full appreciation of their true stature."

    Replies: @anarchyst

    , @anarchyst
    @Art Deco

    Truman's greatest "mistake" was to recognize the apartheid state of israel.

    , @2BR
    @Art Deco

    “Truman managed …to”:

    1) “cut the military budget by 85%”

    If you suggest cutting the military budget today by 8.5% you will be called a traitor, Putin’s puppet etc.

    2) “weather a difficult recession”

    We cannot weather a quarter of downturn before the printing presses must go mad and we begin paying corporations, citizens, foreigners, etc and even after the recession is over, we won’t stop due to “the children” or something.

    3) “and balance the budget.”

    This is an impossibility. It is an idea so ludicrous, it cannot be imagined. We can barely avoid adding three trillion more of debt in one swoop. The idea of balancing the US budget is so ridiculously absurd, it no longer occurs to anyone as a serious topic.

    Truman also governed a country with a border, very low crime, and yes, still, the highest standard of living in the world.

    How anyone can think we are not in a severe decline is beyond me.

  81. Is there a digital effect you can click on entitled Silicon Valley Executive? What does that sound like?

    [MORE]

  82. “In 2014, Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount.”

    I’m sure grad students and libraries forced to pay \$3-400 for a single volume of some Springer publication will appreciate Springer’s wise investment policies.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @James J O'Meara


    “In 2014, Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount.”

    I’m sure grad students and libraries forced to pay $3-400 for a single volume of some Springer publication will appreciate Springer’s wise investment policies.
     

    Different Springer.
  83. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:

    Byron Allen is pretty good at whatever he does. Is he like an emcee? I see his clips programs at 2am which are so chronologically indistinct they may well have been recorded during the “Evening at The Improv” era. The standup comics doing their act in 20-sec bursts while he holds court are also curiously ageless, timeless. Only thing that’d glitch the matrix would be if I recognized one who’d died recently from Fentanyl

  84. @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

    “Truman wasn’t drawn from the best-and-the-brightest”

    He peddled that lie about being broke post-politics exquisitely. People are still quoting that nonsense. Actually he was Trump-like in trying to position his idiot daughter for a movie career (or singing? Something meretricious like that). “A politician who is poor is a poor politician”

  85. @Anon
    There's a lot of wall street culture protecting people with this one

    So an Ozy Media executive pretended to be a Youtube exec and the company says it was a mental health incident?

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @JimB, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Sick of Orcs, @Nicholas Stix

    The legal terms are fraud and criminal impersonation.

    Yet another AA scam, including playing the crazy card.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  86. @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

    “He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics.”

    That is some felicitous phrasing.

  87. @Pixo
    “ I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.”

    Yeah but your 45+ audience ranges from middle class tightwads to wealthy tightwads. Advertisers don’t care.

    Examples: Unz is worth millions but eats at Burger King
    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
    Jonathan Mason and Roatan Bill live in Latin America for the cheap property prices
    Derb does his own major home repairs like septic tank service in his 70s

    Nobody is an instagram influencer and randomly drops $1000 on high margin heavily advertised products.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman

    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry

    You’re completely wrong about this. I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru, not on a 2007 Camry. I would NEVER drive a 2007 Camry.

    But the rest is absolutely right. You could go broke trying to sell stuff to old white guys. This is why TV nowadays is all about vibrant People of Color. I see black secretaries driving Mercedes. Yes, they are crappy A-classes that are worse than Honda Civics but cost almost double, but it has a Mercedes emblem the size of a frisbee on the grill. For extra cost you can order an emblem that lights up.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Are you telling me that DAIMLER-BENZ makes those light up emblems?! I thought for sure they were obtained from Amazon.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Dube
    @Jack D

    I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru...

    Likely not in front of the courthouse in a three-piece suit. Yet, anyone who does his own oil change qualifies to have been raised on a chicken ranch. I know about chicken ranches and people who ran them. It would be a matter of pride to do the chore and instruct the reluctant.

  88. @Anon
    They're using objective standards to judge this black body. That is so whiteness!

    Blacks in charge equals corruption. I wonder if dot Indians are the same?

    As philanthropists the widow Jobs, Ms. Bezos, and Lady Microsoft all seem to be winging it and making big fuckups. Bezos gave a bunch of money to HBCUs, no strings attached, and now there seem to be allegations of misuse due to lack of institutional controls at some of the schools.

    By the way, a million views on YouTube is not that rare, and you don't get rich of of that. It's a nice career for one person, and you can outsource editing and the like, and buy hardware.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Bezos gave a bunch of money to HBCUs, no strings attached,

    You could assist the private HBCUs by adding to their endowment with the proviso that they raise admissions standards and reduce the number of freshman matriculations. About 40% of the students admitted to those places never finish.

    (If state legislatures were responsible, there would be a similar reduction in HBCU enrollment implemented through administered reductions, closures, and mergers; ain’t happenin’, of course).

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Art Deco

    I imagine that HBCUs are riding the student loan financial train just like every other college and university.
    Not in their financial interests to turn away anyone.

  89. So did Goldman-Sachs invest anyways, since the dude is obviously connected?

  90. @Buzz Mohawk

    I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.
     
    https://media.giphy.com/media/Q8Dubr4o23mSc/giphy.gif?cid=790b7611372e97cbe78a2840911cdf60e33271c5fdddbda5&rid=giphy.gif

    Replies: @pyrrhus, @Achmed E. Newman

    Dwight Schrute v The Computer:

  91. @Art Deco
    @Anon

    Bezos gave a bunch of money to HBCUs, no strings attached,

    You could assist the private HBCUs by adding to their endowment with the proviso that they raise admissions standards and reduce the number of freshman matriculations. About 40% of the students admitted to those places never finish.

    (If state legislatures were responsible, there would be a similar reduction in HBCU enrollment implemented through administered reductions, closures, and mergers; ain't happenin', of course).

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    I imagine that HBCUs are riding the student loan financial train just like every other college and university.
    Not in their financial interests to turn away anyone.

  92. @Peter Johnson
    These two fellows give an impression of being greater talkers, who can temporarily fill high-end diversity slots, but both have poor follow-through in terms of actual job usefulness and profit generation. The New York Times article does not state it explicitly, but they both got washed out of Goldman Sachs fairly rapidly, and then one of them got washed out of McKinsey next. I bet the reporters who wrote this story suspected as much. 90% of the people who "quit" at Goldman Sachs actually got pushed out (not fired exactly, but encouraged to think hard about alternatives).

    The jig might be up for both of them now.

    Great find by Sailer to latch on to the hidden messages in this newspaper article! I bet the New York Times reporters were quietly thinking some of the same things, but knew better than to express such thoughts candidly in the New York Times. Or maybe these reporters live in a Woke religious fantasy. Hard to tell the true believers from the keep your head down and your mouth shut rationalists, same as back in Mao's China.

    Replies: @rebel yell

    “These two fellows give an impression of being greater talkers, who can temporarily fill high-end diversity slots, but both have poor follow-through in terms of actual job usefulness and profit generation.”

    They also have poor follow-through in terms of scam completion and pigeon plucking.

    • Replies: @Peter Johnson
    @rebel yell

    True enough - I basically agree with you. But keep in mind that it is extremely difficult to get an executive entry-level position at Goldman Sachs, and they both did so. McKinsey is not easy walk-in either. They were both headed down a golden path to high financial services sector incomes, and then blew it big-time with this crazy scheme.

    Can they manage to recover their career paths by somehow blaming the whole incident on systemic racism or white supremacy? If they use either of those terms in a public defense, all rational thought becomes crimethink.

    We will watch their future careers with interest.

  93. @Jack D
    @Pixo


    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
     
    You're completely wrong about this. I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru, not on a 2007 Camry. I would NEVER drive a 2007 Camry.

    But the rest is absolutely right. You could go broke trying to sell stuff to old white guys. This is why TV nowadays is all about vibrant People of Color. I see black secretaries driving Mercedes. Yes, they are crappy A-classes that are worse than Honda Civics but cost almost double, but it has a Mercedes emblem the size of a frisbee on the grill. For extra cost you can order an emblem that lights up.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Dube

    Are you telling me that DAIMLER-BENZ makes those light up emblems?! I thought for sure they were obtained from Amazon.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @JMcG

    It's a dealer installed option.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15372701/mercedes-benz-gets-its-shine-on-introduces-dealer-installed-illuminated-three-pointed-star-emblems/

    Installed with labor it can be upward of $1,000.

    https://www.howmuchisit.org/illuminated-star-cost/


    More if you are black and they think that they can get away with it. It only adds $25/month to your payment! The feeling at dealerships is that blacks will pay any amount as long as it can be financed.

  94. Legacy Americans have no idea how dishonest the new and improved Desi Americans are. Extremely dishonest. While they’re smarter than AAs, they’re no where near as smart as the Tribe, so we’ll be seeing a lot of this craziness.

    • Replies: @Simon in London
    @martag

    I tend to find them quite endearing. Especially the 'poor little me' weeping & wailing when they get caught - which happens a lot. Dealing with cheating Saudis is a lot less fun. They have this crocodile face like they're thinking of grabbing you, rolling you, and hiding you under a log to rot in the river.

  95. @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

    In his 2008 book, “Bad Old Days: The Myth of the 1950s,” historian Alan J. Levine wrote that Truman was a better man than almost any of his successors, as was Eisenhower. He wrote:

    “Perhaps it was only the appallingly low level of most of their successors that led to a full appreciation of their true stature.”

    • Replies: @anarchyst
    @David In TN

    Eisenhower was a "paper-pusher", not a real "military man" who consigned ordinary Germans to death in the Rheinwiesenlager "concentration camps" after the summation of WW2. Defining captured German soldiers as "disarmed enemy combatants" rather than the proper classification as "prisoners of war" made it possible to disregard Geneva Convention protocols for POWs. Eisenhower was a "crypto-jew" who hated Germans with a passion.

  96. @Goatweed
    What were their concentrations at Harvard?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Rhetoric and Public Speaking no doubt.

  97. @Hangnail Hans

    Mr. Rao took time off from work after the call and is now back at Ozy.
     
    Yes, it's privilege, but it's the new good kind of privilege, not the bad old kind. Besides we have many people [even here] telling us that Asians and Africans are still superior to white people [lower case please] and/or are just doing what white people have always done [insert anecdotes of your choice].

    Replies: @Charlotte

    “it’s the new good kind of privilege”

    Reminds of an article I read a decade or more ago: the author, a black female director of some nonprofit, was talking about mental health issues and work. Seems she herself had a condition which occasionally required fleeing her job and checking into a five star hotel for two or three days of pampering. The board of her organization was very understanding! I had the impression it was actually paying for these mini-vacations. She was an early example of a tired black woman, I guess.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Charlotte

    In my nonprofit days, two out of two of my assigned peer coworker women (both white, 30-ish) "needed" to take multiple unscheduled holidays on short notice for "mental health" or whatever. (I ended up working a lot of extra unpaid time there.)

    It later came to my attention that one of them was booking herself into high end hotels in the local metropole where she hooked up with men who shared her weird ... um ... fetishes. Such were her emergency "mental health" vacations.

    Both of them were major PitA to work with, so I never stood in the way of their unscheduled absences. Sometimes it really is easier just to do the work yourself.

  98. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Anon


    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?
     
    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.

    Replies: @Captain Tripps, @dvorak

    I wonder what the underlying cause of the mental health issues were?

    In Rao’s case, it was a desperate attempt to curry favor.

    Chutney Chutzpah is right. Chutney Chutzpah works. Chutney Chutzpah clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.

  99. @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Are you telling me that DAIMLER-BENZ makes those light up emblems?! I thought for sure they were obtained from Amazon.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s a dealer installed option.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15372701/mercedes-benz-gets-its-shine-on-introduces-dealer-installed-illuminated-three-pointed-star-emblems/

    Installed with labor it can be upward of \$1,000.

    https://www.howmuchisit.org/illuminated-star-cost/

    More if you are black and they think that they can get away with it. It only adds \$25/month to your payment! The feeling at dealerships is that blacks will pay any amount as long as it can be financed.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  100. @Mike Tre
    Does Carlos Watson wear a turtleneck and speak in falsetto? Blond hair and a blank stare couldn’t hurt either.

    Replies: @Prester John

    And starting every sentence with “So…”.

  101. @Abolish_public_education
    Mr. Watson .. a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School .. Mr. Rao, also from Harvard

    Baird men.

    It's really something how some guys can walk away from their attempted, multi-million dollar con (what, not even wire fraud charges by the Manhatten district, US lawyer-attorney?). Ivy privilege.

    I don't want to read any more complaints about how roving gangs of blacks, who walk out of Neiman Marcus with $999 handbags, don't get charged with shoplifting.

    Replies: @lanskrim

    Ozy media’s white guy history podcaster is a Rhodes Scholar with a Harvard Law degree. That’s gotta be a sweet gig. Probably has a whole team of producers and zero listeners.

  102. @James J O'Meara
    "In 2014, Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount."

    I'm sure grad students and libraries forced to pay $3-400 for a single volume of some Springer publication will appreciate Springer's wise investment policies.

    Replies: @anonymous

    “In 2014, Axel Springer, the Berlin publishing giant, invested an undisclosed amount.”

    I’m sure grad students and libraries forced to pay \$3-400 for a single volume of some Springer publication will appreciate Springer’s wise investment policies.

    Different Springer.

  103. Anon[571] • Disclaimer says:

    I started receiving emails from them about a year ago. I thought it was strange but kept receiving them. They are pretty left-wing although this article euphemistically calls it ‘inclusive’. I was reading them to see what things lefties were up to but eventually got tired of the same-old, same-old and ditched them..
    Sounds like they were struggling and wanted to get the money before anyone found out how badly they were really doing. I’ve seen that before with a couple of companies – both before the secret was out (they managed to get the gravy before it was too late) and after – of course, no money was available then. The Ford foundation funds their preferences regardless as they have lots of money to give away.

  104. @Charlotte
    @Hangnail Hans

    “it’s the new good kind of privilege”

    Reminds of an article I read a decade or more ago: the author, a black female director of some nonprofit, was talking about mental health issues and work. Seems she herself had a condition which occasionally required fleeing her job and checking into a five star hotel for two or three days of pampering. The board of her organization was very understanding! I had the impression it was actually paying for these mini-vacations. She was an early example of a tired black woman, I guess.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    In my nonprofit days, two out of two of my assigned peer coworker women (both white, 30-ish) “needed” to take multiple unscheduled holidays on short notice for “mental health” or whatever. (I ended up working a lot of extra unpaid time there.)

    It later came to my attention that one of them was booking herself into high end hotels in the local metropole where she hooked up with men who shared her weird … um … fetishes. Such were her emergency “mental health” vacations.

    Both of them were major PitA to work with, so I never stood in the way of their unscheduled absences. Sometimes it really is easier just to do the work yourself.

  105. @Achmed E. Newman
    @DuanDiRen

    Pao v Rao - fight to the death, no bars held.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Pao v Rao – fight to the death, no bars held.

    Now, now. Don’t start a rao.
    The next thing you’ll hear is the sound of ka-pao!

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Oh wow!

  106. @fnn
    Always trust the Ford Foundation.

    https://twitter.com/ExogenyKarl/status/1440821236716630017

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I had a brief acquaintance with a reputed bigshot at the Ford Foundation in the 1990s. He struck me as the stereotypical boomer-hippie-turned-boomer-yuppie upper-middle class left-liberal, as were so many people in that era.

    While he, and those like him at the time, generally seemed harmless and amiable, I can’t help thinking that today’s woke reign of terror is the inevitable fruit of yesterday’s gormless liberalism.

  107. @Jack D
    @Pixo


    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
     
    You're completely wrong about this. I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru, not on a 2007 Camry. I would NEVER drive a 2007 Camry.

    But the rest is absolutely right. You could go broke trying to sell stuff to old white guys. This is why TV nowadays is all about vibrant People of Color. I see black secretaries driving Mercedes. Yes, they are crappy A-classes that are worse than Honda Civics but cost almost double, but it has a Mercedes emblem the size of a frisbee on the grill. For extra cost you can order an emblem that lights up.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Dube

    I change the oil on my 2003 Subaru…

    Likely not in front of the courthouse in a three-piece suit. Yet, anyone who does his own oil change qualifies to have been raised on a chicken ranch. I know about chicken ranches and people who ran them. It would be a matter of pride to do the chore and instruct the reluctant.

  108. If you are corrupt hustlers looking for investment in your sham company, maybe choose a softer target than Goldman Sachs? There must be many second & third tier competitors whose execs will reliably operate Crimestop on any untoward suspicions.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Simon in London

    I think it's possible the community and regional bankers who ordinarily finance a business of this size are provincial enough to not be impressed with skin color or with Ivy League degrees or with the new new thing. Auto parts stores also apply for loans; that's the next appointment.

  109. @martag
    Legacy Americans have no idea how dishonest the new and improved Desi Americans are. Extremely dishonest. While they're smarter than AAs, they're no where near as smart as the Tribe, so we'll be seeing a lot of this craziness.

    Replies: @Simon in London

    I tend to find them quite endearing. Especially the ‘poor little me’ weeping & wailing when they get caught – which happens a lot. Dealing with cheating Saudis is a lot less fun. They have this crocodile face like they’re thinking of grabbing you, rolling you, and hiding you under a log to rot in the river.

  110. @West reanimator
    Relation to virulently anti-White Twitter personality Saira Rao, I wonder?

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Rao is a common Indian surname. Get used to it. Hey, at least it isn’t Muslim.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rao_(Indian_surname)

  111. @rebel yell
    @Peter Johnson

    "These two fellows give an impression of being greater talkers, who can temporarily fill high-end diversity slots, but both have poor follow-through in terms of actual job usefulness and profit generation."

    They also have poor follow-through in terms of scam completion and pigeon plucking.

    Replies: @Peter Johnson

    True enough – I basically agree with you. But keep in mind that it is extremely difficult to get an executive entry-level position at Goldman Sachs, and they both did so. McKinsey is not easy walk-in either. They were both headed down a golden path to high financial services sector incomes, and then blew it big-time with this crazy scheme.

    Can they manage to recover their career paths by somehow blaming the whole incident on systemic racism or white supremacy? If they use either of those terms in a public defense, all rational thought becomes crimethink.

    We will watch their future careers with interest.

  112. @Spect3r
    "I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts."
    The flexing!!! Well done! :D

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, that was a pretty good line. I don’t mind being ribbed by the boss here either.

    • Replies: @Spect3r
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Exactly, he won the right to do it every now and then.

  113. @Pixo
    “ I could beat those numbers with nothing but a month of pro-vaccine posts.”

    Yeah but your 45+ audience ranges from middle class tightwads to wealthy tightwads. Advertisers don’t care.

    Examples: Unz is worth millions but eats at Burger King
    Jack D changes his own oil on his 2007 Camry
    Jonathan Mason and Roatan Bill live in Latin America for the cheap property prices
    Derb does his own major home repairs like septic tank service in his 70s

    Nobody is an instagram influencer and randomly drops $1000 on high margin heavily advertised products.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman

    I like the comment, Pixo, but there’s another aspect to it that Jack D’s reply didn’t cover either. It’s not just about being tightwads. Most of us in your category are smart enough not to fall for the hype. I not only wouldn’t click on a single internet ad, but my eyes automatically avoid all of that crap. It’s not like many of them are “\$10 off on an oil change”.

    Speaking of that, I change the oil in the vehicles myself too, as I had one place 20 years ago not tighten the filter. I’d already lost a couple of courts before I noticed the mess under there. I never went back to another oil change place and had only gone to that place because I was living somewhere without all my tools. I gotta sheepishly admit here that recently I left the filter slightly too loose – the FRAM ones you can hand-tighten – and thought I the old vehicle was burning oil… more than usual, that is!

  114. I’m a bit late to this thread, but:

    It looks like we’ve progressed from the 1950s America, where people were judged wrongly by the color of their skin, rather than the content of their character, to the 2020s America, where people are judged rightly by the color of their skin, rather than the content of their character.

    Now that’s bloody fucking progress!

  115. @El Dato
    OT for later:

    Dutch PM receives extra security on high alert over fears of Moroccan Mafia kidnapping plot – media


    Citing “well-informed sources” on Monday, Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported that suspicious “spotters” who are believed to be affiliated with the Moroccan Mafia, also known as the Mocro Mafia, were observed near Rutte and that he has subsequently been receiving extra security on high alert.

    De Telegraaf also reported that such spotters are commonly deployed by the mafia before an attack is set to take place, which could include kidnapping or even assassination. Spotters were deployed before the 2019 murder of lawyer Derk Wiersum, who was shot to death while working for a client who was a witness against the Moroccan Mafia, and the July 2021 murder of crime reporter Peter R. de Vries, according to the newspaper.

    ...

    In September 2019, Party for Freedom leader Geert Wilders – a member of the Netherlands’ House of Representatives – controversially questioned whether the government was “still the authority” or whether the Mocro Mafia had “become boss in this country,” and warned that the organization was “getting stronger and more violent every day.”
     
    It's good that the Dutch are so hard on fascists and stronk on diversity otherwise there might be trouble and someone could get killed.

    Replies: @Danindc

    What an embarrassment of a country. Letting Moroccans run roughshod over your country. Disgraceful.

  116. @Alfa158
    @Achmed E. Newman

    John F. Smith, CEO of General Motors in the ‘90s had a great term for it when he warned about the perils of losing the ability to make things. He dubbed it the Shoeshine Economy. We think we can make a living by shining each other’s shoes.
    Oh, and most of that money isn’t being borrowed. Most of the trillions the government is handing out isn’t coming from selling bonds to investors. One branch of government, the Treasury, issues them to another branch of the government, the Federal Reserve. The government then hands out that Monopoly money and everyone agrees to pretend it’s real (well, at least for now).

    Replies: @Art Deco, @LP5

    Shoe shine boys factor into the American life in many ways.

    One example was the boy who shined Joseph Kennedy’s shoes and reportedly offered him stock tips. Joe considered the source and decided it was time to get out of the market in 1929 before the inevitable crash. Variations of the story involve Bernard Baruch but less likely since not named Joe.

    Joe Pesci in Goodfellas was formerly a shoe shine boy and look how life turned out for his character.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @LP5

    Some of us followed the adventures of a shoeshine boy in our youth.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jyy8BGM9Y8

    Sweet Polly Purebred was a looker. Is it even legal to describe a person as purebred these days?

    Replies: @J.Ross

  117. @Simon in London
    If you are corrupt hustlers looking for investment in your sham company, maybe choose a softer target than Goldman Sachs? There must be many second & third tier competitors whose execs will reliably operate Crimestop on any untoward suspicions.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I think it’s possible the community and regional bankers who ordinarily finance a business of this size are provincial enough to not be impressed with skin color or with Ivy League degrees or with the new new thing. Auto parts stores also apply for loans; that’s the next appointment.

  118. @J.Ross
    Of course it was an Indian, of course he was caught. As with the alien abduction movie advertised as nonfiction, or the nonsense analysis of Saint Floyd depending on slowing video down past the point of new information. Whereas the Chinese seem to be simply lazy or dilatory with their lying -- lying because they are forced to by political realities -- the Indians seem to be stupidly effortful, like they live in a sit com. If it weren't for those darned kids. A nation of a billion and a half ten year olds in bath towel capes, ready to demonstrate flight off of the home roof, goggles in place. But don't worry. These people are going to be our ruling class. Instead of wrecking our economy and killing people to deprive Iraq of imaginary weapons, they'll just work out the math on an imaginary war and send us the bill. Jai Hind.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    The Chinese/East Asian strategy is to say as little as possible. Go about your business as quietly as possible. Fly under the radar. Socially cautious and hesitant to let anyone know what you’re up to.

    Indians (as well as other “West Asian” tribes like Persians, Maronites, Italians, Armenians, Chaldeans, Bukharians, etc) are much more loquacious and effusive. As you said, very over the top. Almost like it’s a game.

    Though the net effect of both types of Asians is the same – more corruption&malfeasance.

  119. @LP5
    @Alfa158

    Shoe shine boys factor into the American life in many ways.

    One example was the boy who shined Joseph Kennedy's shoes and reportedly offered him stock tips. Joe considered the source and decided it was time to get out of the market in 1929 before the inevitable crash. Variations of the story involve Bernard Baruch but less likely since not named Joe.

    Joe Pesci in Goodfellas was formerly a shoe shine boy and look how life turned out for his character.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Some of us followed the adventures of a shoeshine boy in our youth.

    Sweet Polly Purebred was a looker. Is it even legal to describe a person as purebred these days?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Brutusale

    Nice reference Brutusale, you're humble and lovable.

  120. The key here, is to get a former Secretary of State or Joint Chief on the board of directors. What’s Mike Pompeo and General Joe Dunford doing? They’d look good for the board.

  121. @Anon
    Indians can be absurdly dishonest.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aV03KuwI6UQ

    Replies: @mmack

    Yes, my first thought is that Zoom, Teams, etc. is a godsend for IT departments. I’d heard many stories of phone screening a candidate from India for a programming job, only to meet a completely different person in a face to face interview. When I worked at MegaBank we had to keep updating our pool of technical questions so the body shops wouldn’t pass the questions around to each other.

    The lip synching is a new one, I’ll give you that.

  122. When Watson was at Stanford,he had a torrid affair with a promising young white woman…Alexandra Souverneva.

  123. The fact that he got so far with the financial sophisticates at Goldman is pretty amazing. It might show that there is far too much money chasing way too few profitable possibilities. When this ride ends, it will impoverish us all.

  124. @Brutusale
    @LP5

    Some of us followed the adventures of a shoeshine boy in our youth.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jyy8BGM9Y8

    Sweet Polly Purebred was a looker. Is it even legal to describe a person as purebred these days?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Nice reference Brutusale, you’re humble and lovable.

  125. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Spect3r

    Yeah, that was a pretty good line. I don't mind being ribbed by the boss here either.

    Replies: @Spect3r

    Exactly, he won the right to do it every now and then.

  126. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Pao v Rao – fight to the death, no bars held.
     
    Now, now. Don't start a rao.
    The next thing you'll hear is the sound of ka-pao!

    Replies: @Anon

    Oh wow!

  127. @Barnard
    From the article you linked to on Allen:

    He also brought a high-profile legal case against two of the nation’s largest pay-TV distributors, Comcast and Charter Communications, alleging that racism was the reason his channels were not carried on those services.
     
    Perhaps he has been engaged in more subtle and discreet Jesse Jackson style shakedown threats to help build his empire. The article goes on to say he lost this case at the Supreme Court 9-0. We should be grateful to Allen for getting Chappaquiddick made, it sounded like he faced a lot of opposition in Hollywood. Other than that, he looks like a typical race hustler.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    Should be noted that as recently as March 2020, the supes said asserting race was one of several factors motivating a company not to do business with the guy was not enough, race had to be the crucial and deciding factor.

    Bet they wouldn’t rule that way today, or at least not 9-0.

  128. @Captain Tripps
    Do you ever get the feeling that, in this age of the "Information Economy", the "GIG Economy", or the "post-Industrial Economy", whatever we're calling it now, that over half of what goes on, is some kind of scam or grift? Turns out there are a lot of selfish, arrogant, greedy people who think the new "economy" is jut a way to enrich themselves deceitfully. Almost like the digital age version of the subset of ruthless industrial age entrepreneurs who really were "robber barons". Except there are 8 billion people on the planet, so many more folks in that subset now.

    I keep thinking of my old POTS (Plain Old Telephone System), invented and built out in the late 19th/early 20th century; originally designed simply to enable people to communicate over vast distances almost instantly, so you wouldn't have to wait weeks or months for the letter to arrive to check on the health of Grandma or Grandpa, or find out what your son was doing in the Texas oil fields or the Oregon timber forests, or how your daughter was getting along at University; to be sure, the wealthy elite had their own purpose for it (for wealth enhancement), but it also had great social benefit for most. Now, 9 out of 10 phone calls I get are some type of scam/grift.

    Gee thanks, "information economy".

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jiminy

    Back in the day when our phone number was printed in the phone book, we would often get calls from the Indians trying to sell mobile phones. Several calls a day actually. I’d let them tell their story, and then I would reply that I’m aiming to be the last person in the country buying a mobile. One time the Indian abused me and called me a dickhead. He obviously had a good grasp of the English language. Another time I showed somebody how persistent these little buggars are by putting the phone in the fridge for a minute or so and went about my routine. After taking the phone out the woman was still yabbering on to herself. This guy should be selling used cars in Bombay- only driven once on Sundays by a little old lady type.

  129. @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

    Truman’s greatest “mistake” was to recognize the apartheid state of israel.

  130. @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    In his 2008 book, "Bad Old Days: The Myth of the 1950s," historian Alan J. Levine wrote that Truman was a better man than almost any of his successors, as was Eisenhower. He wrote:

    "Perhaps it was only the appallingly low level of most of their successors that led to a full appreciation of their true stature."

    Replies: @anarchyst

    Eisenhower was a “paper-pusher”, not a real “military man” who consigned ordinary Germans to death in the Rheinwiesenlager “concentration camps” after the summation of WW2. Defining captured German soldiers as “disarmed enemy combatants” rather than the proper classification as “prisoners of war” made it possible to disregard Geneva Convention protocols for POWs. Eisenhower was a “crypto-jew” who hated Germans with a passion.

    • LOL: IHTG
  131. @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    It is enormous, but it hasn't had ill effects in the real economy until the last year or so. NB, intragovernmental holdings have made up a large fraction of the national debt for a generation or more. When I was first taking macroeconomics classes it stood at 25% of thereabouts.

    I'm remembering that a Democratic Congress followed by a Republican Congress working with Pres. Truman managed in 1945-47 to cut the military budget by 85%, reduce the number of men on active duty by more than 90%, weather a disagreeable economic recession, and balance the budget. Truman wasn't drawn from the best-and-the-brightest. He was an autodidact-bibliophile without any tertiary schooling who had spent 20+ years playing piano in the whorehouse of Kansas City politics. We aren't the people we used to be.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN, @anarchyst, @2BR

    “Truman managed …to”:

    1) “cut the military budget by 85%”

    If you suggest cutting the military budget today by 8.5% you will be called a traitor, Putin’s puppet etc.

    2) “weather a difficult recession”

    We cannot weather a quarter of downturn before the printing presses must go mad and we begin paying corporations, citizens, foreigners, etc and even after the recession is over, we won’t stop due to “the children” or something.

    3) “and balance the budget.”

    This is an impossibility. It is an idea so ludicrous, it cannot be imagined. We can barely avoid adding three trillion more of debt in one swoop. The idea of balancing the US budget is so ridiculously absurd, it no longer occurs to anyone as a serious topic.

    Truman also governed a country with a border, very low crime, and yes, still, the highest standard of living in the world.

    How anyone can think we are not in a severe decline is beyond me.

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