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From the U. of Hawaii:

Are some ethnic groups more susceptible to COVID-19?
UH News » Research » Are some ethnic groups…
April 2, 2020 UH News

A University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center molecular epidemiologist is working on an initiated coronavirus study aimed at understanding why certain individuals and racial/ethnic groups are more prone to the infection, and may suffer more severe symptoms of COVID-19.

The study by Maarit Tiirikainen and Hawaiʻi-based genomics company LifeDNA, Inc. will initially focus on the multi-ethnic population of Hawaiʻi and genetic variants of the ACE2 gene as they relate to infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19.

“There have been major differences in the rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the severe disease between the different geographic regions since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, even among young individuals,” said Tiirikainen, an associate professor at UH Mānoa.

“Epidemiological studies.indicate that populations carry different variants of the ACE2 gene. This variation in the gene coding for the ACE2 receptor may have an effect on the number of ACE2 receptors on the lung cells, as well as on how effectively the virus binds to the receptor. There may also be genetic differences in immunity and other important genes explaining why some people get more sick than others,” she added.

Polynesians were particularly hard hit by the Spanish Flu of a century ago, so it’s a good idea to check up on these things.

On the other hand I haven’t been paying much attention to speculation over whether some racial groups are more or less prone to infection and severity of outcome.

I have strong opinions on topics like how human biodiversity affects sprinting results, because there is a huge amount of data on this, and we’ve had decades to argue over it. In contrast, we have three months of data on a brand new disease and we don’t (yet) have any kind of level playing field to distinguish nature from nurture. At this point, things seem pretty random and contingent.

There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that any specific group would be more or less vulnerable than any other to a novel disease, other than wishful thinking. (When it comes to diseases, people like to have a theory explaining why those who have gotten it deserve to get it, and why they, personally, won’t get it because they deserve to not get it.)

First there was speculation that Chinese were particularly susceptible so nobody else had much to worry about. Then Iranians had to be accommodated into the theory. Then Northern Italians. Then New Yorkers. Then Detroiters.

On the other hand, there may well turn out to be in hindsight genetic differences in response to this novel virus, which would be both innately interesting and potentially useful. No section of the human race has had time to evolve a resistance to this particular disease yet, but it might turn out that, say, resistance to some other older disease might play a role with the new disease. Or something else. This kind of knowledge might inspire some seemingly off the wall treatment or prevention idea. As I like to point out, Knowledge Is Good.

Also, looking for Nature differences might help point out easily changed Nurture differences. Say that in Group X, there is a custom of wetting your thumb on your lips before counting money, but in Group Y that is looked down upon as something that only an Xer would do.

Time will tell.

 
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  1. • Replies: @fredtard
    Personally, I'm more concerned with the pro-vaccine hopium surrounding this pandemic than whether it affects racial groups differently. You're welcome to take any and all vaccines you'd like, but the second they force me to take one, I go postal. Herd immunity is for sheeple, not people with rights to their own body, for chrissakes.

    Now, if the vaccine manufacturers had even a tiny shred of liability for adverse vaccine reactions (Guillane-Barre or any of the other 100-plus chronic, autoimmune disorders, food allergies, asthma, etc.), which they haven't had since 1986, my militancy on the issue would soften considerably. If you think I'm wrong about vaccine safety, fine, I may be. And I have no desire to prevent you or anyone else from taking any vaccine you consent to.

    The greatest need for biomedical research, in my opinion, is to understand the genetic and environmental mechanisms of autoimmunity, an expanding epidemic of chronic disease and
    disability. Maybe we could even develop tests to screen people for susceptibility to immune system hyper-sensitivity pre-vaccination; that'd sure make me feel better about taking the shot. But first Fauci et.al. have to admit there's work to be done to improve vaccine safety, and the pro-vaccine forces (pharma and the media they almost single-handedly fund, primarily) have backed themselves into a corner on this. It appears the "vaccines are safe and effective" lie (again, just my opinion...) is just about the only official propaganda any significant percentage of the population believes any more. And all this chronic immune-related disease is great for the drug/healthcare business..

  2. • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Gee, which of these four might be Maarit Tiirikainen?
     
    The Fi'in'nish one, of course.
  3. Anonymous[283] • Disclaimer says:

    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown “Lance Welton” who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    It's not yet clear how much of a fool Lance Welton made of himself. So beware: Complete anti-Welton- and Peter Frostism could well turn out to be even eh -wronger - than Frost and Whelton.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I like some of Lance Welton's writing, but you are right that he doesn't know enough science to have put his butt out on the line for this theory. There may indeed be something to it, though.

    Since you mentioned Mr. Welton, he seems like an outlier at VDare for not being the type to stick only to the facts. VDare writers are some of the very best, when it comes to sticking to the story and the facts, with very solid grammar and proofreading, and they provide links like there was no tomorrow. Mr. Welton will get into what is psychologically wrong with some of the enemies in the ctrl-left, and I don't think that does any good either - it's just mumbo-jumo.
    , @James Braxton
    Lance Welton is the worst writer on VDare, with the possible exception of Ann Coulter.
    , @jb
    Yes, Welton has been way, way ahead of the evidence. I'm also disturbed by the Z-man, and others like him, who seem convinced that we are panicking over a virus that is really no more of a threat than a bad flu season.

    Stay well Steve. We need you!
    , @Thirdtwin
    You mean like AOC?

    “COVID deaths are disproportionately spiking in Black + Brown communities.”

    “Why? Because the chronic toll of redlining, environmental racism, wealth gap, etc. ARE underlying health conditions.”

    “Inequality is a comorbidity. COVID relief should be drafted with a lens of reparations.”
  4. Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?

    And do we now spell the name of our 50th state “Hawai’i” with an apostophe to please the indigenous a-holes who are blocking the world’s greatest ground-based astronomical observatory from being built atop “their” “sacred” mountain?

    • LOL: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't keep up with astronomy anymore, Buzz. What effective-size mirror are we talking about?
    , @Mike_from_SGV
    It is absurd that such a telescope can be held up by these people. Only a country that has been weakened by PC BS would put up with this kind of thing for more than 5 seconds.
  5. Going off of susceptibility is one thing, but what about likelihood of catching it in the first place? My state is quite populous with plenty of immigrants and international travelers yet only two counties have been majorly impacted by the virus. We don’t have an elaborate public transportation system. There are also huge distances with open land for farms and cattle. Florida is not that different but has a huge problem on it’s hands. Is this because it has more tourism and more nursing homes than other states?

  6. @Reg Cæsar
    Gee, which of these four might be Maarit Tiirikainen?


    https://i2.wp.com/www.hawaii.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Weinman-winners.jpg?resize=400%2C200

    Gee, which of these four might be Maarit Tiirikainen?

    The Fi’in’nish one, of course.

    • LOL: Corn
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    erhmm! 'Suo-malai...nen.

    Suomalainen nainen, Hawaii'in laineitten luona ja laajan luonnon loistossa, etsii lopullista toteutta laboratooriossa.
  7. Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that some group is less vulnerable than another to a novel disease

    If it evolved amid Chinese last year, it seems a fair bet it would be somewhat adapted to infecting them. The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and it was most dangerous to men of military age (the W shape age graph). Men’s death rates in 1918 far exceeded the female death rates, and altered the sax ratio.The male TB death rate in the years following 1918 was lowered because so many men had died of the Spanish flu (I expect a lowering of the death rate from influenza as a result of COVID-19).

    • Replies: @Charon

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.
     
    I'd bet it'll turn out to be more like 2x or 3x. WAG as they say.

    Fun topic for a group wager, if only we had reason to believe that we'd ever find out the truth of the matter.
    , @dfordoom

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.
     
    Western intelligence. Now there's a reliable source. We know that our western intelligence agencies would never ever lie to us or spread propaganda.

    By the way, I have a really nice bridge I can sell you.
    , @Cloudbuster
    But the altered sax ratio caused the birth of the jazz age!
    , @Ron Unz

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.
     
    Sure, that makes seems plausible. And since our same intelligence agencies discovered that Trump was a Russian agent, that may explain his disastrous handling of this crisis, given that Putin wants to destroy America.
  8. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:

    For some time now I’ve been leaving comments on how carriers of some gene variants like HLA B57 and HLA B27 don’t progress from HIV to AIDS quickly if at all, and were studied in the creation of HIV drugs.

    HLA B27 seems to cause Autoimmune diseases like Anklosing Spondyltis, but is also believed to give some anti-viral protection in AIDS, Hep-C and possibly some Influenzas (see links below) It is most commonly found among Northern Scandanavians (Lapland). May be why Sweden isn’t locking down (Ha ha).

    It seems there are unique properties that flush out viral loads in some people and offer protection.
    So could be a relic of ancient evolution like how genes for Malaria/Sickle Cell Anemia. Who knows.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3240147/

    or

    https://spondylitis.org/research-new/covid-19-and-spondyloarthritis-your-questions-answered/

    Dr John Reveille: “However, be mindful of something else: People who are HLA-B27 positive demonstrate increased natural immunity toward a number of viral infections, such as HIV-1, hepatitis C and influenza, although whether this natural immunity carries over to coronavirus has not been studied.”

    • Replies: @OscarWildeLoveChild
    Memory's bad, but I thought this had been studied on and reported 20 years ago...something about how some research showed many people of (ANY) Northern European descent appeared to be immune to HIV (and/or just AIDS?)...and it was presumed to be a genetic relic of the survivors (and thus descendants) of the black plague and many other plagues in Europe the last 2000 years. I had not heard of the specificity to Scandanavians.

    Interesting!


    Also, Steve said: (When it comes to diseases, people like to have a theory explaining why those who have gotten it deserve to get it, and why they, personally, won’t get it because they deserve to not get it.)

    Probably true, but as a follower of Jesus Christ, when I hear about something like this terrible virus, I am the opposite (as probably many Christians are). I do deserve to get it, as a lifetime sinner, and was essentially born with it, and I have ever reason to suffer for it, but if I somehow survive, it is by GOD's grace alone. I take nothing for granted. In that sense, I believe there is such a thing as Christian stoicism -- momento mori. I was born to sin and die, but for Him, I have each precious day.
    , @anon
    yes, for HIV, exploring as many human HIV binding proteins will be key. with modern day, fast geneomics, maybe this will be possible and treatments other than antiretrovials will be possible (anti-binding).

    for the cornonavirus (SARSt ype), there are other virus binding receptors that should be looked at, aside from "ace2"-- L-SING (CD209L or CLEC4M). it appears that Chinese are homogeneous for this, conferring some protection, where as Europeans are more heterogeneous, and more susceptible to SARS.

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by infection of a previously undescribed coronavirus (CoV). L-SIGN, encoded
    by CLEC4M (also known as CD209L), is a SARS-CoV binding receptor that has polymorphism in its extracellular neck region
    encoded by the tandem repeat domain in exon 4. Our genetic risk association study shows that individuals homozygous for
    CLEC4M tandem repeats are less susceptible to SARS infection. L-SIGN is expressed in both non-SARS and SARS-CoV–infected
    lung. Compared with cells heterozygous for L-SIGN, cells homozygous for L-SIGN show higher binding capacity for SARS-CoV,
    higher proteasome-dependent viral degradation and a lower capacity for trans infection. Thus, homozygosity for L-SIGN
    plays a protective role during SARS infection.
  9. What about the correlation of COVID-19 deaths with the consumption of SPAM®?

    • Replies: @epebble
    Don't know about SPAM®, But I see a puzzling correlation between latitude and Covid deaths. Countries South of 18 degree North parallel seem relatively unscathed. May be due to warmer weather. If so, summer can't come fast enough.
    , @vhrm
    The Costco i now go to for essential pizza slices (in CA, not Hawai'i) has a board outside now where they post the items that are sold out.

    It's about 15 things and Spam is one of them. I take this to indicate a high level of baseline consumption.

    The area has low to moderate known cases and pretty low covid-19 mortality.
  10. Hawai’i

    Actually, Steve spelled it with the apostrophe curling the other way. Which in Greek would signify our H. However, the Greeks spell it Χαβάη.

    Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?

    Speaking of obese races, the claim that we’re the fattest is both recent and inaccurate. A good ten Polynesian countries outweigh us. Mexico (#29) finishes below Canada (#26). We don’t break the top 20 until 1992.

    What were the second and third largest US cities in 1840? Baltimore and New Orleans! They had just reached 100,000, joining New York.

    [MORE]

    The changing face of our foreign-born:

    HBD crack:

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Fat Countries is fun: it's the USA + some Arab/Moslem countries + a bunch of inconsequential, mostly Pacific island nations. The cities graphic was also entertaining, though a bit misleading, as (e.g.) Southwark, Northern Liberties, Spring Garden etc are all eventually part of Philly. But they had to run the graphics with the data they had.

    Similarly, in recent years most older cities have long since outgrown their limits, and metro areas (esp consolidated or 'combined' metros) are a more meaningful measure of urban agglomerations. Which is why Phoenix and San Antonio, for example, aren't anywhere near the largest metropolitan areas, but the SF Bay Area and Wash-Balt are now 4th and 3rd respectively--while their constituent cities are relatively small.

    Height? Once upon a time, the USA was one of the world's leading countries! Something you can tell your grandchildren. Who will probably be, as TD keeps reminding us: dark, short, and fat.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, Reg, but I really expected more girls on the last one. Instead, I got creeping bar-graphs again. #Disappointing!
  11. Me, on March 6.

    Polynesians were particularly hard hit by the Spanish Flu of a century ago, so it’s a good idea to check up on these things.

    That’s also consistent with BMI having an effect on respiratory status: fatties can’t breath as well.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    Don’t think Polynesians were fat 100 years ago. They were probably all ripped swimmers.
    , @Aardvark
    IIRC, Spam has no redeemable qualities for immune system boosting.
  12. Indeed, I have just read a particularly premature article about why the prevalence of COVID-19 is apparently low in Africa. My bet would be that it is related to the fact that health care in sub-saharan Africa is usually extremely sparse. When a country like Sierra Leone has fewer than 250 doctors in the entire nation then it would be strange indeed if disease outbreaks were not underreported.

    • Replies: @Corn
    A few days ago the Health Minister of Burundi reported that Burundi had no cases of COVID because Burundi had no testing kits.
    , @Corn
    A few days ago the Health Minister of Burundi reported that Burundi had no cases of COVID because Burundi had no testing kits.
    , @epebble
    But that was not a problem with Ebola. Covid doesn't whisper, but speaks loud and clear - like NY is running out of body bags - DoD is sending them replacements (probably because, they can't be readily procured in open market by the thousands). If bodies were rotting in the streets, somebody's phone would have picked it up.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/04/03/826675439/corpses-lie-for-days-as-ecuador-struggles-to-keep-up-with-covid-19-deaths

    Ecuador is a much, much better country than Sierra Leone. Many American's find it a nice place to retire.
  13. • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Dr. Colleen Smith does medical simulation training. This whole thing feels like a pandemic simulation exercise, a "live" continuation of the "Crimson Contagion" and Event 201 coronavirus pandemic exercises the Trump administration ran last year:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q97Cxqq4knM
    , @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

  14. Anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:

  15. OT

    https://breaking911.com/breaking-man-intentionally-derailed-train-at-high-speed-in-attempt-to-crash-into-hospital-ship-mercy-at-la-port/

    LOS ANGELES – A train engineer at the Port of Los Angeles was arrested this morning on federal charges for allegedly running a locomotive at full speed off the end of rail tracks near the USNS Mercy.

    Eduardo Moreno, 44, of San Pedro, was charged today in a criminal complaint with one count of train wrecking as a result of an incident Tuesday afternoon.

    According to the criminal complaint filed in United States District Court, Moreno admitted in two separate interviews with law enforcement authorities that he intentionally derailed and crashed the train near the Mercy.

    Moreno ran the train off the end of tracks, and crashed through a series of barriers before coming to rest more than 250 yards from the Mercy. No one was injured in the incident, and the Mercy was not harmed or damaged in any way.

    In his first interview with the Los Angeles Port Police, Moreno acknowledged that he “did it,” saying that he was suspicious of the Mercy and believing it had an alternate purpose related to COVID-19 or a government takeover, the affidavit states. Moreno stated that he acted alone and had not pre-planned the attempted attack. While admitting to intentionally derailing and crashing the train, he said he knew it would bring media attention and “people could see for themselves,” referring to the Mercy, according to the affidavit.

    I see a (presumably Islamist) guy was nailed on terror charges yesterday, just planning a rocket attack on the White House, nothing to see here.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/02/hasher-jallal-taheb-white-house-rocket-attack

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    The Washington Post report, which has verbatim quotes, is a classic.


    Engineer intentionally crashes train near hospital ship Mercy, believing in weird coronavirus conspiracy, feds say


    ... Moreno told detectives he had been “putting the pieces together.” He no longer believed “the ship is what they say it’s for.”

    He believed “they are segregating us, and it needs to be put in the open,” according to the affidavit, which doesn’t explain what Moreno might have meant by that. He was pushing his last train of the day, a cargo bound for Vietnam, when the idea hit him:

    He could “draw the world’s attention” to the USNS Mercy if he derailed the train, and then “people could see for themselves,” according to the affidavit. He could “wake people up,” he said. “I don’t know.

    "Sometimes you just get a little snap and man, it was fricking exciting,”
    Moreno told detectives. “I just had it and I was committed. I just went for it. I had one chance.”

    It’s unclear if he intended to hit the ship directly or just crash near it. ...

    He made no attempt to pull back the throttle, no attempt to engage the brakes, instead putting the train in full speed.

    At the last minute, Moreno lit a flare. He looked up at the camera, raising his middle finger to it. Then, just before the train smashed through the concrete barriers, he stuck the flare out the window, keeping it there all the way through impact.

    He told the detectives, “I can’t wait to see the video.”
     


     
  16. @Reg Cæsar

    Hawai’i
     
    Actually, Steve spelled it with the apostrophe curling the other way. Which in Greek would signify our H. However, the Greeks spell it Χαβάη.

    Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?
     
    Speaking of obese races, the claim that we're the fattest is both recent and inaccurate. A good ten Polynesian countries outweigh us. Mexico (#29) finishes below Canada (#26). We don't break the top 20 until 1992.




    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nvJsEX9MWpw


    What were the second and third largest US cities in 1840? Baltimore and New Orleans! They had just reached 100,000, joining New York.





    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzPDFeE9csA


    The changing face of our foreign-born:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GlJg2h2NrTM


    HBD crack:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AwVELgMzwN4

    Fat Countries is fun: it’s the USA + some Arab/Moslem countries + a bunch of inconsequential, mostly Pacific island nations. The cities graphic was also entertaining, though a bit misleading, as (e.g.) Southwark, Northern Liberties, Spring Garden etc are all eventually part of Philly. But they had to run the graphics with the data they had.

    Similarly, in recent years most older cities have long since outgrown their limits, and metro areas (esp consolidated or ‘combined’ metros) are a more meaningful measure of urban agglomerations. Which is why Phoenix and San Antonio, for example, aren’t anywhere near the largest metropolitan areas, but the SF Bay Area and Wash-Balt are now 4th and 3rd respectively–while their constituent cities are relatively small.

    Height? Once upon a time, the USA was one of the world’s leading countries! Something you can tell your grandchildren. Who will probably be, as TD keeps reminding us: dark, short, and fat.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    ..... La raza cósmica

    http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/131103233334-frum-mexico-sugar-tax-story-top.jpg
    , @syonredux

    Fat Countries is fun:
     
    Indeed.For example, the two fattest countries in Europe are Malta (28.90) and the UK (27.80).

    http://d.ibtimes.co.uk/en/full/196051/overweight-women.jpg


    Italy, in contrast, is comparatively svelte (19.90). New Zealand (30.80) is slightly fatter than Australia (29.00). Frankly, given all the Maori in NZ, I was expecting it to be a lot fatter.
    , @Farenheit
    Sir, the correct term is "SLUB", which is shorthand for Short, Lardy, Ugly and Brown. You can change up individual descriptors in the word, but it still gets the concept across.
  17. Yes, why the disparity in deaths between the sexes? Females are only 40% of those who succumb.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    Women are by nature more resistant to most diseases and particularly to flu-like diseases (ergo "man flu"). They also live longer in general. I guess the ability of having babies might be related to that.
    , @Henry's Cat
    Here's an article from the NYT: https://dnyuz.com/2020/04/02/why-are-so-many-more-men-dying-from-coronavirus/
  18. Anonymous[318] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    https://twitter.com/ChristinePolon1/status/1245418050385412096

    Dr. Colleen Smith does medical simulation training. This whole thing feels like a pandemic simulation exercise, a “live” continuation of the “Crimson Contagion” and Event 201 coronavirus pandemic exercises the Trump administration ran last year:

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Troll: Corvinus
  19. What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible, and that seems to hold after you control for age/BMI/race/smoking/drinking/whatever. Whenever you see sob stories on TV it is more often than not women or people of color portrayed as victims. Straight white males deserve to be eradicated I guess. Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise. So stay safe and protect yourself, don’t be a hero – wear that mask and gloves.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise.
     
    I wonder how many personnel in essential services will actually stay at their posts in the coming months, and how many will instead go off on stress leave or pretend they have to stay at home to care for someone who's been infected? Or will just resign.

    That could be the real test of how well western nations are going to cope with the coming crisis as the hysteria ad panic reach fever levels and the economy crumbles.

    What will governments do when cops start refusing to go out on the streets because they're afraid of the virus? What will happen when there are no Heroes in Blue prepared to risk their lives arresting people for breaking curfew, or for going to the park or playing golf?

    What will the US do when military personnel start deserting their posts? And when all the doctors and nurses are hiding in their homes (and probably hiding under their beds)? Will westerners really pull together in a crisis or will it be every man for himself?

    Maybe whipping up a panic wasn't such a great idea?
    , @SimpleSong
    True, but if I recall correctly pretty much all infectious diseases tend to hit men harder than women; it appears that there is some immune downregulatory effect associated with testosterone. The flip side of that is that women tend to have much higher rates of autoimmune diseases (lupus, rheumathoid arthritis, etc.) caused by immune overactivity. Caveat that I'm getting outside my area of expertise.

    Incidentally this is why I think testosterone supplementation is a terrible idea, unless you make your living showing off your chiseled body. Seen a few cases of otherwise very healthy, upstanding older men with endocarditis without any obvious risk factors, of note they all seemed to be unusually toned for their age. I might just be seeing patterns where they don't exist however.

    I also think boob jobs are a bad idea, so I guess I'm an equal opportunity scold...
    , @James Speaks

    What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible,
     
    Women are under-represented and under-diagnosed as heart patient. Therefore less likely to receive ACE-2 inhibitors. From my doctor, learned that ACE-1 inhibitors (ABE blockers) are just as bad due to complex interplay between molecules, biology, etc (I'm not a doctor). So men are more likely to take these meds and experience the complications with COVID-19.
  20. @B36
    Yes, why the disparity in deaths between the sexes? Females are only 40% of those who succumb.

    Women are by nature more resistant to most diseases and particularly to flu-like diseases (ergo “man flu”). They also live longer in general. I guess the ability of having babies might be related to that.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    Please stop posting bullshit on this website, with your only reference being idioms like "man flu.". Women are more susceptible to flu and disease in general. Their longer lifespan is linked to their lower participation in high-risk activity and their tendency to go to hospitals more often than men do.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-20452192


    Research suggests that women are at greater risk of getting flu than men because they tend to spend more time around children, who are more likely to have a flu-like illness in the first place.

    A nationwide flu survey carried out by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine during last winter found that women were 16% more likely to say they had flu symptoms.
     

  21. O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html

    • Replies: @Paco Wové
    Not that it was any good.
    , @dfordoom

    Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan
     
    People thinking that you can't drink Corona Beer because it will give you coronavirus is proof that you must never ever underestimate human stupidity. And normal human stupidity combined with hysteria is a very bad combination. The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity. We're looking at a population that could become as superstitious and unpredictable as a mediæval peasant society.
    , @Mr. Rational
    Serves them right for starting a viral marketing campaign at the exact wrong time.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.
     
    A bunch of roadkill deer have been rotting along a half-mile stretch of highway near here. Some jokers attached party balloons to a couple of them. ( "It's your day!")

    An unopened bottle of Corona was propped in the armpit of one of the less-decomposed ones.

    No, I didn't take it. It's still Lent. I left it for the vultures, bald eagles, and Corvini to pair with their banquet.

    'D be funny if they were hit by one of these:


    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/10/HMN1118-CIP-01.jpg


    https://cdn.dribbble.com/users/892911/screenshots/10274575/media/ed97e4a1b3105358cad2c722defd7b4c.jpg

    , @Mr. Anon

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.
     
    It's a lousy beer anyway. Corona is to mexican beer what Taco Bell is to mexican food.
  22. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT

    https://breaking911.com/breaking-man-intentionally-derailed-train-at-high-speed-in-attempt-to-crash-into-hospital-ship-mercy-at-la-port/


    LOS ANGELES – A train engineer at the Port of Los Angeles was arrested this morning on federal charges for allegedly running a locomotive at full speed off the end of rail tracks near the USNS Mercy.

    Eduardo Moreno, 44, of San Pedro, was charged today in a criminal complaint with one count of train wrecking as a result of an incident Tuesday afternoon.

    According to the criminal complaint filed in United States District Court, Moreno admitted in two separate interviews with law enforcement authorities that he intentionally derailed and crashed the train near the Mercy.

    Moreno ran the train off the end of tracks, and crashed through a series of barriers before coming to rest more than 250 yards from the Mercy. No one was injured in the incident, and the Mercy was not harmed or damaged in any way.

    In his first interview with the Los Angeles Port Police, Moreno acknowledged that he “did it,” saying that he was suspicious of the Mercy and believing it had an alternate purpose related to COVID-19 or a government takeover, the affidavit states. Moreno stated that he acted alone and had not pre-planned the attempted attack. While admitting to intentionally derailing and crashing the train, he said he knew it would bring media attention and “people could see for themselves,” referring to the Mercy, according to the affidavit.
     

    I see a (presumably Islamist) guy was nailed on terror charges yesterday, just planning a rocket attack on the White House, nothing to see here.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/02/hasher-jallal-taheb-white-house-rocket-attack

    The Washington Post report, which has verbatim quotes, is a classic.

    Engineer intentionally crashes train near hospital ship Mercy, believing in weird coronavirus conspiracy, feds say

    … Moreno told detectives he had been “putting the pieces together.” He no longer believed “the ship is what they say it’s for.”

    He believed “they are segregating us, and it needs to be put in the open,” according to the affidavit, which doesn’t explain what Moreno might have meant by that. He was pushing his last train of the day, a cargo bound for Vietnam, when the idea hit him:

    He could “draw the world’s attention” to the USNS Mercy if he derailed the train, and then “people could see for themselves,” according to the affidavit. He could “wake people up,” he said. “I don’t know.

    “Sometimes you just get a little snap and man, it was fricking exciting,”
    Moreno told detectives. “I just had it and I was committed. I just went for it. I had one chance.”

    It’s unclear if he intended to hit the ship directly or just crash near it. …

    He made no attempt to pull back the throttle, no attempt to engage the brakes, instead putting the train in full speed.

    At the last minute, Moreno lit a flare. He looked up at the camera, raising his middle finger to it. Then, just before the train smashed through the concrete barriers, he stuck the flare out the window, keeping it there all the way through impact.

    He told the detectives, “I can’t wait to see the video.”

  23. The New Zealand government is providing an ethnic breakdown. Maori are rarely pure-blooded, but Pasifika usually are. The overwhelming majority of the cases are still imports and so that will skew the data towards Europeans and Asians. So far, we have had only one death, an elderly white woman. My guess is that they will add this data when it becomes available.

    We should get a better idea as the number of community transmissions increase.

    https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-current-situation/covid-19-current-cases#ethnicity

    Hope this helps

    • Thanks: Hail
  24. @Sean
    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that some group is less vulnerable than another to a novel disease
     
    If it evolved amid Chinese last year, it seems a fair bet it would be somewhat adapted to infecting them. The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and it was most dangerous to men of military age (the W shape age graph). Men's death rates in 1918 far exceeded the female death rates, and altered the sax ratio.The male TB death rate in the years following 1918 was lowered because so many men had died of the Spanish flu (I expect a lowering of the death rate from influenza as a result of COVID-19).

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    I’d bet it’ll turn out to be more like 2x or 3x. WAG as they say.

    Fun topic for a group wager, if only we had reason to believe that we’d ever find out the truth of the matter.

  25. @Anonymous
    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown "Lance Welton" who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    It’s not yet clear how much of a fool Lance Welton made of himself. So beware: Complete anti-Welton- and Peter Frostism could well turn out to be even eh -wronger – than Frost and Whelton.

  26. A University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center molecular epidemiologist is working on an initiated coronavirus study aimed at understanding why certain individuals and racial/ethnic groups are more prone to the infection, and may suffer more severe symptoms of COVID-19.

    That’s racist.

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    Working on, i.e., socially constructing.
    , @e
    Will Lizzie Warren take an axe to him? She's sure any rate of death among browns and blacks has to be because of systemic racism.
  27. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:

    To say that the situation is extremely serious is a supreme understatement. What we are watching is an unprecendented crisis in history. We are watching with our eyes the decline and fall of the United States of America and the end of the U.S Dollar as the international reserve currency. And that is the rosy scenario. It could be the absolute collapse of Society itself. This is actually significantly worse than even the Great Depression, and will make the 2008 real state economic crash seem like a walk in the park in comparson.

    Since the Reagan administration, America has been on an uninterrupted consumption and spending binge. The U.S went from the World’s biggest creditor nation in 1980 to the most indebted country in the history of the earth in 1986. Not only that, fiscally, the national debt went from 20% of GDP back in the 1950’s to 105% of GDP today. Those are Greece numbers. The national debt is now approaching $23 trillion.

    Even worse, American banks, corporations and brokerage firms have close to $150 trillion in debt(toxic assets). That is a value several times larger than the entire GDP itself. There is no amount of QE that can bail all those people out.

    But that is what the FED is doing: they are printing money on an unprecendented scale that puts to shame the Weimar Republic. The FED is flooding the market with liquidity at the rate of almost $200 billion a day. While in the previous 2008 fiancila crisis they bailed out only a small number of very large banks and brokerage firms, they are now doing universal bailouts. So far, over $5 trillion in bailout money.

    The problem is, that is not even nearly enough. The amount of debt is larger than the planet’s entire eco0nomy. The FED will fail, and the U.S Dollar will collapse.

    With hyperinflation and the Dollar reduced to just another fiat currency, Americans will not only have much fewer goods to purchase, as the World refuses U.S dollars as payment, but the few products remaining will be exhorbitantly expensive.

    This is beyond catastrophic. This is the end. the total end. Democrats have just secured the Presidency and Congress for the next 12 years, assuming there will be a country left.

    What is the exit strategy? Moving to Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay. Those places are reasonably civilized and prosperous, and not at all hostile to the descendants of Europeans.

    • LOL: IHTG, Charon
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    The worst thing is that the US, like the Brits, seem to be totally dependent on Chinese masks, Chinese PCR machines, Chinese chemicals, Chinese pharmaceuticals.

    Like cargo cultists on some Pacific island, the Brits are waiting hopefully for the Great White Bird to bring them what they need, when they were once the workshop of the world - as the US was from 1940-1995.

    , @UK
    I'm in the South of Brazil at the moment. It is very pleasant, though I don't think a typical European or North American would find it that comfortable.

    Prior to the shutdown, I was surrounded by young, well-educated professional Brazilians. They are all progressive SJW types with the full panopoly of obsessions, such as "white privilege" and "toxic masculinity".

    Two ironies have been particularly obvious though.

    1. The cool bars I went to with them were almost uniformly and strangely pale; and that is someone from the UK noticing it. Even while there'd inevitably be a rainbow flag hanging on the wall or something and the same uniformity of political opinion.

    2. They all thought Bolsonaro was Hitler reborn, and would take away their freedoms and oppress "minorities" - a word used endlessly and which somehow applies to women (as always) as they are not "dominant" or whatever.

    While now that Bolsonaro has the perfect opportunity to imprison them all in their homes and has not done it, they are somewhat hysterical that he hasn't.
  28. @B36
    Yes, why the disparity in deaths between the sexes? Females are only 40% of those who succumb.
  29. @Realist

    A University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center molecular epidemiologist is working on an initiated coronavirus study aimed at understanding why certain individuals and racial/ethnic groups are more prone to the infection, and may suffer more severe symptoms of COVID-19.
     
    That's racist.

    Working on, i.e., socially constructing.

  30. @Anonymous
    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown "Lance Welton" who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    I like some of Lance Welton’s writing, but you are right that he doesn’t know enough science to have put his butt out on the line for this theory. There may indeed be something to it, though.

    Since you mentioned Mr. Welton, he seems like an outlier at VDare for not being the type to stick only to the facts. VDare writers are some of the very best, when it comes to sticking to the story and the facts, with very solid grammar and proofreading, and they provide links like there was no tomorrow. Mr. Welton will get into what is psychologically wrong with some of the enemies in the ctrl-left, and I don’t think that does any good either – it’s just mumbo-jumo.

  31. @Buzz Mohawk
    Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?

    And do we now spell the name of our 50th state "Hawai'i" with an apostophe to please the indigenous a-holes who are blocking the world's greatest ground-based astronomical observatory from being built atop "their" "sacred" mountain?

    I don’t keep up with astronomy anymore, Buzz. What effective-size mirror are we talking about?

    • Replies: @donut
    Anton can tell you .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIQH_RBd_nM
  32. @Reg Cæsar

    Hawai’i
     
    Actually, Steve spelled it with the apostrophe curling the other way. Which in Greek would signify our H. However, the Greeks spell it Χαβάη.

    Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?
     
    Speaking of obese races, the claim that we're the fattest is both recent and inaccurate. A good ten Polynesian countries outweigh us. Mexico (#29) finishes below Canada (#26). We don't break the top 20 until 1992.




    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nvJsEX9MWpw


    What were the second and third largest US cities in 1840? Baltimore and New Orleans! They had just reached 100,000, joining New York.





    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzPDFeE9csA


    The changing face of our foreign-born:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GlJg2h2NrTM


    HBD crack:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AwVELgMzwN4

    Thanks, Reg, but I really expected more girls on the last one. Instead, I got creeping bar-graphs again. #Disappointing!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    The seven-footer is cute, though. Does that make me a megalophile? A psilophile?
  33. @Anonymous
    To say that the situation is extremely serious is a supreme understatement. What we are watching is an unprecendented crisis in history. We are watching with our eyes the decline and fall of the United States of America and the end of the U.S Dollar as the international reserve currency. And that is the rosy scenario. It could be the absolute collapse of Society itself. This is actually significantly worse than even the Great Depression, and will make the 2008 real state economic crash seem like a walk in the park in comparson.

    Since the Reagan administration, America has been on an uninterrupted consumption and spending binge. The U.S went from the World's biggest creditor nation in 1980 to the most indebted country in the history of the earth in 1986. Not only that, fiscally, the national debt went from 20% of GDP back in the 1950's to 105% of GDP today. Those are Greece numbers. The national debt is now approaching $23 trillion.

    Even worse, American banks, corporations and brokerage firms have close to $150 trillion in debt(toxic assets). That is a value several times larger than the entire GDP itself. There is no amount of QE that can bail all those people out.

    But that is what the FED is doing: they are printing money on an unprecendented scale that puts to shame the Weimar Republic. The FED is flooding the market with liquidity at the rate of almost $200 billion a day. While in the previous 2008 fiancila crisis they bailed out only a small number of very large banks and brokerage firms, they are now doing universal bailouts. So far, over $5 trillion in bailout money.

    The problem is, that is not even nearly enough. The amount of debt is larger than the planet's entire eco0nomy. The FED will fail, and the U.S Dollar will collapse.

    With hyperinflation and the Dollar reduced to just another fiat currency, Americans will not only have much fewer goods to purchase, as the World refuses U.S dollars as payment, but the few products remaining will be exhorbitantly expensive.

    This is beyond catastrophic. This is the end. the total end. Democrats have just secured the Presidency and Congress for the next 12 years, assuming there will be a country left.

    What is the exit strategy? Moving to Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay. Those places are reasonably civilized and prosperous, and not at all hostile to the descendants of Europeans.

    https://youtu.be/A5twFON7bc8

    The worst thing is that the US, like the Brits, seem to be totally dependent on Chinese masks, Chinese PCR machines, Chinese chemicals, Chinese pharmaceuticals.

    Like cargo cultists on some Pacific island, the Brits are waiting hopefully for the Great White Bird to bring them what they need, when they were once the workshop of the world – as the US was from 1940-1995.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The worst thing is that the US, like the Brits, seem to be totally dependent on Chinese masks, Chinese PCR machines, Chinese chemicals, Chinese pharmaceuticals."

    If you NOTICED, you would know. I thought Trump by now would be clamping down on American companies engaging in this unpatriotic activity.

    https://theintercept.com/2020/04/01/coronavirus-medical-supplies-export/

    The U.S. government has placed no restrictions on exports of medical supplies while continuing to impose financial penalties on the import of personal protective gear, protective goggles, pulse oximeters, hand sanitizer, and other medical products from China.

    Then again, Trump had the federal government compete with state governments for those supplies.

    https://www.boston.com/news/politics/2020/03/26/charlie-baker-trump-administration-medical-supplies

    In that way, Trump can play the “hero” by saying “Well, look here, we do have what the states need. Here you go.”
  34. @Anonymous
    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown "Lance Welton" who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    Lance Welton is the worst writer on VDare, with the possible exception of Ann Coulter.

  35. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/ChristinePolon1/status/1245418050385412096

    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You’ve been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat

    It's America. And we're supposed to be a first-world country.
     
    Clearly, she never got the iSteve memo.
    , @Anonymous
    Dr. Colleen Smith is quite active in medical simulations. She was an Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellow a few years ago, co-authored a paper last year on a mass casualty simulation exercise, works in medical simulation education.

    Doctors and nurses are being forbidden from speaking to the press or anyone outside of hospitals during this outbreak. It's illegal for doctors to take video footage of emergency rooms with critical patients.

    https://med.nyu.edu/emergency/education/fellowships/non-acgme-accredited-fellowships/emergency-medicine-simulation-fellowship-0

    https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10823/esr/
    , @Jack D
    People die in hospitals? Stop the presses. Who knew? We must look into this immediately and make sure that it stops forthwith. Maybe we can pass a law against death. We should especially require that the sick and elderly not die, because they are the ones who seem to be the most afflicted by death.

    We also learn that young Dr. Smith has a cold. I predict that she'll be feeling better in about a week, or maybe a few days sooner if she takes some chloroquine.
    , @Anon
    Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith's New York State medical license, and found it wasn't current. It was only valid up to 2018. The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404, but other people say they saw it before it disappeared. She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
  36. @Anonymous
    For some time now I’ve been leaving comments on how carriers of some gene variants like HLA B57 and HLA B27 don’t progress from HIV to AIDS quickly if at all, and were studied in the creation of HIV drugs.

    HLA B27 seems to cause Autoimmune diseases like Anklosing Spondyltis, but is also believed to give some anti-viral protection in AIDS, Hep-C and possibly some Influenzas (see links below) It is most commonly found among Northern Scandanavians (Lapland). May be why Sweden isn’t locking down (Ha ha).

    It seems there are unique properties that flush out viral loads in some people and offer protection.
    So could be a relic of ancient evolution like how genes for Malaria/Sickle Cell Anemia. Who knows.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3240147/

    or

    https://spondylitis.org/research-new/covid-19-and-spondyloarthritis-your-questions-answered/

    Dr John Reveille: “However, be mindful of something else: People who are HLA-B27 positive demonstrate increased natural immunity toward a number of viral infections, such as HIV-1, hepatitis C and influenza, although whether this natural immunity carries over to coronavirus has not been studied.”

    Memory’s bad, but I thought this had been studied on and reported 20 years ago…something about how some research showed many people of (ANY) Northern European descent appeared to be immune to HIV (and/or just AIDS?)…and it was presumed to be a genetic relic of the survivors (and thus descendants) of the black plague and many other plagues in Europe the last 2000 years. I had not heard of the specificity to Scandanavians.

    Interesting!

    Also, Steve said: (When it comes to diseases, people like to have a theory explaining why those who have gotten it deserve to get it, and why they, personally, won’t get it because they deserve to not get it.)

    Probably true, but as a follower of Jesus Christ, when I hear about something like this terrible virus, I am the opposite (as probably many Christians are). I do deserve to get it, as a lifetime sinner, and was essentially born with it, and I have ever reason to suffer for it, but if I somehow survive, it is by GOD’s grace alone. I take nothing for granted. In that sense, I believe there is such a thing as Christian stoicism — momento mori. I was born to sin and die, but for Him, I have each precious day.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    You’re referring to the Delta 32 mutation. The average throughout Europe is about 10% for one copy and 1% for two. IIRC two copies make you immune to most forms of HIV. There’s speculation that one copy slows the progression of HIV. Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation - perhaps from being urban for so long? My wife and I both have one copy of the mutation. We haven’t tested our kids yet.
  37. @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

    It’s America. And we’re supposed to be a first-world country.

    Clearly, she never got the iSteve memo.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  38. @The Alarmist
    O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html


    https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/coronachan.jpg

    Not that it was any good.

  39. From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it’s to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected].

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: “My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. “She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    “I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career.”

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: “I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa’adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family – a wife and two sons – said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen’s Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a “loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend”.

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: “Most of my dad’s time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    “He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    “He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    “I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father.”

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: “We can’t mourn in the normal way. We can’t have a normal funeral.

    “He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now.”

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn’t going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London’s biggest hospitals – St Mary’s and St George’s.

    Related Topics

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Perhaps the vast abundance of the doctors and nurses in those hospitals are foreigners. Have you seen many white guys there, Simon?

    #SinglePayerFortheWIN!

    #CallItSinglePayerSosTheyDon'tCatchOnItsSovietStyleCommunism

    , @dearieme
    The very fact that the Powers That Be have not commented on any racial aspect would lead anyone non-comatose to suspect that there is a racial aspect to it. Once the PTB start actively denying that there is a racial aspect the matter will be settled.

    These things are not moral judgements. As I understand it, as a northern white I am unusually susceptible to Multiple Sclerosis. Shrug! C'est la vie.

    , @London
    My sister is a respiratory doctor in London. Naturally, she was working at the Coronavirus ward in a hospital. Predictably, she is now isolated at her home with a fever, sore throat, cough and all that.

    The test results won't be back until next week, but it is a bit irrelevant, tbh.

    She didn't have a lot of protective gear as there isn't much available and so it is saved for those doing intubations. She seemed ok with that and pointed out that even with all of the gear it would still only be as strong as the weakest link.

    E.g one nurse walking from the "dirty" area to the "clean" one and forgetting she still has her mask on would render it a bit pointless.

    I didn't query her on whether it would lessen the problem, as she seemed very forthright and it isn't the right time for me to do so. It may be mostly true anyway as the virus could be just so virulent that it barely makes a difference...or it could be her coping mechanism for getting on with life in the face of shortages. I suspect it is a bit of both.

    Nonetheless, it is likely that all "frontline" medical staff in London have been exposed to a lot of the virus. She had only gone back to work for a week and was already with the initial and almost imperceptibly minor sore throat a few days later.

    Fortunately, she is young and healthy and will be absolutely fine. But if all medical staff are getting it, it does seem strange that not many more have died.

    , @Alden
    The UK medical and nursing schools stopped accepting White British students about 1985. The NHS is like the American post office and veterans administration, a No Native Whites need apply. I live near a big VA hospital. I’ve never seen a White American Dr in those VA uniforms. Everyone is an Indian.

    The ethnic statistics of the NHS employees are skewed toward Indians, Asians, Africans anything but White British
    , @Jack D

    Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.
     
    Maybe the workforce of the NHS in the places where Wuhan Virus is most active is mainly black and south-Asian? I've been noticing that many if not most of the NYC public hospital ER employees that they've been interviewing (even the doctors) are on the dusky side. The whole country is getting less and less white but it's uneven - in certain areas and certain occupations it's even more so.
    , @Anon
    I showed this article to my daughter who works at a New Jersey hospital. “That’s what my coworkers look like here”. Maybe no surprise that’s who’s getting sick
    , @AnotherDad
    Simon, not sure the point of including all this verbiage.

    (I get longwinded when i ramp up. But this isn't even you making your point with extended arguments/examples.)

    You're point about the NHS workers racial skew--solid, potentially interesting, we'll see.
    A link to the story fine.
    All this Dr. blah, blah blah.--why?
    If you insist on doing it, please use "More" tag.
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Alisha__g/status/1246072241164398592
  40. Samoa gives a good example not far in the history :

    Ameican Samoa were closed and there were very few infected and almost no deaths

    New Zealand Samoas (occidental) reacted very late and got 90% of the population infected.

    The death were uneven:
    30% male
    22% female
    10% children

  41. @Smithsonian_6
    Indeed, I have just read a particularly premature article about why the prevalence of COVID-19 is apparently low in Africa. My bet would be that it is related to the fact that health care in sub-saharan Africa is usually extremely sparse. When a country like Sierra Leone has fewer than 250 doctors in the entire nation then it would be strange indeed if disease outbreaks were not underreported.

    A few days ago the Health Minister of Burundi reported that Burundi had no cases of COVID because Burundi had no testing kits.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Actually, it was people online who claimed that Burundi had no Covid testing equipment. The Burundi health minister and other government officials slammed them as liars. You can guess for yourself if the real liar was the people online or the Burundi government. http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-03/26/c_138919629.htm

    There was one death of a schoolteacher that was considered rather suspicious, but government officials claimed he had tested negative for COVID-19.

    Anyway, this was over a week ago. I wouldn’t be surprised if Burundi has gotten testing equipment by now even if they didn’t have it last week. If nothing else, I might suspect the online rumors about the government not having testing equipment might have encouraged Burundi to get testing equipment.

  42. But what about how the lockdown relates to the HBD of hair care?

    Since the epidemic is playing havoc with hair care, the NYT has this infomercial article, complete with links to products like Playa Healing Hair Masque, $38:

    How to Take Care of Your Hair at Home
    Professional advice on maintenance — and Zoom-friendly styling — for when you can’t get to a salon.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/02/t-magazine/home-hair-care-tips-coronavirus.html?action=click&module=Well&pgtype=Homepage&section=T%20Magazine

    Clockwise from Left: Briogeo Don’t Despair, Repair! Strengthening Treatment Oil, $30, briogeohair.com; Rahua Leave-In Treatment Light, $45, rahua.com; Virtue Split End Serum, $40, virtuelabs.com; Playa Healing Hair Masque, $38, playabeauty.com.Credit…Courtesy of the brands

  43. @Smithsonian_6
    Indeed, I have just read a particularly premature article about why the prevalence of COVID-19 is apparently low in Africa. My bet would be that it is related to the fact that health care in sub-saharan Africa is usually extremely sparse. When a country like Sierra Leone has fewer than 250 doctors in the entire nation then it would be strange indeed if disease outbreaks were not underreported.

    A few days ago the Health Minister of Burundi reported that Burundi had no cases of COVID because Burundi had no testing kits.

  44. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    Perhaps the vast abundance of the doctors and nurses in those hospitals are foreigners. Have you seen many white guys there, Simon?

    #SinglePayerFortheWIN!

    #CallItSinglePayerSosTheyDon’tCatchOnItsSovietStyleCommunism

    • Replies: @Simon in London
    Most of the London hospital staff I've seen are non-white, but I have a good friend who's white English female & a nurse in London, and I used to know a crazy young English woman who was a nurse in training, also white. There are also white South Africans working as anaesthetists and other technical roles, and white Irish nurses.

    But generally, most doctors are south-Asian, most nurses are black or south-Asian.

    A white female nurse died on 2nd April, announced right after my post, so clearly it can happen although older, unfit south Asian & black men seem to be the clearly highest risk group. Why no dead elder white male doctors - that could indeed be that you simply don't see them in the hospitals, that they are nearly all in private practice.

  45. @Black-hole creator
    What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible, and that seems to hold after you control for age/BMI/race/smoking/drinking/whatever. Whenever you see sob stories on TV it is more often than not women or people of color portrayed as victims. Straight white males deserve to be eradicated I guess. Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise. So stay safe and protect yourself, don't be a hero - wear that mask and gloves.

    Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise.

    I wonder how many personnel in essential services will actually stay at their posts in the coming months, and how many will instead go off on stress leave or pretend they have to stay at home to care for someone who’s been infected? Or will just resign.

    That could be the real test of how well western nations are going to cope with the coming crisis as the hysteria ad panic reach fever levels and the economy crumbles.

    What will governments do when cops start refusing to go out on the streets because they’re afraid of the virus? What will happen when there are no Heroes in Blue prepared to risk their lives arresting people for breaking curfew, or for going to the park or playing golf?

    What will the US do when military personnel start deserting their posts? And when all the doctors and nurses are hiding in their homes (and probably hiding under their beds)? Will westerners really pull together in a crisis or will it be every man for himself?

    Maybe whipping up a panic wasn’t such a great idea?

  46. UK says:
    @Anonymous
    To say that the situation is extremely serious is a supreme understatement. What we are watching is an unprecendented crisis in history. We are watching with our eyes the decline and fall of the United States of America and the end of the U.S Dollar as the international reserve currency. And that is the rosy scenario. It could be the absolute collapse of Society itself. This is actually significantly worse than even the Great Depression, and will make the 2008 real state economic crash seem like a walk in the park in comparson.

    Since the Reagan administration, America has been on an uninterrupted consumption and spending binge. The U.S went from the World's biggest creditor nation in 1980 to the most indebted country in the history of the earth in 1986. Not only that, fiscally, the national debt went from 20% of GDP back in the 1950's to 105% of GDP today. Those are Greece numbers. The national debt is now approaching $23 trillion.

    Even worse, American banks, corporations and brokerage firms have close to $150 trillion in debt(toxic assets). That is a value several times larger than the entire GDP itself. There is no amount of QE that can bail all those people out.

    But that is what the FED is doing: they are printing money on an unprecendented scale that puts to shame the Weimar Republic. The FED is flooding the market with liquidity at the rate of almost $200 billion a day. While in the previous 2008 fiancila crisis they bailed out only a small number of very large banks and brokerage firms, they are now doing universal bailouts. So far, over $5 trillion in bailout money.

    The problem is, that is not even nearly enough. The amount of debt is larger than the planet's entire eco0nomy. The FED will fail, and the U.S Dollar will collapse.

    With hyperinflation and the Dollar reduced to just another fiat currency, Americans will not only have much fewer goods to purchase, as the World refuses U.S dollars as payment, but the few products remaining will be exhorbitantly expensive.

    This is beyond catastrophic. This is the end. the total end. Democrats have just secured the Presidency and Congress for the next 12 years, assuming there will be a country left.

    What is the exit strategy? Moving to Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay. Those places are reasonably civilized and prosperous, and not at all hostile to the descendants of Europeans.

    https://youtu.be/A5twFON7bc8

    I’m in the South of Brazil at the moment. It is very pleasant, though I don’t think a typical European or North American would find it that comfortable.

    Prior to the shutdown, I was surrounded by young, well-educated professional Brazilians. They are all progressive SJW types with the full panopoly of obsessions, such as “white privilege” and “toxic masculinity”.

    Two ironies have been particularly obvious though.

    1. The cool bars I went to with them were almost uniformly and strangely pale; and that is someone from the UK noticing it. Even while there’d inevitably be a rainbow flag hanging on the wall or something and the same uniformity of political opinion.

    2. They all thought Bolsonaro was Hitler reborn, and would take away their freedoms and oppress “minorities” – a word used endlessly and which somehow applies to women (as always) as they are not “dominant” or whatever.

    While now that Bolsonaro has the perfect opportunity to imprison them all in their homes and has not done it, they are somewhat hysterical that he hasn’t.

  47. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    The very fact that the Powers That Be have not commented on any racial aspect would lead anyone non-comatose to suspect that there is a racial aspect to it. Once the PTB start actively denying that there is a racial aspect the matter will be settled.

    These things are not moral judgements. As I understand it, as a northern white I am unusually susceptible to Multiple Sclerosis. Shrug! C’est la vie.

  48. I see that the Coronavirus uses the ACE site on cell membranes to enter target cells. Caused me to wonder if taking an ACE inhibitor drug for hypertension (which I do) leaves me more or less susceptible to infection. I’m not going to be conducting field tests. Interesting factoid that may or may not have relevance.

    • Replies: @anon
    Caused me to wonder if taking an ACE inhibitor drug for hypertension (which I do) leaves me more or less susceptible to infection.

    It is a known factor. Be extra careful and alert.
  49. @The Alarmist
    O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html


    https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/coronachan.jpg

    Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan

    People thinking that you can’t drink Corona Beer because it will give you coronavirus is proof that you must never ever underestimate human stupidity. And normal human stupidity combined with hysteria is a very bad combination. The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity. We’re looking at a population that could become as superstitious and unpredictable as a mediæval peasant society.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Except medieval people generally weren't as hysterical as we sophisticated moderns.
    , @anon
    The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity

    Nothing new. A huge wave of fear was a factor in the French revo.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Fear

    https://alphahistory.com/frenchrevolution/great-fear/
  50. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    My sister is a respiratory doctor in London. Naturally, she was working at the Coronavirus ward in a hospital. Predictably, she is now isolated at her home with a fever, sore throat, cough and all that.

    The test results won’t be back until next week, but it is a bit irrelevant, tbh.

    She didn’t have a lot of protective gear as there isn’t much available and so it is saved for those doing intubations. She seemed ok with that and pointed out that even with all of the gear it would still only be as strong as the weakest link.

    E.g one nurse walking from the “dirty” area to the “clean” one and forgetting she still has her mask on would render it a bit pointless.

    I didn’t query her on whether it would lessen the problem, as she seemed very forthright and it isn’t the right time for me to do so. It may be mostly true anyway as the virus could be just so virulent that it barely makes a difference…or it could be her coping mechanism for getting on with life in the face of shortages. I suspect it is a bit of both.

    Nonetheless, it is likely that all “frontline” medical staff in London have been exposed to a lot of the virus. She had only gone back to work for a week and was already with the initial and almost imperceptibly minor sore throat a few days later.

    Fortunately, she is young and healthy and will be absolutely fine. But if all medical staff are getting it, it does seem strange that not many more have died.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Our prayers for you and yours, London.
  51. @Sean
    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that some group is less vulnerable than another to a novel disease
     
    If it evolved amid Chinese last year, it seems a fair bet it would be somewhat adapted to infecting them. The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and it was most dangerous to men of military age (the W shape age graph). Men's death rates in 1918 far exceeded the female death rates, and altered the sax ratio.The male TB death rate in the years following 1918 was lowered because so many men had died of the Spanish flu (I expect a lowering of the death rate from influenza as a result of COVID-19).

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    Western intelligence. Now there’s a reliable source. We know that our western intelligence agencies would never ever lie to us or spread propaganda.

    By the way, I have a really nice bridge I can sell you.

  52. “When it comes to diseases, people like to have a theory explaining why those who have gotten it deserve to get it, and why they, personally, won’t get it because they deserve to not get it.”

    You are frail and immunosuppressed by the chemotherapy you had years ago. Thus, you deserve death by sniffles if you venture outdoors without a mask.

  53. The navy hospital ship in New York Harbor currently has 3 patients. The navy hospital ship in Los Angeles harbor has all of 15 patients for their thousand bed hospitals.

    Not expressing an opinion here, just stating a fact.

    • Replies: @Ron Unz

    The navy hospital ship in New York Harbor currently has 3 patients. The navy hospital ship in Los Angeles harbor has all of 15 patients for their thousand bed hospitals.
     
    I'm not surprised at all. I think Santa Clara County has now gone three days without a single death, and I'm hoping the final total comes in at well under 100. That's astonishing for a county of 2M that last month was a national epicenter of the outbreak before NY had its first death.

    Maybe LA will come in at under 1,000.

    Thank you, thank you, Dr. Sarah Cody!
  54. Anonymous[660] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

    Dr. Colleen Smith is quite active in medical simulations. She was an Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellow a few years ago, co-authored a paper last year on a mass casualty simulation exercise, works in medical simulation education.

    Doctors and nurses are being forbidden from speaking to the press or anyone outside of hospitals during this outbreak. It’s illegal for doctors to take video footage of emergency rooms with critical patients.

    https://med.nyu.edu/emergency/education/fellowships/non-acgme-accredited-fellowships/emergency-medicine-simulation-fellowship-0

    https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10823/esr/

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    Indeed, she has solid credentials. And considering that Covid-19 is REAL, she is putting that expertise to good use. And, yes, she faces potential disciplinary action for discussing about what she is experiencing to the media. She stated that is willing to accept the consequences.
  55. @Chrisnonymous
    Me, on March 6.

    Polynesians were particularly hard hit by the Spanish Flu of a century ago, so it’s a good idea to check up on these things.
     
    That's also consistent with BMI having an effect on respiratory status: fatties can't breath as well.

    Don’t think Polynesians were fat 100 years ago. They were probably all ripped swimmers.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Have a look at period portraits of King Kamehameha's favorite wife.
  56. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    The UK medical and nursing schools stopped accepting White British students about 1985. The NHS is like the American post office and veterans administration, a No Native Whites need apply. I live near a big VA hospital. I’ve never seen a White American Dr in those VA uniforms. Everyone is an Indian.

    The ethnic statistics of the NHS employees are skewed toward Indians, Asians, Africans anything but White British

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    This is an exaggeration. NHS doctors are still mostly white British.
  57. An Italian workmate approached me today to pass on a message. Like another Italian friend he was a close talker(think Seinfeld).

  58. Hawaiʻi-based

    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their “preferred pronouns”. For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn’t spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn’t have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai’i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I'd never seen that before until this article, Jack. As for me, I'm not changing my spelling, and, just as with the BC/CE business, seeing this written in some article on-line would just cause me to quit right there. Sure, the rest may have been interesting or important, but I can't be reading the whole damn web every morning anyway - at least not until I've had my morning Constitutional.
    , @Art Deco
    No, it's phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. 'Paa' is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.
    , @Mike_from_SGV
    Also, the big city south of San Francisco is now San Jose' (don't forget that _'_). They're rubbing our faces in it and laughing at the lack of pushback.
    , @James J. O'Meara
    They used to think I was an Arab. Now they think I'm Hawaiian.
    , @James J. O'Meara
    The names of places foreign buggers live in are words in OUR language.

    Cologne, not Koehln

    Berlin, not "Bear-leeen"

    Etc.

    Ever since the Sandinista days, NPR assholes have been virtue-signalling by pretending to give a "Spanish" pronunciation to such words, even though it distorts the rhythm of an English sentence:

    "Today, in Neegaraghwah,.."

    But never "Bear-leen". You'll notice that only "hicks" say "Par-ee." Why not? Silence.

  59. • Replies: @Federalist
    I agree completely with getting rid of these savage "wet markets" which is where the Chinese Pestilence presumably originated.

    But if Fauci is going to talk about what anyone SHOULD do, government agencies like the NIH, CDC, etc. SHOULD have had some kind of a plan on what to do in the easily foreseeable event that a pandemic virus strikes the US. But they didn't.
    , @AnotherDad
    I honestly was surprised that the Chinese re-opened their wet markets.

    I don't know jack about the machinations in the Chicom politiburo. But i'd thought Xi would be cracking down on this nonsense and sending out a message that boiled down to "We've got our shit together. This won't happen again. Global business will surge forward with China at its hub."

    But instead they've gone with--at least for internal consumption--"the US did this". And basically issued a big f.u. to the world.

    Turns out the Chinese are bigger dicks--metaphorically only--than even i'd imagined.

    I can't quite tell if it's just the cluelessness of isolation or they just figure they've won. I think they have misjudged the likely reaction to what they've put the world through. The globalist goons will no doubt run cover for them--certainly here in the US (minoritarianism central). But even the goons are tired of this crap. And the people are pissed. This is unlikely to work out as the Chinese think.
    , @Rob McX
    The US government is more concerned about the threat from obscure Iranian generals than epidemics caused by grotesque Chinese dietary habits. If America and Europe cared about their people's lives and health, they'd have forced the closure of these disgusting markets long ago.
  60. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    Maybe the workforce of the NHS in the places where Wuhan Virus is most active is mainly black and south-Asian? I’ve been noticing that many if not most of the NYC public hospital ER employees that they’ve been interviewing (even the doctors) are on the dusky side. The whole country is getting less and less white but it’s uneven – in certain areas and certain occupations it’s even more so.

  61. @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

    People die in hospitals? Stop the presses. Who knew? We must look into this immediately and make sure that it stops forthwith. Maybe we can pass a law against death. We should especially require that the sick and elderly not die, because they are the ones who seem to be the most afflicted by death.

    We also learn that young Dr. Smith has a cold. I predict that she’ll be feeling better in about a week, or maybe a few days sooner if she takes some chloroquine.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    Stop being a jackass, Jack. The fact of the matter is that our physicians and nurses in certain areas of the U.S. are being overwhelmed. How about showing some compassion and dignity?

    Perhaps you are one of those types who cannot wait for their parents to die to get your greedy hands on their deed to their house to sell it?
  62. @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

    Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith’s New York State medical license, and found it wasn’t current. It was only valid up to 2018. The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404, but other people say they saw it before it disappeared. She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith’s New York State medical license, and found it wasn’t current."

    You mean they made a CLAIM.

    "It was only valid up to 2018".

    According to who?

    "The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404..."

    Evidence, please.

    "She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor".

    You are falling for Fake News.
    , @Anonymous
    To be clear, she's not a generic "crisis actor". Ordinary crisis actors would not be very believable in specialized roles like doctors. She's an actual doctor who seems to have extensive involvement in running medical simulations for education.

    It's illegal to record video inside emergency rooms. Moreover, people have called the hospital the video is from and apparently Dr. Smith is not currently working there and the hospital is not overloaded and out of respirators like Dr. Smith claimed in the video. This coupled with Dr. Smith specializing in medical simulations makes that NY Times story quite strange.
  63. @Mr McKenna
    Fat Countries is fun: it's the USA + some Arab/Moslem countries + a bunch of inconsequential, mostly Pacific island nations. The cities graphic was also entertaining, though a bit misleading, as (e.g.) Southwark, Northern Liberties, Spring Garden etc are all eventually part of Philly. But they had to run the graphics with the data they had.

    Similarly, in recent years most older cities have long since outgrown their limits, and metro areas (esp consolidated or 'combined' metros) are a more meaningful measure of urban agglomerations. Which is why Phoenix and San Antonio, for example, aren't anywhere near the largest metropolitan areas, but the SF Bay Area and Wash-Balt are now 4th and 3rd respectively--while their constituent cities are relatively small.

    Height? Once upon a time, the USA was one of the world's leading countries! Something you can tell your grandchildren. Who will probably be, as TD keeps reminding us: dark, short, and fat.

    ….. La raza cósmica

    • Replies: @Corn
    An angry Latina on twitter once said she’d like to see white people pick their own vegetables.

    I’d like to see alot of the Mexicans I’ve met pick their own vegetables.
  64. @Jack D
    People die in hospitals? Stop the presses. Who knew? We must look into this immediately and make sure that it stops forthwith. Maybe we can pass a law against death. We should especially require that the sick and elderly not die, because they are the ones who seem to be the most afflicted by death.

    We also learn that young Dr. Smith has a cold. I predict that she'll be feeling better in about a week, or maybe a few days sooner if she takes some chloroquine.

    Stop being a jackass, Jack. The fact of the matter is that our physicians and nurses in certain areas of the U.S. are being overwhelmed. How about showing some compassion and dignity?

    Perhaps you are one of those types who cannot wait for their parents to die to get your greedy hands on their deed to their house to sell it?

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
  65. @Anonymous
    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown "Lance Welton" who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    Yes, Welton has been way, way ahead of the evidence. I’m also disturbed by the Z-man, and others like him, who seem convinced that we are panicking over a virus that is really no more of a threat than a bad flu season.

    Stay well Steve. We need you!

  66. @PiltdownMan
    Not really OT:

    From the Washington Post.

    Fauci says world community should push for closure of ‘wet markets’ that sell animals for human consumption

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2020/04/03/coronavirus-latest-news/

    I agree completely with getting rid of these savage “wet markets” which is where the Chinese Pestilence presumably originated.

    But if Fauci is going to talk about what anyone SHOULD do, government agencies like the NIH, CDC, etc. SHOULD have had some kind of a plan on what to do in the easily foreseeable event that a pandemic virus strikes the US. But they didn’t.

  67. @Corvinus
    Smith does work there and they are low on ventilators. You've been hoodwinked, LadyWarAnon.

    https://health.usnews.com/doctors/colleen-smith-915974

    https://sinaiem.org/people/colleen-smith/

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1245123712011112454

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE's strength.
  68. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    I showed this article to my daughter who works at a New Jersey hospital. “That’s what my coworkers look like here”. Maybe no surprise that’s who’s getting sick

  69. res says:

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that any specific group would be more or less vulnerable than any other to a novel disease

    It depends on what you mean here. There is a very good reason to believe groups might differ in resistance to various diseases: HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) frequency differences in populations.
    Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267126/

    Frequency maps for many (all?) HLA alleles available in the supporting material: http://pypop.org/popdata/

    Some background from wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_leukocyte_antigen

    Note that the HLA region is one of the most variable on the human genome. So much so that most current genome sequencing does not cover it well (if anyone knows otherwise, please elaborate. there is current work on inferring HLA information from high coverage whole genome sequencing, but to my knowledge that has not made it to the consumer testing sector yet–or at least not the affordable part).

    There is some SNP based work though. For example, see the paper linked at this 23andMe blog post:
    https://blog.23andme.com/23andme-research/study-finds-genetic-links-vulnerability-common-infectious-diseases/

    A simple rule of thumb might be that groups are most likely to be resistant to diseases similar to those their ancestors experienced historically. Not sure how well that idea holds up in reality. Especially given how diseases have traveled worldwide (e.g. the Native Americans who were least resistant to smallpox died).

    P.S. The wild card is novel disease. Are there any truly novel infectious diseases (the viruses and bacteria are evolving as well)? The question is how much the disease organisms vary from the existing HLA detection templates. And how that affects resistance. Perhaps worth repeating this bit of trivia from another comment of mine:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/masks-inbound-and-outbound-protection/#comment-3812155

    One bit of trivia about the 1968 H3N2 virus:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3291411/

    Thirty-seven years later, the H3N2 subtype still reigns as the major and most troublesome influenza A virus in humans.

  70. @Dumbo
    Women are by nature more resistant to most diseases and particularly to flu-like diseases (ergo "man flu"). They also live longer in general. I guess the ability of having babies might be related to that.

    Please stop posting bullshit on this website, with your only reference being idioms like “man flu.”. Women are more susceptible to flu and disease in general. Their longer lifespan is linked to their lower participation in high-risk activity and their tendency to go to hospitals more often than men do.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-20452192

    Research suggests that women are at greater risk of getting flu than men because they tend to spend more time around children, who are more likely to have a flu-like illness in the first place.

    A nationwide flu survey carried out by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine during last winter found that women were 16% more likely to say they had flu symptoms.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    You, sir, are a moron. Women having "more chance of getting the flu because of being around children" does not invalidate my point that they are more resistant to it and/or have milder symptoms than men. By the way, the 1918 "Spanish" flu, like the coronavirus, also killed disproportionally more men than women.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2740912/
  71. Given the body count in Spain and Italy (and France and the UK), compared with Germany, and the predilection of HDB’ers to shoehorn everything into a ‘it must be racial’ box, I can only say ‘da troof’ is clearly that Corona is a bioweapon deployed by the Germans as their latest scheme to assume ultimate power over Europe 😉

  72. @Chrisnonymous
    Me, on March 6.

    Polynesians were particularly hard hit by the Spanish Flu of a century ago, so it’s a good idea to check up on these things.
     
    That's also consistent with BMI having an effect on respiratory status: fatties can't breath as well.

    IIRC, Spam has no redeemable qualities for immune system boosting.

  73. This makes sense to me. It’s like when Europeans came to the new world and the diseases rampaged through the natives. The natives hadn’t built up the immunity.

    Similarly, looking at the pandemics tbroughout history suggest many started to East Asia. Maybe the reason Korea and Japan and Asian communities in the US haven’t been hit so hard is that East Asians have built up immunity to these types of epidemics. Maybe China isn’t lying so much about the death count.

  74. “On the other hand I haven’t been paying much attention to speculation over whether some racial groups are more or less prone to infection and severity of outcome.”

    No, instead you’ve been rabbiting on and on about how skiers are in large part to blame for spreading a pandemic, including to such far reaching places (and non-skiing nations) as located in South America and Africa.

    Question: Are there more Chinese US citizens residing in the US, or are there more US citizens who ski? And remember, while the total number of skiers tends to fluctuate year by year, the number of citizens only increases with each passing census. COVID-19 also appears to be hitting major urban centers the hardest, which is where significant percentages of ethnic groups reside, as opposed to exurbs. No one is debating whether or not all people groups are prone to infection. The question is, perhaps there is indeed a racial component for the rate of infection, and which groups are more prone to becoming infected as well as developing more severe symptoms of the virus.

    Question: The COVID-19 Virus is considered to be part of SARS (originated in China). Bird and Swine Flu also originated in China as well. With this type of research ongoing, what would Darwin, Galton et al have decided? Also, do we not have precedent for deducing that certain groups are more prone to various diseases? (e.g. Sickle Cell, etc). Answer: We do. And, for the last two decades of the twenty-first century, the world now has a large amount of data and research regarding the originator of such infectious diseases, as well as a percentage of rate of infections by racial composition. From the research, it should be fairly easy to deduce which groups are more prone to being infected with COVID-19. As ‘Rona is related to SARS, start by comparing the infection and death rates worldwide and go from there.

    *Btw, at present time, HI does not appear to have been very hard hit by COVID-19.

    ** If this is a bit much, then word to the wise, the UN should unilaterally step in and demand the closing of wet markets (which are largely operating in China and other Asian nations). In other words, don’t eat bats.

  75. There is already enough info available to make some interesting suppositions.

    Covid19 has a protein that appears to bind to ACE2 receptors in order to attach and infect cells. These receptors are in epithelial cells, lungs and organs. You will note that those that die have bad immune systems, usually have both respiratory failure and organ failure. They are giving antibiotics to fight the sepsis (bacterial infection) in peoples’ bodies whose cells with ACE2 receptors have been ravaged by the virus. COVID19 kills cells with ACE2 receptors and leaves a mess of delicious cell parts, making an opportunity for bacterial infection.

    ACE2 receptors play a role in kidney function and blood pressure, and drugs like lisinopril and losartan block the ACE2 signal and help lower high blood pressure. BUT…ACE2 does not work nearly as well on those of African descent compared to caucasians. So something is up here.

    Lisinopril interrupts the ACE2 enzyme. Losartan actually blocks the receptor, so those on Lisinopril may actually have more open ACE2 receptors for covid19 to attach because serum ACE2 levels are lower and are not filling the receptors. Losartan in the other hand may be actually block the receptors and interrupting covid19 reproduction. But I am not a biologist or a Dr.

    Moreover, you will notice that the hydroxyquinin drug is an anti malarial drug. Sickle Cell is one among what are probably a number of genetic responses of Africans evolving to fight malaria. There may be a relationship.

    The Detroit news had an article this morning indicating that blacks are being hit harder in Detroit than whites. Not sure what this means, or if your assertion about them being more resistant is correct.

    I think that working class blacks with a job got exposed earlier and more often than others as they worked in hospitality and public facing government jobs. They are father along the curve of the pandemic. Blacks that get the disease are typically more overweight, diabetic and generally in poorer health, and thus the infection rate might be slower, but the severity of the infection will be worse.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  76. @The Alarmist
    What about the correlation of COVID-19 deaths with the consumption of SPAM®?

    Don’t know about SPAM®, But I see a puzzling correlation between latitude and Covid deaths. Countries South of 18 degree North parallel seem relatively unscathed. May be due to warmer weather. If so, summer can’t come fast enough.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Yeah, I'm personally rooting for Global Warming. Maybe we should sacrifice Greta Thunberg to the Climate Gods to speed it up.
  77. Here is something that talks about the relationship between ACE2 and corona.

    https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2020/03/17/angiotensin-and-the-coronavirus

  78. @Mr McKenna
    Fat Countries is fun: it's the USA + some Arab/Moslem countries + a bunch of inconsequential, mostly Pacific island nations. The cities graphic was also entertaining, though a bit misleading, as (e.g.) Southwark, Northern Liberties, Spring Garden etc are all eventually part of Philly. But they had to run the graphics with the data they had.

    Similarly, in recent years most older cities have long since outgrown their limits, and metro areas (esp consolidated or 'combined' metros) are a more meaningful measure of urban agglomerations. Which is why Phoenix and San Antonio, for example, aren't anywhere near the largest metropolitan areas, but the SF Bay Area and Wash-Balt are now 4th and 3rd respectively--while their constituent cities are relatively small.

    Height? Once upon a time, the USA was one of the world's leading countries! Something you can tell your grandchildren. Who will probably be, as TD keeps reminding us: dark, short, and fat.

    Fat Countries is fun:

    Indeed.For example, the two fattest countries in Europe are Malta (28.90) and the UK (27.80).

    Italy, in contrast, is comparatively svelte (19.90). New Zealand (30.80) is slightly fatter than Australia (29.00). Frankly, given all the Maori in NZ, I was expecting it to be a lot fatter.

    • Replies: @res
    Where are you getting your numbers? They are BMI, right? Your numbers are very different from what I see at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_body_mass_index

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?
  79. @Mr McKenna
    What say you science-type guys to this? It seems promising:

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/ebiom/article/PIIS2352-3964(20)30118-3/fulltext#seccesectitle0001

    Personally, I’m more concerned with the pro-vaccine hopium surrounding this pandemic than whether it affects racial groups differently. You’re welcome to take any and all vaccines you’d like, but the second they force me to take one, I go postal. Herd immunity is for sheeple, not people with rights to their own body, for chrissakes.

    Now, if the vaccine manufacturers had even a tiny shred of liability for adverse vaccine reactions (Guillane-Barre or any of the other 100-plus chronic, autoimmune disorders, food allergies, asthma, etc.), which they haven’t had since 1986, my militancy on the issue would soften considerably. If you think I’m wrong about vaccine safety, fine, I may be. And I have no desire to prevent you or anyone else from taking any vaccine you consent to.

    The greatest need for biomedical research, in my opinion, is to understand the genetic and environmental mechanisms of autoimmunity, an expanding epidemic of chronic disease and
    disability. Maybe we could even develop tests to screen people for susceptibility to immune system hyper-sensitivity pre-vaccination; that’d sure make me feel better about taking the shot. But first Fauci et.al. have to admit there’s work to be done to improve vaccine safety, and the pro-vaccine forces (pharma and the media they almost single-handedly fund, primarily) have backed themselves into a corner on this. It appears the “vaccines are safe and effective” lie (again, just my opinion…) is just about the only official propaganda any significant percentage of the population believes any more. And all this chronic immune-related disease is great for the drug/healthcare business..

  80. @Anonymous
    Dr. Colleen Smith is quite active in medical simulations. She was an Emergency Medicine Simulation Fellow a few years ago, co-authored a paper last year on a mass casualty simulation exercise, works in medical simulation education.

    Doctors and nurses are being forbidden from speaking to the press or anyone outside of hospitals during this outbreak. It's illegal for doctors to take video footage of emergency rooms with critical patients.

    https://med.nyu.edu/emergency/education/fellowships/non-acgme-accredited-fellowships/emergency-medicine-simulation-fellowship-0

    https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10823/esr/

    Indeed, she has solid credentials. And considering that Covid-19 is REAL, she is putting that expertise to good use. And, yes, she faces potential disciplinary action for discussing about what she is experiencing to the media. She stated that is willing to accept the consequences.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Keypusher
    Um, @YetAnotherAnon, what exactly in that response makes @Corvinus a troll? “I don’t agree” is not an adequate reason.
  81. @Hippopotamusdrome

    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE’s strength.

    • Replies: @res

    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE’s strength.
     
    Good boy. You recited a goodthinker talking point which means you are an extremely virtuous person. (signaling virtue was what you were concerned with there, right?)

    If you have any interest in actually engaging with true reality take a look at this:
    https://eukaryotewritesblog.com/2017/08/22/diversity-and-team-performance-what-the-research-says/

    Social categorization

    This is the human tendency to have an ingroup / outgroup mindset. People like their ingroup more. It’s an “us and them” mentality and it’s often totally unconscious. When diversity interacts with this, the effects are often – though not always – negative.

    Diverse teams tend to have:
    - Lower feelings of group cohesion / identification with group
    - Worse communication (3)
    - More conflict (of productive but also non-productive varieties) (also the perception of more conflict) (5)
    - Biases

    A silver lining: One of these ingrouping biases is the expectation that people more similar to us will also think more like us. Diversity clues us into diversity of opinions. (6) This gets us into:
     
    P.S. Note the very informative comments on that article as well.
  82. @syonredux

    Fat Countries is fun:
     
    Indeed.For example, the two fattest countries in Europe are Malta (28.90) and the UK (27.80).

    http://d.ibtimes.co.uk/en/full/196051/overweight-women.jpg


    Italy, in contrast, is comparatively svelte (19.90). New Zealand (30.80) is slightly fatter than Australia (29.00). Frankly, given all the Maori in NZ, I was expecting it to be a lot fatter.

    Where are you getting your numbers? They are BMI, right? Your numbers are very different from what I see at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_body_mass_index

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Where are you getting your numbers?

     

    I'm getting them here:


    List of countries by obesity rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_obesity_rate

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?
     
    Thanks for asking.I'm fine. Just a tad busy. My Dad's in his 80s (Hence, prime material for Covid-19) ,so I had had him move in with me at the beginning of March. Plus, the virus has thrown my uni into an uproar (some classes cancelled, some moved entirely online, etc).
  83. @Jack D

    Hawaiʻi-based
     
    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their "preferred pronouns". For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn't spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn't have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai'i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    I’d never seen that before until this article, Jack. As for me, I’m not changing my spelling, and, just as with the BC/CE business, seeing this written in some article on-line would just cause me to quit right there. Sure, the rest may have been interesting or important, but I can’t be reading the whole damn web every morning anyway – at least not until I’ve had my morning Constitutional.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    oops, I guess that'd be BCE/CE that I don't take to.

    = Achmed from Wyo'ming.
    , @dearieme
    No need to fuss about the CE/BCE rigmarole. I pronounce them "Christian Era" and "Before the Christian Era". Prob solved.
  84. res says:
    @Corvinus
    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE's strength.

    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE’s strength.

    Good boy. You recited a goodthinker talking point which means you are an extremely virtuous person. (signaling virtue was what you were concerned with there, right?)

    If you have any interest in actually engaging with true reality take a look at this:
    https://eukaryotewritesblog.com/2017/08/22/diversity-and-team-performance-what-the-research-says/

    Social categorization

    This is the human tendency to have an ingroup / outgroup mindset. People like their ingroup more. It’s an “us and them” mentality and it’s often totally unconscious. When diversity interacts with this, the effects are often – though not always – negative.

    Diverse teams tend to have:
    – Lower feelings of group cohesion / identification with group
    – Worse communication (3)
    – More conflict (of productive but also non-productive varieties) (also the perception of more conflict) (5)
    – Biases

    A silver lining: One of these ingrouping biases is the expectation that people more similar to us will also think more like us. Diversity clues us into diversity of opinions. (6) This gets us into:

    P.S. Note the very informative comments on that article as well.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Res, I've had conversations on threads with Mr. Corvinus before. It just never works out. He will never answer your questions directly (anything that refutes a point), and it goes round and round until carpal tunnel sets in. He's always very polite, so that's why people give it a go trying to explain things to him. He is not really here to learn anything.

    I really don't know why Corvinus is on here. He's not funny like Tiny Duck, but he will write something in contradiction to anything iSteve writes, no matter what. If you get an agreement from him, it's only when you've agreed with every damn thing he's just written, which is highly unlikely in my case.

    What's the point, Corvinus? Were you hired early on to get the page-view count up? If so, unz doesn't need you anymore, especially during these trying times of the Kung Flu. Restructuring, yeah, that's the ticket...
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "If you (Coronavinus - YAA) have any interest in actually engaging with true reality..."

    For an intelligent man that's a rookie mistake to make.

    I gave up engaging with him a long time ago, and now the "Troll" and "Ignore Commenter" buttons are my friends.

  85. @Black-hole creator
    What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible, and that seems to hold after you control for age/BMI/race/smoking/drinking/whatever. Whenever you see sob stories on TV it is more often than not women or people of color portrayed as victims. Straight white males deserve to be eradicated I guess. Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise. So stay safe and protect yourself, don't be a hero - wear that mask and gloves.

    True, but if I recall correctly pretty much all infectious diseases tend to hit men harder than women; it appears that there is some immune downregulatory effect associated with testosterone. The flip side of that is that women tend to have much higher rates of autoimmune diseases (lupus, rheumathoid arthritis, etc.) caused by immune overactivity. Caveat that I’m getting outside my area of expertise.

    Incidentally this is why I think testosterone supplementation is a terrible idea, unless you make your living showing off your chiseled body. Seen a few cases of otherwise very healthy, upstanding older men with endocarditis without any obvious risk factors, of note they all seemed to be unusually toned for their age. I might just be seeing patterns where they don’t exist however.

    I also think boob jobs are a bad idea, so I guess I’m an equal opportunity scold…

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Yes, agreed that men should never get boob jobs, period. It just doesn't become them. Best not to go equal opportunity on that procedure and to save it for the gals.
  86. OT: Brookings Institution timeline of the Covid-19 outbreak in the United States is damning; reliance (both psychological and legal) on the CDC and the FDA, the vaunted central government organizations, is the root cause of our problems.

    https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-federal-governments-coronavirus-actions-and-failures-timeline-and-themes/

    What was the government doing during this time?

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry/timeline-trump-impeachment-inquiry-n1066691

  87. @Jack D

    Hawaiʻi-based
     
    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their "preferred pronouns". For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn't spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn't have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai'i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    No, it’s phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. ‘Paa’ is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    No, it’s phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. ‘Paa’ is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.
     
    Actually, it's the same glo'al stop heard in the East End of London.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    So not ‘Ha-whyee’ (in English) but ‘Hawai-E’ or ‘Havai-E’? How cheesy. I’m going to call it Havarti from now on. Havarti is shot through with haoles. I can live with that.
  88. @TelfoedJohn
    Don’t think Polynesians were fat 100 years ago. They were probably all ripped swimmers.

    Have a look at period portraits of King Kamehameha’s favorite wife.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I was thinking the same, but the women were always more sedentary (and fatter, for those who could afford it) than the men. Having a fat wife was a sign that you were rich in many societies because only the rich could afford to eat enough (In Fiddler on the Roof Tevye dreams of a wife with a "proper double chin".) And of course the King was the richest man so he should have the fattest wife.

    A lot of things are inverted in modern society - the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.
  89. Been posting about this for months now. Some interesting evidence that is disputed that some variants in IFITM3 have an effect on severity and perhaps susceptability to influenza infection. (Also suggested for SARs) The risk variant is in a kind of balancing selection frequency in China and somewhat frequency in West Africa but almost absent in Indo-Europeans and a protective variant is very common in Indo-Europeans but almost absent in China.

    These variants are speculated to confer protection from dengue fever, yellow fever and possibly malaria but confer risk towards influenza and coronaviruses. This is somewhat debated in terms of how much of an impact the variants identified so far have but it is clear if such variants exist that they would be in the IFIT genes and the identification of them in those genes is suggestive. The variants identified aren’t causative but may be in high linkage with ones which are.

    IFITM3: How genetics influence influenza infection demographically
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2319417018305675
    The role of host genetics in influenza infection is unclear despite decades of interest. Confounding factors such as age, sex, ethnicity and environmental factors have made it difficult to assess the role of genetics without influence. In recent years a single nucleotide polymorphism, interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) rs12252, has been shown to alter the severity of influenza infection in Asian populations.

    The variants aren’t a part of many of the arrays used to genotype world populations yet so most of this is estimated using the fairy restricted choices in the 1KG samples and through imputation.

    IFITM Genes, Variants, and Their Roles in the Control and Pathogenesis of Viral Infections
    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2018.03228/full

    IFITM3 protects the heart during influenza virus infection
    https://www.pnas.org/content/116/37/18607

    Distinct Patterns of IFITM-Mediated Restriction of Filoviruses, SARS Coronavirus, and Influenza A Virus
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017121/

    SNP-mediated disruption of CTCF binding at the IFITM3 promoter is associated with severe influenza risk in humans
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702558/

    High Level Antibody Response to Pandemic Influenza H1N1/09 Virus Is Associated With Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein-3 rs12252-CC in Young Adults
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5962690/

    Back to the Future: Lessons Learned From the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6187080/

  90. There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that any specific group would be more or less vulnerable than any other to a novel disease

    COVID-19 is novel, but coronaviruses have been around for a long time. They were normally mild in their effects until the emergence of SARS in 2002. So there is a possibility that different human populations have coevolved with coronaviruses in different ways.

    Coronaviruses infect lung tissue via the ACE2 receptor. This receptor varies structurally not only between Asians and other human groups but also between different Asian groups. In particular, the Chinese population has fewer alleles that code for weak binding to the coronavirus S-protein. Different ACE2 alleles are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease with a distinct global pattern of prevalence: 22% in Italy, 23% in China, 30% in the United Kingdom, and 40% in the United States.

    I don’t think this is a case of some populations becoming more resistant than others to coronaviruses. I think it’s the reverse. Some populations have become more susceptible to coronavirus infection as a means to prevent more serious pulmonary infections, like tuberculosis and pneumonic plague. This preventive effect has been shown with other viruses, notably γherpesvirus 68 and cytomegalovirus. The immune response is thereby boosted through production of large quantities of IFN-γ and through activation of macrophages.

    Historically, tuberculosis was especially prevalent in crowded environments, where people lived in proximity not only to each other but also to domesticated animals. Such environments have existed continously for the longest time in China, as well as in areas like the Indo-Gangetic Plain, the Fertile Crescent, and the Mediterranean Basin. So it is in those areas where I would expect to see the greatest susceptibility to coronavirus infection.

    Please note: all humans can get infected by coronaviruses. I’m simply saying that the severity of the infection varies from one population to another. In the case of Europe, I suspect there is a south-to-north gradient, with the severity being highest in the south.

    Yes, other factors are involved. Natural selection acts on the end result, not on the means to that end. So there has been selection not only for inborn means but also for culturally acquired means: avoiding physical contact with strangers, adding spices to food, etc. People may not have understood why or how those cultural traditions worked, but they did work and were passed on to subsequent generations. Much of modern culture has involved getting rid of such traditions because they are “irrational.”

    So be modern. Hug a stranger.

  91. How is the UW model Birx and Fauci are relying on actually doing? I’m hearing of big discrepancies.

    • Replies: @Sean
    In 2012 Dr Dr. Anthony S. Fauci of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, stated that “MERS-CoV does not spread in a sustained person to person way at all”. But he added there was a potential danger in that it is possible for the virus to mutate into a strain that does transmit from person to person. (“Fauci: New Virus Not Yet a ‘threat to the world’ (video)”. Washington Times. 31 August 2012.)

    The previous two novel coronaviruses (SARS and MERS) had high mortality but were not terribly contagious by aerosol and before the infected got sick, and so did not spread easily between people in casual contact. On realizing that COVID-19 was spread by aerosol very easily by healthy people, Fauci was not the only epidemiologist to freak out. Fearing his 2012 worry had materialized in the shape of COVID-19 with mortality just like MERS and SARS, they went with the assumption COVID-19 had a death rate that would overwhelm hospitals and perhaps even cause cause societal breakdown if it was left to spread. But the various originally reported death rates from Wuhan use far too low a denominator, and this is just the cases of active infection. The Chinese had no serological assay to detect antibodies to the pathogen in those who had been infected but eradicated the virus from their bodies. So the denominator could be a enormous number that when the deaths are divided by it gives a universal death rate, for the whole wide world of under 0.1. It is possible that the Chinese are hiding how many deaths there are in their country, but if they have had tens of thousands of hidden death that is probably a sign that the most of the population of China has already been infected and eradicated the disease from their bodies so that only an antibody assay can detect that they once had it.

    The short answer is that Fauci made a worst case assumption that the COVID-19 pathogen (SARS-CoV-2 ) kills relatively many of the people it infects (compared to flu) and got off to a late start. The alternative, which is looking more and more likely with the lack of mass deaths, is the pathogen made an earlier start and had time to have gone through half or more of the population in Western Countries. For this scenario, SARS-CoV-2 would have to produce serious illness in only a tiny minority of people (the sort who might well die if they caught flu which being previously encountered by our immune systems they see coming) with the rest being asymptomatic or suffering only the mildest of symptoms, and things were never going to be as bad as he said. I can see Fauci may have decided scare tactics were justified, but he has sold the pass. I speak of the trust that the population, whose taxes pay for his institution, put in science; they will not be as willing to listen with total credulity next time. On the other hand, we would be able to cope better with a Contagion-style bring-out-your-dead pandemic that may be in our future.

    , @Polynikes
    Not well so far. Off by a factor of 4 in hospitalizations and ICU beds. Model is one week old.


    https://twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1246107585129992192?s=20
  92. @Art Deco
    Have a look at period portraits of King Kamehameha's favorite wife.

    I was thinking the same, but the women were always more sedentary (and fatter, for those who could afford it) than the men. Having a fat wife was a sign that you were rich in many societies because only the rich could afford to eat enough (In Fiddler on the Roof Tevye dreams of a wife with a “proper double chin”.) And of course the King was the richest man so he should have the fattest wife.

    A lot of things are inverted in modern society – the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.

    • LOL: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Obesity is a relatively new occurrence for modern humans. Search the hyroglifics of Ancient Egyptian women, the statues of Greco-Roman times, of the Mosaics during the Byzantine Empire. You do NOT see many fat women, period. Fairly simple really. With outbreaks of plague, and especially famines on a regular basis, one simply couldn't afford to overeat. Even among the wealthy, you didn't see people high on the hog, cause they weren't fat pigs. The Polynesians were the exception to the rule. Pretty much everywhere else on the planet throughout most of human history people simply weren't obese, much less grossly overweight. How could they be? Most of their lives weren't sedentary, they constantly moved around. Also, the food quality while limited at times wasn't overly processed. Junk food was for the most part, nonexistent.

    Aside from the late Victorian era for the wealthy in the US, (ca. 1870-1920) the last three decades have been unprecedented in levels of US obesity. Which also correlates with more and more processed foods, more junk food, and more citizens living a sedentary lifestyle.

    And that has got to end.
    , @AnotherDad


    .. the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.
     
    Classic.
  93. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    Simon, not sure the point of including all this verbiage.

    (I get longwinded when i ramp up. But this isn’t even you making your point with extended arguments/examples.)

    You’re point about the NHS workers racial skew–solid, potentially interesting, we’ll see.
    A link to the story fine.
    All this Dr. blah, blah blah.–why?
    If you insist on doing it, please use “More” tag.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  94. @Jack D
    I was thinking the same, but the women were always more sedentary (and fatter, for those who could afford it) than the men. Having a fat wife was a sign that you were rich in many societies because only the rich could afford to eat enough (In Fiddler on the Roof Tevye dreams of a wife with a "proper double chin".) And of course the King was the richest man so he should have the fattest wife.

    A lot of things are inverted in modern society - the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.

    Obesity is a relatively new occurrence for modern humans. Search the hyroglifics of Ancient Egyptian women, the statues of Greco-Roman times, of the Mosaics during the Byzantine Empire. You do NOT see many fat women, period. Fairly simple really. With outbreaks of plague, and especially famines on a regular basis, one simply couldn’t afford to overeat. Even among the wealthy, you didn’t see people high on the hog, cause they weren’t fat pigs. The Polynesians were the exception to the rule. Pretty much everywhere else on the planet throughout most of human history people simply weren’t obese, much less grossly overweight. How could they be? Most of their lives weren’t sedentary, they constantly moved around. Also, the food quality while limited at times wasn’t overly processed. Junk food was for the most part, nonexistent.

    Aside from the late Victorian era for the wealthy in the US, (ca. 1870-1920) the last three decades have been unprecedented in levels of US obesity. Which also correlates with more and more processed foods, more junk food, and more citizens living a sedentary lifestyle.

    And that has got to end.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    The Spaniards who conquered Mexico deliberately targeted fat Indians and got a twofer: the individuals killed were high caste and killing them removed the officers; and their body fat was used to seal wounds the horses had received. See “The Conquest of New Spain.”
    , @Anon7
    Most Egyptian art is heavily stylized and uniform.

    I’ve seen only one exception to this rule in a museum, a statue of an Egyptian overseer, life size, being carried on a palanquin. He is realistically obese and sedentary, wearing just a sheet around his waist covering the lower half of his body. He looks exactly like an overweight bureaucrat.
  95. @Black-hole creator
    What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible, and that seems to hold after you control for age/BMI/race/smoking/drinking/whatever. Whenever you see sob stories on TV it is more often than not women or people of color portrayed as victims. Straight white males deserve to be eradicated I guess. Also a lot of female nurses are just quitting their jobs right now, what a surprise. So stay safe and protect yourself, don't be a hero - wear that mask and gloves.

    What nobody is talking about much right now is that men are much more susceptible,

    Women are under-represented and under-diagnosed as heart patient. Therefore less likely to receive ACE-2 inhibitors. From my doctor, learned that ACE-1 inhibitors (ABE blockers) are just as bad due to complex interplay between molecules, biology, etc (I’m not a doctor). So men are more likely to take these meds and experience the complications with COVID-19.

  96. We need ideas for nurturing small business startups, else dead nation financially speaking in three months.

  97. @Realist

    A University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center molecular epidemiologist is working on an initiated coronavirus study aimed at understanding why certain individuals and racial/ethnic groups are more prone to the infection, and may suffer more severe symptoms of COVID-19.
     
    That's racist.

    Will Lizzie Warren take an axe to him? She’s sure any rate of death among browns and blacks has to be because of systemic racism.

  98. @Simon in London
    From Daily Telegraph today. All NHS workers killed by the virus so far have been black or South-Asian. All but one were male. Judging by this, elderly black & south-Asian males seem the most at risk by far.

    _______________________

    These are the NHS workers who have died from coronavirus
    As coronavirus spreads throughout the UK, The Telegraph will pay tribute to the medics who have lost their lives fighting Covid-19

    By
    Victoria Ward
    and
    Izzy Lyons
    3 April 2020 • 12:56pm
    NHS victims workers staff frontline died coronavirus
    The risks taken daily by the armies of British doctors, nurses and healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients have been starkly illustrated by a growing number of deaths.

    Several NHS workers have already lost their lives after contracting the disease from patients and that number is likely to soar.

    The rising tally comes amid mounting concerns over the testing crisis, with ministers under increasing pressure to explain when NHS workers are to be tested and why Britain lags behind other nations in testing.

    The Government is also under pressure to accelerate the supply of protective equipment and address growing fears that frontline staff risk both catching and spreading coronavirus.

    The devastated daughter of one medic who has already died, likely spoke for all grieving relatives when she said he had made the ultimate sacrifice for his patients.

    The NHS workers’ deaths have been described as a “a stark reminder to the whole country that we all must take this crisis seriously”.

    Here, the Telegraph pays tribute to medics who have died and tells their stories.

    Would you like to share a story about a friend or relative you have lost? Whether it's to pay tribute or share a funny story about their lives, the Telegraph wants to hear from you. We will be featuring stories of lost loved ones sent to us by readers to remember the many people who have sadly lost their lives to the virus.

    Send an email with any pictures you would like to include to [email protected]

    April 3
    Areema Nasreen, Walsall Manor Hospital

    Areema Nasreen
    Areema Nasreen
    Mrs Nasreem, a 36-year-old staff nurse died in the hospital where she had worked for 16 years.

    The mother-of-three, who had no underlying health issues, developed coronavirus symptoms on March 13, whilst on annual leave.

    She was thought to have rallied but relapsed and died shortly after midnight at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands.

    Her best friend Rubi Aktar wrote on Facebook: "My heart is broken. She fought and fought but Allah decided to take her. "She was the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet, she went above and beyond for everyone she met.

    "I can’t believe I will not see your smile again. With your support, motivation and inspiration I am the nurse that I am today and I hope I can do you proud Areema.

    “You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career."

    Her sister, Kazeema, said the family was “heartbroken” but praised the hospital staff who had gone “above and beyond”, according to BirminghamLive.

    Mrs Nasreem qualified as a staff nurse in January last year and had been working on the hospital’s Acute Medical Unit.

    She had revealed she hoped to encourage more people from Muslim backgrounds into nursing, saying: "I would like to think that I can inspire others. I cry every morning because I am so happy that I have finally realised my dream of becoming a nurse.

    “I would like to think that I could inspire others; particularly within Muslim communities.”

    March 31
    Dr Alfa Sa'adu, Whittington Hospital

    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Nigerian-born Dr Alfa Saadu retired following a glittering 40-year medical career in 2017, but carried on working part-time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire
    Dr Saadu, 68, became the fourth medic to die from coronavirus in the UK, two weeks after contracting it.

    Dr Saadu’s family - a wife and two sons - said he was so determined to treat patients after he retired that he carried on working part time.

    “My dad was a living legend,” his son Dani said. “Up until he got sick, he was still working part-time saving people.

    “He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people. As soon as you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up.”

    Dr Saadu, originally from Nigeria, worked for the NHS for 40 years in hospitals across London, stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

    March 29
    Thomas Harvey, Upper Clapton

    Thomas Harvey
    Thomas Harvey, left, died after contracting coronavirus. His family believe he would still be alive today if he had been given proper protective equipment CREDIT: Sky News
    Mr Harvey, a mental health nurse at Goodmayes Hospital in north east London, passed away on Sunday 29th March after contracting Covid-19 from a hospital patient.

    His daughter, Tamira Harvey, said her father was “let down” by the government, who she blames for his death, due to the lack of protective equipment he was given while treating patients.

    “My dad was definitely let down. I don’t feel that they [NHS staff] are safe at the moment, I don’t think that they would think that they’re safe,” she told ITV News.

    “The Government could have prevented this. If they invested some money into protective equipment for nurses, because they are really on the frontline and putting their lives at risk every day.”

    Mr Harvey was a father of seven and worked as a nurse in the NHS for 20 years.

    March 28
    Amged El-Hawrani, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester

    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani
    Dr Amged El-Hawrani, 55, an ear, nose and throat specialist, worked at Queen's Hospital, Burton, and was the third medic to die of coronavirus in the UK.

    His family paid tribute to a "loving and much-loved husband, son, father, brother and friend".

    Mr El- Hawrani had not seen any patients for a number of weeks and had been receiving treatment in intensive care.

    His son, Ashraf, said: "Most of my dad's time was dedicated towards his family, and the rest of that time was dedicated towards his profession.

    "He taught me the significance of respect and equality. He also stressed the importance of not worrying about the things I cannot control, which he displayed to me right up until the end of his life.

    "He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

    "I am incredibly proud to say that, for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father."

    March 25
    Dr Habib Zaidi, Southend Hospital

    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Habib Zaidi, a GP, died at Southend Hospital
    Dr Zaidi, a family GP, is thought to be the first doctor in the UK to have been killed by coronavirus. The 76-year-old, from Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, died in intensive care just 24 hours after being taken ill.

    His daughter Dr Sarah Zaidi, also a GP, said the knowledge that coronavirus had taken him was “too much to bear.”

    She added: “It is reflective of his sacrifice. He had a vocational attitude to service.”

    Dr Zaidi had been self isolating at home and had not seen patients for a week before he died.

    He and his wife, Dr Talat Zaidi, 70, were both managing partners of Eastwood Group Practice and had served three generations of families in the area for nearly 50 years.

    Their daughter added: "We can't mourn in the normal way. We can't have a normal funeral.

    "He left a gaping hole in our hearts, but a loss that is also felt within the community that he devoted almost his entire life to. We are praying for the safety of everyone right now."

    Dr Adil El Tayar, West Middlesex University Hospital

    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr Adil El Tayar was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain
    Dr El Tayar, a renowned organ transplant specialist, was the first working NHS surgeon to die from coronavirus in Britain.

    He is thought to have contracted the illness while working in the A&E department at Hereford County Hospital, where he had volunteered to help fight the pandemic.

    The Sudanese locum, 63, had no idea that the patient he was treating had coronavirus, family said.

    Dr El Tayar had been self-isolating after developing symptoms around mid-March and he was admitted to hospital on 20 March.

    He tested positive for coronavirus and spent his final days in intensive care.

    His cousin, Dr Hisham El Khidir, a Norfolk consultant, warned that doctors were “sitting ducks” and said more testing could have saved Dr El Tayar’s life.

    “His son was really scared that he wasn't going to make it,” he said. “This disease is horrible and is going to cause more heartbreak for many more families for weeks to come.”

    Dr El Tayar’s career saw him work at hospitals around the world, including in Saudi Arabia, Sudan and two of London's biggest hospitals - St Mary's and St George's.

    Related Topics

    • Replies: @Jack D

    The U.S. *isn't* tracking how many men vs women are dying of coronavirus.
     
    Probably because they already know that it's mostly men. If this was especially killing women they would be tracking the hell out of it.
  99. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Alisha__g/status/1246072241164398592

    The U.S. *isn’t* tracking how many men vs women are dying of coronavirus.

    Probably because they already know that it’s mostly men. If this was especially killing women they would be tracking the hell out of it.

    • Replies: @Sean
    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/how-1918-flu-pandemic-helped-advance-womens-rights-180968311/
    , @DataGeek
    Almost every state and large county has an original source web site. Most have sex ratios for cases.
    Many have age distribution. press may not cover but data is being tracked. Almost always 60-40
    Or 55-45 male. You could look it up
  100. @Smithsonian_6
    Indeed, I have just read a particularly premature article about why the prevalence of COVID-19 is apparently low in Africa. My bet would be that it is related to the fact that health care in sub-saharan Africa is usually extremely sparse. When a country like Sierra Leone has fewer than 250 doctors in the entire nation then it would be strange indeed if disease outbreaks were not underreported.

    But that was not a problem with Ebola. Covid doesn’t whisper, but speaks loud and clear – like NY is running out of body bags – DoD is sending them replacements (probably because, they can’t be readily procured in open market by the thousands). If bodies were rotting in the streets, somebody’s phone would have picked it up.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/04/03/826675439/corpses-lie-for-days-as-ecuador-struggles-to-keep-up-with-covid-19-deaths

    Ecuador is a much, much better country than Sierra Leone. Many American’s find it a nice place to retire.

  101. “Human BioDiversity and the Novel Virus”

    oh yeah? well as always, i bet we won’t have to guess very hard as to who will come up with the treatments or vaccines for the virus. and it won’t be the Chinese, who created it. maybe Steve can do a “Number of vaccines invented by Africans” ongoing series to go along with his sprinting series.

    i’m also under the impression that age groups are a part of demographics, and we know which age group runs the country. and what they want, they usually get. and they want to not die from this virus. so they’ll shut down the entire country if it keeps them alive for another couple years.

    the reason the country reacted so much better to 100,000 people getting killed by the flu in 1968 is largely in part because boomers were young back then and weren’t that vulnerable to it. 5% GDP growth and sports in full swing while 100,000 people were getting killed. today, most selfish generation will trash EVERYTHING if it allows them to breathe for a few more cycles.

    weaker old people getting killed by disease and cleared out so the younger generations can get on with life is a natural part of demographics. until now.

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    the reason the country reacted so much better to 100,000 people getting killed by the flu in 1968 is largely in part because boomers were young back then and weren’t that vulnerable to it. 5% GDP growth and sports in full swing while 100,000 people were getting killed. today, most selfish generation will trash EVERYTHING if it allows them to breathe for a few more cycles.
     
    I know. I know.

    I have a vivid memory from that August. My long time grade school girlfriend was over at my house--our moms worked together in the school library and were friends--and we sitting on my bed.

    I remember my exact words:

    "This Hong Kong flu is going to be coming back with our boys from Vietnam this fall. But i've decided, i'm not locking down America. Screw that! We're young with our whole lives in front of us, who gives a crap if some old timers die and get outta the way."

    M's eyes grew wide and she practically swooned at my manliness. I laid her down on the bed, leaned in and had my first real kisses and makeout session.

    I've often recalled that moment. Despite the years, can still see it today.

    It's great to be a boomer.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Also the internet (much less social media) didn't exist back in '68, which contain updates of the virus every few seconds. It is all encompassing, total. There were only three networks on TV back then, so one could simply turn off the tube and get on with living. Not so easy to do today.
  102. @PiltdownMan
    Not really OT:

    From the Washington Post.

    Fauci says world community should push for closure of ‘wet markets’ that sell animals for human consumption

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2020/04/03/coronavirus-latest-news/

    I honestly was surprised that the Chinese re-opened their wet markets.

    I don’t know jack about the machinations in the Chicom politiburo. But i’d thought Xi would be cracking down on this nonsense and sending out a message that boiled down to “We’ve got our shit together. This won’t happen again. Global business will surge forward with China at its hub.”

    But instead they’ve gone with–at least for internal consumption–“the US did this”. And basically issued a big f.u. to the world.

    Turns out the Chinese are bigger dicks–metaphorically only–than even i’d imagined.

    I can’t quite tell if it’s just the cluelessness of isolation or they just figure they’ve won. I think they have misjudged the likely reaction to what they’ve put the world through. The globalist goons will no doubt run cover for them–certainly here in the US (minoritarianism central). But even the goons are tired of this crap. And the people are pissed. This is unlikely to work out as the Chinese think.

    • Replies: @Bucky
    Not just that. An official member of the party repeated the insane conspiracy theory that this was from US Army personel who were visiting Wuhan.

    That's like quoting Alec Jones from like the the white house press secretary.

    Something is really rotten in the CCP if this is what is going on.
    , @Jack D
    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won't mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080218-cr%20osu.jpg

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

  103. @Jack D
    I was thinking the same, but the women were always more sedentary (and fatter, for those who could afford it) than the men. Having a fat wife was a sign that you were rich in many societies because only the rich could afford to eat enough (In Fiddler on the Roof Tevye dreams of a wife with a "proper double chin".) And of course the King was the richest man so he should have the fattest wife.

    A lot of things are inverted in modern society - the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.

    .. the rich women are thin and tanned and fashion models scowl instead of smile. They look like Dust Bowl victims in Walker Evans photos.

    Classic.

    • Agree: JMcG
  104. @syonredux
    ..... La raza cósmica

    http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/131103233334-frum-mexico-sugar-tax-story-top.jpg

    An angry Latina on twitter once said she’d like to see white people pick their own vegetables.

    I’d like to see alot of the Mexicans I’ve met pick their own vegetables.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    An angry Latina on twitter once said she’d like to see white people pick their own vegetables.

    I’d like to see a lot of the Mexicans I’ve met pick their own vegetables.
     
    The panaderias don't offer vegetables.


    https://cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/large960_blur-fea74e432abfb829d84f260f65f6d2ca.jpg


    Billy Squier picks his own. And volunteers in Central Park.



    https://thenypost.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/squiercentralpark.jpg?quality=80&strip=all
  105. @AnotherDad
    I honestly was surprised that the Chinese re-opened their wet markets.

    I don't know jack about the machinations in the Chicom politiburo. But i'd thought Xi would be cracking down on this nonsense and sending out a message that boiled down to "We've got our shit together. This won't happen again. Global business will surge forward with China at its hub."

    But instead they've gone with--at least for internal consumption--"the US did this". And basically issued a big f.u. to the world.

    Turns out the Chinese are bigger dicks--metaphorically only--than even i'd imagined.

    I can't quite tell if it's just the cluelessness of isolation or they just figure they've won. I think they have misjudged the likely reaction to what they've put the world through. The globalist goons will no doubt run cover for them--certainly here in the US (minoritarianism central). But even the goons are tired of this crap. And the people are pissed. This is unlikely to work out as the Chinese think.

    Not just that. An official member of the party repeated the insane conspiracy theory that this was from US Army personel who were visiting Wuhan.

    That’s like quoting Alec Jones from like the the white house press secretary.

    Something is really rotten in the CCP if this is what is going on.

  106. anon[201] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    For some time now I’ve been leaving comments on how carriers of some gene variants like HLA B57 and HLA B27 don’t progress from HIV to AIDS quickly if at all, and were studied in the creation of HIV drugs.

    HLA B27 seems to cause Autoimmune diseases like Anklosing Spondyltis, but is also believed to give some anti-viral protection in AIDS, Hep-C and possibly some Influenzas (see links below) It is most commonly found among Northern Scandanavians (Lapland). May be why Sweden isn’t locking down (Ha ha).

    It seems there are unique properties that flush out viral loads in some people and offer protection.
    So could be a relic of ancient evolution like how genes for Malaria/Sickle Cell Anemia. Who knows.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3240147/

    or

    https://spondylitis.org/research-new/covid-19-and-spondyloarthritis-your-questions-answered/

    Dr John Reveille: “However, be mindful of something else: People who are HLA-B27 positive demonstrate increased natural immunity toward a number of viral infections, such as HIV-1, hepatitis C and influenza, although whether this natural immunity carries over to coronavirus has not been studied.”

    yes, for HIV, exploring as many human HIV binding proteins will be key. with modern day, fast geneomics, maybe this will be possible and treatments other than antiretrovials will be possible (anti-binding).

    for the cornonavirus (SARSt ype), there are other virus binding receptors that should be looked at, aside from “ace2”– L-SING (CD209L or CLEC4M). it appears that Chinese are homogeneous for this, conferring some protection, where as Europeans are more heterogeneous, and more susceptible to SARS.

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by infection of a previously undescribed coronavirus (CoV). L-SIGN, encoded
    by CLEC4M (also known as CD209L), is a SARS-CoV binding receptor that has polymorphism in its extracellular neck region
    encoded by the tandem repeat domain in exon 4. Our genetic risk association study shows that individuals homozygous for
    CLEC4M tandem repeats are less susceptible to SARS infection. L-SIGN is expressed in both non-SARS and SARS-CoV–infected
    lung. Compared with cells heterozygous for L-SIGN, cells homozygous for L-SIGN show higher binding capacity for SARS-CoV,
    higher proteasome-dependent viral degradation and a lower capacity for trans infection. Thus, homozygosity for L-SIGN
    plays a protective role during SARS infection.

  107. @MG
    How is the UW model Birx and Fauci are relying on actually doing? I’m hearing of big discrepancies.

    In 2012 Dr Dr. Anthony S. Fauci of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, stated that “MERS-CoV does not spread in a sustained person to person way at all”. But he added there was a potential danger in that it is possible for the virus to mutate into a strain that does transmit from person to person. (“Fauci: New Virus Not Yet a ‘threat to the world’ (video)”. Washington Times. 31 August 2012.)

    The previous two novel coronaviruses (SARS and MERS) had high mortality but were not terribly contagious by aerosol and before the infected got sick, and so did not spread easily between people in casual contact. On realizing that COVID-19 was spread by aerosol very easily by healthy people, Fauci was not the only epidemiologist to freak out. Fearing his 2012 worry had materialized in the shape of COVID-19 with mortality just like MERS and SARS, they went with the assumption COVID-19 had a death rate that would overwhelm hospitals and perhaps even cause cause societal breakdown if it was left to spread. But the various originally reported death rates from Wuhan use far too low a denominator, and this is just the cases of active infection. The Chinese had no serological assay to detect antibodies to the pathogen in those who had been infected but eradicated the virus from their bodies. So the denominator could be a enormous number that when the deaths are divided by it gives a universal death rate, for the whole wide world of under 0.1. It is possible that the Chinese are hiding how many deaths there are in their country, but if they have had tens of thousands of hidden death that is probably a sign that the most of the population of China has already been infected and eradicated the disease from their bodies so that only an antibody assay can detect that they once had it.

    The short answer is that Fauci made a worst case assumption that the COVID-19 pathogen (SARS-CoV-2 ) kills relatively many of the people it infects (compared to flu) and got off to a late start. The alternative, which is looking more and more likely with the lack of mass deaths, is the pathogen made an earlier start and had time to have gone through half or more of the population in Western Countries. For this scenario, SARS-CoV-2 would have to produce serious illness in only a tiny minority of people (the sort who might well die if they caught flu which being previously encountered by our immune systems they see coming) with the rest being asymptomatic or suffering only the mildest of symptoms, and things were never going to be as bad as he said. I can see Fauci may have decided scare tactics were justified, but he has sold the pass. I speak of the trust that the population, whose taxes pay for his institution, put in science; they will not be as willing to listen with total credulity next time. On the other hand, we would be able to cope better with a Contagion-style bring-out-your-dead pandemic that may be in our future.

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton

    It is possible that the Chinese are hiding how many deaths there are in their country, but if they have had tens of thousands of hidden death that is probably a sign that the most of the population of China has already been infected and eradicated the disease from their bodies so that only an antibody assay can detect that they once had it.
     
    It is absolutely possible. However, a case fatality rate comparison with a country in which the pandemic had already reliably infected most of the population would be needed. This might be the United States by June or July, perhaps Italy, Spain, or the United Kingdom too. Obviously, if eventually more than a million Americans, or Italians, etc. die because of the novel coronavirus -- to the point it bloats the usual number of deaths those countries have in a year -- and most of China's population has indeed already been infected, then we'd be talking about probably well over a dozen million extra dead Chinese over the course of two or three months. Hard to conceal. If it turns out they managed to do it, I'd be very curious as to how. And of course, one could do an antibody assay, as you mention, and see if really most Chinese have antibodies against the novel coronavirus. This is falsifiable/provable. If it is the case, it will be found out. Same with if it is not the case.
  108. @Sean
    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that some group is less vulnerable than another to a novel disease
     
    If it evolved amid Chinese last year, it seems a fair bet it would be somewhat adapted to infecting them. The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and it was most dangerous to men of military age (the W shape age graph). Men's death rates in 1918 far exceeded the female death rates, and altered the sax ratio.The male TB death rate in the years following 1918 was lowered because so many men had died of the Spanish flu (I expect a lowering of the death rate from influenza as a result of COVID-19).

    But the altered sax ratio caused the birth of the jazz age!

  109. @Jack D

    The U.S. *isn't* tracking how many men vs women are dying of coronavirus.
     
    Probably because they already know that it's mostly men. If this was especially killing women they would be tracking the hell out of it.
  110. @The Alarmist
    O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html


    https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/coronachan.jpg

    Serves them right for starting a viral marketing campaign at the exact wrong time.

  111. @AnotherDad
    I honestly was surprised that the Chinese re-opened their wet markets.

    I don't know jack about the machinations in the Chicom politiburo. But i'd thought Xi would be cracking down on this nonsense and sending out a message that boiled down to "We've got our shit together. This won't happen again. Global business will surge forward with China at its hub."

    But instead they've gone with--at least for internal consumption--"the US did this". And basically issued a big f.u. to the world.

    Turns out the Chinese are bigger dicks--metaphorically only--than even i'd imagined.

    I can't quite tell if it's just the cluelessness of isolation or they just figure they've won. I think they have misjudged the likely reaction to what they've put the world through. The globalist goons will no doubt run cover for them--certainly here in the US (minoritarianism central). But even the goons are tired of this crap. And the people are pissed. This is unlikely to work out as the Chinese think.

    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won’t mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    (I won’t mention any names)
     
    You're not making this easy, Jack. Let me ask you, does it rhyme "the won-ton runs"?
    , @Anonymous
    That's an interesting statement on Jack D's part. Isn't he one of those posters on Unz that is always telling us how much better the US would be if could replace our NAMS with the "face" people". Indeed.
    , @J.Ross
    This, this is a hard barrier to civilization for them, they are missing things we absolutely take for granted, and that poisons all their outside relations. Our own concept of responsibility came out of a freak synthesis of (1) synthesized Jewish and Greek philosophy with (2) chaotic decentralized warlordism (instead of saving face, losing a head), and Chinese childishmess is actually closer to the global norm. The Chinese themselves quietly agree with me and buy non-Chinese brands whenever possible at mealtime. Shaun Rein's End of Cheap China has a late chapter describing how American junk food is jokingly called health food, not because the people who invented stir fry lack an understanding of grease, but because Western brands are seen as an assurance of safe food handling. In fact KFC actually screwed this up with a minor food scandal, but the overall reputation is intact.
    , @AnotherDad
    No argument about the face culture and accepting blame.

    But that's different than not fixing the problem. And the CCP, unlike American elites--well at least until about three weeks ago--can just order stuff. No, your market is closed--permanently. No you can not keep birds and pigs.

    They have actually actively chosen not to fix it, but with the world aware ... reopen their wet markets and essentially give the world the finger.
  112. anon[228] • Disclaimer says:

    Here is an anti-parasitic drug that shows great promise against COVID-19, in vitro. That’s “in a test tube”. Obviously human trials are in the future.

    https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/anti-parasitic-drug-kills-covid-19-in-lab-c-955457

    Ivermectin is an FDA-approved anti-parasitic drug also shown to be effective in vitro against viruses including HIV, dengue and influenza.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivermectin

  113. @Anon
    Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith's New York State medical license, and found it wasn't current. It was only valid up to 2018. The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404, but other people say they saw it before it disappeared. She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor.

    “Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith’s New York State medical license, and found it wasn’t current.”

    You mean they made a CLAIM.

    “It was only valid up to 2018”.

    According to who?

    “The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404…”

    Evidence, please.

    “She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor”.

    You are falling for Fake News.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Anon
    All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead.
  114. @PiltdownMan
    Not really OT:

    From the Washington Post.

    Fauci says world community should push for closure of ‘wet markets’ that sell animals for human consumption

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2020/04/03/coronavirus-latest-news/

    The US government is more concerned about the threat from obscure Iranian generals than epidemics caused by grotesque Chinese dietary habits. If America and Europe cared about their people’s lives and health, they’d have forced the closure of these disgusting markets long ago.

  115. @MG
    How is the UW model Birx and Fauci are relying on actually doing? I’m hearing of big discrepancies.

    Not well so far. Off by a factor of 4 in hospitalizations and ICU beds. Model is one week old.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Berenson has been a good counterbalance to the panic.
  116. @Jack D
    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won't mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080218-cr%20osu.jpg

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

    (I won’t mention any names)

    You’re not making this easy, Jack. Let me ask you, does it rhyme “the won-ton runs”?

  117. @res
    Where are you getting your numbers? They are BMI, right? Your numbers are very different from what I see at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_body_mass_index

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?

    Where are you getting your numbers?

    I’m getting them here:

    List of countries by obesity rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_obesity_rate

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?

    Thanks for asking.I’m fine. Just a tad busy. My Dad’s in his 80s (Hence, prime material for Covid-19) ,so I had had him move in with me at the beginning of March. Plus, the virus has thrown my uni into an uproar (some classes cancelled, some moved entirely online, etc).

    • Replies: @res
    Thanks. I probably should have figured out you meant obesity rate, but I brain locked on BMI.

    Glad to hear things are OK.
    , @Captain Tripps
    Glad you're back commenting; and take good care of Dad.
  118. @The Alarmist
    What about the correlation of COVID-19 deaths with the consumption of SPAM®?

    The Costco i now go to for essential pizza slices (in CA, not Hawai’i) has a board outside now where they post the items that are sold out.

    It’s about 15 things and Spam is one of them. I take this to indicate a high level of baseline consumption.

    The area has low to moderate known cases and pretty low covid-19 mortality.

  119. @res

    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE’s strength.
     
    Good boy. You recited a goodthinker talking point which means you are an extremely virtuous person. (signaling virtue was what you were concerned with there, right?)

    If you have any interest in actually engaging with true reality take a look at this:
    https://eukaryotewritesblog.com/2017/08/22/diversity-and-team-performance-what-the-research-says/

    Social categorization

    This is the human tendency to have an ingroup / outgroup mindset. People like their ingroup more. It’s an “us and them” mentality and it’s often totally unconscious. When diversity interacts with this, the effects are often – though not always – negative.

    Diverse teams tend to have:
    - Lower feelings of group cohesion / identification with group
    - Worse communication (3)
    - More conflict (of productive but also non-productive varieties) (also the perception of more conflict) (5)
    - Biases

    A silver lining: One of these ingrouping biases is the expectation that people more similar to us will also think more like us. Diversity clues us into diversity of opinions. (6) This gets us into:
     
    P.S. Note the very informative comments on that article as well.

    Res, I’ve had conversations on threads with Mr. Corvinus before. It just never works out. He will never answer your questions directly (anything that refutes a point), and it goes round and round until carpal tunnel sets in. He’s always very polite, so that’s why people give it a go trying to explain things to him. He is not really here to learn anything.

    I really don’t know why Corvinus is on here. He’s not funny like Tiny Duck, but he will write something in contradiction to anything iSteve writes, no matter what. If you get an agreement from him, it’s only when you’ve agreed with every damn thing he’s just written, which is highly unlikely in my case.

    What’s the point, Corvinus? Were you hired early on to get the page-view count up? If so, unz doesn’t need you anymore, especially during these trying times of the Kung Flu. Restructuring, yeah, that’s the ticket…

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    He’s a troll. His I’ve hidden his comments. Zero loss.
    , @Corvinus
    The reality is that I am here for debate. I answer questions directly, and most likely it is a response that runs counter to your line of thinking. Hence, you make the false claim that I am not here to learn anything when the rebuttal makes you uncomfortable. Now, when I NOTICE contradictions, I point them out and offer reasons for my position. Your confirmation bias is something fierce. But I do understand why...
  120. Anonymous[140] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith's New York State medical license, and found it wasn't current. It was only valid up to 2018. The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404, but other people say they saw it before it disappeared. She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor.

    To be clear, she’s not a generic “crisis actor”. Ordinary crisis actors would not be very believable in specialized roles like doctors. She’s an actual doctor who seems to have extensive involvement in running medical simulations for education.

    It’s illegal to record video inside emergency rooms. Moreover, people have called the hospital the video is from and apparently Dr. Smith is not currently working there and the hospital is not overloaded and out of respirators like Dr. Smith claimed in the video. This coupled with Dr. Smith specializing in medical simulations makes that NY Times story quite strange.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational

    This coupled with Dr. Smith specializing in medical simulations
     
    Could it have been part of a simulation exercise, or be from a training video derived from same, and someone thought it was real?  Remember that we sometimes see people take satire sites like the Babylon Bee and The Onion seriously.
  121. Anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won't mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080218-cr%20osu.jpg

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

    That’s an interesting statement on Jack D’s part. Isn’t he one of those posters on Unz that is always telling us how much better the US would be if could replace our NAMS with the “face” people”. Indeed.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This applies only to Chinese Chinese. When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations. Even successful Chinese newcomers quick learn that America is not a face culture just like Americans living in China learn that China is, and they adjust their behavior accordingly. When in Rome, do as the Romans do is ancient advice.

    You have a lot more in common with your roommate at Harvard than you do with your great grandpa who lived in a village. He might as well have lived on a different planet because his life was so different than yours. Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

  122. A scientist finds that he’s not seeing infection from the virus from surfaces, rather, it’s just the usual person-to-person contact.

    https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world-news/scientist-germanys-wuhan-claims-coronavirus-21805392

    Covid-19: Killer of extroverts.

  123. @Corvinus
    "Someone on the Twitter thread looked up Colleen Smith’s New York State medical license, and found it wasn’t current."

    You mean they made a CLAIM.

    "It was only valid up to 2018".

    According to who?

    "The page it was on has been abruptly yanked and is now showing 404..."

    Evidence, please.

    "She looks like she was recruited as a crisis actor".

    You are falling for Fake News.

    All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead."

    You ASSUME that she does NOT have one. Are you of the belief that her bosses would allow her to continue to practice medicine without the proper documentation? IF yes, then the burden is on you to prove it with actual documentation, rather than rely on people on Twitter as your sources for allegedly having the scoop on the matter.
    , @HA
    "All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for [Colleen Smith]. Go ahead."

    Assuming there's not a couple of Colleen Smiths from Elmhurst, it took about 5 clicks to find her.

    Her license number can be found at:

    https://www.healthcare4ppl.com/physician/new-york/brooklyn/colleen-smith-1790051076.html


    A verification search for that license number at

    http://www.nysed.gov/COMS/OP001/OPSCR2

    returns her name:

    Name : SMITH COLLEEN MICHELLE
    Address : ELMHURST NY
    Profession : MEDICINE
    License No: [....]
    Date of Licensure : 02/20/2015
    Additional Qualification :
    Status : REGISTERED
    Registered through last day of : 11/20
    Medical School: EMORY UNIVERSITY Degree Date : 05/14/2012

  124. @Jack D

    The U.S. *isn't* tracking how many men vs women are dying of coronavirus.
     
    Probably because they already know that it's mostly men. If this was especially killing women they would be tracking the hell out of it.

    Almost every state and large county has an original source web site. Most have sex ratios for cases.
    Many have age distribution. press may not cover but data is being tracked. Almost always 60-40
    Or 55-45 male. You could look it up

  125. Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate

    • Replies: @anonymous

    Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate
     

    I was at Ralph's grocery last night. Black couple was walking around the milk section, playing grab ass and hanging all over each other. No masks. Then I notice a little black girl, probably 4 or 5, just rolling around on the floor. Sweeping her hands across the floor as if she were swimming. Then she brushed her hair back with her hands. The couple, whom I assume she belonged, as there was nobody else around, saw none of this. Her behavior was grotesque, even if we weren't in the middle of the coronavirus fiasco.

    I didn't say anything to them, but I did think to myself, "if it's their time to go, then it's their time to go. God has a plan for everyone," and carried on my shopping.

    Blaming the outcome on race is a very big mistake. This is a matter of culture. A very stupid, narcissistic culture. And if the reader is not religious, nevertheless, they still collectively really do deserve what's coming, in a Darwinian sense. Think of it as their "accountability to Nature."

    Nature always makes us accountable to her sensibilities, and Nature is always right.

    , @res
    I'm guessing a big chunk of the difference is higher urban prevalence and lumping urban communities (more blacks) in with the rest of the county/state. Here is the relevant excerpt from your link.

    As of Friday morning, African Americans made up almost half of Milwaukee County’s 945 cases and 81% of its 27 deaths in a county whose population is 26% black. Milwaukee is one of the few places in the United States that is tracking the racial breakdown of people who have been infected by the novel coronavirus, offering a glimpse at the disproportionate destruction it is inflicting on black communities nationwide.

    In Michigan, where the state’s population is 14% black, African Americans made up 35% of cases and 40% of deaths as of Friday morning. Detroit, where a majority of residents are black, has emerged as a hot spot with a high death toll. As has New Orleans. Louisiana has not published case breakdowns by race, but 40% of the state’s deaths have happened in Orleans Parish, where the majority of residents are black.

     

    To be clear, I said a big chunk, not all. Decent chance there really is a racial difference. Though hard to be sure (as anonymous noted) how much of that might be behavioral.

    More about Detroit at
    https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-government/michigan-gov-whitmer-asks-legislature-extend-emergency-powers-70-days
  126. There are some times when I want to be wrong.

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.

    Yesterday, 4/2, there were 576 deaths reported by CV19 in NY state.

    One can argue that we still haven’t seen 500 deaths per day in the 5 boroughs of NYC. It is not clear to me if Ron was predicting NY state or NYC.

    My personal prediction was 500-1000 per day in NYC by 4/4.

    The bad news is it looks like this will probably happen.

    The good news is it looks like we will be at the lower end of the scale.

    If I am wrong, and the death rate in the city is below 500/day by the end of the day tomorrow I will be very happy to be wrong.

    Still, it looks like a few commentators who accused me of being alarmist and hysterical were way off the mark.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    There is some reason to be encouraged by the data that is given here:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/new-york-coronavirus-cases.html

    Look at the graph entitled "New reported cases by day in New York" and you'll see that it appears to be leveling off and no longer looks exponential. Now there is a lag on deaths - the people dying yesterday were reported as new cases probably a week or two ago when the curve was still growing exponentially, so the number of deaths is also going to level off in another week or so.

    The scary part is not what is going on in NY but whether the NYC experience is going to be repeated over and over in other cities until every city in America has had its hospital system raked over the coals like NY has? When city X has only one case, does that mean that it is really just NY 1 month ago before the doubling magic began or is it going to stay that way because of the measures that were taken? Wuhan virus is not really that tragic for the society as a whole but it is tragic for the victims and their immediate families and given the huge amount of treasure we have just spent it would be nice to know that it was not entirely for nothing.
    , @Anon
    If you look at the stats, virus cases and deaths in China climbed steadily for about 5 weeks before leveling off, and the Milan region in Italy is showing the same pattern. New York is likely to take about 5 weeks before anything slows down.
    , @Ron Unz

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.
     
    Thanks. I generally try to be rather cautious in my claims, and originally I'd predicted at least 500 daily deaths in New York [State] by *Easter,* thereby causing Trump to "pivot" away from his very stupid proposal:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/so-uh-what-just-happened/#comment-3793485

    Then a few days later, I became much more aggressive and on 3/28th I said: "So I think my estimate of reaching 500-1000 deaths per day in New York within the next week or so is certainly on track." So it only took 5 days to reach 576/day, and the website I use put today's total at 680 (all these daily totals are slightly different due to different cut-offs I think). I wouldn't be surprised if it hits 1000 by early next week. The reason I was always using NYS rather than NYC was that only state figures are listed on the website I like to use.

    https://www.unz.com/runz/correctly-estimating-coronavirus-infections/#comment-3801659

    You may have been a little too pessimistic, but that just means your projections were probably off by a few days, which is hardly a big deal compared to Rush Limbaugh and all the retards here shouting "It's Just the Flu!!!"

    Meanwhile, I haven't yet heard a word of apology from all the Coronavirus Hoaxers who heaped endless insults and ridicule on us for pointing to the obvious. But, then again, I suppose they still haven't admitted they were wrong. I think many of them are now claiming that the official statistics are fraudulent and the doctors and nurses who are eyewitnesses are "crisis actors."

    I wouldn't be surprised if some of the ones who suddenly popped up are just shills and trolls hired to discredit this website and harass people with crackpottery.
  127. @res

    The reality is diversity is EVERYONE’s strength.
     
    Good boy. You recited a goodthinker talking point which means you are an extremely virtuous person. (signaling virtue was what you were concerned with there, right?)

    If you have any interest in actually engaging with true reality take a look at this:
    https://eukaryotewritesblog.com/2017/08/22/diversity-and-team-performance-what-the-research-says/

    Social categorization

    This is the human tendency to have an ingroup / outgroup mindset. People like their ingroup more. It’s an “us and them” mentality and it’s often totally unconscious. When diversity interacts with this, the effects are often – though not always – negative.

    Diverse teams tend to have:
    - Lower feelings of group cohesion / identification with group
    - Worse communication (3)
    - More conflict (of productive but also non-productive varieties) (also the perception of more conflict) (5)
    - Biases

    A silver lining: One of these ingrouping biases is the expectation that people more similar to us will also think more like us. Diversity clues us into diversity of opinions. (6) This gets us into:
     
    P.S. Note the very informative comments on that article as well.

    “If you (Coronavinus – YAA) have any interest in actually engaging with true reality…”

    For an intelligent man that’s a rookie mistake to make.

    I gave up engaging with him a long time ago, and now the “Troll” and “Ignore Commenter” buttons are my friends.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    So you have Coronavinus on ignore and also troll-flag his comment stubs content-unseen? That's pretty based and I thank you.
  128. @Art Deco
    No, it's phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. 'Paa' is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.

    No, it’s phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. ‘Paa’ is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.

    Actually, it’s the same glo’al stop heard in the East End of London.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cDviaeRk--Q

    Also quite Bri'ish:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=XvFg6eEYq94

  129. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Polynikes
    Not well so far. Off by a factor of 4 in hospitalizations and ICU beds. Model is one week old.


    https://twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1246107585129992192?s=20

    Berenson has been a good counterbalance to the panic.

    • Agree: Polynikes
  130. @Alden
    The UK medical and nursing schools stopped accepting White British students about 1985. The NHS is like the American post office and veterans administration, a No Native Whites need apply. I live near a big VA hospital. I’ve never seen a White American Dr in those VA uniforms. Everyone is an Indian.

    The ethnic statistics of the NHS employees are skewed toward Indians, Asians, Africans anything but White British

    This is an exaggeration. NHS doctors are still mostly white British.

  131. @Anonymous
    That's an interesting statement on Jack D's part. Isn't he one of those posters on Unz that is always telling us how much better the US would be if could replace our NAMS with the "face" people". Indeed.

    This applies only to Chinese Chinese. When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations. Even successful Chinese newcomers quick learn that America is not a face culture just like Americans living in China learn that China is, and they adjust their behavior accordingly. When in Rome, do as the Romans do is ancient advice.

    You have a lot more in common with your roommate at Harvard than you do with your great grandpa who lived in a village. He might as well have lived on a different planet because his life was so different than yours. Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

    • Agree: vhrm
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Jack D

    Yes - of course. That's why there hasn't been a Chinatown in San Francisco since the late 1800s. Lol - You are beginning to post too much.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations.
     

    Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.
     
    Hmm… But supposedly East-Asian-descent people in America proportionately don’t do so well when it comes to advancing up the ‘corporate ladder’ and landing plum management/executive positions.

    Could it be something about their actual faces/physiognomy/demeanor that the American ‘establishment’ finds off-putting?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_ceiling

    , @Mr. Rational

    This applies only to Chinese Chinese.
     
    If we replaced all our NAMs with Chinese Chinese, they would be powerful enough to maintain their face culture here.
  132. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Obesity is a relatively new occurrence for modern humans. Search the hyroglifics of Ancient Egyptian women, the statues of Greco-Roman times, of the Mosaics during the Byzantine Empire. You do NOT see many fat women, period. Fairly simple really. With outbreaks of plague, and especially famines on a regular basis, one simply couldn't afford to overeat. Even among the wealthy, you didn't see people high on the hog, cause they weren't fat pigs. The Polynesians were the exception to the rule. Pretty much everywhere else on the planet throughout most of human history people simply weren't obese, much less grossly overweight. How could they be? Most of their lives weren't sedentary, they constantly moved around. Also, the food quality while limited at times wasn't overly processed. Junk food was for the most part, nonexistent.

    Aside from the late Victorian era for the wealthy in the US, (ca. 1870-1920) the last three decades have been unprecedented in levels of US obesity. Which also correlates with more and more processed foods, more junk food, and more citizens living a sedentary lifestyle.

    And that has got to end.

    The Spaniards who conquered Mexico deliberately targeted fat Indians and got a twofer: the individuals killed were high caste and killing them removed the officers; and their body fat was used to seal wounds the horses had received. See “The Conquest of New Spain.”

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, let's not use 21st Century standards of what constitutes fatness. Cathryn Manheim, Walter "The Refrigerator" Perry didn't exist back then. Fattness for Medieval Spaniards could mean anything from 25-50 lbs overweight. A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.

    Because questions arise:

    1. How would one have gained that kind of extreme weight during crop failures and famine? (which were far more common then in the world than they are now, for the most part).

    2. Very little food back then was processed. No fast food a la McDonalds.

    3. Even those who were considered overweight and sedentary is misleading. They would have been sedentary compared to their contemporaries. But compared with today, they were very active. No public transportation for the most part existed. Horses were reserved for the wealthy, and most people of all castes simply had to get around on foot. They most likely walked an average of 15-25 miles per day, if they stopped to examine their fitbits.

    Even the wealthy weren't as sedentary as today. It's all relative. Certainly people then as now gained as they age due to their metabolism slowing down, but then their lifespans weren't as lengthy as todays.
  133. @Reg Cæsar

    No, it’s phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. ‘Paa’ is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.
     
    Actually, it's the same glo'al stop heard in the East End of London.
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The first one sounds like the Yiddish pronunciation. My parents told me that in Poland in the '30s if someone went far far away to an unknown place, you'd say that he's gone to Honolulu (the same way we would say that he's gone to Timbuktu). They had no firm notion of what Honolulu was like or even where it was, just that it was really, really far away.
  134. @The Alarmist
    O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html


    https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/coronachan.jpg

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    A bunch of roadkill deer have been rotting along a half-mile stretch of highway near here. Some jokers attached party balloons to a couple of them. ( “It’s your day!”)

    An unopened bottle of Corona was propped in the armpit of one of the less-decomposed ones.

    No, I didn’t take it. It’s still Lent. I left it for the vultures, bald eagles, and Corvini to pair with their banquet.

    ‘D be funny if they were hit by one of these:


    • Replies: @Rob McX
    I remember those cars. The rust was so bad on them, they'd decompose nearly as fast as the unfortunate deer.
  135. @Paleo Liberal
    There are some times when I want to be wrong.

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.

    Yesterday, 4/2, there were 576 deaths reported by CV19 in NY state.

    One can argue that we still haven’t seen 500 deaths per day in the 5 boroughs of NYC. It is not clear to me if Ron was predicting NY state or NYC.

    My personal prediction was 500-1000 per day in NYC by 4/4.

    The bad news is it looks like this will probably happen.

    The good news is it looks like we will be at the lower end of the scale.

    If I am wrong, and the death rate in the city is below 500/day by the end of the day tomorrow I will be very happy to be wrong.

    Still, it looks like a few commentators who accused me of being alarmist and hysterical were way off the mark.

    There is some reason to be encouraged by the data that is given here:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/new-york-coronavirus-cases.html

    Look at the graph entitled “New reported cases by day in New York” and you’ll see that it appears to be leveling off and no longer looks exponential. Now there is a lag on deaths – the people dying yesterday were reported as new cases probably a week or two ago when the curve was still growing exponentially, so the number of deaths is also going to level off in another week or so.

    The scary part is not what is going on in NY but whether the NYC experience is going to be repeated over and over in other cities until every city in America has had its hospital system raked over the coals like NY has? When city X has only one case, does that mean that it is really just NY 1 month ago before the doubling magic began or is it going to stay that way because of the measures that were taken? Wuhan virus is not really that tragic for the society as a whole but it is tragic for the victims and their immediate families and given the huge amount of treasure we have just spent it would be nice to know that it was not entirely for nothing.

  136. Anonymous[307] • Disclaimer says:

    The Navajo Nation seems to think they are both more susceptible to infection, and more likely to get very sick when infected. Since they are saying this about themselves, it’s less likely to be dismissed as racism. I find it interesting that a crisis is making the notion of human biodiversity more palatable.

  137. Well you knew redlining was going to make an appearance! Alexandria Ocasio C-Cups never disappoints.

    “COVID deaths are disproportionately spiking in Black + Brown communities,” Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) tweeted to her 6 million followers on Friday morning.

    “Why? Because the chronic toll of redlining, environmental racism, wealth gap, etc. ARE underlying health conditions,” the Bronx-born lawmaker added.

    It never ends.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/03/aoc-calls-for-coronavirus-reparations-for-minorities/

  138. @Reg Cæsar
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cDviaeRk--Q

    Also quite Bri'ish:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=XvFg6eEYq94

    The first one sounds like the Yiddish pronunciation. My parents told me that in Poland in the ’30s if someone went far far away to an unknown place, you’d say that he’s gone to Honolulu (the same way we would say that he’s gone to Timbuktu). They had no firm notion of what Honolulu was like or even where it was, just that it was really, really far away.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    They had no firm notion of what Honolulu was like or even where it was, ...
     
    I always liked this scene in the excellent movie Dog Day Afternoon (sorry about the subtitleos):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4uD20A7n68
  139. @Steve

    New Google site shows where people in a community are taking social distancing seriously — and where they’re not

    https://www.google.com/covid19/mobility/

  140. @Jack D
    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won't mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080218-cr%20osu.jpg

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

    This, this is a hard barrier to civilization for them, they are missing things we absolutely take for granted, and that poisons all their outside relations. Our own concept of responsibility came out of a freak synthesis of (1) synthesized Jewish and Greek philosophy with (2) chaotic decentralized warlordism (instead of saving face, losing a head), and Chinese childishmess is actually closer to the global norm. The Chinese themselves quietly agree with me and buy non-Chinese brands whenever possible at mealtime. Shaun Rein’s End of Cheap China has a late chapter describing how American junk food is jokingly called health food, not because the people who invented stir fry lack an understanding of grease, but because Western brands are seen as an assurance of safe food handling. In fact KFC actually screwed this up with a minor food scandal, but the overall reputation is intact.

  141. Anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    This applies only to Chinese Chinese. When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations. Even successful Chinese newcomers quick learn that America is not a face culture just like Americans living in China learn that China is, and they adjust their behavior accordingly. When in Rome, do as the Romans do is ancient advice.

    You have a lot more in common with your roommate at Harvard than you do with your great grandpa who lived in a village. He might as well have lived on a different planet because his life was so different than yours. Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

    Jack D

    Yes – of course. That’s why there hasn’t been a Chinatown in San Francisco since the late 1800s. Lol – You are beginning to post too much.

  142. @Reg Cæsar

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.
     
    A bunch of roadkill deer have been rotting along a half-mile stretch of highway near here. Some jokers attached party balloons to a couple of them. ( "It's your day!")

    An unopened bottle of Corona was propped in the armpit of one of the less-decomposed ones.

    No, I didn't take it. It's still Lent. I left it for the vultures, bald eagles, and Corvini to pair with their banquet.

    'D be funny if they were hit by one of these:


    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/wp-content/uploads//2018/10/HMN1118-CIP-01.jpg


    https://cdn.dribbble.com/users/892911/screenshots/10274575/media/ed97e4a1b3105358cad2c722defd7b4c.jpg

    I remember those cars. The rust was so bad on them, they’d decompose nearly as fast as the unfortunate deer.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Maybe in the East but no such problem in California where their sales really first took off. The Corona was their first big seller in America and the sales took off (ahem) exponentially from 4,000 units in 1964 to 26,000 units in 1967. They would ship them nicely optioned (automatic trans and AC standard) for what you would pay for an American base model economy car (under $2,000).
  143. @Paleo Liberal
    There are some times when I want to be wrong.

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.

    Yesterday, 4/2, there were 576 deaths reported by CV19 in NY state.

    One can argue that we still haven’t seen 500 deaths per day in the 5 boroughs of NYC. It is not clear to me if Ron was predicting NY state or NYC.

    My personal prediction was 500-1000 per day in NYC by 4/4.

    The bad news is it looks like this will probably happen.

    The good news is it looks like we will be at the lower end of the scale.

    If I am wrong, and the death rate in the city is below 500/day by the end of the day tomorrow I will be very happy to be wrong.

    Still, it looks like a few commentators who accused me of being alarmist and hysterical were way off the mark.

    If you look at the stats, virus cases and deaths in China climbed steadily for about 5 weeks before leveling off, and the Milan region in Italy is showing the same pattern. New York is likely to take about 5 weeks before anything slows down.

  144. @Anonymous
    To be clear, she's not a generic "crisis actor". Ordinary crisis actors would not be very believable in specialized roles like doctors. She's an actual doctor who seems to have extensive involvement in running medical simulations for education.

    It's illegal to record video inside emergency rooms. Moreover, people have called the hospital the video is from and apparently Dr. Smith is not currently working there and the hospital is not overloaded and out of respirators like Dr. Smith claimed in the video. This coupled with Dr. Smith specializing in medical simulations makes that NY Times story quite strange.

    This coupled with Dr. Smith specializing in medical simulations

    Could it have been part of a simulation exercise, or be from a training video derived from same, and someone thought it was real?  Remember that we sometimes see people take satire sites like the Babylon Bee and The Onion seriously.

  145. I wonder how many stories we will be hearing about where people contract the virus after the clampdown but observed all the social distancing guidelines.

    I wonder how many of those stories will be true.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    The transition from "helping" to mindless policing is already happening. (arresting that paddle-boarder in LA (?) strikes me as a particularly good illustration of this).

    In the UK people are already calling the cops on their neighbours when they go out of the house for a walk a second time that day.

    If lockdown-19 goes on too much longer the recriminations will surely start about who sinned against the state and how to get the virus.

    Perhaps starting this week we should fine and jail everyone who tests positive who can't prove that they got the virus in an officially sanctioned way. Stoning, i hear, is also an effective remedy for heresy.

  146. anon[380] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    in pretty vibrant o’ahu, (“the gathering place”)”
    confirmed covid infections by zip codes:
    https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2020/04/01/closer-look-how-states-coronavirus-zip-code-maps-work/

    like nyc, LA, anything stand out?…: red se corner, kahala, is a really wealthy area, spread out homes, but then in that red area to the north is kailua-kaneohe, not so wealthy.

    rather than BWI, clinical characteristics, perhaps socioeconomic status explains infecton? from there one could find an underlying biology.

  147. @Art Deco
    No, it's phonetic indicator. A general rule in re Hawaiian place names and personal names is that you pronounce each vowel separately. 'Paa' is pah-ah, with both syllables accented.

    So not ‘Ha-whyee’ (in English) but ‘Hawai-E’ or ‘Havai-E’? How cheesy. I’m going to call it Havarti from now on. Havarti is shot through with haoles. I can live with that.

    • LOL: vhrm
  148. @Buzz Mohawk
    Do obese, 80-year-old, diabetic chain-smokers constitute a race?

    And do we now spell the name of our 50th state "Hawai'i" with an apostophe to please the indigenous a-holes who are blocking the world's greatest ground-based astronomical observatory from being built atop "their" "sacred" mountain?

    It is absurd that such a telescope can be held up by these people. Only a country that has been weakened by PC BS would put up with this kind of thing for more than 5 seconds.

  149. @Anonymous
    The danger here is that anyone who pontificates too hard on this topic is in serious danger of making a damned fool of their self, rather like that clown "Lance Welton" who infests the lunatic fringe of the alt right.

    You mean like AOC?

    “COVID deaths are disproportionately spiking in Black + Brown communities.”

    “Why? Because the chronic toll of redlining, environmental racism, wealth gap, etc. ARE underlying health conditions.”

    “Inequality is a comorbidity. COVID relief should be drafted with a lens of reparations.”

  150. @Jack D
    In a face culture you never accept blame unless you are forced to. An admission of guilt is tantamount to humiliation and loss of power. Acceptance of responsibility is for losers. And only a cruel victor would try to humiliate you by forcing you to do so. No friend would ever try to put you on the spot and directly confront you. He would leave you a way out so that you could save face.

    So when confronted, you deflect even if it is an obvious lie. There will be suckers in the West who will buy it anyway (I won't mention any names). Coronavirus is an American bioweapon!

    This is what it means in China to accept blame:

    http://factsanddetails.com/media/2/20080218-cr%20osu.jpg

    Do you blame Xi for not wanting to do this?

    No argument about the face culture and accepting blame.

    But that’s different than not fixing the problem. And the CCP, unlike American elites–well at least until about three weeks ago–can just order stuff. No, your market is closed–permanently. No you can not keep birds and pigs.

    They have actually actively chosen not to fix it, but with the world aware … reopen their wet markets and essentially give the world the finger.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  151. @Jack D
    This applies only to Chinese Chinese. When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations. Even successful Chinese newcomers quick learn that America is not a face culture just like Americans living in China learn that China is, and they adjust their behavior accordingly. When in Rome, do as the Romans do is ancient advice.

    You have a lot more in common with your roommate at Harvard than you do with your great grandpa who lived in a village. He might as well have lived on a different planet because his life was so different than yours. Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

    When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations.

    Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

    Hmm… But supposedly East-Asian-descent people in America proportionately don’t do so well when it comes to advancing up the ‘corporate ladder’ and landing plum management/executive positions.

    Could it be something about their actual faces/physiognomy/demeanor that the American ‘establishment’ finds off-putting?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_ceiling

  152. @Jack D

    Hawaiʻi-based
     
    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their "preferred pronouns". For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn't spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn't have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai'i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    Also, the big city south of San Francisco is now San Jose’ (don’t forget that _’_). They’re rubbing our faces in it and laughing at the lack of pushback.

  153. @Rob McX
    I remember those cars. The rust was so bad on them, they'd decompose nearly as fast as the unfortunate deer.

    Maybe in the East but no such problem in California where their sales really first took off. The Corona was their first big seller in America and the sales took off (ahem) exponentially from 4,000 units in 1964 to 26,000 units in 1967. They would ship them nicely optioned (automatic trans and AC standard) for what you would pay for an American base model economy car (under $2,000).

  154. @Mr McKenna
    Fat Countries is fun: it's the USA + some Arab/Moslem countries + a bunch of inconsequential, mostly Pacific island nations. The cities graphic was also entertaining, though a bit misleading, as (e.g.) Southwark, Northern Liberties, Spring Garden etc are all eventually part of Philly. But they had to run the graphics with the data they had.

    Similarly, in recent years most older cities have long since outgrown their limits, and metro areas (esp consolidated or 'combined' metros) are a more meaningful measure of urban agglomerations. Which is why Phoenix and San Antonio, for example, aren't anywhere near the largest metropolitan areas, but the SF Bay Area and Wash-Balt are now 4th and 3rd respectively--while their constituent cities are relatively small.

    Height? Once upon a time, the USA was one of the world's leading countries! Something you can tell your grandchildren. Who will probably be, as TD keeps reminding us: dark, short, and fat.

    Sir, the correct term is “SLUB”, which is shorthand for Short, Lardy, Ugly and Brown. You can change up individual descriptors in the word, but it still gets the concept across.

  155. Bodies stacking up in NYC. Reefer trucks brought in as temporary morgues.

    Maybe this had something to do with it – three years ago, the city closed two out of its five morgues and reduced the hours of those that remained.

    March 29, 2017
    Morgue closings have left the city buried in delays

    https://nypost.com/2017/03/29/morgue-closings-have-left-the-city-buried-in-delays/

    “Ruggiero said closing the two offices and cutting back 24-hour service to 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. has not only led to routine delays that last “days””

  156. @prime noticer
    "Human BioDiversity and the Novel Virus"

    oh yeah? well as always, i bet we won't have to guess very hard as to who will come up with the treatments or vaccines for the virus. and it won't be the Chinese, who created it. maybe Steve can do a "Number of vaccines invented by Africans" ongoing series to go along with his sprinting series.

    i'm also under the impression that age groups are a part of demographics, and we know which age group runs the country. and what they want, they usually get. and they want to not die from this virus. so they'll shut down the entire country if it keeps them alive for another couple years.

    the reason the country reacted so much better to 100,000 people getting killed by the flu in 1968 is largely in part because boomers were young back then and weren't that vulnerable to it. 5% GDP growth and sports in full swing while 100,000 people were getting killed. today, most selfish generation will trash EVERYTHING if it allows them to breathe for a few more cycles.

    weaker old people getting killed by disease and cleared out so the younger generations can get on with life is a natural part of demographics. until now.

    the reason the country reacted so much better to 100,000 people getting killed by the flu in 1968 is largely in part because boomers were young back then and weren’t that vulnerable to it. 5% GDP growth and sports in full swing while 100,000 people were getting killed. today, most selfish generation will trash EVERYTHING if it allows them to breathe for a few more cycles.

    I know. I know.

    I have a vivid memory from that August. My long time grade school girlfriend was over at my house–our moms worked together in the school library and were friends–and we sitting on my bed.

    I remember my exact words:

    “This Hong Kong flu is going to be coming back with our boys from Vietnam this fall. But i’ve decided, i’m not locking down America. Screw that! We’re young with our whole lives in front of us, who gives a crap if some old timers die and get outta the way.”

    M’s eyes grew wide and she practically swooned at my manliness. I laid her down on the bed, leaned in and had my first real kisses and makeout session.

    I’ve often recalled that moment. Despite the years, can still see it today.

    It’s great to be a boomer.

    • LOL: Captain Tripps
  157. @The Alarmist
    O/T

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8183477/Corona-beer-suspends-production-coronavirus.html


    https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/coronachan.jpg

    Sadly, Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan.

    It’s a lousy beer anyway. Corona is to mexican beer what Taco Bell is to mexican food.

  158. @SimpleSong
    True, but if I recall correctly pretty much all infectious diseases tend to hit men harder than women; it appears that there is some immune downregulatory effect associated with testosterone. The flip side of that is that women tend to have much higher rates of autoimmune diseases (lupus, rheumathoid arthritis, etc.) caused by immune overactivity. Caveat that I'm getting outside my area of expertise.

    Incidentally this is why I think testosterone supplementation is a terrible idea, unless you make your living showing off your chiseled body. Seen a few cases of otherwise very healthy, upstanding older men with endocarditis without any obvious risk factors, of note they all seemed to be unusually toned for their age. I might just be seeing patterns where they don't exist however.

    I also think boob jobs are a bad idea, so I guess I'm an equal opportunity scold...

    Yes, agreed that men should never get boob jobs, period. It just doesn’t become them. Best not to go equal opportunity on that procedure and to save it for the gals.

  159. @Anon
    All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead.

    “All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead.”

    You ASSUME that she does NOT have one. Are you of the belief that her bosses would allow her to continue to practice medicine without the proper documentation? IF yes, then the burden is on you to prove it with actual documentation, rather than rely on people on Twitter as your sources for allegedly having the scoop on the matter.

  160. @Jack D
    This applies only to Chinese Chinese. When Asians (anyone else high IQ) grows up in America, they become indistinguishable from WASP or Jewish elites in a couple of generations. Even successful Chinese newcomers quick learn that America is not a face culture just like Americans living in China learn that China is, and they adjust their behavior accordingly. When in Rome, do as the Romans do is ancient advice.

    You have a lot more in common with your roommate at Harvard than you do with your great grandpa who lived in a village. He might as well have lived on a different planet because his life was so different than yours. Face culture becomes a distant memory that you read about in books but it means nothing to you personally.

    This applies only to Chinese Chinese.

    If we replaced all our NAMs with Chinese Chinese, they would be powerful enough to maintain their face culture here.

  161. @prime noticer
    "Human BioDiversity and the Novel Virus"

    oh yeah? well as always, i bet we won't have to guess very hard as to who will come up with the treatments or vaccines for the virus. and it won't be the Chinese, who created it. maybe Steve can do a "Number of vaccines invented by Africans" ongoing series to go along with his sprinting series.

    i'm also under the impression that age groups are a part of demographics, and we know which age group runs the country. and what they want, they usually get. and they want to not die from this virus. so they'll shut down the entire country if it keeps them alive for another couple years.

    the reason the country reacted so much better to 100,000 people getting killed by the flu in 1968 is largely in part because boomers were young back then and weren't that vulnerable to it. 5% GDP growth and sports in full swing while 100,000 people were getting killed. today, most selfish generation will trash EVERYTHING if it allows them to breathe for a few more cycles.

    weaker old people getting killed by disease and cleared out so the younger generations can get on with life is a natural part of demographics. until now.

    Also the internet (much less social media) didn’t exist back in ’68, which contain updates of the virus every few seconds. It is all encompassing, total. There were only three networks on TV back then, so one could simply turn off the tube and get on with living. Not so easy to do today.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    From childhood I remember this LIFE magazine cover on our coffee table:

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/12/84/30/1284308032817fabf17f4a35fb8e471f--life-magazine-virus.jpg

    That is a corona virus.

    But that was 1966. I don't remember anything from the Hong Kong flu epidemic of 1968 (which we called the Asian Flu) except that I think we in our family got it. (Normal childhood in America then included bouts with influenza, chicken pox, and who-knows-what. Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It's called growing up, building resistance and getting strong.)

    That might have been when I had the highest fever I remember, my mother rubbing me down with alcohol to cool me off, me slightly delusional (more than usual LOL).

    Interesting aside: I remember the delusional state when Mom was treating me. There was a loss of spatial sense, in that the sizes of everything, her, the bedside table, became independent of distance. She and the table became giant-sized. I was a tiny entity inside my head. Weird, but even at the time I understood it was just an illusion...

    Notice that we didn't go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.
  162. Professional Angry Black Man mad that Hispanics are getting free money because of Corona virus

  163. HA says:
    @Anon
    All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for her. Go ahead.

    “All right, you can try to find a valid medical license for [Colleen Smith]. Go ahead.”

    Assuming there’s not a couple of Colleen Smiths from Elmhurst, it took about 5 clicks to find her.

    Her license number can be found at:

    https://www.healthcare4ppl.com/physician/new-york/brooklyn/colleen-smith-1790051076.html

    A verification search for that license number at

    http://www.nysed.gov/COMS/OP001/OPSCR2

    returns her name:

    Name : SMITH COLLEEN MICHELLE
    Address : ELMHURST NY
    Profession : MEDICINE
    License No: [….]
    Date of Licensure : 02/20/2015
    Additional Qualification :
    Status : REGISTERED
    Registered through last day of : 11/20
    Medical School: EMORY UNIVERSITY Degree Date : 05/14/2012

  164. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Obesity is a relatively new occurrence for modern humans. Search the hyroglifics of Ancient Egyptian women, the statues of Greco-Roman times, of the Mosaics during the Byzantine Empire. You do NOT see many fat women, period. Fairly simple really. With outbreaks of plague, and especially famines on a regular basis, one simply couldn't afford to overeat. Even among the wealthy, you didn't see people high on the hog, cause they weren't fat pigs. The Polynesians were the exception to the rule. Pretty much everywhere else on the planet throughout most of human history people simply weren't obese, much less grossly overweight. How could they be? Most of their lives weren't sedentary, they constantly moved around. Also, the food quality while limited at times wasn't overly processed. Junk food was for the most part, nonexistent.

    Aside from the late Victorian era for the wealthy in the US, (ca. 1870-1920) the last three decades have been unprecedented in levels of US obesity. Which also correlates with more and more processed foods, more junk food, and more citizens living a sedentary lifestyle.

    And that has got to end.

    Most Egyptian art is heavily stylized and uniform.

    I’ve seen only one exception to this rule in a museum, a statue of an Egyptian overseer, life size, being carried on a palanquin. He is realistically obese and sedentary, wearing just a sheet around his waist covering the lower half of his body. He looks exactly like an overweight bureaucrat.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But Egyptian art is also based on real life examples. If one claims the statues are based on real world examples, so too are the art on the walls.

    The idea that the ancient world had a significant obese problem is ludicrous. Daily calorie intake for most people simply didn't warrant the probability of extreme weight gain. Remember, very few people were sedentary; they couldn't afford to be. What were considered urban centers of trade and commerce still involved far more physical activity when compared to today. No cars, no public transportation comparable to today. Only the wealthy could afford horses. Most people got around on foot. The vast majority of people just weren't lounging around at the local inn for hours on end doing nothing but gorging themselves on endless food, waiting for their favorite gladiatorial/chariot/wrestling games to begin at the Colosseum. Surpluses hardly existed and were subjected to crop failures/famines.

    But do show how one could become obese during times of famine and crop failures, especially when over 95-98% of the population was based in agriculture.


    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn't a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    There are also several surviving statues of the Pharaohs and their consorts. They are almost all on the thin side or at least average weight. None that are obese, much less overweight to any great extent.
  165. Anonymous[323] • Disclaimer says:

  166. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:

    As bad as you think this is, it is actually *much* worse than you think. And you have people like Steve Sailer, who think that things will normalize once the coronavirus is gone. No, this is unfathomably bad.

    The Professor has spoken. The Professor has been right about everything he ever predicted, so you can consider this to be as serious as it is:

  167. @Jack D
    The first one sounds like the Yiddish pronunciation. My parents told me that in Poland in the '30s if someone went far far away to an unknown place, you'd say that he's gone to Honolulu (the same way we would say that he's gone to Timbuktu). They had no firm notion of what Honolulu was like or even where it was, just that it was really, really far away.

    They had no firm notion of what Honolulu was like or even where it was, …

    I always liked this scene in the excellent movie Dog Day Afternoon (sorry about the subtitleos):

  168. @candid_observer
    I wonder how many stories we will be hearing about where people contract the virus after the clampdown but observed all the social distancing guidelines.

    I wonder how many of those stories will be true.

    The transition from “helping” to mindless policing is already happening. (arresting that paddle-boarder in LA (?) strikes me as a particularly good illustration of this).

    In the UK people are already calling the cops on their neighbours when they go out of the house for a walk a second time that day.

    If lockdown-19 goes on too much longer the recriminations will surely start about who sinned against the state and how to get the virus.

    Perhaps starting this week we should fine and jail everyone who tests positive who can’t prove that they got the virus in an officially sanctioned way. Stoning, i hear, is also an effective remedy for heresy.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In the UK people are already calling the cops on their neighbours when they go out of the house for a walk a second time that day.
     
    Janan Ganesh reported in his Financial Times column a few years ago that polls showed Britons' biggest complaint about surveillance was that there wasn't enough of it. It's pretty bad when a hairy lefty subcon comes closer to right-wing American views than do the mass of our fellow Anglo-Saxons.
  169. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'd never seen that before until this article, Jack. As for me, I'm not changing my spelling, and, just as with the BC/CE business, seeing this written in some article on-line would just cause me to quit right there. Sure, the rest may have been interesting or important, but I can't be reading the whole damn web every morning anyway - at least not until I've had my morning Constitutional.

    oops, I guess that’d be BCE/CE that I don’t take to.

    = Achmed from Wyo’ming.

  170. @Corn
    An angry Latina on twitter once said she’d like to see white people pick their own vegetables.

    I’d like to see alot of the Mexicans I’ve met pick their own vegetables.

    An angry Latina on twitter once said she’d like to see white people pick their own vegetables.

    I’d like to see a lot of the Mexicans I’ve met pick their own vegetables.

    The panaderias don’t offer vegetables.

    Billy Squier picks his own. And volunteers in Central Park.

  171. @OscarWildeLoveChild
    Memory's bad, but I thought this had been studied on and reported 20 years ago...something about how some research showed many people of (ANY) Northern European descent appeared to be immune to HIV (and/or just AIDS?)...and it was presumed to be a genetic relic of the survivors (and thus descendants) of the black plague and many other plagues in Europe the last 2000 years. I had not heard of the specificity to Scandanavians.

    Interesting!


    Also, Steve said: (When it comes to diseases, people like to have a theory explaining why those who have gotten it deserve to get it, and why they, personally, won’t get it because they deserve to not get it.)

    Probably true, but as a follower of Jesus Christ, when I hear about something like this terrible virus, I am the opposite (as probably many Christians are). I do deserve to get it, as a lifetime sinner, and was essentially born with it, and I have ever reason to suffer for it, but if I somehow survive, it is by GOD's grace alone. I take nothing for granted. In that sense, I believe there is such a thing as Christian stoicism -- momento mori. I was born to sin and die, but for Him, I have each precious day.

    You’re referring to the Delta 32 mutation. The average throughout Europe is about 10% for one copy and 1% for two. IIRC two copies make you immune to most forms of HIV. There’s speculation that one copy slows the progression of HIV. Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation – perhaps from being urban for so long? My wife and I both have one copy of the mutation. We haven’t tested our kids yet.

    • Replies: @utu
    "Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation" which is interesting in combination with the theory that this immunity was acquired during the Black Death in Middle Ages.
    , @Anonymous
    Here are several HIV to AIDS limiting genetic factors that are tested for commonly:


    https://www.delta-32.com/


    Listed here:

    -CCR5-delta32

    -APOBEC3G

    -HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 alleles

    -DRB1*13 and DQB1*6

    -
  172. More punching up:

    Exclusive: How elite U.S. college students brought COVID-19 home from campus

    Vanderbilt, yes, but I wouldn’t call Tampa an élite school. They do sport a rare Babson anti-gravity rock, and Babe Ruth is said to have hit his longest home run there. I don’t know if the two are related.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
    I was in charge of that sign when we built the building in the background. Ah the good ole days.
    , @Charon
    There's a school in Tampa? And while we're at it, does science actually determine gravity or just help us understand it?
  173. anonymous[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate

    Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate

    I was at Ralph’s grocery last night. Black couple was walking around the milk section, playing grab ass and hanging all over each other. No masks. Then I notice a little black girl, probably 4 or 5, just rolling around on the floor. Sweeping her hands across the floor as if she were swimming. Then she brushed her hair back with her hands. The couple, whom I assume she belonged, as there was nobody else around, saw none of this. Her behavior was grotesque, even if we weren’t in the middle of the coronavirus fiasco.

    I didn’t say anything to them, but I did think to myself, “if it’s their time to go, then it’s their time to go. God has a plan for everyone,” and carried on my shopping.

    Blaming the outcome on race is a very big mistake. This is a matter of culture. A very stupid, narcissistic culture. And if the reader is not religious, nevertheless, they still collectively really do deserve what’s coming, in a Darwinian sense. Think of it as their “accountability to Nature.”

    Nature always makes us accountable to her sensibilities, and Nature is always right.

    • Replies: @Charon
    Sounds like you're taking your life in your hands shopping in that store. Otherwise yes, a thousand times yes, it's culture not color.
  174. @vhrm
    The transition from "helping" to mindless policing is already happening. (arresting that paddle-boarder in LA (?) strikes me as a particularly good illustration of this).

    In the UK people are already calling the cops on their neighbours when they go out of the house for a walk a second time that day.

    If lockdown-19 goes on too much longer the recriminations will surely start about who sinned against the state and how to get the virus.

    Perhaps starting this week we should fine and jail everyone who tests positive who can't prove that they got the virus in an officially sanctioned way. Stoning, i hear, is also an effective remedy for heresy.

    In the UK people are already calling the cops on their neighbours when they go out of the house for a walk a second time that day.

    Janan Ganesh reported in his Financial Times column a few years ago that polls showed Britons’ biggest complaint about surveillance was that there wasn’t enough of it. It’s pretty bad when a hairy lefty subcon comes closer to right-wing American views than do the mass of our fellow Anglo-Saxons.

  175. @YetAnotherAnon
    "If you (Coronavinus - YAA) have any interest in actually engaging with true reality..."

    For an intelligent man that's a rookie mistake to make.

    I gave up engaging with him a long time ago, and now the "Troll" and "Ignore Commenter" buttons are my friends.

    So you have Coronavinus on ignore and also troll-flag his comment stubs content-unseen? That’s pretty based and I thank you.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  176. @Anon7
    Most Egyptian art is heavily stylized and uniform.

    I’ve seen only one exception to this rule in a museum, a statue of an Egyptian overseer, life size, being carried on a palanquin. He is realistically obese and sedentary, wearing just a sheet around his waist covering the lower half of his body. He looks exactly like an overweight bureaucrat.

    But Egyptian art is also based on real life examples. If one claims the statues are based on real world examples, so too are the art on the walls.

    The idea that the ancient world had a significant obese problem is ludicrous. Daily calorie intake for most people simply didn’t warrant the probability of extreme weight gain. Remember, very few people were sedentary; they couldn’t afford to be. What were considered urban centers of trade and commerce still involved far more physical activity when compared to today. No cars, no public transportation comparable to today. Only the wealthy could afford horses. Most people got around on foot. The vast majority of people just weren’t lounging around at the local inn for hours on end doing nothing but gorging themselves on endless food, waiting for their favorite gladiatorial/chariot/wrestling games to begin at the Colosseum. Surpluses hardly existed and were subjected to crop failures/famines.

    But do show how one could become obese during times of famine and crop failures, especially when over 95-98% of the population was based in agriculture.

    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn’t a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn’t a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.
     
    500-600 years?

    Try 50. When i was growing up, there were plenty of men who were overweight--they'd gone to college on the GI bill and had desk jobs but ate more like they were working on the farm. But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see--are unfortunately forced to see--routinely in America today.

    Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future. And people in the centuries to come will look back on pictures from this era in bemused disgust. They'll think of the ugly people they see as depraved primitives like we think of burning witches or gladiatorial games.
  177. @Cortes
    The Spaniards who conquered Mexico deliberately targeted fat Indians and got a twofer: the individuals killed were high caste and killing them removed the officers; and their body fat was used to seal wounds the horses had received. See “The Conquest of New Spain.”

    Remember, let’s not use 21st Century standards of what constitutes fatness. Cathryn Manheim, Walter “The Refrigerator” Perry didn’t exist back then. Fattness for Medieval Spaniards could mean anything from 25-50 lbs overweight. A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.

    Because questions arise:

    1. How would one have gained that kind of extreme weight during crop failures and famine? (which were far more common then in the world than they are now, for the most part).

    2. Very little food back then was processed. No fast food a la McDonalds.

    3. Even those who were considered overweight and sedentary is misleading. They would have been sedentary compared to their contemporaries. But compared with today, they were very active. No public transportation for the most part existed. Horses were reserved for the wealthy, and most people of all castes simply had to get around on foot. They most likely walked an average of 15-25 miles per day, if they stopped to examine their fitbits.

    Even the wealthy weren’t as sedentary as today. It’s all relative. Certainly people then as now gained as they age due to their metabolism slowing down, but then their lifespans weren’t as lengthy as todays.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.
     
    Johan Printz, at 400 lbs, is said to have been the largest person in colonial America.



    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Johan-Printz-.jpg
  178. @Anon7
    Most Egyptian art is heavily stylized and uniform.

    I’ve seen only one exception to this rule in a museum, a statue of an Egyptian overseer, life size, being carried on a palanquin. He is realistically obese and sedentary, wearing just a sheet around his waist covering the lower half of his body. He looks exactly like an overweight bureaucrat.

    There are also several surviving statues of the Pharaohs and their consorts. They are almost all on the thin side or at least average weight. None that are obese, much less overweight to any great extent.

  179. @London
    My sister is a respiratory doctor in London. Naturally, she was working at the Coronavirus ward in a hospital. Predictably, she is now isolated at her home with a fever, sore throat, cough and all that.

    The test results won't be back until next week, but it is a bit irrelevant, tbh.

    She didn't have a lot of protective gear as there isn't much available and so it is saved for those doing intubations. She seemed ok with that and pointed out that even with all of the gear it would still only be as strong as the weakest link.

    E.g one nurse walking from the "dirty" area to the "clean" one and forgetting she still has her mask on would render it a bit pointless.

    I didn't query her on whether it would lessen the problem, as she seemed very forthright and it isn't the right time for me to do so. It may be mostly true anyway as the virus could be just so virulent that it barely makes a difference...or it could be her coping mechanism for getting on with life in the face of shortages. I suspect it is a bit of both.

    Nonetheless, it is likely that all "frontline" medical staff in London have been exposed to a lot of the virus. She had only gone back to work for a week and was already with the initial and almost imperceptibly minor sore throat a few days later.

    Fortunately, she is young and healthy and will be absolutely fine. But if all medical staff are getting it, it does seem strange that not many more have died.

    Our prayers for you and yours, London.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  180. Michigan public radio right now: the reason Detroit blacks were so disproportionately affected is because we need more money for them programs. An expensive mass media messaging campaign which communicated the seriousness would make blacks obey guidelines. Brief comedy note: there’s nothing racial happening here because after all two municipalities with a lot of black people in them, but outside the City of Detroit proper (and one of which with a lot of Haredim) were affected too.

  181. @Anonymous Jew
    You’re referring to the Delta 32 mutation. The average throughout Europe is about 10% for one copy and 1% for two. IIRC two copies make you immune to most forms of HIV. There’s speculation that one copy slows the progression of HIV. Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation - perhaps from being urban for so long? My wife and I both have one copy of the mutation. We haven’t tested our kids yet.

    “Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation” which is interesting in combination with the theory that this immunity was acquired during the Black Death in Middle Ages.

  182. @Sean
    In 2012 Dr Dr. Anthony S. Fauci of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, stated that “MERS-CoV does not spread in a sustained person to person way at all”. But he added there was a potential danger in that it is possible for the virus to mutate into a strain that does transmit from person to person. (“Fauci: New Virus Not Yet a ‘threat to the world’ (video)”. Washington Times. 31 August 2012.)

    The previous two novel coronaviruses (SARS and MERS) had high mortality but were not terribly contagious by aerosol and before the infected got sick, and so did not spread easily between people in casual contact. On realizing that COVID-19 was spread by aerosol very easily by healthy people, Fauci was not the only epidemiologist to freak out. Fearing his 2012 worry had materialized in the shape of COVID-19 with mortality just like MERS and SARS, they went with the assumption COVID-19 had a death rate that would overwhelm hospitals and perhaps even cause cause societal breakdown if it was left to spread. But the various originally reported death rates from Wuhan use far too low a denominator, and this is just the cases of active infection. The Chinese had no serological assay to detect antibodies to the pathogen in those who had been infected but eradicated the virus from their bodies. So the denominator could be a enormous number that when the deaths are divided by it gives a universal death rate, for the whole wide world of under 0.1. It is possible that the Chinese are hiding how many deaths there are in their country, but if they have had tens of thousands of hidden death that is probably a sign that the most of the population of China has already been infected and eradicated the disease from their bodies so that only an antibody assay can detect that they once had it.

    The short answer is that Fauci made a worst case assumption that the COVID-19 pathogen (SARS-CoV-2 ) kills relatively many of the people it infects (compared to flu) and got off to a late start. The alternative, which is looking more and more likely with the lack of mass deaths, is the pathogen made an earlier start and had time to have gone through half or more of the population in Western Countries. For this scenario, SARS-CoV-2 would have to produce serious illness in only a tiny minority of people (the sort who might well die if they caught flu which being previously encountered by our immune systems they see coming) with the rest being asymptomatic or suffering only the mildest of symptoms, and things were never going to be as bad as he said. I can see Fauci may have decided scare tactics were justified, but he has sold the pass. I speak of the trust that the population, whose taxes pay for his institution, put in science; they will not be as willing to listen with total credulity next time. On the other hand, we would be able to cope better with a Contagion-style bring-out-your-dead pandemic that may be in our future.

    It is possible that the Chinese are hiding how many deaths there are in their country, but if they have had tens of thousands of hidden death that is probably a sign that the most of the population of China has already been infected and eradicated the disease from their bodies so that only an antibody assay can detect that they once had it.

    It is absolutely possible. However, a case fatality rate comparison with a country in which the pandemic had already reliably infected most of the population would be needed. This might be the United States by June or July, perhaps Italy, Spain, or the United Kingdom too. Obviously, if eventually more than a million Americans, or Italians, etc. die because of the novel coronavirus — to the point it bloats the usual number of deaths those countries have in a year — and most of China’s population has indeed already been infected, then we’d be talking about probably well over a dozen million extra dead Chinese over the course of two or three months. Hard to conceal. If it turns out they managed to do it, I’d be very curious as to how. And of course, one could do an antibody assay, as you mention, and see if really most Chinese have antibodies against the novel coronavirus. This is falsifiable/provable. If it is the case, it will be found out. Same with if it is not the case.

  183. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous Jew
    You’re referring to the Delta 32 mutation. The average throughout Europe is about 10% for one copy and 1% for two. IIRC two copies make you immune to most forms of HIV. There’s speculation that one copy slows the progression of HIV. Interestingly Ashkenazis have a slightly higher frequency of the mutation - perhaps from being urban for so long? My wife and I both have one copy of the mutation. We haven’t tested our kids yet.

    Here are several HIV to AIDS limiting genetic factors that are tested for commonly:

    https://www.delta-32.com/

    Listed here:

    -CCR5-delta32

    -APOBEC3G

    -HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 alleles

    -DRB1*13 and DQB1*6

  184. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, Reg, but I really expected more girls on the last one. Instead, I got creeping bar-graphs again. #Disappointing!

    The seven-footer is cute, though. Does that make me a megalophile? A psilophile?

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  185. @YetAnotherAnon
    The worst thing is that the US, like the Brits, seem to be totally dependent on Chinese masks, Chinese PCR machines, Chinese chemicals, Chinese pharmaceuticals.

    Like cargo cultists on some Pacific island, the Brits are waiting hopefully for the Great White Bird to bring them what they need, when they were once the workshop of the world - as the US was from 1940-1995.

    “The worst thing is that the US, like the Brits, seem to be totally dependent on Chinese masks, Chinese PCR machines, Chinese chemicals, Chinese pharmaceuticals.”

    If you NOTICED, you would know. I thought Trump by now would be clamping down on American companies engaging in this unpatriotic activity.

    https://theintercept.com/2020/04/01/coronavirus-medical-supplies-export/

    The U.S. government has placed no restrictions on exports of medical supplies while continuing to impose financial penalties on the import of personal protective gear, protective goggles, pulse oximeters, hand sanitizer, and other medical products from China.

    Then again, Trump had the federal government compete with state governments for those supplies.

    https://www.boston.com/news/politics/2020/03/26/charlie-baker-trump-administration-medical-supplies

    In that way, Trump can play the “hero” by saying “Well, look here, we do have what the states need. Here you go.”

  186. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Remember, let's not use 21st Century standards of what constitutes fatness. Cathryn Manheim, Walter "The Refrigerator" Perry didn't exist back then. Fattness for Medieval Spaniards could mean anything from 25-50 lbs overweight. A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.

    Because questions arise:

    1. How would one have gained that kind of extreme weight during crop failures and famine? (which were far more common then in the world than they are now, for the most part).

    2. Very little food back then was processed. No fast food a la McDonalds.

    3. Even those who were considered overweight and sedentary is misleading. They would have been sedentary compared to their contemporaries. But compared with today, they were very active. No public transportation for the most part existed. Horses were reserved for the wealthy, and most people of all castes simply had to get around on foot. They most likely walked an average of 15-25 miles per day, if they stopped to examine their fitbits.

    Even the wealthy weren't as sedentary as today. It's all relative. Certainly people then as now gained as they age due to their metabolism slowing down, but then their lifespans weren't as lengthy as todays.

    A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.

    Johan Printz, at 400 lbs, is said to have been the largest person in colonial America.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Touche. You found one. The exception to the rule. Notice, that that governor wouldn't be considered unusual in size for 2020. Was this person the usual standard for colonists? Regarding weight, did he represent a significant percentage of overweight US colonial adult males in the mid. seventeenth century? Obviously not, by a long shot, as he was an anomaly. Have to admire one who goes out of their way to find someone, anyone, who doesn't conform to the standard of weight. "See? They had their fatties back in the day, too! Biggie Smalls got nothin' on this big man!"

    Ok, dawg. Ok. You found one. Whatever.

  187. @dfordoom

    Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan
     
    People thinking that you can't drink Corona Beer because it will give you coronavirus is proof that you must never ever underestimate human stupidity. And normal human stupidity combined with hysteria is a very bad combination. The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity. We're looking at a population that could become as superstitious and unpredictable as a mediæval peasant society.

    Except medieval people generally weren’t as hysterical as we sophisticated moderns.

  188. @syonredux

    Where are you getting your numbers?

     

    I'm getting them here:


    List of countries by obesity rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_obesity_rate

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?
     
    Thanks for asking.I'm fine. Just a tad busy. My Dad's in his 80s (Hence, prime material for Covid-19) ,so I had had him move in with me at the beginning of March. Plus, the virus has thrown my uni into an uproar (some classes cancelled, some moved entirely online, etc).

    Thanks. I probably should have figured out you meant obesity rate, but I brain locked on BMI.

    Glad to hear things are OK.

  189. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corn
    A few days ago the Health Minister of Burundi reported that Burundi had no cases of COVID because Burundi had no testing kits.

    Actually, it was people online who claimed that Burundi had no Covid testing equipment. The Burundi health minister and other government officials slammed them as liars. You can guess for yourself if the real liar was the people online or the Burundi government. http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-03/26/c_138919629.htm

    There was one death of a schoolteacher that was considered rather suspicious, but government officials claimed he had tested negative for COVID-19.

    Anyway, this was over a week ago. I wouldn’t be surprised if Burundi has gotten testing equipment by now even if they didn’t have it last week. If nothing else, I might suspect the online rumors about the government not having testing equipment might have encouraged Burundi to get testing equipment.

  190. @Reg Cæsar

    A health problem to be sure, but nothing remotely resembling being 400, 500, and 600 lbs like we have in the US today. That kind of extreme weight gain was unheard of in the world, period.
     
    Johan Printz, at 400 lbs, is said to have been the largest person in colonial America.



    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Johan-Printz-.jpg

    Touche. You found one. The exception to the rule. Notice, that that governor wouldn’t be considered unusual in size for 2020. Was this person the usual standard for colonists? Regarding weight, did he represent a significant percentage of overweight US colonial adult males in the mid. seventeenth century? Obviously not, by a long shot, as he was an anomaly. Have to admire one who goes out of their way to find someone, anyone, who doesn’t conform to the standard of weight. “See? They had their fatties back in the day, too! Biggie Smalls got nothin’ on this big man!”

    Ok, dawg. Ok. You found one. Whatever.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ok, dawg. Ok. You found one. Whatever.

     

    I didn't "find" one. I knew of him from reading history.

    Those my age know only of one "dawg":


    https://cartoonresearch.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/DeputyDawgLP-Front600.jpg
  191. @Lot
    Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate

    I’m guessing a big chunk of the difference is higher urban prevalence and lumping urban communities (more blacks) in with the rest of the county/state. Here is the relevant excerpt from your link.

    As of Friday morning, African Americans made up almost half of Milwaukee County’s 945 cases and 81% of its 27 deaths in a county whose population is 26% black. Milwaukee is one of the few places in the United States that is tracking the racial breakdown of people who have been infected by the novel coronavirus, offering a glimpse at the disproportionate destruction it is inflicting on black communities nationwide.

    In Michigan, where the state’s population is 14% black, African Americans made up 35% of cases and 40% of deaths as of Friday morning. Detroit, where a majority of residents are black, has emerged as a hot spot with a high death toll. As has New Orleans. Louisiana has not published case breakdowns by race, but 40% of the state’s deaths have happened in Orleans Parish, where the majority of residents are black.

    To be clear, I said a big chunk, not all. Decent chance there really is a racial difference. Though hard to be sure (as anonymous noted) how much of that might be behavioral.

    More about Detroit at
    https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-government/michigan-gov-whitmer-asks-legislature-extend-emergency-powers-70-days

    • Replies: @Gggg
    I do wonder if the cities with disprortionate black cases and deaths are the cities most likely to release their data. They might want the national media to be able to talk about racism during the coronavirus crisis.


    Cities with a roughly proportional amount of deaths per race probably wouldn’t care much about releasing racial data. If a city has a disproportionately high number of white deaths, they certainly wouldn’t want to release that data.


    I suspect there’s a bias toward releasing data that fits the white privilege narrative.

  192. @Dan Smith
    I see that the Coronavirus uses the ACE site on cell membranes to enter target cells. Caused me to wonder if taking an ACE inhibitor drug for hypertension (which I do) leaves me more or less susceptible to infection. I’m not going to be conducting field tests. Interesting factoid that may or may not have relevance.

    Caused me to wonder if taking an ACE inhibitor drug for hypertension (which I do) leaves me more or less susceptible to infection.

    It is a known factor. Be extra careful and alert.

  193. @dfordoom

    Corona® Beer has become the latest victim of Corona-Chan
     
    People thinking that you can't drink Corona Beer because it will give you coronavirus is proof that you must never ever underestimate human stupidity. And normal human stupidity combined with hysteria is a very bad combination. The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity. We're looking at a population that could become as superstitious and unpredictable as a mediæval peasant society.

    The biggest side-effect of the CV may be an extraordinary wave (a tsunami even) of collective insanity

    Nothing new. A huge wave of fear was a factor in the French revo.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Fear

    https://alphahistory.com/frenchrevolution/great-fear/

  194. @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't keep up with astronomy anymore, Buzz. What effective-size mirror are we talking about?

    Anton can tell you .

  195. @Reg Cæsar
    More punching up:

    Exclusive: How elite U.S. college students brought COVID-19 home from campus

    Vanderbilt, yes, but I wouldn't call Tampa an élite school. They do sport a rare Babson anti-gravity rock, and Babe Ruth is said to have hit his longest home run there. I don't know if the two are related.




    http://www.anecdoteworld.com/uploads/b/20190610/201906101100261576.jpg

    https://www.roadsideamerica.com/attract/images/fl/FLTAMbabehomer_1023.jpg

    I was in charge of that sign when we built the building in the background. Ah the good ole days.

  196. @PiltdownMan

    Gee, which of these four might be Maarit Tiirikainen?
     
    The Fi'in'nish one, of course.

    erhmm! ‘Suo-malai…nen.

    Suomalainen nainen, Hawaii’in laineitten luona ja laajan luonnon loistossa, etsii lopullista toteutta laboratooriossa.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  197. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But Egyptian art is also based on real life examples. If one claims the statues are based on real world examples, so too are the art on the walls.

    The idea that the ancient world had a significant obese problem is ludicrous. Daily calorie intake for most people simply didn't warrant the probability of extreme weight gain. Remember, very few people were sedentary; they couldn't afford to be. What were considered urban centers of trade and commerce still involved far more physical activity when compared to today. No cars, no public transportation comparable to today. Only the wealthy could afford horses. Most people got around on foot. The vast majority of people just weren't lounging around at the local inn for hours on end doing nothing but gorging themselves on endless food, waiting for their favorite gladiatorial/chariot/wrestling games to begin at the Colosseum. Surpluses hardly existed and were subjected to crop failures/famines.

    But do show how one could become obese during times of famine and crop failures, especially when over 95-98% of the population was based in agriculture.


    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn't a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.

    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn’t a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.

    500-600 years?

    Try 50. When i was growing up, there were plenty of men who were overweight–they’d gone to college on the GI bill and had desk jobs but ate more like they were working on the farm. But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see–are unfortunately forced to see–routinely in America today.

    Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future. And people in the centuries to come will look back on pictures from this era in bemused disgust. They’ll think of the ugly people they see as depraved primitives like we think of burning witches or gladiatorial games.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see–are unfortunately forced to see–routinely in America today."

    Exactly. Can we get a witness? That's the thing, too many have to witness the sight.


    "Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future."

    This was figured out decades ago. Simply either: Put down the fork and back away from the table. Or, follow the US Gov's guidelines of no more than about 2k daily caloric intake for adult males. Limit/regulate processed foods, simple carbohydrates, little to no junk food. Eat from traditional four food groups (fruits, veggies, meat, dairy). It really isn't rocket science.

    Example: After his 1924 illness which cost him a prime season playing for NY, during the winter off season, HOF RF Babe Ruth hired a personal trainer, and followed a standard diet that anyone can follow today. He lost about 50-65 lbs and was thinner (for him) and stronger and had a great second half career. But anyone can follow Ruth's diet, it basically adheres to the US gov's dietary standards. Four food groups, no junk food, no overly processed foods, little simple carbs, plenty of water, little to no alcohol, etc. If an obese person were to follow those guidelines for a few months the weight will drop immensely.

    What's so hard to understand? For the most part, those in the West who are obese simply aren't following these sensible guidelines. If they were, they wouldn't be obese.

    Old saying that a person who passes from a heart attack didn't suddenly get one that day: he was working on it for his entire life, ever since he was a tweener. Good dietary habits begin early in childhood. Not really that difficult to figure out.
    , @Anon7
    I worked in a Ford office building, and the building lobby had about a dozen big blown-up pictures showing its heritage as a company. In those pictures, which showed hundreds of factory workers from the 1920's and 1930's, and thousands of engineers in car development, there were no obese men. None.

    The overwhelming number of Americans who are obese are IMHO the result of decades of carefully designed social engineering through advertising. We are taught to use food to feel better, we are taught to use food to socialize. Americans are made to feel anxious, and are then taught the remedy - food.

    Also, food in the modern era is hyperpalatable. That is, it has been engineered to appeal to our sensory organs in a way that food has never done before.

    It's not a coincidence that Americans, and increasingly the rest of the world, are obese. I'm not saying that people don't have a role in their own weight gain, I'm just saying that this is engineered, not a random development of greater food availability.
  198. My understanding is where Covid patients are treated by the 3-drug treatment of hydroxychloroquine, zinc and azithromycin (5 days; mg dose schedule available on request), morality rate drops to 0.00%.

    I’m not practicing medicine, I’m just referring to an interview conducted a few days ago by Rudy Giuliani with a doctor who treated 5-600 covid patients.

    If the disease is entirely manageable / cureable using these drugs, which prevent the patients from needing to be intubated, I’m finding it hard to understand what all the fuss is about. It’s curable with a 100% success rate.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Also, if we're lead to believe the CDC and WHO's own stats, about 97% of people will survive anyway, and most will never develop severe symptoms that would require hospitalization, period. That's why suggesting that the US will get between 1-10 million total deaths when all's said and done is ridiculous.
    At present, 6k is not 10 million. A little sense of perspective and balance will go a long way on both sides.

    This isn't "just the flu", obviously. At the same time, perhaps it's best not to go total apocalyptic armageddon with the pessimistic rhetoric "this will be worse than the Black Plague". Perhaps it won't, so let's not go overboard at the present.

    Of course one way to safeguard these types of potential outbreaks would be of course to crack down on the wet markets and total ban of consuming exotic animals. That certainly would help.

    No one got SARS/COVID-19 via KFC or Bob Evans. Just sayin'.

    Unfortunately, for the short term, it could also make some consumers pause about frequenting an Asian restaurant ('how do we know what kind of meat they serve? Didn't they help cause the pandemic?') What one sows is what one tends to reap.
  199. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Touche. You found one. The exception to the rule. Notice, that that governor wouldn't be considered unusual in size for 2020. Was this person the usual standard for colonists? Regarding weight, did he represent a significant percentage of overweight US colonial adult males in the mid. seventeenth century? Obviously not, by a long shot, as he was an anomaly. Have to admire one who goes out of their way to find someone, anyone, who doesn't conform to the standard of weight. "See? They had their fatties back in the day, too! Biggie Smalls got nothin' on this big man!"

    Ok, dawg. Ok. You found one. Whatever.

    Ok, dawg. Ok. You found one. Whatever.

    I didn’t “find” one. I knew of him from reading history.

    Those my age know only of one “dawg”:

    • LOL: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  200. @Corvinus
    Indeed, she has solid credentials. And considering that Covid-19 is REAL, she is putting that expertise to good use. And, yes, she faces potential disciplinary action for discussing about what she is experiencing to the media. She stated that is willing to accept the consequences.

    Um, , what exactly in that response makes a troll? “I don’t agree” is not an adequate reason.

  201. @Achmed E. Newman
    Res, I've had conversations on threads with Mr. Corvinus before. It just never works out. He will never answer your questions directly (anything that refutes a point), and it goes round and round until carpal tunnel sets in. He's always very polite, so that's why people give it a go trying to explain things to him. He is not really here to learn anything.

    I really don't know why Corvinus is on here. He's not funny like Tiny Duck, but he will write something in contradiction to anything iSteve writes, no matter what. If you get an agreement from him, it's only when you've agreed with every damn thing he's just written, which is highly unlikely in my case.

    What's the point, Corvinus? Were you hired early on to get the page-view count up? If so, unz doesn't need you anymore, especially during these trying times of the Kung Flu. Restructuring, yeah, that's the ticket...

    He’s a troll. His I’ve hidden his comments. Zero loss.

  202. @Sean
    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of a priori reasons for imagining that some group is less vulnerable than another to a novel disease
     
    If it evolved amid Chinese last year, it seems a fair bet it would be somewhat adapted to infecting them. The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and it was most dangerous to men of military age (the W shape age graph). Men's death rates in 1918 far exceeded the female death rates, and altered the sax ratio.The male TB death rate in the years following 1918 was lowered because so many men had died of the Spanish flu (I expect a lowering of the death rate from influenza as a result of COVID-19).

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.

    Sure, that makes seems plausible. And since our same intelligence agencies discovered that Trump was a Russian agent, that may explain his disastrous handling of this crisis, given that Putin wants to destroy America.

    • Replies: @Sean
    Yes the intelligence services deal in lies to everyone except their own government, who get wild speculation, and there almost certainly was not 15 to 40 times more deaths in China from COVID-19 than the Chinese are admitting. The Chinese government are no more trustworthy than the CIA though, because China admitted to lying during the SARS 2002–2003 epidemic, and the Wuhan disease was initially covered up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Carey_(United_States_Air_Force_officer)
    Deputy Director, Command, Control and Nuclear Operations (J3), Joint Staff, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. (August 2010 – June 2012)
    On July 14–18, 2013, Carey took part in the work of the Bilateral Presidential Commission, Military Cooperation Working Group during the two-day U.S.-Russian Federation Nuclear Security Exercise 2013 in Sergeiv Posad, Moscow, Russia. He headed the Department of Defense delegation, which consisted of three commissioned officers and five civilian personnel from DOD.
     
    Apart from the official trip by the USAF nuke missile generals to meet their opposite number in Russia, while head of the Defence Intelligence Agency, General Flynn made an official visit to GRU headquarters. Do not give America all the credit for this fraternization going awry, Russia must also take some responsibility I think.

    The essential point is that China has halted the spread of COVID-19, but is that because they are more efficient or because cryptic infecting and eradicating by antibodies has given the country herd immunity to a disease that kills at the age adjusted rate of an ordinary influenza epidemic, and most people get no inkling that they have become immune to? All governments are slow to get started, but the slightest indication that the worst case scenarios might come to pass results in emergency plan A for the worst case scenario plan being retrieved from the file where it has been sitting, and swiftly gaining runaway train momentum.

  203. @Reg Cæsar
    More punching up:

    Exclusive: How elite U.S. college students brought COVID-19 home from campus

    Vanderbilt, yes, but I wouldn't call Tampa an élite school. They do sport a rare Babson anti-gravity rock, and Babe Ruth is said to have hit his longest home run there. I don't know if the two are related.




    http://www.anecdoteworld.com/uploads/b/20190610/201906101100261576.jpg

    https://www.roadsideamerica.com/attract/images/fl/FLTAMbabehomer_1023.jpg

    There’s a school in Tampa? And while we’re at it, does science actually determine gravity or just help us understand it?

  204. @Alden
    The navy hospital ship in New York Harbor currently has 3 patients. The navy hospital ship in Los Angeles harbor has all of 15 patients for their thousand bed hospitals.

    Not expressing an opinion here, just stating a fact.

    The navy hospital ship in New York Harbor currently has 3 patients. The navy hospital ship in Los Angeles harbor has all of 15 patients for their thousand bed hospitals.

    I’m not surprised at all. I think Santa Clara County has now gone three days without a single death, and I’m hoping the final total comes in at well under 100. That’s astonishing for a county of 2M that last month was a national epicenter of the outbreak before NY had its first death.

    Maybe LA will come in at under 1,000.

    Thank you, thank you, Dr. Sarah Cody!

  205. @anonymous

    Finally CV race data!

    As I speculated many weeks ago, Milwaukee and Michigan blacks die from CV at about 300% of the gen population rate.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/early-data-shows-african-americans-have-contracted-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate
     

    I was at Ralph's grocery last night. Black couple was walking around the milk section, playing grab ass and hanging all over each other. No masks. Then I notice a little black girl, probably 4 or 5, just rolling around on the floor. Sweeping her hands across the floor as if she were swimming. Then she brushed her hair back with her hands. The couple, whom I assume she belonged, as there was nobody else around, saw none of this. Her behavior was grotesque, even if we weren't in the middle of the coronavirus fiasco.

    I didn't say anything to them, but I did think to myself, "if it's their time to go, then it's their time to go. God has a plan for everyone," and carried on my shopping.

    Blaming the outcome on race is a very big mistake. This is a matter of culture. A very stupid, narcissistic culture. And if the reader is not religious, nevertheless, they still collectively really do deserve what's coming, in a Darwinian sense. Think of it as their "accountability to Nature."

    Nature always makes us accountable to her sensibilities, and Nature is always right.

    Sounds like you’re taking your life in your hands shopping in that store. Otherwise yes, a thousand times yes, it’s culture not color.

  206. @Jack D

    Hawaiʻi-based
     
    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their "preferred pronouns". For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn't spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn't have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai'i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    They used to think I was an Arab. Now they think I’m Hawaiian.

  207. @Jack D

    Hawaiʻi-based
     
    This is one of those annoying Leftist virtue signaling affectations like calling people by their "preferred pronouns". For almost two centuries, Hawaii was spelled Hawaii in the English language. It wasn't spelled anything in the Hawaiian language because those buggers didn't have a written language until we taught them how to read and write. Hawaii was admitted to the union as the State of Hawaii. But all the Leftists spell it Hawai'i now to show how PC and multicultural they are.

    The names of places foreign buggers live in are words in OUR language.

    Cologne, not Koehln

    Berlin, not “Bear-leeen”

    Etc.

    Ever since the Sandinista days, NPR assholes have been virtue-signalling by pretending to give a “Spanish” pronunciation to such words, even though it distorts the rhythm of an English sentence:

    “Today, in Neegaraghwah,..”

    But never “Bear-leen”. You’ll notice that only “hicks” say “Par-ee.” Why not? Silence.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    My favorite is when the Latino NPR correspondents give an exaggerated Spanish pronunciation of their own names. Even SNL made fun of this years ago (probably wouldn't do that anymore). "This is Marrrria Heeeenohooosa reporting from Washington."
  208. @res
    I'm guessing a big chunk of the difference is higher urban prevalence and lumping urban communities (more blacks) in with the rest of the county/state. Here is the relevant excerpt from your link.

    As of Friday morning, African Americans made up almost half of Milwaukee County’s 945 cases and 81% of its 27 deaths in a county whose population is 26% black. Milwaukee is one of the few places in the United States that is tracking the racial breakdown of people who have been infected by the novel coronavirus, offering a glimpse at the disproportionate destruction it is inflicting on black communities nationwide.

    In Michigan, where the state’s population is 14% black, African Americans made up 35% of cases and 40% of deaths as of Friday morning. Detroit, where a majority of residents are black, has emerged as a hot spot with a high death toll. As has New Orleans. Louisiana has not published case breakdowns by race, but 40% of the state’s deaths have happened in Orleans Parish, where the majority of residents are black.

     

    To be clear, I said a big chunk, not all. Decent chance there really is a racial difference. Though hard to be sure (as anonymous noted) how much of that might be behavioral.

    More about Detroit at
    https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-government/michigan-gov-whitmer-asks-legislature-extend-emergency-powers-70-days

    I do wonder if the cities with disprortionate black cases and deaths are the cities most likely to release their data. They might want the national media to be able to talk about racism during the coronavirus crisis.

    Cities with a roughly proportional amount of deaths per race probably wouldn’t care much about releasing racial data. If a city has a disproportionately high number of white deaths, they certainly wouldn’t want to release that data.

    I suspect there’s a bias toward releasing data that fits the white privilege narrative.

  209. Now they think I’m Hawaiian.

    Didn’t Barack Hussein O’Bama live in Hawa’ii?

  210. @Achmed E. Newman
    Res, I've had conversations on threads with Mr. Corvinus before. It just never works out. He will never answer your questions directly (anything that refutes a point), and it goes round and round until carpal tunnel sets in. He's always very polite, so that's why people give it a go trying to explain things to him. He is not really here to learn anything.

    I really don't know why Corvinus is on here. He's not funny like Tiny Duck, but he will write something in contradiction to anything iSteve writes, no matter what. If you get an agreement from him, it's only when you've agreed with every damn thing he's just written, which is highly unlikely in my case.

    What's the point, Corvinus? Were you hired early on to get the page-view count up? If so, unz doesn't need you anymore, especially during these trying times of the Kung Flu. Restructuring, yeah, that's the ticket...

    The reality is that I am here for debate. I answer questions directly, and most likely it is a response that runs counter to your line of thinking. Hence, you make the false claim that I am not here to learn anything when the rebuttal makes you uncomfortable. Now, when I NOTICE contradictions, I point them out and offer reasons for my position. Your confirmation bias is something fierce. But I do understand why…

  211. @Paleo Liberal
    There are some times when I want to be wrong.

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.

    Yesterday, 4/2, there were 576 deaths reported by CV19 in NY state.

    One can argue that we still haven’t seen 500 deaths per day in the 5 boroughs of NYC. It is not clear to me if Ron was predicting NY state or NYC.

    My personal prediction was 500-1000 per day in NYC by 4/4.

    The bad news is it looks like this will probably happen.

    The good news is it looks like we will be at the lower end of the scale.

    If I am wrong, and the death rate in the city is below 500/day by the end of the day tomorrow I will be very happy to be wrong.

    Still, it looks like a few commentators who accused me of being alarmist and hysterical were way off the mark.

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.

    Thanks. I generally try to be rather cautious in my claims, and originally I’d predicted at least 500 daily deaths in New York [State] by *Easter,* thereby causing Trump to “pivot” away from his very stupid proposal:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/so-uh-what-just-happened/#comment-3793485

    Then a few days later, I became much more aggressive and on 3/28th I said: “So I think my estimate of reaching 500-1000 deaths per day in New York within the next week or so is certainly on track.” So it only took 5 days to reach 576/day, and the website I use put today’s total at 680 (all these daily totals are slightly different due to different cut-offs I think). I wouldn’t be surprised if it hits 1000 by early next week. The reason I was always using NYS rather than NYC was that only state figures are listed on the website I like to use.

    https://www.unz.com/runz/correctly-estimating-coronavirus-infections/#comment-3801659

    You may have been a little too pessimistic, but that just means your projections were probably off by a few days, which is hardly a big deal compared to Rush Limbaugh and all the retards here shouting “It’s Just the Flu!!!”

    Meanwhile, I haven’t yet heard a word of apology from all the Coronavirus Hoaxers who heaped endless insults and ridicule on us for pointing to the obvious. But, then again, I suppose they still haven’t admitted they were wrong. I think many of them are now claiming that the official statistics are fraudulent and the doctors and nurses who are eyewitnesses are “crisis actors.”

    I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the ones who suddenly popped up are just shills and trolls hired to discredit this website and harass people with crackpottery.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Rush Limbaugh and all the retards here shouting “It’s Just the Flu!!!”

    Speaking of which, Limbaugh was diagnosed with lung cancer this year and has supposedly begun treatment. Of all people, it would be wise for him to practice social distancing as something along the lines of COVID-19 would not be very pleasant.
  212. @AnotherDad

    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn’t a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.
     
    500-600 years?

    Try 50. When i was growing up, there were plenty of men who were overweight--they'd gone to college on the GI bill and had desk jobs but ate more like they were working on the farm. But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see--are unfortunately forced to see--routinely in America today.

    Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future. And people in the centuries to come will look back on pictures from this era in bemused disgust. They'll think of the ugly people they see as depraved primitives like we think of burning witches or gladiatorial games.

    “But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see–are unfortunately forced to see–routinely in America today.”

    Exactly. Can we get a witness? That’s the thing, too many have to witness the sight.

    “Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future.”

    This was figured out decades ago. Simply either: Put down the fork and back away from the table. Or, follow the US Gov’s guidelines of no more than about 2k daily caloric intake for adult males. Limit/regulate processed foods, simple carbohydrates, little to no junk food. Eat from traditional four food groups (fruits, veggies, meat, dairy). It really isn’t rocket science.

    Example: After his 1924 illness which cost him a prime season playing for NY, during the winter off season, HOF RF Babe Ruth hired a personal trainer, and followed a standard diet that anyone can follow today. He lost about 50-65 lbs and was thinner (for him) and stronger and had a great second half career. But anyone can follow Ruth’s diet, it basically adheres to the US gov’s dietary standards. Four food groups, no junk food, no overly processed foods, little simple carbs, plenty of water, little to no alcohol, etc. If an obese person were to follow those guidelines for a few months the weight will drop immensely.

    What’s so hard to understand? For the most part, those in the West who are obese simply aren’t following these sensible guidelines. If they were, they wouldn’t be obese.

    Old saying that a person who passes from a heart attack didn’t suddenly get one that day: he was working on it for his entire life, ever since he was a tweener. Good dietary habits begin early in childhood. Not really that difficult to figure out.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    For some reason, Babe Ruth is much more notorious for his appetites than for his successful conquest of his bad habits after 1925, which allowed him to be an outstanding athlete throughout his 30s.
  213. @Ron Unz

    Last week I said that Ron Unz’ prediction of 500-1000 deaths per day in NY by the end of what was then next week, and now the current week, was, if anything, optimistic. That is, if the social distancing efforts started to work, then we would see 500-1000 deaths per day by the end of this week. That is, by 4/4.
     
    Thanks. I generally try to be rather cautious in my claims, and originally I'd predicted at least 500 daily deaths in New York [State] by *Easter,* thereby causing Trump to "pivot" away from his very stupid proposal:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/so-uh-what-just-happened/#comment-3793485

    Then a few days later, I became much more aggressive and on 3/28th I said: "So I think my estimate of reaching 500-1000 deaths per day in New York within the next week or so is certainly on track." So it only took 5 days to reach 576/day, and the website I use put today's total at 680 (all these daily totals are slightly different due to different cut-offs I think). I wouldn't be surprised if it hits 1000 by early next week. The reason I was always using NYS rather than NYC was that only state figures are listed on the website I like to use.

    https://www.unz.com/runz/correctly-estimating-coronavirus-infections/#comment-3801659

    You may have been a little too pessimistic, but that just means your projections were probably off by a few days, which is hardly a big deal compared to Rush Limbaugh and all the retards here shouting "It's Just the Flu!!!"

    Meanwhile, I haven't yet heard a word of apology from all the Coronavirus Hoaxers who heaped endless insults and ridicule on us for pointing to the obvious. But, then again, I suppose they still haven't admitted they were wrong. I think many of them are now claiming that the official statistics are fraudulent and the doctors and nurses who are eyewitnesses are "crisis actors."

    I wouldn't be surprised if some of the ones who suddenly popped up are just shills and trolls hired to discredit this website and harass people with crackpottery.

    “Rush Limbaugh and all the retards here shouting “It’s Just the Flu!!!”

    Speaking of which, Limbaugh was diagnosed with lung cancer this year and has supposedly begun treatment. Of all people, it would be wise for him to practice social distancing as something along the lines of COVID-19 would not be very pleasant.

  214. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see–are unfortunately forced to see–routinely in America today."

    Exactly. Can we get a witness? That's the thing, too many have to witness the sight.


    "Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future."

    This was figured out decades ago. Simply either: Put down the fork and back away from the table. Or, follow the US Gov's guidelines of no more than about 2k daily caloric intake for adult males. Limit/regulate processed foods, simple carbohydrates, little to no junk food. Eat from traditional four food groups (fruits, veggies, meat, dairy). It really isn't rocket science.

    Example: After his 1924 illness which cost him a prime season playing for NY, during the winter off season, HOF RF Babe Ruth hired a personal trainer, and followed a standard diet that anyone can follow today. He lost about 50-65 lbs and was thinner (for him) and stronger and had a great second half career. But anyone can follow Ruth's diet, it basically adheres to the US gov's dietary standards. Four food groups, no junk food, no overly processed foods, little simple carbs, plenty of water, little to no alcohol, etc. If an obese person were to follow those guidelines for a few months the weight will drop immensely.

    What's so hard to understand? For the most part, those in the West who are obese simply aren't following these sensible guidelines. If they were, they wouldn't be obese.

    Old saying that a person who passes from a heart attack didn't suddenly get one that day: he was working on it for his entire life, ever since he was a tweener. Good dietary habits begin early in childhood. Not really that difficult to figure out.

    For some reason, Babe Ruth is much more notorious for his appetites than for his successful conquest of his bad habits after 1925, which allowed him to be an outstanding athlete throughout his 30s.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Talent plus larger than life sells tickets.

    Also didn't hurt that starting in 1926, NY HOF 1B Lou Gehrig batted clean up, just behind him. AL P's certainly weren't walking Ruth so they could face Lou Gehrig, who to the best of recollection never had a weight problem during his life.

    What is fascinating is what was considered to be top notch training and diet for athletes a century ago has been standard US dietary guidelines for last several decades. Anyone can follow them without breaking their budget.
  215. @Currier House
    My understanding is where Covid patients are treated by the 3-drug treatment of hydroxychloroquine, zinc and azithromycin (5 days; mg dose schedule available on request), morality rate drops to 0.00%.

    I’m not practicing medicine, I’m just referring to an interview conducted a few days ago by Rudy Giuliani with a doctor who treated 5-600 covid patients.

    If the disease is entirely manageable / cureable using these drugs, which prevent the patients from needing to be intubated, I’m finding it hard to understand what all the fuss is about. It’s curable with a 100% success rate.

    Also, if we’re lead to believe the CDC and WHO’s own stats, about 97% of people will survive anyway, and most will never develop severe symptoms that would require hospitalization, period. That’s why suggesting that the US will get between 1-10 million total deaths when all’s said and done is ridiculous.
    At present, 6k is not 10 million. A little sense of perspective and balance will go a long way on both sides.

    This isn’t “just the flu”, obviously. At the same time, perhaps it’s best not to go total apocalyptic armageddon with the pessimistic rhetoric “this will be worse than the Black Plague”. Perhaps it won’t, so let’s not go overboard at the present.

    Of course one way to safeguard these types of potential outbreaks would be of course to crack down on the wet markets and total ban of consuming exotic animals. That certainly would help.

    No one got SARS/COVID-19 via KFC or Bob Evans. Just sayin’.

    Unfortunately, for the short term, it could also make some consumers pause about frequenting an Asian restaurant (‘how do we know what kind of meat they serve? Didn’t they help cause the pandemic?’) What one sows is what one tends to reap.

  216. @Achmed E. Newman
    Perhaps the vast abundance of the doctors and nurses in those hospitals are foreigners. Have you seen many white guys there, Simon?

    #SinglePayerFortheWIN!

    #CallItSinglePayerSosTheyDon'tCatchOnItsSovietStyleCommunism

    Most of the London hospital staff I’ve seen are non-white, but I have a good friend who’s white English female & a nurse in London, and I used to know a crazy young English woman who was a nurse in training, also white. There are also white South Africans working as anaesthetists and other technical roles, and white Irish nurses.

    But generally, most doctors are south-Asian, most nurses are black or south-Asian.

    A white female nurse died on 2nd April, announced right after my post, so clearly it can happen although older, unfit south Asian & black men seem to be the clearly highest risk group. Why no dead elder white male doctors – that could indeed be that you simply don’t see them in the hospitals, that they are nearly all in private practice.

    • Replies: @UK
    I very much doubt that most doctors in London aren't white.

    Also, elderly white male doctors are not particularly in private practice. That isn't the way medicine really works in the UK.

    It is very rare for hospital based medics to solely do private work, and the leading experts tend to be the Consultants/Professors at the major teaching hospitals.

    Incidentally, I've met 4 of these individuals from UCLH, possibly the best of the hospitals, and their surnames were "Levy", "Goldsomething, "David" etc. I assume that was somewhat coincidental as they don't work together but maybe it is also a North London thing.
  217. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'd never seen that before until this article, Jack. As for me, I'm not changing my spelling, and, just as with the BC/CE business, seeing this written in some article on-line would just cause me to quit right there. Sure, the rest may have been interesting or important, but I can't be reading the whole damn web every morning anyway - at least not until I've had my morning Constitutional.

    No need to fuss about the CE/BCE rigmarole. I pronounce them “Christian Era” and “Before the Christian Era”. Prob solved.

  218. @syonredux

    Where are you getting your numbers?

     

    I'm getting them here:


    List of countries by obesity rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_obesity_rate

    P.S. Your commenting frequency is way down. Everything OK?
     
    Thanks for asking.I'm fine. Just a tad busy. My Dad's in his 80s (Hence, prime material for Covid-19) ,so I had had him move in with me at the beginning of March. Plus, the virus has thrown my uni into an uproar (some classes cancelled, some moved entirely online, etc).

    Glad you’re back commenting; and take good care of Dad.

  219. @epebble
    Don't know about SPAM®, But I see a puzzling correlation between latitude and Covid deaths. Countries South of 18 degree North parallel seem relatively unscathed. May be due to warmer weather. If so, summer can't come fast enough.

    Yeah, I’m personally rooting for Global Warming. Maybe we should sacrifice Greta Thunberg to the Climate Gods to speed it up.

  220. @James J. O'Meara
    The names of places foreign buggers live in are words in OUR language.

    Cologne, not Koehln

    Berlin, not "Bear-leeen"

    Etc.

    Ever since the Sandinista days, NPR assholes have been virtue-signalling by pretending to give a "Spanish" pronunciation to such words, even though it distorts the rhythm of an English sentence:

    "Today, in Neegaraghwah,.."

    But never "Bear-leen". You'll notice that only "hicks" say "Par-ee." Why not? Silence.

    My favorite is when the Latino NPR correspondents give an exaggerated Spanish pronunciation of their own names. Even SNL made fun of this years ago (probably wouldn’t do that anymore). “This is Marrrria Heeeenohooosa reporting from Washington.”

  221. @AnotherDad

    The fact of the matter, is that obesity, much less extreme overweight (say, 50 lbs and more) simply was non-existent on a wide scale, and wasn’t a significant percentage of the population during ancient times in all civilizations, up to about 500-600 yrs. And even then, it was largely confined to the West.
     
    500-600 years?

    Try 50. When i was growing up, there were plenty of men who were overweight--they'd gone to college on the GI bill and had desk jobs but ate more like they were working on the farm. But we would have simply gawked at someone as obese as you now can now see--are unfortunately forced to see--routinely in America today.

    Medical science will figure out how to regulate this in the future. And people in the centuries to come will look back on pictures from this era in bemused disgust. They'll think of the ugly people they see as depraved primitives like we think of burning witches or gladiatorial games.

    I worked in a Ford office building, and the building lobby had about a dozen big blown-up pictures showing its heritage as a company. In those pictures, which showed hundreds of factory workers from the 1920’s and 1930’s, and thousands of engineers in car development, there were no obese men. None.

    The overwhelming number of Americans who are obese are IMHO the result of decades of carefully designed social engineering through advertising. We are taught to use food to feel better, we are taught to use food to socialize. Americans are made to feel anxious, and are then taught the remedy – food.

    Also, food in the modern era is hyperpalatable. That is, it has been engineered to appeal to our sensory organs in a way that food has never done before.

    It’s not a coincidence that Americans, and increasingly the rest of the world, are obese. I’m not saying that people don’t have a role in their own weight gain, I’m just saying that this is engineered, not a random development of greater food availability.

  222. @Steve Sailer
    For some reason, Babe Ruth is much more notorious for his appetites than for his successful conquest of his bad habits after 1925, which allowed him to be an outstanding athlete throughout his 30s.

    Talent plus larger than life sells tickets.

    Also didn’t hurt that starting in 1926, NY HOF 1B Lou Gehrig batted clean up, just behind him. AL P’s certainly weren’t walking Ruth so they could face Lou Gehrig, who to the best of recollection never had a weight problem during his life.

    What is fascinating is what was considered to be top notch training and diet for athletes a century ago has been standard US dietary guidelines for last several decades. Anyone can follow them without breaking their budget.

  223. @Ron Unz

    Western intelligence thinks the Chinese have had 15 to 40 times more deaths than is admitted.
     
    Sure, that makes seems plausible. And since our same intelligence agencies discovered that Trump was a Russian agent, that may explain his disastrous handling of this crisis, given that Putin wants to destroy America.

    Yes the intelligence services deal in lies to everyone except their own government, who get wild speculation, and there almost certainly was not 15 to 40 times more deaths in China from COVID-19 than the Chinese are admitting. The Chinese government are no more trustworthy than the CIA though, because China admitted to lying during the SARS 2002–2003 epidemic, and the Wuhan disease was initially covered up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Carey_(United_States_Air_Force_officer)
    Deputy Director, Command, Control and Nuclear Operations (J3), Joint Staff, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. (August 2010 – June 2012)
    On July 14–18, 2013, Carey took part in the work of the Bilateral Presidential Commission, Military Cooperation Working Group during the two-day U.S.-Russian Federation Nuclear Security Exercise 2013 in Sergeiv Posad, Moscow, Russia. He headed the Department of Defense delegation, which consisted of three commissioned officers and five civilian personnel from DOD.

    Apart from the official trip by the USAF nuke missile generals to meet their opposite number in Russia, while head of the Defence Intelligence Agency, General Flynn made an official visit to GRU headquarters. Do not give America all the credit for this fraternization going awry, Russia must also take some responsibility I think.

    The essential point is that China has halted the spread of COVID-19, but is that because they are more efficient or because cryptic infecting and eradicating by antibodies has given the country herd immunity to a disease that kills at the age adjusted rate of an ordinary influenza epidemic, and most people get no inkling that they have become immune to? All governments are slow to get started, but the slightest indication that the worst case scenarios might come to pass results in emergency plan A for the worst case scenario plan being retrieved from the file where it has been sitting, and swiftly gaining runaway train momentum.

  224. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Also the internet (much less social media) didn't exist back in '68, which contain updates of the virus every few seconds. It is all encompassing, total. There were only three networks on TV back then, so one could simply turn off the tube and get on with living. Not so easy to do today.

    From childhood I remember this LIFE magazine cover on our coffee table:

    That is a corona virus.

    But that was 1966. I don’t remember anything from the Hong Kong flu epidemic of 1968 (which we called the Asian Flu) except that I think we in our family got it. (Normal childhood in America then included bouts with influenza, chicken pox, and who-knows-what. Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It’s called growing up, building resistance and getting strong.)

    That might have been when I had the highest fever I remember, my mother rubbing me down with alcohol to cool me off, me slightly delusional (more than usual LOL).

    Interesting aside: I remember the delusional state when Mom was treating me. There was a loss of spatial sense, in that the sizes of everything, her, the bedside table, became independent of distance. She and the table became giant-sized. I was a tiny entity inside my head. Weird, but even at the time I understood it was just an illusion…

    Notice that we didn’t go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It’s called growing up, building resistance and getting strong."

    Hope you guys had plenty of Bactine to help get you thru. Stung like blazes but certainly helped in a pinch.

    That Life picture looks like something out of the Jetsons.


    "Notice that we didn’t go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.

    Way wait. Who's parents are pussies? Guess it's better than having parents who are dicks.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I remember when I had a fever of 105 to 106 F. This rubber frog that had come in a capsule from the gum ball machine started moving around. He didn't really go far, but he was definitely moving. I told my Mom and that probably got her even more worried. That wasn't my last hallucination, but she wasn't around the other time ...
  225. @JohnPlywood
    Please stop posting bullshit on this website, with your only reference being idioms like "man flu.". Women are more susceptible to flu and disease in general. Their longer lifespan is linked to their lower participation in high-risk activity and their tendency to go to hospitals more often than men do.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-20452192


    Research suggests that women are at greater risk of getting flu than men because they tend to spend more time around children, who are more likely to have a flu-like illness in the first place.

    A nationwide flu survey carried out by London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine during last winter found that women were 16% more likely to say they had flu symptoms.
     

    You, sir, are a moron. Women having “more chance of getting the flu because of being around children” does not invalidate my point that they are more resistant to it and/or have milder symptoms than men. By the way, the 1918 “Spanish” flu, like the coronavirus, also killed disproportionally more men than women.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2740912/

  226. @Buzz Mohawk
    From childhood I remember this LIFE magazine cover on our coffee table:

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/12/84/30/1284308032817fabf17f4a35fb8e471f--life-magazine-virus.jpg

    That is a corona virus.

    But that was 1966. I don't remember anything from the Hong Kong flu epidemic of 1968 (which we called the Asian Flu) except that I think we in our family got it. (Normal childhood in America then included bouts with influenza, chicken pox, and who-knows-what. Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It's called growing up, building resistance and getting strong.)

    That might have been when I had the highest fever I remember, my mother rubbing me down with alcohol to cool me off, me slightly delusional (more than usual LOL).

    Interesting aside: I remember the delusional state when Mom was treating me. There was a loss of spatial sense, in that the sizes of everything, her, the bedside table, became independent of distance. She and the table became giant-sized. I was a tiny entity inside my head. Weird, but even at the time I understood it was just an illusion...

    Notice that we didn't go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.

    “Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It’s called growing up, building resistance and getting strong.”

    Hope you guys had plenty of Bactine to help get you thru. Stung like blazes but certainly helped in a pinch.

    That Life picture looks like something out of the Jetsons.

    “Notice that we didn’t go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.

    Way wait. Who’s parents are pussies? Guess it’s better than having parents who are dicks.

  227. UK says:
    @Simon in London
    Most of the London hospital staff I've seen are non-white, but I have a good friend who's white English female & a nurse in London, and I used to know a crazy young English woman who was a nurse in training, also white. There are also white South Africans working as anaesthetists and other technical roles, and white Irish nurses.

    But generally, most doctors are south-Asian, most nurses are black or south-Asian.

    A white female nurse died on 2nd April, announced right after my post, so clearly it can happen although older, unfit south Asian & black men seem to be the clearly highest risk group. Why no dead elder white male doctors - that could indeed be that you simply don't see them in the hospitals, that they are nearly all in private practice.

    I very much doubt that most doctors in London aren’t white.

    Also, elderly white male doctors are not particularly in private practice. That isn’t the way medicine really works in the UK.

    It is very rare for hospital based medics to solely do private work, and the leading experts tend to be the Consultants/Professors at the major teaching hospitals.

    Incidentally, I’ve met 4 of these individuals from UCLH, possibly the best of the hospitals, and their surnames were “Levy”, “Goldsomething, “David” etc. I assume that was somewhat coincidental as they don’t work together but maybe it is also a North London thing.

    • Replies: @Simon in London
    I'm in South London - don't think I've ever seen a non-Asian (south Asian) GP, and the vast bulk of hospital doctors here are South Asian too. But a fair number of white hospital nurses and technicians.
  228. @Buzz Mohawk
    From childhood I remember this LIFE magazine cover on our coffee table:

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/12/84/30/1284308032817fabf17f4a35fb8e471f--life-magazine-virus.jpg

    That is a corona virus.

    But that was 1966. I don't remember anything from the Hong Kong flu epidemic of 1968 (which we called the Asian Flu) except that I think we in our family got it. (Normal childhood in America then included bouts with influenza, chicken pox, and who-knows-what. Plus falls outside, cuts, stitches, dirt, etc. It's called growing up, building resistance and getting strong.)

    That might have been when I had the highest fever I remember, my mother rubbing me down with alcohol to cool me off, me slightly delusional (more than usual LOL).

    Interesting aside: I remember the delusional state when Mom was treating me. There was a loss of spatial sense, in that the sizes of everything, her, the bedside table, became independent of distance. She and the table became giant-sized. I was a tiny entity inside my head. Weird, but even at the time I understood it was just an illusion...

    Notice that we didn't go to the hospital. We stuck it out at home and we were fine. Today every pussy-parent and illegal immigrant would be flooding our ERs.

    I remember when I had a fever of 105 to 106 F. This rubber frog that had come in a capsule from the gum ball machine started moving around. He didn’t really go far, but he was definitely moving. I told my Mom and that probably got her even more worried. That wasn’t my last hallucination, but she wasn’t around the other time …

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    It's interesting how fever illusions can be similar to those brought on by hallucinogenic drugs.

    The first time I tried a hallucinogen, ayahuasca, the pillows in the room started breathing, expanding and contracting like someone's chest... because, you know, of course pillows would breath if they could. Then the colors in the van Gogh prints on the walls started moving, the amber paint strokes in the grain fields waving in the winds that must have been blowing inside the frames... When the pattern on my girlfriend's form-fitting, knit dress started flickering, it was time for everyone else to leave the room so we could be alone...

    Picture yourself in a boat on a river
    With tangerine trees and marmalade skies.
    Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly,
    A girl with kaleidoscope eyes.
  229. @Achmed E. Newman
    I remember when I had a fever of 105 to 106 F. This rubber frog that had come in a capsule from the gum ball machine started moving around. He didn't really go far, but he was definitely moving. I told my Mom and that probably got her even more worried. That wasn't my last hallucination, but she wasn't around the other time ...

    It’s interesting how fever illusions can be similar to those brought on by hallucinogenic drugs.

    [MORE]

    The first time I tried a hallucinogen, ayahuasca, the pillows in the room started breathing, expanding and contracting like someone’s chest… because, you know, of course pillows would breath if they could. Then the colors in the van Gogh prints on the walls started moving, the amber paint strokes in the grain fields waving in the winds that must have been blowing inside the frames… When the pattern on my girlfriend’s form-fitting, knit dress started flickering, it was time for everyone else to leave the room so we could be alone…

    Picture yourself in a boat on a river
    With tangerine trees and marmalade skies.
    Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly,
    A girl with kaleidoscope eyes.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    No comment ...

    .

    .... cause, HR
  230. @UK
    I very much doubt that most doctors in London aren't white.

    Also, elderly white male doctors are not particularly in private practice. That isn't the way medicine really works in the UK.

    It is very rare for hospital based medics to solely do private work, and the leading experts tend to be the Consultants/Professors at the major teaching hospitals.

    Incidentally, I've met 4 of these individuals from UCLH, possibly the best of the hospitals, and their surnames were "Levy", "Goldsomething, "David" etc. I assume that was somewhat coincidental as they don't work together but maybe it is also a North London thing.

    I’m in South London – don’t think I’ve ever seen a non-Asian (south Asian) GP, and the vast bulk of hospital doctors here are South Asian too. But a fair number of white hospital nurses and technicians.

  231. @Buzz Mohawk
    It's interesting how fever illusions can be similar to those brought on by hallucinogenic drugs.

    The first time I tried a hallucinogen, ayahuasca, the pillows in the room started breathing, expanding and contracting like someone's chest... because, you know, of course pillows would breath if they could. Then the colors in the van Gogh prints on the walls started moving, the amber paint strokes in the grain fields waving in the winds that must have been blowing inside the frames... When the pattern on my girlfriend's form-fitting, knit dress started flickering, it was time for everyone else to leave the room so we could be alone...

    Picture yourself in a boat on a river
    With tangerine trees and marmalade skies.
    Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly,
    A girl with kaleidoscope eyes.

    No comment …

    .

    …. cause, HR

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    That event post-dated the beginning of my suffering from OCD. There is no cause-and-effect in this case. It, and all others like it, had no effect whatsoever on my mental state or acuity. By that time, I had already suffered OCD, severely, for 15 years! You don't know, and you can't blame me, for eventually exploring a wider range of mental activities. It did me no wrong at all. In fact, it expanded my views in a positive way.

    I had already graduated from college and was working and living a good life before I did anything like that.

  232. @Achmed E. Newman
    No comment ...

    .

    .... cause, HR

    That event post-dated the beginning of my suffering from OCD. There is no cause-and-effect in this case. It, and all others like it, had no effect whatsoever on my mental state or acuity. By that time, I had already suffered OCD, severely, for 15 years! You don’t know, and you can’t blame me, for eventually exploring a wider range of mental activities. It did me no wrong at all. In fact, it expanded my views in a positive way.

    I had already graduated from college and was working and living a good life before I did anything like that.

  233. In the UK, 13% are non-white, but 34% of critically ill coronavirus victims are non-white. I guess there could be a genetic reason, but it could also be due to non-whites being unhealthier (weight in the case of blacks), having more international contacts, and being more urban.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8191443/NHS-data-suggests-people-black-minority-backgrounds-vulnerable-coronavirus.html

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