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As you may recall, I closely covered the recent whoop-tee-doo in Palo Alto that led to stripping the name of the Terman Middle School, the public middle school with the highest standardized test scores in California. The school had been named for Lewis Terman, the father of standardized testing in America, and his son Fred Terman, the father of Silicon Valley. Lewis Terman is accused of advocating eugenics, while a proposal to change the school’s name to solely honor his son Fred, the Stanford dean of engineering who more or less invented the Silicon Valley model, was rejected on the grounds that Fred must have inherited his father Lewis’s Bad Genes.

Considering that, due in large part to the accomplishments of the Terman family, the average dumpy 2,000 square foot ranch house in Palo Alto on a modest lot sells for about $3 million dollars, I think it would be right and fitting if the good folks of Palo Alto erected a solid gold pyramid in honor of the Terman name.

But that’s not how things work in the current year. Instead, while the local politicians are agreed that the Terman name is an abomination and must go, Palo Altans were soon at each other’s throats over what to rename the school. From the San Jose Mercury-News:

Palo Alto: Pearl Harbor memories stir parents to oppose school name change

Chinese-American community balks at possible use of local historical figure with Yamamoto surname; district board to make decision March 27

By KEVIN KELLY | [email protected]sgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: March 19, 2018 at 11:31 pm

The specter of Pearl Harbor has mobilized some of Palo Alto’s Chinese-American residents against the school district’s plan to rename two middle schools.

They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto, one of six Palo Alto historical figures among eight finalists being considered, could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor bombing during World War II.

“There exist certain hurt feeling when the last name ‘Yamamoto’ is mentioned, especially for Asian immigrants whose families were tragically affected in China, Korea and Southeast Asian countries during World War II,” reads a petition (http://bit.ly/2DFS5zy) opposing the suggested name that had garnered more than 750 signatures 14 hours after going up early Monday morning. “This Japanese admiral is whom many first think of upon hearing the name ‘Yamamoto,’ and our middle schools should never be affiliated with such a person.”

The Palo Alto Unified School District is changing the names of Jordan Middle School, named after David Starr Jordan, and Terman Middle School, named in part after Lewis Terman, because both men were leading advocates of eugenics. The name changes were sparked by a student’s book report on Jordan, Stanford University’s first president, in the fall of 2015.

Nearly three dozen community members spoke, most of them against naming either school in honor of Fred Yamamoto, during a Recommending School Names Advisory Committee meeting Monday night. …

Others acknowledged Fred Yamamoto, a 1936 Palo Alto High School graduate held in a Japanese internment camp during World War II who later joined the U.S. Army, is an inspirational figure, but said a school named after him would just cause confusion among Asian-Americans.

Fred Yamamoto was an interned Japanese-American who volunteered to fight for America, was assigned to the famous Fighting 442nd, the most decorated unit in American military history, winning 21 Medals of Honor. Yamamoto was killed in action in Europe at age 26.

One parent said giving a school the Yamamoto surname is akin to naming a school with Jewish students after Adolf Hitler or anyone with Hitler as a last name. Another parent said if a Palo Alto school had been named Yamamoto, he would have chosen a different district for his children.

“If we do change the name (to Fred Yamamoto), parents won’t want their kids to wear shirts representing the school,” added parent Fan Yung.

Keri Wagner, a district parent, said in an email to The Daily News that opposition to Fred Yamamoto’s name is being led by a “small, vocal subset” of the Chinese-American community flexing an “inherently racist position” against what is a common Japanese surname.

“When I meet someone Japanese, I do not think of Pearl Harbor, and I’ll bet most Americans have the same view,” Wagner wrote. “I’m appalled that their racism is tolerated in Palo Alto, and I believe most Northern Californians do not subscribe to those beliefs.”

Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

Naming the old Terman school after Yamamoto was eventually stifled by Chinese anti-Japanese racism. It was decided instead to rename it after Ellen Fletcher, the late Palo Alto city councilwoman, a Jewish woman from Berlin, who was instrumental in adding bike lanes.

 
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  1. Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, but notice the clear double standard here.

    While blacks, Hispanics, and whites complaining about something being named after a certain person is generally taken to be valid, oftentimes leading to that thing being renamed, here we have no doubt a self-avowed progressive, Keri Wagner, referred to the Chinese Americans as racists.

    Could anyone in a thousand years imagine someone like that declaring that blacks were racist for complaining about whoever?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, ...
     
    No, this small skirmish within the "coalition of the fringes" is not the silly part. It just shows why Mr. Sailer is worried for the future of an America resembling Palo Alto (with cheaper housing, hopefully).

    The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor. Are they really thinking of the many thousand American sailors and civilians killed and maimed? I think they were bringing that up to get the few actual Americans in Palo Alto on their side in their opposition to anything Japanese due to, uh, uh, racism. For the Chinese parents to say they were opposed to the name Yamamoto due to Pearl Harbor is some blatant bullshit.

    Silliness number 2 here is:


    Another parent said if a Palo Alto school had been named Yamamoto, he would have chosen a different district for his children.
     
    Not as blatant, I'll give him, but pretty obvious bullshit nonetheless. Our iSteve would be the first to disucss these parents and the best schools, as that's one of his big interests. From my learnings from the Master, I'd say, that no, that parent would absolutely not have kept his children in a worse school just because of the name.

    The infighting is one thing, but I really don't like the lying either.

    , @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a double standard. Were the Chinese complaining about a white man no one would call them racist.

    It's certainly true that Chinese are lower on the totem pole than blacks are but again, that isn't a double standard.

    I'm also actually quite sympathetic to the Chinese here. The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. Nonetheless, a big show of locally celebrating the wonderfully named and clearly heroic Fred Yamamato would surely ease the awkwardness.
    , @Anonymous

    “There exist certain hurt feeling when the last name ‘Yamamoto’ is mentioned, especially for Asian immigrants whose families were tragically affected in China, Korea and Southeast Asian countries during World War II,” reads a petition
     
    In the real world, Korea was part of the Japanese Empire, and solidly rooted for good old Isoroku "56" Yamamoto.

    Although Koreans officially pretend to have 100% been anti-Japanese from the get-go, 98% of the population and 99.9% of the elite were solidly pro-Japanese and remained so long after 1945.

    This is similar to the phenomenon in Europe where, e.g. 100% of the French population were active members of the Résistance.

    , @mark p miller
    When was the last time any whites (successfully) organized to prevent another school from being named after some black (MLK, Tubman, Malcom X, Rosa Parks, etc.)

    I mean, even lilly white Bainbridge, WA (black population ~0%) has some african named school and all whites think it's the bees knees.

    Let's not pretend this is a wash.
  2. Let’s uphold the Social Justice principle of namesake taint, known formally as

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sippenhaft .

    It’s kind of like the Anglo-Saxon principle of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_of_attainder .

  3. And, like a pack of hyenas, the coalition of the fringes squabbles over the carcass of formerly white America.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Precisely.

    Look again at the study of class in America from 1957. Not one person in that film, nor indeed among those who wrote and filmed it, could have ever imagined how low we would have sunk in but sixty years.

    But we didn't fight, so who is to say that we don't deserve the annihilation which is now no mere threat on the horizon, but a blazing sun of hate directly over our heads and beating down with withering force.

    The saddest of all is that those who are about to replace us are not worthy to lick out boots.

    What they inherit they will not sustain.
  4. Anonymous [AKA "Black reader"] says:

    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?
     
    Your idea was taken into deep consideration, Mr. Reader. Unfortunately, it could not be implemented due to worries about confusion during football games between The REVEREND Dr. Martin Luther King Prep against King, JUNIOR Vocational, and in a different league, Dr. Martin Luther, JD, MD-PhD, GOD-KING, Magnet Academy vs. Dr. King, CPUSA, Notary-Public, Eastside High.

    Interleague play would have been even more confusing. Thank you for your input.

    Sincerely,

    The Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King Jr center for excellence in school naming.

    , @Anonymous
    Why aren't all public schools named after MLK Jr., anyway? I mean it's 2018! They should be named like New York City public schools are named, just with numbers like PS #23, PS #57, etc., but with MLK Jr. as the prefix to the numbers.
    , @ScarletNumber
    or famed educational theorist Dr. William H. Cosby Jr, Ed.D.
  5. @Yan Shen
    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, but notice the clear double standard here.

    While blacks, Hispanics, and whites complaining about something being named after a certain person is generally taken to be valid, oftentimes leading to that thing being renamed, here we have no doubt a self-avowed progressive, Keri Wagner, referred to the Chinese Americans as racists.

    Could anyone in a thousand years imagine someone like that declaring that blacks were racist for complaining about whoever?

    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, …

    No, this small skirmish within the “coalition of the fringes” is not the silly part. It just shows why Mr. Sailer is worried for the future of an America resembling Palo Alto (with cheaper housing, hopefully).

    The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor. Are they really thinking of the many thousand American sailors and civilians killed and maimed? I think they were bringing that up to get the few actual Americans in Palo Alto on their side in their opposition to anything Japanese due to, uh, uh, racism. For the Chinese parents to say they were opposed to the name Yamamoto due to Pearl Harbor is some blatant bullshit.

    Silliness number 2 here is:

    Another parent said if a Palo Alto school had been named Yamamoto, he would have chosen a different district for his children.

    Not as blatant, I’ll give him, but pretty obvious bullshit nonetheless. Our iSteve would be the first to disucss these parents and the best schools, as that’s one of his big interests. From my learnings from the Master, I’d say, that no, that parent would absolutely not have kept his children in a worse school just because of the name.

    The infighting is one thing, but I really don’t like the lying either.

    • Replies: @sayless
    "The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor."

    Agree.

    I propose calling the school Nanking Memorial. That'll diversify our strength.
  6. @Yan Shen
    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, but notice the clear double standard here.

    While blacks, Hispanics, and whites complaining about something being named after a certain person is generally taken to be valid, oftentimes leading to that thing being renamed, here we have no doubt a self-avowed progressive, Keri Wagner, referred to the Chinese Americans as racists.

    Could anyone in a thousand years imagine someone like that declaring that blacks were racist for complaining about whoever?

    It isn’t a double standard. Were the Chinese complaining about a white man no one would call them racist.

    It’s certainly true that Chinese are lower on the totem pole than blacks are but again, that isn’t a double standard.

    I’m also actually quite sympathetic to the Chinese here. The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. Nonetheless, a big show of locally celebrating the wonderfully named and clearly heroic Fred Yamamato would surely ease the awkwardness.

    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. "

    Bad? Yamamoto was a famous WWII figure, but as far as I knew he was never associated with things like the Rape of Nanking, the Bataan Death March, or that whacked out Japanese science unit in China (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731).

    From wikipedia which I assume is correct in this case:

    "Yamamoto was part of the Japanese Navy establishment, who were rivals of the more aggressive army establishment, especially the officers of the Kwantung Army. As such, he promoted a policy of a strong fleet to project force through gunboat diplomacy, rather than a fleet used primarily for transport of invasion land forces, as some of his political opponents in the army wanted.[6] This stance led him to oppose the invasion of China. He also opposed war against the United States partly because of his studies at Harvard University (1919–1921) and his two postings as a naval attaché in Washington, D.C., where he learned to speak fluent English. Yamamoto traveled extensively in the United States during his tour of duty there, where he studied American customs and business practices."

    "Yamamoto opposed the invasion of Manchuria in 1931, the subsequent land war with China (1937), and the 1940 Tripartite Pact with Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. As Deputy Navy Minister, he apologized to United States Ambassador Joseph C. Grew for the bombing of the gunboat USS Panay in December 1937. These issues made him a target of assassination threats by pro-war militarists.

    Throughout 1938, many young army and naval officers began to speak publicly against Yamamoto and certain other Japanese admirals such as Mitsumasa Yonai and Shigeyoshi Inoue for their strong opposition to a tripartite pact with Nazi Germany as they saw it as inimical to "Japan's natural interests."[8]:101 Yamamoto received a steady stream of hate mail and death threats from Japanese nationalists. His reaction to the prospect of death by assassination was passive and accepting. The admiral wrote: To die for Emperor and Nation is the highest hope of a military man. After a brave hard fight the blossoms are scattered on the fighting field. But if a person wants to take a life instead, still the fighting man will go to eternity for Emperor and country. One man's life or death is a matter of no importance. All that matters is the Empire. As Confucius said, "They may crush cinnabar, yet they do not take away its color; one may burn a fragrant herb, yet it will not destroy the scent." They may destroy my body, yet they will not take away my will.[8]:101–02

    The Japanese Army, annoyed at Yamamoto's unflinching opposition to a Rome-Berlin-Tokyo treaty, dispatched military police to "guard" Yamamoto, a ruse by the army to keep an eye on him.[8]:102-103 He was later reassigned from the naval ministry to sea as the commander-in-chief of the Combined Fleet on August 30, 1939. This was done as one of the last acts of the then-acting Navy Minister Mitsumasa Yonai, under Baron Hiranuma's short-lived administration. It was done partly to make it harder for assassins to target Yamamoto. Yonai was certain that if Yamamoto remained ashore, he would be killed before the year [1939] ended.[8]:103"

    Call it what it is. Chinese ethnic hatred of the Japanese. With a stupid pretext. Literally the whole thing is a stretch.

    As for Pearl Harbor... put yourself in his shoes. You have a war you didn't want, but still have to prosecute. WTF was he supposed to do? Pulling that off depended on either US laxness or Roosevelt wanting to pull the US into the war (if you roll that way). But it worked.

    They really didn't have too many options if war was the only choice. We'll never know now if Yamamoto thought it was a mistake (tactically and strategically versus any other option) in the years after.
    , @Almost Missouri

    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one"
     
    Isoroku Yamamoto was the best known of Japans' WWII commanders, but I know no American--even of the WWII generation--who knows his name who also holds it in contempt. On the contrary, Americans who know of him also regard him with a certain reverence: one of Japan's great leaders who knew he was fighting a lost cause but did so with honor, skill and courage nevertheless. Commenter Diversity Heretic made a similar point about Erwin Rommel.

    For myself, I would approve naming an American establishment after Isoroku Yamamoto. It would go with the American (and larger Western) tradition of remembering and honoring those who fought against you, provided they did so with honor, bravery, duty and ability, even though they ultimately lost: Geronimo, Rommel, Hannibal, etc. Robert E. Lee and the other great Confederates should also be in that list, the statuary rape crowd notwithstanding.

    This acknowledgement of the honorable foe is an acknowledgment of our larger selves: that we can see and remember your virtue apart from the petty details of whom you struggled for and whether you won or lost. This used not to be unusual in America and the West in general. Alas, that America is submerged daily deeper into the permanent vindictiveness and vituperation of The Current Year.

    Instead we now have the Permanent War against Emmanuel Goldstein. Has the culture of critique run completely rampant?

    , @AndrewR
    Why not just call it the Fred Yamamoto School? No need to omit his first name.
  7. I do get the humor at the end about the school finally getting named after some woman due to bike lanes. I, for one, maybe the only one, however, am pretty appreciative of real bike lanes and trails, not just some painted line that gives you 2 ft. separation from 50 mph 5,000 lb. SUVs. You like golf, I like bike lanes.

    I’ll give the lady kudos for that, though it is 3 orders of magnitude less an accomplishment than being the founder of Silicon Valley. That’s your humor there, so I do get it. BTW, upon reading the article on Mrs. Fletcher that you linked to, I see her other big thing was fighting and beating city hall for the ability to hang out laundry rather than use a clothes line. You can’t beat GREEN people! (oops, missed a comma, but that works too.) I just wonder if Mrs. Fletcher would have been as supportive of men working under the hoods on their carburetors* in the driveways of their small Palo Alto lots, which is about the same concept (property rights vs. busybody local gov).

    * Yeah, I know, but I just read Fred Reed’s old recycled column, and yes, it seems easier to bring it in the house to rebuild. (I have, but the gasoline smell in the kitchen stayed for days.)

  8. It was decided instead to rename it after Ellen Fletcher, the late Palo Alto city councilwoman, a Jewish woman from Berlin, who was instrumental in adding bike lanes.

    Reminds me of what happened in Boston with the “Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge.” The most visible part of the Big Dig, the iconic new bridge was somehow named after a nobody from New Jersey who was posthumously promoted by the soon-to-be notorious Cardinal Bernard Law.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    I was thinking of the same example.

    I wonder if there's ever been a bigger ratio between the prominence of a public feature and the importance of the person for whom it gets named. It's actually genuinely embarrassing to explain the "accomplishments" of Zakim to outsiders.

    He worked for the ADL to "make bridges" between "communities" and then he died. He seemed nice.

    Boston is filled to the brim with major historical figures, and this pisher gets the honor.
  9. Keri Wagner? What right does she have to speak publicly on this issue? Isn’t she aware she has the same last name as a composer who was a close personal friend of Hitler’s, and the infamous head of the SS Musical Corps? Just her opening her yap and identifying herself is triggering enough.

    Okay, so I just checked, and Richard Wagner actually died about five years before Hitler was born. But STILL–even being reminded of his music in any way has got to be offensive to many students.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Lars von Trier likes Wagner, so you know ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kP-vuOy8cU

    , @Triumph104
    https://youtu.be/DaPBhxXhprg
  10. If anyone starts a fund to supply the left with guns, I’m in for $100.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    If anyone starts a fund to supply the left with guns, I’m in for $100.
     
    That's a good cause, but it's not needed. The left has a real problem with gun ownership. I don't mean their views, though.

    I mean that gun-ownership for a member of the cntrl-left is a self-defeating proposition. See, gun ownership, shooting practice, and shooting sports require responsibility. This responsibility causes many to have a change in viewpoint, taking them far from their cntrl-left ways. It's a win/win for everyone except their left-behind idiots who have defriended them anyway.

    It's very difficult to raise a left-wing militia due to this conundrum... sigh (of contentment).
  11. The specter of Pearl Harbor has mobilized some of Palo Alto’s Chinese-American residents against the school district’s plan to rename two middle schools.

    They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto, one of six Palo Alto historical figures among eight finalists being considered, could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor bombing during World War II.

    Specifically the Chinese-American community is upset because of Pearl Harbor…

  12. They should name it after the person who discovered that coffee causes cancer:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43594645

  13. Stuttgart, Germany had a similar controversy when they named the airport after long-time mayor, Manfred Rommel. His father, Field Marshall Erwin Rommel, is much better known and most people hearing the phrase “Rommel Airport,” assume it’s named after the field marshall, not the mayor. But from what I’ve read of British 8th Army attitudes toward Erwin Rommel, any remaining 8th Army veteran would probably approve of naming the airport after the field marshall and feel privileged to land there.

    I would never approve naming an American school after Isoroku Yamamoto, but, IIRC, he opposed war with the United States.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Sid
    Right, Yamamoto argued that the USA was far more powerful than Japan. I think he may have gone as far to say we were 10x more powerful than Japan was, so war would be hopeless.

    Of course, sanity was not privileged by the power-elite in Japan during WWII, so he lost out and was tasked with attacking Pearl Harbor.

    We targeted and shot down the plane he was in. Assassination, a little distasteful.

    I agree naming something after Yamamoto in the US is unappealing, especially when we have accomplished people like, say, the Termans to name our schools after.

    The ethnic Chinese people here clearly aren't all that upset about Pearl Harbor. That was the event that saved their country from another decade of quagmire and human rights atrocities. Chiang Kai-Shek himself celebrated unabashedly when Japan hit Pearl Harbor: it meant he would actually win the war!
    , @Jake
    The school have been named Tojo Yamamoto Elementary, after the great wrassler.
  14. @The Man From K Street
    Keri Wagner? What right does she have to speak publicly on this issue? Isn't she aware she has the same last name as a composer who was a close personal friend of Hitler's, and the infamous head of the SS Musical Corps? Just her opening her yap and identifying herself is triggering enough.

    Okay, so I just checked, and Richard Wagner actually died about five years before Hitler was born. But STILL--even being reminded of his music in any way has got to be offensive to many students.

    Lars von Trier likes Wagner, so you know …

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Ok, but now remind me, is Lars von Trier supposed to be Jewish or Nazi?

    It's so hard keeping up with The Current Truth...

    , @Charles Pewitt
    Golf course putting green sinkingly slogged through by Gainsbourg in slow-motion.

    Kirsten Dunst is a very beautiful American women of German ancestry. There are a lot of beautiful Krauts like her in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the other mid-Atlantic states.

    Pennsylvania is Great Lakes and mid-Atlantic. Pennsylvania might be the key to ending globalization, financialization, mass immigration and the key to making the American Empire behave more like a republic.

    Pennsylvania!
    , @Mishra
    Note to everyone: the movie itself, sadly, does not live up to the breathtaking overture..
  15. bike lane lady vs. Father of Silicon Valley ,hey, it’s…….. a no brainer!

  16. “The specter of Pearl Harbor has mobilized some of Palo Alto’s Chinese-American residents against the school district’s plan to rename two middle schools.”

    The specter of Pearl Harbor? Try the Rape of Nanking.

    If we’re going to dig up historical grievances, at least make them accurate in application.

  17. @Diversity Heretic
    Stuttgart, Germany had a similar controversy when they named the airport after long-time mayor, Manfred Rommel. His father, Field Marshall Erwin Rommel, is much better known and most people hearing the phrase "Rommel Airport," assume it's named after the field marshall, not the mayor. But from what I've read of British 8th Army attitudes toward Erwin Rommel, any remaining 8th Army veteran would probably approve of naming the airport after the field marshall and feel privileged to land there.

    I would never approve naming an American school after Isoroku Yamamoto, but, IIRC, he opposed war with the United States.

    Right, Yamamoto argued that the USA was far more powerful than Japan. I think he may have gone as far to say we were 10x more powerful than Japan was, so war would be hopeless.

    Of course, sanity was not privileged by the power-elite in Japan during WWII, so he lost out and was tasked with attacking Pearl Harbor.

    We targeted and shot down the plane he was in. Assassination, a little distasteful.

    I agree naming something after Yamamoto in the US is unappealing, especially when we have accomplished people like, say, the Termans to name our schools after.

    The ethnic Chinese people here clearly aren’t all that upset about Pearl Harbor. That was the event that saved their country from another decade of quagmire and human rights atrocities. Chiang Kai-Shek himself celebrated unabashedly when Japan hit Pearl Harbor: it meant he would actually win the war!

  18. In some parts of the USA (Alabama, for instance), pro-wrestling heel Tojo Yamamoto is the most famous Yamamoto of all.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tojo_Yamamoto

    • Replies: @mhowell
    Tojo Yamamoto. That's a blast from the distant past. Growing up in NE Arkansas in the early 70's we used to watch Mid-South wrestling Saturday mornings on the Memphis stations. Jackie Fargo, Tojo Yamamoto, others I can't remember. Jerry Lawler was just getting started as a young heel, getting his ass kicked by Jackie & Tojo. Later on wrestling got all roided up and lost alot of its regional flavor. But it ruled in the Memphis area back in the day.
  19. Umm…if a school named after Abraham Lincoln, the president, reminds me of George Lincoln Rockwell, the Nazi, can I protest credibly? If a school named after Cesar Chavez, the UFW leader, reminds me of Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan president, can I protest credibly? If a school named after a Chinese American Robert Lee reminds me of Robert E. Lee, Confederate general, can I protest credibly? No, no, and no.

    • Replies: @anon
    Tiny Duck - your comment actually shows some common sense! What's gotten into you?
  20. • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @danand
    It's their school now, let them name it whatever they want:

    Terman Middle
    655 Arastradero Road
    Palo Alto, CA 94306

    Student Ethnicity:
    Asian 37.06%
    White 36.5%
    Hispanic or Latino 13.99%
    Two or More Races 9.23%
    African American 1.54%
    Filipino 1.54%
    American Indian or Alaska Native 0.14%

    http://school-ratings.com/ratingsDetails.php?cds=43696416118707

    Arclight

    Those guys are great, I've seen them out riding. They are featureed in a commercial that is currently running on over the air TV out here.

    A related article:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/arts/design/mohamed-bourouissa-urban-cowboys.html
  21. @Anonymous
    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?

    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?

    Your idea was taken into deep consideration, Mr. Reader. Unfortunately, it could not be implemented due to worries about confusion during football games between The REVEREND Dr. Martin Luther King Prep against King, JUNIOR Vocational, and in a different league, Dr. Martin Luther, JD, MD-PhD, GOD-KING, Magnet Academy vs. Dr. King, CPUSA, Notary-Public, Eastside High.

    Interleague play would have been even more confusing. Thank you for your input.

    Sincerely,

    The Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King Jr center for excellence in school naming.

  22. Some years ago the bien pensants in the western suburbs of Philadelphia fell over themselves in their haste to name a new high school after Bayard Rustin, a black, homosexual communist. I would say – “Top that”!, but as they are getting ready to build a new elementary school in the same district, I’m sure they will.

  23. This is an interesting example of policy being driven by the fear of mass stupidity.

    This is the same fear that fuels the HBD controversy. Anyone who knows the science knows that there are significant group differences. But Good People (TM) are afraid that the masses can only deal with two possibilities, “All people are equal” and “All whites are smarter than all blacks,” and they’re afraid HBD will lead them to the latter and therefore must be suppressed.

    • Agree: Peter Johnson
  24. There exist certain hurt feeling when the last name “Yamamoto” is mentioned, especially for Asian immigrants whose families were tragically affected in China, Korea and Southeast Asian countries during World War II

    Notice how giving an American school the same name as the son of a bitch behind the invasion of Pearl Harbor by Orientals is taken as a matter of course to stir righteous indignation, wholly justified, amongst Oriental invaders of Palo Alto, but the very idea this name might offend the Americans whose country was, you know, actually invaded by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor – never mind the idea the current invasion by the offended Chinese, Koreans, et al.! – is not merely dismissed: the possibility is not even considered.

    (Also note the comical Engrish of the petition, if that transcribed verbiage is indeed accurate: “There exist … hurt feeling….” It only adds to the irony and emphasises these whiners don’t even belong here.)

  25. @Steve Sailer
    Lars von Trier likes Wagner, so you know ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kP-vuOy8cU

    Ok, but now remind me, is Lars von Trier supposed to be Jewish or Nazi?

    It’s so hard keeping up with The Current Truth…

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
    You tell us.

    Here's what Max Nordau, the brain behind Herzl's, uh, passion, had to say in his opus, Degeneration:

    Evidently the German audiences entertain no misgivings concerning the actions and attitudes of Wagnerian personages; they seem to have no suspicion of the emotions by which they are excited, and what intentions their words, gestures and acts denote; and this explains the peaceful artlessness with which these audiences follow theatrical scenes during which, among a less childlike public, no one would dare lift his eyes to his neighbour or endure his glance.
    With Wagner amorous excitement assumes the form of mad delirium. The lovers in his pieces behave like tom-cats gone mad, rolling in contortions and convulsions over a root of valerian. They reflect a state of mind in the poet which is well known to the professional expert. It is a form of Sadism. It is the love of those degenerates who, in sexual transport, become like wild beasts. Wagner suffered from ‘erotic madness,’ which leads coarse natures to murder for lust, and inspires ‘higher degenerates’ with works like Die Walküre, Siegfried, and Tristan und Isolde.
     
  26. >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

    • Replies: @Mishra

    >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

     

    Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .
  27. @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a double standard. Were the Chinese complaining about a white man no one would call them racist.

    It's certainly true that Chinese are lower on the totem pole than blacks are but again, that isn't a double standard.

    I'm also actually quite sympathetic to the Chinese here. The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. Nonetheless, a big show of locally celebrating the wonderfully named and clearly heroic Fred Yamamato would surely ease the awkwardness.

    “The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. ”

    Bad? Yamamoto was a famous WWII figure, but as far as I knew he was never associated with things like the Rape of Nanking, the Bataan Death March, or that whacked out Japanese science unit in China (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731).

    From wikipedia which I assume is correct in this case:

    “Yamamoto was part of the Japanese Navy establishment, who were rivals of the more aggressive army establishment, especially the officers of the Kwantung Army. As such, he promoted a policy of a strong fleet to project force through gunboat diplomacy, rather than a fleet used primarily for transport of invasion land forces, as some of his political opponents in the army wanted.[6] This stance led him to oppose the invasion of China. He also opposed war against the United States partly because of his studies at Harvard University (1919–1921) and his two postings as a naval attaché in Washington, D.C., where he learned to speak fluent English. Yamamoto traveled extensively in the United States during his tour of duty there, where he studied American customs and business practices.”

    “Yamamoto opposed the invasion of Manchuria in 1931, the subsequent land war with China (1937), and the 1940 Tripartite Pact with Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. As Deputy Navy Minister, he apologized to United States Ambassador Joseph C. Grew for the bombing of the gunboat USS Panay in December 1937. These issues made him a target of assassination threats by pro-war militarists.

    Throughout 1938, many young army and naval officers began to speak publicly against Yamamoto and certain other Japanese admirals such as Mitsumasa Yonai and Shigeyoshi Inoue for their strong opposition to a tripartite pact with Nazi Germany as they saw it as inimical to “Japan’s natural interests.”[8]:101 Yamamoto received a steady stream of hate mail and death threats from Japanese nationalists. His reaction to the prospect of death by assassination was passive and accepting. The admiral wrote: To die for Emperor and Nation is the highest hope of a military man. After a brave hard fight the blossoms are scattered on the fighting field. But if a person wants to take a life instead, still the fighting man will go to eternity for Emperor and country. One man’s life or death is a matter of no importance. All that matters is the Empire. As Confucius said, “They may crush cinnabar, yet they do not take away its color; one may burn a fragrant herb, yet it will not destroy the scent.” They may destroy my body, yet they will not take away my will.[8]:101–02

    The Japanese Army, annoyed at Yamamoto’s unflinching opposition to a Rome-Berlin-Tokyo treaty, dispatched military police to “guard” Yamamoto, a ruse by the army to keep an eye on him.[8]:102-103 He was later reassigned from the naval ministry to sea as the commander-in-chief of the Combined Fleet on August 30, 1939. This was done as one of the last acts of the then-acting Navy Minister Mitsumasa Yonai, under Baron Hiranuma’s short-lived administration. It was done partly to make it harder for assassins to target Yamamoto. Yonai was certain that if Yamamoto remained ashore, he would be killed before the year [1939] ended.[8]:103″

    Call it what it is. Chinese ethnic hatred of the Japanese. With a stupid pretext. Literally the whole thing is a stretch.

    As for Pearl Harbor… put yourself in his shoes. You have a war you didn’t want, but still have to prosecute. WTF was he supposed to do? Pulling that off depended on either US laxness or Roosevelt wanting to pull the US into the war (if you roll that way). But it worked.

    They really didn’t have too many options if war was the only choice. We’ll never know now if Yamamoto thought it was a mistake (tactically and strategically versus any other option) in the years after.

    • Replies: @Jake
    You are trying to use facts and logic, both of which have been expelled in the name of PC sacred cows.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Yamamoto said he could "run wild" in the Pacific for 6 months, but had grave doubts beyond that. It was almost exactly 6 months after Pearl Harbor that the US sank 4 Jap carriers at Midway. The outcome of the war was decided that day.
  28. @schnellandine
    If anyone starts a fund to supply the left with guns, I'm in for $100.

    If anyone starts a fund to supply the left with guns, I’m in for $100.

    That’s a good cause, but it’s not needed. The left has a real problem with gun ownership. I don’t mean their views, though.

    I mean that gun-ownership for a member of the cntrl-left is a self-defeating proposition. See, gun ownership, shooting practice, and shooting sports require responsibility. This responsibility causes many to have a change in viewpoint, taking them far from their cntrl-left ways. It’s a win/win for everyone except their left-behind idiots who have defriended them anyway.

    It’s very difficult to raise a left-wing militia due to this conundrum… sigh (of contentment).

  29. Ah the beauty of multiculturalism. In the end, a Jew wins.

    Mission accomplished.

  30. @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a double standard. Were the Chinese complaining about a white man no one would call them racist.

    It's certainly true that Chinese are lower on the totem pole than blacks are but again, that isn't a double standard.

    I'm also actually quite sympathetic to the Chinese here. The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. Nonetheless, a big show of locally celebrating the wonderfully named and clearly heroic Fred Yamamato would surely ease the awkwardness.

    “The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one”

    Isoroku Yamamoto was the best known of Japans’ WWII commanders, but I know no American–even of the WWII generation–who knows his name who also holds it in contempt. On the contrary, Americans who know of him also regard him with a certain reverence: one of Japan’s great leaders who knew he was fighting a lost cause but did so with honor, skill and courage nevertheless. Commenter Diversity Heretic made a similar point about Erwin Rommel.

    For myself, I would approve naming an American establishment after Isoroku Yamamoto. It would go with the American (and larger Western) tradition of remembering and honoring those who fought against you, provided they did so with honor, bravery, duty and ability, even though they ultimately lost: Geronimo, Rommel, Hannibal, etc. Robert E. Lee and the other great Confederates should also be in that list, the statuary rape crowd notwithstanding.

    This acknowledgement of the honorable foe is an acknowledgment of our larger selves: that we can see and remember your virtue apart from the petty details of whom you struggled for and whether you won or lost. This used not to be unusual in America and the West in general. Alas, that America is submerged daily deeper into the permanent vindictiveness and vituperation of The Current Year.

    Instead we now have the Permanent War against Emmanuel Goldstein. Has the culture of critique run completely rampant?

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    I took their comparison of him to Hitler at face value, rather than the more apt example of Rommel. Honouring a great military leader rather than a failed and atrocious political leader makes a lot more sense.
    , @anonymous
    Spot-on!!
    , @Diversity Heretic
    Good comment! The concept of an honorable enemy is one that a civilized people should cultivate. In World War I, the British in Kenya admired German General Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck of German East Africa (today Tanzania). British prisoners asked to be permitted to shake his hand.
  31. Diversity is our great strength, and the more we get of it, the more powerful Jews will be.

    Is that it? Diversity upon diversity leads to even the most nothing Jews having schools named for them?

    Thanks, Oliver Cromwell and the Judaizing heresy of Anglo-Saxon Puritanism and their seemingly endless fruits.

  32. What’s wrong with PS 1, PS 2, PS n+1…?

  33. Fred Yamamoto was an interned Japanese-American who volunteered to fight for America, was assigned to the famous Fighting 442nd, the most decorated unit in American military history

    The 442nd exemplifies the fact that assimilation requires intolerance. America used to be openly intolerant of immigrants who didn’t assimilate and display their loyalty to the American nation. After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, a lot of suspicion arose about the loyalties of Japanese-Americans. It may have been unfair by today’s standards, but it was understandable. Those Japanese-Americans who enlisted in the 442 and other such units were determined to prove their loyalty, to earn the respect of their fellow citizens. With today’s victim culture and emphasis on the supreme virtue of tolerance, this wouldn’t be the case. We didn’t see American Muslims flooding the enlistment centers after 9/11. Instead we got the frontlash, with Muslims whining about being treated with suspicion and George W. Bush falling all over himself to praise Islam.

    • Replies: @Larsen Halleck
    Wouldn't you know it, I did an article and video on this exact concept:

    http://thebarbaricgentleman.com/2017/03/25/stereotypes-can-beneficial/

    https://youtu.be/PM7_EahxnAM
  34. @Diversity Heretic
    Stuttgart, Germany had a similar controversy when they named the airport after long-time mayor, Manfred Rommel. His father, Field Marshall Erwin Rommel, is much better known and most people hearing the phrase "Rommel Airport," assume it's named after the field marshall, not the mayor. But from what I've read of British 8th Army attitudes toward Erwin Rommel, any remaining 8th Army veteran would probably approve of naming the airport after the field marshall and feel privileged to land there.

    I would never approve naming an American school after Isoroku Yamamoto, but, IIRC, he opposed war with the United States.

    The school have been named Tojo Yamamoto Elementary, after the great wrassler.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    Yes, despite hurt feeling, the school have been name Tojo Yamamoto Elementary. Local Chinese may save face by referring to it as "Mr. Moto Elementary".
  35. If we survive Silicon Valley as a species (let alone SV politics as White folks), our ancestors will eat “Terman’s Ears” in eternal celebration.

  36. Thanks for the laugh, Steve.

    Yamamoto School would have been badass, but Fletcher is a lovely name for a school… Though come to think of it, it sounds rather disturbingly… English and aggressive (it means “maker of arrows”). Perhaps naming schools in the form “P.S. 42” like in New York is an even better solution?

    There is no record of any objections to the city’s numbering system. In fact, some New Yorkers became uncommonly attached to the digits.

    In 1916, when the city decided to give all its schools names alongside their numbers, The New York Times was not pleased.

    “The Board of Education is now contributing to enlightenment by slapping new names on the public schools,” an editorial said.

    “It forgets, in its zeal for innovation, the love which thousands of men and women in this city, thousands scattered over the country, feel for ‘Old Public School, Number’ So and So.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/education/08numbers.html

    So numbers are nice…Though to be honest I do find them… Well they’re a little cold and male and rational… Let’s work on this…

    Soon we will reach the Omega Point, where everything cancels everything out.

    Out of the void, through a series of regrettable incidents, and back to the void!

    I often think of this story by Margaret Atwood, which I forget where I first saw:

    There Was Once by Margaret Atwood

    “There was once a poor girl, as beautiful as she was good, who lived with her wicked stepmother in a house in the forest.”

    “Forest? Forest is passé, I mean, I’ve had it with all this wilderness stuff. It’s not a right image of our society, today. Let’s have some urban for a change.”

    “There was once a poor girl, as beautiful as she was good, who lived with her wicked stepmother in a house in the suburbs.”

    “That’s better. But I have to seriously query this word poor.”

    “But she was poor!”

    “Poor is relative. She lived in a house, didn’t she?”

    “Yes.”

    “Then socio-economically speaking, she was not poor.”

    [The story goes on to detail how all possibly questionable details are gradually taken out, and ends as follows:]

    “There was once-”

    “What’s this was, once? Enough of the dead past. Tell me about now.”

    “There-”

    “So?”

    “So, what?”

    “So, why not here?”

    ***

    http://ouallinator.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/There-Was-Once.pdf

    Margaret Atwood, despite Handmaid’s Tale, is apparently not impeccably PC:
    https://www.vox.com/culture/2018/1/17/16897404/margaret-atwood-metoo-backlash-steven-galloway-ubc-accountable

    • Replies: @MEH 0910


    "So you have undoubtedly inferred," Pethel said, "that there is a good deal involved in what we are attempting, here. The leader
    has his eye on you; that's clear. As a matter of fact, he has communicated to myself regarding you." He opened his bulging briefcase and rummaged

    "Lost the goddamn thing. Anyhow --" He glanced at Tso-pin, who nodded slightly. "His Greatness would like to have you appear for dinner at the Yangtze River Ranch next Thursday night. Mrs. Fletcher in particular appreciates --"

    Chien said, " 'Mrs. Fletcher'? Who is 'Mrs. Fletcher'?"

    After a pause Tso-pin said dryly, "The Absolute Benefactor's wife. His name -- which you of course had never heard -- is Thomas Fletcher."

    "He's a Caucasian," Pethel explained. "Originally from the New Zealand Communist Party; he participated in the difficult takeover there. This news is not in the strict sense secret, but on the other hand it hasn't been noised about." He hesitated, toying with his watch chain. "Probably it would be better if you forgot about that. Of course, as soon as you meet him, see him face to face, you'll realize that, realize that he's a Cauc. As I am. As many of us are."

    "Race," Tso-pin pointed out, "has nothing to do with loyalty to the leader and the Party. As witness Mr. Pethel, here."

    But His Greatness, Chien thought, jolted. He did not appear, on the TV screen, to be Occidental.
    "On TV --" he began.

    "The image," Tso-pin interrupted, "is subjected to a variegated assortment of skillful refinements. For ideological purposes. Most persons holding higher offices are aware of this." He eyed Chien with hard criticism. So everyone agrees, Chien thought. What we see every night is not real. The question is, How unreal? Partially? Or -- completely?
     
    Philip K. Dick - Faith of Our Fathers
    https://genius.com/Philip-k-dick-faith-of-our-fathers-annotated
  37. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It was decided instead to rename it after Ellen Fletcher, the late Palo Alto city councilwoman, a Jewish woman from Berlin, who was instrumental in adding bike lanes.
     
    Reminds me of what happened in Boston with the “Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge.” The most visible part of the Big Dig, the iconic new bridge was somehow named after a nobody from New Jersey who was posthumously promoted by the soon-to-be notorious Cardinal Bernard Law.

    I was thinking of the same example.

    I wonder if there’s ever been a bigger ratio between the prominence of a public feature and the importance of the person for whom it gets named. It’s actually genuinely embarrassing to explain the “accomplishments” of Zakim to outsiders.

    He worked for the ADL to “make bridges” between “communities” and then he died. He seemed nice.

    Boston is filled to the brim with major historical figures, and this pisher gets the honor.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    It's hard to think of anything that better symbolizes the displacement of the WASP elite by Jews than the naming of a major bridge after a Jewish nobody in the most quintessentially Anglo of all American cities.
  38. @Arclight
    Not related, but I enjoyed this story and the willingness of these guys to go against the grain: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/31/us/compton-cowboys-horseback-riding-african-americans.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

    It’s their school now, let them name it whatever they want:

    Terman Middle
    655 Arastradero Road
    Palo Alto, CA 94306

    Student Ethnicity:
    Asian 37.06%
    White 36.5%
    Hispanic or Latino 13.99%
    Two or More Races 9.23%
    African American 1.54%
    Filipino 1.54%
    American Indian or Alaska Native 0.14%

    http://school-ratings.com/ratingsDetails.php?cds=43696416118707

    Arclight

    Those guys are great, I’ve seen them out riding. They are featureed in a commercial that is currently running on over the air TV out here.

    A related article:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/arts/design/mohamed-bourouissa-urban-cowboys.html

  39. They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto… could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto

    Besides the other reasons this is bullshit, one of those guys was a nonwhite citizen who was unjustly locked up, and the other was the commander in a sneak attack that killed over two thousand Americans – which one is more likely to be part of the curriculum in a 21st century California high school?

    • Agree: International Jew
  40. It’s just a power struggle between two different ethnic Asian factions in America. Not the most important fight, but it gives the leaders and troops something to do. And it yellow-washes yet another piece of American history.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Japanese-Americans aren't really much of a cohesive force. Unlike many other ethnic groups - specifically, the Chinese - there hasn't been significant Japanese immigration to the US since the 1924 immigration act. Sure, there are purebred JapAms like George Takei, but they're mostly elderly. Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.
  41. They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto, one of six Palo Alto historical figures among eight finalists being considered, could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor bombing during World War II.

    It would be a major faux pas to name a school in Palo Alto, the home of Stanford University, after a Yamamoto. Isoroku Yamamoto was a Harvard man.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    You know, I always hear about the all the presidents and wonderful people who went to Harvard. Somebody ought to do a nice list of scoundrels and enemies who went to Harvard. Did any famous Nazis study there?
    , @European-American
    Indeed:

    “... a special student at Harvard ...

    Classmates would have remembered Yamamoto well: a hard worker but not a grind, exceptionally curious and imaginative,” Morris writes. “When they introduced him to the game of poker, he became a fanatical poker player who would stay up all night, winning hand after hand. And what did he do with his poker winnings--lead the good life? No, not at all: he hitchhiked around the country during the summer, exploring America.”

    ...

    The shame of the Joint Chiefs was their lack of imagination in trying to figure out their opponent. They thought of him as a traditional Japanese who would do everything ‘by the book’ (just as they did). They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    https://harvardmagazine.com/2010/07/lessons-in-surprise
     

    Or perhaps only barely a Harvard student:

    In 1919, Yamamoto Isoroku, who later planned the attack on Pearl Harbor, came to Harvard to study English. He received only a C+ in the course but spent his free time to advantage by hitchhiking to Texas, where, by some accounts, he gathered information on America’s oil industry.

    https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2004/02/history-of-the-japanese-at-harvard/
     

    In fact he was a drop-out!

    [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: We say that Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto studied at Harvard for four years. However, according to the registrar, records show that Yamamoto withdrew shortly after the start of his first semester in 1920 and did not return.]

    https://www.npr.org/2016/12/07/504651757/the-legacy-of-the-man-who-planned-the-pearl-harbor-attack

     

  42. But of course, race isn’t about a single gene, it’s about a statistical package of multiple genes.

    One more Steve-Sailer-formula (to be remembered in the (Chinese, Korean,Taiwanese?) future, when there’ll be a need – : ) – for a decent textbook.

  43. @Steve Sailer
    Lars von Trier likes Wagner, so you know ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kP-vuOy8cU

    Golf course putting green sinkingly slogged through by Gainsbourg in slow-motion.

    Kirsten Dunst is a very beautiful American women of German ancestry. There are a lot of beautiful Krauts like her in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the other mid-Atlantic states.

    Pennsylvania is Great Lakes and mid-Atlantic. Pennsylvania might be the key to ending globalization, financialization, mass immigration and the key to making the American Empire behave more like a republic.

    Pennsylvania!

  44. I’m pretty sure I’ve read about this kind of activity before…

    Got it:

    “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.

    George Orwell, 1984

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Orwell was the great prophet of our time.

    The Left used to claim him, but no longer: he hits too close to home; they see themselves mirrored, uncomfortably, guiltily, in his stark dystopic vision.

    The other great prophet, less visionary, but surer as to where the moorings had slipped, Evelyn Waugh, saw in Orwell a fellow alarm-raiser and, like himself, only misleadingly to be confined in the old dichotomies of Left and Right.
  45. Mike Honda lost in 2016 to an Indian ‘American’. So-called ‘Asian’ solidarity only works when beating up the white man.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/trailguide/la-na-election-day-2016-honda-khanna-1478392928-htmlstory.html

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Perhaps he wa defeated by a revolt of Toyota owners.
  46. @Harry Baldwin
    Fred Yamamoto was an interned Japanese-American who volunteered to fight for America, was assigned to the famous Fighting 442nd, the most decorated unit in American military history

    The 442nd exemplifies the fact that assimilation requires intolerance. America used to be openly intolerant of immigrants who didn't assimilate and display their loyalty to the American nation. After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, a lot of suspicion arose about the loyalties of Japanese-Americans. It may have been unfair by today's standards, but it was understandable. Those Japanese-Americans who enlisted in the 442 and other such units were determined to prove their loyalty, to earn the respect of their fellow citizens. With today's victim culture and emphasis on the supreme virtue of tolerance, this wouldn't be the case. We didn't see American Muslims flooding the enlistment centers after 9/11. Instead we got the frontlash, with Muslims whining about being treated with suspicion and George W. Bush falling all over himself to praise Islam.

    Wouldn’t you know it, I did an article and video on this exact concept:

    http://thebarbaricgentleman.com/2017/03/25/stereotypes-can-beneficial/

  47. @Almost Missouri

    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one"
     
    Isoroku Yamamoto was the best known of Japans' WWII commanders, but I know no American--even of the WWII generation--who knows his name who also holds it in contempt. On the contrary, Americans who know of him also regard him with a certain reverence: one of Japan's great leaders who knew he was fighting a lost cause but did so with honor, skill and courage nevertheless. Commenter Diversity Heretic made a similar point about Erwin Rommel.

    For myself, I would approve naming an American establishment after Isoroku Yamamoto. It would go with the American (and larger Western) tradition of remembering and honoring those who fought against you, provided they did so with honor, bravery, duty and ability, even though they ultimately lost: Geronimo, Rommel, Hannibal, etc. Robert E. Lee and the other great Confederates should also be in that list, the statuary rape crowd notwithstanding.

    This acknowledgement of the honorable foe is an acknowledgment of our larger selves: that we can see and remember your virtue apart from the petty details of whom you struggled for and whether you won or lost. This used not to be unusual in America and the West in general. Alas, that America is submerged daily deeper into the permanent vindictiveness and vituperation of The Current Year.

    Instead we now have the Permanent War against Emmanuel Goldstein. Has the culture of critique run completely rampant?

    I took their comparison of him to Hitler at face value, rather than the more apt example of Rommel. Honouring a great military leader rather than a failed and atrocious political leader makes a lot more sense.

  48. Yamamoto (山本 meaning “base of the mountain”) is one of the most common Japanese surnames. Notable people with the surname include:

    Azusa Yamamoto (山本 梓), gravure idol and actress
    Donald Yamamoto (ドナルド・ヤマモト), American Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, for African Affairs
    Fujiko Yamamoto (山本 富士子) film actress
    Gonnohyōe Yamamoto (山本 権兵衛), the 16th Prime Minister of Japan
    Hideo Yamamoto (山本 英夫), manga artist
    Hiro Yamamoto (ヒロ・ヤマモト), bassist
    Hiroshi Yamamoto (archer) (山本 博), archer, Olympic silver medalist
    Hiroto Yamamoto (山本 啓人, born 1988), Japanese footballer
    Hisashi Yamamoto (山本 尚), Professor of Chemistry, The University of Chicago
    Hisaye Yamamoto (ヒサエ・ヤマモト) (1921–2011), Japanese American author
    Hōzan Yamamoto (山本 邦山), shakuhachi player, composer and lecturer
    Ichita Yamamoto (山本 一太), politician
    Isoroku Yamamoto (山本 五十六), World War II Admiral
    Issei Yamamoto (山本 一清), astronomer
    Kailer Yamamoto (カイラー・ヤマモト), American ice hockey player
    Kaito Yamamoto (山本 海人, born 1985), Japanese footballer
    Kajirō Yamamoto (山本 嘉次郎), film director
    Kanichi Yamamoto (山本 寛一), the first Japanese Bahá’í
    Kansai Yamamoto (山本 寛斎), noted fashion designer
    Yamamoto Kansuke (山本 勘助), general
    Kenichi Yamamoto (engineer) (山本 健一), mechanical engineer and business executive
    Kenichi Yamamoto (yakuza) (山本 健一),Yakuza
    Kenji Yamamoto (山本 健誌), video game music composer
    Koichi Yamamoto (山本 公一), politician
    Kotetsu Yamamoto (山本 小鉄), wrestler
    Koji Yamamoto (actor) (山本 耕史), actor
    Koji Yamamoto (baseball) (山本 浩二), baseball player
    Linda Yamamoto (山本 リンダ), pop star
    Maria Yamamoto (山本 麻里安), voice actress
    Mariko Yamamoto (山本 万里子), cricketer
    Masahiro Yamamoto (baseball) (山本真弘), baseball player
    Masahiro Yamamoto (kickboxer) (山本真弘), kickboxer
    Masakuni Yamamoto (山本 昌邦), football coach
    Masao Yamamoto (山本 昌男), photographer
    Masayoshi Yamamoto (山本 雅賢), Japanese artistic gymnast
    Masashi Yamamoto (山本 政志), film director
    Mayumi Yamamoto (disambiguation), multiple people
    Mirai Yamamoto (山本 未來), actress
    Mona Yamamoto (山本 モナ),announcer
    Norifumi “Kid” Yamamoto (山本 徳郁), mixed martial arts fighter
    Ryohei Yamamoto (山本 領平), R&B singer
    Sakon Yamamoto (山本 左近), race car driver
    Saori Yamamoto (山本 早織), bikini idol
    Satoshi Yamamoto (山本 サトシ), illustrator of Pokémon Adventures starting in volume 10
    Sayaka Yamamoto (山本 彩), idol, actress, model
    Sayo Yamamoto (山本 沙代, born 1977), Japanese anime director
    Seiichi Yamamoto (山本 精一), musician; member of seminal Osaka-based noise/krautrock band Boredoms
    Shizuka Yamamoto (山本 静香), badminton player
    Shinya Yamamoto (山本 晋也), film director
    Shin’ya Yamamoto (山本 真也, born 1971), Japanese shogi player
    Shūgorō Yamamoto (山本 周五郎), novelist
    Takahiro Yamamoto (山本 隆弘), volleyball player
    Takashi Yamamoto (swimmer) (山本 貴司), swimmer at the 2004 Summer Olympics
    Taro Yamamoto (山本 太郎), actor
    Taro Yamamoto (artist) (1919–1994), American artist
    Tatsuo Yamamoto (山本 達雄), politician
    Toshikatsu Yamamoto (山元 敏勝, born 1929), Japanese physician
    Tsunetomo Yamamoto (山本 常朝), author of the Hagakure
    Yohji Yamamoto (山本 耀司), fashion designer
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (scientist) (born 1950),
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (wrestler) (born 1970),
    Yuriko Yamamoto (山本 百合子), voice actor
    Yusuke Yamamoto (山本 裕典), actor and fashion model
    Yutaka Yamamoto (山本 寛), animation director
    Yamamoto Hosui, a Prewar period painter

    Fictional characters
    Yamamoto (Spriggan), head of ARCAM’s Japanese branch in Spriggan
    Shigekuni Yamamoto-Genryūsai, the General (sotaicho) and 1st Division Captain (ichibantai-taicho) in the Bleach manga and anime
    Aki Yamamoto from the anime Colorful
    Lt. Commander Yamamoto, the first officer in the anime series, The Irresponsible Captain Tylor
    Kazuhiko Yamamoto, a student in Battle Royale
    Takeshi Yamamoto, a swordsman and a Vongola Guardian from the anime Reborn!
    Yamamoto Yoko from the anime Starship Girl Yamamoto Yohko
    Julie Yamamoto from Ben 10: Alien Force
    Yamamoto Yueniang of The Little Nyonya
    Megumi Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Jun Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Naoki Yamamoto, a character from Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isoroku_Yamamoto#Family_background

    Yamamoto was born Isoroku Takano (高野 五十六 Takano Isoroku) in Nagaoka, Niigata. His father was Sadayoshi Takano (高野 貞吉), an intermediate-rank samurai of the Nagaoka Domain. "Isoroku" is an old Japanese term meaning "56"; the name referred to his father's age at Isoroku's birth.[4]

    In 1916, Isoroku was adopted into the Yamamoto family (another family of former Nagaoka samurai) and took the Yamamoto name. It was a common practice for samurai families lacking sons to adopt suitable young men in this fashion to carry on the family name, the rank and the income that comes with it.
     
    , @Hibernian
    Fred didn't make the list.
  49. LaDoris Cordell is a great 3-for. Black-female-Bryn Mawr.

  50. How about naming it after Margaret Sanger. They won’t get the joke.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That would be a good idea on several levels, not the least of which....
  51. New York City names most of their public schools P.S.###. Numbers tend not to offend people, but with the superstitious Chinese, who knows? It won’t be long before Chinese parents are suing public school boards for exposing their children to bad feng shui.

  52. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Morons all around.

    Idiot Yamamoto attacks much more powerful US even though he knew it would be a disaster.

    Moron Fred Yamamoto pledges to fight for a nation that dispossessed his family and threw them into a camp. Suppose Americans live in Mexico and there is war between US and Mexico. Suppose Mexican government puts all Americans in Mexico into internment camps. What Americans would volunteer to fight for the Mexican government?

    Still, Fred Yamamoto fought against the Axis(including Japan) that was invading China.

    But now Chinese in America demean him because his name happens to be the same as the infamous Admiral.

    And then moron whites attack the chinese as ‘racist’ even though they are the ones who fanned the flames of PC hysteria all around to the point of lunacy. Also, even their decision to honor Fred Yamamoto was part of a plan to bait ‘white guilt’.

    They all stumble over each other, and the Jewish lady crosses the finish line.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    What Americans would volunteer to fight for the Mexican government?

    Fred Reed?
  53. I really thought the Chinese were better than this.

    • Replies: @JimB
    Newsflash: They aren't.
  54. Anonymous[336] • Disclaimer says:

    Let’s just name every high school George Washington Carver (identified by #s 1 – 26,407) and be done with it.

  55. @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a double standard. Were the Chinese complaining about a white man no one would call them racist.

    It's certainly true that Chinese are lower on the totem pole than blacks are but again, that isn't a double standard.

    I'm also actually quite sympathetic to the Chinese here. The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. Nonetheless, a big show of locally celebrating the wonderfully named and clearly heroic Fred Yamamato would surely ease the awkwardness.

    Why not just call it the Fred Yamamoto School? No need to omit his first name.

  56. @Almost Missouri
    Ok, but now remind me, is Lars von Trier supposed to be Jewish or Nazi?

    It's so hard keeping up with The Current Truth...

    You tell us.

    Here’s what Max Nordau, the brain behind Herzl’s, uh, passion, had to say in his opus, Degeneration:

    Evidently the German audiences entertain no misgivings concerning the actions and attitudes of Wagnerian personages; they seem to have no suspicion of the emotions by which they are excited, and what intentions their words, gestures and acts denote; and this explains the peaceful artlessness with which these audiences follow theatrical scenes during which, among a less childlike public, no one would dare lift his eyes to his neighbour or endure his glance.
    With Wagner amorous excitement assumes the form of mad delirium. The lovers in his pieces behave like tom-cats gone mad, rolling in contortions and convulsions over a root of valerian. They reflect a state of mind in the poet which is well known to the professional expert. It is a form of Sadism. It is the love of those degenerates who, in sexual transport, become like wild beasts. Wagner suffered from ‘erotic madness,’ which leads coarse natures to murder for lust, and inspires ‘higher degenerates’ with works like Die Walküre, Siegfried, and Tristan und Isolde.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    The eternal Jew, who derides and demeans what he can neither understand nor, least of all, emulate.
    , @Mishra
    I'd happily trade all the atom bombs ever built for one Tristan.
  57. Just for fun, they could name the school for, I don’t know, Doolittle’s Raiders. After all, his bombing mission resulted in a quarter-million dead Chinese.


    At midday on April 18, 1942, 16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor. For the 80 volunteer raiders, who lifted off that morning from the carrier Hornet, the mission was one-way. After attacking Japan, most of the aircrews flew on to Free China, where low on fuel, the men either bailed out or crash-landed along the coast and were rescued by local villagers, guerrillas and missionaries.

    That generosity shown by the Chinese would trigger a horrific retaliation by the Japanese that claimed an estimated quarter-million lives and would prompt comparisons to the 1937-38 Rape of Nanking. American military authorities, cognizant that a raid on Tokyo would result in a vicious counterattack upon free China, saw the mission through regardless, even keeping the operation a secret from their Pacific theater allies. This chapter of the Doolittle Raid has largely gone unreported—until now.

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/untold-story-vengeful-japanese-attack-doolittle-raid-180955001/

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is similar to the Vaasgo raid, which was probably completely unnecessary and resulted in the punitive execution of Norwegians (as well as an angry reaction from the Norwegian government in exile).
    , @Mishra
    This is not news to me, but is the implication that we should refrain from attacking our enemies in wartime because they might seek revenge upon on us or our friends? Weird implication there.

    War is hell, in case you didn't know. Should be avoided at (almost) all costs.

    "16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor."

    It was also and especially designed to show the Japanese that we could fight back, and also and especially designed to demonstrate for a despondent American public this very same fact. The Japanese--experts without parallel at sadism during wartime--required evermore intensive demonstrations during the next few years. Jimmy Doolittle was an American Hero.

  58. Perusing a list of famous Palo Alto natives, I noticed that actor James Franco hails from that very place. Why not name the school after him. I think Franco Middle School sounds pretty good.

    Surely, nobody would have any objections to that.

  59. One parent said giving a school the Yamamoto surname is akin to naming a school with Jewish students after Adolf Hitler or anyone with Hitler as a last name.

    You have to hand it to these Chinese ethnic activists; they certainly know which white subgroup to appeal to. Reminds of an old Letterman Top Ten List. Top Ten Least Favorite Supermarket Names. Of the ones I remember:

    Risky’s…Pick & Lick…and, of course, Number 1: Hitler’s!

  60. @Achmed E. Newman

    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, ...
     
    No, this small skirmish within the "coalition of the fringes" is not the silly part. It just shows why Mr. Sailer is worried for the future of an America resembling Palo Alto (with cheaper housing, hopefully).

    The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor. Are they really thinking of the many thousand American sailors and civilians killed and maimed? I think they were bringing that up to get the few actual Americans in Palo Alto on their side in their opposition to anything Japanese due to, uh, uh, racism. For the Chinese parents to say they were opposed to the name Yamamoto due to Pearl Harbor is some blatant bullshit.

    Silliness number 2 here is:


    Another parent said if a Palo Alto school had been named Yamamoto, he would have chosen a different district for his children.
     
    Not as blatant, I'll give him, but pretty obvious bullshit nonetheless. Our iSteve would be the first to disucss these parents and the best schools, as that's one of his big interests. From my learnings from the Master, I'd say, that no, that parent would absolutely not have kept his children in a worse school just because of the name.

    The infighting is one thing, but I really don't like the lying either.

    “The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor.”

    Agree.

    I propose calling the school Nanking Memorial. That’ll diversify our strength.

    • Replies: @wren
    Diversify our strength!

    Brilliant!

    I'm surprised that the Korean Americans haven't joined this important conversation on school names yet.

    Perhaps we can have a Japanese named school with a Korean comfort woman statue as the mascot and the school fight song in Chinese (à la Sun Tzu).

    Something like this might provide for a good separation of powers type arrangement.

    Korean statues in the US provide a glimpse of the same issues.

    https://nyti.ms/2i7Q7n0
    , @JimB
    How about renaming the Terman Middle School "The Free School for Children of Cheapskate Immigrant Parents Owning Multi-million Dollar Homes Who Can't Be Bothered Paying Tuition for the Harker School?"
  61. anonymous[286] • Disclaimer says:

    “One parent said giving a school the Yamamoto surname is akin to naming a school with Jewish students after Adolf Hitler or anyone with Hitler as a last name.”

    As an historical analogy, this makes no sense. And for reasons that should not be necessary to delve into but, hey, this is America-2018.

  62. anonymous[286] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one"
     
    Isoroku Yamamoto was the best known of Japans' WWII commanders, but I know no American--even of the WWII generation--who knows his name who also holds it in contempt. On the contrary, Americans who know of him also regard him with a certain reverence: one of Japan's great leaders who knew he was fighting a lost cause but did so with honor, skill and courage nevertheless. Commenter Diversity Heretic made a similar point about Erwin Rommel.

    For myself, I would approve naming an American establishment after Isoroku Yamamoto. It would go with the American (and larger Western) tradition of remembering and honoring those who fought against you, provided they did so with honor, bravery, duty and ability, even though they ultimately lost: Geronimo, Rommel, Hannibal, etc. Robert E. Lee and the other great Confederates should also be in that list, the statuary rape crowd notwithstanding.

    This acknowledgement of the honorable foe is an acknowledgment of our larger selves: that we can see and remember your virtue apart from the petty details of whom you struggled for and whether you won or lost. This used not to be unusual in America and the West in general. Alas, that America is submerged daily deeper into the permanent vindictiveness and vituperation of The Current Year.

    Instead we now have the Permanent War against Emmanuel Goldstein. Has the culture of critique run completely rampant?

    Spot-on!!

  63. It was decided instead to rename it after Ellen Fletcher, the late Palo Alto city councilwoman, a Jewish woman from Berlin…

    Aha! Divide and conquer! Another Jewish conspiracy!

  64. @Lugash
    It's just a power struggle between two different ethnic Asian factions in America. Not the most important fight, but it gives the leaders and troops something to do. And it yellow-washes yet another piece of American history.

    Japanese-Americans aren’t really much of a cohesive force. Unlike many other ethnic groups – specifically, the Chinese – there hasn’t been significant Japanese immigration to the US since the 1924 immigration act. Sure, there are purebred JapAms like George Takei, but they’re mostly elderly. Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.

    • Replies: @European-American

    Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.
     
    Really? Mixed with Chinese? Interesting.

    For what it's worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Americans

    Searching for "half" I got 4 out of 400, 3 with a Taiwanese parent:

    Louis Ozawa Changchien, actor, Taiwanese father
    James Hiroyuki Liao, actor, Taiwanese father
    Kevin Nishimura, musician, Chinese American mother
    Kobe Tai, porn star, Taiwanese mother, Japanese soldier father, adopted by Americans as an infant
    Yuna Ito, pop star, Korean mother

    Vaguely related, some interesting photos here:


    After Pearl Harbor perceptions of China and Chinese Americans were suddenly transformed
    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/chinese-americans-during-ww2-1941/
     
  65. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?

    Why aren’t all public schools named after MLK Jr., anyway? I mean it’s 2018! They should be named like New York City public schools are named, just with numbers like PS #23, PS #57, etc., but with MLK Jr. as the prefix to the numbers.

  66. @candid_observer
    I was thinking of the same example.

    I wonder if there's ever been a bigger ratio between the prominence of a public feature and the importance of the person for whom it gets named. It's actually genuinely embarrassing to explain the "accomplishments" of Zakim to outsiders.

    He worked for the ADL to "make bridges" between "communities" and then he died. He seemed nice.

    Boston is filled to the brim with major historical figures, and this pisher gets the honor.

    It’s hard to think of anything that better symbolizes the displacement of the WASP elite by Jews than the naming of a major bridge after a Jewish nobody in the most quintessentially Anglo of all American cities.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    Speaking of the ADL...their twitter feed yesterday of endless tweets attacking American "nazis" was briefly interrupted by a defense of IDF snipers shooting unarmed Palestinians.
    , @Mishra
    Tough call. I always liked that moment in the 1990s when the presidents of all eight Ivy League universities happened to be Jewish at the same time. Since then it's usually been "most" not all of them at once. Doesn't look good to have eight out of eight, I'm thinking.
  67. >Yamamoto was killed in action in Europe at age 26.

    The country Mr. Yamamoto died for now spits on his name.

    Is it worth dying for an ungrateful fatherland?

  68. Wait until someone figures out that PAUSD has an elementary school named Nixon.

    That sounds so Republican!

    If anywhere around there deserves a school with a Japanese name, it would be somewhere in East Palo Alto.

    Although the area got its start as an American Indian cemetery, by the 1940’s it was largely a Japanese farming town.

    Until they got ethnically cleansed and replaced by African Americans.

    Until the African Americans got ethnically cleansed and replaced by Hispanics and Pacific islanders.

    Who will soon, no doubt, be replaced by someone else once the gentrification and terraforming is complete.

    Thinking about it though, another infamous PAUSD school, Gunn High, suicide school champion of the US, is probably due for a name change in this era of gunn control and guilt by homonym.

    Wasn’t it built on orchard land? Maybe Japanese?

    Although, thinking about it further, having a high suicide rate in a school with a Japanese name might be problematic. Not to mention that Chinese students may now make up the largest percentage of students.

    Anyway, so many conversations to be had in Palo Alto!

  69. @PiltdownMan

    They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto, one of six Palo Alto historical figures among eight finalists being considered, could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor bombing during World War II.
     
    It would be a major faux pas to name a school in Palo Alto, the home of Stanford University, after a Yamamoto. Isoroku Yamamoto was a Harvard man.

    You know, I always hear about the all the presidents and wonderful people who went to Harvard. Somebody ought to do a nice list of scoundrels and enemies who went to Harvard. Did any famous Nazis study there?

    • Replies: @wren
    https://www.bostonmagazine.com/2006/05/15/the-harvard-nazi/
    , @European-American
    > Did any famous Nazis study there?

    When Ernst Hanfstaengl, a close aide of Hitler who was the most senior Nazi to have set foot on U.S. soil, attended his 25th reunion at his alma mater on June 16, 1934, his visit reverberated far beyond Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

    ... it was as an unashamed anti-Semite and apologist for Hitler that Hanfstaengl took his place in the Harvard parade in 1934, despite one commentator's warning to the university that to welcome him was to endorse a man "whose fundamental activity consisted in organizing, abetting and defending persecution and violence."

    Hanfstaengl had an enthusiastic champion in the youthful editors of the Harvard Crimson, the student newspaper. Hanfstaengl, it argued, should even be given an honorary degree "as a tribute to the position to which he has risen." Such a view was far from out of character. The Crimson had been strongly criticized by a student group that had held protests against Nazism and Fascism.

    Many of Hanfstaengl's fellow alumni seem to have regarded the affair as a joke, turning his visit into the central theme of the parade. According to contemporary accounts, some participants goose-stepped their way around the stadium in Bavarian peasant costumes. Hanfstaengl was cheered when he gave a Nazi salute to several friends in the crowd.

    The university authorities were also welcoming. James Bryant Conant, Harvard's president, invited Hanfstaengl to tea...

    https://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/30/opinion/meanwhile-when-harvard-played-host-to-hitlers-righthand-man.html
     

    When Putzi played some of the rousing football marches from his Harvard days, he writes, he had Hitler “fairly shouting with enthusiasm. ‘That is it, Hanf-staengl, that is what we need for the movement, marvelous,’ and he pranced up and down the room like a drum majorette.” Putzi wrote more marches for the führer, including one that took the cheer “Harvard! Harvard! Harvard! Rah! Rah! Rah!” and turned it into the infamous “Sieg Heil! Sieg Heil!”

    https://www.bostonmagazine.com/2006/05/15/the-harvard-nazi/

     

  70. How about Ms. Sakamato Middle School? Named after the Japanese chick from the She Blinded Me With Science video! She was pretty hot.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    You mean the lady with a body like a cello? I do remember - "My goodness, Miss Sakamoto, you're beautiful!".

    SCIENCE!
  71. So, now we have Name-ism.

    Certain names are one. One bad Yamamoto sullies all Yamamotos. LOL.

    It’s like one bad tomato means all tomatoes are bad.

    If they want to name after a Chinese-American named Lee, forget about it. It’s too much like Robert E. Lee the ‘racist’.

  72. We must stop GAY pride parades in SF.

    It triggers Japanese with memories of Enola GAY.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @JimB

    We must stop GAY pride parades in SF.
     
    Another good reason to end them: not too many gays show up for them anymore. Conditions on the street are atrocious, with public puking and pissing everywhere. Mostly the crowds are composed of shitfaced college students, gang bangers from the East Bay, tourist gawkers, and middle-aged exhibitionists.
  73. Don’t name anything after Harvey Milk.

    It triggers the Lactose Intolerant.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It triggers the Lactose Intolerant.
     
    Well what happens, do they start lactating?

    .
    .

    Don't name anything after pro-wrastler Dusty Rhodes.

    It triggers the hyper-allergenic.

    .
    .

    OK, I"m just a piker, unit-425, but this is a great joke format. I'm gonna sleep on this.
  74. @sayless
    "The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor."

    Agree.

    I propose calling the school Nanking Memorial. That'll diversify our strength.

    Diversify our strength!

    Brilliant!

    I’m surprised that the Korean Americans haven’t joined this important conversation on school names yet.

    Perhaps we can have a Japanese named school with a Korean comfort woman statue as the mascot and the school fight song in Chinese (à la Sun Tzu).

    Something like this might provide for a good separation of powers type arrangement.

    Korean statues in the US provide a glimpse of the same issues.

    https://nyti.ms/2i7Q7n0

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Virginia vote on Sea of Japan hands victory to Koreans"

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-korea-japan-virginia/virginia-vote-on-sea-of-japan-hands-victory-to-koreans-idUSBREA150SB20140206

    Two of America’s closest Asian allies played out their historic rivalry in the U.S. state of Virginia on Thursday, with South Korea celebrating victory after state lawmakers approved legislation requiring that the Korean name for the Sea of Japan be included in new school textbooks.

    Virginia’s House of Delegates voted 81-15 to approve the two-line bill, which requires “that all text books approved by the Broad of Education ... when referring to the Sea of Japan, shall note that it is also called the East Sea.”
     
  75. @AndrewR
    It's hard to think of anything that better symbolizes the displacement of the WASP elite by Jews than the naming of a major bridge after a Jewish nobody in the most quintessentially Anglo of all American cities.

    Speaking of the ADL…their twitter feed yesterday of endless tweets attacking American “nazis” was briefly interrupted by a defense of IDF snipers shooting unarmed Palestinians.

  76. Clearly we have reached the point of needing to name every public school in the USA after:

    Alfred E Neuman.

    Seriously.

    Or failing that, Rufus T. Firefly.

    Again, seriously.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Hey, I don't want my name, or any of my cousin's on the front of this or any other government indoctrination camp, thank you very much.
  77. @for-the-record

    Yamamoto (山本 meaning "base of the mountain") is one of the most common Japanese surnames. Notable people with the surname include:

    Azusa Yamamoto (山本 梓), gravure idol and actress
    Donald Yamamoto (ドナルド・ヤマモト), American Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, for African Affairs
    Fujiko Yamamoto (山本 富士子) film actress
    Gonnohyōe Yamamoto (山本 権兵衛), the 16th Prime Minister of Japan
    Hideo Yamamoto (山本 英夫), manga artist
    Hiro Yamamoto (ヒロ・ヤマモト), bassist
    Hiroshi Yamamoto (archer) (山本 博), archer, Olympic silver medalist
    Hiroto Yamamoto (山本 啓人, born 1988), Japanese footballer
    Hisashi Yamamoto (山本 尚), Professor of Chemistry, The University of Chicago
    Hisaye Yamamoto (ヒサエ・ヤマモト) (1921–2011), Japanese American author
    Hōzan Yamamoto (山本 邦山), shakuhachi player, composer and lecturer
    Ichita Yamamoto (山本 一太), politician
    Isoroku Yamamoto (山本 五十六), World War II Admiral
    Issei Yamamoto (山本 一清), astronomer
    Kailer Yamamoto (カイラー・ヤマモト), American ice hockey player
    Kaito Yamamoto (山本 海人, born 1985), Japanese footballer
    Kajirō Yamamoto (山本 嘉次郎), film director
    Kanichi Yamamoto (山本 寛一), the first Japanese Bahá'í
    Kansai Yamamoto (山本 寛斎), noted fashion designer
    Yamamoto Kansuke (山本 勘助), general
    Kenichi Yamamoto (engineer) (山本 健一), mechanical engineer and business executive
    Kenichi Yamamoto (yakuza) (山本 健一),Yakuza
    Kenji Yamamoto (山本 健誌), video game music composer
    Koichi Yamamoto (山本 公一), politician
    Kotetsu Yamamoto (山本 小鉄), wrestler
    Koji Yamamoto (actor) (山本 耕史), actor
    Koji Yamamoto (baseball) (山本 浩二), baseball player
    Linda Yamamoto (山本 リンダ), pop star
    Maria Yamamoto (山本 麻里安), voice actress
    Mariko Yamamoto (山本 万里子), cricketer
    Masahiro Yamamoto (baseball) (山本真弘), baseball player
    Masahiro Yamamoto (kickboxer) (山本真弘), kickboxer
    Masakuni Yamamoto (山本 昌邦), football coach
    Masao Yamamoto (山本 昌男), photographer
    Masayoshi Yamamoto (山本 雅賢), Japanese artistic gymnast
    Masashi Yamamoto (山本 政志), film director
    Mayumi Yamamoto (disambiguation), multiple people
    Mirai Yamamoto (山本 未來), actress
    Mona Yamamoto (山本 モナ),announcer
    Norifumi "Kid" Yamamoto (山本 徳郁), mixed martial arts fighter
    Ryohei Yamamoto (山本 領平), R&B singer
    Sakon Yamamoto (山本 左近), race car driver
    Saori Yamamoto (山本 早織), bikini idol
    Satoshi Yamamoto (山本 サトシ), illustrator of Pokémon Adventures starting in volume 10
    Sayaka Yamamoto (山本 彩), idol, actress, model
    Sayo Yamamoto (山本 沙代, born 1977), Japanese anime director
    Seiichi Yamamoto (山本 精一), musician; member of seminal Osaka-based noise/krautrock band Boredoms
    Shizuka Yamamoto (山本 静香), badminton player
    Shinya Yamamoto (山本 晋也), film director
    Shin'ya Yamamoto (山本 真也, born 1971), Japanese shogi player
    Shūgorō Yamamoto (山本 周五郎), novelist
    Takahiro Yamamoto (山本 隆弘), volleyball player
    Takashi Yamamoto (swimmer) (山本 貴司), swimmer at the 2004 Summer Olympics
    Taro Yamamoto (山本 太郎), actor
    Taro Yamamoto (artist) (1919–1994), American artist
    Tatsuo Yamamoto (山本 達雄), politician
    Toshikatsu Yamamoto (山元 敏勝, born 1929), Japanese physician
    Tsunetomo Yamamoto (山本 常朝), author of the Hagakure
    Yohji Yamamoto (山本 耀司), fashion designer
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (scientist) (born 1950),
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (wrestler) (born 1970),
    Yuriko Yamamoto (山本 百合子), voice actor
    Yusuke Yamamoto (山本 裕典), actor and fashion model
    Yutaka Yamamoto (山本 寛), animation director
    Yamamoto Hosui, a Prewar period painter

    Fictional characters
    Yamamoto (Spriggan), head of ARCAM's Japanese branch in Spriggan
    Shigekuni Yamamoto-Genryūsai, the General (sotaicho) and 1st Division Captain (ichibantai-taicho) in the Bleach manga and anime
    Aki Yamamoto from the anime Colorful
    Lt. Commander Yamamoto, the first officer in the anime series, The Irresponsible Captain Tylor
    Kazuhiko Yamamoto, a student in Battle Royale
    Takeshi Yamamoto, a swordsman and a Vongola Guardian from the anime Reborn!
    Yamamoto Yoko from the anime Starship Girl Yamamoto Yohko
    Julie Yamamoto from Ben 10: Alien Force
    Yamamoto Yueniang of The Little Nyonya
    Megumi Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Jun Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Naoki Yamamoto, a character from Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isoroku_Yamamoto#Family_background

    Yamamoto was born Isoroku Takano (高野 五十六 Takano Isoroku) in Nagaoka, Niigata. His father was Sadayoshi Takano (高野 貞吉), an intermediate-rank samurai of the Nagaoka Domain. “Isoroku” is an old Japanese term meaning “56”; the name referred to his father’s age at Isoroku’s birth.[4]

    In 1916, Isoroku was adopted into the Yamamoto family (another family of former Nagaoka samurai) and took the Yamamoto name. It was a common practice for samurai families lacking sons to adopt suitable young men in this fashion to carry on the family name, the rank and the income that comes with it.

  78. added parent Fan Yung.
    Heh.
    But yeah it’s a pretty normal thing in other cultures for surnames to not be distinctive. Other societies were usually flatter and relied more on place-names or the over-extension of formerly noble names when surnames became unavoidable. One of the most important but under-discussed aspects of the Anglosphere was the aberrant intelligence, literacy, discipline, felt-enfranchisement, and autonomy of non-noble uneducated working class losers, who in Asia would truly have been nothing, but in English history were the real engine of revolution and civilization; their distinctive naming, drawing more on occupation or ither bases, is actually a big deal. Our Founding Fathers were truly great and unique, but they had a nation of Founding Sergeants under them, and if you grabbed any brilliant Enlightenment philosopher you wanted and made him try the America thing with some Andean indios filling in for Paul Revere and Andrew Jackson, they’d end up like Bolivar. So that thing where the peasants took the name of the local lord (really of the fief) is largely preferred to giving every single little peasant a distinct name, with the result that totally unrelated people have the same last names. I strongly suspect that the early post-IX/XI policy of preventing boarding based on names had to have been deliberate anti-Muslim bigotry — Islamic names are often pretty arbitrarily chosen (to represent Islamic qualities like devotion to god or resistance to tyranny) out of a set canon, and of course there is heavy overrepresentation of names in honor of saints. In Russian circles there will be so many Michaels that one will be Misha, one will be Fat Mike, one will be Tall Michael, etc..
    I am totally in favor of recognizing nonwhite achievement and definitely so in the case of the 442nd; maybe the solution is to unironically embrace a distinctive nickname, with the full name as an explanatory parenthetical?

  79. @Joe Stalin
    Just for fun, they could name the school for, I don't know, Doolittle's Raiders. After all, his bombing mission resulted in a quarter-million dead Chinese.

    ---
    At midday on April 18, 1942, 16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor. For the 80 volunteer raiders, who lifted off that morning from the carrier Hornet, the mission was one-way. After attacking Japan, most of the aircrews flew on to Free China, where low on fuel, the men either bailed out or crash-landed along the coast and were rescued by local villagers, guerrillas and missionaries.

    That generosity shown by the Chinese would trigger a horrific retaliation by the Japanese that claimed an estimated quarter-million lives and would prompt comparisons to the 1937-38 Rape of Nanking. American military authorities, cognizant that a raid on Tokyo would result in a vicious counterattack upon free China, saw the mission through regardless, even keeping the operation a secret from their Pacific theater allies. This chapter of the Doolittle Raid has largely gone unreported—until now.

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/untold-story-vengeful-japanese-attack-doolittle-raid-180955001/

    This is similar to the Vaasgo raid, which was probably completely unnecessary and resulted in the punitive execution of Norwegians (as well as an angry reaction from the Norwegian government in exile).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The assassination of Heydrich also led to bloody reprisals against innocent Czech civilians.
  80. @European-American
    Thanks for the laugh, Steve.

    Yamamoto School would have been badass, but Fletcher is a lovely name for a school... Though come to think of it, it sounds rather disturbingly... English and aggressive (it means "maker of arrows"). Perhaps naming schools in the form "P.S. 42" like in New York is an even better solution?


    There is no record of any objections to the city’s numbering system. In fact, some New Yorkers became uncommonly attached to the digits.

    ...

    In 1916, when the city decided to give all its schools names alongside their numbers, The New York Times was not pleased.

    “The Board of Education is now contributing to enlightenment by slapping new names on the public schools,” an editorial said.

    “It forgets, in its zeal for innovation, the love which thousands of men and women in this city, thousands scattered over the country, feel for ‘Old Public School, Number’ So and So.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/education/08numbers.html
     

    So numbers are nice...Though to be honest I do find them... Well they're a little cold and male and rational... Let's work on this...

    Soon we will reach the Omega Point, where everything cancels everything out.

    Out of the void, through a series of regrettable incidents, and back to the void!

    I often think of this story by Margaret Atwood, which I forget where I first saw:


    There Was Once by Margaret Atwood

    "There was once a poor girl, as beautiful as she was good, who lived with her wicked stepmother in a house in the forest."

    "Forest? Forest is passé, I mean, I've had it with all this wilderness stuff. It's not a right image of our society, today. Let's have some urban for a change."

    "There was once a poor girl, as beautiful as she was good, who lived with her wicked stepmother in a house in the suburbs."

    "That's better. But I have to seriously query this word poor."

    "But she was poor!"

    "Poor is relative. She lived in a house, didn't she?"

    "Yes."

    "Then socio-economically speaking, she was not poor."


    [The story goes on to detail how all possibly questionable details are gradually taken out, and ends as follows:]


    "There was once-"

    "What's this was, once? Enough of the dead past. Tell me about now."

    "There-"

    "So?"

    "So, what?"

    "So, why not here?"

    ***

    http://ouallinator.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/There-Was-Once.pdf
     

    Margaret Atwood, despite Handmaid's Tale, is apparently not impeccably PC:
    https://www.vox.com/culture/2018/1/17/16897404/margaret-atwood-metoo-backlash-steven-galloway-ubc-accountable

    “So you have undoubtedly inferred,” Pethel said, “that there is a good deal involved in what we are attempting, here. The leader
    has his eye on you; that’s clear. As a matter of fact, he has communicated to myself regarding you.” He opened his bulging briefcase and rummaged

    “Lost the goddamn thing. Anyhow –” He glanced at Tso-pin, who nodded slightly. “His Greatness would like to have you appear for dinner at the Yangtze River Ranch next Thursday night. Mrs. Fletcher in particular appreciates –”

    Chien said, ” ‘Mrs. Fletcher’? Who is ‘Mrs. Fletcher’?”

    After a pause Tso-pin said dryly, “The Absolute Benefactor’s wife. His name — which you of course had never heard — is Thomas Fletcher.”

    “He’s a Caucasian,” Pethel explained. “Originally from the New Zealand Communist Party; he participated in the difficult takeover there. This news is not in the strict sense secret, but on the other hand it hasn’t been noised about.” He hesitated, toying with his watch chain. “Probably it would be better if you forgot about that. Of course, as soon as you meet him, see him face to face, you’ll realize that, realize that he’s a Cauc. As I am. As many of us are.”

    “Race,” Tso-pin pointed out, “has nothing to do with loyalty to the leader and the Party. As witness Mr. Pethel, here.”

    But His Greatness, Chien thought, jolted. He did not appear, on the TV screen, to be Occidental.
    “On TV –” he began.

    “The image,” Tso-pin interrupted, “is subjected to a variegated assortment of skillful refinements. For ideological purposes. Most persons holding higher offices are aware of this.” He eyed Chien with hard criticism. So everyone agrees, Chien thought. What we see every night is not real. The question is, How unreal? Partially? Or — completely?

    Philip K. Dick – Faith of Our Fathers
    https://genius.com/Philip-k-dick-faith-of-our-fathers-annotated

    • Replies: @European-American
    Very nice!
  81. @Almost Missouri

    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one"
     
    Isoroku Yamamoto was the best known of Japans' WWII commanders, but I know no American--even of the WWII generation--who knows his name who also holds it in contempt. On the contrary, Americans who know of him also regard him with a certain reverence: one of Japan's great leaders who knew he was fighting a lost cause but did so with honor, skill and courage nevertheless. Commenter Diversity Heretic made a similar point about Erwin Rommel.

    For myself, I would approve naming an American establishment after Isoroku Yamamoto. It would go with the American (and larger Western) tradition of remembering and honoring those who fought against you, provided they did so with honor, bravery, duty and ability, even though they ultimately lost: Geronimo, Rommel, Hannibal, etc. Robert E. Lee and the other great Confederates should also be in that list, the statuary rape crowd notwithstanding.

    This acknowledgement of the honorable foe is an acknowledgment of our larger selves: that we can see and remember your virtue apart from the petty details of whom you struggled for and whether you won or lost. This used not to be unusual in America and the West in general. Alas, that America is submerged daily deeper into the permanent vindictiveness and vituperation of The Current Year.

    Instead we now have the Permanent War against Emmanuel Goldstein. Has the culture of critique run completely rampant?

    Good comment! The concept of an honorable enemy is one that a civilized people should cultivate. In World War I, the British in Kenya admired German General Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck of German East Africa (today Tanzania). British prisoners asked to be permitted to shake his hand.

  82. @Sunbeam
    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. "

    Bad? Yamamoto was a famous WWII figure, but as far as I knew he was never associated with things like the Rape of Nanking, the Bataan Death March, or that whacked out Japanese science unit in China (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731).

    From wikipedia which I assume is correct in this case:

    "Yamamoto was part of the Japanese Navy establishment, who were rivals of the more aggressive army establishment, especially the officers of the Kwantung Army. As such, he promoted a policy of a strong fleet to project force through gunboat diplomacy, rather than a fleet used primarily for transport of invasion land forces, as some of his political opponents in the army wanted.[6] This stance led him to oppose the invasion of China. He also opposed war against the United States partly because of his studies at Harvard University (1919–1921) and his two postings as a naval attaché in Washington, D.C., where he learned to speak fluent English. Yamamoto traveled extensively in the United States during his tour of duty there, where he studied American customs and business practices."

    "Yamamoto opposed the invasion of Manchuria in 1931, the subsequent land war with China (1937), and the 1940 Tripartite Pact with Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. As Deputy Navy Minister, he apologized to United States Ambassador Joseph C. Grew for the bombing of the gunboat USS Panay in December 1937. These issues made him a target of assassination threats by pro-war militarists.

    Throughout 1938, many young army and naval officers began to speak publicly against Yamamoto and certain other Japanese admirals such as Mitsumasa Yonai and Shigeyoshi Inoue for their strong opposition to a tripartite pact with Nazi Germany as they saw it as inimical to "Japan's natural interests."[8]:101 Yamamoto received a steady stream of hate mail and death threats from Japanese nationalists. His reaction to the prospect of death by assassination was passive and accepting. The admiral wrote: To die for Emperor and Nation is the highest hope of a military man. After a brave hard fight the blossoms are scattered on the fighting field. But if a person wants to take a life instead, still the fighting man will go to eternity for Emperor and country. One man's life or death is a matter of no importance. All that matters is the Empire. As Confucius said, "They may crush cinnabar, yet they do not take away its color; one may burn a fragrant herb, yet it will not destroy the scent." They may destroy my body, yet they will not take away my will.[8]:101–02

    The Japanese Army, annoyed at Yamamoto's unflinching opposition to a Rome-Berlin-Tokyo treaty, dispatched military police to "guard" Yamamoto, a ruse by the army to keep an eye on him.[8]:102-103 He was later reassigned from the naval ministry to sea as the commander-in-chief of the Combined Fleet on August 30, 1939. This was done as one of the last acts of the then-acting Navy Minister Mitsumasa Yonai, under Baron Hiranuma's short-lived administration. It was done partly to make it harder for assassins to target Yamamoto. Yonai was certain that if Yamamoto remained ashore, he would be killed before the year [1939] ended.[8]:103"

    Call it what it is. Chinese ethnic hatred of the Japanese. With a stupid pretext. Literally the whole thing is a stretch.

    As for Pearl Harbor... put yourself in his shoes. You have a war you didn't want, but still have to prosecute. WTF was he supposed to do? Pulling that off depended on either US laxness or Roosevelt wanting to pull the US into the war (if you roll that way). But it worked.

    They really didn't have too many options if war was the only choice. We'll never know now if Yamamoto thought it was a mistake (tactically and strategically versus any other option) in the years after.

    You are trying to use facts and logic, both of which have been expelled in the name of PC sacred cows.

  83. @PiltdownMan

    They’re worried that Fred Yamamoto, one of six Palo Alto historical figures among eight finalists being considered, could be confused with Isoroku Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor bombing during World War II.
     
    It would be a major faux pas to name a school in Palo Alto, the home of Stanford University, after a Yamamoto. Isoroku Yamamoto was a Harvard man.

    Indeed:

    “… a special student at Harvard …

    Classmates would have remembered Yamamoto well: a hard worker but not a grind, exceptionally curious and imaginative,” Morris writes. “When they introduced him to the game of poker, he became a fanatical poker player who would stay up all night, winning hand after hand. And what did he do with his poker winnings–lead the good life? No, not at all: he hitchhiked around the country during the summer, exploring America.”

    The shame of the Joint Chiefs was their lack of imagination in trying to figure out their opponent. They thought of him as a traditional Japanese who would do everything ‘by the book’ (just as they did). They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    https://harvardmagazine.com/2010/07/lessons-in-surprise

    Or perhaps only barely a Harvard student:

    In 1919, Yamamoto Isoroku, who later planned the attack on Pearl Harbor, came to Harvard to study English. He received only a C+ in the course but spent his free time to advantage by hitchhiking to Texas, where, by some accounts, he gathered information on America’s oil industry.

    https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2004/02/history-of-the-japanese-at-harvard/

    In fact he was a drop-out!

    [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: We say that Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto studied at Harvard for four years. However, according to the registrar, records show that Yamamoto withdrew shortly after the start of his first semester in 1920 and did not return.]

    https://www.npr.org/2016/12/07/504651757/the-legacy-of-the-man-who-planned-the-pearl-harbor-attack

    • Replies: @Mishra

    "They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”
     
    ::sigh::
  84. @the one they call Desanex
    In some parts of the USA (Alabama, for instance), pro-wrestling heel Tojo Yamamoto is the most famous Yamamoto of all.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tojo_Yamamoto
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jLKO310O5A

    Tojo Yamamoto. That’s a blast from the distant past. Growing up in NE Arkansas in the early 70’s we used to watch Mid-South wrestling Saturday mornings on the Memphis stations. Jackie Fargo, Tojo Yamamoto, others I can’t remember. Jerry Lawler was just getting started as a young heel, getting his ass kicked by Jackie & Tojo. Later on wrestling got all roided up and lost alot of its regional flavor. But it ruled in the Memphis area back in the day.

  85. @stillCARealist
    You know, I always hear about the all the presidents and wonderful people who went to Harvard. Somebody ought to do a nice list of scoundrels and enemies who went to Harvard. Did any famous Nazis study there?
  86. @AndrewR
    Japanese-Americans aren't really much of a cohesive force. Unlike many other ethnic groups - specifically, the Chinese - there hasn't been significant Japanese immigration to the US since the 1924 immigration act. Sure, there are purebred JapAms like George Takei, but they're mostly elderly. Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.

    Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.

    Really? Mixed with Chinese? Interesting.

    For what it’s worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Americans

    Searching for “half” I got 4 out of 400, 3 with a Taiwanese parent:

    Louis Ozawa Changchien, actor, Taiwanese father
    James Hiroyuki Liao, actor, Taiwanese father
    Kevin Nishimura, musician, Chinese American mother
    Kobe Tai, porn star, Taiwanese mother, Japanese soldier father, adopted by Americans as an infant
    Yuna Ito, pop star, Korean mother

    Vaguely related, some interesting photos here:

    After Pearl Harbor perceptions of China and Chinese Americans were suddenly transformed
    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/chinese-americans-during-ww2-1941/

    • Replies: @anonymous

    For what it’s worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?
     
    A large percentage of people on that list are quite old. Many don't even have Japanese surnames. Of the younger ones with Japanese surnames, many are only half Japanese. Interestingly, I'm seeing a lot of surnames that are relatively rare in mainland Japan, but are more common in Okinawa.
    , @J.Ross
    Perceptions of China transformed by the war would be news to Pearl Buck and a host of writers, artists and intellectuals who had been worshipping the Chinese people for at least a decade prior. 1932's Shanghai Express was a hit partly because people were following news about the civil war. Have you see the army pamphlet on how to tell East Asians apart? Inevitably there's a bit about toes. I once thought I had yellow fever, but online it always descends to foot stuff, which I never understood.
    http://www.ep.tc/howtospotajap/
  87. @anon
    And, like a pack of hyenas, the coalition of the fringes squabbles over the carcass of formerly white America.

    Precisely.

    Look again at the study of class in America from 1957. Not one person in that film, nor indeed among those who wrote and filmed it, could have ever imagined how low we would have sunk in but sixty years.

    But we didn’t fight, so who is to say that we don’t deserve the annihilation which is now no mere threat on the horizon, but a blazing sun of hate directly over our heads and beating down with withering force.

    The saddest of all is that those who are about to replace us are not worthy to lick out boots.

    What they inherit they will not sustain.

    • Replies: @Mishra

    But we didn’t fight, so who is to say that we don’t deserve the annihilation...
     
    "We" didn't fight because, thanks to pervasive mass-media indoctrination, it became social suicide even to consider fighting. And what little the indoctrination failed to accomplish, the rest of the 'Institutions' mopped up with a vengeance.

    It's not your fault, and it's not mine, but that's not saying it's no one's fault. And it wasn't a mistake--it was never a mistake. Every step has been deliberate and calculated. We're not in this fix by accident.

    I'm not a fan of blaming the victim.

  88. @MEH 0910


    "So you have undoubtedly inferred," Pethel said, "that there is a good deal involved in what we are attempting, here. The leader
    has his eye on you; that's clear. As a matter of fact, he has communicated to myself regarding you." He opened his bulging briefcase and rummaged

    "Lost the goddamn thing. Anyhow --" He glanced at Tso-pin, who nodded slightly. "His Greatness would like to have you appear for dinner at the Yangtze River Ranch next Thursday night. Mrs. Fletcher in particular appreciates --"

    Chien said, " 'Mrs. Fletcher'? Who is 'Mrs. Fletcher'?"

    After a pause Tso-pin said dryly, "The Absolute Benefactor's wife. His name -- which you of course had never heard -- is Thomas Fletcher."

    "He's a Caucasian," Pethel explained. "Originally from the New Zealand Communist Party; he participated in the difficult takeover there. This news is not in the strict sense secret, but on the other hand it hasn't been noised about." He hesitated, toying with his watch chain. "Probably it would be better if you forgot about that. Of course, as soon as you meet him, see him face to face, you'll realize that, realize that he's a Cauc. As I am. As many of us are."

    "Race," Tso-pin pointed out, "has nothing to do with loyalty to the leader and the Party. As witness Mr. Pethel, here."

    But His Greatness, Chien thought, jolted. He did not appear, on the TV screen, to be Occidental.
    "On TV --" he began.

    "The image," Tso-pin interrupted, "is subjected to a variegated assortment of skillful refinements. For ideological purposes. Most persons holding higher offices are aware of this." He eyed Chien with hard criticism. So everyone agrees, Chien thought. What we see every night is not real. The question is, How unreal? Partially? Or -- completely?
     
    Philip K. Dick - Faith of Our Fathers
    https://genius.com/Philip-k-dick-faith-of-our-fathers-annotated

    Very nice!

  89. @Anon
    Morons all around.


    Idiot Yamamoto attacks much more powerful US even though he knew it would be a disaster.

    Moron Fred Yamamoto pledges to fight for a nation that dispossessed his family and threw them into a camp. Suppose Americans live in Mexico and there is war between US and Mexico. Suppose Mexican government puts all Americans in Mexico into internment camps. What Americans would volunteer to fight for the Mexican government?

    Still, Fred Yamamoto fought against the Axis(including Japan) that was invading China.

    But now Chinese in America demean him because his name happens to be the same as the infamous Admiral.

    And then moron whites attack the chinese as 'racist' even though they are the ones who fanned the flames of PC hysteria all around to the point of lunacy. Also, even their decision to honor Fred Yamamoto was part of a plan to bait 'white guilt'.

    They all stumble over each other, and the Jewish lady crosses the finish line.

    What Americans would volunteer to fight for the Mexican government?

    Fred Reed?

  90. @Anon7
    I’m pretty sure I’ve read about this kind of activity before...

    Got it:

    “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.

    George Orwell, 1984

     

    Orwell was the great prophet of our time.

    The Left used to claim him, but no longer: he hits too close to home; they see themselves mirrored, uncomfortably, guiltily, in his stark dystopic vision.

    The other great prophet, less visionary, but surer as to where the moorings had slipped, Evelyn Waugh, saw in Orwell a fellow alarm-raiser and, like himself, only misleadingly to be confined in the old dichotomies of Left and Right.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes, Mishra
  91. @SolontoCroesus
    You tell us.

    Here's what Max Nordau, the brain behind Herzl's, uh, passion, had to say in his opus, Degeneration:

    Evidently the German audiences entertain no misgivings concerning the actions and attitudes of Wagnerian personages; they seem to have no suspicion of the emotions by which they are excited, and what intentions their words, gestures and acts denote; and this explains the peaceful artlessness with which these audiences follow theatrical scenes during which, among a less childlike public, no one would dare lift his eyes to his neighbour or endure his glance.
    With Wagner amorous excitement assumes the form of mad delirium. The lovers in his pieces behave like tom-cats gone mad, rolling in contortions and convulsions over a root of valerian. They reflect a state of mind in the poet which is well known to the professional expert. It is a form of Sadism. It is the love of those degenerates who, in sexual transport, become like wild beasts. Wagner suffered from ‘erotic madness,’ which leads coarse natures to murder for lust, and inspires ‘higher degenerates’ with works like Die Walküre, Siegfried, and Tristan und Isolde.
     

    The eternal Jew, who derides and demeans what he can neither understand nor, least of all, emulate.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    While he is constitutionally unable to emulate, he understands all too well and it fuels his hatred.
  92. Online education, like online shopping, is an idea whose time has come. Diversity has made public spaces in the US needlessly dangerous, not to mention filthy and unpleasant. Even upscale shopping districts in places like CA and NYC now look like Middle East refugee centers and Mexican flea markets. With a widescreen TV, a small group of families can organize a communal classroom for the social benefit of their kids if they like. Time to end the great forced omnium gatherum of public education.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Time to end the great forced omnium gatherum of public education.
     
    AGREED!
  93. @stillCARealist
    You know, I always hear about the all the presidents and wonderful people who went to Harvard. Somebody ought to do a nice list of scoundrels and enemies who went to Harvard. Did any famous Nazis study there?

    > Did any famous Nazis study there?

    When Ernst Hanfstaengl, a close aide of Hitler who was the most senior Nazi to have set foot on U.S. soil, attended his 25th reunion at his alma mater on June 16, 1934, his visit reverberated far beyond Cambridge, Massachusetts. …

    … it was as an unashamed anti-Semite and apologist for Hitler that Hanfstaengl took his place in the Harvard parade in 1934, despite one commentator’s warning to the university that to welcome him was to endorse a man “whose fundamental activity consisted in organizing, abetting and defending persecution and violence.”

    Hanfstaengl had an enthusiastic champion in the youthful editors of the Harvard Crimson, the student newspaper. Hanfstaengl, it argued, should even be given an honorary degree “as a tribute to the position to which he has risen.” Such a view was far from out of character. The Crimson had been strongly criticized by a student group that had held protests against Nazism and Fascism.

    Many of Hanfstaengl’s fellow alumni seem to have regarded the affair as a joke, turning his visit into the central theme of the parade. According to contemporary accounts, some participants goose-stepped their way around the stadium in Bavarian peasant costumes. Hanfstaengl was cheered when he gave a Nazi salute to several friends in the crowd.

    The university authorities were also welcoming. James Bryant Conant, Harvard’s president, invited Hanfstaengl to tea…

    https://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/30/opinion/meanwhile-when-harvard-played-host-to-hitlers-righthand-man.html

    When Putzi played some of the rousing football marches from his Harvard days, he writes, he had Hitler “fairly shouting with enthusiasm. ‘That is it, Hanf-staengl, that is what we need for the movement, marvelous,’ and he pranced up and down the room like a drum majorette.” Putzi wrote more marches for the führer, including one that took the cheer “Harvard! Harvard! Harvard! Rah! Rah! Rah!” and turned it into the infamous “Sieg Heil! Sieg Heil!”

    https://www.bostonmagazine.com/2006/05/15/the-harvard-nazi/

  94. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @wren
    Diversify our strength!

    Brilliant!

    I'm surprised that the Korean Americans haven't joined this important conversation on school names yet.

    Perhaps we can have a Japanese named school with a Korean comfort woman statue as the mascot and the school fight song in Chinese (à la Sun Tzu).

    Something like this might provide for a good separation of powers type arrangement.

    Korean statues in the US provide a glimpse of the same issues.

    https://nyti.ms/2i7Q7n0

    “Virginia vote on Sea of Japan hands victory to Koreans”

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-korea-japan-virginia/virginia-vote-on-sea-of-japan-hands-victory-to-koreans-idUSBREA150SB20140206

    Two of America’s closest Asian allies played out their historic rivalry in the U.S. state of Virginia on Thursday, with South Korea celebrating victory after state lawmakers approved legislation requiring that the Korean name for the Sea of Japan be included in new school textbooks.

    Virginia’s House of Delegates voted 81-15 to approve the two-line bill, which requires “that all text books approved by the Broad of Education … when referring to the Sea of Japan, shall note that it is also called the East Sea.”

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    Huh. It does in fact say "the Broad of Education". Freudian from Reuters Gary Robertson.
  95. @LKM
    I really thought the Chinese were better than this.

    Newsflash: They aren’t.

  96. @The Man From K Street
    Keri Wagner? What right does she have to speak publicly on this issue? Isn't she aware she has the same last name as a composer who was a close personal friend of Hitler's, and the infamous head of the SS Musical Corps? Just her opening her yap and identifying herself is triggering enough.

    Okay, so I just checked, and Richard Wagner actually died about five years before Hitler was born. But STILL--even being reminded of his music in any way has got to be offensive to many students.

  97. @sayless
    "The silly part is the Chinese bringing up Pearl Harbor."

    Agree.

    I propose calling the school Nanking Memorial. That'll diversify our strength.

    How about renaming the Terman Middle School “The Free School for Children of Cheapskate Immigrant Parents Owning Multi-million Dollar Homes Who Can’t Be Bothered Paying Tuition for the Harker School?”

    • Replies: @wren
    The Harker School! Haha! $30,000 for kindergarten and $45,000 for high school.

    An acquaintance used to teach there, but got stressed out.

    Not by the students, but by the tiger moms.

    And they all sounded like tiger moms.
    , @wren
    The Harker School deserves an iSteve post by itself.

    The school represents the future elite of California, if not the US since they come from Silicon Valley money or wannabe Silicon Valley money.


    Student Diversity

    Asian
    69.1%

    White
    28.3%

    Hispanic
    1.7%

    African American
    0.8%

    Native American
    0.1%

    Multiracial
    0%

    Pacific Islander
    0%
     

    https://www.niche.com/k12/the-harker-school-san-jose-ca/students/

    Interesting that they don't even pretend diversity is their strength.

  98. @Anon
    We must stop GAY pride parades in SF.

    It triggers Japanese with memories of Enola GAY.

    We must stop GAY pride parades in SF.

    Another good reason to end them: not too many gays show up for them anymore. Conditions on the street are atrocious, with public puking and pissing everywhere. Mostly the crowds are composed of shitfaced college students, gang bangers from the East Bay, tourist gawkers, and middle-aged exhibitionists.

  99. @Sunbeam
    "The most famous Yamamoto is the bad one and it would initially naturally grate. "

    Bad? Yamamoto was a famous WWII figure, but as far as I knew he was never associated with things like the Rape of Nanking, the Bataan Death March, or that whacked out Japanese science unit in China (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731).

    From wikipedia which I assume is correct in this case:

    "Yamamoto was part of the Japanese Navy establishment, who were rivals of the more aggressive army establishment, especially the officers of the Kwantung Army. As such, he promoted a policy of a strong fleet to project force through gunboat diplomacy, rather than a fleet used primarily for transport of invasion land forces, as some of his political opponents in the army wanted.[6] This stance led him to oppose the invasion of China. He also opposed war against the United States partly because of his studies at Harvard University (1919–1921) and his two postings as a naval attaché in Washington, D.C., where he learned to speak fluent English. Yamamoto traveled extensively in the United States during his tour of duty there, where he studied American customs and business practices."

    "Yamamoto opposed the invasion of Manchuria in 1931, the subsequent land war with China (1937), and the 1940 Tripartite Pact with Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. As Deputy Navy Minister, he apologized to United States Ambassador Joseph C. Grew for the bombing of the gunboat USS Panay in December 1937. These issues made him a target of assassination threats by pro-war militarists.

    Throughout 1938, many young army and naval officers began to speak publicly against Yamamoto and certain other Japanese admirals such as Mitsumasa Yonai and Shigeyoshi Inoue for their strong opposition to a tripartite pact with Nazi Germany as they saw it as inimical to "Japan's natural interests."[8]:101 Yamamoto received a steady stream of hate mail and death threats from Japanese nationalists. His reaction to the prospect of death by assassination was passive and accepting. The admiral wrote: To die for Emperor and Nation is the highest hope of a military man. After a brave hard fight the blossoms are scattered on the fighting field. But if a person wants to take a life instead, still the fighting man will go to eternity for Emperor and country. One man's life or death is a matter of no importance. All that matters is the Empire. As Confucius said, "They may crush cinnabar, yet they do not take away its color; one may burn a fragrant herb, yet it will not destroy the scent." They may destroy my body, yet they will not take away my will.[8]:101–02

    The Japanese Army, annoyed at Yamamoto's unflinching opposition to a Rome-Berlin-Tokyo treaty, dispatched military police to "guard" Yamamoto, a ruse by the army to keep an eye on him.[8]:102-103 He was later reassigned from the naval ministry to sea as the commander-in-chief of the Combined Fleet on August 30, 1939. This was done as one of the last acts of the then-acting Navy Minister Mitsumasa Yonai, under Baron Hiranuma's short-lived administration. It was done partly to make it harder for assassins to target Yamamoto. Yonai was certain that if Yamamoto remained ashore, he would be killed before the year [1939] ended.[8]:103"

    Call it what it is. Chinese ethnic hatred of the Japanese. With a stupid pretext. Literally the whole thing is a stretch.

    As for Pearl Harbor... put yourself in his shoes. You have a war you didn't want, but still have to prosecute. WTF was he supposed to do? Pulling that off depended on either US laxness or Roosevelt wanting to pull the US into the war (if you roll that way). But it worked.

    They really didn't have too many options if war was the only choice. We'll never know now if Yamamoto thought it was a mistake (tactically and strategically versus any other option) in the years after.

    Yamamoto said he could “run wild” in the Pacific for 6 months, but had grave doubts beyond that. It was almost exactly 6 months after Pearl Harbor that the US sank 4 Jap carriers at Midway. The outcome of the war was decided that day.

  100. @JimB
    How about renaming the Terman Middle School "The Free School for Children of Cheapskate Immigrant Parents Owning Multi-million Dollar Homes Who Can't Be Bothered Paying Tuition for the Harker School?"

    The Harker School! Haha! $30,000 for kindergarten and $45,000 for high school.

    An acquaintance used to teach there, but got stressed out.

    Not by the students, but by the tiger moms.

    And they all sounded like tiger moms.

  101. @JimB
    How about renaming the Terman Middle School "The Free School for Children of Cheapskate Immigrant Parents Owning Multi-million Dollar Homes Who Can't Be Bothered Paying Tuition for the Harker School?"

    The Harker School deserves an iSteve post by itself.

    The school represents the future elite of California, if not the US since they come from Silicon Valley money or wannabe Silicon Valley money.

    Student Diversity

    Asian
    69.1%

    White
    28.3%

    Hispanic
    1.7%

    African American
    0.8%

    Native American
    0.1%

    Multiracial
    0%

    Pacific Islander
    0%

    https://www.niche.com/k12/the-harker-school-san-jose-ca/students/

    Interesting that they don’t even pretend diversity is their strength.

  102. anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @European-American

    Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.
     
    Really? Mixed with Chinese? Interesting.

    For what it's worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Americans

    Searching for "half" I got 4 out of 400, 3 with a Taiwanese parent:

    Louis Ozawa Changchien, actor, Taiwanese father
    James Hiroyuki Liao, actor, Taiwanese father
    Kevin Nishimura, musician, Chinese American mother
    Kobe Tai, porn star, Taiwanese mother, Japanese soldier father, adopted by Americans as an infant
    Yuna Ito, pop star, Korean mother

    Vaguely related, some interesting photos here:


    After Pearl Harbor perceptions of China and Chinese Americans were suddenly transformed
    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/chinese-americans-during-ww2-1941/
     

    For what it’s worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?

    A large percentage of people on that list are quite old. Many don’t even have Japanese surnames. Of the younger ones with Japanese surnames, many are only half Japanese. Interestingly, I’m seeing a lot of surnames that are relatively rare in mainland Japan, but are more common in Okinawa.

  103. @European-American

    Younger people of Japanese descent usually are of mixed-ethnicity, very often mixed with Chinese.
     
    Really? Mixed with Chinese? Interesting.

    For what it's worth, I see few Chinese names in this list, but maybe the mixes are too young to be famous?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Americans

    Searching for "half" I got 4 out of 400, 3 with a Taiwanese parent:

    Louis Ozawa Changchien, actor, Taiwanese father
    James Hiroyuki Liao, actor, Taiwanese father
    Kevin Nishimura, musician, Chinese American mother
    Kobe Tai, porn star, Taiwanese mother, Japanese soldier father, adopted by Americans as an infant
    Yuna Ito, pop star, Korean mother

    Vaguely related, some interesting photos here:


    After Pearl Harbor perceptions of China and Chinese Americans were suddenly transformed
    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/chinese-americans-during-ww2-1941/
     

    Perceptions of China transformed by the war would be news to Pearl Buck and a host of writers, artists and intellectuals who had been worshipping the Chinese people for at least a decade prior. 1932’s Shanghai Express was a hit partly because people were following news about the civil war. Have you see the army pamphlet on how to tell East Asians apart? Inevitably there’s a bit about toes. I once thought I had yellow fever, but online it always descends to foot stuff, which I never understood.
    http://www.ep.tc/howtospotajap/

  104. Anonymous[311] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    This is similar to the Vaasgo raid, which was probably completely unnecessary and resulted in the punitive execution of Norwegians (as well as an angry reaction from the Norwegian government in exile).

    The assassination of Heydrich also led to bloody reprisals against innocent Czech civilians.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Speaking as an awful deplorable -- yes but the assassination of Heydrich actually made sense. It was at worst an objective of some sort. Heydrich was a unique authority with a bloodied hand in the worst business.
    (Although, speaking as an awful deplorable, his funeral was packed -- and full of non-Germans.)
    Vaasgo was just p---taking for the sake of it, and the Doolittle raid was an angry gesture.
  105. @Malcolm X-Lax
    How about Ms. Sakamato Middle School? Named after the Japanese chick from the She Blinded Me With Science video! She was pretty hot.

    You mean the lady with a body like a cello? I do remember – “My goodness, Miss Sakamoto, you’re beautiful!”.

    SCIENCE!

  106. @theMann
    Clearly we have reached the point of needing to name every public school in the USA after:


    Alfred E Neuman.


    Seriously.


    Or failing that, Rufus T. Firefly.

    Again, seriously.

    Hey, I don’t want my name, or any of my cousin’s on the front of this or any other government indoctrination camp, thank you very much.

  107. @JimB
    Online education, like online shopping, is an idea whose time has come. Diversity has made public spaces in the US needlessly dangerous, not to mention filthy and unpleasant. Even upscale shopping districts in places like CA and NYC now look like Middle East refugee centers and Mexican flea markets. With a widescreen TV, a small group of families can organize a communal classroom for the social benefit of their kids if they like. Time to end the great forced omnium gatherum of public education.

    Time to end the great forced omnium gatherum of public education.

    AGREED!

  108. @Anonymous
    Why not name the school after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther, PnD, MD, Esq.?

    or famed educational theorist Dr. William H. Cosby Jr, Ed.D.

  109. @Anon
    Don't name anything after Harvey Milk.

    It triggers the Lactose Intolerant.

    It triggers the Lactose Intolerant.

    Well what happens, do they start lactating?

    .
    .

    Don’t name anything after pro-wrastler Dusty Rhodes.

    It triggers the hyper-allergenic.

    .
    .

    OK, I”m just a piker, unit-425, but this is a great joke format. I’m gonna sleep on this.

  110. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist
    How about naming it after Margaret Sanger. They won't get the joke.

    That would be a good idea on several levels, not the least of which….

  111. @Old Palo Altan
    The eternal Jew, who derides and demeans what he can neither understand nor, least of all, emulate.

    While he is constitutionally unable to emulate, he understands all too well and it fuels his hatred.

  112. “Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell”

    I think a middle school in Palo Alto should be named LaDoris Cordell Middle School. It’s very unlikely that there has ever been another LaDoris before Ms. Cordell’s mama dreamed up that name, and therefore no bad historical connotation would be found for the name.

  113. @Jake
    The school have been named Tojo Yamamoto Elementary, after the great wrassler.

    Yes, despite hurt feeling, the school have been name Tojo Yamamoto Elementary. Local Chinese may save face by referring to it as “Mr. Moto Elementary”.

  114. @Old Palo Altan
    Precisely.

    Look again at the study of class in America from 1957. Not one person in that film, nor indeed among those who wrote and filmed it, could have ever imagined how low we would have sunk in but sixty years.

    But we didn't fight, so who is to say that we don't deserve the annihilation which is now no mere threat on the horizon, but a blazing sun of hate directly over our heads and beating down with withering force.

    The saddest of all is that those who are about to replace us are not worthy to lick out boots.

    What they inherit they will not sustain.

    But we didn’t fight, so who is to say that we don’t deserve the annihilation…

    “We” didn’t fight because, thanks to pervasive mass-media indoctrination, it became social suicide even to consider fighting. And what little the indoctrination failed to accomplish, the rest of the ‘Institutions’ mopped up with a vengeance.

    It’s not your fault, and it’s not mine, but that’s not saying it’s no one’s fault. And it wasn’t a mistake–it was never a mistake. Every step has been deliberate and calculated. We’re not in this fix by accident.

    I’m not a fan of blaming the victim.

  115. @Steve Sailer
    Lars von Trier likes Wagner, so you know ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kP-vuOy8cU

    Note to everyone: the movie itself, sadly, does not live up to the breathtaking overture..

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    True, but watching the movie helps you understand the overture to Melancholia. And the overture really is something.
  116. @Anonymous
    The assassination of Heydrich also led to bloody reprisals against innocent Czech civilians.

    Speaking as an awful deplorable — yes but the assassination of Heydrich actually made sense. It was at worst an objective of some sort. Heydrich was a unique authority with a bloodied hand in the worst business.
    (Although, speaking as an awful deplorable, his funeral was packed — and full of non-Germans.)
    Vaasgo was just p—taking for the sake of it, and the Doolittle raid was an angry gesture.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    The Doolittle raid was a glorious what-for and provided a tremendous psychological boost to the American public.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    I read the occupation government was too stable and the assassination was hoped to trigger reprisals that would turn the population against the occupation. Standard insurgency 101 stuff.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Take a look at Heydrich's funeral: find the youtube film which shows it from Prague on to Berlin.

    The crowds of Czechs in Prague are impressive, but the actual funeral rite in Berlin, with Hitler and his paladins out in full force, is simply overwhelming in its magnificence, a magnificence born of a self-confidence and elan unknown, indeed incomprehensible to us now.

    Heydrich was not assassinated because he was evil, but because he was all too successful.
  117. @rogue-one
    >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

    >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

    Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .

    • Replies: @rogue-one
    >Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .

    And some dumb white woman at Vox will write an article explaining how it is all because of racism.
    , @Mark P Miller
    "Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot ."

    I generally agree. But it's also obvious our herd needs culling. It's because of the effete whites that we find ourselves in this situation. I'm fine with making them the sacrificial offering to Diversity.
  118. @SolontoCroesus
    You tell us.

    Here's what Max Nordau, the brain behind Herzl's, uh, passion, had to say in his opus, Degeneration:

    Evidently the German audiences entertain no misgivings concerning the actions and attitudes of Wagnerian personages; they seem to have no suspicion of the emotions by which they are excited, and what intentions their words, gestures and acts denote; and this explains the peaceful artlessness with which these audiences follow theatrical scenes during which, among a less childlike public, no one would dare lift his eyes to his neighbour or endure his glance.
    With Wagner amorous excitement assumes the form of mad delirium. The lovers in his pieces behave like tom-cats gone mad, rolling in contortions and convulsions over a root of valerian. They reflect a state of mind in the poet which is well known to the professional expert. It is a form of Sadism. It is the love of those degenerates who, in sexual transport, become like wild beasts. Wagner suffered from ‘erotic madness,’ which leads coarse natures to murder for lust, and inspires ‘higher degenerates’ with works like Die Walküre, Siegfried, and Tristan und Isolde.
     

    I’d happily trade all the atom bombs ever built for one Tristan.

  119. @Joe Stalin
    Just for fun, they could name the school for, I don't know, Doolittle's Raiders. After all, his bombing mission resulted in a quarter-million dead Chinese.

    ---
    At midday on April 18, 1942, 16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor. For the 80 volunteer raiders, who lifted off that morning from the carrier Hornet, the mission was one-way. After attacking Japan, most of the aircrews flew on to Free China, where low on fuel, the men either bailed out or crash-landed along the coast and were rescued by local villagers, guerrillas and missionaries.

    That generosity shown by the Chinese would trigger a horrific retaliation by the Japanese that claimed an estimated quarter-million lives and would prompt comparisons to the 1937-38 Rape of Nanking. American military authorities, cognizant that a raid on Tokyo would result in a vicious counterattack upon free China, saw the mission through regardless, even keeping the operation a secret from their Pacific theater allies. This chapter of the Doolittle Raid has largely gone unreported—until now.

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/untold-story-vengeful-japanese-attack-doolittle-raid-180955001/

    This is not news to me, but is the implication that we should refrain from attacking our enemies in wartime because they might seek revenge upon on us or our friends? Weird implication there.

    War is hell, in case you didn’t know. Should be avoided at (almost) all costs.

    “16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor.”

    It was also and especially designed to show the Japanese that we could fight back, and also and especially designed to demonstrate for a despondent American public this very same fact. The Japanese–experts without parallel at sadism during wartime–required evermore intensive demonstrations during the next few years. Jimmy Doolittle was an American Hero.

    • Agree: Highlander
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    I think that Doolittle shouldn't have launched early; after all, the Japanese still wouldn't have any idea who the target was even if they were spotted and the aircrew survival would definitely have improved.
  120. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yan Shen
    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, but notice the clear double standard here.

    While blacks, Hispanics, and whites complaining about something being named after a certain person is generally taken to be valid, oftentimes leading to that thing being renamed, here we have no doubt a self-avowed progressive, Keri Wagner, referred to the Chinese Americans as racists.

    Could anyone in a thousand years imagine someone like that declaring that blacks were racist for complaining about whoever?

    “There exist certain hurt feeling when the last name ‘Yamamoto’ is mentioned, especially for Asian immigrants whose families were tragically affected in China, Korea and Southeast Asian countries during World War II,” reads a petition

    In the real world, Korea was part of the Japanese Empire, and solidly rooted for good old Isoroku “56” Yamamoto.

    Although Koreans officially pretend to have 100% been anti-Japanese from the get-go, 98% of the population and 99.9% of the elite were solidly pro-Japanese and remained so long after 1945.

    This is similar to the phenomenon in Europe where, e.g. 100% of the French population were active members of the Résistance.

  121. @Tiny Duck
    Umm...if a school named after Abraham Lincoln, the president, reminds me of George Lincoln Rockwell, the Nazi, can I protest credibly? If a school named after Cesar Chavez, the UFW leader, reminds me of Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan president, can I protest credibly? If a school named after a Chinese American Robert Lee reminds me of Robert E. Lee, Confederate general, can I protest credibly? No, no, and no.

    Tiny Duck – your comment actually shows some common sense! What’s gotten into you?

  122. @AndrewR
    It's hard to think of anything that better symbolizes the displacement of the WASP elite by Jews than the naming of a major bridge after a Jewish nobody in the most quintessentially Anglo of all American cities.

    Tough call. I always liked that moment in the 1990s when the presidents of all eight Ivy League universities happened to be Jewish at the same time. Since then it’s usually been “most” not all of them at once. Doesn’t look good to have eight out of eight, I’m thinking.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    Before anyone jumps, I can only find six out of eight at one time. Mea culpa, apparently.
  123. @European-American
    Indeed:

    “... a special student at Harvard ...

    Classmates would have remembered Yamamoto well: a hard worker but not a grind, exceptionally curious and imaginative,” Morris writes. “When they introduced him to the game of poker, he became a fanatical poker player who would stay up all night, winning hand after hand. And what did he do with his poker winnings--lead the good life? No, not at all: he hitchhiked around the country during the summer, exploring America.”

    ...

    The shame of the Joint Chiefs was their lack of imagination in trying to figure out their opponent. They thought of him as a traditional Japanese who would do everything ‘by the book’ (just as they did). They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    https://harvardmagazine.com/2010/07/lessons-in-surprise
     

    Or perhaps only barely a Harvard student:

    In 1919, Yamamoto Isoroku, who later planned the attack on Pearl Harbor, came to Harvard to study English. He received only a C+ in the course but spent his free time to advantage by hitchhiking to Texas, where, by some accounts, he gathered information on America’s oil industry.

    https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2004/02/history-of-the-japanese-at-harvard/
     

    In fact he was a drop-out!

    [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: We say that Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto studied at Harvard for four years. However, according to the registrar, records show that Yamamoto withdrew shortly after the start of his first semester in 1920 and did not return.]

    https://www.npr.org/2016/12/07/504651757/the-legacy-of-the-man-who-planned-the-pearl-harbor-attack

     

    “They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    ::sigh::

    • Replies: @Mark P Miller
    “They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    Sums up so succinctly why Western Europe was lost before even the first volley of the recent immvasion.
  124. @Mishra
    Tough call. I always liked that moment in the 1990s when the presidents of all eight Ivy League universities happened to be Jewish at the same time. Since then it's usually been "most" not all of them at once. Doesn't look good to have eight out of eight, I'm thinking.

    Before anyone jumps, I can only find six out of eight at one time. Mea culpa, apparently.

  125. @Anonymous
    "Virginia vote on Sea of Japan hands victory to Koreans"

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-korea-japan-virginia/virginia-vote-on-sea-of-japan-hands-victory-to-koreans-idUSBREA150SB20140206

    Two of America’s closest Asian allies played out their historic rivalry in the U.S. state of Virginia on Thursday, with South Korea celebrating victory after state lawmakers approved legislation requiring that the Korean name for the Sea of Japan be included in new school textbooks.

    Virginia’s House of Delegates voted 81-15 to approve the two-line bill, which requires “that all text books approved by the Broad of Education ... when referring to the Sea of Japan, shall note that it is also called the East Sea.”
     

    Huh. It does in fact say “the Broad of Education”. Freudian from Reuters Gary Robertson.

  126. @Mishra
    Note to everyone: the movie itself, sadly, does not live up to the breathtaking overture..

    True, but watching the movie helps you understand the overture to Melancholia. And the overture really is something.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    No argument there at all. That intro remains one of the most amazing things I've ever seen on screen. It absolutely requires (and justifies!) a high quality big screen and a good, loud sound system. Doesn't hurt to appreciate Wagner too.

    Tell your wife that all the money you spent on the a/v system is justified by material like this. If she still doesn't see it, you may need a new wife.

  127. @M_Young
    Mike Honda lost in 2016 to an Indian 'American'. So-called 'Asian' solidarity only works when beating up the white man.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/trailguide/la-na-election-day-2016-honda-khanna-1478392928-htmlstory.html

    Perhaps he wa defeated by a revolt of Toyota owners.

  128. @for-the-record

    Yamamoto (山本 meaning "base of the mountain") is one of the most common Japanese surnames. Notable people with the surname include:

    Azusa Yamamoto (山本 梓), gravure idol and actress
    Donald Yamamoto (ドナルド・ヤマモト), American Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, for African Affairs
    Fujiko Yamamoto (山本 富士子) film actress
    Gonnohyōe Yamamoto (山本 権兵衛), the 16th Prime Minister of Japan
    Hideo Yamamoto (山本 英夫), manga artist
    Hiro Yamamoto (ヒロ・ヤマモト), bassist
    Hiroshi Yamamoto (archer) (山本 博), archer, Olympic silver medalist
    Hiroto Yamamoto (山本 啓人, born 1988), Japanese footballer
    Hisashi Yamamoto (山本 尚), Professor of Chemistry, The University of Chicago
    Hisaye Yamamoto (ヒサエ・ヤマモト) (1921–2011), Japanese American author
    Hōzan Yamamoto (山本 邦山), shakuhachi player, composer and lecturer
    Ichita Yamamoto (山本 一太), politician
    Isoroku Yamamoto (山本 五十六), World War II Admiral
    Issei Yamamoto (山本 一清), astronomer
    Kailer Yamamoto (カイラー・ヤマモト), American ice hockey player
    Kaito Yamamoto (山本 海人, born 1985), Japanese footballer
    Kajirō Yamamoto (山本 嘉次郎), film director
    Kanichi Yamamoto (山本 寛一), the first Japanese Bahá'í
    Kansai Yamamoto (山本 寛斎), noted fashion designer
    Yamamoto Kansuke (山本 勘助), general
    Kenichi Yamamoto (engineer) (山本 健一), mechanical engineer and business executive
    Kenichi Yamamoto (yakuza) (山本 健一),Yakuza
    Kenji Yamamoto (山本 健誌), video game music composer
    Koichi Yamamoto (山本 公一), politician
    Kotetsu Yamamoto (山本 小鉄), wrestler
    Koji Yamamoto (actor) (山本 耕史), actor
    Koji Yamamoto (baseball) (山本 浩二), baseball player
    Linda Yamamoto (山本 リンダ), pop star
    Maria Yamamoto (山本 麻里安), voice actress
    Mariko Yamamoto (山本 万里子), cricketer
    Masahiro Yamamoto (baseball) (山本真弘), baseball player
    Masahiro Yamamoto (kickboxer) (山本真弘), kickboxer
    Masakuni Yamamoto (山本 昌邦), football coach
    Masao Yamamoto (山本 昌男), photographer
    Masayoshi Yamamoto (山本 雅賢), Japanese artistic gymnast
    Masashi Yamamoto (山本 政志), film director
    Mayumi Yamamoto (disambiguation), multiple people
    Mirai Yamamoto (山本 未來), actress
    Mona Yamamoto (山本 モナ),announcer
    Norifumi "Kid" Yamamoto (山本 徳郁), mixed martial arts fighter
    Ryohei Yamamoto (山本 領平), R&B singer
    Sakon Yamamoto (山本 左近), race car driver
    Saori Yamamoto (山本 早織), bikini idol
    Satoshi Yamamoto (山本 サトシ), illustrator of Pokémon Adventures starting in volume 10
    Sayaka Yamamoto (山本 彩), idol, actress, model
    Sayo Yamamoto (山本 沙代, born 1977), Japanese anime director
    Seiichi Yamamoto (山本 精一), musician; member of seminal Osaka-based noise/krautrock band Boredoms
    Shizuka Yamamoto (山本 静香), badminton player
    Shinya Yamamoto (山本 晋也), film director
    Shin'ya Yamamoto (山本 真也, born 1971), Japanese shogi player
    Shūgorō Yamamoto (山本 周五郎), novelist
    Takahiro Yamamoto (山本 隆弘), volleyball player
    Takashi Yamamoto (swimmer) (山本 貴司), swimmer at the 2004 Summer Olympics
    Taro Yamamoto (山本 太郎), actor
    Taro Yamamoto (artist) (1919–1994), American artist
    Tatsuo Yamamoto (山本 達雄), politician
    Toshikatsu Yamamoto (山元 敏勝, born 1929), Japanese physician
    Tsunetomo Yamamoto (山本 常朝), author of the Hagakure
    Yohji Yamamoto (山本 耀司), fashion designer
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (scientist) (born 1950),
    Yoshihisa Yamamoto (wrestler) (born 1970),
    Yuriko Yamamoto (山本 百合子), voice actor
    Yusuke Yamamoto (山本 裕典), actor and fashion model
    Yutaka Yamamoto (山本 寛), animation director
    Yamamoto Hosui, a Prewar period painter

    Fictional characters
    Yamamoto (Spriggan), head of ARCAM's Japanese branch in Spriggan
    Shigekuni Yamamoto-Genryūsai, the General (sotaicho) and 1st Division Captain (ichibantai-taicho) in the Bleach manga and anime
    Aki Yamamoto from the anime Colorful
    Lt. Commander Yamamoto, the first officer in the anime series, The Irresponsible Captain Tylor
    Kazuhiko Yamamoto, a student in Battle Royale
    Takeshi Yamamoto, a swordsman and a Vongola Guardian from the anime Reborn!
    Yamamoto Yoko from the anime Starship Girl Yamamoto Yohko
    Julie Yamamoto from Ben 10: Alien Force
    Yamamoto Yueniang of The Little Nyonya
    Megumi Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Jun Yamamoto from the anime Special A
    Naoki Yamamoto, a character from Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple
     

    Fred didn’t make the list.

  129. Idiocracy Courts soon will rule
    Thou Shalt Not Serve in a School:
    “…watermelon with fritters,
    Cream of Wheat, Crispy Critters,”
    Or Ho Ho’s (“…unusually cruel”).

  130. @J.Ross
    Speaking as an awful deplorable -- yes but the assassination of Heydrich actually made sense. It was at worst an objective of some sort. Heydrich was a unique authority with a bloodied hand in the worst business.
    (Although, speaking as an awful deplorable, his funeral was packed -- and full of non-Germans.)
    Vaasgo was just p---taking for the sake of it, and the Doolittle raid was an angry gesture.

    The Doolittle raid was a glorious what-for and provided a tremendous psychological boost to the American public.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I agree but in World Leader Pretend I don't know if I would have signed off on it (and Vaasgo certainly not-- the formation of special forces yes, the training yes, but then a last minute heart-brake). It is difficult to talk about our overwhelming superiority to the Japanese and not be doubted, and that superiority was a product of our longer experience in expeditionary work, our meritocracy and flexibility (Japan's top air ace was an unawarded, unpromoted enlisted man who had to wait in line behind new officers) and our totally incomperable industrial capacity. We would still have all three without that raid, plus the pilots we lost.
  131. @Mishra
    This is not news to me, but is the implication that we should refrain from attacking our enemies in wartime because they might seek revenge upon on us or our friends? Weird implication there.

    War is hell, in case you didn't know. Should be avoided at (almost) all costs.

    "16 U.S. Army bombers, under the command of daredevil pilot Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, thundered into the skies over Tokyo and other key Japanese industrial cities in a surprise raid designed to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbor."

    It was also and especially designed to show the Japanese that we could fight back, and also and especially designed to demonstrate for a despondent American public this very same fact. The Japanese--experts without parallel at sadism during wartime--required evermore intensive demonstrations during the next few years. Jimmy Doolittle was an American Hero.

    I think that Doolittle shouldn’t have launched early; after all, the Japanese still wouldn’t have any idea who the target was even if they were spotted and the aircrew survival would definitely have improved.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Doolittle Raid aircrew survival rate was remarkably high, even though a lot of the survivors survived four years in Japanese POW camps. It was not a kamikaze mission. In early 1942 they probably could have found volunteers for a kamikaze mission but instead they put together a complex plan to provide a decent chance of survival ... and it worked!

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what's acceptable for Americans and what's not.

    , @Highlander
    Except they were spotted by Japanese picket ships which is why they launched as early as they did. The Japanese did not think that we had any naval aircraft capable of launching that far out which of course we didn't. The B-25s caught them by surprise.
  132. @Yan Shen
    Well I certainly think these Chinese Americans are being kinda silly in their opposition to something being named Yamamoto, but notice the clear double standard here.

    While blacks, Hispanics, and whites complaining about something being named after a certain person is generally taken to be valid, oftentimes leading to that thing being renamed, here we have no doubt a self-avowed progressive, Keri Wagner, referred to the Chinese Americans as racists.

    Could anyone in a thousand years imagine someone like that declaring that blacks were racist for complaining about whoever?

    When was the last time any whites (successfully) organized to prevent another school from being named after some black (MLK, Tubman, Malcom X, Rosa Parks, etc.)

    I mean, even lilly white Bainbridge, WA (black population ~0%) has some african named school and all whites think it’s the bees knees.

    Let’s not pretend this is a wash.

  133. @Mishra

    "They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”
     
    ::sigh::

    “They failed to consider that maybe, just maybe, Isoroku Yamamoto was more American than they were.”

    Sums up so succinctly why Western Europe was lost before even the first volley of the recent immvasion.

  134. @Mishra

    >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

     

    Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .

    >Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .

    And some dumb white woman at Vox will write an article explaining how it is all because of racism.

  135. @Mishra

    >Advisory committee member LaDoris Cordell suggested that tension among ethnic groups in the district is the “elephant in the room.”

    Future will be lovely.

     

    Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .

    “Future be big stomping ground for many big elephants. White ppl underfoot .”

    I generally agree. But it’s also obvious our herd needs culling. It’s because of the effete whites that we find ourselves in this situation. I’m fine with making them the sacrificial offering to Diversity.

  136. @Steve Sailer
    True, but watching the movie helps you understand the overture to Melancholia. And the overture really is something.

    No argument there at all. That intro remains one of the most amazing things I’ve ever seen on screen. It absolutely requires (and justifies!) a high quality big screen and a good, loud sound system. Doesn’t hurt to appreciate Wagner too.

    Tell your wife that all the money you spent on the a/v system is justified by material like this. If she still doesn’t see it, you may need a new wife.

  137. @J.Ross
    Speaking as an awful deplorable -- yes but the assassination of Heydrich actually made sense. It was at worst an objective of some sort. Heydrich was a unique authority with a bloodied hand in the worst business.
    (Although, speaking as an awful deplorable, his funeral was packed -- and full of non-Germans.)
    Vaasgo was just p---taking for the sake of it, and the Doolittle raid was an angry gesture.

    I read the occupation government was too stable and the assassination was hoped to trigger reprisals that would turn the population against the occupation. Standard insurgency 101 stuff.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Sounds about right (Germans then and now consider Czechs to basically be better-looking Germans). And we always fall for it. See Kyle's speech at the end of the WalMart episode of South Park. What distinguishes us from wild animals is that we are actually easily led.
  138. @J.Ross
    Speaking as an awful deplorable -- yes but the assassination of Heydrich actually made sense. It was at worst an objective of some sort. Heydrich was a unique authority with a bloodied hand in the worst business.
    (Although, speaking as an awful deplorable, his funeral was packed -- and full of non-Germans.)
    Vaasgo was just p---taking for the sake of it, and the Doolittle raid was an angry gesture.

    Take a look at Heydrich’s funeral: find the youtube film which shows it from Prague on to Berlin.

    The crowds of Czechs in Prague are impressive, but the actual funeral rite in Berlin, with Hitler and his paladins out in full force, is simply overwhelming in its magnificence, a magnificence born of a self-confidence and elan unknown, indeed incomprehensible to us now.

    Heydrich was not assassinated because he was evil, but because he was all too successful.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is a good point, it's a forgotten rule we might name after Bitburg: it used to be that you respecred ability, period. Furthermore this is hardly brotherhood-of-man nonsense or a sneaking-in of Nazism. Respecting the ability of enemies is self-explanatorily self-interested.
  139. @Joe Stalin
    I think that Doolittle shouldn't have launched early; after all, the Japanese still wouldn't have any idea who the target was even if they were spotted and the aircrew survival would definitely have improved.

    The Doolittle Raid aircrew survival rate was remarkably high, even though a lot of the survivors survived four years in Japanese POW camps. It was not a kamikaze mission. In early 1942 they probably could have found volunteers for a kamikaze mission but instead they put together a complex plan to provide a decent chance of survival … and it worked!

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what’s acceptable for Americans and what’s not.

    • Replies: @Highlander

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what’s acceptable for Americans and what’s not.
     
    I wouldn't say that at all. Our commanders and staff officers have often purposefully put troops from company up to division level in untenable positions in order to draw out the enemy. They have also knowingly ordered suicidal assaults on impregnable enemy positions that have resulted in extremely high casualty rates.
  140. Amateurs. They should have reached farther back in history and used some Indian names, complete with a new symbol set, like Cal Poly did with their new dorms: yakʔitʸutʸu, elewexe, nipumūʔ, tiłhini, tsʰɨtqawɨ, tšɨłkukunɨtš, tsɨpxatu and tsɨtkawayu. There’s even a video to teach you how to pronounce them:

  141. @Joe Stalin
    I think that Doolittle shouldn't have launched early; after all, the Japanese still wouldn't have any idea who the target was even if they were spotted and the aircrew survival would definitely have improved.

    Except they were spotted by Japanese picket ships which is why they launched as early as they did. The Japanese did not think that we had any naval aircraft capable of launching that far out which of course we didn’t. The B-25s caught them by surprise.

  142. @Steve Sailer
    The Doolittle Raid aircrew survival rate was remarkably high, even though a lot of the survivors survived four years in Japanese POW camps. It was not a kamikaze mission. In early 1942 they probably could have found volunteers for a kamikaze mission but instead they put together a complex plan to provide a decent chance of survival ... and it worked!

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what's acceptable for Americans and what's not.

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what’s acceptable for Americans and what’s not.

    I wouldn’t say that at all. Our commanders and staff officers have often purposefully put troops from company up to division level in untenable positions in order to draw out the enemy. They have also knowingly ordered suicidal assaults on impregnable enemy positions that have resulted in extremely high casualty rates.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Steve is essentially right, though this was even more true up until about 20 years ago. I recall an interview during the U.S. bombing of Serbia, most of which was done at a high enough altitude to put the planes out of reach of guns, where Ted Koppel or someone asked a U.S. Air Force general if he'd order his pilots to fly low and slow if necessary to hit certain targets, and the general said if they had to fly low, they'd fly fast to increase their survivability. I don't think the U.S. military, at least not in the last 120 years, was ever as tolerant of its own casualties as, say, the Japanese, Germans, or Russians.
  143. I think the real problem lies in the fact that Fred Yamamoto was a Confederate general…

  144. @Highlander

    I presume that has had some influence on American military planners ever since as to what’s acceptable for Americans and what’s not.
     
    I wouldn't say that at all. Our commanders and staff officers have often purposefully put troops from company up to division level in untenable positions in order to draw out the enemy. They have also knowingly ordered suicidal assaults on impregnable enemy positions that have resulted in extremely high casualty rates.

    Steve is essentially right, though this was even more true up until about 20 years ago. I recall an interview during the U.S. bombing of Serbia, most of which was done at a high enough altitude to put the planes out of reach of guns, where Ted Koppel or someone asked a U.S. Air Force general if he’d order his pilots to fly low and slow if necessary to hit certain targets, and the general said if they had to fly low, they’d fly fast to increase their survivability. I don’t think the U.S. military, at least not in the last 120 years, was ever as tolerant of its own casualties as, say, the Japanese, Germans, or Russians.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    You never served in the United Sates Marine Corps nor fought under Gen. Mark Clark in Italy then.
  145. @Old Palo Altan
    Take a look at Heydrich's funeral: find the youtube film which shows it from Prague on to Berlin.

    The crowds of Czechs in Prague are impressive, but the actual funeral rite in Berlin, with Hitler and his paladins out in full force, is simply overwhelming in its magnificence, a magnificence born of a self-confidence and elan unknown, indeed incomprehensible to us now.

    Heydrich was not assassinated because he was evil, but because he was all too successful.

    This is a good point, it’s a forgotten rule we might name after Bitburg: it used to be that you respecred ability, period. Furthermore this is hardly brotherhood-of-man nonsense or a sneaking-in of Nazism. Respecting the ability of enemies is self-explanatorily self-interested.

  146. @Highlander
    The Doolittle raid was a glorious what-for and provided a tremendous psychological boost to the American public.

    I agree but in World Leader Pretend I don’t know if I would have signed off on it (and Vaasgo certainly not– the formation of special forces yes, the training yes, but then a last minute heart-brake). It is difficult to talk about our overwhelming superiority to the Japanese and not be doubted, and that superiority was a product of our longer experience in expeditionary work, our meritocracy and flexibility (Japan’s top air ace was an unawarded, unpromoted enlisted man who had to wait in line behind new officers) and our totally incomperable industrial capacity. We would still have all three without that raid, plus the pilots we lost.

  147. @Hippopotamusdrome
    I read the occupation government was too stable and the assassination was hoped to trigger reprisals that would turn the population against the occupation. Standard insurgency 101 stuff.

    Sounds about right (Germans then and now consider Czechs to basically be better-looking Germans). And we always fall for it. See Kyle’s speech at the end of the WalMart episode of South Park. What distinguishes us from wild animals is that we are actually easily led.

  148. @Dave Pinsen
    Steve is essentially right, though this was even more true up until about 20 years ago. I recall an interview during the U.S. bombing of Serbia, most of which was done at a high enough altitude to put the planes out of reach of guns, where Ted Koppel or someone asked a U.S. Air Force general if he'd order his pilots to fly low and slow if necessary to hit certain targets, and the general said if they had to fly low, they'd fly fast to increase their survivability. I don't think the U.S. military, at least not in the last 120 years, was ever as tolerant of its own casualties as, say, the Japanese, Germans, or Russians.

    You never served in the United Sates Marine Corps nor fought under Gen. Mark Clark in Italy then.

  149. These niggling objections remind me of how black staffers in Washington, D.C. objected when a manager used, perfectly appropriately, the word “niggardly” in a meeting.

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