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How to Win the Hugo Award These Days: Namibian Magic Dirt Resolves Galactic War Hair
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Winners of the Hugo Award for science fiction used to be books like A Canticle for Liebowitz, The Man in the High Castle, Dune, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, Stand on Zanzibar, Left Hand of Darkness, and Ringworld.

But in recent years, Wokeness and IdPol come first.

Thus, the 2016 Hugo and Nebula winning Best Novella, Binti by Igbo-American Nnedi Okorafor (to her credit, she has had to deal with being in a wheelchair since 19). Binti combines classic iSteve themes of Magic Dirt and World War Hair. From Wikipedia:

A young woman named Binti is the first member of the Himba ethnic group on Earth (closely modeled on the Himba people)

Ya think?

to be accepted into the prestigious intergalactic university Oomza Uni. … While in transit, the ship is hijacked by the Meduse, a jellyfish-like alien species that was previously at war with the Khoush, another human ethnic group. … She subsequently discovers that … her otjize, a type of mixed clay made from the soil of her homeland, has healing properties when applied to the tentacles of the Meduse.

Wikipedia explains otjize:

Otjize is a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment used by the Himba people of Namibia to protect themselves from the harsh desert climate. … The mixture lends the skin a deep orange or reddish tinge. This symbolises earth’s rich red color, and blood, the essence of life, and is the Himba ideal of beauty. The Himba use otjize in their hair as well, which is long and plaited into intricate designs. Himba women start designing their hair from puberty using the red clay as well as adding on the hair of goats for stylist purposes.

Back to the plot description:

She makes a friend in one of the younger, more hot-headed Meduse, named Okwu, and subsequently brokers a tentative truce between herself and the hijacker; the truce entails Binti’s profound physical transformation. Upon arrival at the University, she is able to negotiate a short lasting peace between the Meduse and the human race, after which she begins her studies at Oomza Uni in earnest.

 
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  1. image search
    georgia juro spiders
    happy halloween

  2. Pitch meeting: Avatar meets Do the Right Thing! I tell ya the Chinese will love, love, love it!

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  3. This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Colin Wright

    Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @Colin Wright

    Me too, and also pulled away from most other pop culture, entertainment, organization etc, which are all now engaged in Black/Queer worship. An exception is Youtube, where I can find good old movies, audiobooks, lectures, and music from pre-decadent Anerica.

    , @JimDandy
    @Colin Wright

    And continued reading what kind of fiction?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @duncsbaby
    @Colin Wright

    Old science fiction is good. I think new science fiction has lost a lot of it's bite because we are more and more living a sci-fi reality. We are in the future after all. Now if I can only get Jenny Agutter beamed into my apartment.

    , @Justvisiting
    @Colin Wright

    Science fiction can be enjoyed these days, but it must be read as satire (in the Jonathan Swift tradition).

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology--now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    You just need a dark sense of humor to appreciate it!

    Replies: @Adept, @From Beer to Paternity, @kaganovitch

    , @Alfa158
    @Colin Wright

    Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  4. Han and Nordic tribesmen were accepted first.

  5. Ironically, as a member of the Igbo (Nigeria), Missy would presumably have almost no cultural familiarity with the Himba (Namibia). It’s as if I wrote a novel in which the protagonist was a Hutsul on the grounds that we’re both white.

    The sheer idiocy is overwhelming.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Colin Wright


    Ironically, as a member of the Igbo (Nigeria), Missy would presumably have almost no cultural familiarity with the Himba (Namibia). It’s as if I wrote a novel in which the protagonist was a Hutsul on the grounds that we’re both white.
     
    Yeah, or if Philip Roth wrote a novel with gentiles in it!
  6. Who reads these books? Are they really profitable, or is there some murkier incentive for their publication? Serious questions.
    I suppose a few people read them because they think they should, and then there are libraries and schools that righteously order them, but how many copies are actually read for fun and not as a curriculum requirement?
    This is a long shot, but do any of you know someone who’d pick up a book like that voluntarily? I don’t. I’ve read all sorts of pulp nonsense from youth hostel book exchange shelves but that’s where I’d draw the line.

    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    I have a friend who attends Worldcon and votes on the Hugo. She’s an educated, white, Midwestern-raised female sixtysomething who likes to compare herself favorably to those sad, ignorant, racist, Trump-voting persons who surround her, and yes, she’d read this voluntarily (and I’m sure she has). It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors. I know other women like her, but I’m not sure there is enough of a fan base to make novels like this profitable. My guess is that they are a form of virtue-signaling by the publisher-and if a book wins a Hugo, it probably does make money from all the library sales.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Sebastian Y.

    , @Lurker
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    I've read a lot of scifi but these new fangled authors and themes . . . I wouldn't even pick them up to skim a few pages. In fact when I look at the shelves for new books I don't even notice them. Not sure if that's because I automatically dismiss them or because they're not actually on sale where I'm looking?

    I don't seem to see them for sale used IRL either.

    Replies: @res

    , @guest007
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    From amazon

    Best Sellers Rank: #34,381 in Books
    #45 in Science Fiction Short Stories
    #880 in First Contact Science Fiction
    #1,004 in Alien Invasion Science Fiction
    Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings

    https://www.amazon.com/Binti-Nnedi-Okorafor/dp/0765385252/ref=asc_df_0765385252/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312195849562&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6291630222224926648&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9008124&hvtargid=pla-421988019325&psc=1

    This sounds like the type of books that a progressive English teacher assigns believing boys will be interested.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  7. And yes, I want to touch that hair.

    • Agree: Tony massey
    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Buffalo Joe

    Which hair?

  8. Hugo Awards have been complete trash since SJWs took it over in the mid 2000s. A crippled immigrant black is someone who wins a Hugo just by showing up.

  9. With all due respect, I’ve seen more interesting plots on Futurama.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    With all due respect, I’ve seen more interesting plots on Futurama.

     

    Hell, there were more interesting plots in the Danny Dunn, Encyclopedia Brown, Mushroom Planet, and Miss Pickerell series.

    BTW, For any iStevers who still care, Paul Walker is back in the news, kind of.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G7EAAOSwDvRg9zwG/s-l300.jpg


    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61LMVs6xTCL._SL500_.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/_BseaLMuSYMk/S-W2MSfJlOI/AAAAAAAAD94/CXTM3eWan1M/s1600/dannydunn.jpg

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  10. This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?

    Well, we know, of course. And they’ve rewritten/butchered the storyline, of course.

    Wouldn’t it be cool if a film treatment of A Canticle for Liebowitz didn’t require that Liebowitz
    be a black dude? That would be freedom.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @From Beer to Paternity

    'Wouldn’t it be cool if a film treatment of A Canticle for Liebowitz didn’t require that Liebowitz
    be a black dude? That would be freedom.'


    They can make the mutant sidekicks who knock off the monk in the first episode black; that would work.

    Eat! Eat!'

    , @Wilkey
    @From Beer to Paternity


    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?
     
    It's bloody awful. The casting is atrocious and the writing is worse. I nearly had to stop my wife from throwing dishes at the television. She was a much bigger fan of the Foundation series than I ever was, but we're both ready to cancel our AppleTV and give up on it. They are over half way through the first season and not a damn thing has happened. They are sent to Terminus, they get to Terminus, they get about doing...something. Raych murders Hari Seldon for...reasons. There's some kind of ark that the people on Terminus aren't allowed to touch for...reasons. And then some halfwit tribe from a neighboring system comes to attack the people on Terminus for Seldon-only-knows-why.

    So that's it. We're six episodes into a ten episode season and all we've seen is a space elevator collapse, the Foundation move to Terminus, and one silly battle scene. Oh, and the emperor-in-training falls in love with a gardener who may possibly be the only attractive woman in the entire galaxy of 50 trillion people.

    The truth is that "Foundation" doesn't work as a TV series or movie, and probably never will. It covers too long a time period. It's too episodic. You'd have to get used to seeing brand new characters from one episode to the next. That is certainly doable. I would argue it could be great. But no producer wants to take that risk.

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well...don't they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future? Is that no longer a thing? Every person on every single one of the thousands of planets in the empire is going to forget how to tell time? Wikipedia has entire entries for individual characters from "The Simpsons" and individual episodes of "Star Trek," but the encyclopedia of the future doesn't have room to explain two different ways to tell time? Do sundials even work on planets in binary systems? And oh, wouldn't you be more worried about losing knowledge about, oh, how to build space ships that travel through space at FTL speeds? Just food for thought.

    I guess what happened is that the richest Woke corporation on the planet - whose executives are almost entirely white, BTW - was tossing around money like confetti and some producer went to them and said "Hey, we can do Foundation." And Apple said, "Can you include lots of blacks and trannies?" and the producer said "Sure thing," took Apple's zillion dollar check, and laughed his way to the bank.

    Lee Pace is decent as the emperor (although he was infiinitely better in Pushing Daisies). Jared Harris is OK as Seldon. The actress who plays Gaal Dornick is passable, at best, and the actre-thing who plays Salvor Hardin (I guess she is an "it") may actually be the worst lead on any TV show in all of history. Virtually every other second and third tier actor in the show is appallingly bad.

    The reality is that any artist with any integrity, no matter how far on the left he may be, is not going to be pushed around by studio demands for diversity. He may be fine with diversity. He may actively look for a diverse cast. He may even get a diverse cast. But he is not going to allow studio demands for diversity, or even his own desire for diversity, to get in the way of telling a great story and creating a successful show. Game of Thrones wasn't diverse. The original Star Wars trilogy had almost no minorities at all, and the first Star Wars movie had none. The Lord of the Rings was 100% white. The Hobbit (which also starred Lee Pace) had about 5 seconds of scenes that included black people, after someone twisted Peter Jackson's arm, but that was it. JK Rowling is very liberal, but none of the Harry Potter movies I've seen had anything but white leads.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @SFG, @raga10

  11. That sounds like sci-fi a ten-year-old would write. Gotta hand it to the woke. They found sci-fi/fantasy, a field full of not-overly-socially-gifted people, and were all “I’ll serve on the committee!” I’m sure they were very go-with-the-flow when there were only one or two of them on the committee. They analyzed sci-fi by the field’s traditional standards, so they did not seem like a threat. Who would have even suspected? There are advocates for minoritarian social deviants who will take over your field’s award committees, and they will ensure that only aliens and transsexuals, preferably alien transsexuals, will win awards. Whenever there was an opening on the board, they had people lined up to fill the seat, and it looked as if new audiences were appreciating science fiction.

    Is the book’s author from one of the highest achieving Nigerian ethnicities, the Igbo, or the runners-up, the Yoruba, or is she from one of the backward, northern peoples? The Himba living in the desert implies north. If she’s not one of the two higher ethnicities, she may deal with “ethnicism” from other Nigerian colonists in the west.

    [MORE]

    Perhaps because white jocks are a cornerstone of the political right, white nerds have always thrown in with the left. Witness the Revenge of the Nerds fraternity joining a network of historically black frats, and their black frat brothers showing up to intimidate the white jock frat. God, that was a vile movie. I watched it when I was ten or so, and really appreciated the boobs. Watched it again at like eighteen, and realized that it did not portray healthy sexuality at all. As Yoda might say, “look good nerds make not it did.” Despite little in common, the nerdy types becoming the tech billionaires is probably the origin of woke. A bit analogously to the Jews, who think that because they contributed quite a lot, some of it even good, when finally accepted into society from their marginal position, every marginalized population will thrive once whites “let them out of the niches they’ve been forced into”, nerds think that the trannies’ time will come, and they will revolutionize something or other. Yes, the Jews were not so much finally accepted but decided to stop accepting the rebbes’ rule and to move from swindling peasants to bigger things. Here was this virgin, industrialized nation, founded by people whose motherland kicked the Jews out so long ago that they had no memories!

    Has the audience for sci-fi totally changed since the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve? Are nerdy boys so drawn into video games that the only readers left are socially awkward

    girls

    ? How dorky boys of decades past would have loved to have chicks interested in the same books they liked! I realize sci-fi/fantasy has always been wish fulfillment, just look at how powerful D&D wizards were, and a home for the socially dispossessed.

    To do some armchair analysis of the writer, I think westernizing Africans are somewhat ashamed that none of their traditional cultures have a real place in the modern world. Far from cultural appropriation being a problem, no one is interested in their folkways, so she tried to compensate with “in the future, space aliens will appreciate our body paint. Just wait, you’ll see!”

    How were these Meduse (very clever name) hurting their tentacles, anyway? Didn’t they design their ship so it wasn’t rippin’ them apart all the time?

    Ocher is almost certainly the first pigment people used. I wanna say there is cave art in ocher in Africa that dates back before the oldest sapiens fossils? It is not “representational” art, but abstract designs, that, who knows, may have represented something to them.

    Do these Himba body painters permanently stain their hair and skin, or do they have to put on a new coat of ocher butter every, what, week, month? I do have to say, I think it looks better than un-ochered black skin. Wonder if there’s a market for a better pigment-fat product? Could lead to an African chemistry revolution! I mean, butter. Don’t they get rancid, living in the desert?

    Also, Himbas? I cannot be the only wishing that they were Himbos!

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Rob


    the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve
     
    Yes, but only for Isaac's stuff.
    , @Lurker
    @Rob

    I've always assumed sci-fi trended male while fantasy was more for girls.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    , @SFG
    @Rob

    I wasn't there--the last convention I attended was in 2006 or so--but what you're describing sounds plausible, and is probably exactly what happened. I suspect the original beachhead of woke geeks actually did like the material and wanted to make gay, black, etc. versions, and then had more asabiyya than the white male geeks, who were always famous for getting into silly fights. ( I was reading some of the original issues of Dragon magazine back in the late 70s and a lot of the complaints in the letters section about Bakshi's Lord of the Rings half-movie sound really similar to the Star Wars complaints today. Not to mention all the people writing in to tell them they had Cthulhu's stats wrong.) So the wokies come in, serve on all the meetings as you say, run all the tracks, and before you know it--bang! The Hugo's for women only.

    I actually ran into Annalee Newitz, the 'they' NYT tech columnist and woke sf writer, ages ago at Arisia (Boston sci-fi convention) in the mid-2000s, and she (I think that's how 'they' identified back then) actually gave me a hug, unprompted, when I said I had read her writing on technology. (I was a complete stranger!) Funny to look back 15 years later and realize we'd be enemies now.

    The Jewish/nerd crossover's quite large, and makes sense given Jewish cultural values. Also look at who wrote all the classic comic book characters--Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Bill Finger, etc. You could even claim this is an early example of the golem getting out of control, though I think Asimov and Co. actually liked spaceships and believed in reason and science.

    How much dorky boys would have loved to have girls into that stuff? Yeah, I thought about that quite a bit. Maybe once enough girls got in it stopped being interesting to boys and they went off to play video games instead. And, I mean, if you're talking about nerd culture, video games are a really big deal. I suspect a lot of dorky boys went off to play (and eventually develop) video games and stopped being interested in literary sci-fi.

    Geeks and jocks, right and left--I've thought a lot about this. What I've actually found is that when you count up personality types, jocks lean right, artsy types lean left, and geeks are in the middle or on both sides--they're leftier than jocks but rightier than artsy types. I mean, WTF do you call Ted Cruz, who makes Hitchhiker's Guide jokes in judicial confirmation hearings and has a video where he turns the Constitution into a lighstaber? However, intellectual women lean left (they tend not to want kids or to want fewer because you can't have sophisticated conversations with a three-year-old), and intellectual women are the most likely to overlook the geek's other shortcomings. So I suspect some of these geek dudes may be, ah, p***y-whipped as they say. (There's some evidence this may have happened to Paul Krugman of all people--he's leaned further left over the years.)

    A lot more geeks are leaning right as feminists step up their attacks on geek culture though.

    Replies: @El Dato

  12. “to her credit, she has had to deal with being in a wheelchair since 19”

    Why does she get credit for this? Is wheelchair confinement now the “being born black” of handicaps?

    She went to Homewood Flossmoor HS in the south Chicago suburbs, next door to my wife’s hometown of Park Forest. These were the first suburbs to be packed with negroes from decaying Chicago housing projects starting in the 1980’s after the Section 8 voucher program was implemented in 1983. The entire south suburbs are now a wasteland of negro degeneracy, and Nnedi may have trouble distinguishing Flossmoor from Nigeria these days.

    But of course she lives in Arizona now, far away from the negroes she romanticizes in her fiction.

    • Replies: @Bill in Glendale
    @Mike Tre

    HFHS was my high school and no blacks when I graduated in the 60's. Beautiful facilities thanks to the high property taxes that suburban whites voted themselves. Makes many California high schools look sick by comparison. We had 16 Merit Scholarship semifinalists in my class. Now they are lucky to get two.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  13. From the ongoing non-fiction story Blacks Ruin Everything.

    They attacked EBIL RAYSISS H.P. Lovecraft (while leeching off his work.)

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.wired.com/2017/01/geeks-guide-writers-of-color-lovecraft/winamp/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Sick of Orcs


    “The dude was a wild, rabid racist in a very racist time in a very racist country,” Older says in Episode 237 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “He really did weaponize literature in a way that was very damaging to people who were reading it.”
     
    Lovecraft really opened my eyes on black behaviour. I have looked at inner cities differently ever since.

    Older, Moreno-Garcia, and Broaddus recently helped edit People of Colo(u)r Destroy Fantasy and People of Colo(u)r Destroy Horror, special issues of Fantasy magazine and Nightmare magazine written, edited, and illustrated by people of color. People of color have recently become much more vocal within the fantasy and horror communities, which has led to a certain amount of backlash, but Older says that criticisms of authors such as Lovecraft should be viewed as part of a healthy fan dialog.
     
    "Cutural Appropriation" is on hold for the duration of the black dialogue.
  14. In not-on-CNN-news:

    School board tries to cover up sexual assault by 15 year old tranny in bathroom
    https://nypost.com/2021/10/22/loudoun-county-school-boss-scott-ziegler-knew-of-alleged-sex-assault-report/

    This is exactly what liberals said would not happen and that conservatives were ‘ignorant’ to suggest otherwise.

  15. You kind of wonder whether anything would be left to whites were it not for the influence of the Chinese movie-goer.

    • Replies: @Escher
    @Paperback Writer

    Soon enough Batman will be Chinese, with an Indian sidekick.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Catdompanj

  16. In potential iSteve news.

    Too early to say if he can go further, but pale Iowa starting CB Riley Moss looks at least good enough to be drafted by the NFL. He jointly leads the nation with 4 interceptions and is a former hurdles champion.

    https://hawkeyesports.com/roster/riley-moss/

    • Replies: @Che Blutarsky
    @Anon55uu

    Riley Moss most likely ends up playing safety in the NFL.

  17. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @additionalMike

    'Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.'

    Ursula LeGuin was pretty good until she discovered feminism.

    ...she also appears to be a closet racist -- or 'race realist' as that flavor of racist might prefer. One of her short stories involves a blind white girl and a sighted black girl. The black girl sees, the white girl thinks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  18. Hugo Awards have become pretty amazing since I last looked into them. The 2019 nominees for the Best Novel were four chicks, one tranny, and one Korean-American dude. In 2020 and 2021, all 12 nominees were chicks.

    I guess men don’t write good sci-fi anymore.

    • Thanks: Unladen Swallow
    • Replies: @inertial
    @inertial

    Upon further investigation, that Korean-American dude turned out to be a a "trans man" who "lives in Louisiana with his husband and daughter."

    So, not one but two trannies were nominated in 2019--one MtF and the other FtM. If that's not diversity I don't know what is.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pericles

    , @res
    @inertial

    Were you watching the Hugos when the Sad and Rabid Puppies movements were going? For a starting point.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Puppies

    Of course, here is how things ended.
    https://www.vox.com/2018/8/21/17763260/n-k-jemisin-hugo-awards-broken-earth-sad-puppies
    The Hugo Awards just made history, and defied alt-right extremists in the process


    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

     

    P.S. I do find it fascinating how a majority of men being nominated is irredeemably sexist, while ALL women being nominated is admirable progress.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

  19. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:

    It seems like sci fi has been going downhill since the late 80s. Sections in book stores getting smaller and smaller. Fantasy is not suffering this way, doing well.

    I don’t think it’s just the wokeness. But also maybe all the good plots have been done. Or perhaps we are finding the future is less exciting. Not as much of a Western in space. But just farting around on your computer. Which is typing, really!

    Feel like the end of the Cold War sort of coincided with the downfall of sci fi and wonder if some correlation. Sci fi in movies still doing well though.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Anonymous

    There were some great science fiction writers in the 1990s-2000s.

    Check our Robert Charles Wilson or Kage Baker novels for a start.

    Then there was Ted Chiang's brilliant short story "The Story of Your Life" made into an equally stunning movie "The Arrival".

    The Amazon reviews of "The Arrival" were hilarious.

    Half the reviewers were in total awe of its brilliance.

    Half had absolutely no idea what it was about and hated it!

  20. I pine for the days when the Rabid Puppies injected some much needed pathos into the Hugos by nominating such classics as Space Raptor Butt Invasion. Sadly, the typical voter was too stupid to understand the brilliance of the conceit, or that of Vox Day, who convinced legions of people to follow his example.

  21. I disagree that black people don’t belong in science fiction.

    Kunta Kinte, despite being captured and enslaved, AND having both his foot cut off and going blind at various times in his long life, still managed to become the Chief Engineer of the Flagship of the United Federation of Planets, that too just 596 years after being captured and enslaved (1767-2363).

    He even found time along the way to teach millions of children how to read.

    If that isn’t the most inspiring story of personal accomplishment, spanning seven centuries, I don’t know what is.

    • Replies: @Sol Ipsis
    @Thomm

    After all he accomplished, he was denied the right to host jeopardy due to systemic racism. Tragic.

    , @Pericles
    @Thomm

    This Thomm guy from customer support is unironically maintaining a list of wrongthinkers, as he admitted on Karlin's section a short while ago. ADL among us. Lol, watch out guys!

    Replies: @Thomm

  22. To be fair, non-woke SF was long cursed with the cliché that space aliens would love to eat chocolate. Even Pournelle and Niven couldn’t resist; from The Mote In God’s Eye (1974):

    The Marine brought them the drink humans called chocolate, and they drank with pleasure. Humans were omnivores like Moties, but the flavors humans preferred were generally tasteless. Chocolate, though: that was excellent, and with extra hydrocarbons to simulate the waters of the home world, it was incomparable.

    Later…

    “He can get artistic some other time. The Commissioners don’t want anything fancy tonight. Just be able to feed ‘em all if they want it.” Kelley glanced at the magic coffeepot to be sure it was full, then glared at an empty space next to it. “Where’s the goddamn chocolate?” he demanded.

    “It’s comin’, Mr. Kelley,” the steward said defensively.

    “Right. See that it’s here before the Moties come in. That’ll be an hour.” Kelley glanced at the wall clock. “OK. I guess we’re ready. But make sure of that chocolate.”

    Since they’d discovered it aboard Lenin the Moties had become addicted to hot chocolate. It was one of the few human beverages they liked; but the way they liked it! Kelley shuddered. Butter he could understand. They put butter in chocolate aboard the Limey ships. But a drop of machine oil in every cup?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Veracitor

    John Ringo used maple syrup as the one thing from Earth that aliens craved.

    Replies: @El Dato

  23. @Mike Tre
    "to her credit, she has had to deal with being in a wheelchair since 19"

    Why does she get credit for this? Is wheelchair confinement now the "being born black" of handicaps?

    She went to Homewood Flossmoor HS in the south Chicago suburbs, next door to my wife's hometown of Park Forest. These were the first suburbs to be packed with negroes from decaying Chicago housing projects starting in the 1980's after the Section 8 voucher program was implemented in 1983. The entire south suburbs are now a wasteland of negro degeneracy, and Nnedi may have trouble distinguishing Flossmoor from Nigeria these days.

    But of course she lives in Arizona now, far away from the negroes she romanticizes in her fiction.

    Replies: @Bill in Glendale

    HFHS was my high school and no blacks when I graduated in the 60’s. Beautiful facilities thanks to the high property taxes that suburban whites voted themselves. Makes many California high schools look sick by comparison. We had 16 Merit Scholarship semifinalists in my class. Now they are lucky to get two.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Bill in Glendale

    My wife graduated Rich East in 1989. The school was closed a few years ago. And they are shipping the students west into the Lincoln Way school district. In 10 years New Lenox and Frankfort and Mokena will be lost. Tinley Park and Oak Forest are already lost. Lagrange Blvd through Orland used to be a great place for dinner and drinks but now the mall and everywhere else is infested with negroes and they pretty much ruin any attempt to enjoy a night out.

    Replies: @Bill in Glendale

  24. @Thomm
    I disagree that black people don't belong in science fiction.

    Kunta Kinte, despite being captured and enslaved, AND having both his foot cut off and going blind at various times in his long life, still managed to become the Chief Engineer of the Flagship of the United Federation of Planets, that too just 596 years after being captured and enslaved (1767-2363).

    He even found time along the way to teach millions of children how to read.

    If that isn’t the most inspiring story of personal accomplishment, spanning seven centuries, I don’t know what is.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/04/GeordiLaForge.jpg

    Replies: @Sol Ipsis, @Pericles

    After all he accomplished, he was denied the right to host jeopardy due to systemic racism. Tragic.

  25. @inertial
    Hugo Awards have become pretty amazing since I last looked into them. The 2019 nominees for the Best Novel were four chicks, one tranny, and one Korean-American dude. In 2020 and 2021, all 12 nominees were chicks.

    I guess men don't write good sci-fi anymore.

    Replies: @inertial, @res

    Upon further investigation, that Korean-American dude turned out to be a a “trans man” who “lives in Louisiana with his husband and daughter.”

    So, not one but two trannies were nominated in 2019–one MtF and the other FtM. If that’s not diversity I don’t know what is.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @inertial

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @Reg Cæsar, @EH

    , @Pericles
    @inertial

    Some sort of cultural three-card monte, innit?

  26. Nexflix Films is already lined up, prepared for the bidding war to green light this into a film. If they can work in an angle about Wakanda and specifically Black Panther joining forces on the Nimbi’s side, then it’s pure gold for the studio lucky enough to produce Nnedi’s novel.

    So will it be Netflix, Paramount, WBros, Amazon, or a dark horse studio that wins the bidding war to produce it?

    You all know its coming, you all know its true.

  27. @Rob
    That sounds like sci-fi a ten-year-old would write. Gotta hand it to the woke. They found sci-fi/fantasy, a field full of not-overly-socially-gifted people, and were all “I'll serve on the committee!” I’m sure they were very go-with-the-flow when there were only one or two of them on the committee. They analyzed sci-fi by the field's traditional standards, so they did not seem like a threat. Who would have even suspected? There are advocates for minoritarian social deviants who will take over your field’s award committees, and they will ensure that only aliens and transsexuals, preferably alien transsexuals, will win awards. Whenever there was an opening on the board, they had people lined up to fill the seat, and it looked as if new audiences were appreciating science fiction.

    Is the book’s author from one of the highest achieving Nigerian ethnicities, the Igbo, or the runners-up, the Yoruba, or is she from one of the backward, northern peoples? The Himba living in the desert implies north. If she’s not one of the two higher ethnicities, she may deal with “ethnicism” from other Nigerian colonists in the west.

    Perhaps because white jocks are a cornerstone of the political right, white nerds have always thrown in with the left. Witness the Revenge of the Nerds fraternity joining a network of historically black frats, and their black frat brothers showing up to intimidate the white jock frat. God, that was a vile movie. I watched it when I was ten or so, and really appreciated the boobs. Watched it again at like eighteen, and realized that it did not portray healthy sexuality at all. As Yoda might say, “look good nerds make not it did.” Despite little in common, the nerdy types becoming the tech billionaires is probably the origin of woke. A bit analogously to the Jews, who think that because they contributed quite a lot, some of it even good, when finally accepted into society from their marginal position, every marginalized population will thrive once whites “let them out of the niches they’ve been forced into”, nerds think that the trannies’ time will come, and they will revolutionize something or other. Yes, the Jews were not so much finally accepted but decided to stop accepting the rebbes’ rule and to move from swindling peasants to bigger things. Here was this virgin, industrialized nation, founded by people whose motherland kicked the Jews out so long ago that they had no memories!

    Has the audience for sci-fi totally changed since the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve? Are nerdy boys so drawn into video games that the only readers left are socially awkward

    girls
     
    ? How dorky boys of decades past would have loved to have chicks interested in the same books they liked! I realize sci-fi/fantasy has always been wish fulfillment, just look at how powerful D&D wizards were, and a home for the socially dispossessed.

    To do some armchair analysis of the writer, I think westernizing Africans are somewhat ashamed that none of their traditional cultures have a real place in the modern world. Far from cultural appropriation being a problem, no one is interested in their folkways, so she tried to compensate with “in the future, space aliens will appreciate our body paint. Just wait, you’ll see!”

    How were these Meduse (very clever name) hurting their tentacles, anyway? Didn’t they design their ship so it wasn’t rippin’ them apart all the time?

    Ocher is almost certainly the first pigment people used. I wanna say there is cave art in ocher in Africa that dates back before the oldest sapiens fossils? It is not “representational” art, but abstract designs, that, who knows, may have represented something to them.

    Do these Himba body painters permanently stain their hair and skin, or do they have to put on a new coat of ocher butter every, what, week, month? I do have to say, I think it looks better than un-ochered black skin. Wonder if there’s a market for a better pigment-fat product? Could lead to an African chemistry revolution! I mean, butter. Don't they get rancid, living in the desert?

    Also, Himbas? I cannot be the only wishing that they were Himbos!

    Replies: @El Dato, @Lurker, @SFG

    the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve

    Yes, but only for Isaac’s stuff.

  28. @inertial
    @inertial

    Upon further investigation, that Korean-American dude turned out to be a a "trans man" who "lives in Louisiana with his husband and daughter."

    So, not one but two trannies were nominated in 2019--one MtF and the other FtM. If that's not diversity I don't know what is.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pericles

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    • Replies: @Whereismyhandle
    @Steve Sailer

    Vox Days aggressive attack on woke SF really pushed the Hugos, etc. to become more extremely shitlib.

    Unfortunately, Vox may have been right but he's not a great writer. So when a liberal like George R.R. Martin who is a great SF writer says it's the Vox crowd pushing politics over quality Vox's point does look more muddled.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer



    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.
     
    • Replies: @Whereismyhandle
     
    We see what the commenter did there.
    , @EH
    @Steve Sailer

    "As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life. "

    Not sure if you mean the Martians in Red Planet ('49), who were all female before adulthood, then reprised in Stranger in a Strange Land in '61 - but both times were pretty much in passing, er, so to speak. There was also one short story where a hermaphrodite with the aid of a time machine became his own grandpa, referencing a joke song of the era, but not technically a sex change.

    His main sex-change plot was possibly his worst book, I Will Fear No Evil in '70, when he was suffering from blocked arteries to his brain. His later, sexually depraved work in the '80s also had only one sex change that I can recall, Andrew Jackson Libby, one of his earliest characters, for no good reason, also just in passing.

  29. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    With all due respect, I’ve seen more interesting plots on Futurama.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    With all due respect, I’ve seen more interesting plots on Futurama.

    Hell, there were more interesting plots in the Danny Dunn, Encyclopedia Brown, Mushroom Planet, and Miss Pickerell series.

    BTW, For any iStevers who still care, Paul Walker is back in the news, kind of.

    [MORE]


    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hey! The Mushroom Planet!! I didn't know anybody knew the Mushroom Planet!!! Wow!!!!

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

  30. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Who reads these books? Are they really profitable, or is there some murkier incentive for their publication? Serious questions.
    I suppose a few people read them because they think they should, and then there are libraries and schools that righteously order them, but how many copies are actually read for fun and not as a curriculum requirement?
    This is a long shot, but do any of you know someone who'd pick up a book like that voluntarily? I don't. I've read all sorts of pulp nonsense from youth hostel book exchange shelves but that's where I'd draw the line.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @Lurker, @guest007

    I have a friend who attends Worldcon and votes on the Hugo. She’s an educated, white, Midwestern-raised female sixtysomething who likes to compare herself favorably to those sad, ignorant, racist, Trump-voting persons who surround her, and yes, she’d read this voluntarily (and I’m sure she has). It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors. I know other women like her, but I’m not sure there is enough of a fan base to make novels like this profitable. My guess is that they are a form of virtue-signaling by the publisher-and if a book wins a Hugo, it probably does make money from all the library sales.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Charlotte

    Which sci-fi novels get the best movie directors and the biggest budgets? Dune, The Martian, etc.

    , @Sebastian Y.
    @Charlotte


    It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors.
     
    This might be a reason to keep print editions of book publishing going, to openly display one’s superior moral position? Can’t do that with a Kindle. When Kindles first came out I remember a comedian saying that the worst thing about the Kindle is that you can’t see what someone’s reading and make a moral judgment about them based on what they’re reading. Then again I rarely see anyone with a print book in public (trains, subways, coffee shops, benches,…) anymore. They mostly look at their phones.
  31. @Sick of Orcs
    From the ongoing non-fiction story Blacks Ruin Everything.

    They attacked EBIL RAYSISS H.P. Lovecraft (while leeching off his work.)

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.wired.com/2017/01/geeks-guide-writers-of-color-lovecraft/winamp/

    Replies: @El Dato

    “The dude was a wild, rabid racist in a very racist time in a very racist country,” Older says in Episode 237 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “He really did weaponize literature in a way that was very damaging to people who were reading it.”

    Lovecraft really opened my eyes on black behaviour. I have looked at inner cities differently ever since.

    Older, Moreno-Garcia, and Broaddus recently helped edit People of Colo(u)r Destroy Fantasy and People of Colo(u)r Destroy Horror, special issues of Fantasy magazine and Nightmare magazine written, edited, and illustrated by people of color. People of color have recently become much more vocal within the fantasy and horror communities, which has led to a certain amount of backlash, but Older says that criticisms of authors such as Lovecraft should be viewed as part of a healthy fan dialog.

    “Cutural Appropriation” is on hold for the duration of the black dialogue.

    • Thanks: Sick of Orcs
  32. Otjize is a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment

    Jujitze is mixture of tempura and wasabi japonica pigment. Ho-tjize is a mixture of ph and napalm pigment. Rajtjize is a mixture of ghee and henna pigment, with tea and crumpets on the side. Hajjize is a mixture of black coffee and the kaffir’s freshly-shed blood…

    Igbo-American Nnedi Okorafor

    We nneed to knnow who got the nnotionn to nnominnate her. Nned Flannders?

    Nnedi Okorafor = No ‘fro on darkie:

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Reg Cæsar

    That's more what you'd call a "vertical 'fro", rather than a standard 'fro.

    , @Woodsie
    @Reg Cæsar

    Culturally appropriated Marge Simpon's hairdo.

    , @additionalMike
    @Reg Cæsar

    A high-altitude Kid'n'Play weave.

    Can she walk through a doorway without bowing?

  33. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Who reads these books? Are they really profitable, or is there some murkier incentive for their publication? Serious questions.
    I suppose a few people read them because they think they should, and then there are libraries and schools that righteously order them, but how many copies are actually read for fun and not as a curriculum requirement?
    This is a long shot, but do any of you know someone who'd pick up a book like that voluntarily? I don't. I've read all sorts of pulp nonsense from youth hostel book exchange shelves but that's where I'd draw the line.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @Lurker, @guest007

    I’ve read a lot of scifi but these new fangled authors and themes . . . I wouldn’t even pick them up to skim a few pages. In fact when I look at the shelves for new books I don’t even notice them. Not sure if that’s because I automatically dismiss them or because they’re not actually on sale where I’m looking?

    I don’t seem to see them for sale used IRL either.

    • Replies: @res
    @Lurker

    Not sure how accurate this 2018 SF all time sales list is (the 2020 version I saw looked less complete).
    https://thewertzone.blogspot.com/2018/12/the-sff-all-time-sales-list-revised.html

    An illustrative example.


    278) N.K. Jemisin (1 million+)
    Nora Jemisin’s three series (Inheritance, Dreamblood and The Broken Earth) have taken her past 1 million sales, with her profile and sales increasing noticeably after she won her third successive Hugo Award for Best Novel.
     

    Replies: @guest007

  34. @Rob
    That sounds like sci-fi a ten-year-old would write. Gotta hand it to the woke. They found sci-fi/fantasy, a field full of not-overly-socially-gifted people, and were all “I'll serve on the committee!” I’m sure they were very go-with-the-flow when there were only one or two of them on the committee. They analyzed sci-fi by the field's traditional standards, so they did not seem like a threat. Who would have even suspected? There are advocates for minoritarian social deviants who will take over your field’s award committees, and they will ensure that only aliens and transsexuals, preferably alien transsexuals, will win awards. Whenever there was an opening on the board, they had people lined up to fill the seat, and it looked as if new audiences were appreciating science fiction.

    Is the book’s author from one of the highest achieving Nigerian ethnicities, the Igbo, or the runners-up, the Yoruba, or is she from one of the backward, northern peoples? The Himba living in the desert implies north. If she’s not one of the two higher ethnicities, she may deal with “ethnicism” from other Nigerian colonists in the west.

    Perhaps because white jocks are a cornerstone of the political right, white nerds have always thrown in with the left. Witness the Revenge of the Nerds fraternity joining a network of historically black frats, and their black frat brothers showing up to intimidate the white jock frat. God, that was a vile movie. I watched it when I was ten or so, and really appreciated the boobs. Watched it again at like eighteen, and realized that it did not portray healthy sexuality at all. As Yoda might say, “look good nerds make not it did.” Despite little in common, the nerdy types becoming the tech billionaires is probably the origin of woke. A bit analogously to the Jews, who think that because they contributed quite a lot, some of it even good, when finally accepted into society from their marginal position, every marginalized population will thrive once whites “let them out of the niches they’ve been forced into”, nerds think that the trannies’ time will come, and they will revolutionize something or other. Yes, the Jews were not so much finally accepted but decided to stop accepting the rebbes’ rule and to move from swindling peasants to bigger things. Here was this virgin, industrialized nation, founded by people whose motherland kicked the Jews out so long ago that they had no memories!

    Has the audience for sci-fi totally changed since the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve? Are nerdy boys so drawn into video games that the only readers left are socially awkward

    girls
     
    ? How dorky boys of decades past would have loved to have chicks interested in the same books they liked! I realize sci-fi/fantasy has always been wish fulfillment, just look at how powerful D&D wizards were, and a home for the socially dispossessed.

    To do some armchair analysis of the writer, I think westernizing Africans are somewhat ashamed that none of their traditional cultures have a real place in the modern world. Far from cultural appropriation being a problem, no one is interested in their folkways, so she tried to compensate with “in the future, space aliens will appreciate our body paint. Just wait, you’ll see!”

    How were these Meduse (very clever name) hurting their tentacles, anyway? Didn’t they design their ship so it wasn’t rippin’ them apart all the time?

    Ocher is almost certainly the first pigment people used. I wanna say there is cave art in ocher in Africa that dates back before the oldest sapiens fossils? It is not “representational” art, but abstract designs, that, who knows, may have represented something to them.

    Do these Himba body painters permanently stain their hair and skin, or do they have to put on a new coat of ocher butter every, what, week, month? I do have to say, I think it looks better than un-ochered black skin. Wonder if there’s a market for a better pigment-fat product? Could lead to an African chemistry revolution! I mean, butter. Don't they get rancid, living in the desert?

    Also, Himbas? I cannot be the only wishing that they were Himbos!

    Replies: @El Dato, @Lurker, @SFG

    I’ve always assumed sci-fi trended male while fantasy was more for girls.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Lurker

    When the Lord of the Rings movies came out, I remember frequenting a lot of Tolkien fan sites. It seemed like the membership was about 5:1 female.

  35. Anon[221] • Disclaimer says:

    From an Amazon review:

    One of the aliens, as a gesture of friendship, instantaneously and unexpectedly replaces Binti’s hair with copies of its tentacles.

    How traumatized is she by this macroaggression?

    Her reaction is “whatever.” Not only is this absurd for any human being, it’s especially absurd given that her whole characterization is built on her Himba ethnic identity, which is expressed in part through her hair plaits and otjize.

    A helpful summary from another reviewer:

    TL;DR: Weird things happen to Binti while she shrieks and screams and cries and sobs and rolls her eyes and laughs and chuckles and then shrieks and screams some more.

    By the way, the reviews are mostly 5 stars. There are only a few one or two star reviews, and they tend to be weirdly woke and PC negative reviews, like “she doesn’t portray the trauma accurately.” I think that the readers of these books are mostly self-selected, but I also think that Amazon is keeping a close, curational eye on any reviews submitted.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon


    One of the aliens, as a gesture of friendship, instantaneously and unexpectedly replaces Binti’s hair with copies of its tentacles.

     

    Isn't that from Mass Effect?

    https://i.postimg.cc/CKMS4WvY/mass-effect-hair.png
  36. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    With all due respect, I’ve seen more interesting plots on Futurama.

     

    Hell, there were more interesting plots in the Danny Dunn, Encyclopedia Brown, Mushroom Planet, and Miss Pickerell series.

    BTW, For any iStevers who still care, Paul Walker is back in the news, kind of.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G7EAAOSwDvRg9zwG/s-l300.jpg


    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61LMVs6xTCL._SL500_.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/_BseaLMuSYMk/S-W2MSfJlOI/AAAAAAAAD94/CXTM3eWan1M/s1600/dannydunn.jpg

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Hey! The Mushroom Planet!! I didn’t know anybody knew the Mushroom Planet!!! Wow!!!!

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @obwandiyag

    Why not get busy with the classics?

    https://www.amazon.com/Stand-Zanzibar-Hugo-Award-Winning-Novel/dp/0765326787

    Replies: @Simon

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @obwandiyag


    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

     

    Ever so much more so!
    , @Brutusale
    @obwandiyag

    Wow, Danny Dunn and Homer Price. I'm flashing back to my youth!

    IIRC, a black kid found the missing bracelet in the doughnut. He may have been the first black character in any book I had read to that point.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @inertial

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @Reg Cæsar, @EH

    Vox Days aggressive attack on woke SF really pushed the Hugos, etc. to become more extremely shitlib.

    Unfortunately, Vox may have been right but he’s not a great writer. So when a liberal like George R.R. Martin who is a great SF writer says it’s the Vox crowd pushing politics over quality Vox’s point does look more muddled.

    • Agree: guest007
  38. anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Vox Days aggressive attack on woke SF really pushed the Hugos, etc. to become more extremely shitlib.

    Unfortunately, Vox may have been right but he’s not a great writer. So when a liberal like George R.R. Martin who is a great SF writer says it’s the Vox crowd pushing politics over quality Vox’s point does look more muddled.

  39. Anon[407] • Disclaimer says:

    For those who missed this dust-up at the time, from Wikipedia:

    In 2015, two groups of science fiction writers, the “Sad Puppies” led by Brad R. Torgersen and Larry Correia, and the “Rabid Puppies” led by Vox Day, each put forward a similar slate of suggested nominations which came to dominate the ballot…. The leaders of the campaigns characterized them as a reaction to “niche, academic, overtly [leftist]” nominees and the Hugo becoming “an affirmative action award” that preferred female and non-white authors and characters.

    In response, five nominees declined their nomination before and, for the first time, two after the ballot was published. Multiple-Hugo-winner Connie Willis declined to present the awards.

    The slates were characterized by The Guardian as a “right wing”, “orchestrated backlash” and by The A.V. Club as a “group of white guys”, and were linked with the Gamergate controversy. Multiple Hugo winner Samuel R. Delany characterized the campaigns as a response to “socio-economic” changes such as minority authors gaining prominence and thus “economic heft”.

    In all but the Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form category, “No Award” placed above all nominees that were on either slate, and it won all five categories that only contained slate nominees. The two campaigns were repeated in 2016 with some changes, and the “Rabid Puppy” slate again dominated the ballot in several categories, with all five nominees in Best Related Work, Best Graphic Story, Best Professional Artist, and Best Fancast.

    In response to the campaigns, a set of new rules, called “E Pluribus Hugo”, were passed in 2015 and ratified in 2016 to modify the nominations process. Intended to ensure that organized minority groups cannot dominate every finalist position in a category, the new rules define a voting system in which nominees are eliminated one by one, with each vote for an eliminated work then spread out over the uneliminated works they nominated, until only the final shortlist remains.

    These rules were ratified in 2016 to be used for the first time in 2017. A rule mandating that the final nominees must appear on at least five percent of ballots was also eliminated, to ensure that all categories could reach a full set of nominees even when the initial pool of works was very large.

    I think these new rules may have worked to counter organized slate voting, but they may also have enabled works that have no redeeming value beyond wokeness to survive and win their categories. Even assuming you want to expand the range of sci fi that can win awards, you might think that the rules have overshot to the point that enjoyability, plotting, reasonable suspension of disbelief, and writing quality are no longer taken into account.

  40. @From Beer to Paternity
    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov's Foundation trilogy? Sure, it's got mega production value, but for pity's sake, what's up with the casting?

    Well, we know, of course. And they've rewritten/butchered the storyline, of course.

    Wouldn't it be cool if a film treatment of A Canticle for Liebowitz didn't require that Liebowitz
    be a black dude? That would be freedom.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Wilkey

    ‘Wouldn’t it be cool if a film treatment of A Canticle for Liebowitz didn’t require that Liebowitz
    be a black dude? That would be freedom.’

    They can make the mutant sidekicks who knock off the monk in the first episode black; that would work.

    Eat! Eat!’

  41. The Hugos are awarded not by a large community of readers, but by the few hundred attendees of WorldCon, an annual science fiction convention. Over the past 10 years, and especially since things kicked into overdrive around 2013, WorldCon has become extremely woke — today it’s about as woke as Tumblr. White men are hardly considered for any awards, even when it’s richly deserved, and female PoCs are given a tremendous advantage… particularly if they’re members of the woke WorldCon clique.

    Three things, however, need to be mentioned:

    First, nobody takes those awards seriously these days. And I mean nobody. They’re too transparently woke; too obviously not awarded on basis of merit. This has gone far enough that even folks on normie discussion boards know that the awards are a sham.

    Second, the stuff that wins awards these days hardly sells. On amazon.com, it’s always — without exception — outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF. And, of course, Asimov and Clarke still out-sell “Binti.”

    Third, good SF is still being published. It’s simply that the authors need to content themselves with money rather than with awards. (Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British. Just about all of the woke stuff all comes from the US. This is indicative of something fairly rotten in America.)

    • Replies: @personfellowindividual
    @Adept


    The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.
     
    I noticed that too. I used to have a stable of goto authors that I always knew would give me a good read, but that was a long time ago, back when Benford, Bear and Brin still had a decent output. It hasn't been true since the 90s though.

    Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book.
    Neal Asher has a large collection of great space-opera books. Highly recommended if you like more action-oriented stuff.
    Charles Stross is an excellent writer, although he is personally woke as hell. It's only become annoying to me in his more recent works.

    In any case, the dearth of readable stuff being created these days just means there's more time to catch up on the good books and authors from the past.

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @SunBakedSuburb

    , @SFG
    @Adept

    Ah, thank you! Good to know the old spirit's still alive somewhere. How old are these fellows, though? I kind of feel like the younger generation of nerds is more into video games. (Which makes sense--you get to play with computers, and there's all kinds of hacking and tinkering to do.)

    I was thinking about the whole space-travel thing, though. It seems more and more clear we're not going to space (Bezos and Musk's best efforts aside), and a lot of people's vision of the future is more post-apocalyptic (zombie plagues and the like) than anything else. People are increasingly pessimistic about the future. And, I don't blame them.

    (Like Karlin, I do believe in climate change/global warming, though it actually inclines me to the right--I favor an immigration moratorium and assimilation to keep the country in one piece to deal with the eventual flood of refugees from the south. And a wall if possible.)

    , @Anon
    @Adept


    On amazon.com, it’s always — without exception — outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF.
     
    Is any of this stuff any good? Any recommendations off the top of your head?

    Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.
     
    Thanks for the names!
  42. @Veracitor
    To be fair, non-woke SF was long cursed with the cliché that space aliens would love to eat chocolate. Even Pournelle and Niven couldn't resist; from The Mote In God's Eye (1974):

    The Marine brought them the drink humans called chocolate, and they drank with pleasure. Humans were omnivores like Moties, but the flavors humans preferred were generally tasteless. Chocolate, though: that was excellent, and with extra hydrocarbons to simulate the waters of the home world, it was incomparable.
     
    Later...

    “He can get artistic some other time. The Commissioners don’t want anything fancy tonight. Just be able to feed ‘em all if they want it.” Kelley glanced at the magic coffeepot to be sure it was full, then glared at an empty space next to it. “Where’s the goddamn chocolate?” he demanded.

    “It’s comin’, Mr. Kelley,” the steward said defensively.

    “Right. See that it’s here before the Moties come in. That’ll be an hour.” Kelley glanced at the wall clock. “OK. I guess we’re ready. But make sure of that chocolate.”

    Since they’d discovered it aboard Lenin the Moties had become addicted to hot chocolate. It was one of the few human beverages they liked; but the way they liked it! Kelley shuddered. Butter he could understand. They put butter in chocolate aboard the Limey ships. But a drop of machine oil in every cup?
     

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    John Ringo used maple syrup as the one thing from Earth that aliens craved.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Redneck farmer

    The original & best, I hope.

    Not the HFCS Ersatz.

  43. @additionalMike
    @Colin Wright

    Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.’

    Ursula LeGuin was pretty good until she discovered feminism.

    …she also appears to be a closet racist — or ‘race realist’ as that flavor of racist might prefer. One of her short stories involves a blind white girl and a sighted black girl. The black girl sees, the white girl thinks.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    Ursula K. Le Guin's dad Alfred Kroeber was a famous progressive anthropologist who got his degree under Franz Boas. He was the keeper of Ishi, the last California wild Indian, in 1911. The father and daughter's lives spanned from 1876-2018.

  44. @Thomm
    I disagree that black people don't belong in science fiction.

    Kunta Kinte, despite being captured and enslaved, AND having both his foot cut off and going blind at various times in his long life, still managed to become the Chief Engineer of the Flagship of the United Federation of Planets, that too just 596 years after being captured and enslaved (1767-2363).

    He even found time along the way to teach millions of children how to read.

    If that isn’t the most inspiring story of personal accomplishment, spanning seven centuries, I don’t know what is.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/04/GeordiLaForge.jpg

    Replies: @Sol Ipsis, @Pericles

    This Thomm guy from customer support is unironically maintaining a list of wrongthinkers, as he admitted on Karlin’s section a short while ago. ADL among us. Lol, watch out guys!

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Pericles

    LOL! No matter how much you gaslight, the fact remains that you openly said you would rather have sex with a white man than a mulatto woman who looks like Halle Berry. Your admission of this is there for all to see.

    This is why we don't let you pollute normal, heterosexual society.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  45. @inertial
    @inertial

    Upon further investigation, that Korean-American dude turned out to be a a "trans man" who "lives in Louisiana with his husband and daughter."

    So, not one but two trannies were nominated in 2019--one MtF and the other FtM. If that's not diversity I don't know what is.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Pericles

    Some sort of cultural three-card monte, innit?

  46. What I find really tedious is all the male authors trying to prolong their careers by writing stories with female protagonists.

    Since, as a rule, most writers can’t portray the opposite gender very well, it doesn’t work out.

    …and ‘blacks’ who aren’t black in any detectable way. I hit that and the read is over. Of course, by this point, I can’t see myself putting up with a black in the story in any capacity — and if the protagonist is female, the author better be as well.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @Colin Wright

    John Norman writes great female characters. He understands what women want.

    Replies: @InnerCynic

  47. Victim bingo achieved, I suppose.

    Anyone want to take one for the team and review the book for us from the MAN OF UNZ perspective? Or could we even prevail on Steve to do a Taki mag writeup?

  48. @Colin Wright
    @additionalMike

    'Ursula K. Le Guin kind of got it going with the Norton science fiction anthology, heavy on female authors to the exclusion of the more deserving guy types.
    What a shame, picking authors to be included on sex and not much else.'

    Ursula LeGuin was pretty good until she discovered feminism.

    ...she also appears to be a closet racist -- or 'race realist' as that flavor of racist might prefer. One of her short stories involves a blind white girl and a sighted black girl. The black girl sees, the white girl thinks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Ursula K. Le Guin’s dad Alfred Kroeber was a famous progressive anthropologist who got his degree under Franz Boas. He was the keeper of Ishi, the last California wild Indian, in 1911. The father and daughter’s lives spanned from 1876-2018.

    • Thanks: Escher, TWS
  49. @Reg Cæsar

    Otjize is a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment
     
    Jujitze is mixture of tempura and wasabi japonica pigment. Ho-tjize is a mixture of ph and napalm pigment. Rajtjize is a mixture of ghee and henna pigment, with tea and crumpets on the side. Hajjize is a mixture of black coffee and the kaffir's freshly-shed blood...

    Igbo-American Nnedi Okorafor

     

    We nneed to knnow who got the nnotionn to nnominnate her. Nned Flannders?

    Nnedi Okorafor = No 'fro on darkie:

    https://i1.wp.com/www.paperbackparis.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nnedi-okorafor-non-fiction-debut-broken-places-outer-spaces.jpg

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Woodsie, @additionalMike

    That’s more what you’d call a “vertical ‘fro”, rather than a standard ‘fro.

  50. @Adept
    The Hugos are awarded not by a large community of readers, but by the few hundred attendees of WorldCon, an annual science fiction convention. Over the past 10 years, and especially since things kicked into overdrive around 2013, WorldCon has become extremely woke -- today it's about as woke as Tumblr. White men are hardly considered for any awards, even when it's richly deserved, and female PoCs are given a tremendous advantage... particularly if they're members of the woke WorldCon clique.

    Three things, however, need to be mentioned:

    First, nobody takes those awards seriously these days. And I mean nobody. They're too transparently woke; too obviously not awarded on basis of merit. This has gone far enough that even folks on normie discussion boards know that the awards are a sham.

    Second, the stuff that wins awards these days hardly sells. On amazon.com, it's always -- without exception -- outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF. And, of course, Asimov and Clarke still out-sell "Binti."

    Third, good SF is still being published. It's simply that the authors need to content themselves with money rather than with awards. (Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors -- Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky -- all happen to be British. Just about all of the woke stuff all comes from the US. This is indicative of something fairly rotten in America.)

    Replies: @personfellowindividual, @SFG, @Anon

    The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.

    I noticed that too. I used to have a stable of goto authors that I always knew would give me a good read, but that was a long time ago, back when Benford, Bear and Brin still had a decent output. It hasn’t been true since the 90s though.

    Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book.
    Neal Asher has a large collection of great space-opera books. Highly recommended if you like more action-oriented stuff.
    Charles Stross is an excellent writer, although he is personally woke as hell. It’s only become annoying to me in his more recent works.

    In any case, the dearth of readable stuff being created these days just means there’s more time to catch up on the good books and authors from the past.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @personfellowindividual

    Tim Powers is a great writer. Overlooked I think because his books have no real specific genre. He combines sci-fi, horror and fantasy w/out a care to a reader's expectations. I've been enjoying the hell out of his two recent books that combine crime/thriller elements with espionage and the supernatural: Forced Perspectives and Alternate Routes. All his books are great and rewarding though. Intelligently written hocus-pocus. Great stuff.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @personfellowindividual

    "Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book."

    Good writer and fun stories. Not SF, I wouldn't say fantasy because that conjures tiresome images of elves and unicorns; speculative or weird are the best descriptors for his fiction. He had an interesting friendship with the enormously difficult Philip K. Dick whilst a younger man.

  51. @Charlotte
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    I have a friend who attends Worldcon and votes on the Hugo. She’s an educated, white, Midwestern-raised female sixtysomething who likes to compare herself favorably to those sad, ignorant, racist, Trump-voting persons who surround her, and yes, she’d read this voluntarily (and I’m sure she has). It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors. I know other women like her, but I’m not sure there is enough of a fan base to make novels like this profitable. My guess is that they are a form of virtue-signaling by the publisher-and if a book wins a Hugo, it probably does make money from all the library sales.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Sebastian Y.

    Which sci-fi novels get the best movie directors and the biggest budgets? Dune, The Martian, etc.

  52. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Who reads these books? Are they really profitable, or is there some murkier incentive for their publication? Serious questions.
    I suppose a few people read them because they think they should, and then there are libraries and schools that righteously order them, but how many copies are actually read for fun and not as a curriculum requirement?
    This is a long shot, but do any of you know someone who'd pick up a book like that voluntarily? I don't. I've read all sorts of pulp nonsense from youth hostel book exchange shelves but that's where I'd draw the line.

    Replies: @Charlotte, @Lurker, @guest007

    From amazon

    Best Sellers Rank: #34,381 in Books
    #45 in Science Fiction Short Stories
    #880 in First Contact Science Fiction
    #1,004 in Alien Invasion Science Fiction
    Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings

    This sounds like the type of books that a progressive English teacher assigns believing boys will be interested.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @guest007

    'Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings'

    That's probably a good example of what reader (or viewer) ratings are worth.

    I've learned -- the hard way -- to ignore the four-and-a-half stars, etc. What's mildly troubling is that three-and-a-half stars will make one move on -- and if the high ratings are worthless, perhaps the low ones are as well.

    Replies: @guest007

  53. @Charlotte
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    I have a friend who attends Worldcon and votes on the Hugo. She’s an educated, white, Midwestern-raised female sixtysomething who likes to compare herself favorably to those sad, ignorant, racist, Trump-voting persons who surround her, and yes, she’d read this voluntarily (and I’m sure she has). It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors. I know other women like her, but I’m not sure there is enough of a fan base to make novels like this profitable. My guess is that they are a form of virtue-signaling by the publisher-and if a book wins a Hugo, it probably does make money from all the library sales.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Sebastian Y.

    It’s a mark of her intellectual and moral superiority that she would seek out and read fiction by African female authors.

    This might be a reason to keep print editions of book publishing going, to openly display one’s superior moral position? Can’t do that with a Kindle. When Kindles first came out I remember a comedian saying that the worst thing about the Kindle is that you can’t see what someone’s reading and make a moral judgment about them based on what they’re reading. Then again I rarely see anyone with a print book in public (trains, subways, coffee shops, benches,…) anymore. They mostly look at their phones.

  54. @Paperback Writer
    You kind of wonder whether anything would be left to whites were it not for the influence of the Chinese movie-goer.

    Replies: @Escher

    Soon enough Batman will be Chinese, with an Indian sidekick.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Escher

    "Soon enough Batman will be Chinese"

    I think the Caped Crusader should be Slavic, and Gotham will be Kyiv, a city of violence and vice. Something has to be done because Steve ain't hacking it as Batman.

    , @Catdompanj
    @Escher

    Yup, Bruce Wuhan and his ward Sikh Grayson.

  55. @Lurker
    @Rob

    I've always assumed sci-fi trended male while fantasy was more for girls.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    When the Lord of the Rings movies came out, I remember frequenting a lot of Tolkien fan sites. It seemed like the membership was about 5:1 female.

  56. @Reg Cæsar

    Otjize is a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment
     
    Jujitze is mixture of tempura and wasabi japonica pigment. Ho-tjize is a mixture of ph and napalm pigment. Rajtjize is a mixture of ghee and henna pigment, with tea and crumpets on the side. Hajjize is a mixture of black coffee and the kaffir's freshly-shed blood...

    Igbo-American Nnedi Okorafor

     

    We nneed to knnow who got the nnotionn to nnominnate her. Nned Flannders?

    Nnedi Okorafor = No 'fro on darkie:

    https://i1.wp.com/www.paperbackparis.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nnedi-okorafor-non-fiction-debut-broken-places-outer-spaces.jpg

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Woodsie, @additionalMike

    Culturally appropriated Marge Simpon’s hairdo.

    • Agree: flyingtiger
  57. I am looking for agents to help market my science fiction novel THE CHRONOKINE but having no success. Possible reasons: maybe it’s not good enough, it’s about time travel by a white college student, it’s critical of communism. Working on an alternate history about a Compton gangbanger who crosses paths with OJ Simpson the night his ex-wife is murdered.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dan

    Market yourself on dissident-right sites, gaming sites, anywhere young, right-leaning nerdy guys hang out?

    The Delicious Tacos guy apparently built himself up on his blog first, releasing (dirty) short-short stories.

    Replies: @Dan

  58. “she is able to negotiate a short lasting peace”
    Which is it? Short or lasting? English much?

  59. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    Me too, and also pulled away from most other pop culture, entertainment, organization etc, which are all now engaged in Black/Queer worship. An exception is Youtube, where I can find good old movies, audiobooks, lectures, and music from pre-decadent Anerica.

    • Agree: SafeNow
  60. @Anon
    From an Amazon review:

    One of the aliens, as a gesture of friendship, instantaneously and unexpectedly replaces Binti's hair with copies of its tentacles.
     
    How traumatized is she by this macroaggression?

    Her reaction is "whatever." Not only is this absurd for any human being, it's especially absurd given that her whole characterization is built on her Himba ethnic identity, which is expressed in part through her hair plaits and otjize.
     
    A helpful summary from another reviewer:


    TL;DR: Weird things happen to Binti while she shrieks and screams and cries and sobs and rolls her eyes and laughs and chuckles and then shrieks and screams some more.
     
    By the way, the reviews are mostly 5 stars. There are only a few one or two star reviews, and they tend to be weirdly woke and PC negative reviews, like "she doesn't portray the trauma accurately." I think that the readers of these books are mostly self-selected, but I also think that Amazon is keeping a close, curational eye on any reviews submitted.

    Replies: @El Dato

    One of the aliens, as a gesture of friendship, instantaneously and unexpectedly replaces Binti’s hair with copies of its tentacles.

    Isn’t that from Mass Effect?

  61. @Redneck farmer
    @Veracitor

    John Ringo used maple syrup as the one thing from Earth that aliens craved.

    Replies: @El Dato

    The original & best, I hope.

    Not the HFCS Ersatz.

  62. @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hey! The Mushroom Planet!! I didn't know anybody knew the Mushroom Planet!!! Wow!!!!

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Why not get busy with the classics?

    • Replies: @Simon
    @El Dato

    Yes, let me second the motion. Science fiction was, long ago, my go-to genre; I read a lot of it, and the best novel I read was Brunner’s Stand on Zanzibar.

  63. @Bill in Glendale
    @Mike Tre

    HFHS was my high school and no blacks when I graduated in the 60's. Beautiful facilities thanks to the high property taxes that suburban whites voted themselves. Makes many California high schools look sick by comparison. We had 16 Merit Scholarship semifinalists in my class. Now they are lucky to get two.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    My wife graduated Rich East in 1989. The school was closed a few years ago. And they are shipping the students west into the Lincoln Way school district. In 10 years New Lenox and Frankfort and Mokena will be lost. Tinley Park and Oak Forest are already lost. Lagrange Blvd through Orland used to be a great place for dinner and drinks but now the mall and everywhere else is infested with negroes and they pretty much ruin any attempt to enjoy a night out.

    • Replies: @Bill in Glendale
    @Mike Tre

    Hated Rich East. Too much green.

  64. @From Beer to Paternity
    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov's Foundation trilogy? Sure, it's got mega production value, but for pity's sake, what's up with the casting?

    Well, we know, of course. And they've rewritten/butchered the storyline, of course.

    Wouldn't it be cool if a film treatment of A Canticle for Liebowitz didn't require that Liebowitz
    be a black dude? That would be freedom.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Wilkey

    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?

    It’s bloody awful. The casting is atrocious and the writing is worse. I nearly had to stop my wife from throwing dishes at the television. She was a much bigger fan of the Foundation series than I ever was, but we’re both ready to cancel our AppleTV and give up on it. They are over half way through the first season and not a damn thing has happened. They are sent to Terminus, they get to Terminus, they get about doing…something. Raych murders Hari Seldon for…reasons. There’s some kind of ark that the people on Terminus aren’t allowed to touch for…reasons. And then some halfwit tribe from a neighboring system comes to attack the people on Terminus for Seldon-only-knows-why.

    So that’s it. We’re six episodes into a ten episode season and all we’ve seen is a space elevator collapse, the Foundation move to Terminus, and one silly battle scene. Oh, and the emperor-in-training falls in love with a gardener who may possibly be the only attractive woman in the entire galaxy of 50 trillion people.

    The truth is that “Foundation” doesn’t work as a TV series or movie, and probably never will. It covers too long a time period. It’s too episodic. You’d have to get used to seeing brand new characters from one episode to the next. That is certainly doable. I would argue it could be great. But no producer wants to take that risk.

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well…don’t they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future? Is that no longer a thing? Every person on every single one of the thousands of planets in the empire is going to forget how to tell time? Wikipedia has entire entries for individual characters from “The Simpsons” and individual episodes of “Star Trek,” but the encyclopedia of the future doesn’t have room to explain two different ways to tell time? Do sundials even work on planets in binary systems? And oh, wouldn’t you be more worried about losing knowledge about, oh, how to build space ships that travel through space at FTL speeds? Just food for thought.

    I guess what happened is that the richest Woke corporation on the planet – whose executives are almost entirely white, BTW – was tossing around money like confetti and some producer went to them and said “Hey, we can do Foundation.” And Apple said, “Can you include lots of blacks and trannies?” and the producer said “Sure thing,” took Apple’s zillion dollar check, and laughed his way to the bank.

    Lee Pace is decent as the emperor (although he was infiinitely better in Pushing Daisies). Jared Harris is OK as Seldon. The actress who plays Gaal Dornick is passable, at best, and the actre-thing who plays Salvor Hardin (I guess she is an “it”) may actually be the worst lead on any TV show in all of history. Virtually every other second and third tier actor in the show is appallingly bad.

    The reality is that any artist with any integrity, no matter how far on the left he may be, is not going to be pushed around by studio demands for diversity. He may be fine with diversity. He may actively look for a diverse cast. He may even get a diverse cast. But he is not going to allow studio demands for diversity, or even his own desire for diversity, to get in the way of telling a great story and creating a successful show. Game of Thrones wasn’t diverse. The original Star Wars trilogy had almost no minorities at all, and the first Star Wars movie had none. The Lord of the Rings was 100% white. The Hobbit (which also starred Lee Pace) had about 5 seconds of scenes that included black people, after someone twisted Peter Jackson’s arm, but that was it. JK Rowling is very liberal, but none of the Harry Potter movies I’ve seen had anything but white leads.

    • Replies: @Whereismyhandle
    @Wilkey

    "The writing is atrocious" applies to Asimov, though.

    Maybe he was a smart guy. Couldn't write his way out of a wet paper bag, though--any more than Heinlein could understand real human beings.

    Replies: @Hermes

    , @SFG
    @Wilkey

    Your wife is a bigger fan of the Foundation series than you? Where are you finding these right-wing geek women? (There's a very obscure, old Jonah Goldberg joke here--https://www.nationalreview.com/2003/06/column-doesnt-end-jonah-goldberg/)

    Foundation was written a while ago, and you're kind of stuck. The problem with old sci-fi is it dates awfully quickly. You could update the central idea with advanced AI that predicts human behavior, and then have the Mule show up as planned. I actually think a right-wing version of Foundation could work, with a bunch of conservatives trying to preserve the West's history from the woke multiculti onslaught, but who's going to write it?

    (Foundation's actually kind of conservative if you think about it, faith in social engineering and Asimov's personal politics aside--protecting the achievements of the past and all that. Notes to someone smarter than me. ;) )

    Ironically it's the far future and the names aren't supposed to correspond to any existing culture, so you could make them BIPOC if you wanted to. I mean, thousands of years in the future, who's to say Africa's not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all...

    Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to--just say Middle-Earth's a lot warmer and sunnier than Tolkien imagined it. But they'd have to *all* be black, given how the Shire is an isolated farming community. You want diversity, go to Lankhmar (or Waterdeep or Greyhawk City if you can sell Hasbro on the idea).

    What I'd say about the works you cite (GoT, Harry Potter, LoTR) is that they were all started before the Great Awokening, and couldn't be greenlighted today. I suspect one of the attractions of anime, particularly to young right-wingers, is the lack of politics and the fact that they all look white (though, of course, they're Japanese and there are no doubt Japanese political issues in there we're missing).

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Peter Akuleyev

    , @raga10
    @Wilkey


    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well…don’t they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future?
     
    Well... maybe, but that one is on Asimov himself, not on the adaptation...

    I admit I'm actually enjoying Foundation. It probably helps that I never really read the books (I started reading but I never got into it... and that's basically all I remember about the original). I do know that the female robot in the series is re-gendered Daneel R. Olivaw and the clone emperors are not a part of the original books at all... but I think they are one of the most interesting parts of the show, so I'm fine with them. I'm told the show added a lot of action-driven plots that didn't exist in the books - if so, thank god for that! It would be one extremely boring show if it was just a straightforward adaptation.

    When it comes to screen adaptations I think most of the time not knowing the source material is really a blessing: you can just take what you see at face value. (I think that held for Game of Thrones as well, another opus that I never knew in its original book form)

    Replies: @Wilkey

  65. @Reg Cæsar

    Otjize is a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment
     
    Jujitze is mixture of tempura and wasabi japonica pigment. Ho-tjize is a mixture of ph and napalm pigment. Rajtjize is a mixture of ghee and henna pigment, with tea and crumpets on the side. Hajjize is a mixture of black coffee and the kaffir's freshly-shed blood...

    Igbo-American Nnedi Okorafor

     

    We nneed to knnow who got the nnotionn to nnominnate her. Nned Flannders?

    Nnedi Okorafor = No 'fro on darkie:

    https://i1.wp.com/www.paperbackparis.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nnedi-okorafor-non-fiction-debut-broken-places-outer-spaces.jpg

    Replies: @G. Poulin, @Woodsie, @additionalMike

    A high-altitude Kid’n’Play weave.

    Can she walk through a doorway without bowing?

  66. African-American women in the Mississipi delta were known to eat clay during pregnancy, and on migrating north switched to corn starch as a substitute. Kaolin is an aluminosilicate clay that has long been used for medicinal purposes. Readers may be familiar with examples such as Kaopectate.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @Elmer T. Jones

    https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/mud-cake-a-delicacy-made-with-mud-in-poverty-stricken-haiti-1437242

    https://newint.org/sites/default/files/features/2014/06/27/haitimudcakes.jpg

  67. @Wilkey
    @From Beer to Paternity


    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?
     
    It's bloody awful. The casting is atrocious and the writing is worse. I nearly had to stop my wife from throwing dishes at the television. She was a much bigger fan of the Foundation series than I ever was, but we're both ready to cancel our AppleTV and give up on it. They are over half way through the first season and not a damn thing has happened. They are sent to Terminus, they get to Terminus, they get about doing...something. Raych murders Hari Seldon for...reasons. There's some kind of ark that the people on Terminus aren't allowed to touch for...reasons. And then some halfwit tribe from a neighboring system comes to attack the people on Terminus for Seldon-only-knows-why.

    So that's it. We're six episodes into a ten episode season and all we've seen is a space elevator collapse, the Foundation move to Terminus, and one silly battle scene. Oh, and the emperor-in-training falls in love with a gardener who may possibly be the only attractive woman in the entire galaxy of 50 trillion people.

    The truth is that "Foundation" doesn't work as a TV series or movie, and probably never will. It covers too long a time period. It's too episodic. You'd have to get used to seeing brand new characters from one episode to the next. That is certainly doable. I would argue it could be great. But no producer wants to take that risk.

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well...don't they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future? Is that no longer a thing? Every person on every single one of the thousands of planets in the empire is going to forget how to tell time? Wikipedia has entire entries for individual characters from "The Simpsons" and individual episodes of "Star Trek," but the encyclopedia of the future doesn't have room to explain two different ways to tell time? Do sundials even work on planets in binary systems? And oh, wouldn't you be more worried about losing knowledge about, oh, how to build space ships that travel through space at FTL speeds? Just food for thought.

    I guess what happened is that the richest Woke corporation on the planet - whose executives are almost entirely white, BTW - was tossing around money like confetti and some producer went to them and said "Hey, we can do Foundation." And Apple said, "Can you include lots of blacks and trannies?" and the producer said "Sure thing," took Apple's zillion dollar check, and laughed his way to the bank.

    Lee Pace is decent as the emperor (although he was infiinitely better in Pushing Daisies). Jared Harris is OK as Seldon. The actress who plays Gaal Dornick is passable, at best, and the actre-thing who plays Salvor Hardin (I guess she is an "it") may actually be the worst lead on any TV show in all of history. Virtually every other second and third tier actor in the show is appallingly bad.

    The reality is that any artist with any integrity, no matter how far on the left he may be, is not going to be pushed around by studio demands for diversity. He may be fine with diversity. He may actively look for a diverse cast. He may even get a diverse cast. But he is not going to allow studio demands for diversity, or even his own desire for diversity, to get in the way of telling a great story and creating a successful show. Game of Thrones wasn't diverse. The original Star Wars trilogy had almost no minorities at all, and the first Star Wars movie had none. The Lord of the Rings was 100% white. The Hobbit (which also starred Lee Pace) had about 5 seconds of scenes that included black people, after someone twisted Peter Jackson's arm, but that was it. JK Rowling is very liberal, but none of the Harry Potter movies I've seen had anything but white leads.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @SFG, @raga10

    “The writing is atrocious” applies to Asimov, though.

    Maybe he was a smart guy. Couldn’t write his way out of a wet paper bag, though–any more than Heinlein could understand real human beings.

    • Agree: Wilkey
    • Replies: @Hermes
    @Whereismyhandle

    Asimov was a great non-fiction writer, and had good ideas, but didn't really know how to tell a story.

    I will never understand the love Heinlein got for his dialogue. Some of the most unrealistic-sounding speech I've ever read. That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.

    Replies: @Corn, @Colin Wright

  68. @Wilkey
    @From Beer to Paternity


    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?
     
    It's bloody awful. The casting is atrocious and the writing is worse. I nearly had to stop my wife from throwing dishes at the television. She was a much bigger fan of the Foundation series than I ever was, but we're both ready to cancel our AppleTV and give up on it. They are over half way through the first season and not a damn thing has happened. They are sent to Terminus, they get to Terminus, they get about doing...something. Raych murders Hari Seldon for...reasons. There's some kind of ark that the people on Terminus aren't allowed to touch for...reasons. And then some halfwit tribe from a neighboring system comes to attack the people on Terminus for Seldon-only-knows-why.

    So that's it. We're six episodes into a ten episode season and all we've seen is a space elevator collapse, the Foundation move to Terminus, and one silly battle scene. Oh, and the emperor-in-training falls in love with a gardener who may possibly be the only attractive woman in the entire galaxy of 50 trillion people.

    The truth is that "Foundation" doesn't work as a TV series or movie, and probably never will. It covers too long a time period. It's too episodic. You'd have to get used to seeing brand new characters from one episode to the next. That is certainly doable. I would argue it could be great. But no producer wants to take that risk.

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well...don't they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future? Is that no longer a thing? Every person on every single one of the thousands of planets in the empire is going to forget how to tell time? Wikipedia has entire entries for individual characters from "The Simpsons" and individual episodes of "Star Trek," but the encyclopedia of the future doesn't have room to explain two different ways to tell time? Do sundials even work on planets in binary systems? And oh, wouldn't you be more worried about losing knowledge about, oh, how to build space ships that travel through space at FTL speeds? Just food for thought.

    I guess what happened is that the richest Woke corporation on the planet - whose executives are almost entirely white, BTW - was tossing around money like confetti and some producer went to them and said "Hey, we can do Foundation." And Apple said, "Can you include lots of blacks and trannies?" and the producer said "Sure thing," took Apple's zillion dollar check, and laughed his way to the bank.

    Lee Pace is decent as the emperor (although he was infiinitely better in Pushing Daisies). Jared Harris is OK as Seldon. The actress who plays Gaal Dornick is passable, at best, and the actre-thing who plays Salvor Hardin (I guess she is an "it") may actually be the worst lead on any TV show in all of history. Virtually every other second and third tier actor in the show is appallingly bad.

    The reality is that any artist with any integrity, no matter how far on the left he may be, is not going to be pushed around by studio demands for diversity. He may be fine with diversity. He may actively look for a diverse cast. He may even get a diverse cast. But he is not going to allow studio demands for diversity, or even his own desire for diversity, to get in the way of telling a great story and creating a successful show. Game of Thrones wasn't diverse. The original Star Wars trilogy had almost no minorities at all, and the first Star Wars movie had none. The Lord of the Rings was 100% white. The Hobbit (which also starred Lee Pace) had about 5 seconds of scenes that included black people, after someone twisted Peter Jackson's arm, but that was it. JK Rowling is very liberal, but none of the Harry Potter movies I've seen had anything but white leads.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @SFG, @raga10

    Your wife is a bigger fan of the Foundation series than you? Where are you finding these right-wing geek women? (There’s a very obscure, old Jonah Goldberg joke here–https://www.nationalreview.com/2003/06/column-doesnt-end-jonah-goldberg/)

    Foundation was written a while ago, and you’re kind of stuck. The problem with old sci-fi is it dates awfully quickly. You could update the central idea with advanced AI that predicts human behavior, and then have the Mule show up as planned. I actually think a right-wing version of Foundation could work, with a bunch of conservatives trying to preserve the West’s history from the woke multiculti onslaught, but who’s going to write it?

    (Foundation’s actually kind of conservative if you think about it, faith in social engineering and Asimov’s personal politics aside–protecting the achievements of the past and all that. Notes to someone smarter than me. 😉 )

    Ironically it’s the far future and the names aren’t supposed to correspond to any existing culture, so you could make them BIPOC if you wanted to. I mean, thousands of years in the future, who’s to say Africa’s not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all…

    Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to–just say Middle-Earth’s a lot warmer and sunnier than Tolkien imagined it. But they’d have to *all* be black, given how the Shire is an isolated farming community. You want diversity, go to Lankhmar (or Waterdeep or Greyhawk City if you can sell Hasbro on the idea).

    What I’d say about the works you cite (GoT, Harry Potter, LoTR) is that they were all started before the Great Awokening, and couldn’t be greenlighted today. I suspect one of the attractions of anime, particularly to young right-wingers, is the lack of politics and the fact that they all look white (though, of course, they’re Japanese and there are no doubt Japanese political issues in there we’re missing).

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @SFG

    '...Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to–...'

    But who would identify with black hobbits?

    Seriously. Almost any work of literature has to provide characters one can identify with somehow for it to be enjoyable to read. Take War and Peace: most readers can imagine they're either Pierre or Natasha. That's half the reason the book works. Conversely, whatever others seem to have thought of it, I never could enjoy Breaking Bad. Primarily, it was because I didn't like -- and so wouldn't identify with -- any of the characters.

    Black hobbits? I can think of only one group who could identify as black hobbits -- and they don't read.

    Replies: @Simon

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @SFG

    I mean, thousands of years in the future, who’s to say Africa’s not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all…

    Thousands of years in the future skin color will almost certainly have very little obvious relation to African or European ancestry. Any more than you can pick out a Sumerian from a Yamnaya in a crowd today. Moreover, presumably humans living on a foreign planet will evolve to adapt to that planet, which will completely obscure any racial features relating to contemporary humans. That is one thing science fiction almost invariably gets wrong, or ignores.

  69. Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to–just say Middle-Earth’s a lot warmer and sunnier than Tolkien imagined it. But they’d have to *all* be black, given how the Shire is an isolated farming community.

    Yes. Diversity just isn’t very believable in a place like Middle Earth. Jackson’s all white “LOTR” and essentially all white “Hobbit” were both true to their texts as well as to our sense of what such a place would actually be like.

    Diversity is more believable in a Mediterranean kind of setting, where it’s easy to travel great distances and you have lots of different populations mixing around in cosmopolitan cities along trade routes. And of course we all know the kind of women who watch shows like “Bridgerton,” and just hope we aren’t related to very many of them.

    Your wife is a bigger fan of the Foundation series than you? Where are you finding these right-wing geek women?

    I think my wife was just a bigger reader, period, than me. She reads a lot more modern fiction than I do. I’m more into non-fiction, and am that guy in your college/high school class who actually liked the classics crap our teacher made us read. I really did like “The Scarlet Letter” and “Silas Marner” and basically everything by Dickens and Shakespeare. I did read science fiction, but never really loved it. I think I read it more out of a sense of obligation.

  70. @Anon55uu
    In potential iSteve news.

    Too early to say if he can go further, but pale Iowa starting CB Riley Moss looks at least good enough to be drafted by the NFL. He jointly leads the nation with 4 interceptions and is a former hurdles champion.

    https://hawkeyesports.com/roster/riley-moss/

    Replies: @Che Blutarsky

    Riley Moss most likely ends up playing safety in the NFL.

  71. Here’s a beautiful concept for woke sf novelists:

    Pope Francis said Sunday that he hears the cries of migrants in Libya and appealed for an end to repatriation and the establishment instead of “regular migration routes.”

    Just imagine if there were regular migration routes for African black people; what an inspiring story that would make. From the heat and sun of sub-Saharan Africa to the polar cold of Finland, a beautiful tale.

    Of course, unlike actual migrations in the natural world, the migration would be strictly one-way.

    Also, was the Pope comparing the various peoples of Africa to animals that migrate? I hope not.

    Anyway, it gives new meaning to the phrase “Do coconuts migrate?”

  72. @Rob
    That sounds like sci-fi a ten-year-old would write. Gotta hand it to the woke. They found sci-fi/fantasy, a field full of not-overly-socially-gifted people, and were all “I'll serve on the committee!” I’m sure they were very go-with-the-flow when there were only one or two of them on the committee. They analyzed sci-fi by the field's traditional standards, so they did not seem like a threat. Who would have even suspected? There are advocates for minoritarian social deviants who will take over your field’s award committees, and they will ensure that only aliens and transsexuals, preferably alien transsexuals, will win awards. Whenever there was an opening on the board, they had people lined up to fill the seat, and it looked as if new audiences were appreciating science fiction.

    Is the book’s author from one of the highest achieving Nigerian ethnicities, the Igbo, or the runners-up, the Yoruba, or is she from one of the backward, northern peoples? The Himba living in the desert implies north. If she’s not one of the two higher ethnicities, she may deal with “ethnicism” from other Nigerian colonists in the west.

    Perhaps because white jocks are a cornerstone of the political right, white nerds have always thrown in with the left. Witness the Revenge of the Nerds fraternity joining a network of historically black frats, and their black frat brothers showing up to intimidate the white jock frat. God, that was a vile movie. I watched it when I was ten or so, and really appreciated the boobs. Watched it again at like eighteen, and realized that it did not portray healthy sexuality at all. As Yoda might say, “look good nerds make not it did.” Despite little in common, the nerdy types becoming the tech billionaires is probably the origin of woke. A bit analogously to the Jews, who think that because they contributed quite a lot, some of it even good, when finally accepted into society from their marginal position, every marginalized population will thrive once whites “let them out of the niches they’ve been forced into”, nerds think that the trannies’ time will come, and they will revolutionize something or other. Yes, the Jews were not so much finally accepted but decided to stop accepting the rebbes’ rule and to move from swindling peasants to bigger things. Here was this virgin, industrialized nation, founded by people whose motherland kicked the Jews out so long ago that they had no memories!

    Has the audience for sci-fi totally changed since the golden age of sci-fi, which, as Isaac Asimov said, is twelve? Are nerdy boys so drawn into video games that the only readers left are socially awkward

    girls
     
    ? How dorky boys of decades past would have loved to have chicks interested in the same books they liked! I realize sci-fi/fantasy has always been wish fulfillment, just look at how powerful D&D wizards were, and a home for the socially dispossessed.

    To do some armchair analysis of the writer, I think westernizing Africans are somewhat ashamed that none of their traditional cultures have a real place in the modern world. Far from cultural appropriation being a problem, no one is interested in their folkways, so she tried to compensate with “in the future, space aliens will appreciate our body paint. Just wait, you’ll see!”

    How were these Meduse (very clever name) hurting their tentacles, anyway? Didn’t they design their ship so it wasn’t rippin’ them apart all the time?

    Ocher is almost certainly the first pigment people used. I wanna say there is cave art in ocher in Africa that dates back before the oldest sapiens fossils? It is not “representational” art, but abstract designs, that, who knows, may have represented something to them.

    Do these Himba body painters permanently stain their hair and skin, or do they have to put on a new coat of ocher butter every, what, week, month? I do have to say, I think it looks better than un-ochered black skin. Wonder if there’s a market for a better pigment-fat product? Could lead to an African chemistry revolution! I mean, butter. Don't they get rancid, living in the desert?

    Also, Himbas? I cannot be the only wishing that they were Himbos!

    Replies: @El Dato, @Lurker, @SFG

    I wasn’t there–the last convention I attended was in 2006 or so–but what you’re describing sounds plausible, and is probably exactly what happened. I suspect the original beachhead of woke geeks actually did like the material and wanted to make gay, black, etc. versions, and then had more asabiyya than the white male geeks, who were always famous for getting into silly fights. ( I was reading some of the original issues of Dragon magazine back in the late 70s and a lot of the complaints in the letters section about Bakshi’s Lord of the Rings half-movie sound really similar to the Star Wars complaints today. Not to mention all the people writing in to tell them they had Cthulhu’s stats wrong.) So the wokies come in, serve on all the meetings as you say, run all the tracks, and before you know it–bang! The Hugo’s for women only.

    I actually ran into Annalee Newitz, the ‘they’ NYT tech columnist and woke sf writer, ages ago at Arisia (Boston sci-fi convention) in the mid-2000s, and she (I think that’s how ‘they’ identified back then) actually gave me a hug, unprompted, when I said I had read her writing on technology. (I was a complete stranger!) Funny to look back 15 years later and realize we’d be enemies now.

    The Jewish/nerd crossover’s quite large, and makes sense given Jewish cultural values. Also look at who wrote all the classic comic book characters–Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Bill Finger, etc. You could even claim this is an early example of the golem getting out of control, though I think Asimov and Co. actually liked spaceships and believed in reason and science.

    How much dorky boys would have loved to have girls into that stuff? Yeah, I thought about that quite a bit. Maybe once enough girls got in it stopped being interesting to boys and they went off to play video games instead. And, I mean, if you’re talking about nerd culture, video games are a really big deal. I suspect a lot of dorky boys went off to play (and eventually develop) video games and stopped being interested in literary sci-fi.

    Geeks and jocks, right and left–I’ve thought a lot about this. What I’ve actually found is that when you count up personality types, jocks lean right, artsy types lean left, and geeks are in the middle or on both sides–they’re leftier than jocks but rightier than artsy types. I mean, WTF do you call Ted Cruz, who makes Hitchhiker’s Guide jokes in judicial confirmation hearings and has a video where he turns the Constitution into a lighstaber? However, intellectual women lean left (they tend not to want kids or to want fewer because you can’t have sophisticated conversations with a three-year-old), and intellectual women are the most likely to overlook the geek’s other shortcomings. So I suspect some of these geek dudes may be, ah, p***y-whipped as they say. (There’s some evidence this may have happened to Paul Krugman of all people–he’s leaned further left over the years.)

    A lot more geeks are leaning right as feminists step up their attacks on geek culture though.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @SFG


    Funny to look back 15 years later and realize we’d be enemies now.
     
    "Your powers are weak, old Them"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kpHK4YIwY4

    When I first saw Star Wars I didn't understand a think about "lifetimes" or how old those guys were. Hundreds of years maybe?

  73. @Adept
    The Hugos are awarded not by a large community of readers, but by the few hundred attendees of WorldCon, an annual science fiction convention. Over the past 10 years, and especially since things kicked into overdrive around 2013, WorldCon has become extremely woke -- today it's about as woke as Tumblr. White men are hardly considered for any awards, even when it's richly deserved, and female PoCs are given a tremendous advantage... particularly if they're members of the woke WorldCon clique.

    Three things, however, need to be mentioned:

    First, nobody takes those awards seriously these days. And I mean nobody. They're too transparently woke; too obviously not awarded on basis of merit. This has gone far enough that even folks on normie discussion boards know that the awards are a sham.

    Second, the stuff that wins awards these days hardly sells. On amazon.com, it's always -- without exception -- outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF. And, of course, Asimov and Clarke still out-sell "Binti."

    Third, good SF is still being published. It's simply that the authors need to content themselves with money rather than with awards. (Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors -- Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky -- all happen to be British. Just about all of the woke stuff all comes from the US. This is indicative of something fairly rotten in America.)

    Replies: @personfellowindividual, @SFG, @Anon

    Ah, thank you! Good to know the old spirit’s still alive somewhere. How old are these fellows, though? I kind of feel like the younger generation of nerds is more into video games. (Which makes sense–you get to play with computers, and there’s all kinds of hacking and tinkering to do.)

    I was thinking about the whole space-travel thing, though. It seems more and more clear we’re not going to space (Bezos and Musk’s best efforts aside), and a lot of people’s vision of the future is more post-apocalyptic (zombie plagues and the like) than anything else. People are increasingly pessimistic about the future. And, I don’t blame them.

    (Like Karlin, I do believe in climate change/global warming, though it actually inclines me to the right–I favor an immigration moratorium and assimilation to keep the country in one piece to deal with the eventual flood of refugees from the south. And a wall if possible.)

  74. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    And continued reading what kind of fiction?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @JimDandy

    'And continued reading what kind of fiction?'

    The BBC, mostly.

  75. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    Old science fiction is good. I think new science fiction has lost a lot of it’s bite because we are more and more living a sci-fi reality. We are in the future after all. Now if I can only get Jenny Agutter beamed into my apartment.

  76. @personfellowindividual
    @Adept


    The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.
     
    I noticed that too. I used to have a stable of goto authors that I always knew would give me a good read, but that was a long time ago, back when Benford, Bear and Brin still had a decent output. It hasn't been true since the 90s though.

    Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book.
    Neal Asher has a large collection of great space-opera books. Highly recommended if you like more action-oriented stuff.
    Charles Stross is an excellent writer, although he is personally woke as hell. It's only become annoying to me in his more recent works.

    In any case, the dearth of readable stuff being created these days just means there's more time to catch up on the good books and authors from the past.

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @SunBakedSuburb

    Tim Powers is a great writer. Overlooked I think because his books have no real specific genre. He combines sci-fi, horror and fantasy w/out a care to a reader’s expectations. I’ve been enjoying the hell out of his two recent books that combine crime/thriller elements with espionage and the supernatural: Forced Perspectives and Alternate Routes. All his books are great and rewarding though. Intelligently written hocus-pocus. Great stuff.

  77. @SFG
    @Rob

    I wasn't there--the last convention I attended was in 2006 or so--but what you're describing sounds plausible, and is probably exactly what happened. I suspect the original beachhead of woke geeks actually did like the material and wanted to make gay, black, etc. versions, and then had more asabiyya than the white male geeks, who were always famous for getting into silly fights. ( I was reading some of the original issues of Dragon magazine back in the late 70s and a lot of the complaints in the letters section about Bakshi's Lord of the Rings half-movie sound really similar to the Star Wars complaints today. Not to mention all the people writing in to tell them they had Cthulhu's stats wrong.) So the wokies come in, serve on all the meetings as you say, run all the tracks, and before you know it--bang! The Hugo's for women only.

    I actually ran into Annalee Newitz, the 'they' NYT tech columnist and woke sf writer, ages ago at Arisia (Boston sci-fi convention) in the mid-2000s, and she (I think that's how 'they' identified back then) actually gave me a hug, unprompted, when I said I had read her writing on technology. (I was a complete stranger!) Funny to look back 15 years later and realize we'd be enemies now.

    The Jewish/nerd crossover's quite large, and makes sense given Jewish cultural values. Also look at who wrote all the classic comic book characters--Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Bill Finger, etc. You could even claim this is an early example of the golem getting out of control, though I think Asimov and Co. actually liked spaceships and believed in reason and science.

    How much dorky boys would have loved to have girls into that stuff? Yeah, I thought about that quite a bit. Maybe once enough girls got in it stopped being interesting to boys and they went off to play video games instead. And, I mean, if you're talking about nerd culture, video games are a really big deal. I suspect a lot of dorky boys went off to play (and eventually develop) video games and stopped being interested in literary sci-fi.

    Geeks and jocks, right and left--I've thought a lot about this. What I've actually found is that when you count up personality types, jocks lean right, artsy types lean left, and geeks are in the middle or on both sides--they're leftier than jocks but rightier than artsy types. I mean, WTF do you call Ted Cruz, who makes Hitchhiker's Guide jokes in judicial confirmation hearings and has a video where he turns the Constitution into a lighstaber? However, intellectual women lean left (they tend not to want kids or to want fewer because you can't have sophisticated conversations with a three-year-old), and intellectual women are the most likely to overlook the geek's other shortcomings. So I suspect some of these geek dudes may be, ah, p***y-whipped as they say. (There's some evidence this may have happened to Paul Krugman of all people--he's leaned further left over the years.)

    A lot more geeks are leaning right as feminists step up their attacks on geek culture though.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Funny to look back 15 years later and realize we’d be enemies now.

    “Your powers are weak, old Them”

    When I first saw Star Wars I didn’t understand a think about “lifetimes” or how old those guys were. Hundreds of years maybe?

  78. @Whereismyhandle
    @Wilkey

    "The writing is atrocious" applies to Asimov, though.

    Maybe he was a smart guy. Couldn't write his way out of a wet paper bag, though--any more than Heinlein could understand real human beings.

    Replies: @Hermes

    Asimov was a great non-fiction writer, and had good ideas, but didn’t really know how to tell a story.

    I will never understand the love Heinlein got for his dialogue. Some of the most unrealistic-sounding speech I’ve ever read. That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Hermes

    I haven’t read much Asimov, but what I have read I enjoyed.

    I really enjoy much of Heinlein’s work but some hasn’t aged well and as you mentioned “dirty old man”. He couldn’t help but insert his libido or kinks or quirks in his work. I think even Steve cracked years ago something to the effect, “In the typical Heinlein novel our protagonist is a young man who embarks on a great journey or gets in a jam and is helped by someone who just so happens to be a nudist or something”.

    A couple more rambles about Heinlein. He wrote a book, Tramp Royale, about a trip him and his wife took around the Southern Hemisphere in 1953-54. He hated New Zealand. He found the weather gray and dreary, multiple merchants shortchanged him money etc. He claimed he had a letter of introduction to a former Prime Minister but refused to meet him lest he badmouth his country. If the lists I’ve seen are accurate however, New Zealand had no living former PMs in 1953-54.

    Heinlein also wrote a short story about a vacation to the Soviet Union in which he claimed the USSR was fudging its census or reported birthrates. IIRC Greg Cochran or someone else read the same piece and called BS on Heinlein’s claims. I like Heinlein the writer but I suspect Heinlein the man was not particularly honest.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Hermes

    'That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.'

    Worse, a cynical dirty old man who gets the outrageously young and often perilously closely related female as his bed partner.

    ...or better, depending on how one looks at it. Farmham's Freehold is about the extreme. The love interest is young, cooperative, relaxed about side interests, fertile, and can play bridge. Hard to see how it could get better than that.

  79. At least it captured the zeitgeist of, “negotiate and interstellar peace treaty so that you can prove yourself worthy of the true objective: attending a prestigious college.”

  80. @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hey! The Mushroom Planet!! I didn't know anybody knew the Mushroom Planet!!! Wow!!!!

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    Ever so much more so!

  81. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    Science fiction can be enjoyed these days, but it must be read as satire (in the Jonathan Swift tradition).

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    You just need a dark sense of humor to appreciate it!

    • Replies: @Adept
    @Justvisiting


    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

     

    In fairness, that series is full of extensively gene-modded people who live on other planets, in the ocean, etc. That a certain ultra-wealthy African family would carry genetic modifications for increased IQ and executive function is one of the least implausible things about it.

    On the whole, contemporary white male British SF authors like Reynolds do pay lip-service to the modern religion, but that's usually as far as it goes. It's never as obnoxious as the vast majority of American SF...
    , @From Beer to Paternity
    @Justvisiting

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    Just so, but don't judge Alistair by those novels alone. He's just released another novel in his Revelation Space series and it's quite good (I'm ~71% through it).

    , @kaganovitch
    @Justvisiting

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.


    What, you never heard of Wakanda?

  82. @Anonymous
    It seems like sci fi has been going downhill since the late 80s. Sections in book stores getting smaller and smaller. Fantasy is not suffering this way, doing well.

    I don't think it's just the wokeness. But also maybe all the good plots have been done. Or perhaps we are finding the future is less exciting. Not as much of a Western in space. But just farting around on your computer. Which is typing, really!

    Feel like the end of the Cold War sort of coincided with the downfall of sci fi and wonder if some correlation. Sci fi in movies still doing well though.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    There were some great science fiction writers in the 1990s-2000s.

    Check our Robert Charles Wilson or Kage Baker novels for a start.

    Then there was Ted Chiang’s brilliant short story “The Story of Your Life” made into an equally stunning movie “The Arrival”.

    The Amazon reviews of “The Arrival” were hilarious.

    Half the reviewers were in total awe of its brilliance.

    Half had absolutely no idea what it was about and hated it!

  83. @Dan
    I am looking for agents to help market my science fiction novel THE CHRONOKINE but having no success. Possible reasons: maybe it’s not good enough, it’s about time travel by a white college student, it’s critical of communism. Working on an alternate history about a Compton gangbanger who crosses paths with OJ Simpson the night his ex-wife is murdered.

    Replies: @SFG

    Market yourself on dissident-right sites, gaming sites, anywhere young, right-leaning nerdy guys hang out?

    The Delicious Tacos guy apparently built himself up on his blog first, releasing (dirty) short-short stories.

    • Replies: @Dan
    @SFG

    Thanks for the suggestion.

  84. @Escher
    @Paperback Writer

    Soon enough Batman will be Chinese, with an Indian sidekick.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Catdompanj

    “Soon enough Batman will be Chinese”

    I think the Caped Crusader should be Slavic, and Gotham will be Kyiv, a city of violence and vice. Something has to be done because Steve ain’t hacking it as Batman.

  85. Anon[407] • Disclaimer says:
    @Adept
    The Hugos are awarded not by a large community of readers, but by the few hundred attendees of WorldCon, an annual science fiction convention. Over the past 10 years, and especially since things kicked into overdrive around 2013, WorldCon has become extremely woke -- today it's about as woke as Tumblr. White men are hardly considered for any awards, even when it's richly deserved, and female PoCs are given a tremendous advantage... particularly if they're members of the woke WorldCon clique.

    Three things, however, need to be mentioned:

    First, nobody takes those awards seriously these days. And I mean nobody. They're too transparently woke; too obviously not awarded on basis of merit. This has gone far enough that even folks on normie discussion boards know that the awards are a sham.

    Second, the stuff that wins awards these days hardly sells. On amazon.com, it's always -- without exception -- outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF. And, of course, Asimov and Clarke still out-sell "Binti."

    Third, good SF is still being published. It's simply that the authors need to content themselves with money rather than with awards. (Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors -- Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky -- all happen to be British. Just about all of the woke stuff all comes from the US. This is indicative of something fairly rotten in America.)

    Replies: @personfellowindividual, @SFG, @Anon

    On amazon.com, it’s always — without exception — outsold bigtime by self-published neo-pulp SF.

    Is any of this stuff any good? Any recommendations off the top of your head?

    Very interestingly, more English-language SF comes from the UK than the US. The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.

    Thanks for the names!

  86. @personfellowindividual
    @Adept


    The best living and active SF authors — Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter, Ken MacLeod, Peter Hamilton, Adrian Tchaikovsky — all happen to be British.
     
    I noticed that too. I used to have a stable of goto authors that I always knew would give me a good read, but that was a long time ago, back when Benford, Bear and Brin still had a decent output. It hasn't been true since the 90s though.

    Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book.
    Neal Asher has a large collection of great space-opera books. Highly recommended if you like more action-oriented stuff.
    Charles Stross is an excellent writer, although he is personally woke as hell. It's only become annoying to me in his more recent works.

    In any case, the dearth of readable stuff being created these days just means there's more time to catch up on the good books and authors from the past.

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Tim Powers is still good, and still puts out the occasional book.”

    Good writer and fun stories. Not SF, I wouldn’t say fantasy because that conjures tiresome images of elves and unicorns; speculative or weird are the best descriptors for his fiction. He had an interesting friendship with the enormously difficult Philip K. Dick whilst a younger man.

  87. @Justvisiting
    @Colin Wright

    Science fiction can be enjoyed these days, but it must be read as satire (in the Jonathan Swift tradition).

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology--now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    You just need a dark sense of humor to appreciate it!

    Replies: @Adept, @From Beer to Paternity, @kaganovitch

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    In fairness, that series is full of extensively gene-modded people who live on other planets, in the ocean, etc. That a certain ultra-wealthy African family would carry genetic modifications for increased IQ and executive function is one of the least implausible things about it.

    On the whole, contemporary white male British SF authors like Reynolds do pay lip-service to the modern religion, but that’s usually as far as it goes. It’s never as obnoxious as the vast majority of American SF…

  88. @guest007
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    From amazon

    Best Sellers Rank: #34,381 in Books
    #45 in Science Fiction Short Stories
    #880 in First Contact Science Fiction
    #1,004 in Alien Invasion Science Fiction
    Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings

    https://www.amazon.com/Binti-Nnedi-Okorafor/dp/0765385252/ref=asc_df_0765385252/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312195849562&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6291630222224926648&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9008124&hvtargid=pla-421988019325&psc=1

    This sounds like the type of books that a progressive English teacher assigns believing boys will be interested.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings’

    That’s probably a good example of what reader (or viewer) ratings are worth.

    I’ve learned — the hard way — to ignore the four-and-a-half stars, etc. What’s mildly troubling is that three-and-a-half stars will make one move on — and if the high ratings are worthless, perhaps the low ones are as well.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Colin Wright

    A humorous review of one star reviews of what are considered by many to be top novels.

    https://themorningnews.org/article/lone-star-statements

    I use the review of "The Sun Also Rises" as a way to describe many books. One of the Hugo Award winning novels A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine could be described using the same review except all of the dinners and drinks occur on another planet.

    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926)
    “Here’s the first half of the book: ‘We had dinner and a few drinks. We went to a cafe and talked and had some drinks. We ate dinner and had a few drinks. Dinner. Drinks. More dinner. More drinks. We took a cab here (or there) in Paris and had some drinks, and maybe we danced and flirted and talked sh*t about somebody. More dinner. More drinks. I love you, I hate you, maybe you should come up to my room, no you can’t’… I flipped through the second half of the book a day or two later and saw the words ‘dinner’ and ‘drinks’ on nearly every page and figured it wasn’t worth the risk.”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  89. @SFG
    @Wilkey

    Your wife is a bigger fan of the Foundation series than you? Where are you finding these right-wing geek women? (There's a very obscure, old Jonah Goldberg joke here--https://www.nationalreview.com/2003/06/column-doesnt-end-jonah-goldberg/)

    Foundation was written a while ago, and you're kind of stuck. The problem with old sci-fi is it dates awfully quickly. You could update the central idea with advanced AI that predicts human behavior, and then have the Mule show up as planned. I actually think a right-wing version of Foundation could work, with a bunch of conservatives trying to preserve the West's history from the woke multiculti onslaught, but who's going to write it?

    (Foundation's actually kind of conservative if you think about it, faith in social engineering and Asimov's personal politics aside--protecting the achievements of the past and all that. Notes to someone smarter than me. ;) )

    Ironically it's the far future and the names aren't supposed to correspond to any existing culture, so you could make them BIPOC if you wanted to. I mean, thousands of years in the future, who's to say Africa's not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all...

    Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to--just say Middle-Earth's a lot warmer and sunnier than Tolkien imagined it. But they'd have to *all* be black, given how the Shire is an isolated farming community. You want diversity, go to Lankhmar (or Waterdeep or Greyhawk City if you can sell Hasbro on the idea).

    What I'd say about the works you cite (GoT, Harry Potter, LoTR) is that they were all started before the Great Awokening, and couldn't be greenlighted today. I suspect one of the attractions of anime, particularly to young right-wingers, is the lack of politics and the fact that they all look white (though, of course, they're Japanese and there are no doubt Japanese political issues in there we're missing).

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Peter Akuleyev

    ‘…Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to–…’

    But who would identify with black hobbits?

    Seriously. Almost any work of literature has to provide characters one can identify with somehow for it to be enjoyable to read. Take War and Peace: most readers can imagine they’re either Pierre or Natasha. That’s half the reason the book works. Conversely, whatever others seem to have thought of it, I never could enjoy Breaking Bad. Primarily, it was because I didn’t like — and so wouldn’t identify with — any of the characters.

    Black hobbits? I can think of only one group who could identify as black hobbits — and they don’t read.

    • Replies: @Simon
    @Colin Wright

    Auden, a notable Tolkien fan, supposedly described hobbits as “pint-sized Englishmen.” (I love that line and think it gets hobbits exactly right, but — full disclosure — googling it turns up nothing.)

    Alan Allport, in his recent book Britain at Bay — basically a revisionist history of Britain’s entry into World War II, heavy on the debunking — spends a lot of time poking fun at what he calls the “Shire Folk” myth that he says dominates British thinking today about the war: the notion that Britons were basically a gentle, garden-loving people who, in their unworldliness, were maybe a bit slow to wake up to the German menace to the east. (Cf. the idyllic opening scenes of the first LOTR movie.)

    Whether one endorses that image or ridicules it, it’s certainly true that hobbits were, are, and always should be white.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  90. @inertial
    Hugo Awards have become pretty amazing since I last looked into them. The 2019 nominees for the Best Novel were four chicks, one tranny, and one Korean-American dude. In 2020 and 2021, all 12 nominees were chicks.

    I guess men don't write good sci-fi anymore.

    Replies: @inertial, @res

    Were you watching the Hugos when the Sad and Rabid Puppies movements were going? For a starting point.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Puppies

    Of course, here is how things ended.
    https://www.vox.com/2018/8/21/17763260/n-k-jemisin-hugo-awards-broken-earth-sad-puppies
    The Hugo Awards just made history, and defied alt-right extremists in the process

    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

    P.S. I do find it fascinating how a majority of men being nominated is irredeemably sexist, while ALL women being nominated is admirable progress.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @res

    Uncle Hugo's was a victim of last summer's peaceful protests:

    https://assets.change.org/photos/9/js/xv/rAJSxVrxNPpeMIJ-800x450-noPad.jpg?1590886603


    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EZhppjAWsAA674d.jpg

    , @kaganovitch
    @res

    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

    This is actually hilarious. They are treating their bureaucratic victory in packing the Hugo 'court' as artistic vindication. It has all the valence of " Monday the Politburo repudiated Trotskyite deviationism by approving General Secretary J. Stalin's latest pyatiletka."

  91. @Lurker
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    I've read a lot of scifi but these new fangled authors and themes . . . I wouldn't even pick them up to skim a few pages. In fact when I look at the shelves for new books I don't even notice them. Not sure if that's because I automatically dismiss them or because they're not actually on sale where I'm looking?

    I don't seem to see them for sale used IRL either.

    Replies: @res

    Not sure how accurate this 2018 SF all time sales list is (the 2020 version I saw looked less complete).
    https://thewertzone.blogspot.com/2018/12/the-sff-all-time-sales-list-revised.html

    An illustrative example.

    278) N.K. Jemisin (1 million+)
    Nora Jemisin’s three series (Inheritance, Dreamblood and The Broken Earth) have taken her past 1 million sales, with her profile and sales increasing noticeably after she won her third successive Hugo Award for Best Novel.

    • Thanks: El Dato
    • Replies: @guest007
    @res

    The list of science fiction mixes young adult fiction with Science fiction. They are really two very different categories. One does not find Twilight or Percy Jackson in the science fiction section of the book store, Amazon, or the library.

  92. @Elmer T. Jones
    African-American women in the Mississipi delta were known to eat clay during pregnancy, and on migrating north switched to corn starch as a substitute. Kaolin is an aluminosilicate clay that has long been used for medicinal purposes. Readers may be familiar with examples such as Kaopectate.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

  93. @Wilkey
    @From Beer to Paternity


    This forum may be the only place where this can be asked. Anyone seen the Apple TV treatment of Asimov’s Foundation trilogy? Sure, it’s got mega production value, but for pity’s sake, what’s up with the casting?
     
    It's bloody awful. The casting is atrocious and the writing is worse. I nearly had to stop my wife from throwing dishes at the television. She was a much bigger fan of the Foundation series than I ever was, but we're both ready to cancel our AppleTV and give up on it. They are over half way through the first season and not a damn thing has happened. They are sent to Terminus, they get to Terminus, they get about doing...something. Raych murders Hari Seldon for...reasons. There's some kind of ark that the people on Terminus aren't allowed to touch for...reasons. And then some halfwit tribe from a neighboring system comes to attack the people on Terminus for Seldon-only-knows-why.

    So that's it. We're six episodes into a ten episode season and all we've seen is a space elevator collapse, the Foundation move to Terminus, and one silly battle scene. Oh, and the emperor-in-training falls in love with a gardener who may possibly be the only attractive woman in the entire galaxy of 50 trillion people.

    The truth is that "Foundation" doesn't work as a TV series or movie, and probably never will. It covers too long a time period. It's too episodic. You'd have to get used to seeing brand new characters from one episode to the next. That is certainly doable. I would argue it could be great. But no producer wants to take that risk.

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well...don't they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future? Is that no longer a thing? Every person on every single one of the thousands of planets in the empire is going to forget how to tell time? Wikipedia has entire entries for individual characters from "The Simpsons" and individual episodes of "Star Trek," but the encyclopedia of the future doesn't have room to explain two different ways to tell time? Do sundials even work on planets in binary systems? And oh, wouldn't you be more worried about losing knowledge about, oh, how to build space ships that travel through space at FTL speeds? Just food for thought.

    I guess what happened is that the richest Woke corporation on the planet - whose executives are almost entirely white, BTW - was tossing around money like confetti and some producer went to them and said "Hey, we can do Foundation." And Apple said, "Can you include lots of blacks and trannies?" and the producer said "Sure thing," took Apple's zillion dollar check, and laughed his way to the bank.

    Lee Pace is decent as the emperor (although he was infiinitely better in Pushing Daisies). Jared Harris is OK as Seldon. The actress who plays Gaal Dornick is passable, at best, and the actre-thing who plays Salvor Hardin (I guess she is an "it") may actually be the worst lead on any TV show in all of history. Virtually every other second and third tier actor in the show is appallingly bad.

    The reality is that any artist with any integrity, no matter how far on the left he may be, is not going to be pushed around by studio demands for diversity. He may be fine with diversity. He may actively look for a diverse cast. He may even get a diverse cast. But he is not going to allow studio demands for diversity, or even his own desire for diversity, to get in the way of telling a great story and creating a successful show. Game of Thrones wasn't diverse. The original Star Wars trilogy had almost no minorities at all, and the first Star Wars movie had none. The Lord of the Rings was 100% white. The Hobbit (which also starred Lee Pace) had about 5 seconds of scenes that included black people, after someone twisted Peter Jackson's arm, but that was it. JK Rowling is very liberal, but none of the Harry Potter movies I've seen had anything but white leads.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @SFG, @raga10

    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well…don’t they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future?

    Well… maybe, but that one is on Asimov himself, not on the adaptation…

    I admit I’m actually enjoying Foundation. It probably helps that I never really read the books (I started reading but I never got into it… and that’s basically all I remember about the original). I do know that the female robot in the series is re-gendered Daneel R. Olivaw and the clone emperors are not a part of the original books at all… but I think they are one of the most interesting parts of the show, so I’m fine with them. I’m told the show added a lot of action-driven plots that didn’t exist in the books – if so, thank god for that! It would be one extremely boring show if it was just a straightforward adaptation.

    When it comes to screen adaptations I think most of the time not knowing the source material is really a blessing: you can just take what you see at face value. (I think that held for Game of Thrones as well, another opus that I never knew in its original book form)

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @raga10

    So far there's been about six hours worth of episodes. By the time you watch six hours of the Star Wars, Dark Knight, or LOTR trilogies you are done or nearly done with the entire thing. Six hours into GoT or Stranger Things they had told a lot of story and most of the audience was hooked. So far, six hours into Foundation, there's nothing in the series that seems all that promising.

  94. The thing is, science fiction writers and readers are a bunch of autists, but the worse kind of autists. They’re socially capable enough to feel the zeitgeist, but not capable enough to see through it, so they treat it like a prescription from an exact science textbook and go further with it than anybody else. See also: Thurnberg, Greta.

  95. @Pericles
    @Thomm

    This Thomm guy from customer support is unironically maintaining a list of wrongthinkers, as he admitted on Karlin's section a short while ago. ADL among us. Lol, watch out guys!

    Replies: @Thomm

    LOL! No matter how much you gaslight, the fact remains that you openly said you would rather have sex with a white man than a mulatto woman who looks like Halle Berry. Your admission of this is there for all to see.

    This is why we don’t let you pollute normal, heterosexual society.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Thomm

    Ah, the woman everyone wants to screw but nobody wants to live with.

    I'll denigrate no man for not wanting to screw crazy.

    Replies: @Thomm

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @inertial

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @Reg Cæsar, @EH

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    • Replies: @Whereismyhandle

    We see what the commenter did there.

  97. Science fiction writers have typically leaned left, but there was still a seriousness in their efforts. Le Guin’s proto-trans aliens in -Left Hand of Darkness- were nonetheless interesting and the interaction with humans was treated with respect and never preachy.

    Woke culture makes everything it touches really suck.

  98. ‘Science fiction writers have typically leaned left, but there was still a seriousness in their efforts. Le Guin’s proto-trans aliens in -Left Hand of Darkness- were nonetheless interesting and the interaction with humans was treated with respect and never preachy…’

    Ursula Le Guin illustrates all this right in one writer. The first part of her ouvre is, in retrospect, discernibly Left — but only occasionally overtly so. She was pretty good.

    Then she seems to have become a mighty warrioress for feminism — and became tedious.

    The same could be said of Scalzi. I read and enjoyed Old Man’s War, Redshirts…whatever.

    Then he became a standard-bearer for woke orthodoxy. I’m not about to read anything he’s written since.

    • Replies: @ErisGuy
    @Colin Wright

    but only occasionally overtly so

    Kennedy’ s assassination really threw her off. One of her characters in, IIRC, “Planet of Exile” was actually called Jon Kennedy (some alternative spelling).

  99. @Hermes
    @Whereismyhandle

    Asimov was a great non-fiction writer, and had good ideas, but didn't really know how to tell a story.

    I will never understand the love Heinlein got for his dialogue. Some of the most unrealistic-sounding speech I've ever read. That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.

    Replies: @Corn, @Colin Wright

    I haven’t read much Asimov, but what I have read I enjoyed.

    I really enjoy much of Heinlein’s work but some hasn’t aged well and as you mentioned “dirty old man”. He couldn’t help but insert his libido or kinks or quirks in his work. I think even Steve cracked years ago something to the effect, “In the typical Heinlein novel our protagonist is a young man who embarks on a great journey or gets in a jam and is helped by someone who just so happens to be a nudist or something”.

    A couple more rambles about Heinlein. He wrote a book, Tramp Royale, about a trip him and his wife took around the Southern Hemisphere in 1953-54. He hated New Zealand. He found the weather gray and dreary, multiple merchants shortchanged him money etc. He claimed he had a letter of introduction to a former Prime Minister but refused to meet him lest he badmouth his country. If the lists I’ve seen are accurate however, New Zealand had no living former PMs in 1953-54.

    Heinlein also wrote a short story about a vacation to the Soviet Union in which he claimed the USSR was fudging its census or reported birthrates. IIRC Greg Cochran or someone else read the same piece and called BS on Heinlein’s claims. I like Heinlein the writer but I suspect Heinlein the man was not particularly honest.

  100. The Chicago Tribune has called her the greatest SCIFi author of all time! The same news paper elected Dewey in 1948.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @flyingtiger

    I forgot to add that the Dewy wins paper considers her better than N.K. Jemison. Imagine that!

  101. As a kid I went from comics to science fiction to video games. Today’s kids jump straight to video games.

    It’s debatable whether the SJW takeover of comics and sci-fi is a cause, or consequence, of their decline.

  102. @Colin Wright
    @guest007

    'Customer Reviews: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839 ratings'

    That's probably a good example of what reader (or viewer) ratings are worth.

    I've learned -- the hard way -- to ignore the four-and-a-half stars, etc. What's mildly troubling is that three-and-a-half stars will make one move on -- and if the high ratings are worthless, perhaps the low ones are as well.

    Replies: @guest007

    A humorous review of one star reviews of what are considered by many to be top novels.

    https://themorningnews.org/article/lone-star-statements

    I use the review of “The Sun Also Rises” as a way to describe many books. One of the Hugo Award winning novels A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine could be described using the same review except all of the dinners and drinks occur on another planet.

    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926)
    “Here’s the first half of the book: ‘We had dinner and a few drinks. We went to a cafe and talked and had some drinks. We ate dinner and had a few drinks. Dinner. Drinks. More dinner. More drinks. We took a cab here (or there) in Paris and had some drinks, and maybe we danced and flirted and talked sh*t about somebody. More dinner. More drinks. I love you, I hate you, maybe you should come up to my room, no you can’t’… I flipped through the second half of the book a day or two later and saw the words ‘dinner’ and ‘drinks’ on nearly every page and figured it wasn’t worth the risk.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Hemingway explained in "A Movable Feast" that fine dining was ridiculously cheap in Paris in the 1920s due to the exchange rate. Hemingway liked to eat (and drink, of course).

    Replies: @guest007

  103. @res
    @Lurker

    Not sure how accurate this 2018 SF all time sales list is (the 2020 version I saw looked less complete).
    https://thewertzone.blogspot.com/2018/12/the-sff-all-time-sales-list-revised.html

    An illustrative example.


    278) N.K. Jemisin (1 million+)
    Nora Jemisin’s three series (Inheritance, Dreamblood and The Broken Earth) have taken her past 1 million sales, with her profile and sales increasing noticeably after she won her third successive Hugo Award for Best Novel.
     

    Replies: @guest007

    The list of science fiction mixes young adult fiction with Science fiction. They are really two very different categories. One does not find Twilight or Percy Jackson in the science fiction section of the book store, Amazon, or the library.

  104. @JimDandy
    @Colin Wright

    And continued reading what kind of fiction?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘And continued reading what kind of fiction?’

    The BBC, mostly.

  105. @Hermes
    @Whereismyhandle

    Asimov was a great non-fiction writer, and had good ideas, but didn't really know how to tell a story.

    I will never understand the love Heinlein got for his dialogue. Some of the most unrealistic-sounding speech I've ever read. That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.

    Replies: @Corn, @Colin Wright

    ‘That, and his practice of inserting a cynical dirty old man in every one of his works to serve as his mouthpiece.’

    Worse, a cynical dirty old man who gets the outrageously young and often perilously closely related female as his bed partner.

    …or better, depending on how one looks at it. Farmham’s Freehold is about the extreme. The love interest is young, cooperative, relaxed about side interests, fertile, and can play bridge. Hard to see how it could get better than that.

  106. @raga10
    @Wilkey


    And if the whole point of the Foundation is to collect knowledge well…don’t they have Wikipedia ~20,000 something years in the future?
     
    Well... maybe, but that one is on Asimov himself, not on the adaptation...

    I admit I'm actually enjoying Foundation. It probably helps that I never really read the books (I started reading but I never got into it... and that's basically all I remember about the original). I do know that the female robot in the series is re-gendered Daneel R. Olivaw and the clone emperors are not a part of the original books at all... but I think they are one of the most interesting parts of the show, so I'm fine with them. I'm told the show added a lot of action-driven plots that didn't exist in the books - if so, thank god for that! It would be one extremely boring show if it was just a straightforward adaptation.

    When it comes to screen adaptations I think most of the time not knowing the source material is really a blessing: you can just take what you see at face value. (I think that held for Game of Thrones as well, another opus that I never knew in its original book form)

    Replies: @Wilkey

    So far there’s been about six hours worth of episodes. By the time you watch six hours of the Star Wars, Dark Knight, or LOTR trilogies you are done or nearly done with the entire thing. Six hours into GoT or Stranger Things they had told a lot of story and most of the audience was hooked. So far, six hours into Foundation, there’s nothing in the series that seems all that promising.

  107. @Buffalo Joe
    And yes, I want to touch that hair.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Which hair?

  108. @Colin Wright
    This is why I stopped reading science fiction.

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Mike_from_SGV, @JimDandy, @duncsbaby, @Justvisiting, @Alfa158

    Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Alfa158

    'Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.'

    There are obvious problems -- but it seriously would work if one had a magazine in which only submissions in which the protagonist was a white male and no blacks appeared were accepted.

    If you can write a decent story, you can work within those parameters. If you can't, submit your work elsewhere. I can think of one Orson Scott Card story that would have to go, but generally...

    Replies: @Alfa158

  109. @Alfa158
    @Colin Wright

    Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.’

    There are obvious problems — but it seriously would work if one had a magazine in which only submissions in which the protagonist was a white male and no blacks appeared were accepted.

    If you can write a decent story, you can work within those parameters. If you can’t, submit your work elsewhere. I can think of one Orson Scott Card story that would have to go, but generally…

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps the highest literary quality sci-fi series was the late Gene Wolfe’s Urth of the New Sun books. I have read through them two or three times and eventually noticed that, based on the descriptions of the characters where provided, it appears that the far future humans seem to all be White. I’m a little surprised in retrospect that he never got any heat from that, but maybe I stopped reading sci-fi before he was denounced.

    Replies: @InnerCynic

  110. @res
    @inertial

    Were you watching the Hugos when the Sad and Rabid Puppies movements were going? For a starting point.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Puppies

    Of course, here is how things ended.
    https://www.vox.com/2018/8/21/17763260/n-k-jemisin-hugo-awards-broken-earth-sad-puppies
    The Hugo Awards just made history, and defied alt-right extremists in the process


    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

     

    P.S. I do find it fascinating how a majority of men being nominated is irredeemably sexist, while ALL women being nominated is admirable progress.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

    Uncle Hugo’s was a victim of last summer’s peaceful protests:


  111. @guest007
    @Colin Wright

    A humorous review of one star reviews of what are considered by many to be top novels.

    https://themorningnews.org/article/lone-star-statements

    I use the review of "The Sun Also Rises" as a way to describe many books. One of the Hugo Award winning novels A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine could be described using the same review except all of the dinners and drinks occur on another planet.

    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926)
    “Here’s the first half of the book: ‘We had dinner and a few drinks. We went to a cafe and talked and had some drinks. We ate dinner and had a few drinks. Dinner. Drinks. More dinner. More drinks. We took a cab here (or there) in Paris and had some drinks, and maybe we danced and flirted and talked sh*t about somebody. More dinner. More drinks. I love you, I hate you, maybe you should come up to my room, no you can’t’… I flipped through the second half of the book a day or two later and saw the words ‘dinner’ and ‘drinks’ on nearly every page and figured it wasn’t worth the risk.”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Hemingway explained in “A Movable Feast” that fine dining was ridiculously cheap in Paris in the 1920s due to the exchange rate. Hemingway liked to eat (and drink, of course).

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Yngvar

  112. @SFG
    @Dan

    Market yourself on dissident-right sites, gaming sites, anywhere young, right-leaning nerdy guys hang out?

    The Delicious Tacos guy apparently built himself up on his blog first, releasing (dirty) short-short stories.

    Replies: @Dan

    Thanks for the suggestion.

  113. @Justvisiting
    @Colin Wright

    Science fiction can be enjoyed these days, but it must be read as satire (in the Jonathan Swift tradition).

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology--now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    You just need a dark sense of humor to appreciate it!

    Replies: @Adept, @From Beer to Paternity, @kaganovitch

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    Just so, but don’t judge Alistair by those novels alone. He’s just released another novel in his Revelation Space series and it’s quite good (I’m ~71% through it).

  114. @Justvisiting
    @Colin Wright

    Science fiction can be enjoyed these days, but it must be read as satire (in the Jonathan Swift tradition).

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology--now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    You just need a dark sense of humor to appreciate it!

    Replies: @Adept, @From Beer to Paternity, @kaganovitch

    I was reading some Alistair Reynolds novels where this African family led the way in developing new technology–now _that_ is crazier than time loops and inter-dimensional travel and immortality.

    What, you never heard of Wakanda?

  115. @res
    @inertial

    Were you watching the Hugos when the Sad and Rabid Puppies movements were going? For a starting point.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Puppies

    Of course, here is how things ended.
    https://www.vox.com/2018/8/21/17763260/n-k-jemisin-hugo-awards-broken-earth-sad-puppies
    The Hugo Awards just made history, and defied alt-right extremists in the process


    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

     

    P.S. I do find it fascinating how a majority of men being nominated is irredeemably sexist, while ALL women being nominated is admirable progress.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @kaganovitch

    N.K. Jemisin’s third consecutive win in the Hugo Awards repudiates extremist voters who’ve spent years trying to keep her from winning.

    This is actually hilarious. They are treating their bureaucratic victory in packing the Hugo ‘court’ as artistic vindication. It has all the valence of ” Monday the Politburo repudiated Trotskyite deviationism by approving General Secretary J. Stalin’s latest pyatiletka.”

    • Agree: res
  116. @El Dato
    @obwandiyag

    Why not get busy with the classics?

    https://www.amazon.com/Stand-Zanzibar-Hugo-Award-Winning-Novel/dp/0765326787

    Replies: @Simon

    Yes, let me second the motion. Science fiction was, long ago, my go-to genre; I read a lot of it, and the best novel I read was Brunner’s Stand on Zanzibar.

  117. @Colin Wright
    @SFG

    '...Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to–...'

    But who would identify with black hobbits?

    Seriously. Almost any work of literature has to provide characters one can identify with somehow for it to be enjoyable to read. Take War and Peace: most readers can imagine they're either Pierre or Natasha. That's half the reason the book works. Conversely, whatever others seem to have thought of it, I never could enjoy Breaking Bad. Primarily, it was because I didn't like -- and so wouldn't identify with -- any of the characters.

    Black hobbits? I can think of only one group who could identify as black hobbits -- and they don't read.

    Replies: @Simon

    Auden, a notable Tolkien fan, supposedly described hobbits as “pint-sized Englishmen.” (I love that line and think it gets hobbits exactly right, but — full disclosure — googling it turns up nothing.)

    Alan Allport, in his recent book Britain at Bay — basically a revisionist history of Britain’s entry into World War II, heavy on the debunking — spends a lot of time poking fun at what he calls the “Shire Folk” myth that he says dominates British thinking today about the war: the notion that Britons were basically a gentle, garden-loving people who, in their unworldliness, were maybe a bit slow to wake up to the German menace to the east. (Cf. the idyllic opening scenes of the first LOTR movie.)

    Whether one endorses that image or ridicules it, it’s certainly true that hobbits were, are, and always should be white.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Simon

    '...Whether one endorses that image or ridicules it, it’s certainly true that hobbits were, are, and always should be white.'

    It's making me smile to imagine hobbits who actually act like they're black -- as opposed to merely being portrayed by (half) black actors.

    It could be interesting. We could root for the Orcs.

  118. @Escher
    @Paperback Writer

    Soon enough Batman will be Chinese, with an Indian sidekick.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Catdompanj

    Yup, Bruce Wuhan and his ward Sikh Grayson.

  119. @obwandiyag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hey! The Mushroom Planet!! I didn't know anybody knew the Mushroom Planet!!! Wow!!!!

    Hey, do you know Homer Price?

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Wow, Danny Dunn and Homer Price. I’m flashing back to my youth!

    IIRC, a black kid found the missing bracelet in the doughnut. He may have been the first black character in any book I had read to that point.

  120. @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Hemingway explained in "A Movable Feast" that fine dining was ridiculously cheap in Paris in the 1920s due to the exchange rate. Hemingway liked to eat (and drink, of course).

    Replies: @guest007

    Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @guest007

    'Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.'

    That's something. Maybe it's just because I'm outrageously cheap (but then, I 'm not broke, either), but I always find myself wondering, 'don't these people care how much it will cost?'

    I mean, on the rare occasions I buy something without checking to see how much it costs, I generally discover I've made a mistake. Always ask how much it will cost.

    But then, maybe I'm just cheap.

    , @Yngvar
    @guest007

    Picasso paid for his considerable café bills by doodling and signing the paper napkins and selling them for a couple of bucks to extremely happy American tourists. It's said.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  121. @Thomm
    @Pericles

    LOL! No matter how much you gaslight, the fact remains that you openly said you would rather have sex with a white man than a mulatto woman who looks like Halle Berry. Your admission of this is there for all to see.

    This is why we don't let you pollute normal, heterosexual society.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Ah, the woman everyone wants to screw but nobody wants to live with.

    I’ll denigrate no man for not wanting to screw crazy.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Brutusale

    But that was not the question.

    The question was, would the White Nationalists that the question is posed to prefer a white man over the most attractive black or mulatto woman in the world. Most either chose the white man, or refused to say what a heterosexual would say and instead filibustered forever.

    Display the answers (across the 12+ WNs this was posed to) to *any* group of normal, heterosexual people and they will all draw the correct conclusion from the evidence. At least Pericles admitted it openly, so on one level he is more honest than the others.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  122. @Colin Wright
    Ironically, as a member of the Igbo (Nigeria), Missy would presumably have almost no cultural familiarity with the Himba (Namibia). It's as if I wrote a novel in which the protagonist was a Hutsul on the grounds that we're both white.

    The sheer idiocy is overwhelming.

    Replies: @Truth

    Ironically, as a member of the Igbo (Nigeria), Missy would presumably have almost no cultural familiarity with the Himba (Namibia). It’s as if I wrote a novel in which the protagonist was a Hutsul on the grounds that we’re both white.

    Yeah, or if Philip Roth wrote a novel with gentiles in it!

  123. @Brutusale
    @Thomm

    Ah, the woman everyone wants to screw but nobody wants to live with.

    I'll denigrate no man for not wanting to screw crazy.

    Replies: @Thomm

    But that was not the question.

    The question was, would the White Nationalists that the question is posed to prefer a white man over the most attractive black or mulatto woman in the world. Most either chose the white man, or refused to say what a heterosexual would say and instead filibustered forever.

    Display the answers (across the 12+ WNs this was posed to) to *any* group of normal, heterosexual people and they will all draw the correct conclusion from the evidence. At least Pericles admitted it openly, so on one level he is more honest than the others.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Thomm

    You've still got a hardon for this dead horse, I see.

  124. At least Pericles admitted it openly, so on one level he is more honest than the others.

    LOL

    Hey Perry, I didn’t get to see that post, do you mind admitting it one more time, just for my sense of curiosity?

  125. Check the Dragon Awards. They seem to be still free from the woke. The last 6 years have had White men winners.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Awards#Best_Science_Fiction_Novel

    This years award went to:

    Project Hail Mary is a 2021 science fiction novel by Andy Weir. It is his third novel, after 2011’s The Martian, and 2017’s Artemis. Set in the near future, the novel centers on junior high (middle) school-teacher-turned-astronaut Ryland Grace, who wakes up from a coma afflicted with amnesia. He gradually remembers that he was sent to the Tau Ceti solar system, 12 light-years from Earth, to find a means of reversing a solar dimming event that could cause the extinction of humanity.[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Hail_Mary

  126. @Thomm
    @Brutusale

    But that was not the question.

    The question was, would the White Nationalists that the question is posed to prefer a white man over the most attractive black or mulatto woman in the world. Most either chose the white man, or refused to say what a heterosexual would say and instead filibustered forever.

    Display the answers (across the 12+ WNs this was posed to) to *any* group of normal, heterosexual people and they will all draw the correct conclusion from the evidence. At least Pericles admitted it openly, so on one level he is more honest than the others.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    You’ve still got a hardon for this dead horse, I see.

  127. @Colin Wright
    What I find really tedious is all the male authors trying to prolong their careers by writing stories with female protagonists.

    Since, as a rule, most writers can't portray the opposite gender very well, it doesn't work out.

    ...and 'blacks' who aren't black in any detectable way. I hit that and the read is over. Of course, by this point, I can't see myself putting up with a black in the story in any capacity -- and if the protagonist is female, the author better be as well.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    John Norman writes great female characters. He understands what women want.

    • LOL: InnerCynic
    • Replies: @InnerCynic
    @flyingtiger

    At one time, back in the early 80s, I had all of the Gor books. Then it hit me that it was all just softcore sci-fi porn. Sigh! But the old Boris Valejo artwork appealed to my hormonal youth.

  128. @Simon
    @Colin Wright

    Auden, a notable Tolkien fan, supposedly described hobbits as “pint-sized Englishmen.” (I love that line and think it gets hobbits exactly right, but — full disclosure — googling it turns up nothing.)

    Alan Allport, in his recent book Britain at Bay — basically a revisionist history of Britain’s entry into World War II, heavy on the debunking — spends a lot of time poking fun at what he calls the “Shire Folk” myth that he says dominates British thinking today about the war: the notion that Britons were basically a gentle, garden-loving people who, in their unworldliness, were maybe a bit slow to wake up to the German menace to the east. (Cf. the idyllic opening scenes of the first LOTR movie.)

    Whether one endorses that image or ridicules it, it’s certainly true that hobbits were, are, and always should be white.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘…Whether one endorses that image or ridicules it, it’s certainly true that hobbits were, are, and always should be white.’

    It’s making me smile to imagine hobbits who actually act like they’re black — as opposed to merely being portrayed by (half) black actors.

    It could be interesting. We could root for the Orcs.

  129. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Yngvar

    ‘Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.’

    That’s something. Maybe it’s just because I’m outrageously cheap (but then, I ‘m not broke, either), but I always find myself wondering, ‘don’t these people care how much it will cost?’

    I mean, on the rare occasions I buy something without checking to see how much it costs, I generally discover I’ve made a mistake. Always ask how much it will cost.

    But then, maybe I’m just cheap.

  130. @Colin Wright
    @Alfa158

    'Dropped my subscription to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy after fifty years when I realized the only readable fiction still in it was the occasional story published by an eighty year old White guy who started writing after he retired.'

    There are obvious problems -- but it seriously would work if one had a magazine in which only submissions in which the protagonist was a white male and no blacks appeared were accepted.

    If you can write a decent story, you can work within those parameters. If you can't, submit your work elsewhere. I can think of one Orson Scott Card story that would have to go, but generally...

    Replies: @Alfa158

    Perhaps the highest literary quality sci-fi series was the late Gene Wolfe’s Urth of the New Sun books. I have read through them two or three times and eventually noticed that, based on the descriptions of the characters where provided, it appears that the far future humans seem to all be White. I’m a little surprised in retrospect that he never got any heat from that, but maybe I stopped reading sci-fi before he was denounced.

    • Replies: @InnerCynic
    @Alfa158

    Gene had some really dense text to wade through. You had to pay attention

  131. @flyingtiger
    @Colin Wright

    John Norman writes great female characters. He understands what women want.

    Replies: @InnerCynic

    At one time, back in the early 80s, I had all of the Gor books. Then it hit me that it was all just softcore sci-fi porn. Sigh! But the old Boris Valejo artwork appealed to my hormonal youth.

  132. @Alfa158
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps the highest literary quality sci-fi series was the late Gene Wolfe’s Urth of the New Sun books. I have read through them two or three times and eventually noticed that, based on the descriptions of the characters where provided, it appears that the far future humans seem to all be White. I’m a little surprised in retrospect that he never got any heat from that, but maybe I stopped reading sci-fi before he was denounced.

    Replies: @InnerCynic

    Gene had some really dense text to wade through. You had to pay attention

  133. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    Hemingway was probably not footing the bill for all of the dinners and drinks either. Many of the arts types find a way to sticking others with the bills.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Yngvar

    Picasso paid for his considerable café bills by doodling and signing the paper napkins and selling them for a couple of bucks to extremely happy American tourists. It’s said.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Yngvar

    'Picasso paid for his considerable café bills by doodling and signing the paper napkins and selling them for a couple of bucks to extremely happy American tourists. It’s said.'

    That sounds like a singularly happy arrangement. Everyone gets what they want, and nobody gets hurt.

    Capitalism in it's ideal form. Amusingly, though, wasn't Picasso at least in principle a Communist?

  134. @flyingtiger
    The Chicago Tribune has called her the greatest SCIFi author of all time! The same news paper elected Dewey in 1948.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    I forgot to add that the Dewy wins paper considers her better than N.K. Jemison. Imagine that!

  135. @SFG
    @Wilkey

    Your wife is a bigger fan of the Foundation series than you? Where are you finding these right-wing geek women? (There's a very obscure, old Jonah Goldberg joke here--https://www.nationalreview.com/2003/06/column-doesnt-end-jonah-goldberg/)

    Foundation was written a while ago, and you're kind of stuck. The problem with old sci-fi is it dates awfully quickly. You could update the central idea with advanced AI that predicts human behavior, and then have the Mule show up as planned. I actually think a right-wing version of Foundation could work, with a bunch of conservatives trying to preserve the West's history from the woke multiculti onslaught, but who's going to write it?

    (Foundation's actually kind of conservative if you think about it, faith in social engineering and Asimov's personal politics aside--protecting the achievements of the past and all that. Notes to someone smarter than me. ;) )

    Ironically it's the far future and the names aren't supposed to correspond to any existing culture, so you could make them BIPOC if you wanted to. I mean, thousands of years in the future, who's to say Africa's not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all...

    Thing is, you could have black hobbits if you wanted to--just say Middle-Earth's a lot warmer and sunnier than Tolkien imagined it. But they'd have to *all* be black, given how the Shire is an isolated farming community. You want diversity, go to Lankhmar (or Waterdeep or Greyhawk City if you can sell Hasbro on the idea).

    What I'd say about the works you cite (GoT, Harry Potter, LoTR) is that they were all started before the Great Awokening, and couldn't be greenlighted today. I suspect one of the attractions of anime, particularly to young right-wingers, is the lack of politics and the fact that they all look white (though, of course, they're Japanese and there are no doubt Japanese political issues in there we're missing).

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Peter Akuleyev

    I mean, thousands of years in the future, who’s to say Africa’s not ahead of Europe? Egypt was the most advanced civilization around for a while, after all…

    Thousands of years in the future skin color will almost certainly have very little obvious relation to African or European ancestry. Any more than you can pick out a Sumerian from a Yamnaya in a crowd today. Moreover, presumably humans living on a foreign planet will evolve to adapt to that planet, which will completely obscure any racial features relating to contemporary humans. That is one thing science fiction almost invariably gets wrong, or ignores.

  136. @Steve Sailer
    @inertial

    As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle, @Reg Cæsar, @EH

    “As Heinlein noticed in the 1950s, sex changes are basically a science fiction story come to life. ”

    Not sure if you mean the Martians in Red Planet (’49), who were all female before adulthood, then reprised in Stranger in a Strange Land in ’61 – but both times were pretty much in passing, er, so to speak. There was also one short story where a hermaphrodite with the aid of a time machine became his own grandpa, referencing a joke song of the era, but not technically a sex change.

    His main sex-change plot was possibly his worst book, I Will Fear No Evil in ’70, when he was suffering from blocked arteries to his brain. His later, sexually depraved work in the ’80s also had only one sex change that I can recall, Andrew Jackson Libby, one of his earliest characters, for no good reason, also just in passing.

  137. @Yngvar
    @guest007

    Picasso paid for his considerable café bills by doodling and signing the paper napkins and selling them for a couple of bucks to extremely happy American tourists. It's said.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Picasso paid for his considerable café bills by doodling and signing the paper napkins and selling them for a couple of bucks to extremely happy American tourists. It’s said.’

    That sounds like a singularly happy arrangement. Everyone gets what they want, and nobody gets hurt.

    Capitalism in it’s ideal form. Amusingly, though, wasn’t Picasso at least in principle a Communist?

  138. @Mike Tre
    @Bill in Glendale

    My wife graduated Rich East in 1989. The school was closed a few years ago. And they are shipping the students west into the Lincoln Way school district. In 10 years New Lenox and Frankfort and Mokena will be lost. Tinley Park and Oak Forest are already lost. Lagrange Blvd through Orland used to be a great place for dinner and drinks but now the mall and everywhere else is infested with negroes and they pretty much ruin any attempt to enjoy a night out.

    Replies: @Bill in Glendale

    Hated Rich East. Too much green.

  139. Namibia is an amazing place. Ive done quite a few 4×4 trips there. It’s very empty and very beautiful. It’s more than twice as big as Germany and has a population of 2.5 million.

    Google image search the areas Marienfluss, Etosha pan, Caprivi strip.

    It really is magnificent.

  140. @Colin Wright
    'Science fiction writers have typically leaned left, but there was still a seriousness in their efforts. Le Guin’s proto-trans aliens in -Left Hand of Darkness- were nonetheless interesting and the interaction with humans was treated with respect and never preachy...'

    Ursula Le Guin illustrates all this right in one writer. The first part of her ouvre is, in retrospect, discernibly Left -- but only occasionally overtly so. She was pretty good.

    Then she seems to have become a mighty warrioress for feminism -- and became tedious.

    The same could be said of Scalzi. I read and enjoyed Old Man's War, Redshirts...whatever.

    Then he became a standard-bearer for woke orthodoxy. I'm not about to read anything he's written since.

    Replies: @ErisGuy

    but only occasionally overtly so

    Kennedy’ s assassination really threw her off. One of her characters in, IIRC, “Planet of Exile” was actually called Jon Kennedy (some alternative spelling).

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Becker update V1.3.2
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