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From the New York Times news section:

Republicans Rewrite History of the Capitol Riot, Hampering an Inquiry

Republicans in Congress are insisting that any investigation into the Jan. 6 attack include an examination of left-wing violence.

By Luke Broadwater
May 13, 2021

… Republicans have insisted that any inquiry include an examination of violence by antifa, a loose collective of antifascist activists, and Black Lives Matter. … Representative Andy Biggs of Arizona, the chairman of the right-wing House Freedom Caucus, used his time to show video of mob violence purportedly by antifa that had unfolded 2,800 miles away in Portland, Ore.

2,800 miles away! Is this Portland place even in the United States?

… “Let’s be honest with the American people: It was not an insurrection,” Mr. Clyde said, adding that the House floor was never breached and that no firearms had been confiscated. “There was an undisciplined mob. There were some rioters, and some who committed acts of vandalism.”

He then asked Jeffrey A. Rosen, who was the acting attorney general at the time of the attack, whether he considered it “an insurrection, or a riot with vandalism, similar to what we saw last summer,” apparently referring to racial justice protests that swept across the country.

… Ms. Pelosi said discussions had stalled given Republicans’ insistence on including unrelated groups and events, and that Democrats might be forced to undertake their own inquiry through existing House committees if the G.O.P. would not drop the demand.

… Republicans involved in the effort to shift attention from the Jan. 6 attack argue they are merely pointing out hypocrisy by Democrats, who want to investigate supporters of the former president but not those aligned with movements on the left. The topic took center stage this week over Ms. Cheney’s ouster.

Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the top House Republican, has insisted the commission must investigate left-wing violence, while Ms. Cheney publicly undercut him by arguing that it should be narrowly focused on the events of Jan. 6.

After all, as Ms. Cheney explained, what matters is who and whom, not outdated notions like cause and effect. We can’t go around getting perspective. Yuck!

Meanwhile, from NBC 5 in Chicago:

One Year After Looting Rampages In Chicago, Few Defendants Are Getting Jail Time

Only a handful of looting suspects have had their day in court, and most who have gone through the system left with probation.

By Phil Rogers and Lisa Capitanini • Published May 12, 2021

The Chicago area watched in horror last summer as hundreds of looters descended on Chicago and some suburbs, smashing windows, ransacking stores and stealing merchandise with abandon.

But a year later, an analysis of court records by NBC 5 Investigates indicates only a few dozen cases have made it through the courts and only a handful of defendants have drawn terms in prison.

The outbreaks of violence in May and August were closely linked to the timing of developments in the death of George Floyd, who died at the hands of police in Minneapolis May 25. But in contrast with the largely peaceful protests that took place in cities across America

That they were largely peaceful is what we read in the New York Times, and whoever heard of the Times pushing a narrative.

, those taking part in the looting episodes in Chicago were seen by most observers as opportunists who engaged in criminal activity with little regard for the larger issues of racial justice.

Or that’s what we saw with our own eyes here in Chicago.

… The Cook County State’s Attorney’s office approved a total of 392 cases stemming from the two looting episodes in May and August. But nearly a year after the first looters took to the streets, only 33 cases have made it through the courts. Out of those, 26 individuals received probation and only seven will end up doing time in jail. …

NBC 5 Investigates has been tracking the cases for months, and while it is true that many of the defendants who received probation had no criminal record, several had previous stays in the Illinois Department of Corrections. And we found prior convictions ranging from theft, to unlawful use of a weapon, child endangerment, felony drug charges and domestic battery.

“These were organized groups,” said Tanya Triche Dawood, the general counsel for the Illinois Retail Merchants Association. “They took advantage of this particular moment to do great damage all at once.”

Dawood stopped short of saying she wants to see more jail time for looters, noting “the fact that they have been convicted of a felony is a win.”

This is the general counsel for the Illinois Retail Merchants Association stopping short of saying she wants more jail time for looters.

… “I’d love to see them in jail for sure,” said Eddie Kim of the looters who hit his family’s clothing store on May 30. “I just wish more was done to stop those people or help hold those people accountable.”

Kim’s father Hal Tong Kim stood in the doorway and begged looters to spare his store at 34th and King Drive on May 30. He was unsuccessful and thieves ransacked the business.

“I told them, ‘Please, don’t loot this store,'” the elder Kim told NBC 5. “I don’t want to look — my heart is broken.”

No one was arrested for that episode.

“I didn’t know people were capable of that,” Eddie Kim told NBC 5. “I hate to think those people are still out there.”

Caspian Rugs on North LaSalle Street was hit during both looting episodes in May and August. Manager Lazar Malik estimated the losses at hundreds of thousands of dollars.

“The first time they broke the first window and took a lot of rugs, but
the second time was worse,” Malik said. “We need justice. I mean that’s not fair what happened to all these store owners.”

Foxx says she wants to see justice too.

“Accountability doesn’t just mean prison sentences or prison terms,” the State’s Attorney said. “Accountability by probation means someone has a conviction on their record, and we should note that having a conviction hinders one’s ability to get a job, housing and the like. And so, having that conviction and having probation doesn’t mean someone’s gotten away for their crimes. In fact, having that conviction is severe.”

The looter’s dream of being a licensed actuary is shattered.

 
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  1. Out of those, 26 individuals received probation and only seven will end up doing time in jail.

    To put these small numbers in perspective: just the number of active parolees who participated in the looting, ie violated the terms of their parole which often means (in theory) reincarceration, has to be more than seven.

    • Agree: Polistra
  2. And so, having that conviction and having probation doesn’t mean someone’s gotten away for their crimes. In fact, having that conviction is severe.”

    Foxx , of course , is one of the people who wants to make discrimination in the hiring of ex convicts unlawful. As the saying goes “if they didn’t have double standards they’d have no standards at all.”

    • Agree: bomag
  3. Zoos says:

    I’ve always said that the “insurrection” would never have crossed any of the perps minds in the first place if there was transparency during and after the voting process. If not, they SHOULD surround the Capital building. There’s nothing else to do.

    A significant number of politicians are some variation of sociopaths, or clinically qualified narcissists. We’ve known them in our personal lives. They’re amongst the few people that finally make you say, “the only thing this person can understand is a good ass-kicking.” And in the case of the narcissist, it’s always true. They need their shit shook, and that’s what happened. Note the narcissistic response of forcing our military to stand around doing nothing all day “protecting” the Capital from a past momentary threat that’s highly unlikely to happen in the immediate future. Crazy, self-involved cowardly narcissism.

    As our population keeps increasing, and via unchecked immigration, will become even more ethnically tribal for the next 100 years, election transparency should be upgraded to an inalienable human right.

    The process must be made fully transparent, and exclusive to qualified United States citizens, or worse will happen in the future, in ways that will be unexpected… again.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @Zoos

    Zoos, I agree but honestly, where have you been? You think the “process” in Washington D.C. has been “transparent” until recently?

    Are you kidding?

    The federal government hasn’t been “transparent” almost my entire lifetime!

    Hell, a president of the United States of America was murdered in broad daylight on the streets of a major American city almost 58 years ago, and we STILL can’t say exactly what happened!

    Why not?
    Because the narcissistic pols and major media types in Washington were more concerned with advancing their own careers than in solving the brazen Deep State murder of an elected president.

    Allen Dulles and John McCloy ensured the “Warren Commission” was nothing but a giant P.R. exercise to pin it all on an innocent dead man.

    So, a fake investigation of a fake “insurrection”in 2021 is the inevitable end of a long slow path to national ruin which began before most of us here were born.

    Art Deco bait in 3 . . . 2. . . 1

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Zoos


    if there was transparency during and after the voting process
     
    If I remember correctly, Putin offered to supply Russian election officials to oversee and guarantee the rectitude of our last election. This would have been a great step forward. U.N. overseers could have been used as well, but the Russians have more experience with the people who rigged the election--having, after all, just rid themselves of occupation by these people and being therefore more mindful of their tricks--and would have been the better choice.
  4. If more of the US had ‘Sunshine Laws’ like Florida a criminal conviction might be a deterrence. I can look up someone’s criminal record in Florida with ease. I can even read the police probable cause affidavit that led to their arrest. “Checking the box” or providing a state police report to get a job isn’t necessary. It is also the case that you can’t vote in Florida if you have a felony conviction and have not paid court ordered fines or restitution penalties. Can’t even get your driver’s license if you owe fines.

    Unfortunately, other states do no make public records as ‘public’ and make no effort to enforce court ordered penalties so what happens in court stays in court.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @UNIT472

    Unit, Berkeley passed a law that says landlords can not ask a prospective tenant if they have a criminal past. Also, Berkeley cops can not ask a suspect if they are on parole or probation. Chicago laws just haven't reach maximum wokeness.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  5. Republicans in Congress are insisting that any investigation into the Jan. 6 attack include an examination of left-wing violence.

    How racist! Left-wingers aren’t even capable of violence–ask TD–but any assemblage of more than two right-wingers in the same spot is ipso facto a violent insurrection.

    And anything which looks like a party, with laughing, milling about, and the repeated use of selfie sticks? Well that strikes at the very core of our “Democracy”..

    “I didn’t know people were capable of that,” Eddie Kim told NBC 5. “I hate to think those people are still out there.”

    Eddie Kim is lucky that there’s another country on this planet which will happily take him in. He should take advantage of that. From his first sentence one gets the impression that he’s watched too much television. What’s that the lefties used to say? ‘The Revolution will not be televised?’ Truer than Gil Scott-Heron ever knew.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  6. I guess that the Woke elites have memory-holed the White House siege. Just imagine what would have happened if the White House had been as lightly guarded as the Capitol Building used to be…

    Secret Service agents wounded outside White House, car bombs feared; official says Trump was taken to bunker

    Numerous Secret Service agents were injured, fires set by rioters blazed near the White House and authorities were searching for car bombs late Sunday as protests over the death of George Floyd continued to roil the capital just two days after President Trump had to be taken to a bunker for his safety.

    As authorities clashed with demonstrators for the third straight night, the parish house connected to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church across the street from the White House was set on fire late Sunday. The parish house contains offices and parlors for gatherings. The basement, which was also torched, is used for childcare during church services, and had recently undergone renovations.

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/secret-service-took-trump-to-underground-bunker-amid-george-floyd-protests

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Thanks: Polistra, Travis, Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Tex
    @syonredux


    Secret Service agents wounded outside White House, car bombs feared; official says Trump was taken to bunker
     
    I seem to recall a great deal of crowing on the left about how cowardly Trump was for cowering in the WH basement. As opposed to the stiff-upper lip, let's-just-talk-to-the-constituents approach of Congress on the 6th. Up above someone mentioned if it weren't for double-standards, the left would have none at all.
  7. But save us from what? What exactly is wrong with the Establishment losing credibility?

  8. Left-Wing violence is not spontaneous and uncoordinated. From the NYTIMES:

    The Truth About Today’s Anarchists.

    “Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.

    While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.

    Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.

    If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/30/opinion/anarchists-protests-black-lives-matter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @syonredux

    Well someone isn't going to be writing in the NYT anymore.

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @Lockean Proviso
    @syonredux

    They weren't really protesting for racial justice, they were protesting against it- and against civilization, standards, truth, beauty. sovereignty, and the rule of law.

    , @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    The FBI isn't capable of pointing its browser to the web site "It's Going Down," or any one of dozens of infoshops and discussion forums, where leftists literally say, because of X guy getting arrested let's all meet at Y location at Z time. Law school graduates are not capable of understanding the real meaning of sentences like "because of the past events, we certainly understand if you would want to defend yourself, and we won't do anything from discouraging you from taking your safety seriously." High tech panopticon cannot find scruffy faces in black pyjamas or certain license plates.
    But Ashli Babbitt is dead and the confused "insurrectionists" in jail are getting beaten by the guards.

    , @Lurker
    @syonredux


    It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.
     
    It's Asymmetric Terrorism 101.
  9. @syonredux
    Left-Wing violence is not spontaneous and uncoordinated. From the NYTIMES:


    The Truth About Today’s Anarchists.

    “Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.


    While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.
     

    Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.
     

    If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/30/opinion/anarchists-protests-black-lives-matter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Lockean Proviso, @J.Ross, @Lurker

    Well someone isn’t going to be writing in the NYT anymore.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Redneck farmer

    The MSM and Antifa have a close relationship:


    And yet, Antifa often receives media coverage that is neutral or even favorable, with its members’ violence either being ignored by reporters or vaguely explained away as a product of right-wing provocation. What’s more, anecdotal evidence has suggested that many of the mainstream reporters who are most active in covering Antifa also tend to enthusiastically amplify Antifa’s claims on social media.
     

    In October 2018, my research partner and I decided to investigate the truth of this impression by using a mix of network mapping and linguistic analysis to see which prominent journalists who covered Antifa also were closely connected to leading Antifa figures on social media. We then inspected the Antifa-related stories these journalists had written.
     

    We created a data set of 58,254 Antifa or Antifa-associated Twitter accounts based on the follows of 16 verified Antifa seed accounts. Using a software tool that analyzed the number and nature of connections associated with each individual account, we winnowed the 58,254 Antifa or Antifa-associated Twitter accounts down to 962 accounts. This represents a core group of Twitter users who are connected in overlapping ways to the most influential and widely followed Antifa figures. Of these 962 accounts, 22 were found to be verified—of which 15 were journalists who work regularly with national-level news outlets.
     

    That correlation turned out to be quite pronounced: Of all 15 verified national-level journalists in our subset, we couldn’t find a single article, by any of them, that was markedly critical of Antifa in any way. In all cases, their work in this area consisted primarily of downplaying Antifa violence while advancing Antifa talking points, and in some cases quoting Antifa extremists as if they were impartial experts.

     


    A more prominent example is Jason Wilson, a Portland-based writer for The Guardian. One of his recent articles focused on a U.S. regional intelligence report whose authors concluded that Antifa and the far right share responsibility for street violence. “Experts say the report mischaracterizes the dynamics of the street violence,” Wilson complained.
     

    One of Wilson’s main “experts” in the piece, it turned out, was none other than Antifa handbook author Mark Bray, who, predictably, denounced the report’s contents as “ludicrous.” In fact, Bray makes regular appearances in Wilson’s articles. So does fellow Portland resident and eco-extremist Alexander Reid Ross, who regularly writes for Antifa publications such as the It’s Going Down anarchist news site. (Ross also contributed to a 30-year-anniversary edition publication for Earth First!, an extremist environmentalist collective that advocates what activists euphemistically call “direct action.”)

     


    Interestingly, while other Portland journalists such as Genevieve Reaume of KATU News, Maggie Vespa of KGW News and Quillette’s own Andy Ngo (who has voiced concerns about Antifa’s actions) have been harassed and assaulted by Antifa activists, Wilson seems welcome to mingle freely among Antifa, and has even been photographed standing close to Marquez. In one piece, titled “How the world has fought back against the violent far-right and started winning,” Wilson effectively drops the pretense that he is a neutral reporter, and approvingly outlines the Antifa tactics set out in Bray’s book. He also defends such tactics as doxing, stalking, deplatforming and shaming as valuable means to attack individuals whose views he dislikes. In doing so, he cites both Bray and Emily Gorcenski, who runs a doxing site called First Vigil, and an associated Twitter account, which shame individuals she deems to be fascists before they have received due process.

     


    Christopher Mathias, a senior reporter for the Huffington Post, applies the same cynical approach. Like Wilson, Mathias’ byline seems to pop up whenever Antifa stages violent protests—and he always can be counted on to deliver a play-by-play that favors Antifa. But he goes even further than his Guardian counterpart. Unlike Wilson, Mathias actually doxes individuals whom he suspects of being right-wing extremists. His doxing sources for an article about suspected extremists in the U.S. military included Unicorn Riot, an anarchic Antifa journalist collective, and other shady sites that exist as a sort of in-house 4chan for the Antifa movement. (Mathias cited similar sources when he published identifying details of a Texas schoolteacher, and of a Virginia police officer.)

     


    Like other prominent writers whose names appear among the 15 journalists most closely engaged with Antifa, they seem to function not at professional arm’s length from their sources, but rather as cogs in an activist enterprise that churns out both pro-Antifa propaganda and doxing information about real or imagined ideological enemies. Their allies in this mission include trolls such as AntiFashGordon, the pseudonym of a Twitter user who declares that “I expose fascists, get them fired, de-homed, kicked out of school etc,” and brags that he passes “dossiers” of doxes to national-level journalists, whom he refers to as “our contacts.” His entire online mission is to ruin other people’s lives, and it is a mission being supported by “contacts” like Mathias and Wilson. In providing such support, they are discrediting their publications and misinforming their readers.
     
    https://quillette.com/2019/05/29/its-not-your-imagination-the-journalists-writing-about-antifa-are-often-their-cheerleaders/
  10. Notice also its the feds doing the prosecution for the DC riot….all these other looters are getting gravy train slaps on the wrist from the Kim Fox types…..i want to be prosecuted by her…..

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Neoconned

    Not if you're a white male conservative, you don't. How many books do you think Kim Foxx would have thrown at the white men who attacked Jussie Smollett (that is, if he hadn't made up the whole story out of whole kente cloth)?

    As Steve quite rightly says on many occasions, "Who? Whom?"

  11. Here in South Philly, a gun store owner camped out in his store to protect it from looters. Two men (both armed with firearms) broke in to the store around 3am but the owner had the drop on them, killing one with a headshot and wounding the other.

    The DA was actually considering charges against the store owner, but by some miracle decided not to. That charges would even be considered under these circumstances is outrageous!

    But anyway, it’s always good to hear about looters getting shot. I wish we could go back to the way things were in the 60’s, when police could unapologetically shoot looters with no questions asked. That’s what real social justice would look like.

  12. “Only a handful of looting suspects have had their day in court…”

    The impression this sentence leaves is that suspects have been denied due process and are wasting away in some cell somewhere as they await trial.

    Even a license to steal for negroes must be worded so that it seems like they are victims of something.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  13. Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Dan Smith
    @Harry Baldwin

    The crew that bombed the math building in Madison Wisconsin in 1970 received pretty light sentences considering they killed a man. One was never caught. Karl Armstrong returned after serving his sentence and opened a natural food store. His only regret was not doing more.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato, @AnotherDad

    , @stillCARealist
    @Harry Baldwin

    This is the reason my right-wing parents taught us kids to avoid and fear the police back in the 70's. The poh-leece and criminals were all playing a game together, a deadly game, and we had no business to ever get involved with that.

    What is called "white flight" was also partly "policing flight."

    I didn't appreciate the impossibleness of their jobs until I was an older adult. How can you truly prove that suspects did something that they consistently deny? How do you restrain someone who sees himself as completely without fault? How do you enforce compliance with a rule that many see as stupid?

    I confess I want the cops to be nasty to the nasty people and nice to the nice people. But I'd rather just never encounter them, or need to call them. That means rural living with decent neighbors, all of us armed to the teeth. But that doesn't work on a larger scale.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    ...and the assassination attempt on President Truman.
     
    Truman was far more of a terrorist than the goofballs who tried to knock him off. Puerto Rico was never really ours, anyway. Let Make their people go!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Days of Rage by Bryan Burroughs"

    Agreed. It's an excellent well-written book. Sensing the zeitgeist in 2019 I read it in anticipation of what was to come. Burroughs interviewed a lefty-lawyer working for the upper middle class Weathermen who admitted their anti-war activity was secondary; the emotional fever for blacks that pulsed through the privileged white radicals was primary. Similar to the current white worship of the sacred black though the climate today features an FBI/DOJ alliance with totalitarian leftism and financial backing by corporations and decadent billionaires.

    , @Kronos
    @Harry Baldwin

    It really is a great book.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Harry Baldwin

    The two lefty AA lawyers who firebombed (!) an NYPD police car last year will probably get off with a slap on the wrist, and then get jobs at some lefty think tank supported by tax money, As Bill Ayers said, "Guilty as hell. Free as a bird.

    , @J.Ross
    @Harry Baldwin

    I don't have the link (I believe a German commenter posted it here), but a number of top level German politicians were terrorists, Stasi, or East German saboteurs working in the West in the 70s. They were never really punished in any way, they were allowed to assume office, and the newsmedia never brings up their career highlights. (The really crucial thing is the names, with those you could easily search the article title, and these are not people who get regularly mentioned in English-language media.) The main operation described is "depicted" in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it's the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.

    Replies: @Tex

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Harry Baldwin

    Harry, the DA in San Francisco, chesa boudin, is the child of two convicted murderers, both members of the Weatherman. He was raised by bill ayers and bernadine dohrn. That says a lot. Oh, and he is all in for "restorative justice." His mother was released and she too became a law prof. His father is still in jail and I am willing to bet biden pardons him. Stay safe.

    , @ATBOTL
    @Harry Baldwin

    Yes, and that happened under Trump.

  14. A small number of the rioters who burned the Third Precinct station in Minneapolis got jail time, more the exception than the rule. Was the Boston Massacre a riot or an insurrection?

  15. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    The crew that bombed the math building in Madison Wisconsin in 1970 received pretty light sentences considering they killed a man. One was never caught. Karl Armstrong returned after serving his sentence and opened a natural food store. His only regret was not doing more.

  16. @syonredux
    Left-Wing violence is not spontaneous and uncoordinated. From the NYTIMES:


    The Truth About Today’s Anarchists.

    “Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.


    While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.
     

    Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.
     

    If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/30/opinion/anarchists-protests-black-lives-matter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Lockean Proviso, @J.Ross, @Lurker

    They weren’t really protesting for racial justice, they were protesting against it- and against civilization, standards, truth, beauty. sovereignty, and the rule of law.

    • Agree: new Stalin
    • Disagree: Corvinus
  17. “Accountability by probation means someone has a conviction on their record, and we should note that having a conviction hinders one’s ability to get a job, housing and the like.”

    Can that possibly be true of public housing in the State of Illinois? And I can’t imagine that getting a job is a really high priority for many of the looters in question.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    , @cityview
    @slumber_j

    My guess is that most if not all public housing policy is set by the federal government. I think there has been talk of rescinding the policy on felonies; I don't know whether anything has changed. I also don't know whether the no-felonies would apply to vouchers, the preferred method of funding housing in recent years.

  18. Hope for what exactly ?

  19. “Accountability doesn’t just mean prison sentences or prison terms,”

    …if you’re a black looter.

    On the other hand, if you’re a white nut with a painted face and buffalo horns or a hillbilly putting his feet on Pelosi’s desk for a selfie, then twenty five-to-life for treason is a slap on the wrist…

  20. It is amazing how you can get the wrong end of the stick from mass media news.

    Here was me thinking that those people who marched on Congress on January the 6th were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election, when all along it was just a bunch of rowdy tourists fooling about.

    In any other country on Earth the Congress people would have come outside to shake their hands and greet them and give them a personal guided tour of the building, show them around their offices, make them coffee, and hand out autographed photos and Congressional toys for the kiddies.

    • Thanks: Grahamsno(G64)
    • Replies: @gent
    @Jonathan Mason

    Considering the exact same thing, lead by AOC, happened during the Kavanaugh hearings, I find the pearl clutching pathetic.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election
     
    A corrupted general election. Those are not taken lightly in any country with even a modicum of freedom of assembly.


    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/10/05/world/05kyrgyzstan-rally01/merlin_178099248_090c84d6-8a35-41fb-a31e-7fac07571dcb-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp

    https://i.cbc.ca/1.5766488.1602899592!/fileImage/httpImage/image.JPG_gen/derivatives/4x3_1180/thailand-protests.JPG

    https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/styles/embed_small/public/media_2020/08/202008eca_belarus_argue.jpg?itok=Why1DHvC

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  21. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The Washington Post credulously claims that hair touching is a widespread problem for black women, without evidence, and without a single case documented in their searchable archives:

    Microaggressions at the office can make remote work even more appealing: Extended remote work during the pandemic has highlighted how much energy people of color, women, and people with disabilities expend dealing with microaggressions in the office. Some are reluctant to return because of it.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/05/13/workplace-microaggressions-remote-workers/

    Black knowledge workers had a greater sense of belonging when they didn’t feel the constant need to “code-switch” to fit in with a majority-White office environment.

    In a Twitter discussion on office microaggressions, people said working at home has largely spared them from having to deal with such incidents as:

    o having colleagues touch their hair

    o being mistaken for another colleague of the same race (a problem solved by having names displayed in video meetings)

    o overhearing insensitive commentary on or being pressured to discuss traumatizing news events such as racist violence or coronavirus outbreaks in their home country

    o fielding comments from passersby on their “angry” (actually focused) expressions

    Hair touching is number one in the list. It’s mysterious that in a world where anytime a Karen does the slightest thing to offend a black woman she loses her job, that there have been zero-point-zero actual hair touching incidents reported in any media over the past several years that involve a name, date, and place. Why do black women run to the media for every other category of slight, but never for hair touching?

    • Replies: @new Stalin
    @Anon

    Why in hades would anyone want o touch a negress or negroes hair?

  22. @slumber_j

    "Accountability by probation means someone has a conviction on their record, and we should note that having a conviction hinders one’s ability to get a job, housing and the like."
     
    Can that possibly be true of public housing in the State of Illinois? And I can't imagine that getting a job is a really high priority for many of the looters in question.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @cityview

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980’s, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively “chained to the rock” for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jonathan Mason

    Brave fellow planting illegal drugs on someone else’s property. Why so unwilling to face the consequences of your actions? Because you are a coward. This incident comports perfectly with your commenting history. Alligator mouth and a tadpole ass.

    , @AndrewR
    @Jonathan Mason

    Why would they need to go through customs at all? Can't you go from one flight to another in international terminal?That's the way São Paulo Guarulhos airport is. When I flew to Montevideo from the US I had a layover at Guarulhos. All the international flights were out of a single "quarantined" terminal.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @TWS
    @Jonathan Mason

    So you're not only dense but a dirtbag as well! Some things just bring a smile to your face. Unless you were working in a sensitive field no one would care about a minor possession charge.

    Except you are stone stupid enough to carry in public and dumb enough to do so in a head shop. The experience would have been salutary for your common sense.

    , @Tex
    @Jonathan Mason


    People mature with age.
     
    But even the mature can write paragraph after paragraph of nonsense.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason


    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.
     
    Sadly, for the rest of us.
  23. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    I note that Korean merchants defended their businesses and drove off the Black and other POC looters during the horrible 1992 Rodney King Riots.

    Here in my Chicago the only group that opposed in anyway the BLM riots, organized mass looting were some Hispanic street gangs, clubs let by the Latin Kings. The Latin Kings took their streets with guns and stopped suspicious cars invading their neighborhoods – the Hispanic gangs told everyone they would defend their mom and pop stores in their neighborhoods and just see to it that there was no BLM looting in “their neighborhoods” Good for them.

    As always, non of the big talking Conservative NRA types did anything. A year later the Country GOP at least tried to run a candidate against BLM District Attorney Kim Foxx – it was a very timid campaign, refuse to do Lee Atwater type adverts where they presented real individual people robbed, destroyed even murdered by the worst criminals Kim Foxx let go or…

    Just show the rampaging BLM looters and counter that your candidate thinks this was wrong and will see to it that it doesn’t happen again.

    But…. they don’t call it “The stupid party” for nothing.

    Most lamestream GOP Conservatives are too busy pandering to Woke capital that screws us or getting a hard on for the next Neo Conservative Zionist wars. The Christian Zionists are also totally AWOL in these Antifa, BLM riots, insurrections. These Christian Zionists don’t seem to notice or care that Christians are being completely driven out of Jerusalem and the rest of the Middle East.

    Pathetic.

    J Ryan
    Left Behind in Chicago

  24. OT – Dominic Cummings is threatening to get involved in CA politics!

    (I don’t blame him for looking, mind, I’m sure I’d have looked too)

  25. Read the comments.

    The majority people are completely against you and want Republicans punished.

    You guys are in for a rude awakening the next few elections.

    I guarantee Liberal anger over right wing violence is about to reach a boiling point.

    I think sites like this will be shut down.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @Tiny Duck


    I guarantee Liberal anger over "right wing violence" is about to reach a boiling point.

    I think sites like this will be shut down.
     
    FIFY
  26. @Jonathan Mason
    It is amazing how you can get the wrong end of the stick from mass media news.

    Here was me thinking that those people who marched on Congress on January the 6th were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election, when all along it was just a bunch of rowdy tourists fooling about.

    In any other country on Earth the Congress people would have come outside to shake their hands and greet them and give them a personal guided tour of the building, show them around their offices, make them coffee, and hand out autographed photos and Congressional toys for the kiddies.

    Replies: @gent, @Reg Cæsar

    Considering the exact same thing, lead by AOC, happened during the Kavanaugh hearings, I find the pearl clutching pathetic.

  27. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Jonathan Mason


    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!
     
    I'd say you should know better, but clearly you don't know better about anything. The Democratic Party isn't treating the 1/6 riot as "breaking and entering" or rioting, or any such thing. They are treating it as armed rebellion, lese majeste, sacrilege, and blasphemy.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jonathan Mason

    Leading the lambs to slaughter on January 6 was Trump's final act of presidential buffoonery. He gave the DC authoritarians even more political capital.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    , @El Dato
    @Jonathan Mason


    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.
     
    One person was killed and nothing happened. Black privilege maybe.

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position
     
    These times are over.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason

    Harry Baldwin writes an excellent comment/book-suggestion on this issue of leftist-minoritarian-establishment's non-prosecution/leniency of leftist political violence. A very serious issue, one of the--many--ways leftists have been institutionally undermining/de-stabilizing the rule-of-law and our my republic and nation.

    And this is your response?

    At least the Duck is a--at times well executed--parody account. As far as i can tell, you don't have that excuse.

  28. Three more NYC subway slashings just this morning — it’s like some kind of insurrection or something! If it bleeds the local media will still cover it, they’ll just launder the demographic details. We’re open for business, Mr and Mrs Tourist!

  29. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    This is the reason my right-wing parents taught us kids to avoid and fear the police back in the 70’s. The poh-leece and criminals were all playing a game together, a deadly game, and we had no business to ever get involved with that.

    What is called “white flight” was also partly “policing flight.”

    I didn’t appreciate the impossibleness of their jobs until I was an older adult. How can you truly prove that suspects did something that they consistently deny? How do you restrain someone who sees himself as completely without fault? How do you enforce compliance with a rule that many see as stupid?

    I confess I want the cops to be nasty to the nasty people and nice to the nice people. But I’d rather just never encounter them, or need to call them. That means rural living with decent neighbors, all of us armed to the teeth. But that doesn’t work on a larger scale.

  30. I don’t care what happens in big cities where this looting and rioting takes place. The people of Portland, Minneapolis, Chicago, New York voted for this. It is the logical conclusion of having elected the people they’ve elected and having enacted the policies they’ve enacted.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  31. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato, @AnotherDad

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    I’d say you should know better, but clearly you don’t know better about anything. The Democratic Party isn’t treating the 1/6 riot as “breaking and entering” or rioting, or any such thing. They are treating it as armed rebellion, lese majeste, sacrilege, and blasphemy.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Mr. Anon

    It is normal in the American justice system to overcharge people so as force them into plea bargaining.

    Since the penalty for blasphemy is being burned at the stake, offenders are more likely to plead guilty to a lesser charge such as spitting on public property.

  32. This is the general counsel for the Illinois Retail Merchants Association stopping short of saying she wants more jail time for looters.

    This is the general counsel for the Illinois Retail Merchants Association:

  33. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    …and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Truman was far more of a terrorist than the goofballs who tried to knock him off. Puerto Rico was never really ours, anyway. Let Make their people go!

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    I devoutly wish we had never annexed Puerto Rico. What a terrible mistake. I wish we could cut it loose.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  34. The January 6th storming of the Capitol was a reaction to a stolen election coup, which is far more historically significant than a violation of Nancy Pelosi’s desk.

    A coup against a popularly elected president, which defies the will of an electorate and installs an illegitimate regime, deserves justice be served, including long prison sentences for the conspirators.

    • Agree: Tex
  35. @Jonathan Mason
    It is amazing how you can get the wrong end of the stick from mass media news.

    Here was me thinking that those people who marched on Congress on January the 6th were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election, when all along it was just a bunch of rowdy tourists fooling about.

    In any other country on Earth the Congress people would have come outside to shake their hands and greet them and give them a personal guided tour of the building, show them around their offices, make them coffee, and hand out autographed photos and Congressional toys for the kiddies.

    Replies: @gent, @Reg Cæsar

    were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election

    A corrupted general election. Those are not taken lightly in any country with even a modicum of freedom of assembly.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    It seems that the US has no way of determining whether an election is corrupt or not, since both the political system and the court system are corrupt too.

    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    As regards crime and violence, it seems to me that we must distinguish between violence for political ends such as terrorism or unruly street demonstrations and violence for criminal ends, such as people breaking into and looting stores while law enforcement agencies are distracted by political demonstrations.

    Clearly political violence is fueled by the mass media, because the presence of cameras means that the whole world will see what is going on.

    This was made very clear to me when I was in Port au Prince, Haiti several days after the massive earthquakes of 2010 when ten of thousands of people were sleeping in the streets and camping in makeshift tens made of bed sheets or blankets right outside the Presidential palace.

    CNN cameras were set up on a balcony conveniently overlooking the palace grounds, and CNN staff were helpfully distributing large sheets of white paper and laundry markers to anybody who wanted to make a sign to hold up, and even offering English language spelling correction to potential demonstrators.

    I believe the same thing goes on all over the world.

    When looting is going on, on the other hand, the looters cover their faces and it is quite dangerous to try to film looting as looters do not take kindly to the whole world seeing their exploits.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted. But, as ever, history is written by the victors, so they may have to row upstream. But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  36. @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    Brave fellow planting illegal drugs on someone else’s property. Why so unwilling to face the consequences of your actions? Because you are a coward. This incident comports perfectly with your commenting history. Alligator mouth and a tadpole ass.

  37. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    “Days of Rage by Bryan Burroughs”

    Agreed. It’s an excellent well-written book. Sensing the zeitgeist in 2019 I read it in anticipation of what was to come. Burroughs interviewed a lefty-lawyer working for the upper middle class Weathermen who admitted their anti-war activity was secondary; the emotional fever for blacks that pulsed through the privileged white radicals was primary. Similar to the current white worship of the sacred black though the climate today features an FBI/DOJ alliance with totalitarian leftism and financial backing by corporations and decadent billionaires.

  38. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    It really is a great book.

  39. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato, @AnotherDad

    Leading the lambs to slaughter on January 6 was Trump’s final act of presidential buffoonery. He gave the DC authoritarians even more political capital.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Trump was a useful idiot encouraged and allowed by the oligarchy to thoroughly taint and discredit populism for at least a generation. He was so toxic and stupid that he made American political discourse even more toxic and stupid than it already was. Few actually talk about issues on their merits or evidence anymore, and historical memory has become an evanescent and cartoonish mirage.. Now it is largely feelings, reactions, and Manichean dichotomy. Trump is now the Emmanuel Goldstein forever lurking behind many a plot du jour that thrills the credulous masses.

    Those who script the puppet show are good at what they do.

  40. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato, @AnotherDad

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    One person was killed and nothing happened. Black privilege maybe.

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position

    These times are over.

  41. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    The two lefty AA lawyers who firebombed (!) an NYPD police car last year will probably get off with a slap on the wrist, and then get jobs at some lefty think tank supported by tax money, As Bill Ayers said, “Guilty as hell. Free as a bird.

  42. @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    Why would they need to go through customs at all? Can’t you go from one flight to another in international terminal?That’s the way São Paulo Guarulhos airport is. When I flew to Montevideo from the US I had a layover at Guarulhos. All the international flights were out of a single “quarantined” terminal.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @AndrewR


    Why would they need to go through customs at all? Can’t you go from one flight to another in international terminal?
     
    Not in the United States, no. I do not know of any international terminal that permits transit without entry in the US, certainly not on the east coast, anyway, and have never heard of one elsewhere.
  43. Here in California, Penal Code Section 647.6 makes it a crime to annoy a teenager. Annoying Nancy Pelosi hasn’t got anything on us. When I’m in front of my house getting the mail or whatever, and a teenager walks by, I don’t even make eye contact.

  44. If there had been a right-wing insurrection, Trump would not still be President. The Revolution would be over and a fifty-something, telegenic AnotherDad would be Interim President.

  45. TWS says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    So you’re not only dense but a dirtbag as well! Some things just bring a smile to your face. Unless you were working in a sensitive field no one would care about a minor possession charge.

    Except you are stone stupid enough to carry in public and dumb enough to do so in a head shop. The experience would have been salutary for your common sense.

  46. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    were trying to violently block the process of certifying the general election
     
    A corrupted general election. Those are not taken lightly in any country with even a modicum of freedom of assembly.


    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2020/10/05/world/05kyrgyzstan-rally01/merlin_178099248_090c84d6-8a35-41fb-a31e-7fac07571dcb-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp

    https://i.cbc.ca/1.5766488.1602899592!/fileImage/httpImage/image.JPG_gen/derivatives/4x3_1180/thailand-protests.JPG

    https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/styles/embed_small/public/media_2020/08/202008eca_belarus_argue.jpg?itok=Why1DHvC

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It seems that the US has no way of determining whether an election is corrupt or not, since both the political system and the court system are corrupt too.

    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    As regards crime and violence, it seems to me that we must distinguish between violence for political ends such as terrorism or unruly street demonstrations and violence for criminal ends, such as people breaking into and looting stores while law enforcement agencies are distracted by political demonstrations.

    Clearly political violence is fueled by the mass media, because the presence of cameras means that the whole world will see what is going on.

    This was made very clear to me when I was in Port au Prince, Haiti several days after the massive earthquakes of 2010 when ten of thousands of people were sleeping in the streets and camping in makeshift tens made of bed sheets or blankets right outside the Presidential palace.

    CNN cameras were set up on a balcony conveniently overlooking the palace grounds, and CNN staff were helpfully distributing large sheets of white paper and laundry markers to anybody who wanted to make a sign to hold up, and even offering English language spelling correction to potential demonstrators.

    I believe the same thing goes on all over the world.

    When looting is going on, on the other hand, the looters cover their faces and it is quite dangerous to try to film looting as looters do not take kindly to the whole world seeing their exploits.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted. But, as ever, history is written by the victors, so they may have to row upstream. But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

     

    Perhaps [past] elections need[ed]...

    FIFY,M.

    ...a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

     

    Exactly. However, the Carter Center has a severe conflict-of-interest in its homeland. Do you know of any trustworthy counterparts abroad? We could always request a commission appointed by the heads of government of countries (e.g., Germany, Mexico) who voiced objection to the "deplatforming" of the President.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted.

     

    Demanding a delay in certification hardly constitutes a coup attempt, particularly when such a delay is more than justified, even necessary. Burglary should be prosecuted as just that, and nothing more.

    But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

     

    The few on our side will have their hands full with Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  47. “Accountability by probation means someone has a conviction on their record, and we should note that having a conviction hinders one’s ability to get a job…”

    So…their punishment is that they are going to continue not working, and presumably living off the taxpayers? Zounds, that’ll show ’em!

  48. Anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted. But, as ever, history is written by the victors, so they may have to row upstream. But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

    The guy who trespassed and put his feet up on Nancy Pelosi’s desk was given a sentence of 7 years in federal prison without parole or early release. His family was financially wiped out before he was forced to turn to a federal public defender who arranged for his prison sentence.

    Meanwhile, a few months later, another crime occurred 1.3 miles from the U.S. Capitol involving a black girl who carjacked and murdered a Pakistani UberEats driver. She was given 3 years in juvenile detention and when she turns 18 her record will be sealed by a judge and her criminal history will not come up even on any criminal record check, including NCIC/FBI.

  49. If someone is currently on probation for a felony when they commit a felony, they should get jail time, and this should include actual time in an actual jail, not merely “house arrest”, or six hours of light yard work under light supervision counting as a day or two in jail. This should be a no-brainer.

    We’re actually doing young people a disservice when we teach them that crime actually does pay, and we’re not actually serious about serious parole violations.

    That guy who got shot while fleeing from police (when they were probably trying to tase him) should have been in jail already for parole violations. He’d be alive today if he had been behind bars.

    There used to be something called a “suspended sentence” where someone would get jail time and parole, and would only have to serve the time in jail if they violated parole. What ever happened to that? Does holding people accountable for violating parole have a “disparate impact”?

  50. @syonredux
    Left-Wing violence is not spontaneous and uncoordinated. From the NYTIMES:


    The Truth About Today’s Anarchists.

    “Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.


    While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.
     

    Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.
     

    If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/30/opinion/anarchists-protests-black-lives-matter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Lockean Proviso, @J.Ross, @Lurker

    The FBI isn’t capable of pointing its browser to the web site “It’s Going Down,” or any one of dozens of infoshops and discussion forums, where leftists literally say, because of X guy getting arrested let’s all meet at Y location at Z time. Law school graduates are not capable of understanding the real meaning of sentences like “because of the past events, we certainly understand if you would want to defend yourself, and we won’t do anything from discouraging you from taking your safety seriously.” High tech panopticon cannot find scruffy faces in black pyjamas or certain license plates.
    But Ashli Babbitt is dead and the confused “insurrectionists” in jail are getting beaten by the guards.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  51. >if there is hope
    No hope.
    >local media
    No local media.

  52. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    I don’t have the link (I believe a German commenter posted it here), but a number of top level German politicians were terrorists, Stasi, or East German saboteurs working in the West in the 70s. They were never really punished in any way, they were allowed to assume office, and the newsmedia never brings up their career highlights. (The really crucial thing is the names, with those you could easily search the article title, and these are not people who get regularly mentioned in English-language media.) The main operation described is “depicted” in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it’s the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.

    • Replies: @Tex
    @J.Ross


    The main operation described is “depicted” in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it’s the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.
     
    The cop who shot the protestor was in fact a Stasi operative. I don't know at what level, or if it had a bearing on his decision to shoot. Nonetheless, given the German radical left's narrative of Nazi West German cops on a murder rampage, the fact that the shooter was a COMMUNIST SPY, really ought to have some relevance.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @but an humble craftsman

  53. I agree that the January 6 Insurrection should be investigated separately. It is a unique situation.

    However, I have been and still am very puzzled that there seems to be little interest in figuring out who the core group of travelling rioters were last summer and getting them into prison, especially for serious crimes like arson. Everybody wanted to know who messed with the Colonial pipeline and wants to see those Russians caught and put out of business which is already happening. How can people not demand the same thing when the criminals went to multiple cities and are right here in America?

    So I want Congress to hold hearings about who these people are and what they want and who is behind them. This investigation has nothing to do with the people who stormed the Capitol. Combining them together would be a mistake.

    • Replies: @anon
    @notsaying

    So I want Congress to hold hearings about who these people are and what they want and who is behind them.

    Have you informed your Congressional Representative and both Senators of this?

    If so, what was the response?

  54. Everything is paid for. You talk about “demonstrations” or “riots” or “tourism,” whatever, as if they were “spontaneous.” You never ever talk about who paid for it.

    They are never “spontaneous.” Nothing is ever “spontaneous.” Everything is paid for.

    And I mean antifa and BLM and the anti-Vietnam riots and the Martin Luther King riots, and the Capitol Hill trick trap, and all their “leaders,” and everything else that seems “spontaneous” you see on TV.

    It is all, all, disingenuous. It is all, all, fixed. It never is what they say it is.

    Follow, as they say, the money.

  55. I have a new term that I want to introduce into the American narrative…’Systemic Hyprocrisy.’ truly one of the biggest problems in America.

    • Thanks: Joseph Doaks
  56. @syonredux
    Left-Wing violence is not spontaneous and uncoordinated. From the NYTIMES:


    The Truth About Today’s Anarchists.

    “Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.


    While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.
     

    Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.
     

    If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/30/opinion/anarchists-protests-black-lives-matter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Lockean Proviso, @J.Ross, @Lurker

    It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.

    It’s Asymmetric Terrorism 101.

  57. @UNIT472
    If more of the US had 'Sunshine Laws' like Florida a criminal conviction might be a deterrence. I can look up someone's criminal record in Florida with ease. I can even read the police probable cause affidavit that led to their arrest. "Checking the box" or providing a state police report to get a job isn't necessary. It is also the case that you can't vote in Florida if you have a felony conviction and have not paid court ordered fines or restitution penalties. Can't even get your driver's license if you owe fines.

    Unfortunately, other states do no make public records as 'public' and make no effort to enforce court ordered penalties so what happens in court stays in court.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Unit, Berkeley passed a law that says landlords can not ask a prospective tenant if they have a criminal past. Also, Berkeley cops can not ask a suspect if they are on parole or probation. Chicago laws just haven’t reach maximum wokeness.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Buffalo Joe


    Unit, Berkeley passed a law that says landlords can not ask a prospective tenant if they have a criminal past.
     
    Irrelevant, since I can pay for an anonymous internet search and find out all about a prospective tenant, including civil cases. It’s nothing but empty political posturing for the benefit of the local dumb slags.
  58. You idiots think that our owners and their government flunkies are “left-wing.”

    More fool you.

    They tolerate and sometimes encourage whichever kind of agitation serves their needs.

  59. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    @UNIT472

    Unit, Berkeley passed a law that says landlords can not ask a prospective tenant if they have a criminal past. Also, Berkeley cops can not ask a suspect if they are on parole or probation. Chicago laws just haven't reach maximum wokeness.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Unit, Berkeley passed a law that says landlords can not ask a prospective tenant if they have a criminal past.

    Irrelevant, since I can pay for an anonymous internet search and find out all about a prospective tenant, including civil cases. It’s nothing but empty political posturing for the benefit of the local dumb slags.

    • Agree: Cortes
  60. @AndrewR
    @Jonathan Mason

    Why would they need to go through customs at all? Can't you go from one flight to another in international terminal?That's the way São Paulo Guarulhos airport is. When I flew to Montevideo from the US I had a layover at Guarulhos. All the international flights were out of a single "quarantined" terminal.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Why would they need to go through customs at all? Can’t you go from one flight to another in international terminal?

    Not in the United States, no. I do not know of any international terminal that permits transit without entry in the US, certainly not on the east coast, anyway, and have never heard of one elsewhere.

  61. Tex says:
    @syonredux
    I guess that the Woke elites have memory-holed the White House siege. Just imagine what would have happened if the White House had been as lightly guarded as the Capitol Building used to be...

    Secret Service agents wounded outside White House, car bombs feared; official says Trump was taken to bunker

    Numerous Secret Service agents were injured, fires set by rioters blazed near the White House and authorities were searching for car bombs late Sunday as protests over the death of George Floyd continued to roil the capital just two days after President Trump had to be taken to a bunker for his safety.
     

    As authorities clashed with demonstrators for the third straight night, the parish house connected to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church across the street from the White House was set on fire late Sunday. The parish house contains offices and parlors for gatherings. The basement, which was also torched, is used for childcare during church services, and had recently undergone renovations.
     
    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/secret-service-took-trump-to-underground-bunker-amid-george-floyd-protests


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut1-1MOcxsE

    Replies: @Tex

    Secret Service agents wounded outside White House, car bombs feared; official says Trump was taken to bunker

    I seem to recall a great deal of crowing on the left about how cowardly Trump was for cowering in the WH basement. As opposed to the stiff-upper lip, let’s-just-talk-to-the-constituents approach of Congress on the 6th. Up above someone mentioned if it weren’t for double-standards, the left would have none at all.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  62. @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    People mature with age.

    But even the mature can write paragraph after paragraph of nonsense.

  63. @Redneck farmer
    @syonredux

    Well someone isn't going to be writing in the NYT anymore.

    Replies: @syonredux

    The MSM and Antifa have a close relationship:

    And yet, Antifa often receives media coverage that is neutral or even favorable, with its members’ violence either being ignored by reporters or vaguely explained away as a product of right-wing provocation. What’s more, anecdotal evidence has suggested that many of the mainstream reporters who are most active in covering Antifa also tend to enthusiastically amplify Antifa’s claims on social media.

    In October 2018, my research partner and I decided to investigate the truth of this impression by using a mix of network mapping and linguistic analysis to see which prominent journalists who covered Antifa also were closely connected to leading Antifa figures on social media. We then inspected the Antifa-related stories these journalists had written.

    We created a data set of 58,254 Antifa or Antifa-associated Twitter accounts based on the follows of 16 verified Antifa seed accounts. Using a software tool that analyzed the number and nature of connections associated with each individual account, we winnowed the 58,254 Antifa or Antifa-associated Twitter accounts down to 962 accounts. This represents a core group of Twitter users who are connected in overlapping ways to the most influential and widely followed Antifa figures. Of these 962 accounts, 22 were found to be verified—of which 15 were journalists who work regularly with national-level news outlets.

    That correlation turned out to be quite pronounced: Of all 15 verified national-level journalists in our subset, we couldn’t find a single article, by any of them, that was markedly critical of Antifa in any way. In all cases, their work in this area consisted primarily of downplaying Antifa violence while advancing Antifa talking points, and in some cases quoting Antifa extremists as if they were impartial experts.

    A more prominent example is Jason Wilson, a Portland-based writer for The Guardian. One of his recent articles focused on a U.S. regional intelligence report whose authors concluded that Antifa and the far right share responsibility for street violence. “Experts say the report mischaracterizes the dynamics of the street violence,” Wilson complained.

    One of Wilson’s main “experts” in the piece, it turned out, was none other than Antifa handbook author Mark Bray, who, predictably, denounced the report’s contents as “ludicrous.” In fact, Bray makes regular appearances in Wilson’s articles. So does fellow Portland resident and eco-extremist Alexander Reid Ross, who regularly writes for Antifa publications such as the It’s Going Down anarchist news site. (Ross also contributed to a 30-year-anniversary edition publication for Earth First!, an extremist environmentalist collective that advocates what activists euphemistically call “direct action.”)

    Interestingly, while other Portland journalists such as Genevieve Reaume of KATU News, Maggie Vespa of KGW News and Quillette’s own Andy Ngo (who has voiced concerns about Antifa’s actions) have been harassed and assaulted by Antifa activists, Wilson seems welcome to mingle freely among Antifa, and has even been photographed standing close to Marquez. In one piece, titled “How the world has fought back against the violent far-right and started winning,” Wilson effectively drops the pretense that he is a neutral reporter, and approvingly outlines the Antifa tactics set out in Bray’s book. He also defends such tactics as doxing, stalking, deplatforming and shaming as valuable means to attack individuals whose views he dislikes. In doing so, he cites both Bray and Emily Gorcenski, who runs a doxing site called First Vigil, and an associated Twitter account, which shame individuals she deems to be fascists before they have received due process.

    Christopher Mathias, a senior reporter for the Huffington Post, applies the same cynical approach. Like Wilson, Mathias’ byline seems to pop up whenever Antifa stages violent protests—and he always can be counted on to deliver a play-by-play that favors Antifa. But he goes even further than his Guardian counterpart. Unlike Wilson, Mathias actually doxes individuals whom he suspects of being right-wing extremists. His doxing sources for an article about suspected extremists in the U.S. military included Unicorn Riot, an anarchic Antifa journalist collective, and other shady sites that exist as a sort of in-house 4chan for the Antifa movement. (Mathias cited similar sources when he published identifying details of a Texas schoolteacher, and of a Virginia police officer.)

    Like other prominent writers whose names appear among the 15 journalists most closely engaged with Antifa, they seem to function not at professional arm’s length from their sources, but rather as cogs in an activist enterprise that churns out both pro-Antifa propaganda and doxing information about real or imagined ideological enemies. Their allies in this mission include trolls such as AntiFashGordon, the pseudonym of a Twitter user who declares that “I expose fascists, get them fired, de-homed, kicked out of school etc,” and brags that he passes “dossiers” of doxes to national-level journalists, whom he refers to as “our contacts.” His entire online mission is to ruin other people’s lives, and it is a mission being supported by “contacts” like Mathias and Wilson. In providing such support, they are discrediting their publications and misinforming their readers.

    https://quillette.com/2019/05/29/its-not-your-imagination-the-journalists-writing-about-antifa-are-often-their-cheerleaders/

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  64. @Jonathan Mason
    @slumber_j

    People mature with age.

    I was once in a clothing store looking at a pair of pants when police entered and proceeded to bust a place as apparently it was selling marijuana from under the counter (unbeknown to me, but I later read about it in the newspaper.)

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    In retrospect I can see that the police were only interested in busting the store, and not intent on arresting customers, but if I had been arrested and convicted of possession of a tiny amount of marijuana, it probably would have negatively affected me for the whole of the rest of my life.

    When I lived and worked in Bermuda in the 1980's, one source of resentment in the local population was that nobody who had a marijuana conviction was allowed to enter the United States.

    Since almost all flights out of Bermuda landed in the United States, and you could not change planes in the United States without passing through customs and immigration, such people complain that they were effectively "chained to the rock" for the rest of their lives.

    Actually there were some possibilities of flights to Canada and the United Kingdom, but inability to travel to or through the United States did cut off many opportunities for young people to study overseas.

    Replies: @JMcG, @AndrewR, @TWS, @Tex, @AnotherDad

    I was very scared because I had a small amount of marijuana concealed in a cigarette packet in my pocket, but I managed to put the packet inside the pocket of a pair of flared pants hanging on a rack, and left the store unhindered.

    Sadly, for the rest of us.

  65. Tex says:
    @J.Ross
    @Harry Baldwin

    I don't have the link (I believe a German commenter posted it here), but a number of top level German politicians were terrorists, Stasi, or East German saboteurs working in the West in the 70s. They were never really punished in any way, they were allowed to assume office, and the newsmedia never brings up their career highlights. (The really crucial thing is the names, with those you could easily search the article title, and these are not people who get regularly mentioned in English-language media.) The main operation described is "depicted" in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it's the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.

    Replies: @Tex

    The main operation described is “depicted” in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it’s the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.

    The cop who shot the protestor was in fact a Stasi operative. I don’t know at what level, or if it had a bearing on his decision to shoot. Nonetheless, given the German radical left’s narrative of Nazi West German cops on a murder rampage, the fact that the shooter was a COMMUNIST SPY, really ought to have some relevance.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Tex

    This is not brought up or even implied in the film. Another thing the film does is imply that there can be no safe handling of firearms by showing firearms being grossly mishandled every single time they are onscreen.
    If people want "conspiracy theory" to go away, then it would help to not have literal enemy spies writing news articles and holding public office, and ostensibly factual media products toeing a propaganda party line from a country that no longer exists.

    , @but an humble craftsman
    @Tex

    The protestor was not a protestor but a bystander.

    There is reason to speculate he was murdered as he had the bad luck to have a name very similar to that of a dishonest wannabe spy.

    Benno Ohnesorg - the victim
    Ben Ohnesorge - the spy, who met a horrible end years later.

    Karlheinz Kurras - policeman and StaSi-agent.

    Obviously a policeman will not be held responsible by a court of justice. The whole thing was a travesty even without the Ohnesorge-StaSi angle.

  66. OT:

    A little while ago I went to KFC to get some tenders. The store was out of tenders. The cashier – a black Haitian – spoke just enough English to suggest popcorn chicken as an alternative. I didn’t feel like going anywhere else – I was on foot – so I agreed.

    I gave her a twenty. She looked at it as if it were some kind of bizarre alien artifact, then set it down on the counter and started poking through the bills in the register. She pulled out two fives and stared blankly at them. Then she picked up the twenty and stared blankly at it. Then she called someone over to help her. Finally she gave me a ten and three ones.

    The manager – a Cuban guy with native English proficiency and a friendly demeanor – gave me my food. I had to remind him to give me a cup.

    I sat down and started eating. All of the tables had big “Table Closed” signs taped to them, but I figured, “I’ll sit here and eat until they tell me to leave, and then I’ll leave. No big deal.” Nobody said anything.

    The bathroom door had a big “Closed to Customers” sign taped on the front, but someone walked in, marched straight into the bathroom, and then waltzed out of the restaurant without buying anything. Nobody said anything.

    Then two customers came into the store – an older Cuban guy with limited English skills and an American black lady. The Cuban guy was there to pick up an online order, or so I gathered. The Haitian lady couldn’t understand a word he was saying, and he couldn’t understand a word she was saying. Finally the manager took over that transaction.

    The American black lady had a middle-class demeanor. She was dressed conservatively. (The KFC is near several office buildings.) The Haitian lady couldn’t understand a word she was saying, despite the fact that she repeated herself multiple times. She wanted two meals with wings – one with fries, one with mashed potatoes. The Haitian lady kept saying, “You want two combo” – note the lack of the s – and the American lady kept saying, “No, I don’t want combos because I don’t want any drinks. I just want the wings and the sides.” Finally the manager had to intervene once again. She agreed to get the drinks just to be able to complete the transaction.

    By that time, I was done eating. I left at the same time as the black lady. The Cuban guy was still arguing with the manager.

    Just another day in Miami…

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Stan Adams



    Just another day in Miami…
     
    One of the nice things about foreign travel, is when you've had enough ... you can go back home.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  67. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    Harry, the DA in San Francisco, chesa boudin, is the child of two convicted murderers, both members of the Weatherman. He was raised by bill ayers and bernadine dohrn. That says a lot. Oh, and he is all in for “restorative justice.” His mother was released and she too became a law prof. His father is still in jail and I am willing to bet biden pardons him. Stay safe.

  68. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    Its almost as if when you commit a violent crime in the provinces you only get dealt with locally by State law, but when you do it in on Capitol Hill, they want to make a federal case out of it.

    Why is that?

    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @SunBakedSuburb, @El Dato, @AnotherDad

    Harry Baldwin writes an excellent comment/book-suggestion on this issue of leftist-minoritarian-establishment’s non-prosecution/leniency of leftist political violence. A very serious issue, one of the–many–ways leftists have been institutionally undermining/de-stabilizing the rule-of-law and our my republic and nation.

    And this is your response?

    At least the Duck is a–at times well executed–parody account. As far as i can tell, you don’t have that excuse.

  69. @Stan Adams
    OT:

    A little while ago I went to KFC to get some tenders. The store was out of tenders. The cashier - a black Haitian - spoke just enough English to suggest popcorn chicken as an alternative. I didn’t feel like going anywhere else - I was on foot - so I agreed.

    I gave her a twenty. She looked at it as if it were some kind of bizarre alien artifact, then set it down on the counter and started poking through the bills in the register. She pulled out two fives and stared blankly at them. Then she picked up the twenty and stared blankly at it. Then she called someone over to help her. Finally she gave me a ten and three ones.

    The manager - a Cuban guy with native English proficiency and a friendly demeanor - gave me my food. I had to remind him to give me a cup.

    I sat down and started eating. All of the tables had big “Table Closed” signs taped to them, but I figured, “I’ll sit here and eat until they tell me to leave, and then I’ll leave. No big deal.” Nobody said anything.

    The bathroom door had a big “Closed to Customers” sign taped on the front, but someone walked in, marched straight into the bathroom, and then waltzed out of the restaurant without buying anything. Nobody said anything.

    Then two customers came into the store - an older Cuban guy with limited English skills and an American black lady. The Cuban guy was there to pick up an online order, or so I gathered. The Haitian lady couldn’t understand a word he was saying, and he couldn’t understand a word she was saying. Finally the manager took over that transaction.

    The American black lady had a middle-class demeanor. She was dressed conservatively. (The KFC is near several office buildings.) The Haitian lady couldn’t understand a word she was saying, despite the fact that she repeated herself multiple times. She wanted two meals with wings - one with fries, one with mashed potatoes. The Haitian lady kept saying, “You want two combo” - note the lack of the s - and the American lady kept saying, “No, I don’t want combos because I don’t want any drinks. I just want the wings and the sides.” Finally the manager had to intervene once again. She agreed to get the drinks just to be able to complete the transaction.

    By that time, I was done eating. I left at the same time as the black lady. The Cuban guy was still arguing with the manager.

    Just another day in Miami...

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Just another day in Miami…

    One of the nice things about foreign travel, is when you’ve had enough … you can go back home.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @AnotherDad

    My family has lived in this area for nearly a century. For better or for worse, this is home.

    My great-aunt lived most of her life in Miami but lived in Texas for about a decade before she died. She told me Mexicans were easier to deal with than Cubans - “They don’t have the nasty attitude.” She said (more or less) that, generally, Mexicans are content to remain at the lower levels of society, while Cubans aspire to overlord status. Whether she was correct, I can’t say. But she was certainly aware that the two groups were quite distinct and had relatively little in common.

  70. @AnotherDad
    @Stan Adams



    Just another day in Miami…
     
    One of the nice things about foreign travel, is when you've had enough ... you can go back home.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    My family has lived in this area for nearly a century. For better or for worse, this is home.

    My great-aunt lived most of her life in Miami but lived in Texas for about a decade before she died. She told me Mexicans were easier to deal with than Cubans – “They don’t have the nasty attitude.” She said (more or less) that, generally, Mexicans are content to remain at the lower levels of society, while Cubans aspire to overlord status. Whether she was correct, I can’t say. But she was certainly aware that the two groups were quite distinct and had relatively little in common.

  71. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    It seems that the US has no way of determining whether an election is corrupt or not, since both the political system and the court system are corrupt too.

    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    As regards crime and violence, it seems to me that we must distinguish between violence for political ends such as terrorism or unruly street demonstrations and violence for criminal ends, such as people breaking into and looting stores while law enforcement agencies are distracted by political demonstrations.

    Clearly political violence is fueled by the mass media, because the presence of cameras means that the whole world will see what is going on.

    This was made very clear to me when I was in Port au Prince, Haiti several days after the massive earthquakes of 2010 when ten of thousands of people were sleeping in the streets and camping in makeshift tens made of bed sheets or blankets right outside the Presidential palace.

    CNN cameras were set up on a balcony conveniently overlooking the palace grounds, and CNN staff were helpfully distributing large sheets of white paper and laundry markers to anybody who wanted to make a sign to hold up, and even offering English language spelling correction to potential demonstrators.

    I believe the same thing goes on all over the world.

    When looting is going on, on the other hand, the looters cover their faces and it is quite dangerous to try to film looting as looters do not take kindly to the whole world seeing their exploits.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted. But, as ever, history is written by the victors, so they may have to row upstream. But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    Perhaps [past] elections need[ed]…

    FIFY,M.

    …a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    Exactly. However, the Carter Center has a severe conflict-of-interest in its homeland. Do you know of any trustworthy counterparts abroad? We could always request a commission appointed by the heads of government of countries (e.g., Germany, Mexico) who voiced objection to the “deplatforming” of the President.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted.

    Demanding a delay in certification hardly constitutes a coup attempt, particularly when such a delay is more than justified, even necessary. Burglary should be prosecuted as just that, and nothing more.

    But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

    The few on our side will have their hands full with Kyle Rittenhouse.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    From Jonathan Mason (he's on my ignore list so I don't see his comments): …a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    It's funny that in 2012 a team of observers from neutral countries were brought in to observe the US presidential election and what astonished them the most was that people were allowed to vote without showing a voter ID.


    “It’s very difficult to transfer this system as it is to any other country. This system is built according to trust and this trust needs a lot of procedures and a lot of education for other countries to adopt it,” Elabbar said.

    The most often noted difference between American elections among the visitors was that in most U.S. states, voters need no identification. Voters can also vote by mail, sometimes online, and there’s often no way to know if one person has voted several times under different names, unlike in some Arab countries, where voters ink their fingers when casting their ballots.
     
    Too bad our system can no longer be described as based on trust. Our rulers have made it too obvious that they can't be trusted.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2012/11/06/foreign-election-officials-amazed-by-trust-based-u-s-voting-system-2/
  72. I’ve heard that organized groups, in Alameda County, will enter a coffee shop and rob patrons of their cash, devices, etc.

    The cops don’t even bother showing up to take statements from the victims.

    An insurrection. Really.

  73. @notsaying
    I agree that the January 6 Insurrection should be investigated separately. It is a unique situation.

    However, I have been and still am very puzzled that there seems to be little interest in figuring out who the core group of travelling rioters were last summer and getting them into prison, especially for serious crimes like arson. Everybody wanted to know who messed with the Colonial pipeline and wants to see those Russians caught and put out of business which is already happening. How can people not demand the same thing when the criminals went to multiple cities and are right here in America?

    So I want Congress to hold hearings about who these people are and what they want and who is behind them. This investigation has nothing to do with the people who stormed the Capitol. Combining them together would be a mistake.

    Replies: @anon

    So I want Congress to hold hearings about who these people are and what they want and who is behind them.

    Have you informed your Congressional Representative and both Senators of this?

    If so, what was the response?

  74. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    ...and the assassination attempt on President Truman.
     
    Truman was far more of a terrorist than the goofballs who tried to knock him off. Puerto Rico was never really ours, anyway. Let Make their people go!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    I devoutly wish we had never annexed Puerto Rico. What a terrible mistake. I wish we could cut it loose.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    I devoutly wish we had never annexed Puerto Rico. What a terrible mistake. I wish we could cut it loose.
     
    Technically, we've never annexed Boriquén. The territory is "unincorporated". But by making them citizens, we annexed the population. PR outnumbers all the other outlying territories combined. Their effect is trivial. (Except in neighborhoods where Samoans, etc, concentrate.)
  75. @Tex
    @J.Ross


    The main operation described is “depicted” in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it’s the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.
     
    The cop who shot the protestor was in fact a Stasi operative. I don't know at what level, or if it had a bearing on his decision to shoot. Nonetheless, given the German radical left's narrative of Nazi West German cops on a murder rampage, the fact that the shooter was a COMMUNIST SPY, really ought to have some relevance.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @but an humble craftsman

    This is not brought up or even implied in the film. Another thing the film does is imply that there can be no safe handling of firearms by showing firearms being grossly mishandled every single time they are onscreen.
    If people want “conspiracy theory” to go away, then it would help to not have literal enemy spies writing news articles and holding public office, and ostensibly factual media products toeing a propaganda party line from a country that no longer exists.

  76. @Neoconned
    Notice also its the feds doing the prosecution for the DC riot....all these other looters are getting gravy train slaps on the wrist from the Kim Fox types.....i want to be prosecuted by her.....

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Not if you’re a white male conservative, you don’t. How many books do you think Kim Foxx would have thrown at the white men who attacked Jussie Smollett (that is, if he hadn’t made up the whole story out of whole kente cloth)?

    As Steve quite rightly says on many occasions, “Who? Whom?”

  77. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    Perhaps future elections need a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

     

    Perhaps [past] elections need[ed]...

    FIFY,M.

    ...a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

     

    Exactly. However, the Carter Center has a severe conflict-of-interest in its homeland. Do you know of any trustworthy counterparts abroad? We could always request a commission appointed by the heads of government of countries (e.g., Germany, Mexico) who voiced objection to the "deplatforming" of the President.

    At least the Capitol Hill burglars have the chance to stand before a public court and explain themselves and maybe some of them will be acquitted.

     

    Demanding a delay in certification hardly constitutes a coup attempt, particularly when such a delay is more than justified, even necessary. Burglary should be prosecuted as just that, and nothing more.

    But no doubt there are many talented attorneys lining up to represent them pro bono, so there is always that.

     

    The few on our side will have their hands full with Kyle Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    From Jonathan Mason (he’s on my ignore list so I don’t see his comments): …a substantial team of UN observers from neutral countries empowered to certify or decertify the election.

    It’s funny that in 2012 a team of observers from neutral countries were brought in to observe the US presidential election and what astonished them the most was that people were allowed to vote without showing a voter ID.

    “It’s very difficult to transfer this system as it is to any other country. This system is built according to trust and this trust needs a lot of procedures and a lot of education for other countries to adopt it,” Elabbar said.

    The most often noted difference between American elections among the visitors was that in most U.S. states, voters need no identification. Voters can also vote by mail, sometimes online, and there’s often no way to know if one person has voted several times under different names, unlike in some Arab countries, where voters ink their fingers when casting their ballots.

    Too bad our system can no longer be described as based on trust. Our rulers have made it too obvious that they can’t be trusted.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2012/11/06/foreign-election-officials-amazed-by-trust-based-u-s-voting-system-2/

  78. @slumber_j

    "Accountability by probation means someone has a conviction on their record, and we should note that having a conviction hinders one’s ability to get a job, housing and the like."
     
    Can that possibly be true of public housing in the State of Illinois? And I can't imagine that getting a job is a really high priority for many of the looters in question.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @cityview

    My guess is that most if not all public housing policy is set by the federal government. I think there has been talk of rescinding the policy on felonies; I don’t know whether anything has changed. I also don’t know whether the no-felonies would apply to vouchers, the preferred method of funding housing in recent years.

  79. @Zoos
    I’ve always said that the "insurrection" would never have crossed any of the perps minds in the first place if there was transparency during and after the voting process. If not, they SHOULD surround the Capital building. There's nothing else to do.

    A significant number of politicians are some variation of sociopaths, or clinically qualified narcissists. We’ve known them in our personal lives. They’re amongst the few people that finally make you say, "the only thing this person can understand is a good ass-kicking." And in the case of the narcissist, it’s always true. They need their shit shook, and that’s what happened. Note the narcissistic response of forcing our military to stand around doing nothing all day "protecting" the Capital from a past momentary threat that’s highly unlikely to happen in the immediate future. Crazy, self-involved cowardly narcissism.

    As our population keeps increasing, and via unchecked immigration, will become even more ethnically tribal for the next 100 years, election transparency should be upgraded to an inalienable human right.

    The process must be made fully transparent, and exclusive to qualified United States citizens, or worse will happen in the future, in ways that will be unexpected… again.

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe, @ThreeCranes

    Zoos, I agree but honestly, where have you been? You think the “process” in Washington D.C. has been “transparent” until recently?

    Are you kidding?

    The federal government hasn’t been “transparent” almost my entire lifetime!

    Hell, a president of the United States of America was murdered in broad daylight on the streets of a major American city almost 58 years ago, and we STILL can’t say exactly what happened!

    Why not?
    Because the narcissistic pols and major media types in Washington were more concerned with advancing their own careers than in solving the brazen Deep State murder of an elected president.

    Allen Dulles and John McCloy ensured the “Warren Commission” was nothing but a giant P.R. exercise to pin it all on an innocent dead man.

    So, a fake investigation of a fake “insurrection”in 2021 is the inevitable end of a long slow path to national ruin which began before most of us here were born.

    Art Deco bait in 3 . . . 2. . . 1

  80. @Tex
    @J.Ross


    The main operation described is “depicted” in the well made but dishonest Baader Meinhof Complex, it’s the killing of a protester by a cop at a visit by the Shah of Iran.
     
    The cop who shot the protestor was in fact a Stasi operative. I don't know at what level, or if it had a bearing on his decision to shoot. Nonetheless, given the German radical left's narrative of Nazi West German cops on a murder rampage, the fact that the shooter was a COMMUNIST SPY, really ought to have some relevance.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @but an humble craftsman

    The protestor was not a protestor but a bystander.

    There is reason to speculate he was murdered as he had the bad luck to have a name very similar to that of a dishonest wannabe spy.

    Benno Ohnesorg – the victim
    Ben Ohnesorge – the spy, who met a horrible end years later.

    Karlheinz Kurras – policeman and StaSi-agent.

    Obviously a policeman will not be held responsible by a court of justice. The whole thing was a travesty even without the Ohnesorge-StaSi angle.

  81. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jonathan Mason

    Leading the lambs to slaughter on January 6 was Trump's final act of presidential buffoonery. He gave the DC authoritarians even more political capital.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    Trump was a useful idiot encouraged and allowed by the oligarchy to thoroughly taint and discredit populism for at least a generation. He was so toxic and stupid that he made American political discourse even more toxic and stupid than it already was. Few actually talk about issues on their merits or evidence anymore, and historical memory has become an evanescent and cartoonish mirage.. Now it is largely feelings, reactions, and Manichean dichotomy. Trump is now the Emmanuel Goldstein forever lurking behind many a plot du jour that thrills the credulous masses.

    Those who script the puppet show are good at what they do.

  82. How long before they put all the White law-abiding citizens into “protective custody?”

    Vaxx macht frei.

  83. @Zoos
    I’ve always said that the "insurrection" would never have crossed any of the perps minds in the first place if there was transparency during and after the voting process. If not, they SHOULD surround the Capital building. There's nothing else to do.

    A significant number of politicians are some variation of sociopaths, or clinically qualified narcissists. We’ve known them in our personal lives. They’re amongst the few people that finally make you say, "the only thing this person can understand is a good ass-kicking." And in the case of the narcissist, it’s always true. They need their shit shook, and that’s what happened. Note the narcissistic response of forcing our military to stand around doing nothing all day "protecting" the Capital from a past momentary threat that’s highly unlikely to happen in the immediate future. Crazy, self-involved cowardly narcissism.

    As our population keeps increasing, and via unchecked immigration, will become even more ethnically tribal for the next 100 years, election transparency should be upgraded to an inalienable human right.

    The process must be made fully transparent, and exclusive to qualified United States citizens, or worse will happen in the future, in ways that will be unexpected… again.

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe, @ThreeCranes

    if there was transparency during and after the voting process

    If I remember correctly, Putin offered to supply Russian election officials to oversee and guarantee the rectitude of our last election. This would have been a great step forward. U.N. overseers could have been used as well, but the Russians have more experience with the people who rigged the election–having, after all, just rid themselves of occupation by these people and being therefore more mindful of their tricks–and would have been the better choice.

    • Agree: JMcG
  84. @Tiny Duck
    Read the comments.

    The majority people are completely against you and want Republicans punished.

    You guys are in for a rude awakening the next few elections.

    I guarantee Liberal anger over right wing violence is about to reach a boiling point.

    I think sites like this will be shut down.

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    I guarantee Liberal anger over “right wing violence” is about to reach a boiling point.

    I think sites like this will be shut down.

    FIFY

  85. Tens of thousands of fraudulent ballots were cast in the Presidential Election. The media have managed to find one that was cast for Donald Trump, and unlike all the others it is news:

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/05/14/suzanne-morphew-husband-election-fraud/

  86. This entry is CLASSIC i-Steve deception and deflection. Let us do some NOTICING, shall we?

    I would surmise that Mr. Sailer is a secret reader of this substack, and that his post is reflective of the recent developments. Stay cagey!

    https://sethabramson.substack.com/p/insurrection-update-1

  87. @Anon
    OT

    The Washington Post credulously claims that hair touching is a widespread problem for black women, without evidence, and without a single case documented in their searchable archives:

    Microaggressions at the office can make remote work even more appealing: Extended remote work during the pandemic has highlighted how much energy people of color, women, and people with disabilities expend dealing with microaggressions in the office. Some are reluctant to return because of it.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/05/13/workplace-microaggressions-remote-workers/

    Black knowledge workers had a greater sense of belonging when they didn’t feel the constant need to “code-switch” to fit in with a majority-White office environment.

    In a Twitter discussion on office microaggressions, people said working at home has largely spared them from having to deal with such incidents as:

    o having colleagues touch their hair

    o being mistaken for another colleague of the same race (a problem solved by having names displayed in video meetings)

    o overhearing insensitive commentary on or being pressured to discuss traumatizing news events such as racist violence or coronavirus outbreaks in their home country

    o fielding comments from passersby on their “angry” (actually focused) expressions
     
    Hair touching is number one in the list. It's mysterious that in a world where anytime a Karen does the slightest thing to offend a black woman she loses her job, that there have been zero-point-zero actual hair touching incidents reported in any media over the past several years that involve a name, date, and place. Why do black women run to the media for every other category of slight, but never for hair touching?

    Replies: @new Stalin

    Why in hades would anyone want o touch a negress or negroes hair?

  88. @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    I devoutly wish we had never annexed Puerto Rico. What a terrible mistake. I wish we could cut it loose.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I devoutly wish we had never annexed Puerto Rico. What a terrible mistake. I wish we could cut it loose.

    Technically, we’ve never annexed Boriquén. The territory is “unincorporated”. But by making them citizens, we annexed the population. PR outnumbers all the other outlying territories combined. Their effect is trivial. (Except in neighborhoods where Samoans, etc, concentrate.)

  89. @Mr. Anon
    @Jonathan Mason


    Anyway when the Republicans get back into a majority position, they will be able to introduce new legislation to decriminalize breaking and entering into Congress. Expect it to obtain bipartisan support!
     
    I'd say you should know better, but clearly you don't know better about anything. The Democratic Party isn't treating the 1/6 riot as "breaking and entering" or rioting, or any such thing. They are treating it as armed rebellion, lese majeste, sacrilege, and blasphemy.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It is normal in the American justice system to overcharge people so as force them into plea bargaining.

    Since the penalty for blasphemy is being burned at the stake, offenders are more likely to plead guilty to a lesser charge such as spitting on public property.

    • Troll: TWS
  90. It is normal in the American justice system to overcharge people so as force them into plea bargaining.

    Stop lecturing the rest of us about how OUR country works. We know how it works – better than you do, you foreign interloper.

    It is not normal for the President to call out such people as the greatest terror threat. It is not normal for the FBI to hound anyone who might have been at the protest.

  91. @Harry Baldwin
    Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough is a thorough examination of the now largely forgotten leftwing terror that afflicted the nation in the early 1970s. As retired FBI agent Max Noel put it, “People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over 1,900 domestic bombings in the United States.”

    What is most interesting to me is not the riots, bombings, bank robberies and assassinations of that period, but that the perpetrators got away with little or no punishment, due to the Leftist control of so many institutions, a situation that has gotten much, much worse. During the 1970s, Weatherman terrorists who were being hunted by the FBI were being financially supported and sheltered by the National Lawyers’ Guild. The Puerto Rican terrorist group, the FALN, responsible for numerous bombings including the bombing of Wall Street’s Fraunces Tavern on Wall Street that killed four and wounded 40, was supported by the Episcopal Church.

    When the most prominent terrorists turned themselves in or were arrested, they got a slap on the wrist or eventual clemency. Bill Ayers went scott free. Cathy Wilkerson did a year. Bernardine Dohrn got three years probation and a $1500 fine. President Clinton gave clemency to 14 imprisoned FALN terrorists. President Obama commuted the sentence of FALN terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera.

    Afterward, they were taken care of by leftist institutions. Bernardine Dohrn was a clinical associate professor of law at Northwestern University for more than 20 years. Eleanor Stein, arrested in 1981, got a law degree in 1986 and became an administrative law judge. Radical attorney Michael Kennedy, a key player in keeping the Weather Underground alive, was special advisor to the President of the UN General Assembly.

    During last summer’s riots, we learned that arrested Antifa rioters were released on bail the following morning, courtesy of the radical National Lawyers’ Guild. In a video, an Antifa rioter showed how he had its hotline written in Sharpie on his forearm. (Can you imagine a Reactionary Lawyers’ Guild that actively assisted rightwing agitators and criminals being allowed to exist?) The Minnesota Freedom Fund is endowed with with $35 million dollars to bail out left wing rioters. Kamala Harris tweeted support for it.

    This is a key difference between the consequences of being a rightwing protestor and a leftwing protestor. The law comes down on rightwingers like a ton of bricks. Recall the two Proud Boys sentenced to four years in prison each for a street scuffle with Antifa in NYC in which no one was injured and their opponents refused to identify themselves or press charges. The DA used an obscure law to bring charges against them. The January 6 protestors are being treated extraordinarily harshly, hunted down by the FBI if they so much as entered the Capitol (sometimes even if they didn’t) and held without bail. Meanwhile, the FBI appears to have as little interest in Antifa as it does in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop. White House Resident Joe Biden absurdly called the January 6 riot at the Capitol the worst threat to our democracy since the Civil War, ignoring such leftwing violence as the 1950 attack in the House chamber and the assassination attempt on President Truman.

    Clearly, the Powers that Be more-or-less condone leftwing violence, but will not tolerate even a moderate reaction to it from the right. Googling reviews of Burrough’s book, I see that most leave out the really shocking part of the story, the institutional complicity in the violence, and many even excuse it as an appropriate response to the Vietnam War and racism.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Jonathan Mason, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Kronos, @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @ATBOTL

    Yes, and that happened under Trump.

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