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Here’s an interesting article in the Washington Post by Kent Babb about the NFL Dallas Cowboys’ team fixer, a big black ex-cop and ex-bail bondsman who is on friendly terms with everybody who works at the courthouse in Dallas. He gets paid by the Cowboys to make drunk driving and domestic violence arrests of Cowboy football players disappear before they get into the newspapers.

He is, like the “Pulp Fiction” character Winston Wolf [played by Harvey Keitel], a fixer who exists on the margins and functions without ceremony. He considers the angles, contemplates the ifs, solves the most complicated problems. No wonder the Cowboys, known for acquiring players on their second or third chances, have come to trust Wells implicitly with their most valuable and unpredictable assets. Whatever route a player is trying to find through the system — from simple help with a driver’s license to thorny entanglements involving criminal charges — there’s always one more option to help find a way: Call in the Wolf.

“I haven’t had a question that Dave couldn’t answer, I can tell you that,” said Adam “Pacman” Jones, the Bengals cornerback.

“Whenever something is messed up and you need to go outside the lines a little bit,” former Kaufman County, Tex., district attorney Rick Harrison said, “he’s your guy.”

“A tremendous asset to the franchise,” Jerry Jones said. “. . . I won’t get into detail of the kinds of things [Wells does], because he does everything.” …

Said longtime attorney Anthony Lyons: “There are going to be times that David comes up with a result that you’re just not going to ask him about.” …

Almost nothing is as valuable to an NFL front office as discretion, nothing as threatening to a season or brand as a “distraction.” Forbes says the Cowboys are worth $4.2 billion, a value that in part depends on the team’s ability to keep star players on the field, contend for championships and maintain its global popularity. For every incident that generates a negative headline, Wells said, 10 are handled without the public’s knowledge.

Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

 
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  1. It’s interesting that the guy went back to Pulp Fiction for his example (of covering up a homicide, btw). There are two current examples of fixers in Showtime shows. Ray Donovan, and Billions.

    I’m not sure this means there’s another order of magnitude of incidents though. Dallas has long had a particularly trashy team in contrast with, say, the New York Giants. The Giants have generally had a low tolerance for off-the-field nonsense, quickly cutting players that embarrass them. Whether that’s due to the character of the owners or the higher visibility of being in a media capital, I don’t know.

    • Replies: @SFG
    If a fixer's doing his job right, you shouldn't hear about him.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    There seems to be a real layer of sleaze in Dallas, of the rich asshole who can get out of anything variety. I had the misfortune of rooming with one and he bragged constantly about how much money talked there. This was around the time of its heyday as the Ecstasy capital.
  2. Steve, you haven’t blogged yet about the Rams return to LA. What are you thoughts? Do you support the return? Are you a Rams fan?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Back in Roman Gabriel's days ...
  3. I would venture that Mr. Wolf acts mainly as a conduit through which sufficient hush money is funneled to the potential plaintiffs (and others) to make them “forget” the incident.

    • Replies: @TheJester
    Exactly my thoughts: "Hush" money, especially for savagery associated with sexual assaults, spousal abuse, drunk driving, wild parties, drug use, doping. But who gets the "hush" money to motivate people (including the media and authorities) to look the other way? The victims, victim's relatives, media reporters, cops on the beat, the friendly sergeant at the station house? Money talks. I'm reminded of how easily JFK over his life avoided publicity about his sexual misadventures and how easily Michael Jackson was able to avoid being charged with pedophilia.

    We're acquainted with a "fixer" in our local community ... although her specialty is "damage control" over industrial accidents and deaths to avoid negative publicity for clients ranging from local businesses to major corporations. It's fascinating to hear her talk about it.

    We occasionally meet for lunch. She gives us the rundown on the latest industrial accidents and deaths in the community. Yes, we're always surprised; one in ten appears in the media! She brings together victims (if they survive), victim's relatives, insurance companies, management, cleanup crews. She is responsible for drafting statements to the media when necessary. Her objective is to get things back to normal with as little damage as quickly as possible. She is very good at it.

    The strangest thing is that our friend is always busy. Sometimes our lunches are short. She has to get back to the scene. The bottom line is that "fixing" works.

    , @Connecticut Famer
    Makes sense. Money is the ultimate lubricant.
  4. ‘..and the sons of gods did sport merrily on the Earth in those days…they found the daughters of men fair, and knew them, they begot the heroes of ancient times…’

    • Replies: @5371
    Sporting but not much begetting here, I'll warrant.
    , @Truth
    Possibly the most controversial, most debated passage in the English language...
  5. @Anonymous
    Steve, you haven't blogged yet about the Rams return to LA. What are you thoughts? Do you support the return? Are you a Rams fan?

    Back in Roman Gabriel’s days …

    • Replies: @David In TN
    "Back in Roman Gabriel's days..."

    I fell in love with the 1967 Rams (Gabriel, Jack Snow, Bernie Casey and a great defense) and rooted for them until around 1980. They were one of the most frustrating teams of all time, innumerable playoff disasters and only one Super Bowl appearance during the period.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Still not sure why the Rams "need" a new stadium. Let them play in the Coliseum or in Westwood at the Rose Bowl. The Rose Bowl still has the attendance record for most fans to watch a Super Bowl (XIV) live.

    Just add some additional luxury boxes to the Rose Bowl, and you're all set. Nice area, perhaps the Rams could have a working agreement to use UCLA's onsite training facilities until they build their own.
  6. Sad anthropological observation: this guy is basically a substitute dad.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Sad anthropological observation: this guy is basically a substitute dad."

    No, he's serving a niche market. Who says blacks can't be entrepreneurs?
    , @Anonymous
    not a substitute dad, substitute loser infected with greed and willing to sell his mother or sister if it makes money for him.
  7. @Anonymous
    '..and the sons of gods did sport merrily on the Earth in those days...they found the daughters of men fair, and knew them, they begot the heroes of ancient times...'

    Sporting but not much begetting here, I’ll warrant.

  8. There is a female free agent fixer who works for NFL players. It sounds like she has a good gig going, and stays very busy.

    Interesting lady.

    http://www.mensjournal.com/magazine/the-woman-who-bails-out-the-nfls-bad-boys-20141114

  9. It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks — that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true — can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    • Replies: @Keith Vaz
    There are soooooo many White students harshly treated by schools simply to equalize exclusion rates. It's certain that were both races dealt fairly by the leftist NMCWLs the exclusion rates for blacks would be astronomical.
    , @Blobby5
    Here is one example of equalization of discipline in Syracuse schools. They brought a lady in from Baltimore to straighten out the local schools. Hijinx ensue...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oReuETjnjXw
    , @NOTA
    College and pro sports stars aren't a big enough fraction of the population to matter. And a low clearance rate of murders in the black ghetto may decrease the number of blacks in jail for murder, but it's not a policy that favors blacks--the murder victims in the ghetto are almost all black, just like the murderers.
    , @yarwey

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.
     
    My high was about 20% black. Racial fistfights would often breakout. It was usually but not always, blacks who started it. The school's policy - for interracial fights only - was to suspend both students, no matter who the aggressor.
    , @Gringo
    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true — can someone supply supporting evidence?)

    Courtesy of NPR, you can type in the name of a city to find out clearance rates: How Many Crimes Do Your Police 'Clear'? Now You Can Find Out. Hint: when there is more than one listing for a city, look for Municipal Police.

    Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, Clearance Rate
    Detroit 34% in 2014
    Camden NJ 42% in 2014
    New Orleans 43% in 2014
    Baltimore 45% in 2014
    St. Louis 45% in 2014
    Newark NJ 49% in 2014
    Philadelphia 59% in 2014
    Oakland 63% in 2014 [34% in 2013]
    Atlanta 65% in 2014
    Houston 71% in 2014
    New York City 71% in 2014

     
    The clearance rate for murders in Chicago is not listed at the NPR website, but it was 26% in 2015, and below 30% since 2009. There are some indications that the clearance rate for Baltimore murders has done down recently. Surprise, surprise. The nationwide clearance rate for murder is about 65%.

    Summary: there are a fair number of cities with a lot of black murders with below average clearance rates, but there are also some cities with a lot of black murders with clearance rates around the national average.
  10. The incoming state rep for Ferguson Missouri just accused an incoming state rep for a St Louis district of rape.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ferguson-attorney-accuses-fellow-state-house-candidate-rape-article-1.2813957

    They are both light-skinned blacks and both certain to win as they are in safe democratic seats and already won their primaries.

  11. Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

    I am really looking forward to the Chargers leaving San Diego after we vote this November against raising taxes by $600 million to build them a new stadium.

  12. “I haven’t had a question that Dave couldn’t answer, I can tell you that,” said Adam “Pacman” Jones, the Bengals cornerback.

    Seems like it was just yesterday when Pacman Jones was “being rebellion” and beating up women at “scrip” clubs. (LINK) (LINK)

    “A tremendous asset to the franchise,” Jerry Jones said. “. . . I won’t get into detail of the kinds of things [Wells does], because he does everything.” …

    Jerry is not going to be around forever folks; treasure him while he is still here.

  13. Keith Vaz [AKA "Sir Charles Pipkins"] says:
    @Beliavsky
    It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks -- that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true -- can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    There are soooooo many White students harshly treated by schools simply to equalize exclusion rates. It’s certain that were both races dealt fairly by the leftist NMCWLs the exclusion rates for blacks would be astronomical.

  14. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    When the Cowboys unleash the Wolf, for instance if a player is arrested for drunken driving, Wells’s instructions often begin the same way: Do what the officers tell you — but say nothing.

    From there Wells begins the paperwork on the player’s behalf for a restricted occupational license and learns the name of the presiding judge. He already knows the lawyers who are cozy with his or her honor. “I hate to say this,” Wells says. “I know who to hire based on what that relationship is.”

    He hasn’t made the drunk driving arrest disappear … just mitigated the damages.

    In the suburbs, we actually have strict law and order. Plenty of police and not much crime. The players strike me as clueless regarding how to let their privilege work for them — instead of attracting publicity that negates their advantages.

    It’s a good article.

    Here is the white man version from the movie Michael Clayton:

    Favorite line: The smaller the mess, the easier it is to clean up

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    The jerk client reminds me so much of Anthony Weiner. I wonder if Huma threw crockery like that.
    , @Busby
    Good point. This is nothing like the infamous fixers of Hollywood's Golden Age who actually made scandals disappear. As a resident of north Texas, we know about all these incidents if there is an arrest or injury to a civilian.
    Sports writing is a funny business. In the old days it was struggling blue collar scribblers writing about struggling blue collar players. There was lots of bad behavior that went unremarked because of the shared background and values. What values does an educated middle class sports writer have in common with a sports professional who earns more money in a month than most writers earn in a year.
    If you want to experience culture shock, reread Ball Four by Jim Bouton.
    , @Neoconned
    Michael Clayton is one of my favorite films ever. Clooney had a nice hot streak from 07- 2012 or so and then he went mediocre.

    Clayton, Up in the Air, the American, Idea of March etc were some of my favorite films of the past ten years.
  15. Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

    More than one study has found that NFL players have a lower rate of arrests than the general population of males in their 20s and 30s. Obviously the unreported arrests weren’t taken into account.

    And this research relies on media reports to determine how many players are arrested. But that may understate the actual number of arrests in the NFL because it’s possible that some players’ arrests are never reported.

    Add it all up, and it’s not so clear that NFL players break the law any less often than American men as a whole. It may be more a matter of NFL players doing a better job of making their problems go away before an arrest hits the news. Especially if they’re taking Cris Carter’s advice.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/08/28/crime-rate-among-nfl-players-is-relatively-low-with-some-caveats/

    Cris Carter’s advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I would imagine that NFL players talk their way out of drunk driving arrests a lot.

    My cousin who had been merely a minor league baseball player, but was a big charismatic guy, talked his way out of a lot of tickets when we shared an apartment.

    , @antipater_1
    "Cris Carter’s advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player."

    Unfortunately for Chris Carter, his advice about fall guys is what probably got him canned at ESPN.
    , @dr kill
    Is that you, Ray Lewis?
  16. But does he like his coffee with “lotsa cream and lotsa sugar”?

  17. sounds like some sort of privilege to me, along with taking a knee for the anthem ,can we stop watching now.

  18. And who here believes that your [team name] has rosters that are substantially different?

    Renounced this stupid, sordid diversion decades ago. You’ll never miss it, either.

  19. @Triumph104
    Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

    More than one study has found that NFL players have a lower rate of arrests than the general population of males in their 20s and 30s. Obviously the unreported arrests weren't taken into account.

    And this research relies on media reports to determine how many players are arrested. But that may understate the actual number of arrests in the NFL because it’s possible that some players’ arrests are never reported.

    Add it all up, and it’s not so clear that NFL players break the law any less often than American men as a whole. It may be more a matter of NFL players doing a better job of making their problems go away before an arrest hits the news. Especially if they’re taking Cris Carter’s advice.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/08/28/crime-rate-among-nfl-players-is-relatively-low-with-some-caveats/
     
    Cris Carter's advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.

    I would imagine that NFL players talk their way out of drunk driving arrests a lot.

    My cousin who had been merely a minor league baseball player, but was a big charismatic guy, talked his way out of a lot of tickets when we shared an apartment.

    • Replies: @donut
    One night back in the 80's we left a bar in Williamsburg , Va . We got pulled over doing 60 in a 30mph. zone at 2 AM . My "big charismatic" friend from north Jersey no less , talked his way out of a ticket .
  20. @Dave Shanken
    I would venture that Mr. Wolf acts mainly as a conduit through which sufficient hush money is funneled to the potential plaintiffs (and others) to make them "forget" the incident.

    Exactly my thoughts: “Hush” money, especially for savagery associated with sexual assaults, spousal abuse, drunk driving, wild parties, drug use, doping. But who gets the “hush” money to motivate people (including the media and authorities) to look the other way? The victims, victim’s relatives, media reporters, cops on the beat, the friendly sergeant at the station house? Money talks. I’m reminded of how easily JFK over his life avoided publicity about his sexual misadventures and how easily Michael Jackson was able to avoid being charged with pedophilia.

    We’re acquainted with a “fixer” in our local community … although her specialty is “damage control” over industrial accidents and deaths to avoid negative publicity for clients ranging from local businesses to major corporations. It’s fascinating to hear her talk about it.

    We occasionally meet for lunch. She gives us the rundown on the latest industrial accidents and deaths in the community. Yes, we’re always surprised; one in ten appears in the media! She brings together victims (if they survive), victim’s relatives, insurance companies, management, cleanup crews. She is responsible for drafting statements to the media when necessary. Her objective is to get things back to normal with as little damage as quickly as possible. She is very good at it.

    The strangest thing is that our friend is always busy. Sometimes our lunches are short. She has to get back to the scene. The bottom line is that “fixing” works.

    • Agree: backup
  21. @Triumph104
    Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

    More than one study has found that NFL players have a lower rate of arrests than the general population of males in their 20s and 30s. Obviously the unreported arrests weren't taken into account.

    And this research relies on media reports to determine how many players are arrested. But that may understate the actual number of arrests in the NFL because it’s possible that some players’ arrests are never reported.

    Add it all up, and it’s not so clear that NFL players break the law any less often than American men as a whole. It may be more a matter of NFL players doing a better job of making their problems go away before an arrest hits the news. Especially if they’re taking Cris Carter’s advice.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/08/28/crime-rate-among-nfl-players-is-relatively-low-with-some-caveats/
     
    Cris Carter's advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.

    “Cris Carter’s advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.”

    Unfortunately for Chris Carter, his advice about fall guys is what probably got him canned at ESPN.

  22. @Beliavsky
    It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks -- that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true -- can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    Here is one example of equalization of discipline in Syracuse schools. They brought a lady in from Baltimore to straighten out the local schools. Hijinx ensue…

    • Replies: @2Mintzin1
    Wow. $147K is serious money up in Syracuse, even for a public school administrator.

    What a waste.
  23. @Beliavsky
    It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks -- that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true -- can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    College and pro sports stars aren’t a big enough fraction of the population to matter. And a low clearance rate of murders in the black ghetto may decrease the number of blacks in jail for murder, but it’s not a policy that favors blacks–the murder victims in the ghetto are almost all black, just like the murderers.

    • Replies: @anon
    What you say is true, and yet the main reason for the low rate of clearance of murders is due to the fact that the black community does not cooperate with the police. Nobody ever sees anything. Nobody ever knows anything. The "don't snitch" culture prevails.
  24. I wonder how much of this article was true. Knowing how bad reporters are at following up and cross-checking stories (Haven Monahan, anyone?), and how they’ll believe any old story told to them by a source they like (look at any opinion column quoting a “refugee” story unquestionably; or, again, Haven Monahan, anyone?), I don’t know how much of this to believe.

    Certainly this “fixer’s” story about how he got canned from the police—stealing boxing gloves for a poor person—-sounds like a nonsensical sob story, especially given affirmative action standards in police departments, the salary of a cop, etc. Pretty self-serving of a tale, and the reporter sounds like he bought it hook, line, and sinker from the Wolf himself without checking with anyone. Ghetto dudes often make up such ludicrous tales to justify outcomes that are really caused by serious malfeasance they’re not telling you about.

    And then the reporter mysteriously can’t figure out how this Wolf is paid by the Cowboys, or how much. It wouldn’t be hard for an intrepid reporter to get his own Wolf to get inside the Cowboys/Wolf’s bank account and see the deposits. This is the day and age when the FBI is reading everyone’s emails and viewing everyone’s bank accounts, completely unchecked by the courts.

    So it leads me to the conclusion that most of this story is just the Wolf spinning yarns and following the Wolf around through a courthouse for one day and then a few players getting drunk and talking about Wolf. Interesting, but about as reliable as Jackie talking about the Night of Broken Glass.

  25. True. But the last paragraph is a little misleading. It implies that NFL arrest rates are already high, so if the un-fixed rates are an order of magnitude higher, then that’s really eye-opening. But the thing is that NFL arrest and accusation rates are actually low. A random group of 2,000 American males 21-33, 60% of them black, has a much higher incidence of criminal and other nefarious activity than does the active membership of the NFLPA. So maybe the cover-up just increases the apparent disparity between NFLers and their civilian counterparts, and if the whole truth were known we’d see similar levels of offending or that NFL players are only moderately less likely to offend than non-NFLers are.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  26. I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues, when so very many of them engage in revolting and hypocritical personal behavior that would be embarrassing to the majority of the population if it concerned a friend of family member. But that’s the age we live in and the professional left loves celebrity – our president was a career legislative back bencher that was elevated by political celebrity, and that’s all that mattered in the end.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    Hence the old saying that politics is showbiz for ugly people. The same sort of mechanisms are at work, I think.

    I bet most of the football fixer's ability do do his job is based on widespread support for the local football team. That's certainly the pattern you see among college athletes, where the local cops and prosecutors don't want to mess us the team's chances on Saturday morning.
    , @William BadWhite
    "I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues"

    Today's Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the "LeBron endorses Hillary".

    That was good to know. I was waiting to hear what a semi-literate high school graduate thought on the matter before deciding myself.
  27. @Dave Shanken
    I would venture that Mr. Wolf acts mainly as a conduit through which sufficient hush money is funneled to the potential plaintiffs (and others) to make them "forget" the incident.

    Makes sense. Money is the ultimate lubricant.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    I also think the "fixing" is nothing that requires cleverness or ingenuity, it is probably mostly handing out money to make complaints going away.
    It is an intriguing exercise to think about how much money it would take to make a problem go away if you are the injured party. For instance, NFL player punches you in the face. How much would it take to keep you from pressing criminal charges? A driving drunk player runs into your car; how much would you take to allow it be treated as a regular accident instead of calling in the cops and letting them test the guy? Given the money in professional sports, I would have a price but I would be really expensive to buy out.
  28. @Arclight
    I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues, when so very many of them engage in revolting and hypocritical personal behavior that would be embarrassing to the majority of the population if it concerned a friend of family member. But that's the age we live in and the professional left loves celebrity - our president was a career legislative back bencher that was elevated by political celebrity, and that's all that mattered in the end.

    Hence the old saying that politics is showbiz for ugly people. The same sort of mechanisms are at work, I think.

    I bet most of the football fixer’s ability do do his job is based on widespread support for the local football team. That’s certainly the pattern you see among college athletes, where the local cops and prosecutors don’t want to mess us the team’s chances on Saturday morning.

    • Replies: @AndrewR

    That’s certainly the pattern you see among college athletes, where the local cops and prosecutors don’t want to mess us the team’s chances on Saturday morning.
     
    Is that a thing?
  29. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Every NFL team has this sort of (usually) black guy on the payroll. His job is to deal with the players’ chaotic personal lives, whether crazy girlfriends or wives, crazy mothers, run-ins, child-support, you name it. I don’t think he’s so much a surrogate father as a buffer to permit coaches and general managers to have some level of plausible deniability when dealing with the (rare) press coverage of how truly degenerate most of their players are. Probably a lot of the big college programs also have this sort of consigliere type figure.

    Here’s a report of one of them in action last year.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/10/31/report-packers-official-tried-to-intimidate-journalist-over-letroy-guion-story/

    And here’s the link to the fixer’s responsibilities.

    http://www.packers.com/team/staff/rob-davis/ef1e1ad0-97ff-462f-b98d-7c9180ef0933

  30. For all of Jerry Jones reclamation projects, the Cowboys have won how many Superbowls since he canned Jimmy Johnson? The Giants won two under authoritarian Tom Coughlin, sorely missed. The Patriots under Bill Belichick have skated the edge in coaching but ruthlessly discard players who create problems (Hernandez) and even those who bump up against the salary cap.

    The problem with guys like Jones is that their indiscipline off the field infects them on the field, negating raw athletic talent. The Patriots tend to get guys with only one athletic talent, devise schemes where that’s all they do — maximize that one particular talent, and make it clear any screw ups and they will be replaced instantly with just another guy with that same talent.

    Just as a guess, I’d bet that the Cowboys are among the worst along with the Seahawks and a few others, the Patriots the least bad (I would not say “best”) and many other teams somewhere in between. But yes very eye opening.

  31. Steve, in April you posted about another study of NFL player criminality. There, one fact was particularly striking: that NFL players who had arrest records from their pre-NFL days were twice as likely to get arrested once they were in the NFL.

    What’s striking about that, is that for the population at large, people who are arrested before age 22 are way more than twice as likely to be arrested later, than are random people. (I’m basing that on the fact that ex-cons recidivize at a rate of about 70%.)

    So either NFL players are saints, or there’s some serious undercounting going on.

    Here’s a link to the relevant discussion:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/wonderlic-iq-test-help-predict-nfl-arrest-rates/#comment-1385917

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    Or the incentives or pressures that go along with being in the NFL really do help people stay straight.
    , @Triumph104
    The difference between NFL players and the general population can easily be explained by the fact that NFL players earn a minimum of $450,000. NFL players are very unlikely to rob and steal because they have money. We have debtors prison in the United States. People are arrested when they can't pay child support, traffic tickets, or court fees.
  32. Forbes says the Cowboys are worth $4.2 billion, a value that in part depends on the team’s ability to keep star players on the field, contend for championships; and maintain its global popularity.

    Bwahahahaha!

    • Replies: @Forbes
    In other words, a contingent valuation--which means the Cowboys are worth somewhat less than this silly number.
  33. I guess everyone is tired of hearing about steroids. But I think I’ll wonder forever exactly what effect they are having on the rate of bad behavior by … pretty much all athletes.

    I am one that has the belief that various types of performance enhancing drugs are and have been used for a long time by all professional teams (in any sport), every major college football program, and it is very widespread in the … call it “highly developed” or maybe competitive or hotbed high school football teams.

    My understanding is things are kind of built around HGH now, but testosterone is still used, as the deer antler stuff seems to indicate.

    Given some of the reports about these guys, I dunno maybe they are spoiled brats to a man, but it seems like there is something else involved. To me at least.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Steroids don't make you an asshole. Assholes do steroids.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yG89XmCCaw4
  34. The Negro Football League and Negro Basketball Association are gone. Whites are not watching or attending the games. These issues are moot.

    • Replies: @Hrw-500
    Another nickname I heard for the NFL is "National Felon League". ;-)
    http://hyannisnews.com/national-felon-league-no-longer-entertaining/
    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865611438/Well-blindly-continue-to-follow-and-love-the-National-Felons-League.html?pg=all
  35. @Anon

    When the Cowboys unleash the Wolf, for instance if a player is arrested for drunken driving, Wells’s instructions often begin the same way: Do what the officers tell you — but say nothing.

    From there Wells begins the paperwork on the player’s behalf for a restricted occupational license and learns the name of the presiding judge. He already knows the lawyers who are cozy with his or her honor. “I hate to say this,” Wells says. “I know who to hire based on what that relationship is.”
     

    He hasn't made the drunk driving arrest disappear ... just mitigated the damages.

    In the suburbs, we actually have strict law and order. Plenty of police and not much crime. The players strike me as clueless regarding how to let their privilege work for them -- instead of attracting publicity that negates their advantages.

    It's a good article.

    Here is the white man version from the movie Michael Clayton:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwBLPaUYqFo

    Favorite line: The smaller the mess, the easier it is to clean up

    The jerk client reminds me so much of Anthony Weiner. I wonder if Huma threw crockery like that.

  36. @Anonymous
    '..and the sons of gods did sport merrily on the Earth in those days...they found the daughters of men fair, and knew them, they begot the heroes of ancient times...'

    Possibly the most controversial, most debated passage in the English language…

  37. @Anon

    When the Cowboys unleash the Wolf, for instance if a player is arrested for drunken driving, Wells’s instructions often begin the same way: Do what the officers tell you — but say nothing.

    From there Wells begins the paperwork on the player’s behalf for a restricted occupational license and learns the name of the presiding judge. He already knows the lawyers who are cozy with his or her honor. “I hate to say this,” Wells says. “I know who to hire based on what that relationship is.”
     

    He hasn't made the drunk driving arrest disappear ... just mitigated the damages.

    In the suburbs, we actually have strict law and order. Plenty of police and not much crime. The players strike me as clueless regarding how to let their privilege work for them -- instead of attracting publicity that negates their advantages.

    It's a good article.

    Here is the white man version from the movie Michael Clayton:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwBLPaUYqFo

    Favorite line: The smaller the mess, the easier it is to clean up

    Good point. This is nothing like the infamous fixers of Hollywood’s Golden Age who actually made scandals disappear. As a resident of north Texas, we know about all these incidents if there is an arrest or injury to a civilian.
    Sports writing is a funny business. In the old days it was struggling blue collar scribblers writing about struggling blue collar players. There was lots of bad behavior that went unremarked because of the shared background and values. What values does an educated middle class sports writer have in common with a sports professional who earns more money in a month than most writers earn in a year.
    If you want to experience culture shock, reread Ball Four by Jim Bouton.

  38. Al Davis and his Raiders never could grok the difference between white bad boys and black bad boyz. As the league got blacker the Raiders got blacker and the wheels came off the organization.

    It continues today.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn't have these much anymore after Long left.
    , @Jack Hanson
    It was pretty obvious that Al Davis didn't care about black or white and expected that the only colors that mattered were black and silver.

    He wouldn't have tolerated today's crap from any player, and neither would Madden.
  39. Another example of how pro football is a corrupt institution, inherently incompatible with a free society.

  40. More proof of a two tiered justice system where politicians, athletes, and celebrities get to “fix” their problems while everyone else gets to be financially and personally ruined and go to jail.

    Steve has talked in the past about the Harvard price, the minimum donation a rich man pays to fix his kid’s acceptance into Harvard College. I wonder what a person’s asset value is that allows him to receive alternative justice and fix their problems. It must vary with location I’m sure. In NYC I’m guessing it’s $100 million.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  41. @Dave Pinsen
    It's interesting that the guy went back to Pulp Fiction for his example (of covering up a homicide, btw). There are two current examples of fixers in Showtime shows. Ray Donovan, and Billions.

    I'm not sure this means there's another order of magnitude of incidents though. Dallas has long had a particularly trashy team in contrast with, say, the New York Giants. The Giants have generally had a low tolerance for off-the-field nonsense, quickly cutting players that embarrass them. Whether that's due to the character of the owners or the higher visibility of being in a media capital, I don't know.

    If a fixer’s doing his job right, you shouldn’t hear about him.

  42. Steve, maybe this is a stupid idea, but maybe sometime after the election you can do a ‘no race week’ where you don’t post anything about race? I’m curious to see what some of your non-politically-charged noticings might turn up. Even if it’s just golf course architecture. 😉

    • Replies: @Truth
    Uh.....

    Would you believe...

    No race day?...

    No race hour?...

    How about two articles in a row?...
  43. @NOTA
    Hence the old saying that politics is showbiz for ugly people. The same sort of mechanisms are at work, I think.

    I bet most of the football fixer's ability do do his job is based on widespread support for the local football team. That's certainly the pattern you see among college athletes, where the local cops and prosecutors don't want to mess us the team's chances on Saturday morning.

    That’s certainly the pattern you see among college athletes, where the local cops and prosecutors don’t want to mess us the team’s chances on Saturday morning.

    Is that a thing?

  44. @Thomas
    Sad anthropological observation: this guy is basically a substitute dad.

    “Sad anthropological observation: this guy is basically a substitute dad.”

    No, he’s serving a niche market. Who says blacks can’t be entrepreneurs?

  45. I think the overarching, 30,000 foot theme here—in this story as well as so many other stories appearing of late—is just how completely “rigged” the system really is. Everything is Potemkin these days; nothing is actually solid or solvent or on the level. Nothing is genuine. Nothing is authentic.

    I know this is off-topic, but I think it is an important point to emphasize with regard to the Hillary Clinton campaign, particularly to those who are upset about Trump’s recent debate performance. The main thread of criticism appearing just after the debate was that Trump looked “unprepared.” Do you not realize, those of you who say such things, that being “prepared” would just have meant buying into the very Potemkin reality that Trump is running against. The Hillary Clinton campaign is nothing but a series of staged incidents. For example, cf. the most recent one concerning the disgraced Ms. Universe, who was carefully prepped by the Clinton people for a year before Mrs. Clinton skillfully used her last debate response to drop her name in a highly scripted fashion.

    This is the Potemkin Election. Hillary Clinton had the script; Lester Holt had the script; the rest of the mainstream media had the script; Donald Trump did not have the script. Now I ask you, how are you supposed to “prepare” for something like that? The answer is that you don’t. You just go up against them and try to hold your own, which is what Trump did.

    • Replies: @Mikeybikey
    While I agree that everything is pretty much a lie if you hear about it from the MSM all der Drumpf had to do was bring up Monica when Shrill brought up Machado and riff on the changes from there on out.
    Didn't happen though.

    The whole thing's a pathetic fraud.
    She belongs in jail and you ignore the moderator and hammer immigration, the economy and the unconstitutional Mid east boondoggles against the over arching backdrop of PC.
    IOW you never let your opponent frame the debate/argue their case/fight their fight.
    DT should know that, but hey whatever.

  46. @Steve Sailer
    Back in Roman Gabriel's days ...

    “Back in Roman Gabriel’s days…”

    I fell in love with the 1967 Rams (Gabriel, Jack Snow, Bernie Casey and a great defense) and rooted for them until around 1980. They were one of the most frustrating teams of all time, innumerable playoff disasters and only one Super Bowl appearance during the period.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    And they played Super Bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn't beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams.
  47. @Steve Sailer
    Back in Roman Gabriel's days ...

    Still not sure why the Rams “need” a new stadium. Let them play in the Coliseum or in Westwood at the Rose Bowl. The Rose Bowl still has the attendance record for most fans to watch a Super Bowl (XIV) live.

    Just add some additional luxury boxes to the Rose Bowl, and you’re all set. Nice area, perhaps the Rams could have a working agreement to use UCLA’s onsite training facilities until they build their own.

  48. @David In TN
    "Back in Roman Gabriel's days..."

    I fell in love with the 1967 Rams (Gabriel, Jack Snow, Bernie Casey and a great defense) and rooted for them until around 1980. They were one of the most frustrating teams of all time, innumerable playoff disasters and only one Super Bowl appearance during the period.

    And they played Super Bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn’t beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    "And they played Super bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn't beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams."

    Even though Super Bowl XIV was at the Rose Bowl, there were more Steeler fans inside the stadium than Ram fans. This was the result of Georgia Frontiere and her umpteenth husband Dominick's ticket scalping.

    The Rams led after three quarters and battled to the end against "one of the all time greatest NFL teams." It wasn't a Minnesota Vikings Super Bowl performance, as Jim Murray wrote after the game.

  49. I’m grateful for the NFL and the NBA for keeping these felons off the streets. Just think what the crime rate would be if these guys were out roaming around. I shiver at the thought.

  50. “Now if he could just fix Tony Romo’s playing!” *rimshot*

  51. Well, apparently the fixers only work for currently employed NFLers. Former Cowboys player Greg Hardy was arrested five days ago for possession of cocaine. He had failed to use a turn signal last Sunday night on the road, and the cops pulled him over. Hardy gave the cops permission to search his car, and they found a powdery substance in his wallet, later tested to be cocaine.

    Hardy stated that he was at a party the night before and someone must’ve put the cocaine in his wallet when it was passed around.

    But it does make you wonder how many instances along these lines that current NFL team fixers manage to diffuse. When the player is unemployed, he’s apparently on his own.

  52. @Triumph104
    Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.

    More than one study has found that NFL players have a lower rate of arrests than the general population of males in their 20s and 30s. Obviously the unreported arrests weren't taken into account.

    And this research relies on media reports to determine how many players are arrested. But that may understate the actual number of arrests in the NFL because it’s possible that some players’ arrests are never reported.

    Add it all up, and it’s not so clear that NFL players break the law any less often than American men as a whole. It may be more a matter of NFL players doing a better job of making their problems go away before an arrest hits the news. Especially if they’re taking Cris Carter’s advice.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/08/28/crime-rate-among-nfl-players-is-relatively-low-with-some-caveats/
     
    Cris Carter's advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.

    Is that you, Ray Lewis?

  53. @International Jew
    Steve, in April you posted about another study of NFL player criminality. There, one fact was particularly striking: that NFL players who had arrest records from their pre-NFL days were twice as likely to get arrested once they were in the NFL.

    What's striking about that, is that for the population at large, people who are arrested before age 22 are way more than twice as likely to be arrested later, than are random people. (I'm basing that on the fact that ex-cons recidivize at a rate of about 70%.)

    So either NFL players are saints, or there's some serious undercounting going on.

    Here's a link to the relevant discussion:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/wonderlic-iq-test-help-predict-nfl-arrest-rates/#comment-1385917

    Or the incentives or pressures that go along with being in the NFL really do help people stay straight.

  54. Further cementing my opinion that encouraging or contributing to professional sports (and big college sports) in any way is contributing to the degradation of America. A pox on them all.

    • Replies: @jeremiahjohnbalaya
    I've given up the NFL b/c of the Kaepernick issue (although the whole fantasy sports obsession had already driven me away) and all major college sports because of the NCAA's retribution against the state of North Carolina (for their trans-related legislation).

    By the way, here is gooding reading on the reality of black commission, arrest and conviction of crime rates: http://www.city-journal.org/html/hillarys-debate-lies-14759.html
    , @rod1963
    I tend to agree, there are no redeeming values in patronizing professional and collegiate sports in anyway. To me their only purpose is distract the populace and drain them of their emotional energy just as they did in the time of Imperial Rome.

    BTW this includes professional Wrestling under Vince McMahons whose organization is nothing but a human meatgrinder.

    The faster they die out the better it is for white America or what left of it.

  55. @Cloudbuster
    Further cementing my opinion that encouraging or contributing to professional sports (and big college sports) in any way is contributing to the degradation of America. A pox on them all.

    I’ve given up the NFL b/c of the Kaepernick issue (although the whole fantasy sports obsession had already driven me away) and all major college sports because of the NCAA’s retribution against the state of North Carolina (for their trans-related legislation).

    By the way, here is gooding reading on the reality of black commission, arrest and conviction of crime rates: http://www.city-journal.org/html/hillarys-debate-lies-14759.html

  56. @Anon

    When the Cowboys unleash the Wolf, for instance if a player is arrested for drunken driving, Wells’s instructions often begin the same way: Do what the officers tell you — but say nothing.

    From there Wells begins the paperwork on the player’s behalf for a restricted occupational license and learns the name of the presiding judge. He already knows the lawyers who are cozy with his or her honor. “I hate to say this,” Wells says. “I know who to hire based on what that relationship is.”
     

    He hasn't made the drunk driving arrest disappear ... just mitigated the damages.

    In the suburbs, we actually have strict law and order. Plenty of police and not much crime. The players strike me as clueless regarding how to let their privilege work for them -- instead of attracting publicity that negates their advantages.

    It's a good article.

    Here is the white man version from the movie Michael Clayton:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwBLPaUYqFo

    Favorite line: The smaller the mess, the easier it is to clean up

    Michael Clayton is one of my favorite films ever. Clooney had a nice hot streak from 07- 2012 or so and then he went mediocre.

    Clayton, Up in the Air, the American, Idea of March etc were some of my favorite films of the past ten years.

  57. @Anonymous
    Al Davis and his Raiders never could grok the difference between white bad boys and black bad boyz. As the league got blacker the Raiders got blacker and the wheels came off the organization.

    It continues today.

    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn’t have these much anymore after Long left.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    The most swash-bucklingest Raider of all-time was from Brooklyn. Lyle Alzado.
    , @Brutusale
    Don't forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.
    , @Brutusale
    Don't forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.
    , @Brutusale
    Don't forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.
  58. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    And they played Super Bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn't beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams.

    “And they played Super bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn’t beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams.”

    Even though Super Bowl XIV was at the Rose Bowl, there were more Steeler fans inside the stadium than Ram fans. This was the result of Georgia Frontiere and her umpteenth husband Dominick’s ticket scalping.

    The Rams led after three quarters and battled to the end against “one of the all time greatest NFL teams.” It wasn’t a Minnesota Vikings Super Bowl performance, as Jim Murray wrote after the game.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Rams largely outplayed the Steelers in that Super Bowl (see the closing pages of Updike's Rabbit Is Rich novel for a close description of the game), but the Swann and Stallworth made some huge plays that made the difference.
  59. My last comment seems to have disappeared completely. Not only is it not on the thread, it’s not even in the moderation queue. Is this a feature of Unz’s new comment policy, or is this just a one-time glitch, or did Steve really not care for it?

  60. @Blobby5
    Here is one example of equalization of discipline in Syracuse schools. They brought a lady in from Baltimore to straighten out the local schools. Hijinx ensue...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oReuETjnjXw

    Wow. $147K is serious money up in Syracuse, even for a public school administrator.

    What a waste.

    • Agree: EriK
  61. @David In TN
    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn't have these much anymore after Long left.

    The most swash-bucklingest Raider of all-time was from Brooklyn. Lyle Alzado.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    Right, I forgot Alzado, who unlike the others mentioned came in a trade rather than the draft.
  62. @Cloudbuster
    Further cementing my opinion that encouraging or contributing to professional sports (and big college sports) in any way is contributing to the degradation of America. A pox on them all.

    I tend to agree, there are no redeeming values in patronizing professional and collegiate sports in anyway. To me their only purpose is distract the populace and drain them of their emotional energy just as they did in the time of Imperial Rome.

    BTW this includes professional Wrestling under Vince McMahons whose organization is nothing but a human meatgrinder.

    The faster they die out the better it is for white America or what left of it.

  63. @Sunbeam
    I guess everyone is tired of hearing about steroids. But I think I'll wonder forever exactly what effect they are having on the rate of bad behavior by ... pretty much all athletes.

    I am one that has the belief that various types of performance enhancing drugs are and have been used for a long time by all professional teams (in any sport), every major college football program, and it is very widespread in the ... call it "highly developed" or maybe competitive or hotbed high school football teams.

    My understanding is things are kind of built around HGH now, but testosterone is still used, as the deer antler stuff seems to indicate.

    Given some of the reports about these guys, I dunno maybe they are spoiled brats to a man, but it seems like there is something else involved. To me at least.

    Steroids don’t make you an asshole. Assholes do steroids.

  64. @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    Forbes says the Cowboys are worth $4.2 billion, a value that in part depends on the team’s ability to keep star players on the field, contend for championships; and maintain its global popularity.

    Bwahahahaha!

    In other words, a contingent valuation–which means the Cowboys are worth somewhat less than this silly number.

  65. @International Jew
    Steve, in April you posted about another study of NFL player criminality. There, one fact was particularly striking: that NFL players who had arrest records from their pre-NFL days were twice as likely to get arrested once they were in the NFL.

    What's striking about that, is that for the population at large, people who are arrested before age 22 are way more than twice as likely to be arrested later, than are random people. (I'm basing that on the fact that ex-cons recidivize at a rate of about 70%.)

    So either NFL players are saints, or there's some serious undercounting going on.

    Here's a link to the relevant discussion:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/wonderlic-iq-test-help-predict-nfl-arrest-rates/#comment-1385917

    The difference between NFL players and the general population can easily be explained by the fact that NFL players earn a minimum of $450,000. NFL players are very unlikely to rob and steal because they have money. We have debtors prison in the United States. People are arrested when they can’t pay child support, traffic tickets, or court fees.

  66. @Connecticut Famer
    Makes sense. Money is the ultimate lubricant.

    I also think the “fixing” is nothing that requires cleverness or ingenuity, it is probably mostly handing out money to make complaints going away.
    It is an intriguing exercise to think about how much money it would take to make a problem go away if you are the injured party. For instance, NFL player punches you in the face. How much would it take to keep you from pressing criminal charges? A driving drunk player runs into your car; how much would you take to allow it be treated as a regular accident instead of calling in the cops and letting them test the guy? Given the money in professional sports, I would have a price but I would be really expensive to buy out.

  67. @dr kill
    The most swash-bucklingest Raider of all-time was from Brooklyn. Lyle Alzado.

    Right, I forgot Alzado, who unlike the others mentioned came in a trade rather than the draft.

  68. @David In TN
    "And they played Super bowl XIV at home, so to speak, and they still couldn't beat one of the all time greatest NFL teams."

    Even though Super Bowl XIV was at the Rose Bowl, there were more Steeler fans inside the stadium than Ram fans. This was the result of Georgia Frontiere and her umpteenth husband Dominick's ticket scalping.

    The Rams led after three quarters and battled to the end against "one of the all time greatest NFL teams." It wasn't a Minnesota Vikings Super Bowl performance, as Jim Murray wrote after the game.

    The Rams largely outplayed the Steelers in that Super Bowl (see the closing pages of Updike’s Rabbit Is Rich novel for a close description of the game), but the Swann and Stallworth made some huge plays that made the difference.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ok, now I've heard everything.

    It's one thing when the late Steve Sabol of NFL films would constantly and consistently downplay the team of the decade Steelers with the "but you know, even though they won more Super Bowl championships during the '70's, the Raiders actually won more regular season games and therefore they should be the real team of the decade (at least in close contention)."

    LA didn't have Pat Haden that yr, if memory serves correct and had to rely on jabrones for some of their offensive firepower.

    Also, the Steelers lost perennial All Pro and HOF LB Jack Ham before the start of the playoffs that season, as well as strong safety Mike Wagner. Jack Ham is widely considered to be one of the all time greatest LB's ever to play in the NFL. Perhaps, just perhaps, not having Jack Ham in the lineup might have been a contributing factor as to why the game was as close as it appeared during the first three quarters. The game, however, was never seriously in doubt--only a matter of when the Steelers would pull away with the Lombardi Trophy. After all, they held HOF RB Earl Campbell, one of the NFL's most dominant running backs of his era to a mere 15 yrs total rushing yards in the AFC Title game. Lacking a dominant HOF RB such as Earl Campbell meant that LA didn't stand much of a chance.

    Swann and Stallworth just went out and did what they usually were known to do--make the plays during the big games, which is one of the reasons that both are enshrined in the HOF in Canton.

  69. @Beliavsky
    It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks -- that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true -- can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    My high was about 20% black. Racial fistfights would often breakout. It was usually but not always, blacks who started it. The school’s policy – for interracial fights only – was to suspend both students, no matter who the aggressor.

  70. @Anonymous
    Al Davis and his Raiders never could grok the difference between white bad boys and black bad boyz. As the league got blacker the Raiders got blacker and the wheels came off the organization.

    It continues today.

    It was pretty obvious that Al Davis didn’t care about black or white and expected that the only colors that mattered were black and silver.

    He wouldn’t have tolerated today’s crap from any player, and neither would Madden.

  71. Being polite and friendly, saying “yes sir” and “no sir” and “please” and “thank you,” can work wonders. Since I always do this anyway, all I have to do is not stop doing it when I get pulled over.

    “Cris Carter’s advice was to have a fall guy in the crew who would take the blame and be arrested in lieu of the NFL player.”

    Unfortunately for Chris Carter, his advice about fall guys is what probably got him canned at ESPN.

    He probably would’ve been okay if he’d framed it as a description, instead of advice.

    College and pro sports stars aren’t a big enough fraction of the population to matter. And a low clearance rate of murders in the black ghetto may decrease the number of blacks in jail for murder, but it’s not a policy that favors blacks–the murder victims in the ghetto are almost all black, just like the murderers.

    Actually it probably is a fact (clearance rate doesn’t necessarily amount to policy) that favors blacks; last time I checked, blacks engaged in more intra-racial murder than other races. On the other hand, these sorts of murders might get more investigation, and/or a higher clearance rate.

  72. @Beliavsky
    It is often asserted that the justice system is unfair to blacks -- that their conviction rate reflects more than their offending rate. However, there reasons why the opposite may be true:

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true -- can someone supply supporting evidence?)
    (2) Some blacks who are good at sports at the college and pro level have fixers.

    In many schools there is pressure to equalize discipline rates by race, which leads to under-punishing of black delinquents.

    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true — can someone supply supporting evidence?)

    Courtesy of NPR, you can type in the name of a city to find out clearance rates: How Many Crimes Do Your Police ‘Clear’? Now You Can Find Out. Hint: when there is more than one listing for a city, look for Municipal Police.

    Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, Clearance Rate
    Detroit 34% in 2014
    Camden NJ 42% in 2014
    New Orleans 43% in 2014
    Baltimore 45% in 2014
    St. Louis 45% in 2014
    Newark NJ 49% in 2014
    Philadelphia 59% in 2014
    Oakland 63% in 2014 [34% in 2013]
    Atlanta 65% in 2014
    Houston 71% in 2014
    New York City 71% in 2014

    The clearance rate for murders in Chicago is not listed at the NPR website, but it was 26% in 2015, and below 30% since 2009. There are some indications that the clearance rate for Baltimore murders has done down recently. Surprise, surprise. The nationwide clearance rate for murder is about 65%.

    Summary: there are a fair number of cities with a lot of black murders with below average clearance rates, but there are also some cities with a lot of black murders with clearance rates around the national average.

    • Replies: @Boomstick
    The nature of black homicides also reduces the clearance rates. White homicides are often domestic violence, and those are easy to solve--you go find the ex-husband or boyfriend. Black-on-black homicides in the cities are often drug or gang related, and the killer and the victim may have only a slight acquaintance with each other. That makes it harder for the police to find the perp, especially if the gangs aren't talking.

    A clean black vs. white homicide clearance rate would be interesting. (Of course most of the murders are intra-racial.)
  73. @Dave Pinsen
    It's interesting that the guy went back to Pulp Fiction for his example (of covering up a homicide, btw). There are two current examples of fixers in Showtime shows. Ray Donovan, and Billions.

    I'm not sure this means there's another order of magnitude of incidents though. Dallas has long had a particularly trashy team in contrast with, say, the New York Giants. The Giants have generally had a low tolerance for off-the-field nonsense, quickly cutting players that embarrass them. Whether that's due to the character of the owners or the higher visibility of being in a media capital, I don't know.

    There seems to be a real layer of sleaze in Dallas, of the rich asshole who can get out of anything variety. I had the misfortune of rooming with one and he bragged constantly about how much money talked there. This was around the time of its heyday as the Ecstasy capital.

    • Replies: @jake
    You think that layer of sleaze in Dallas is in any way unique in America? It may manifest itself in ways that you notice more or find more offensive, but is no worse than the layer of sleaze in Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Columbus, Chicago, Milwaukee, Twin Cities, St Louis, Atlanta, Miami, SanFran, Los Angeles, Seattle, etc.
  74. @NOTA
    College and pro sports stars aren't a big enough fraction of the population to matter. And a low clearance rate of murders in the black ghetto may decrease the number of blacks in jail for murder, but it's not a policy that favors blacks--the murder victims in the ghetto are almost all black, just like the murderers.

    What you say is true, and yet the main reason for the low rate of clearance of murders is due to the fact that the black community does not cooperate with the police. Nobody ever sees anything. Nobody ever knows anything. The “don’t snitch” culture prevails.

  75. @Steve Sailer
    The Rams largely outplayed the Steelers in that Super Bowl (see the closing pages of Updike's Rabbit Is Rich novel for a close description of the game), but the Swann and Stallworth made some huge plays that made the difference.

    Ok, now I’ve heard everything.

    It’s one thing when the late Steve Sabol of NFL films would constantly and consistently downplay the team of the decade Steelers with the “but you know, even though they won more Super Bowl championships during the ’70’s, the Raiders actually won more regular season games and therefore they should be the real team of the decade (at least in close contention).”

    LA didn’t have Pat Haden that yr, if memory serves correct and had to rely on jabrones for some of their offensive firepower.

    Also, the Steelers lost perennial All Pro and HOF LB Jack Ham before the start of the playoffs that season, as well as strong safety Mike Wagner. Jack Ham is widely considered to be one of the all time greatest LB’s ever to play in the NFL. Perhaps, just perhaps, not having Jack Ham in the lineup might have been a contributing factor as to why the game was as close as it appeared during the first three quarters. The game, however, was never seriously in doubt–only a matter of when the Steelers would pull away with the Lombardi Trophy. After all, they held HOF RB Earl Campbell, one of the NFL’s most dominant running backs of his era to a mere 15 yrs total rushing yards in the AFC Title game. Lacking a dominant HOF RB such as Earl Campbell meant that LA didn’t stand much of a chance.

    Swann and Stallworth just went out and did what they usually were known to do–make the plays during the big games, which is one of the reasons that both are enshrined in the HOF in Canton.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    The Rams matched up well with the Steelers on both lines and their linebackers. The Rams beat the Steelers in regular season games in 1975 and 1978. both years the Steelers won the Super Bowl.

    On the other hand, the 1973-79 Rams had their weaknesses, which prevented them from being a really great team. The special teams never were very good. They had kicks blocked frequently. Their placekickers and punters were never reliable. In Super Bowl XIV, they allowed long runbacks on every kickoff. They had a different QB almost every year. And the QB's never had a hot hand at playoff time.

    The San Diego writer Jerry Magee had a column in Pro Football Weekly. Magee loved to take shots at the LA Rams. In a 1979 column he called the Rams the most overrated team in pro football, as proof he pointed out the Rams usually failed to cover the spread. Magee wrote something like:

    "Their QB (Pat Haden) is 5-10. Their running backs are mostly plodders. Their offensive line doesn't excite me. Their cornerbacks ae 5-9. They have no wide receivers. The Rams have few quality players at the skill positions. I do admire their defensive line."

    The Rams lost both of their starting wide receivers early in the 1979 season to knee injuries, Ron Jessie and Willie Miller (the crafty little Vietnam veteran) were good journeymen. The receivers they had the rest of 1979 were below that.

    The Steelers big advantage was Swann and Stallworth. The Rams had no such receivers, to put it mildly.

    Pat Haden broke his hand in mid-season and Vince Ferragamo (who could throw deep better than Haden) played the rest of the year. Before Super Bowl XIV, the Ram coaches were supposedly saying "If only we had Haden." Ferragamo played fairly well until throwing a bad interception to Lambert when the Rams were driving late in the game trailing 24-19. That was it.
    , @Desiderius
    As a nine-year-old diehard Bengals fan, I remember the Rams very much having a good chance to win that game into the 4th quarter. It ended in tears.

    I remember the Rams/Cowboys playoff game also being a good one that year.
  76. @Gringo
    (1) The fraction of murders cleared in black areas is lower, since blacks are less likely to report crimes to the police. (I think this is true — can someone supply supporting evidence?)

    Courtesy of NPR, you can type in the name of a city to find out clearance rates: How Many Crimes Do Your Police 'Clear'? Now You Can Find Out. Hint: when there is more than one listing for a city, look for Municipal Police.

    Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, Clearance Rate
    Detroit 34% in 2014
    Camden NJ 42% in 2014
    New Orleans 43% in 2014
    Baltimore 45% in 2014
    St. Louis 45% in 2014
    Newark NJ 49% in 2014
    Philadelphia 59% in 2014
    Oakland 63% in 2014 [34% in 2013]
    Atlanta 65% in 2014
    Houston 71% in 2014
    New York City 71% in 2014

     
    The clearance rate for murders in Chicago is not listed at the NPR website, but it was 26% in 2015, and below 30% since 2009. There are some indications that the clearance rate for Baltimore murders has done down recently. Surprise, surprise. The nationwide clearance rate for murder is about 65%.

    Summary: there are a fair number of cities with a lot of black murders with below average clearance rates, but there are also some cities with a lot of black murders with clearance rates around the national average.

    The nature of black homicides also reduces the clearance rates. White homicides are often domestic violence, and those are easy to solve–you go find the ex-husband or boyfriend. Black-on-black homicides in the cities are often drug or gang related, and the killer and the victim may have only a slight acquaintance with each other. That makes it harder for the police to find the perp, especially if the gangs aren’t talking.

    A clean black vs. white homicide clearance rate would be interesting. (Of course most of the murders are intra-racial.)

    • Replies: @Anon
    Agree

    A cop once told me ... a cop adage .. "you always know you murderer"

    In the case of gangs, its also mostly true. You know the gang and probably the person ... at least recognize him or someone in the car ... but you can't clear a case by just specifying the gang.

    A true stranger homicide is not that common. Among whites, you do see situations where a child is abducted or dead .... and they fixate on the family. When they do and it is a mistake, it always shows up on true crime television.

    But, sure ... the white clearance rate is probably pretty high.
    , @res
    Although I don't think it fully answers your final question, this link gives some analysis of what affects clearance rates: http://www.jrsa.org/pubs/reports/Clearance_of_Homicide.html
    It also breaks out victims/offenders separately for whites and hispanics which might be of interest.

    They assert "There was no significant difference between Black and White offenders in solving a case", but I find Table 13 confusing in that they also assert "The case was less likely to be solved if the offender was Black compared to the offender being Hispanic (odds ratio = .4428)" but looking at the table it appears to also show whites are (much) more likely to be caught than hispanics, while not showing white vs. black because that was not significant.

    Table 7 shows 41 white offenders, 505 black and 111 hispanic so I'm guessing the significance issue is mainly a matter of small sample size for whites. I wish they had shown the odds ratios. I bet it would have been enlightening even if not "significant". I'm still baffled how W/H could attain significance while with a larger sample size for blacks W/B did not (given that H appear to be between W and B with respect to clearance rate).

    It's also interesting that the B/H difference does not appear in summary table 25 (the W/H difference does). It's amazing how much obfuscation is engaged in by social "scientists" when it comes to white/black issues.
  77. @Steve Sailer
    I would imagine that NFL players talk their way out of drunk driving arrests a lot.

    My cousin who had been merely a minor league baseball player, but was a big charismatic guy, talked his way out of a lot of tickets when we shared an apartment.

    One night back in the 80’s we left a bar in Williamsburg , Va . We got pulled over doing 60 in a 30mph. zone at 2 AM . My “big charismatic” friend from north Jersey no less , talked his way out of a ticket .

  78. I’m not sure how to focus this comment, but I’ve been noticing recently just how obviously football (and, to a lesser extent, other college and pro sports) comprises the glue that holds together — just barely — the cultural fault line running right across the USA.

    Many on the right tolerate and even excuse the increasingly gross behaviors and ridiculous costs of American colleges and universities because they love cheering for these institutions’ sports teams. They are repaid with sneering disregard — as, increasingly, are NFL fans. And yet, year after year, they continue to buy tickets and gear and TV packages and more . . . .

    If sports fans on the right could ever let go of their fandom and contribute nothing to the American sports complex, even just for a season, the results would be seismic.

    The current NFL season is getting comparatively low ratings. Maybe it’s time for a push . . . .

    • Replies: @jake
    You are on to something. I do not intend to watch a single NFL game this season - nor NBA when that starts.
  79. @David In TN
    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn't have these much anymore after Long left.

    Don’t forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.

  80. @David In TN
    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn't have these much anymore after Long left.

    Don’t forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.

  81. @David In TN
    Al Davis liked white eastern street kids, Phil Villapiano, Howie Long, Bill Pickel, Fred Biltnikoff, whom I can think of off hand. He didn't have these much anymore after Long left.

    Don’t forget the first Guatemalan-American to play in the NFL, Ted (The Mad Stork) Hendricks.

  82. “Considering how many scandals involving football players wind up in the press, the notion that another order of magnitude incidents actually happen is, well, eye-opening.”

    Absolutely. The entire Big Man system of Sub-Saharan African socio-politics is erected upon the premise that once a man becomes BIG, he is above the law. He then has fixers clean up the messes, which are to be swept away from any public knowledge.

    That is the way it is with black athletes – in college and even high school as well as in the pros – as much as it with black politicians, entertainers and preachers.

  83. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I'm not sure how to focus this comment, but I've been noticing recently just how obviously football (and, to a lesser extent, other college and pro sports) comprises the glue that holds together -- just barely -- the cultural fault line running right across the USA.

    Many on the right tolerate and even excuse the increasingly gross behaviors and ridiculous costs of American colleges and universities because they love cheering for these institutions' sports teams. They are repaid with sneering disregard -- as, increasingly, are NFL fans. And yet, year after year, they continue to buy tickets and gear and TV packages and more . . . .

    If sports fans on the right could ever let go of their fandom and contribute nothing to the American sports complex, even just for a season, the results would be seismic.

    The current NFL season is getting comparatively low ratings. Maybe it's time for a push . . . .

    You are on to something. I do not intend to watch a single NFL game this season – nor NBA when that starts.

    • Replies: @TheJester
    I'm with you ... no more NFL, NBA, or college sports for that matter.

    What do we (Whites that is) have in common anymore with the typical college or professional football or basketball team? There is little connection with the fans ... and those that remain are being broken as I write.

    Periphery to the games are the athletes' behaviors off the field, which includes a rape culture on campus, blackmailing university administrations unless they get their way, and widespread spousal abuse in the pros.

    The Supreme Court just let stand a ruling that collegiate sports are just the "pros" in miniature. Same players; same culture; same results.

    http://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/17703790/supreme-court-rejects-ncaa-appeal-antitrust-ruling
    , @Truth
    Oprah's network is happy for the new viewer...
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    Rasmussen has just come out with a poll showing 32% of Americans are avoiding the NFL this season because of the BLM protests: see here. The ratings for MNF this week also continued to slide.
  84. @yaqub the mad scientist
    There seems to be a real layer of sleaze in Dallas, of the rich asshole who can get out of anything variety. I had the misfortune of rooming with one and he bragged constantly about how much money talked there. This was around the time of its heyday as the Ecstasy capital.

    You think that layer of sleaze in Dallas is in any way unique in America? It may manifest itself in ways that you notice more or find more offensive, but is no worse than the layer of sleaze in Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Columbus, Chicago, Milwaukee, Twin Cities, St Louis, Atlanta, Miami, SanFran, Los Angeles, Seattle, etc.

  85. Q: How do you keep a Dallas Cowboy from going to jail?

    A: Put a goal post in front of it.

  86. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ok, now I've heard everything.

    It's one thing when the late Steve Sabol of NFL films would constantly and consistently downplay the team of the decade Steelers with the "but you know, even though they won more Super Bowl championships during the '70's, the Raiders actually won more regular season games and therefore they should be the real team of the decade (at least in close contention)."

    LA didn't have Pat Haden that yr, if memory serves correct and had to rely on jabrones for some of their offensive firepower.

    Also, the Steelers lost perennial All Pro and HOF LB Jack Ham before the start of the playoffs that season, as well as strong safety Mike Wagner. Jack Ham is widely considered to be one of the all time greatest LB's ever to play in the NFL. Perhaps, just perhaps, not having Jack Ham in the lineup might have been a contributing factor as to why the game was as close as it appeared during the first three quarters. The game, however, was never seriously in doubt--only a matter of when the Steelers would pull away with the Lombardi Trophy. After all, they held HOF RB Earl Campbell, one of the NFL's most dominant running backs of his era to a mere 15 yrs total rushing yards in the AFC Title game. Lacking a dominant HOF RB such as Earl Campbell meant that LA didn't stand much of a chance.

    Swann and Stallworth just went out and did what they usually were known to do--make the plays during the big games, which is one of the reasons that both are enshrined in the HOF in Canton.

    The Rams matched up well with the Steelers on both lines and their linebackers. The Rams beat the Steelers in regular season games in 1975 and 1978. both years the Steelers won the Super Bowl.

    On the other hand, the 1973-79 Rams had their weaknesses, which prevented them from being a really great team. The special teams never were very good. They had kicks blocked frequently. Their placekickers and punters were never reliable. In Super Bowl XIV, they allowed long runbacks on every kickoff. They had a different QB almost every year. And the QB’s never had a hot hand at playoff time.

    The San Diego writer Jerry Magee had a column in Pro Football Weekly. Magee loved to take shots at the LA Rams. In a 1979 column he called the Rams the most overrated team in pro football, as proof he pointed out the Rams usually failed to cover the spread. Magee wrote something like:

    “Their QB (Pat Haden) is 5-10. Their running backs are mostly plodders. Their offensive line doesn’t excite me. Their cornerbacks ae 5-9. They have no wide receivers. The Rams have few quality players at the skill positions. I do admire their defensive line.”

    The Rams lost both of their starting wide receivers early in the 1979 season to knee injuries, Ron Jessie and Willie Miller (the crafty little Vietnam veteran) were good journeymen. The receivers they had the rest of 1979 were below that.

    The Steelers big advantage was Swann and Stallworth. The Rams had no such receivers, to put it mildly.

    Pat Haden broke his hand in mid-season and Vince Ferragamo (who could throw deep better than Haden) played the rest of the year. Before Super Bowl XIV, the Ram coaches were supposedly saying “If only we had Haden.” Ferragamo played fairly well until throwing a bad interception to Lambert when the Rams were driving late in the game trailing 24-19. That was it.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Dude, you're obviously not from Pittsburgh. Some know their own history better than outsiders.

    The Steelers also had Terry Bradshaw, HOFer at the helm for the entire game. Playing in his fourth Superbowl, Bradshaw proved yet again why he made it to Canton on the first ballot. PIT also had HOFer Franco Harris, who did quite well in receiving yards out of the backfield. Current PIT RB Le'veon Bell is often compared to Harris in similar ability to catch passes out of the backfield or as a sometime third option.

    Point being: The Steelers were going to win XIV eventually, as they were favored by 11 and of course the final score, 31-19, more than proved that as in their other three championships, the Steelers always covered the spread. I agree with Magee that the Rams were always overrated. Perhaps because they played in a large market and access to the media helps explain it. They were a wildcard team that year and by rights should've lost to Dallas. They managed to out perform expectations in the playoffs but there was no way they were going to beat a reasonably healthy Steelers team.

    The Steelers won XIV based largely on experience from their veterans. "Been there, done that" attitude came into play largely in this game. LA was simply outclassed and outplayed.

    Can't emphasize this enough: HOF LB Jack Ham, one of the NFL's all time greatest LBers was lost for the playoffs due to a broken leg. This was a large hole to fill, and although Robin Cole did an admirable job filling in for Ham, very few players played at his level. But its fairly apparent that his loss created a major hole on defense which helps explain why the AFC title game and Super Bowl XIV appeared closer than they were. If Jack Ham was healthy (and also Mike Wagner, lost for most of the '79 season), the Steelers win XIV by 38-16, or somewhere along that score. Think about that for a second: The loss of Safety Mike Wagner, a strong coverage man over the middle, and Jack Ham, one of the NFL's all time greatest linebackers, and STILL the Steelers won, and fairly easily at that.

    Once Swann was lost to injury during the third quarter, all LA had to do was double cover Stallworth, but instead they just stuck Eddie Brown on him man to man. No one was gonna beat Stallworth in a match like that.

    After all, we're talking about one of the greatest ever all time NFL teams of the twentieth century. I don't need to watch Costner's "Field of Dreams". Just watch the DVDs of the Superbowls and you're literally watching a 'field of dreams' at just about every position on both sides of the ball. Yes, LA lucked out and beat them a couple times during the season, so what? That plays into NFL Films Steve Sabol's argument that the Raiders were really the team of the '70's largely because they won the most regular season games.

    "Exceptional claims demand exceptional evidence". Well, how did the Rams do at the big dance? Did they get the job done and win?

    Nope.

    4 Super Bowls in 6 yrs. Four rings, four championships and nine starters in the HOF and a case to be made for at least 2-3 other starters, and still the Steelers prevailed as they would've anyway.
  87. @David In TN
    The Rams matched up well with the Steelers on both lines and their linebackers. The Rams beat the Steelers in regular season games in 1975 and 1978. both years the Steelers won the Super Bowl.

    On the other hand, the 1973-79 Rams had their weaknesses, which prevented them from being a really great team. The special teams never were very good. They had kicks blocked frequently. Their placekickers and punters were never reliable. In Super Bowl XIV, they allowed long runbacks on every kickoff. They had a different QB almost every year. And the QB's never had a hot hand at playoff time.

    The San Diego writer Jerry Magee had a column in Pro Football Weekly. Magee loved to take shots at the LA Rams. In a 1979 column he called the Rams the most overrated team in pro football, as proof he pointed out the Rams usually failed to cover the spread. Magee wrote something like:

    "Their QB (Pat Haden) is 5-10. Their running backs are mostly plodders. Their offensive line doesn't excite me. Their cornerbacks ae 5-9. They have no wide receivers. The Rams have few quality players at the skill positions. I do admire their defensive line."

    The Rams lost both of their starting wide receivers early in the 1979 season to knee injuries, Ron Jessie and Willie Miller (the crafty little Vietnam veteran) were good journeymen. The receivers they had the rest of 1979 were below that.

    The Steelers big advantage was Swann and Stallworth. The Rams had no such receivers, to put it mildly.

    Pat Haden broke his hand in mid-season and Vince Ferragamo (who could throw deep better than Haden) played the rest of the year. Before Super Bowl XIV, the Ram coaches were supposedly saying "If only we had Haden." Ferragamo played fairly well until throwing a bad interception to Lambert when the Rams were driving late in the game trailing 24-19. That was it.

    Dude, you’re obviously not from Pittsburgh. Some know their own history better than outsiders.

    The Steelers also had Terry Bradshaw, HOFer at the helm for the entire game. Playing in his fourth Superbowl, Bradshaw proved yet again why he made it to Canton on the first ballot. PIT also had HOFer Franco Harris, who did quite well in receiving yards out of the backfield. Current PIT RB Le’veon Bell is often compared to Harris in similar ability to catch passes out of the backfield or as a sometime third option.

    Point being: The Steelers were going to win XIV eventually, as they were favored by 11 and of course the final score, 31-19, more than proved that as in their other three championships, the Steelers always covered the spread. I agree with Magee that the Rams were always overrated. Perhaps because they played in a large market and access to the media helps explain it. They were a wildcard team that year and by rights should’ve lost to Dallas. They managed to out perform expectations in the playoffs but there was no way they were going to beat a reasonably healthy Steelers team.

    The Steelers won XIV based largely on experience from their veterans. “Been there, done that” attitude came into play largely in this game. LA was simply outclassed and outplayed.

    Can’t emphasize this enough: HOF LB Jack Ham, one of the NFL’s all time greatest LBers was lost for the playoffs due to a broken leg. This was a large hole to fill, and although Robin Cole did an admirable job filling in for Ham, very few players played at his level. But its fairly apparent that his loss created a major hole on defense which helps explain why the AFC title game and Super Bowl XIV appeared closer than they were. If Jack Ham was healthy (and also Mike Wagner, lost for most of the ’79 season), the Steelers win XIV by 38-16, or somewhere along that score. Think about that for a second: The loss of Safety Mike Wagner, a strong coverage man over the middle, and Jack Ham, one of the NFL’s all time greatest linebackers, and STILL the Steelers won, and fairly easily at that.

    Once Swann was lost to injury during the third quarter, all LA had to do was double cover Stallworth, but instead they just stuck Eddie Brown on him man to man. No one was gonna beat Stallworth in a match like that.

    After all, we’re talking about one of the greatest ever all time NFL teams of the twentieth century. I don’t need to watch Costner’s “Field of Dreams”. Just watch the DVDs of the Superbowls and you’re literally watching a ‘field of dreams’ at just about every position on both sides of the ball. Yes, LA lucked out and beat them a couple times during the season, so what? That plays into NFL Films Steve Sabol’s argument that the Raiders were really the team of the ’70’s largely because they won the most regular season games.

    “Exceptional claims demand exceptional evidence”. Well, how did the Rams do at the big dance? Did they get the job done and win?

    Nope.

    4 Super Bowls in 6 yrs. Four rings, four championships and nine starters in the HOF and a case to be made for at least 2-3 other starters, and still the Steelers prevailed as they would’ve anyway.

  88. @jake
    You are on to something. I do not intend to watch a single NFL game this season - nor NBA when that starts.

    I’m with you … no more NFL, NBA, or college sports for that matter.

    What do we (Whites that is) have in common anymore with the typical college or professional football or basketball team? There is little connection with the fans … and those that remain are being broken as I write.

    Periphery to the games are the athletes’ behaviors off the field, which includes a rape culture on campus, blackmailing university administrations unless they get their way, and widespread spousal abuse in the pros.

    The Supreme Court just let stand a ruling that collegiate sports are just the “pros” in miniature. Same players; same culture; same results.

    http://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/17703790/supreme-court-rejects-ncaa-appeal-antitrust-ruling

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    I don't support ESPN because of their social policies so I didn't click the link. I found the story on another site.
  89. @Arclight
    I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues, when so very many of them engage in revolting and hypocritical personal behavior that would be embarrassing to the majority of the population if it concerned a friend of family member. But that's the age we live in and the professional left loves celebrity - our president was a career legislative back bencher that was elevated by political celebrity, and that's all that mattered in the end.

    “I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues”

    Today’s Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the “LeBron endorses Hillary”.

    That was good to know. I was waiting to hear what a semi-literate high school graduate thought on the matter before deciding myself.

    • LOL: Triumph104
    • Replies: @res

    Today’s Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the “LeBron endorses Hillary”.
     
    Hillary is really going all out for the black vote.

    Here's a link for those who like to see for themselves: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2016/10/02/lebron-james-officially-endorses-hillary-clinton-for-president/

    Some sample quotes from LeBron:

    I support Hillary because she will build on the legacy of my good friend, President Barack Obama
    ...
    I believe in what President Obama has done for our country and support her commitment to continuing that legacy
    ...
    We must all stand together — no matter where we are from or the color of our skin. And Hillary is running on the message of hope and unity that we need.
     
    It would be really interesting to know who wrote LeBron's statement and whether or not the Clinton campaign had any editorial oversight.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Speaking of which, here's an ad that takes on the whole "vote the way you're told to by the famous folks".

    vimeo.com/185223229
  90. @SFG
    Steve, maybe this is a stupid idea, but maybe sometime after the election you can do a 'no race week' where you don't post anything about race? I'm curious to see what some of your non-politically-charged noticings might turn up. Even if it's just golf course architecture. ;)

    Uh…..

    Would you believe…

    No race day?…

    No race hour?…

    How about two articles in a row?…

  91. @jake
    You are on to something. I do not intend to watch a single NFL game this season - nor NBA when that starts.

    Oprah’s network is happy for the new viewer…

  92. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Boomstick
    The nature of black homicides also reduces the clearance rates. White homicides are often domestic violence, and those are easy to solve--you go find the ex-husband or boyfriend. Black-on-black homicides in the cities are often drug or gang related, and the killer and the victim may have only a slight acquaintance with each other. That makes it harder for the police to find the perp, especially if the gangs aren't talking.

    A clean black vs. white homicide clearance rate would be interesting. (Of course most of the murders are intra-racial.)

    Agree

    A cop once told me … a cop adage .. “you always know you murderer”

    In the case of gangs, its also mostly true. You know the gang and probably the person … at least recognize him or someone in the car … but you can’t clear a case by just specifying the gang.

    A true stranger homicide is not that common. Among whites, you do see situations where a child is abducted or dead …. and they fixate on the family. When they do and it is a mistake, it always shows up on true crime television.

    But, sure … the white clearance rate is probably pretty high.

  93. @Boomstick
    The nature of black homicides also reduces the clearance rates. White homicides are often domestic violence, and those are easy to solve--you go find the ex-husband or boyfriend. Black-on-black homicides in the cities are often drug or gang related, and the killer and the victim may have only a slight acquaintance with each other. That makes it harder for the police to find the perp, especially if the gangs aren't talking.

    A clean black vs. white homicide clearance rate would be interesting. (Of course most of the murders are intra-racial.)

    Although I don’t think it fully answers your final question, this link gives some analysis of what affects clearance rates: http://www.jrsa.org/pubs/reports/Clearance_of_Homicide.html
    It also breaks out victims/offenders separately for whites and hispanics which might be of interest.

    They assert “There was no significant difference between Black and White offenders in solving a case”, but I find Table 13 confusing in that they also assert “The case was less likely to be solved if the offender was Black compared to the offender being Hispanic (odds ratio = .4428)” but looking at the table it appears to also show whites are (much) more likely to be caught than hispanics, while not showing white vs. black because that was not significant.

    Table 7 shows 41 white offenders, 505 black and 111 hispanic so I’m guessing the significance issue is mainly a matter of small sample size for whites. I wish they had shown the odds ratios. I bet it would have been enlightening even if not “significant”. I’m still baffled how W/H could attain significance while with a larger sample size for blacks W/B did not (given that H appear to be between W and B with respect to clearance rate).

    It’s also interesting that the B/H difference does not appear in summary table 25 (the W/H difference does). It’s amazing how much obfuscation is engaged in by social “scientists” when it comes to white/black issues.

  94. @William BadWhite
    "I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues"

    Today's Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the "LeBron endorses Hillary".

    That was good to know. I was waiting to hear what a semi-literate high school graduate thought on the matter before deciding myself.

    Today’s Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the “LeBron endorses Hillary”.

    Hillary is really going all out for the black vote.

    Here’s a link for those who like to see for themselves: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2016/10/02/lebron-james-officially-endorses-hillary-clinton-for-president/

    Some sample quotes from LeBron:

    I support Hillary because she will build on the legacy of my good friend, President Barack Obama

    I believe in what President Obama has done for our country and support her commitment to continuing that legacy

    We must all stand together — no matter where we are from or the color of our skin. And Hillary is running on the message of hope and unity that we need.

    It would be really interesting to know who wrote LeBron’s statement and whether or not the Clinton campaign had any editorial oversight.

  95. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ok, now I've heard everything.

    It's one thing when the late Steve Sabol of NFL films would constantly and consistently downplay the team of the decade Steelers with the "but you know, even though they won more Super Bowl championships during the '70's, the Raiders actually won more regular season games and therefore they should be the real team of the decade (at least in close contention)."

    LA didn't have Pat Haden that yr, if memory serves correct and had to rely on jabrones for some of their offensive firepower.

    Also, the Steelers lost perennial All Pro and HOF LB Jack Ham before the start of the playoffs that season, as well as strong safety Mike Wagner. Jack Ham is widely considered to be one of the all time greatest LB's ever to play in the NFL. Perhaps, just perhaps, not having Jack Ham in the lineup might have been a contributing factor as to why the game was as close as it appeared during the first three quarters. The game, however, was never seriously in doubt--only a matter of when the Steelers would pull away with the Lombardi Trophy. After all, they held HOF RB Earl Campbell, one of the NFL's most dominant running backs of his era to a mere 15 yrs total rushing yards in the AFC Title game. Lacking a dominant HOF RB such as Earl Campbell meant that LA didn't stand much of a chance.

    Swann and Stallworth just went out and did what they usually were known to do--make the plays during the big games, which is one of the reasons that both are enshrined in the HOF in Canton.

    As a nine-year-old diehard Bengals fan, I remember the Rams very much having a good chance to win that game into the 4th quarter. It ended in tears.

    I remember the Rams/Cowboys playoff game also being a good one that year.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But that's the thing, as a Bengals fan you've a built in animus vs the team of the decade. Steelers did that sort of thing, coming from behind to win the day quite often back in the day.

    LA never really stood a chance. If anything, the Steelers were over trying, and were slow to capitalize on many opportunities. Remember, Bradshaw threw three interceptions, two of which came as PIT was driving deep into Rams territory. The spread picked the Steelers by 11, and they won by 12 (31-19). In fact, the Steelers covered the spread in all four of their '70's Super Bowl victories. Perhaps a major reason that it looked closer than it was was because Wagner and especially Jack Ham, one of the all time LBs to play in the NFL were out due to injuries. That does tend to make a difference. If XIV had featured the Steelers vs. say, the Cowboys, for instance, Dallas would've won because their roster contained much more talent.

    This is similar to the 1972 WS, where A's slugger Reggie Jackson was out due to injuries. No one expected C-1B Gene Tenace to come thru big time in the clutch, and even so, CIN almost nearly pulled it out in seven games.

    If Super Bowl XIV had featured a rematch of Dallas vs. PIT, minus Jack Ham and S Mike Wagner, Dallas wins hands down without question.
  96. @attilathehen
    The Negro Football League and Negro Basketball Association are gone. Whites are not watching or attending the games. These issues are moot.
  97. @TheJester
    I'm with you ... no more NFL, NBA, or college sports for that matter.

    What do we (Whites that is) have in common anymore with the typical college or professional football or basketball team? There is little connection with the fans ... and those that remain are being broken as I write.

    Periphery to the games are the athletes' behaviors off the field, which includes a rape culture on campus, blackmailing university administrations unless they get their way, and widespread spousal abuse in the pros.

    The Supreme Court just let stand a ruling that collegiate sports are just the "pros" in miniature. Same players; same culture; same results.

    http://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/17703790/supreme-court-rejects-ncaa-appeal-antitrust-ruling

    I don’t support ESPN because of their social policies so I didn’t click the link. I found the story on another site.

  98. @Desiderius
    As a nine-year-old diehard Bengals fan, I remember the Rams very much having a good chance to win that game into the 4th quarter. It ended in tears.

    I remember the Rams/Cowboys playoff game also being a good one that year.

    But that’s the thing, as a Bengals fan you’ve a built in animus vs the team of the decade. Steelers did that sort of thing, coming from behind to win the day quite often back in the day.

    LA never really stood a chance. If anything, the Steelers were over trying, and were slow to capitalize on many opportunities. Remember, Bradshaw threw three interceptions, two of which came as PIT was driving deep into Rams territory. The spread picked the Steelers by 11, and they won by 12 (31-19). In fact, the Steelers covered the spread in all four of their ’70’s Super Bowl victories. Perhaps a major reason that it looked closer than it was was because Wagner and especially Jack Ham, one of the all time LBs to play in the NFL were out due to injuries. That does tend to make a difference. If XIV had featured the Steelers vs. say, the Cowboys, for instance, Dallas would’ve won because their roster contained much more talent.

    This is similar to the 1972 WS, where A’s slugger Reggie Jackson was out due to injuries. No one expected C-1B Gene Tenace to come thru big time in the clutch, and even so, CIN almost nearly pulled it out in seven games.

    If Super Bowl XIV had featured a rematch of Dallas vs. PIT, minus Jack Ham and S Mike Wagner, Dallas wins hands down without question.

  99. @William BadWhite
    "I often wonder at the absurdity of athletes and entertainers as being held up as voices of moral authority on social issues"

    Today's Washington Post sports section (online version) had a headline announcing the "LeBron endorses Hillary".

    That was good to know. I was waiting to hear what a semi-literate high school graduate thought on the matter before deciding myself.

    Speaking of which, here’s an ad that takes on the whole “vote the way you’re told to by the famous folks”.

    vimeo.com/185223229

  100. Anonymous [AKA "Patrick Wilson"] says:
    @Thomas
    Sad anthropological observation: this guy is basically a substitute dad.

    not a substitute dad, substitute loser infected with greed and willing to sell his mother or sister if it makes money for him.

  101. @jake
    You are on to something. I do not intend to watch a single NFL game this season - nor NBA when that starts.

    Rasmussen has just come out with a poll showing 32% of Americans are avoiding the NFL this season because of the BLM protests: see here. The ratings for MNF this week also continued to slide.

  102. @Intelligent Dasein
    I think the overarching, 30,000 foot theme here---in this story as well as so many other stories appearing of late---is just how completely "rigged" the system really is. Everything is Potemkin these days; nothing is actually solid or solvent or on the level. Nothing is genuine. Nothing is authentic.

    I know this is off-topic, but I think it is an important point to emphasize with regard to the Hillary Clinton campaign, particularly to those who are upset about Trump's recent debate performance. The main thread of criticism appearing just after the debate was that Trump looked "unprepared." Do you not realize, those of you who say such things, that being "prepared" would just have meant buying into the very Potemkin reality that Trump is running against. The Hillary Clinton campaign is nothing but a series of staged incidents. For example, cf. the most recent one concerning the disgraced Ms. Universe, who was carefully prepped by the Clinton people for a year before Mrs. Clinton skillfully used her last debate response to drop her name in a highly scripted fashion.

    This is the Potemkin Election. Hillary Clinton had the script; Lester Holt had the script; the rest of the mainstream media had the script; Donald Trump did not have the script. Now I ask you, how are you supposed to "prepare" for something like that? The answer is that you don't. You just go up against them and try to hold your own, which is what Trump did.

    While I agree that everything is pretty much a lie if you hear about it from the MSM all der Drumpf had to do was bring up Monica when Shrill brought up Machado and riff on the changes from there on out.
    Didn’t happen though.

    The whole thing’s a pathetic fraud.
    She belongs in jail and you ignore the moderator and hammer immigration, the economy and the unconstitutional Mid east boondoggles against the over arching backdrop of PC.
    IOW you never let your opponent frame the debate/argue their case/fight their fight.
    DT should know that, but hey whatever.

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