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The MacArthur Genius grants were announced and they’re the usual weird collection of legitimate nice white lady scientists, such as microbe researcher Diane Newman of Caltech, and hilariously shameless race hustlers, such as Genius T. Coates last year and this year, Claudia Rankine, a poetry professor at Pomona College, who won for her collection of microaggressions she and her friends say they have suffered. From the Wikipedia article on her award-winning 2014 book Citizen: An American Lyric:

The book consists of seven chapters interspersed with images and artworks. The first chapter details microagressions that have occurred to Rankine and her friends. The second chapter discusses the YouTube character Hennessy Youngman created by Jayson Musson, and discusses racial incidents in the life of Serena Williams and her public image. The third chapter features more microagressions and the nature of racist language. In the fourth chapter Rankine writes of the transition of sighs into aches, the nature of language, memory, and watching tennis matches in silence. Chapter five is a complex poem on self-identity, interspersed with more microagressions. Chapter six is a series of scripts for “situation videos” created in collaboration with John Lucas on Hurricane Katrina, the shootings of Trayvon Martin and James Craig Anderson, the Jena Six, the 2011 England riots in the wake of the death of Mark Duggan, Stop-and-frisk, Zinedine Zidane’s headbutt of Marco Materazzi in the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final, and the verbal error during Barack Obama’s first inauguration as President of the United States. The seventh chapter ends with “Making Room”, a script for a “public fiction” about finding a seat on the subway, and a list of African-American men involved in recent police shooting incidents that concludes with the phrase “because white men can’t police their imagination black men are dying”. The seventh chapter is a complex meditation on race, the body, language and various incidents in the life of the author.

… These factors, subtly and metaphorically penned in the first paragraph grants these citizens a means to press forward against the subtle microaggressions, which, metaphorically speaking, is a wake for them in the very wake of the book. … The first chapter immediately transfers the reader into a black persona who is quickly becoming invisible by the harassment of microaggressions. The necessity of tolerance ascribed by blacks, that is, in these occurrences even are subjected to children in grade school. Still consistent with second person perspective use of you, the short narration is of a child: “You”, who experiences a microaggression by first a student who is copying her work throughout the school year, and secondly, from Sister Evelyn, who never acknowledges the blatant incidences. “…… The microaggression described here is that, you are unworthy of a genuine acknowledgment of gratitude.

Chapter 3[edit]
This chapter, similar to Chapter 1, is composed of events in the form of micro-aggressions. … This form of micro-aggression reference is common throughout Citizen. …

Rankine refers to her own personal micro-aggressions and others of importance in real world situations that might have seemed flagrant. … Then continues to describe more moments of micro-aggressions. … ‘Did he just say that?’ ‘Did I just hear what I think I heard?’” (Believermag). These questions refer to responses made by Rankine throughout Citizen after instances of microaggressions. The way in which both the black body and the heads hold a history of racism and question instances of microaggressions supports Rankine’s purpose of relating the history of slavery and racism to the present form of racism in the form of microaggressions. …

2014 National Book Critics Circle Award (Poetry) winner[11][12]
2014 National Book Critics Circle Award (Criticism) finalist[11]
2014 California Book Awards Poetry Finalist[13]
2015 PEN Center USA Poetry Award[14]
2015 New York Times Bestseller[15]
2015 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Poetry[16]
2015 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Poetry[17]

 
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  1. Did you just blog that? Did I just read what I thought I read?
    Can you see me?
    Can you even see me?
    Me Me Me…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @G Pinfold

    Is it me, for a moment... ♪♪

  2. Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year’s campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @PiltdownMan

    When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    , @Dr. X
    @PiltdownMan


    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall.

     

    Ah, yes... another "genius" college professor of color.

    Well, colleges seem to have been adjusting the curriculum lately to match the intellect of their "genius" professors and all the "genius" students they're turning out:

    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/29106/
    , @anon930
    @PiltdownMan

    Yeah, that sounds like a lot of money for Genius T. Rankine, didn't Yale promise like this enormous sum of money to recruit minority professors last year after the costume crisis. I wonder how much superstar professors like her get at an ivy league school. $500,000 dollars a year is my guess. Plus I hear there are a lot of perks, I've heard of colleges paying half of the mortgage on a house.

    She's also married to a white dude, which I found surprising. Both the "white" part and the "dude" part, if you know what I mean.

    , @Ivy
    @PiltdownMan

    What will Rankine decide to wear for a Halloween costume?

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @SteveRogers42

    , @Triumph104
    @PiltdownMan

    After Pomona College, Rankine was at USC for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    She came to the US from Jamaica at age 7, attended Catholic schools then Williams and Columbia. Her parents worked in hospitals as an orderly and nurse's aide. Rankine is married to a white man, documentary photographer John Lucas.


    https://news.usc.edu/83689/poet-claudia-rankine-to-join-english-department/

    , @Connecticut Famer
    @PiltdownMan

    What in hell was this person doing at Cal Tech of all places? Yale, a breeding ground for off-the-charts pseudo-intellectual drivel of the type being propagated by this twit, is a more appropriate venue.

    , @guest
    @PiltdownMan

    If so, Yale administrators are fools. Of course, they were when they surrendered in the 60s, too. But at least back then it was to Scary Blacks instead of Whiny Blacks.

  3. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?

    • LOL: anon930
    • Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @jimmyriddle

    "When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?"
    The most appropriate date for
    http://dailycaller.com/2015/11/09/meet-the-privileged-yale-student-who-shrieked-at-her-professor/
    would be October 31, 2017, which is the 500th anniversary of the church-door publication by her namesake of his 95 Theses demanding safe spaces and the abolition of indulgences for microagressions.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle

  4. [Zinedine Zidane’s headbutt of Marco Materazzi in the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final]

    So a very light-skinned Berber becomes black on the strength of committing one counterproductive violent act?

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    @5371

    that'd be news to most berbers, especially Algerians ones, who have not much love for what they call the "kehls". Pathetic.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @5371

    Strange ... I have achieved the power of the dupe post. Disregard this.

  5. I’m waiting for the MacArthur Foundation to give an award to a cow when it complains about living a life of nothing but hay and suction.

    Really, this is what happens when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Buzz Mohawk


    ...when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.
     
    ...and nothing good to spend it on.

    So they lavish over-praise on a mediocrity plucked from a thin pool. Look at the list of awards cited at the end of the post: seems to indicate a non-competitive field.
    , @Olorin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You and bomag laser in on the hamartia in fiat-currency-speculation-based, debt-slavery-producing, casino-owned-and-operated globalismo:

    Once people have enough money to buy anything people could possibly want, they have no real use for the rest of it.

    So they have to invent things. And being the type of people who do the best in the globalismo noted above, they don't have much practical experience of anything but stroking their own egos. Inflating their own whims into crises or mandates. Inventing phantoms to fear or get others to take seriously.

    The so-called "genius" grants reward frivolity, but even more the capacity for sustaining the philanthropic LARPing of these super-rich people and their foundation staffs.

    , @Mr. Blank
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, it's because of stuff like this that I've gradually warmed to the idea of socking the rich with higher taxes. I'm no socialist, but if all these rich clowns are gonna do with their money is dream up ways to demolish the very foundations of our culture, well, that money would be better spent giving folks EBT cards to use at strip clubs.

  6. Not sure why I do this to myself but I’m reading through Goodreads’ collection of quotes from Citizen:

    Again Serena’s frustrations, her disappointments, exist within a system you understand not to try to understand in any fair-minded way because to do so is to understand the erasure of the self as systemic, as ordinary. For Serena, the daily diminishment is a low flame, a constant drip. Every look, every comment, every bad call blossoms out of history, through her, onto you. To understand is to see Serena as hemmed in as any other black body thrown against our American background. “Aren’t you the one that screwed me over last time here?” she asks umpire Asderaki. “Yeah, you are. Don’t look at me. Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats, because it is that simple.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @larry lurker

    Jeez Louise! That hurt. You might have warned us.

    Okay "Not sure why I do this to myself but ..." was a clue but still.

    You might have warned us.

    , @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    , @Glossy
    @larry lurker

    That stuff, like Coates's writing, is the literary equivalent of pimp suits and pimped-out cars. Gaudy excess, showing off, little sense.

  7. what’s her point? That microaggressions cause black people to score badly on their SATs? That never stopped ashknezi jews or north east asians from scoring well.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @anon

    Her point is that she hates academe so badly, and it's been so horrible and traumatic to her, that she wants a job in it forever and never to leave it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

  8. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT: While I don’t expect Steve to draw attention to this via a dedicated post, I would encourage those with reddit accounts to upvote this:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/53y52d/soros_is_mobilizing_the_global_us_citizen_vote/?st=ite8wwo8&sh=a78c4198

    While it was on the front page at Breitbart recently, it would help to have some additional help and targeted action by reddit. The idea is that there are nearly 8 million US citizens who are not registered to vote. If we can get them to vote, then it could prove to be a decider. And now, the Eye of Soros has cast its baleful gaze at the problem. From what I understand, the overseas voters are more likely to vote Republican, so a general raising of awareness of this is good. Our side has nothing to lose by advertising this.

    The registration and counting of the votes is according to the last state you lived in. So if you last resided in anything approaching a swing state, it’s very important to register.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    Actually, apart from military, the overseas voters are much more likely to vote dem. That is why Soros is behind this.

  9. from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation

    “MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support “ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures.” However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation’s board of directors, “I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it.”

    Between 1979 and 1981, John’s son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation’s finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur’s desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called ‘one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.’”

    • Replies: @unit472
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Philanthropic foundations should be required to disburse their funds within 20 years of the bequest. If they are truly charitable endeavors there is no need to have them exist in perpetuity for the benefit of their boards and preserve the original intent of the donor.

    As a note aside, requiring charitable foundations to disgorge their holdings would boost 'aggregate demand' ,the holy grail of liberal economists, as large foundations had to liquidate and spend their assets

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anonymous Nephew


    subtly and metaphorically penned in the first paragraph grants these citizens a means to press forward against the subtle microaggressions, which, metaphorically speaking, is a wake for them in the very wake of the book
     
    I'm trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a--subtle--dig at Genius Claudia.

    Replies: @Kylie

    , @pepperinmono
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Almost all of the huge foundations of severe capitalists are doing work their founders would find abhorrent.

    , @Barnard
    @Anonymous Nephew

    This isn't uncommon. I seriously doubt this is what Andrew Mellon would have wanted done with a foundation setup in his memory.

    https://mellon.org/programs/diversity/

    https://mellon.org/initiatives/our-compelling-interests/

    The thought that part of his fortune was squandered by his daughter in law bankrolling John Edwards Presidential Campaign also had to have him rolling over in his grave.

    , @Njguy73
    @Anonymous Nephew


    “I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it.”
     
    He said that? He got what he deserved. To have his name linked with Marxist clowns and race-baiters.
  10. More like Narcissism grants.

  11. My God, look at this one… where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    “Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender.”

    This is her ‘art’:

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Marie

    There's no end to it and no escaping it, is there?

    Btw I don't usually reply to your posts but I really enjoy them.

    Replies: @Marie

    , @Front toward enemy
    @Marie

    "....a potent platform for commentary..." Beads? Beads? You gotta be shotting me. Genius? There are going to be a lot of hungry "geniuses" come the apocalypse.

    , @SFG
    @Marie

    Once photography made copying nature really easy artists had to find something else to do. With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    I can't say I'm all that impressed with what they came up with. Interestingly, the one really vital visual medium, film, often shows things that can't happen in real life. There's something deep in this, but I don't know what it is...

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @guest, @guest

    , @Lot
    @Marie

    Well her bead dolls and Murano style glass sculptures may not be great fine art, but it is better than 95% of the post-1970 garbage that sells for a million dollars at auctions.

    I'd call them good folk art, often cute or clever. No need to hate on her just because some foundation wants to give her a million dollars and call her a top artist.

    Replies: @Marie

    , @sayless
    @Marie

    "Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender.”

    Can we look forward to her beadwork interpretation of the Channon-Newsome murders?

    , @Clyde
    @Marie


    “Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations......
     
    A $600,000 genius grant for this pretentious crap? Her jewelry is junky folk art, images can be found on the www.
    She is very light skinned black with a mop of curled orangish hair.https://goo.gl/qgvEmP
    On the plus side, at least she is not ripping off the taxpayers via a public university sinecure.
  12. Many blacks seem to think that white people don’t experience rude and inconsiderate behavior.

    And really, how often do white students copy from black students?

    • Agree: sayless
  13. When I read, “Rankine refers to her own personal micro-aggressions and others of importance in real world situations that might have seemed flagrant” I thought Rankine might have engaged in some self-criticism, at least about her own unintended offenses to people of greater intersectionality, but apparently not.

    Getting a seat on a subway – is that hard for a black person? Three black guys entering together a mostly empty subway car (not talking men in suits here) tend to declare a third of it their territory, triangulating aisle seats with about five spaces between them, and man-spreading in a shoulder-tailbone slouch.

    Ms. Rankine, there are plenty of not-nice white ladies who won’t move their coats for nice white ladies either. Your hue, gentility and need matter not a whit to them. They want their space but at least they are satisfied with one extra seat.

  14. @Anonymous Nephew
    from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation


    "MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support "ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures." However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation's board of directors, "I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it."

    Between 1979 and 1981, John's son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation's finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur's desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called 'one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.'"
     

    Replies: @unit472, @The Anti-Gnostic, @pepperinmono, @Barnard, @Njguy73

    Philanthropic foundations should be required to disburse their funds within 20 years of the bequest. If they are truly charitable endeavors there is no need to have them exist in perpetuity for the benefit of their boards and preserve the original intent of the donor.

    As a note aside, requiring charitable foundations to disgorge their holdings would boost ‘aggregate demand’ ,the holy grail of liberal economists, as large foundations had to liquidate and spend their assets

  15. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    Germany: Nearly 40 Per Cent of Under Fives Now ‘Migrant Background’
    by VIRGINIA HALE, 21 Sep 2016
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/09/21/germany-40-percent-migrant-background/

    Following the release of figures which reveal almost four in ten children under five have foreign roots, Michael Paulwitz says the demographic change will be the death of Germany’s welfare state.

    The journalist and historian predicts that “hard struggles” over resources will take place when ethnic Germans are a minority, and that native Germans “will inevitably lose out”…

    Mr Paulwitz’ article follows the release on Friday of official figures from the Federal Statistics Office. While they show 21 per cent of the total population currently have a migrant background he notes that such people are disproportionately represented in the younger age cohorts.

    Mr Paulwitz writes: “The social and redistributive state as we know it will no longer be affordable at its present level when the population is no longer dominated by ethnic Germans, and is a multicultural population mix.”

    Collected in mid 2015, the Federal Statistics Office data fails to reflect the more than 1.6 million migrants who arrived in 2015 and the first half of 2016, or the huge number of estimated illegal immigrants living in Germany.

    Mr Paulwitz points out that while Angela Merkel’s open door policy was a “dramatic escalation” of previous policies, even before she “opened the lock” a quarter of people aged between 15 and 45 had foreign roots in 2014.

    He contends that these demographic trends can only increase as, “through family reunification, this number [1.6 million] is expected to at least double if not multiply”.

    Furthermore he observes there is an “inexhaustible supply” of Arabs and Africans who want to move to Germany. The historian typifies them as “second, third and fourth sons” of families, who are “demanding” but “lack the education or drive to create their own wealth”.

    Taking all of this into account, Mr Paulwitz diagnoses a grim future for Germany and its native population. He forecasts “hard struggles over resources will be the result” and contends that ethnic Germans are “pacified” and “ageing”…

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Anonymous

    Four in ten with both parents foreign?

  16. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall.

    Ah, yes… another “genius” college professor of color.

    Well, colleges seem to have been adjusting the curriculum lately to match the intellect of their “genius” professors and all the “genius” students they’re turning out:

    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/29106/

  17. @Anonymous Nephew
    from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation


    "MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support "ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures." However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation's board of directors, "I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it."

    Between 1979 and 1981, John's son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation's finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur's desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called 'one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.'"
     

    Replies: @unit472, @The Anti-Gnostic, @pepperinmono, @Barnard, @Njguy73

    subtly and metaphorically penned in the first paragraph grants these citizens a means to press forward against the subtle microaggressions, which, metaphorically speaking, is a wake for them in the very wake of the book

    I’m trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a–subtle–dig at Genius Claudia.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "I’m trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a–subtle–dig at Genius Claudia."

    No. That entry was written by a black. Subtle digs are a white thing.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Truth

  18. Claudia Rankine should have moved to Northwestern. Apparently, we are now lunatics in addition to being deplorables.

    http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/09/21/northwestern-president-critics-of-safe-spaces-are-lunatics/

    • Replies: @Altai
    @berserker


    Schapiro is a trustee of the Williamstown Theatre Festival, the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and Hillel International.
     
    Those all seem so progressive and universalist, except that last one...
  19. “You, who experiences a microaggression by first a student who is copying her work throughout the school year,”

    Hm. When that happened to me, I figured it was because the kids knew I was smart and didn’t know the answers for themselves. Silly white girl that I am, I never knew race had anything to do with cheaters looking over my shoulder.

  20. Is that Wikipedia entry expected to encourage people to buy her book?
    On the other hand, school, college and public libraries are probably the only target customers, and that description is like catnip to their purchasers.

  21. The history cited by anonymous nephew was interesting.

    I suppose the lesson is that if you somehow become mega-rich, don’t set up a foundation dispensing your wealth in the form of prizes to worthy beneficiaries. Once you die, and you will die, the foundation will be taken over by the usual suspects and direct your money towards what they want, which might not be what you want. The history of the Nobels also indicates this.

    • Replies: @Thirdtwin
    @eD

    Conquest's 2nd Law:

    ""Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing."

    http://www.isegoria.net/2008/07/robert-conquests-three-laws-of-politics/

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Desiderius

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @eD

    The John M. Olin Foundation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Olin_Foundation) showed how the founder's wishes could be observed. This ought to be the law. Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Bill Jones

  22. My third grade teacher Miss Ivanovna had a standard reply: If you keep complaining for nothing, I shall give you a good whacking so you will have a real reason to complain. OK, she was an evil Russian Communist and believed in corporal punishment.

  23. @Anonymous Nephew
    from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation


    "MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support "ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures." However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation's board of directors, "I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it."

    Between 1979 and 1981, John's son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation's finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur's desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called 'one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.'"
     

    Replies: @unit472, @The Anti-Gnostic, @pepperinmono, @Barnard, @Njguy73

    Almost all of the huge foundations of severe capitalists are doing work their founders would find abhorrent.

    • Agree: Barnard
  24. Clockmed doesn’t seem to be on the list, even though he invented the clock. Just because he is black and muhslim

  25. Ouch!

    What about the constant onslaught of microaggressions blacks unleash against the English language?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Kylie


    onslaught... against the English language
     
    I believe that, and all other Black activity, qualifies as macro-aggression.
  26. Claudia Rankine
    Wikipedia____Born: 1963 · Kingston, Jamaica

    IOW she came here to be microaggressed against, to make a lucrative university career of bellyaching about the country she *chose* to immigrate to. Forced to no doubt by American colonialism, imperialism, etc., etc., she would have much preferred to be picking mangoes and coconuts for two dollars a day in Jamaica mon.

    …and is the Iseman Professor of Poetry, Yale University.

    and the beat goes on

  27. @eD
    The history cited by anonymous nephew was interesting.

    I suppose the lesson is that if you somehow become mega-rich, don't set up a foundation dispensing your wealth in the form of prizes to worthy beneficiaries. Once you die, and you will die, the foundation will be taken over by the usual suspects and direct your money towards what they want, which might not be what you want. The history of the Nobels also indicates this.

    Replies: @Thirdtwin, @Jim Don Bob

    Conquest’s 2nd Law:

    “”Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.”

    http://www.isegoria.net/2008/07/robert-conquests-three-laws-of-politics/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Thirdtwin

    Technically O'Sullivan's Law:

    http://www.isegoria.net/2015/09/osullivans-first-law/

    , @Desiderius
    @Thirdtwin


    Conquest’s 2nd Law:

    “”Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.”
     

    Maybe it's time to retire the Washington Generals' (and, not coincidentally, that of Soros and friends) definition of right and left.
  28. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anonymous Nephew


    subtly and metaphorically penned in the first paragraph grants these citizens a means to press forward against the subtle microaggressions, which, metaphorically speaking, is a wake for them in the very wake of the book
     
    I'm trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a--subtle--dig at Genius Claudia.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “I’m trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a–subtle–dig at Genius Claudia.”

    No. That entry was written by a black. Subtle digs are a white thing.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Kylie

    It's all good. Now it's unintentional hilarity.

    , @Truth
    @Kylie

    After 10 years here, you know that's not true, Sportette.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Djinn Fizz, @Mr. Anon

  29. @Kylie
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "I’m trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a–subtle–dig at Genius Claudia."

    No. That entry was written by a black. Subtle digs are a white thing.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Truth

    It’s all good. Now it’s unintentional hilarity.

  30. @Anonymous Nephew
    from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation


    "MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support "ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures." However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation's board of directors, "I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it."

    Between 1979 and 1981, John's son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation's finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur's desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called 'one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.'"
     

    Replies: @unit472, @The Anti-Gnostic, @pepperinmono, @Barnard, @Njguy73

    This isn’t uncommon. I seriously doubt this is what Andrew Mellon would have wanted done with a foundation setup in his memory.

    https://mellon.org/programs/diversity/

    https://mellon.org/initiatives/our-compelling-interests/

    The thought that part of his fortune was squandered by his daughter in law bankrolling John Edwards Presidential Campaign also had to have him rolling over in his grave.

  31. Apparently there is now an African American set-aside for MacArthur awards. It appears that the criteria for winning is is similar to that for Acadamy Awards, i.e., “Never go full retard.”

    In the case of the MacArthurs, full retard would be, ““Burnin’ down shit ain’t going to help nothin’! Y’all burnin’ down shit we need in our community. Take that shit to the suburbs. Burn that shit down! We need our shit! We need our weaves. [Pause] I don’t wear it. But we need it.”

    The winning approach would be the one followed by Genius T. Coates and Claudia Rankine. Just retarded enough for black studies.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Silber
    @Harry Baldwin

    "We need our weaves...I don't wear it. But we need it."

    Yes Weave Can!

  32. @Kylie
    Ouch!

    What about the constant onslaught of microaggressions blacks unleash against the English language?

    Replies: @bomag

    onslaught… against the English language

    I believe that, and all other Black activity, qualifies as macro-aggression.

    • Agree: Kylie
  33. I am now officially living in Bizarro World. It’s almost as if this is true:

    https://twitter.com/gatewaypundit/status/778811992190558208

  34. OT – Steve Did you see that Diblasio criticized Trump’s suggestion that stop-and-frisk be extended elsewhere in the USA?

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/22/politics/bill-de-blasio-trump-stop-and-frisk/

  35. @Buzz Mohawk
    I'm waiting for the MacArthur Foundation to give an award to a cow when it complains about living a life of nothing but hay and suction.

    Really, this is what happens when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.

    Replies: @bomag, @Olorin, @Mr. Blank

    …when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.

    …and nothing good to spend it on.

    So they lavish over-praise on a mediocrity plucked from a thin pool. Look at the list of awards cited at the end of the post: seems to indicate a non-competitive field.

  36. I have to say, my reaction to reading this sort of stuff is like walking into a gymnasium where a a 35 foot tall house of cards built by my worst enemy has collapsed: At first I laugh at the flimsy structure and the predictable fate which has befallen it, but then I realize everybody outside a tiny fringe of the deplorable alt right takes this stuff very seriously, or at least pretends to so they don’t have their careers ruined. So now the joke is on me, and it’s up to me to painstakingly put the whole thing back together again just to show these people how flimsy and unsubstantial this thing was in the first place and not the great edifice they claim it was. I just don’t have the time and energy to do it. So I lose.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Patrick in SC

    Excellent!

    , @bomag
    @Patrick in SC

    Good analogy. And when you've painstakingly put it back together to demonstrate the flimsiness, your worst enemy will claim you neglected one small detail that would have rendered the thing robust, but since you think bad thoughts you can't see the critical detail, so off to the gulag with you.

  37. If this is the best we can expect of a Black “genius,” then, like it or not, the stereotype of Blacks as being less intelligent is true.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Jonathan Silber

    "If this is the best we can expect of a Black “genius,” then, like it or not, the stereotype of Blacks as being less intelligent is true."

    Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That's why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates will never write a book or article that is not about Blackness and neither will Barack Hussein Obama.

    That's what I like about White people, we are way less monolithic than Blacks when it comes to subjects we are interested in.

    Replies: @Kylie

  38. @Harry Baldwin
    Apparently there is now an African American set-aside for MacArthur awards. It appears that the criteria for winning is is similar to that for Acadamy Awards, i.e., "Never go full retard."

    In the case of the MacArthurs, full retard would be, "“Burnin’ down shit ain’t going to help nothin’! Y’all burnin’ down shit we need in our community. Take that shit to the suburbs. Burn that shit down! We need our shit! We need our weaves. [Pause] I don’t wear it. But we need it.”

    The winning approach would be the one followed by Genius T. Coates and Claudia Rankine. Just retarded enough for black studies.

    Replies: @Jonathan Silber

    “We need our weaves…I don’t wear it. But we need it.”

    Yes Weave Can!

  39. Deputy Chair of the Board of Directors, NY Federal Reserve, Sara Horowitz, an Obama crony from Chicago, is a 1999 winner of the MacArthur Genius Award.

    Horowitz was granted $517 million in low-interest federal loans to create Obama CO-OP, Health Republic, and two other CO-OPs, more than one-fifth of the total $2.4 billion in federal loans available to build all 23 CO-OPs.

    Two of the CO-OPS are now bankrupt and doctors and hospitals are owed 100s of millions of dollars and Horowitz remains on the board of directors.

    Everything is political and along with that comes corruption. I have more examples, but what the hell is the use of pointing them out.

    You can read it all Horowitz here:
    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20160417/HEALTH_CARE/160419890

  40. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    Yeah, that sounds like a lot of money for Genius T. Rankine, didn’t Yale promise like this enormous sum of money to recruit minority professors last year after the costume crisis. I wonder how much superstar professors like her get at an ivy league school. $500,000 dollars a year is my guess. Plus I hear there are a lot of perks, I’ve heard of colleges paying half of the mortgage on a house.

    She’s also married to a white dude, which I found surprising. Both the “white” part and the “dude” part, if you know what I mean.

  41. I’m considering writing a book about all the microagressions committed by black people. Remember when urban black males walked around with giant boom-boxes on their shoulders blasting rap? Thanks for sharing, yo.

    Wonder if I’ll get a MacArthur grant?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Laugh Track

    You haven't got one already? For shame!

  42. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    What will Rankine decide to wear for a Halloween costume?

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @Ivy

    Rankine bears a very weird resemblance to Julian Bond.

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Ivy

    Doesn't need one.

  43. I propose we stop with the “micro” part, and start showing them “macro” aggression.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Truth
    @LiveFreeOrDie

    Lead the way, Dirty Harry.

    Replies: @bomag, @Neil Templeton

  44. From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:

    “Not long ago you are in a room where someone asks the philosopher Judith Butler what makes language hurtful. You can feel everyone lean in. Our very being exposes us to the address of another, she answers. We suffer from the condition of being addressable. Our emotional openness, she adds, is carried by our addressability. Language navigates this.

    For so long you thought the ambition of racist language was to denigrate and erase you as a person. After considering Butler’s remarks you begin to understand yourself as rendered hyper-visible in the face of such language acts. Language that feels hurtful is intended to exploit all the ways that you are present. Your alertness, your openness, your desire to engage actually demand your presence, your looking up, your talking back as insane as it is, saying please.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudia_Rankine

    I don’t think many of us have enough Ivy League degrees even to begin to grasp such penetrating and subtle reflections.

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    @candid_observer

    It's not reflection. It's word salad performance. It's cargo cult philosophy. It's slam. It's spoken word poetry and it's not even intended to make sense and yet we stoop so low as to call these "people" geniuses and thinkers. Maddening.

    , @Ozymandias
    @candid_observer

    "From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:"

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H1lWxHdzwL0

    , @Deckin
    @candid_observer

    The saddest part of this bit of doggerel is 'the philosopher Judith Butler'. How often since Socrates' execution has the discipline suffered such an insult?

    Replies: @CCZ

    , @guest
    @candid_observer

    Riddle: I am meaningless, but you can see me. Put me in your brain, and I'll make it lighter. What am I?

    Answer: academic prose.

  45. “a black persona who is quickly becoming invisible by the harassment of microaggressions”

    LOL @ this gibberish

  46. Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always. Everything they write. Everything they do. However, whites don’t. It must be ‘torture’ for them to compare themselves to something they envy, hate, and can’t be. I doubt this is so much the case in all black countries.

    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    @susie

    I'm sure none of the white people reading this blog have the habit of always viewing the world through the lens of race.

    Replies: @IA

    , @sayless
    @susie

    Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always.

    Aren't any public black intellectuals interested in ideas? Are they only interested in being black? Do they understand what a frigging bore they all are?

    Replies: @Kylie

  47. As bad as the MacArthur Awards have always been, it now seems to be collapsing into a black hole of political correctness.

    Of the 23 recipients, only 2 may be said to be white males (one other who at first blush might seem to be one, Daryl Baldwin, is a Native American doing research on the language of his tribe): Bill Thies and Josh Kun.

    And what do they do?

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, “creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world.”

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    The MacArthur grants have now officially violated the rule: Never go full retard.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @candid_observer

    Oops, I did miss Vincent Fecteau, who is a sculptor, and doesn't seem to be part of some politically correct enterprise, so there is that.

    , @ogunsiron
    @candid_observer

    The foundation is fully converged, as Vox Day would say. Whatever its original purpose was doesn't matter anymore.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @candid_observer

    Two guys in the list seem to have traded places. No borders!


    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, “creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world.”
     
    Bill Thies is a capable computer scientist.

    https://www.eecs.mit.edu/people/alumni/alumni-eecs-connector-2014/bill-thies-01-meng-02-phd-09

    Subhash Khot, a very capable theoretical computer scientist was also named a Fellow this year. He's from India, but like Bill Thies, decided that his talents were best employed on the other side of the world.


    Subhash Khot is a theoretical computer scientist whose work is providing critical insight into unresolved problems in the field of computational complexity.

     
    https://www.macfound.org/fellows/960/
    , @Lurker
    @candid_observer


    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.
     
    They left the 't' off the end of his name, clearly a microaggression that needs investigating.
  48. All this micro-aggression stuff is just a way to purge every remaining White male out of any job that BLM types want, and most White women too. White women go along with it because it helps purge White males and they figure they’ll do better by going along with the more aggressive types.

    Thus the future is a a bunch of incompetent BLM types running everything, with outsourced foreigners doing the actual work. Leaving White men to do what?

    If the genius BLM people wanted to create a violent revolution, pushing the most talented and dangerous group to have zero interest and investment in the current system could not be more direct.

    • Replies: @Anonitron2
    @Whiskey

    Another clumsy attempt to make PC stuff sound more deliberate than it is.

    The people pushing microaggressions are sentimental mediocrities acting in total sincerity. There's no surreptitious will to power, it's just the elevation of Hallmark politics to a level of stonefaced seriousness not possible without the internet.

    Think about how your spinster aunt reacts to Family Circus cartoons (or insert schlocky old lady shit here). That's what politics are now.

  49. @candid_observer
    As bad as the MacArthur Awards have always been, it now seems to be collapsing into a black hole of political correctness.

    Of the 23 recipients, only 2 may be said to be white males (one other who at first blush might seem to be one, Daryl Baldwin, is a Native American doing research on the language of his tribe): Bill Thies and Josh Kun.

    And what do they do?

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, "creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world."

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    The MacArthur grants have now officially violated the rule: Never go full retard.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @ogunsiron, @PiltdownMan, @Lurker

    Oops, I did miss Vincent Fecteau, who is a sculptor, and doesn’t seem to be part of some politically correct enterprise, so there is that.

  50. @5371
    [Zinedine Zidane’s headbutt of Marco Materazzi in the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final]

    So a very light-skinned Berber becomes black on the strength of committing one counterproductive violent act?

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Expletive Deleted

    that’d be news to most berbers, especially Algerians ones, who have not much love for what they call the “kehls”. Pathetic.

  51. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    After Pomona College, Rankine was at USC for the 2015-2016 academic year.

    She came to the US from Jamaica at age 7, attended Catholic schools then Williams and Columbia. Her parents worked in hospitals as an orderly and nurse’s aide. Rankine is married to a white man, documentary photographer John Lucas.

    https://news.usc.edu/83689/poet-claudia-rankine-to-join-english-department/

  52. @Laugh Track
    I'm considering writing a book about all the microagressions committed by black people. Remember when urban black males walked around with giant boom-boxes on their shoulders blasting rap? Thanks for sharing, yo.

    Wonder if I'll get a MacArthur grant?

    Replies: @Lurker

    You haven’t got one already? For shame!

  53. @Patrick in SC
    I have to say, my reaction to reading this sort of stuff is like walking into a gymnasium where a a 35 foot tall house of cards built by my worst enemy has collapsed: At first I laugh at the flimsy structure and the predictable fate which has befallen it, but then I realize everybody outside a tiny fringe of the deplorable alt right takes this stuff very seriously, or at least pretends to so they don't have their careers ruined. So now the joke is on me, and it's up to me to painstakingly put the whole thing back together again just to show these people how flimsy and unsubstantial this thing was in the first place and not the great edifice they claim it was. I just don't have the time and energy to do it. So I lose.

    Replies: @Lurker, @bomag

    Excellent!

  54. @candid_observer
    From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:

    "Not long ago you are in a room where someone asks the philosopher Judith Butler what makes language hurtful. You can feel everyone lean in. Our very being exposes us to the address of another, she answers. We suffer from the condition of being addressable. Our emotional openness, she adds, is carried by our addressability. Language navigates this.

    For so long you thought the ambition of racist language was to denigrate and erase you as a person. After considering Butler’s remarks you begin to understand yourself as rendered hyper-visible in the face of such language acts. Language that feels hurtful is intended to exploit all the ways that you are present. Your alertness, your openness, your desire to engage actually demand your presence, your looking up, your talking back as insane as it is, saying please."
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudia_Rankine

    I don't think many of us have enough Ivy League degrees even to begin to grasp such penetrating and subtle reflections.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Ozymandias, @Deckin, @guest

    It’s not reflection. It’s word salad performance. It’s cargo cult philosophy. It’s slam. It’s spoken word poetry and it’s not even intended to make sense and yet we stoop so low as to call these “people” geniuses and thinkers. Maddening.

  55. @candid_observer
    As bad as the MacArthur Awards have always been, it now seems to be collapsing into a black hole of political correctness.

    Of the 23 recipients, only 2 may be said to be white males (one other who at first blush might seem to be one, Daryl Baldwin, is a Native American doing research on the language of his tribe): Bill Thies and Josh Kun.

    And what do they do?

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, "creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world."

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    The MacArthur grants have now officially violated the rule: Never go full retard.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @ogunsiron, @PiltdownMan, @Lurker

    The foundation is fully converged, as Vox Day would say. Whatever its original purpose was doesn’t matter anymore.

  56. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    What in hell was this person doing at Cal Tech of all places? Yale, a breeding ground for off-the-charts pseudo-intellectual drivel of the type being propagated by this twit, is a more appropriate venue.

  57. @susie
    Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always. Everything they write. Everything they do. However, whites don't. It must be 'torture' for them to compare themselves to something they envy, hate, and can't be. I doubt this is so much the case in all black countries.

    Replies: @oddsbodkins, @sayless

    I’m sure none of the white people reading this blog have the habit of always viewing the world through the lens of race.

    • Replies: @IA
    @oddsbodkins


    I’m sure none of the white people reading this blog have the habit of always viewing the world through the lens of race.
     
    We never made it into a shakedown business. We never called the Smithsonian Institute the European-American Institute. We didn't call the National Gallery the Gallery of European Art, nor the American Museum of Technology the European-American Museum of Technology. Etc., etc., etc. BTW, the opening of the Smithsonian's African-American Museum is tomorrow, Sep. 24, 2016. This is huge.
  58. Ron Unz–Thank you so much for the “commenters to ignore” feature. I have gotten good use out of it. What would be even better is if there were also be an option to ignore the responses to those commenters we ignore. That would help me clear up the waste of space occupied by Tiny Duck and those who find him worth debating.

    • Replies: @Kyle a
    @Harry Baldwin

    Even better. Just ban the TD for life. That would save even more time in your hectic life. You wouldn't have the buttons so much.

  59. Rankine bears a very weird resemblance to Julian Bond.

  60. @Patrick in SC
    I have to say, my reaction to reading this sort of stuff is like walking into a gymnasium where a a 35 foot tall house of cards built by my worst enemy has collapsed: At first I laugh at the flimsy structure and the predictable fate which has befallen it, but then I realize everybody outside a tiny fringe of the deplorable alt right takes this stuff very seriously, or at least pretends to so they don't have their careers ruined. So now the joke is on me, and it's up to me to painstakingly put the whole thing back together again just to show these people how flimsy and unsubstantial this thing was in the first place and not the great edifice they claim it was. I just don't have the time and energy to do it. So I lose.

    Replies: @Lurker, @bomag

    Good analogy. And when you’ve painstakingly put it back together to demonstrate the flimsiness, your worst enemy will claim you neglected one small detail that would have rendered the thing robust, but since you think bad thoughts you can’t see the critical detail, so off to the gulag with you.

  61. @larry lurker
    Not sure why I do this to myself but I'm reading through Goodreads' collection of quotes from Citizen:

    Again Serena’s frustrations, her disappointments, exist within a system you understand not to try to understand in any fair-minded way because to do so is to understand the erasure of the self as systemic, as ordinary. For Serena, the daily diminishment is a low flame, a constant drip. Every look, every comment, every bad call blossoms out of history, through her, onto you. To understand is to see Serena as hemmed in as any other black body thrown against our American background. “Aren’t you the one that screwed me over last time here?” she asks umpire Asderaki. “Yeah, you are. Don’t look at me. Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats, because it is that simple.
     

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous, @Glossy

    Jeez Louise! That hurt. You might have warned us.

    Okay “Not sure why I do this to myself but …” was a clue but still.

    You might have warned us.

  62. @Harry Baldwin
    Ron Unz--Thank you so much for the "commenters to ignore" feature. I have gotten good use out of it. What would be even better is if there were also be an option to ignore the responses to those commenters we ignore. That would help me clear up the waste of space occupied by Tiny Duck and those who find him worth debating.

    Replies: @Kyle a

    Even better. Just ban the TD for life. That would save even more time in your hectic life. You wouldn’t have the buttons so much.

  63. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    There’s no end to it and no escaping it, is there?

    Btw I don’t usually reply to your posts but I really enjoy them.

    • Replies: @Marie
    @Kylie

    Thanks! What with the daily Cultural Revolution and its outrages, you just have to wonder if Herbert Marcuse is in the grave watching it all, cackling with glee and reveling in the destruction of the West.

  64. This didn’t occur to me until Rod Dreher pointed this out in a blog post today, but the riot in Charlotte probably helped Trump lock up NC. Thanks BLM!

  65. @eD
    The history cited by anonymous nephew was interesting.

    I suppose the lesson is that if you somehow become mega-rich, don't set up a foundation dispensing your wealth in the form of prizes to worthy beneficiaries. Once you die, and you will die, the foundation will be taken over by the usual suspects and direct your money towards what they want, which might not be what you want. The history of the Nobels also indicates this.

    Replies: @Thirdtwin, @Jim Don Bob

    The John M. Olin Foundation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Olin_Foundation) showed how the founder’s wishes could be observed. This ought to be the law. Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jim Don Bob


    Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.
     
    They're well on their way to the fate of monasteries under Henry VIII.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Bill Jones
    @Jim Don Bob

    This is not a new problem: back in the mid '50's the Reese commission looked at this, here's the Dodd report that resulted.

    To no-ones surprise, the foundations had concluded that war was the best way to achieve societal change, hence, one is coming soon near you.


    https://archive.org/details/DoddReportToTheReeceCommitteeOnFoundations-1954-RobberBaron

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  66. The amount of cant in the MacArthur winner descriptions deserves its own award.

    https://www.macfound.org/fellows/class/class-2016/

    I particularly enjoyed this one:

    Joyce J. Scott

    Jewelry Maker and Sculptor repositioning beadwork into a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @C. Van Carter

    "Repositioning beadwork." I did that once with some wainscotting in our bathroom. Decided not to put it behind the potent porcelain platform, but on the opposite wall, where it could be...more lengthily observed and appreciated so to speak.

    Perhaps our host, or his host, could consider hosting an annual award like the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest.

    The Unz-Sailer Award recognizing hyperbolically turgid social justice rhetoric. The award being the top 20 entries posted somewhere hereabouts, all resultant fame and fortune deposited into a sidebar to inspire the PC-oppressed.

    Replies: @C. Van Carter, @Bill Jones

  67. @Buzz Mohawk
    I'm waiting for the MacArthur Foundation to give an award to a cow when it complains about living a life of nothing but hay and suction.

    Really, this is what happens when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.

    Replies: @bomag, @Olorin, @Mr. Blank

    You and bomag laser in on the hamartia in fiat-currency-speculation-based, debt-slavery-producing, casino-owned-and-operated globalismo:

    Once people have enough money to buy anything people could possibly want, they have no real use for the rest of it.

    So they have to invent things. And being the type of people who do the best in the globalismo noted above, they don’t have much practical experience of anything but stroking their own egos. Inflating their own whims into crises or mandates. Inventing phantoms to fear or get others to take seriously.

    The so-called “genius” grants reward frivolity, but even more the capacity for sustaining the philanthropic LARPing of these super-rich people and their foundation staffs.

  68. @anon
    what's her point? That microaggressions cause black people to score badly on their SATs? That never stopped ashknezi jews or north east asians from scoring well.

    Replies: @Olorin

    Her point is that she hates academe so badly, and it’s been so horrible and traumatic to her, that she wants a job in it forever and never to leave it.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Olorin

    Inspiration flourishes at the intersection of fantasy, Truth, and greed.

  69. Look at the board of directions for the MacArthur grant, and you will see a demographic problem.

    https://www.macfound.org/about/people/board-directors/

    Way too many women. That’s what gives rise to bullshit like this.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @Jason Liu

    I see that Claude Steele -- pioneer of the "stereotype-threat" notion -- is on the board.

    Just looking at the selection of "geniuses", I'd have to say that it appears to be an exercise in the grand to correct "stereotype-threat".

    I can't imagine why something that can't be made to work reliably in experiments should fail in the real, complex world.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  70. @jimmyriddle
    @PiltdownMan

    When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    “When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?”
    The most appropriate date for
    http://dailycaller.com/2015/11/09/meet-the-privileged-yale-student-who-shrieked-at-her-professor/
    would be October 31, 2017, which is the 500th anniversary of the church-door publication by her namesake of his 95 Theses demanding safe spaces and the abolition of indulgences for microagressions.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    And, appropriately, the German pronunciation is, I think, "looter".

  71. I’m wondering what non-black, non-white Americans are thinking about this mess. The Hispanics I know, who were all born here, think BLM are crazy & dangerous. I don’t hear any sympathy. Is it different with Millenials in those demographics?

  72. Anonymous [AKA "CaliforniaDreaming"] says:

    Note there is an immigration angle on this as well. Claudia is from Jamaica. We brought her from Jamaica to America, not because she brought any critical skills we needed, or because of her STEM achievements, or whatever other benefit, but because she would come here and lecture us about how bad we are, all while living off of white American (mostly male) taxpayers. We need to stop all third world immigration. Third world immigration is like being robbed, raped and publicly humiliated all at the same time.

    She has a country she can go to where nearly everyone is black. It’s Jamaica. I pray that Trump wins, and as one of his actions, goes through and audits the naturalization papers of scammers like Claudia, and if there are falsehoods in her naturalization documents, she should be denaturalized and returned home. Oh that would be beautiful.

    • Agree: Kylie
  73. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    “….a potent platform for commentary…” Beads? Beads? You gotta be shotting me. Genius? There are going to be a lot of hungry “geniuses” come the apocalypse.

  74. @C. Van Carter
    The amount of cant in the MacArthur winner descriptions deserves its own award.

    https://www.macfound.org/fellows/class/class-2016/

    I particularly enjoyed this one:

    Joyce J. Scott

    Jewelry Maker and Sculptor repositioning beadwork into a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices.
     

    Replies: @Olorin

    “Repositioning beadwork.” I did that once with some wainscotting in our bathroom. Decided not to put it behind the potent porcelain platform, but on the opposite wall, where it could be…more lengthily observed and appreciated so to speak.

    Perhaps our host, or his host, could consider hosting an annual award like the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest.

    The Unz-Sailer Award recognizing hyperbolically turgid social justice rhetoric. The award being the top 20 entries posted somewhere hereabouts, all resultant fame and fortune deposited into a sidebar to inspire the PC-oppressed.

    • Replies: @C. Van Carter
    @Olorin

    There are too many deserving examples and not enough judges with the mental strength to read them.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Olorin

    Bead board

    Replies: @Olorin

  75. @Jonathan Silber
    If this is the best we can expect of a Black "genius," then, like it or not, the stereotype of Blacks as being less intelligent is true.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “If this is the best we can expect of a Black “genius,” then, like it or not, the stereotype of Blacks as being less intelligent is true.”

    Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That’s why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates will never write a book or article that is not about Blackness and neither will Barack Hussein Obama.

    That’s what I like about White people, we are way less monolithic than Blacks when it comes to subjects we are interested in.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Jefferson

    "Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That’s why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example."

    It's all the arts. All black, all the time. So boring.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  76. @5371
    [Zinedine Zidane’s headbutt of Marco Materazzi in the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final]

    So a very light-skinned Berber becomes black on the strength of committing one counterproductive violent act?

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Expletive Deleted

    Strange … I have achieved the power of the dupe post. Disregard this.

  77. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    the verbal error during Barack Obama’s first inauguration as President of the United States

    I like to consider myself prepped on all the silly contrived scandals of the past 10-15 years but on this one I was totally blanking. I’m guessing it’s about Roberts omitting the “faithfully” during the swearing-in? Actually there’s some fun to be had with it retrospectively — so much water under the bridge — but it’d be a surprise to say the least if Rankine followed that from a Constitution-thumper angle; instead I’m guessing it just offended her? i.e. The white man tripping up Barry-O, in other words, with the microaggression. Holy geez, is “micro” even minute enough for such finely tuned sensors

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    @Anonymous

    While disdaining the entire micro-aggression enterprise, I did think that it was a poor performance on the part of John Roberts, C.J., to muff the administration of Obama's oath of office. As I recall, it was pure hubris that he didn't bring a copy of the oath with him and then his memory failed him at the critical moment. Given that the oath is specified in the Constitution, perhaps this anti-Constitutional lapse on Roberts's part was an omen of things to come.

  78. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    Once photography made copying nature really easy artists had to find something else to do. With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    I can’t say I’m all that impressed with what they came up with. Interestingly, the one really vital visual medium, film, often shows things that can’t happen in real life. There’s something deep in this, but I don’t know what it is…

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @SFG


    With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.
     
    Rembrandt and Vermeer aren't "realistic". They painted highly stylized (from the point of view of real-world physics and optics) pictures that nevertheless tricked your eye and mind to perceive them as real. That's why they are geniuses.

    Modern art has nothing to do with technology and "realism". It is Gnostic religious iconography. (The founders of it, e.g., Malevich and Kandinsky, never hid the fact that they're making a religious statement, not a technological one.)
    , @guest
    @SFG

    Don't buy that just-so story. Photography may have put some artists out of business, but it wouldn't cause the remaining ones to become degenerates. It's a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @guest
    @SFG

    Whoever told you, by the way, that the chief aim of Rembrandt or Vermeer was to be realistic. They weren't photographers in paint. If you're seeking for those artists truly displaced by photography, look further down the chain. The guy handing out pictures of the canal to tourists in Venice, for instance.

  79. @G Pinfold
    Did you just blog that? Did I just read what I thought I read?
    Can you see me?
    Can you even see me?
    Me Me Me...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Is it me, for a moment… ♪♪

  80. “Non-profit” grant and awards crap is just more of our Dear Ruling Globalist Open Borders Sellout Establishment Elite using the Bottom against the Middle.

    It’s more today than just épater la bourgeoisie – today it’s pour écraser la bourgeoisie.

  81. @Thirdtwin
    @eD

    Conquest's 2nd Law:

    ""Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing."

    http://www.isegoria.net/2008/07/robert-conquests-three-laws-of-politics/

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Desiderius

  82. @Buzz Mohawk
    I'm waiting for the MacArthur Foundation to give an award to a cow when it complains about living a life of nothing but hay and suction.

    Really, this is what happens when rich do-gooders have too much money lying around.

    Replies: @bomag, @Olorin, @Mr. Blank

    Yeah, it’s because of stuff like this that I’ve gradually warmed to the idea of socking the rich with higher taxes. I’m no socialist, but if all these rich clowns are gonna do with their money is dream up ways to demolish the very foundations of our culture, well, that money would be better spent giving folks EBT cards to use at strip clubs.

  83. I still remember when I first heard ab0ut “microaggressions.” I was certain it had to be a right-wing parody of SJW looniness. Heck, for the longest time, I was half-convinced that it was just right-wingers making a mountain out of a molehill, as I never seemed to encounter any leftists who used the term sincerely.

    Well, that’s changed in the past couple of years. And now, “microaggressions” get the imprimatur of the MacArthur Genius Grant.

    We’re doomed.

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    @Mr. Blank

    I think I first heard about them through Steve.
    The story was about a hoax by some "academic" named Madonna Constantine.

    , @CCZ
    @Mr. Blank

    After I very consciously and conscientiously "micro-aggress," I hand-out the below:


    TO ALL:

    Seeking to respect the safe space desired by those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions, I am henceforth ceasing to talk, email, discuss, converse, or inter-act with anyone in order to avoid, even inadvertently, committing a micro-aggression of any sort. I fully recognize that withdrawing from discourse may itself be a micro-aggression, but, to ensure the future sanctity of the safe space that is desired, I have decided that one singular micro-aggression (the initiation of silence and withdrawal of personal inter-action) would be preferable to the substantial risk of even inadvertent micro-aggressing that is inherent, and most likely inevitable, in continuing communication or personal interaction. To all persons who read this, please accept my sincere apology for any pain that you may feel upon reading this micro-aggression. Inflicting pain was not my intention, but I recognize, that because of my past insularity and extensive privilege(s), I am neither imaginative enough nor sufficiently culturally literate to present or phrase my comments in a way that would not inflict pain upon some or perhaps even all of the persons who comprise a politically, socially, economically, physically, ethnically, racially, culturally, sexually, religiously, intellectually, occupationally, functionally, educationally, philosophically diverse community.

    Likewise, I sincerely apologize for my failure, recognizing the limits of my capacities, to consider my pico-, femto-, atto-, zepto-, or yocto-aggressions and for the perhaps very obvious macro-aggression of defining these words for those who already know them. (Pico refers to 10^-12; femto is a thousand times less, atto is a thousand times less than that, then zepto, and finally yocto at a whopping 10^-24.)

     

    Replies: @Njguy73

  84. @Mr. Blank
    I still remember when I first heard ab0ut "microaggressions." I was certain it had to be a right-wing parody of SJW looniness. Heck, for the longest time, I was half-convinced that it was just right-wingers making a mountain out of a molehill, as I never seemed to encounter any leftists who used the term sincerely.

    Well, that's changed in the past couple of years. And now, "microaggressions" get the imprimatur of the MacArthur Genius Grant.

    We're doomed.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @CCZ

    I think I first heard about them through Steve.
    The story was about a hoax by some “academic” named Madonna Constantine.

  85. @Ivy
    @PiltdownMan

    What will Rankine decide to wear for a Halloween costume?

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @SteveRogers42

    Rankine bears a very weird resemblance to Julian Bond.

  86. @candid_observer
    From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:

    "Not long ago you are in a room where someone asks the philosopher Judith Butler what makes language hurtful. You can feel everyone lean in. Our very being exposes us to the address of another, she answers. We suffer from the condition of being addressable. Our emotional openness, she adds, is carried by our addressability. Language navigates this.

    For so long you thought the ambition of racist language was to denigrate and erase you as a person. After considering Butler’s remarks you begin to understand yourself as rendered hyper-visible in the face of such language acts. Language that feels hurtful is intended to exploit all the ways that you are present. Your alertness, your openness, your desire to engage actually demand your presence, your looking up, your talking back as insane as it is, saying please."
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudia_Rankine

    I don't think many of us have enough Ivy League degrees even to begin to grasp such penetrating and subtle reflections.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Ozymandias, @Deckin, @guest

    “From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:”

  87. @SFG
    @Marie

    Once photography made copying nature really easy artists had to find something else to do. With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    I can't say I'm all that impressed with what they came up with. Interestingly, the one really vital visual medium, film, often shows things that can't happen in real life. There's something deep in this, but I don't know what it is...

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @guest, @guest

    With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    Rembrandt and Vermeer aren’t “realistic”. They painted highly stylized (from the point of view of real-world physics and optics) pictures that nevertheless tricked your eye and mind to perceive them as real. That’s why they are geniuses.

    Modern art has nothing to do with technology and “realism”. It is Gnostic religious iconography. (The founders of it, e.g., Malevich and Kandinsky, never hid the fact that they’re making a religious statement, not a technological one.)

  88. @Mr. Blank
    I still remember when I first heard ab0ut "microaggressions." I was certain it had to be a right-wing parody of SJW looniness. Heck, for the longest time, I was half-convinced that it was just right-wingers making a mountain out of a molehill, as I never seemed to encounter any leftists who used the term sincerely.

    Well, that's changed in the past couple of years. And now, "microaggressions" get the imprimatur of the MacArthur Genius Grant.

    We're doomed.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @CCZ

    After I very consciously and conscientiously “micro-aggress,” I hand-out the below:

    TO ALL:

    Seeking to respect the safe space desired by those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions, I am henceforth ceasing to talk, email, discuss, converse, or inter-act with anyone in order to avoid, even inadvertently, committing a micro-aggression of any sort. I fully recognize that withdrawing from discourse may itself be a micro-aggression, but, to ensure the future sanctity of the safe space that is desired, I have decided that one singular micro-aggression (the initiation of silence and withdrawal of personal inter-action) would be preferable to the substantial risk of even inadvertent micro-aggressing that is inherent, and most likely inevitable, in continuing communication or personal interaction. To all persons who read this, please accept my sincere apology for any pain that you may feel upon reading this micro-aggression. Inflicting pain was not my intention, but I recognize, that because of my past insularity and extensive privilege(s), I am neither imaginative enough nor sufficiently culturally literate to present or phrase my comments in a way that would not inflict pain upon some or perhaps even all of the persons who comprise a politically, socially, economically, physically, ethnically, racially, culturally, sexually, religiously, intellectually, occupationally, functionally, educationally, philosophically diverse community.

    Likewise, I sincerely apologize for my failure, recognizing the limits of my capacities, to consider my pico-, femto-, atto-, zepto-, or yocto-aggressions and for the perhaps very obvious macro-aggression of defining these words for those who already know them. (Pico refers to 10^-12; femto is a thousand times less, atto is a thousand times less than that, then zepto, and finally yocto at a whopping 10^-24.)

    • Replies: @Njguy73
    @CCZ

    To those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions...

    Screw all ya'll. Have a nice life.

    Replies: @CCZ

  89. @PiltdownMan
    Rankine, appropriately, has moved on to Yale University this fall. I wonder if she got recruited as a reaction by the administrators to last year's campus protests about microaggressions and such, in order to placate the mob?

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Dr. X, @anon930, @Ivy, @Triumph104, @Connecticut Famer, @guest

    If so, Yale administrators are fools. Of course, they were when they surrendered in the 60s, too. But at least back then it was to Scary Blacks instead of Whiny Blacks.

  90. @Thirdtwin
    @eD

    Conquest's 2nd Law:

    ""Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing."

    http://www.isegoria.net/2008/07/robert-conquests-three-laws-of-politics/

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Desiderius

    Conquest’s 2nd Law:

    “”Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.”

    Maybe it’s time to retire the Washington Generals’ (and, not coincidentally, that of Soros and friends) definition of right and left.

  91. @candid_observer
    From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:

    "Not long ago you are in a room where someone asks the philosopher Judith Butler what makes language hurtful. You can feel everyone lean in. Our very being exposes us to the address of another, she answers. We suffer from the condition of being addressable. Our emotional openness, she adds, is carried by our addressability. Language navigates this.

    For so long you thought the ambition of racist language was to denigrate and erase you as a person. After considering Butler’s remarks you begin to understand yourself as rendered hyper-visible in the face of such language acts. Language that feels hurtful is intended to exploit all the ways that you are present. Your alertness, your openness, your desire to engage actually demand your presence, your looking up, your talking back as insane as it is, saying please."
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudia_Rankine

    I don't think many of us have enough Ivy League degrees even to begin to grasp such penetrating and subtle reflections.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Ozymandias, @Deckin, @guest

    The saddest part of this bit of doggerel is ‘the philosopher Judith Butler’. How often since Socrates’ execution has the discipline suffered such an insult?

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Deckin

    But would Socrates be able to contribute to this critically needed intellectual perspective on “white supremacy” the way “philosopher” scholar Judith Butler can?” Also good to know that Ms. Chadderton draws her salary from a British public university, but this is fodder for social justice warriors in the US also. Anyone interested in de-funding university departments of “social sciences?”


    Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research
    Journal of Ethnography and Education
    Charlotte Chadderton

    Abstract
    This article contributes to the debate on decolonizing methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilize white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. Developing an innovative analytical framework which draws on insights from both critical race theory and the work of JUDITH BUTLER, the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research. It is argued that an approach which engages with elements of both structural and post-structural theory allows a more critical exploration of white supremacy through an understanding of the performativity of race. The author works towards a possible research methodology which not only takes into account, but also tries to destabilise processes of white supremacy in research by both recognizing participants’ efforts to do this, and trying to make researchers better able to take responsibility for their own complicity in perpetuating unequal racial structures. It is argued that such a recognition by white researchers will necessarily be an uncomfortable process

     

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Percy Gryce, @Neil Templeton

  92. The nice white lady scientists are usually very good picks (in the natural sciences, at least). The few that I have known have been legitimately at the top of their fields.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Reginald Maplethorp


    The nice white lady scientists are usually very good picks (in the natural sciences, at least). The few that I have known have been legitimately at the top of their fields.
     
    I'm having a hard time figuring out how the MacArthur grant search process works.

    I mean, their minds are so infatuated by all these absurdly esoteric candidates in soft specialties, yet they seem to be knowledgeable and hard-headed enough to pick a few high quality people in the hard STEM specialties each year.

    How are the people who fall in love with Claudia Rankine or the beadwork lady able to properly size up a theoretical computer scientist who works on P ≠ NP computability?
  93. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    Well her bead dolls and Murano style glass sculptures may not be great fine art, but it is better than 95% of the post-1970 garbage that sells for a million dollars at auctions.

    I’d call them good folk art, often cute or clever. No need to hate on her just because some foundation wants to give her a million dollars and call her a top artist.

    • Agree: Laugh Track
    • Replies: @Marie
    @Lot

    She would be resigned to selling her work on the regional art and craft fair circuit were it not for:

    -her privileged racial class

    -her politically fashionable decision (in the postmodern method of mediocre artists everywhere) to bank on the profitable niche of SJW art

    I don't doubt she put a lot of time into her pieces, particularly with the laborious tasks of hand-stitching and glassblowing - but come on, this is a (supposedly prestigious, wholly merit-based and extremely competitive) MacArthur Fellowship and Genius Grant! Classical visual artists who also applied, undoubtedly more aesthetically talented in their work than this woman, were rejected in favor of this affirmative-action choice and her social-justice art.

    She obviously got it because of the blackness/SJWness.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Lot

  94. @berserker
    Claudia Rankine should have moved to Northwestern. Apparently, we are now lunatics in addition to being deplorables.

    http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/09/21/northwestern-president-critics-of-safe-spaces-are-lunatics/

    Replies: @Altai

    Schapiro is a trustee of the Williamstown Theatre Festival, the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and Hillel International.

    Those all seem so progressive and universalist, except that last one…

  95. Claudia Rankine* is called a “poet” by her promoters because her prose is reprehensible, something between unintended jabberwocky** and word salad which makes the writing of Genius T. Coates seem lucid by comparison.

    By praising and rewarding Claudia Rankine (and implicitly the craven college faculties and administrations who employ her) the MacArthur folks are simply repeating their tactics to humiliate all the writers in the world who might be tempted to hope that competence could be esteemed above skin color and tedious race-hustling. It is essential to the MacArthur Foundation that Claudia Rankine be obviously incompetent so that everyone who envies her rewards will be utterly degraded thereby.

    * No apparent relation to William J. M. Rankine.

    ** “It seems very pretty,” [she] said when she had finished it, “but it’s rather hard to understand! …somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas–only I don’t exactly know what they are!”

  96. @SFG
    @Marie

    Once photography made copying nature really easy artists had to find something else to do. With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    I can't say I'm all that impressed with what they came up with. Interestingly, the one really vital visual medium, film, often shows things that can't happen in real life. There's something deep in this, but I don't know what it is...

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @guest, @guest

    Don’t buy that just-so story. Photography may have put some artists out of business, but it wouldn’t cause the remaining ones to become degenerates. It’s a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @guest


    It’s a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.
     
    What better way to de-legitimize the very idea of high and low.

    Cui bono from there.

    Replies: @guest

  97. @SFG
    @Marie

    Once photography made copying nature really easy artists had to find something else to do. With my phone I can make a picture that looks more realistic than any Rembrandt or Vermeer.

    I can't say I'm all that impressed with what they came up with. Interestingly, the one really vital visual medium, film, often shows things that can't happen in real life. There's something deep in this, but I don't know what it is...

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @guest, @guest

    Whoever told you, by the way, that the chief aim of Rembrandt or Vermeer was to be realistic. They weren’t photographers in paint. If you’re seeking for those artists truly displaced by photography, look further down the chain. The guy handing out pictures of the canal to tourists in Venice, for instance.

    • Agree: Bill Jones
  98. Well this shouldn’t be surprising at all. Genius and diversity go together about as well as Peanut Butter and Leprosy. Did you know that peanut butter was invented by the Aztecs? Probably not because until White men put it in jars and sold it, no one had heard about it. The blacks claimed they discovered it. I think they found it at a store they looted.

  99. @Anonymous Nephew
    from the wiki

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._and_Catherine_T._MacArthur_Foundation


    "MacArthur was a capitalist, and the Foundation’s original 1970 deed said that one purpose of the foundation was to support "ways to discover and promulgate avoidance of waste in government expenditures." However, MacArthur did not spell out specific parameters for how his money was to be spent after he died. MacArthur told the Foundation's board of directors, "I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it."

    Between 1979 and 1981, John's son J. Roderick MacArthur, an ideological opponent of his father with whom the elder MacArthur had an acrimonious relationship, waged a legal battle against the Foundation for control of the board of directors. The younger MacArthur sued eight members of the board, accusing them of mismanagement of the Foundation's finances. By 1981, most of the original board had been replaced by members who agreed with J. Roderick MacArthur's desire to support liberal causes. This ultimately resulted in the creation of what, in 2008, Martin Morse Wooster called 'one of the pillars of the liberal philanthropic establishment.'"
     

    Replies: @unit472, @The Anti-Gnostic, @pepperinmono, @Barnard, @Njguy73

    “I figured out how to make the money. You fellows will have to figure out how to spend it.”

    He said that? He got what he deserved. To have his name linked with Marxist clowns and race-baiters.

  100. @candid_observer
    From her wikipedia page, Deep Thoughts by Claudia Rankin:

    "Not long ago you are in a room where someone asks the philosopher Judith Butler what makes language hurtful. You can feel everyone lean in. Our very being exposes us to the address of another, she answers. We suffer from the condition of being addressable. Our emotional openness, she adds, is carried by our addressability. Language navigates this.

    For so long you thought the ambition of racist language was to denigrate and erase you as a person. After considering Butler’s remarks you begin to understand yourself as rendered hyper-visible in the face of such language acts. Language that feels hurtful is intended to exploit all the ways that you are present. Your alertness, your openness, your desire to engage actually demand your presence, your looking up, your talking back as insane as it is, saying please."
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudia_Rankine

    I don't think many of us have enough Ivy League degrees even to begin to grasp such penetrating and subtle reflections.

    Replies: @ogunsiron, @Ozymandias, @Deckin, @guest

    Riddle: I am meaningless, but you can see me. Put me in your brain, and I’ll make it lighter. What am I?

    Answer: academic prose.

  101. I like the fact that microaggressions are quoted in a place called Believermag. I live in America, I believe, I really do believe.

  102. @Deckin
    @candid_observer

    The saddest part of this bit of doggerel is 'the philosopher Judith Butler'. How often since Socrates' execution has the discipline suffered such an insult?

    Replies: @CCZ

    But would Socrates be able to contribute to this critically needed intellectual perspective on “white supremacy” the way “philosopher” scholar Judith Butler can?” Also good to know that Ms. Chadderton draws her salary from a British public university, but this is fodder for social justice warriors in the US also. Anyone interested in de-funding university departments of “social sciences?”

    Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research
    Journal of Ethnography and Education
    Charlotte Chadderton

    Abstract
    This article contributes to the debate on decolonizing methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilize white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. Developing an innovative analytical framework which draws on insights from both critical race theory and the work of JUDITH BUTLER, the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research. It is argued that an approach which engages with elements of both structural and post-structural theory allows a more critical exploration of white supremacy through an understanding of the performativity of race. The author works towards a possible research methodology which not only takes into account, but also tries to destabilise processes of white supremacy in research by both recognizing participants’ efforts to do this, and trying to make researchers better able to take responsibility for their own complicity in perpetuating unequal racial structures. It is argued that such a recognition by white researchers will necessarily be an uncomfortable process

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    @CCZ

    I love this navel gaze through a glass onion-kind of humanities scholasticism.

    It's like how New Criticism became a joke in the 1950's when you'd argue over a criticism of the critic rather than getting to the author.

    This idea of trying to conduct research as an outsider while fighting for her cause is like how anthropologists in the 60's argued if Jane Goodall was corrupting her subjects by engaging with them, when the real argument is about whether National Geographic's pics of her in those shorts were corrupting the readership.

    , @Percy Gryce
    @CCZ


    the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research.
     
    I'd prefer my researchers to solutionmatise some issues.

    Replies: @guest

    , @Neil Templeton
    @CCZ

    It reminds me of the arguments I read in medieval philosophy, or the statements of Mr. Kissinger circa 1970 "...the negotiations will be very delicate." Some moral persuasion is accompanied by a swelling surf of sophistic mantra intended to disable logic and critical thought.

  103. @CCZ
    @Mr. Blank

    After I very consciously and conscientiously "micro-aggress," I hand-out the below:


    TO ALL:

    Seeking to respect the safe space desired by those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions, I am henceforth ceasing to talk, email, discuss, converse, or inter-act with anyone in order to avoid, even inadvertently, committing a micro-aggression of any sort. I fully recognize that withdrawing from discourse may itself be a micro-aggression, but, to ensure the future sanctity of the safe space that is desired, I have decided that one singular micro-aggression (the initiation of silence and withdrawal of personal inter-action) would be preferable to the substantial risk of even inadvertent micro-aggressing that is inherent, and most likely inevitable, in continuing communication or personal interaction. To all persons who read this, please accept my sincere apology for any pain that you may feel upon reading this micro-aggression. Inflicting pain was not my intention, but I recognize, that because of my past insularity and extensive privilege(s), I am neither imaginative enough nor sufficiently culturally literate to present or phrase my comments in a way that would not inflict pain upon some or perhaps even all of the persons who comprise a politically, socially, economically, physically, ethnically, racially, culturally, sexually, religiously, intellectually, occupationally, functionally, educationally, philosophically diverse community.

    Likewise, I sincerely apologize for my failure, recognizing the limits of my capacities, to consider my pico-, femto-, atto-, zepto-, or yocto-aggressions and for the perhaps very obvious macro-aggression of defining these words for those who already know them. (Pico refers to 10^-12; femto is a thousand times less, atto is a thousand times less than that, then zepto, and finally yocto at a whopping 10^-24.)

     

    Replies: @Njguy73

    To those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions…

    Screw all ya’ll. Have a nice life.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Njguy73

    My compliments. Very “Jerzesque!”

  104. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @larry lurker
    Not sure why I do this to myself but I'm reading through Goodreads' collection of quotes from Citizen:

    Again Serena’s frustrations, her disappointments, exist within a system you understand not to try to understand in any fair-minded way because to do so is to understand the erasure of the self as systemic, as ordinary. For Serena, the daily diminishment is a low flame, a constant drip. Every look, every comment, every bad call blossoms out of history, through her, onto you. To understand is to see Serena as hemmed in as any other black body thrown against our American background. “Aren’t you the one that screwed me over last time here?” she asks umpire Asderaki. “Yeah, you are. Don’t look at me. Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats, because it is that simple.
     

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous, @Glossy

    Notice how Serena’s command to the ref “Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats” is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That’s why they’re so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they’re NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn’s Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright’s name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    There is a scene in Updike's The Coup where the African narrator, a Barack Obama Sr. like individual, is visiting his white girlfriend's sheepish parents in 1958, and he notices how their queenly black maid appears to order them around through the sheer regalness of her demeanor.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Desiderius
    @Anonymous

    Our skin didn't get to be white from the lack of sun in the Olduvai Gorge. Someone's ancestors kicked someone else's to the curb somewhere along the way.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    , @Desiderius
    @Anonymous


    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33zPlnhymCU

    Replies: @sayless

    , @hhsiii
    @Anonymous

    What makes you think they're NOT ruling?

    , @Neil Templeton
    @Anonymous

    In all fairness, I doubt Ms. Williams discriminates by race with regard to whom she speaks that way. Maybe, but I doubt.

  105. @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    There is a scene in Updike’s The Coup where the African narrator, a Barack Obama Sr. like individual, is visiting his white girlfriend’s sheepish parents in 1958, and he notices how their queenly black maid appears to order them around through the sheer regalness of her demeanor.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    Bullies. The only way to deal with them is to push back.

    Life is competition. White people have been trained to forget that.

  106. Schoolteachers mispronouncing a student’s name to be considered a microaggression in this school district.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    Those kids won't last a minute in Basic Training, where drill sergeants routinely butcher recruits' names.

  107. @Kylie
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "I’m trying to figure out whether the author is actually making a–subtle–dig at Genius Claudia."

    No. That entry was written by a black. Subtle digs are a white thing.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Truth

    After 10 years here, you know that’s not true, Sportette.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Truth

    No, she's right. There's nothing subtle about you, Pravda.

    , @Djinn Fizz
    @Truth

    Man oh man Harry Baldwin's comment (number 31) is hilarious. Pick on Kylie all you want, but you gotta admit, little fella, that is comedy gold.

    Replies: @Kylie

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Truth

    It's evident from everything you've ever written, cockroach. Subtlety doesn't seem to be a black specialty. It certainly isn't yours.

    And.....of course.......you pop up here where the topic is "blackness" - the only topic you care about.

  108. @Jason Liu
    Look at the board of directions for the MacArthur grant, and you will see a demographic problem.

    https://www.macfound.org/about/people/board-directors/

    Way too many women. That's what gives rise to bullshit like this.

    Replies: @candid_observer

    I see that Claude Steele — pioneer of the “stereotype-threat” notion — is on the board.

    Just looking at the selection of “geniuses”, I’d have to say that it appears to be an exercise in the grand to correct “stereotype-threat”.

    I can’t imagine why something that can’t be made to work reliably in experiments should fail in the real, complex world.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @candid_observer

    Well, the MacArthur Foundation did stereotype the black recipients, all were in the arts not one scientist. Although, that woman who repositions beadwork is priceless. There was variety among the Asians, three were in STEM, one attorney, and one graphic novelist. Even the Hispanic recipient worked in community-based financial services.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  109. @CCZ
    @Deckin

    But would Socrates be able to contribute to this critically needed intellectual perspective on “white supremacy” the way “philosopher” scholar Judith Butler can?” Also good to know that Ms. Chadderton draws her salary from a British public university, but this is fodder for social justice warriors in the US also. Anyone interested in de-funding university departments of “social sciences?”


    Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research
    Journal of Ethnography and Education
    Charlotte Chadderton

    Abstract
    This article contributes to the debate on decolonizing methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilize white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. Developing an innovative analytical framework which draws on insights from both critical race theory and the work of JUDITH BUTLER, the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research. It is argued that an approach which engages with elements of both structural and post-structural theory allows a more critical exploration of white supremacy through an understanding of the performativity of race. The author works towards a possible research methodology which not only takes into account, but also tries to destabilise processes of white supremacy in research by both recognizing participants’ efforts to do this, and trying to make researchers better able to take responsibility for their own complicity in perpetuating unequal racial structures. It is argued that such a recognition by white researchers will necessarily be an uncomfortable process

     

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Percy Gryce, @Neil Templeton

    I love this navel gaze through a glass onion-kind of humanities scholasticism.

    It’s like how New Criticism became a joke in the 1950’s when you’d argue over a criticism of the critic rather than getting to the author.

    This idea of trying to conduct research as an outsider while fighting for her cause is like how anthropologists in the 60’s argued if Jane Goodall was corrupting her subjects by engaging with them, when the real argument is about whether National Geographic’s pics of her in those shorts were corrupting the readership.

  110. @Jim Don Bob
    @eD

    The John M. Olin Foundation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Olin_Foundation) showed how the founder's wishes could be observed. This ought to be the law. Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Bill Jones

    Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.

    They’re well on their way to the fate of monasteries under Henry VIII.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Desiderius

    That is devoutly to be wished under President Trump.

    There are many things that can be done to cut the Left off the government tit. Let the bobos keep NPR and kill EPA, Education, Energy, etc.

  111. @LiveFreeOrDie
    I propose we stop with the "micro" part, and start showing them "macro" aggression.

    Replies: @Truth

    Lead the way, Dirty Harry.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Truth


    Lead the way...
     
    The first order would be to quit filling the EBT card.
    , @Neil Templeton
    @Truth

    I'll accept that as an apology, Truth, that the appropriation of "micro" with respect to aggression is either mistaken or disingenuous.

    Replies: @Truth

  112. @Njguy73
    @CCZ

    To those who feel the emotional pain of verbal micro-aggressions...

    Screw all ya'll. Have a nice life.

    Replies: @CCZ

    My compliments. Very “Jerzesque!”

  113. @Anonymous

    the verbal error during Barack Obama’s first inauguration as President of the United States
     
    I like to consider myself prepped on all the silly contrived scandals of the past 10-15 years but on this one I was totally blanking. I'm guessing it's about Roberts omitting the "faithfully" during the swearing-in? Actually there's some fun to be had with it retrospectively -- so much water under the bridge -- but it'd be a surprise to say the least if Rankine followed that from a Constitution-thumper angle; instead I'm guessing it just offended her? i.e. The white man tripping up Barry-O, in other words, with the microaggression. Holy geez, is "micro" even minute enough for such finely tuned sensors

    Replies: @Percy Gryce

    While disdaining the entire micro-aggression enterprise, I did think that it was a poor performance on the part of John Roberts, C.J., to muff the administration of Obama’s oath of office. As I recall, it was pure hubris that he didn’t bring a copy of the oath with him and then his memory failed him at the critical moment. Given that the oath is specified in the Constitution, perhaps this anti-Constitutional lapse on Roberts’s part was an omen of things to come.

  114. @Truth
    @Kylie

    After 10 years here, you know that's not true, Sportette.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Djinn Fizz, @Mr. Anon

    No, she’s right. There’s nothing subtle about you, Pravda.

  115. @yaqub the mad scientist
    Schoolteachers mispronouncing a student's name to be considered a microaggression in this school district.

    Replies: @Percy Gryce

    Those kids won’t last a minute in Basic Training, where drill sergeants routinely butcher recruits’ names.

  116. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    There is a scene in Updike's The Coup where the African narrator, a Barack Obama Sr. like individual, is visiting his white girlfriend's sheepish parents in 1958, and he notices how their queenly black maid appears to order them around through the sheer regalness of her demeanor.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Bullies. The only way to deal with them is to push back.

    Life is competition. White people have been trained to forget that.

  117. @CCZ
    @Deckin

    But would Socrates be able to contribute to this critically needed intellectual perspective on “white supremacy” the way “philosopher” scholar Judith Butler can?” Also good to know that Ms. Chadderton draws her salary from a British public university, but this is fodder for social justice warriors in the US also. Anyone interested in de-funding university departments of “social sciences?”


    Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research
    Journal of Ethnography and Education
    Charlotte Chadderton

    Abstract
    This article contributes to the debate on decolonizing methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilize white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. Developing an innovative analytical framework which draws on insights from both critical race theory and the work of JUDITH BUTLER, the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research. It is argued that an approach which engages with elements of both structural and post-structural theory allows a more critical exploration of white supremacy through an understanding of the performativity of race. The author works towards a possible research methodology which not only takes into account, but also tries to destabilise processes of white supremacy in research by both recognizing participants’ efforts to do this, and trying to make researchers better able to take responsibility for their own complicity in perpetuating unequal racial structures. It is argued that such a recognition by white researchers will necessarily be an uncomfortable process

     

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Percy Gryce, @Neil Templeton

    the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research.

    I’d prefer my researchers to solutionmatise some issues.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Percy Gryce

    Look up "problematize" in a dictionary--which I have unfortunately done--and you find it means to regard something as a problem that needs a solution. Which sounds roundabout but comprehensible. Problem is (excuse the terminology), most of the things they're talking about are already seen as a "problem," at least to the kind of person who could say the word "problematize" without choking. So why speak of making something into a problem? Why not cut to the solution?

    Because they're not interested in solutions to these "problems." This is pure Critical Theory. The aim is to tear down, not build up. (They have one, big solution, which is the New World Order, but in the meantime they have to create problems to get there.) You take that which normal people view as normal and turn it into a problem. This "recontextualizes" it, or "defamiliarizes" it, or whatever. Point is to confuse them, and while they're distracted you lift their wallets.

    Normal people won't ever get to read this, you say. Well, yes, but it's not for them. It's verbal masturbation, mostly, but it's also fun for these people to share nonsense with eachother, like they're in a Mystery Cult. Where it becomes meaningful is a few branches down the line. Professors influence eachother, they eventually train teachers and journalists, they in turn instruct portions of the masses with or without their knowledge to think of perfectly normal things as problems.

  118. @Percy Gryce
    @CCZ


    the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research.
     
    I'd prefer my researchers to solutionmatise some issues.

    Replies: @guest

    Look up “problematize” in a dictionary–which I have unfortunately done–and you find it means to regard something as a problem that needs a solution. Which sounds roundabout but comprehensible. Problem is (excuse the terminology), most of the things they’re talking about are already seen as a “problem,” at least to the kind of person who could say the word “problematize” without choking. So why speak of making something into a problem? Why not cut to the solution?

    Because they’re not interested in solutions to these “problems.” This is pure Critical Theory. The aim is to tear down, not build up. (They have one, big solution, which is the New World Order, but in the meantime they have to create problems to get there.) You take that which normal people view as normal and turn it into a problem. This “recontextualizes” it, or “defamiliarizes” it, or whatever. Point is to confuse them, and while they’re distracted you lift their wallets.

    Normal people won’t ever get to read this, you say. Well, yes, but it’s not for them. It’s verbal masturbation, mostly, but it’s also fun for these people to share nonsense with eachother, like they’re in a Mystery Cult. Where it becomes meaningful is a few branches down the line. Professors influence eachother, they eventually train teachers and journalists, they in turn instruct portions of the masses with or without their knowledge to think of perfectly normal things as problems.

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
  119. DM with the video and stills of the white man attacked in Charlotte (and many other shots). So weary of “white supremacy” and “white privilege”, just a poor white homeless man who tried to tuck himself away in a garage.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3802230/War-zone-Charlotte-White-man-begs-mercy-beaten-reporter-nearly-dragged-fire-rioters-people-told-stay-home-work-police-shooting-black-father.html

  120. Auster’s First Law of Majority-Minority Relations goes something like this: The worse the behavior of a minority, and the poorer its performance, the higher its pedestal.

  121. @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    Our skin didn’t get to be white from the lack of sun in the Olduvai Gorge. Someone’s ancestors kicked someone else’s to the curb somewhere along the way.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Desiderius

    Our skin got to be white because we moved north and paler skins could make more vitamin D, so our darker-skinned forebears slowly died out or were outbred, as people with rickets weren't of high mate value.

    This won't happen today, because governments/health centres can recommend synthesised vitamin D, so incomers to northern regions will stay dark.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36846894

    Replies: @Desiderius

  122. @larry lurker
    Not sure why I do this to myself but I'm reading through Goodreads' collection of quotes from Citizen:

    Again Serena’s frustrations, her disappointments, exist within a system you understand not to try to understand in any fair-minded way because to do so is to understand the erasure of the self as systemic, as ordinary. For Serena, the daily diminishment is a low flame, a constant drip. Every look, every comment, every bad call blossoms out of history, through her, onto you. To understand is to see Serena as hemmed in as any other black body thrown against our American background. “Aren’t you the one that screwed me over last time here?” she asks umpire Asderaki. “Yeah, you are. Don’t look at me. Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats, because it is that simple.
     

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous, @Glossy

    That stuff, like Coates’s writing, is the literary equivalent of pimp suits and pimped-out cars. Gaudy excess, showing off, little sense.

    • Agree: sayless
  123. @guest
    @SFG

    Don't buy that just-so story. Photography may have put some artists out of business, but it wouldn't cause the remaining ones to become degenerates. It's a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    It’s a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.

    What better way to de-legitimize the very idea of high and low.

    Cui bono from there.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Desiderius

    I've heard the argument that it was capitalism. Modern art is easy to produce. You don't have to train anyone to do it, and since there's no real difference between good and bad you can just tell people what's good and they'll buy it. And it's true, Rockefeller and related varieties of Big Money supported modernism. So did the U.S. government, to counter Socialist Realism. That's why poop on a canvas can sell for $15 million dollars.

    But that doesn't explain it. There's always more money to be made, and modernism never sold to the masses. They know Pop Art a little, and maybe surrealism, plus a few big names like Picasso. Mostly, though, they remain blissfully unaware. Mass production of the Old Masters sell, up to and including the Impressionists. Believe me, if captains of industry could find a new Raphael they'd snatch him up.

    That won't happen, because the degenerates are in charge of the art world. So I say capitalism is merely taking advantage. The rot came first. Something in the Western mind broke in the latter half of the 19th century.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  124. @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm.

    • LOL: Triumph104
    • Replies: @sayless
    @Desiderius

    Thank you, Desiderius! Laughter is the best medicine.

  125. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @jimmyriddle

    "When does Jerelyn Luther get her Genius Grant?"
    The most appropriate date for
    http://dailycaller.com/2015/11/09/meet-the-privileged-yale-student-who-shrieked-at-her-professor/
    would be October 31, 2017, which is the 500th anniversary of the church-door publication by her namesake of his 95 Theses demanding safe spaces and the abolition of indulgences for microagressions.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle

    And, appropriately, the German pronunciation is, I think, “looter”.

  126. I want a MacArthur Award given to the discoverer of cure for “Negro Fatigue,” which seems be incurable and untreatable. Maybe a lapel ribbon and an awareness month until a cure is found.

  127. @candid_observer
    As bad as the MacArthur Awards have always been, it now seems to be collapsing into a black hole of political correctness.

    Of the 23 recipients, only 2 may be said to be white males (one other who at first blush might seem to be one, Daryl Baldwin, is a Native American doing research on the language of his tribe): Bill Thies and Josh Kun.

    And what do they do?

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, "creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world."

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    The MacArthur grants have now officially violated the rule: Never go full retard.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @ogunsiron, @PiltdownMan, @Lurker

    Two guys in the list seem to have traded places. No borders!

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, “creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world.”

    Bill Thies is a capable computer scientist.

    https://www.eecs.mit.edu/people/alumni/alumni-eecs-connector-2014/bill-thies-01-meng-02-phd-09

    Subhash Khot, a very capable theoretical computer scientist was also named a Fellow this year. He’s from India, but like Bill Thies, decided that his talents were best employed on the other side of the world.


    Subhash Khot is a theoretical computer scientist whose work is providing critical insight into unresolved problems in the field of computational complexity.

    https://www.macfound.org/fellows/960/

  128. @Olorin
    @C. Van Carter

    "Repositioning beadwork." I did that once with some wainscotting in our bathroom. Decided not to put it behind the potent porcelain platform, but on the opposite wall, where it could be...more lengthily observed and appreciated so to speak.

    Perhaps our host, or his host, could consider hosting an annual award like the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest.

    The Unz-Sailer Award recognizing hyperbolically turgid social justice rhetoric. The award being the top 20 entries posted somewhere hereabouts, all resultant fame and fortune deposited into a sidebar to inspire the PC-oppressed.

    Replies: @C. Van Carter, @Bill Jones

    There are too many deserving examples and not enough judges with the mental strength to read them.

  129. @Olorin
    @C. Van Carter

    "Repositioning beadwork." I did that once with some wainscotting in our bathroom. Decided not to put it behind the potent porcelain platform, but on the opposite wall, where it could be...more lengthily observed and appreciated so to speak.

    Perhaps our host, or his host, could consider hosting an annual award like the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest.

    The Unz-Sailer Award recognizing hyperbolically turgid social justice rhetoric. The award being the top 20 entries posted somewhere hereabouts, all resultant fame and fortune deposited into a sidebar to inspire the PC-oppressed.

    Replies: @C. Van Carter, @Bill Jones

    Bead board

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Bill Jones

    Also called beadwork by this master cabinetmaker I knew and others of his ilk North Jersey/NYC. Referred to the carved thin rounded stuff on William and Mary chests and such. I think it was called cockbeading in the Chippendale style.

    A lofty term to apply to machine-routed wainscotting I realize, but whaddaya whaddaya.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  130. @Anonymous
    OT: While I don't expect Steve to draw attention to this via a dedicated post, I would encourage those with reddit accounts to upvote this:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/53y52d/soros_is_mobilizing_the_global_us_citizen_vote/?st=ite8wwo8&sh=a78c4198

    While it was on the front page at Breitbart recently, it would help to have some additional help and targeted action by reddit. The idea is that there are nearly 8 million US citizens who are not registered to vote. If we can get them to vote, then it could prove to be a decider. And now, the Eye of Soros has cast its baleful gaze at the problem. From what I understand, the overseas voters are more likely to vote Republican, so a general raising of awareness of this is good. Our side has nothing to lose by advertising this.

    The registration and counting of the votes is according to the last state you lived in. So if you last resided in anything approaching a swing state, it's very important to register.

    Replies: @anon

    Actually, apart from military, the overseas voters are much more likely to vote dem. That is why Soros is behind this.

  131. I feel microaggressed today.

  132. @Whiskey
    All this micro-aggression stuff is just a way to purge every remaining White male out of any job that BLM types want, and most White women too. White women go along with it because it helps purge White males and they figure they'll do better by going along with the more aggressive types.

    Thus the future is a a bunch of incompetent BLM types running everything, with outsourced foreigners doing the actual work. Leaving White men to do what?

    If the genius BLM people wanted to create a violent revolution, pushing the most talented and dangerous group to have zero interest and investment in the current system could not be more direct.

    Replies: @Anonitron2

    Another clumsy attempt to make PC stuff sound more deliberate than it is.

    The people pushing microaggressions are sentimental mediocrities acting in total sincerity. There’s no surreptitious will to power, it’s just the elevation of Hallmark politics to a level of stonefaced seriousness not possible without the internet.

    Think about how your spinster aunt reacts to Family Circus cartoons (or insert schlocky old lady shit here). That’s what politics are now.

  133. After micro aggressions can only come nanoagressions.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Foreign Expert

    What also comes next is “cultural appropriation” (along with more diversity and cultural sensitivity re-education and indoctrination no doubt).

    “Cultural appropriation is the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of another culture. Cultural appropriation is seen by some as controversial, notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority; this is seen as wrongfully oppressing the minority culture or stripping it of its group identity and intellectual property rights.” (Wikipedia)


    Students, Cornell Athletics Respond to ‘Culturally Insensitive’ Football Coach Tweet
    Daily Cornell Sun

    Fresh off the heels of Cornell football’s first win of the season, offensive coordinator and line coach Roy Istvan received backlash after tweeting a picture of players in sombreros, with the caption “Eman and Fosta! THE BIG SOMBRERO!”

    The tweet was criticized by Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán de Cornell, or MEChA. a student organization that “promotes higher education, cultura and historia,” according to their national website.

    “I think this is indicative of the problem that a decent portion of Cornellians kind of don’t have sympathy for one another,” said Barbara Cruz ’19, the secretary of MEChA de Cornell. “Cornell prides itself on ‘any student, any study,’ but it kind of feels as if a lot of people don’t want us here.”

    “[I am] absolutely embarrassed to attend a university that publicly, or not publicly, supports this [tweet], and hope to work collaboratively to ensure that university communications, and all staff and faculty, receive much needed diversity and cultural sensitivity training,” Matthew Indimine ’18, the executive vice president of the Student Assembly wrote in a comment on MEChA’s post.

    Responding to criticism, Istvan took to twitter to explain his tweet, saying, “I award the big hat to team members who represent the best teamwork and winning spirit on and off the field. I am truly sorry for the cultural insensitivity and understand how our expression of pride came at the expense of others in the Cornell community.”

    Head football coach David Archer ’05 also expressed his regret about the incident, issuing a statement apologizing to the Cornell community for the tweet’s implications.

    “Along with the coaches and players in my program, I regret that an image of our players, that was intended to share our pride and accomplishments, offended anybody in our community,” he said. “I apologize for any disrespect it caused.”

    The University, too, has reached out to MEChA and apologized for the “misuse of important cultural symbols.”

    “Choosing a sombrero to celebrate accomplishments by Cornell University Athletics sent the wrong message to the community,” athletic director Andy Noel wrote in an email to leaders of MEChA de Cornell. “Even when in celebration, misappropriating these symbols can devalue cultures, extend negative stereotypes and needlessly offend others.”

    Hoping to mend the wounds caused by this incident, Noel added that he and the athletic department aim to address the cultural insensitivity problem across campus.

     

    Replies: @guest, @PiltdownMan

  134. @Jefferson
    @Jonathan Silber

    "If this is the best we can expect of a Black “genius,” then, like it or not, the stereotype of Blacks as being less intelligent is true."

    Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That's why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates will never write a book or article that is not about Blackness and neither will Barack Hussein Obama.

    That's what I like about White people, we are way less monolithic than Blacks when it comes to subjects we are interested in.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That’s why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example.”

    It’s all the arts. All black, all the time. So boring.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Kylie

    "It’s all the arts. All black, all the time. So boring"

    Even within the arts it always has to revolve around Blackness.

  135. 10^6 micro-aggressions = 1 aggression = 1 punch in the face
    ~10 aggressions = 1 death (scholars continue to debate)
    9/11 = ~3000 deaths = ~30 kilo-aggressions = ~3 x 10^10 micro-aggressions
    communism = ~100M deaths = ~1 giga-aggression = ~10^15 micro-aggressions

    for what it’s worth…

  136. There’s no surreptitious will to power, it’s just the elevation of Hallmark politics to a level of stonefaced seriousness not possible without the internet.

    Who is financing that elevation? They do not lack for power nor the will for more, and they’re anything but sentimental about it.

  137. @candid_observer
    @Jason Liu

    I see that Claude Steele -- pioneer of the "stereotype-threat" notion -- is on the board.

    Just looking at the selection of "geniuses", I'd have to say that it appears to be an exercise in the grand to correct "stereotype-threat".

    I can't imagine why something that can't be made to work reliably in experiments should fail in the real, complex world.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    Well, the MacArthur Foundation did stereotype the black recipients, all were in the arts not one scientist. Although, that woman who repositions beadwork is priceless. There was variety among the Asians, three were in STEM, one attorney, and one graphic novelist. Even the Hispanic recipient worked in community-based financial services.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Triumph104

    "Well, the MacArthur Foundation did stereotype the black recipients, all were in the arts not one scientist"

    We Wuz Kangz does not extend to science.

  138. @Jim Don Bob
    @eD

    The John M. Olin Foundation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Olin_Foundation) showed how the founder's wishes could be observed. This ought to be the law. Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Bill Jones

    This is not a new problem: back in the mid ’50’s the Reese commission looked at this, here’s the Dodd report that resulted.

    To no-ones surprise, the foundations had concluded that war was the best way to achieve societal change, hence, one is coming soon near you.

    https://archive.org/details/DoddReportToTheReeceCommitteeOnFoundations-1954-RobberBaron

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill Jones

    Agree completely. Jonah Goldberg pointed out repeatedly in his book Liberal Fascism (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W917ZG) (which is quite good) that Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson. Short translation is that what we are doing is too important to be left to the votes of the plebes who might disagree out of ignorance.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Harry Baldwin, @Mr. Anon

  139. “How to be a MacArthur Genius”

    I take it ‘genius’ is now one of those liberal-redefined terms that means whatever they want it to.

  140. @Bill Jones
    @Olorin

    Bead board

    Replies: @Olorin

    Also called beadwork by this master cabinetmaker I knew and others of his ilk North Jersey/NYC. Referred to the carved thin rounded stuff on William and Mary chests and such. I think it was called cockbeading in the Chippendale style.

    A lofty term to apply to machine-routed wainscotting I realize, but whaddaya whaddaya.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Olorin

    I do it myself with a fluted dado-head on the table saw, any sizeable length is bead board.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  141. @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    What makes you think they’re NOT ruling?

  142. @Triumph104
    @candid_observer

    Well, the MacArthur Foundation did stereotype the black recipients, all were in the arts not one scientist. Although, that woman who repositions beadwork is priceless. There was variety among the Asians, three were in STEM, one attorney, and one graphic novelist. Even the Hispanic recipient worked in community-based financial services.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Well, the MacArthur Foundation did stereotype the black recipients, all were in the arts not one scientist”

    We Wuz Kangz does not extend to science.

  143. @Kylie
    @Jefferson

    "Very few Negroes like to write about things that have nothing to do with their Blackness. That’s why there is no Black version of Stephen King and J.K Rowling for example."

    It's all the arts. All black, all the time. So boring.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “It’s all the arts. All black, all the time. So boring”

    Even within the arts it always has to revolve around Blackness.

  144. @Desiderius
    @Jim Don Bob


    Our country would be better off without the corrupting influence of Ford, Pew, McArthur, etc.
     
    They're well on their way to the fate of monasteries under Henry VIII.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    That is devoutly to be wished under President Trump.

    There are many things that can be done to cut the Left off the government tit. Let the bobos keep NPR and kill EPA, Education, Energy, etc.

  145. @Bill Jones
    @Jim Don Bob

    This is not a new problem: back in the mid '50's the Reese commission looked at this, here's the Dodd report that resulted.

    To no-ones surprise, the foundations had concluded that war was the best way to achieve societal change, hence, one is coming soon near you.


    https://archive.org/details/DoddReportToTheReeceCommitteeOnFoundations-1954-RobberBaron

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Agree completely. Jonah Goldberg pointed out repeatedly in his book Liberal Fascism (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W917ZG) (which is quite good) that Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson. Short translation is that what we are doing is too important to be left to the votes of the plebes who might disagree out of ignorance.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jim Don Bob


    Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson
     
    War is hell.

    Hell is no place to look for morals.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jim Don Bob

    Jonah Goldberg is such an ass as a commentator I've been wondering if he actually wrote that book.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Entitling a book "Liberal Fascism" proves that he doesn't know what fascism is. Liberals (as we use the term in contemporary America) are not fascist. The word fascism doesn't simply mean "any political movement I don't like". Goldberg is a light-weight.

    Replies: @guest, @Bill Jones, @guest

  146. @Desiderius
    @guest


    It’s a ridiculous argument, anyway, given the exact same nonsense happened to literature, music, and every other branch of High Art.
     
    What better way to de-legitimize the very idea of high and low.

    Cui bono from there.

    Replies: @guest

    I’ve heard the argument that it was capitalism. Modern art is easy to produce. You don’t have to train anyone to do it, and since there’s no real difference between good and bad you can just tell people what’s good and they’ll buy it. And it’s true, Rockefeller and related varieties of Big Money supported modernism. So did the U.S. government, to counter Socialist Realism. That’s why poop on a canvas can sell for $15 million dollars.

    But that doesn’t explain it. There’s always more money to be made, and modernism never sold to the masses. They know Pop Art a little, and maybe surrealism, plus a few big names like Picasso. Mostly, though, they remain blissfully unaware. Mass production of the Old Masters sell, up to and including the Impressionists. Believe me, if captains of industry could find a new Raphael they’d snatch him up.

    That won’t happen, because the degenerates are in charge of the art world. So I say capitalism is merely taking advantage. The rot came first. Something in the Western mind broke in the latter half of the 19th century.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @guest


    Something in the Western mind broke in the latter half of the 19th century.
     
    "God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under our knives: who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it?"

    Luckily for us, we have a God who isn't very good at staying dead.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-JqH1M4Ya8
  147. How to be a MacArthur Genius
    1) be a NAM preferably foreign
    2) don’t be cisgendered
    3) be telegenic
    4) master the art of academic gobbledy-gook by using words like “intersectionality”, etc.
    5) focus all your scholarly work on yourself and how the world has mistreated you
    6) have a bad attitude towards criticism. because raaaaacism.

  148. @candid_observer
    As bad as the MacArthur Awards have always been, it now seems to be collapsing into a black hole of political correctness.

    Of the 23 recipients, only 2 may be said to be white males (one other who at first blush might seem to be one, Daryl Baldwin, is a Native American doing research on the language of his tribe): Bill Thies and Josh Kun.

    And what do they do?

    Bill Thies is part of Microsoft Research in India, "creating communication and digital technologies to advance the social and economic well-being of low-income communities in the developing world."

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    The MacArthur grants have now officially violated the rule: Never go full retard.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @ogunsiron, @PiltdownMan, @Lurker

    Josh Kun got his Ph.D. from Berkeley in Ethnic Studies, and is plying his trade in various racial/ethnic projects.

    They left the ‘t’ off the end of his name, clearly a microaggression that needs investigating.

    • LOL: Kylie
  149. @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill Jones

    Agree completely. Jonah Goldberg pointed out repeatedly in his book Liberal Fascism (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W917ZG) (which is quite good) that Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson. Short translation is that what we are doing is too important to be left to the votes of the plebes who might disagree out of ignorance.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Harry Baldwin, @Mr. Anon

    Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson

    War is hell.

    Hell is no place to look for morals.

  150. @guest
    @Desiderius

    I've heard the argument that it was capitalism. Modern art is easy to produce. You don't have to train anyone to do it, and since there's no real difference between good and bad you can just tell people what's good and they'll buy it. And it's true, Rockefeller and related varieties of Big Money supported modernism. So did the U.S. government, to counter Socialist Realism. That's why poop on a canvas can sell for $15 million dollars.

    But that doesn't explain it. There's always more money to be made, and modernism never sold to the masses. They know Pop Art a little, and maybe surrealism, plus a few big names like Picasso. Mostly, though, they remain blissfully unaware. Mass production of the Old Masters sell, up to and including the Impressionists. Believe me, if captains of industry could find a new Raphael they'd snatch him up.

    That won't happen, because the degenerates are in charge of the art world. So I say capitalism is merely taking advantage. The rot came first. Something in the Western mind broke in the latter half of the 19th century.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Something in the Western mind broke in the latter half of the 19th century.

    “God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under our knives: who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it?”

    Luckily for us, we have a God who isn’t very good at staying dead.

  151. @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill Jones

    Agree completely. Jonah Goldberg pointed out repeatedly in his book Liberal Fascism (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W917ZG) (which is quite good) that Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson. Short translation is that what we are doing is too important to be left to the votes of the plebes who might disagree out of ignorance.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Harry Baldwin, @Mr. Anon

    Jonah Goldberg is such an ass as a commentator I’ve been wondering if he actually wrote that book.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Harry Baldwin

    I met Jonah Goldberg at a small gathering about 5 years ago and he was quite personable, though he did quite forcefully defend NR's sacking of The Derb for his Talk column. The next day he gave a speech to about a hundred people and was quite good.

    I am surprised he, along with people like Kevin Willliamson at NR, got on the NeverTrup band wagon. The only explanation that makes any sense is $; these people fear that a President Trump won't need them and their "conservative" ideas and think tanks. I'll bet Trump has a long memory.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

  152. @Ivy
    @PiltdownMan

    What will Rankine decide to wear for a Halloween costume?

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @SteveRogers42

    Doesn’t need one.

  153. Anonymous [AKA "treasurehunter"] says:

    to olorin: my thoughts exactly, having restored several old yankee homes. laughed so hard almost soiled myself! oh the genius of repurposed beadwork.

  154. @Anonymous
    @larry lurker

    Notice how Serena's command to the ref "Really, don’t even look at me. Don’t look my way. Don’t look my way,” she repeats" is so similar to the black b*tches command to the poor sap during the confrontation at Yale. The parallels are striking.

    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm. Just as every black claims to be descended from some Royal African Chieftain, so to the same degree do they sincerely believe that their natural station in life is to rule over Whites.

    That's why they're so d*mn resentful and why they always conjure up elaborate excuses for why they're NOT ruling. They sincerely believe that they ARE superior and that some chance, some element of Luck and if not that then some ruthless evilness on the part of whites, their privilege, systemic racism whatever, has turned the natural order on its head. This is, of course, the rich vein of resentiment that Farrakahn's Nation of Islam taps into. Jeremiah Wright's name can be added to that roster as well and that of his disciple, Barack Obama, who also mine this same inexhaustible lode.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Desiderius, @Desiderius, @hhsiii, @Neil Templeton

    In all fairness, I doubt Ms. Williams discriminates by race with regard to whom she speaks that way. Maybe, but I doubt.

  155. All this stuff about microaggressions being unique to blacks is so much bullshit.
    This is life for everyone.
    From parents to grade school to high school to service to college to graduate school to jobs to relationships and so on, there are always mean, inconsiderate, stupid, selfish, petty , authoritative assholes that have to be dealt with and overcome. Hell, we are all that way ourselves to others. This is not the Garden of Eden. It is the human condition. These things can never be totally eliminated.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @pepperinmono

    Apparently you've never been to a Hillary rally. Have you never seen the movie, "Where the Votes are"?

  156. @Olorin
    @Bill Jones

    Also called beadwork by this master cabinetmaker I knew and others of his ilk North Jersey/NYC. Referred to the carved thin rounded stuff on William and Mary chests and such. I think it was called cockbeading in the Chippendale style.

    A lofty term to apply to machine-routed wainscotting I realize, but whaddaya whaddaya.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    I do it myself with a fluted dado-head on the table saw, any sizeable length is bead board.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Bill Jones

    Making the beading used to be a high-skill aspect of woodworking. Decades ago, my school wood-shop was all manual, except for a lathe. I foolishly picked a project that required me to create a simple beaded border and learned how very hard it is to do.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Bill Jones

  157. @Bill Jones
    @Olorin

    I do it myself with a fluted dado-head on the table saw, any sizeable length is bead board.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Making the beading used to be a high-skill aspect of woodworking. Decades ago, my school wood-shop was all manual, except for a lathe. I foolishly picked a project that required me to create a simple beaded border and learned how very hard it is to do.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @PiltdownMan

    Precisely. Study the beadwork on William and Mary drawer or carcase fronts for instance. Now reproduce or recreate it by hand, with sharp tools. Now add several different methods of construction (scratch, cock, applied...).

    Every last millimeter of the run possesses at least twelve cosmic dimensions of potential f-up. It's uncanny really, and one of the many reasons I've always perceived woodworking as one of the quintessential time-and-space-travel disciplines.

    The gentlemen to whom I earlier referred were assigned that sort of carving as part of their apprenticeships...in their early teens. They had mastered it at a younger age than today's teens have detached from the teat. Producing it was part of earning their keep.

    , @Bill Jones
    @PiltdownMan

    I notice that I get less satisfaction from, and therefore do less, woodworking as by collection of power tools has increased.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  158. @Olorin
    @anon

    Her point is that she hates academe so badly, and it's been so horrible and traumatic to her, that she wants a job in it forever and never to leave it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Inspiration flourishes at the intersection of fantasy, Truth, and greed.

  159. @Anonymous
    OT:


    Germany: Nearly 40 Per Cent of Under Fives Now ‘Migrant Background’
    by VIRGINIA HALE, 21 Sep 2016
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/09/21/germany-40-percent-migrant-background/

    Following the release of figures which reveal almost four in ten children under five have foreign roots, Michael Paulwitz says the demographic change will be the death of Germany’s welfare state.

    The journalist and historian predicts that “hard struggles” over resources will take place when ethnic Germans are a minority, and that native Germans “will inevitably lose out”...

     

    ...


    Mr Paulwitz’ article follows the release on Friday of official figures from the Federal Statistics Office. While they show 21 per cent of the total population currently have a migrant background he notes that such people are disproportionately represented in the younger age cohorts.

    Mr Paulwitz writes: “The social and redistributive state as we know it will no longer be affordable at its present level when the population is no longer dominated by ethnic Germans, and is a multicultural population mix.”

    Collected in mid 2015, the Federal Statistics Office data fails to reflect the more than 1.6 million migrants who arrived in 2015 and the first half of 2016, or the huge number of estimated illegal immigrants living in Germany.

    Mr Paulwitz points out that while Angela Merkel’s open door policy was a “dramatic escalation” of previous policies, even before she “opened the lock” a quarter of people aged between 15 and 45 had foreign roots in 2014.

    He contends that these demographic trends can only increase as, “through family reunification, this number [1.6 million] is expected to at least double if not multiply”.

    Furthermore he observes there is an “inexhaustible supply” of Arabs and Africans who want to move to Germany. The historian typifies them as “second, third and fourth sons” of families, who are “demanding” but “lack the education or drive to create their own wealth”.

    Taking all of this into account, Mr Paulwitz diagnoses a grim future for Germany and its native population. He forecasts “hard struggles over resources will be the result” and contends that ethnic Germans are “pacified” and “ageing”...
     

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Four in ten with both parents foreign?

  160. @Truth
    @LiveFreeOrDie

    Lead the way, Dirty Harry.

    Replies: @bomag, @Neil Templeton

    Lead the way…

    The first order would be to quit filling the EBT card.

  161. @Truth
    @LiveFreeOrDie

    Lead the way, Dirty Harry.

    Replies: @bomag, @Neil Templeton

    I’ll accept that as an apology, Truth, that the appropriation of “micro” with respect to aggression is either mistaken or disingenuous.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Neil Templeton

    The Allied landing at Normandy was "macro." You decide.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

  162. @pepperinmono
    All this stuff about microaggressions being unique to blacks is so much bullshit.
    This is life for everyone.
    From parents to grade school to high school to service to college to graduate school to jobs to relationships and so on, there are always mean, inconsiderate, stupid, selfish, petty , authoritative assholes that have to be dealt with and overcome. Hell, we are all that way ourselves to others. This is not the Garden of Eden. It is the human condition. These things can never be totally eliminated.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Apparently you’ve never been to a Hillary rally. Have you never seen the movie, “Where the Votes are”?

  163. @Reginald Maplethorp
    The nice white lady scientists are usually very good picks (in the natural sciences, at least). The few that I have known have been legitimately at the top of their fields.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    The nice white lady scientists are usually very good picks (in the natural sciences, at least). The few that I have known have been legitimately at the top of their fields.

    I’m having a hard time figuring out how the MacArthur grant search process works.

    I mean, their minds are so infatuated by all these absurdly esoteric candidates in soft specialties, yet they seem to be knowledgeable and hard-headed enough to pick a few high quality people in the hard STEM specialties each year.

    How are the people who fall in love with Claudia Rankine or the beadwork lady able to properly size up a theoretical computer scientist who works on P ≠ NP computability?

  164. @Neil Templeton
    @Truth

    I'll accept that as an apology, Truth, that the appropriation of "micro" with respect to aggression is either mistaken or disingenuous.

    Replies: @Truth

    The Allied landing at Normandy was “macro.” You decide.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Truth

    Apology accepted.

  165. @CCZ
    @Deckin

    But would Socrates be able to contribute to this critically needed intellectual perspective on “white supremacy” the way “philosopher” scholar Judith Butler can?” Also good to know that Ms. Chadderton draws her salary from a British public university, but this is fodder for social justice warriors in the US also. Anyone interested in de-funding university departments of “social sciences?”


    Problematising the Role of the White Researcher in Social Justice Research
    Journal of Ethnography and Education
    Charlotte Chadderton

    Abstract
    This article contributes to the debate on decolonizing methodologies in qualitative research by considering how a white researcher can try and destabilize white supremacy when explicitly conducting research with social justice aims. Developing an innovative analytical framework which draws on insights from both critical race theory and the work of JUDITH BUTLER, the researcher problematises issues of voice and representation in conducting social justice research. It is argued that an approach which engages with elements of both structural and post-structural theory allows a more critical exploration of white supremacy through an understanding of the performativity of race. The author works towards a possible research methodology which not only takes into account, but also tries to destabilise processes of white supremacy in research by both recognizing participants’ efforts to do this, and trying to make researchers better able to take responsibility for their own complicity in perpetuating unequal racial structures. It is argued that such a recognition by white researchers will necessarily be an uncomfortable process

     

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @Percy Gryce, @Neil Templeton

    It reminds me of the arguments I read in medieval philosophy, or the statements of Mr. Kissinger circa 1970 “…the negotiations will be very delicate.” Some moral persuasion is accompanied by a swelling surf of sophistic mantra intended to disable logic and critical thought.

  166. @Truth
    @Neil Templeton

    The Allied landing at Normandy was "macro." You decide.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Apology accepted.

  167. @Truth
    @Kylie

    After 10 years here, you know that's not true, Sportette.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Djinn Fizz, @Mr. Anon

    Man oh man Harry Baldwin’s comment (number 31) is hilarious. Pick on Kylie all you want, but you gotta admit, little fella, that is comedy gold.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Djinn Fizz

    Was Truth picking on me? I didn't notice.

    Replies: @Truth

  168. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    “Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender.”

    Can we look forward to her beadwork interpretation of the Channon-Newsome murders?

  169. @susie
    Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always. Everything they write. Everything they do. However, whites don't. It must be 'torture' for them to compare themselves to something they envy, hate, and can't be. I doubt this is so much the case in all black countries.

    Replies: @oddsbodkins, @sayless

    Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always.

    Aren’t any public black intellectuals interested in ideas? Are they only interested in being black? Do they understand what a frigging bore they all are?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @sayless

    No.

    Yes.

    No.

  170. Aren’t any public black intellectuals interested in ideas?

    Not the ones that rich and powerful whites are interested in hiring.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  171. @Marie
    My God, look at this one... where are they finding these people? Racist, sexist beaded jewelry? When will the madness cease?

    "Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations, Scott upends conceptions of beadwork and jewelry as domestic or merely for adornment by creating exquisitely crafted objects that reveal, upon closer examination, stark representations of racism and sexism and the violence they engender."

    This is her 'art':

    Replies: @Kylie, @Front toward enemy, @SFG, @Lot, @sayless, @Clyde

    “Joyce J. Scott is a jewelry maker and sculptor repositioning craft, and in particular beadwork, as a potent platform for commentary on social and political injustices. In handmade works ranging from elaborate, over-sized neckpieces, to two- and three-dimensional figurative sculptures, to installations……

    A $600,000 genius grant for this pretentious crap? Her jewelry is junky folk art, images can be found on the www.
    She is very light skinned black with a mop of curled orangish hair.https://goo.gl/qgvEmP
    On the plus side, at least she is not ripping off the taxpayers via a public university sinecure.

  172. Why don’t rich paleoconservatives hand out money to support what they think of as important and deserving science and arts people? Enough with the whining, let’s have some positive action.

    I don’t know science, alas, but I know the arts well enough to vouch for the fact that deserving people are out there: novelists doing story-centric fiction; poets, painters and composers using traditional forms; architects and urbanists working in classical and local styles … You won’t learn much about them from the usual outlets, of course. To them, this stuff is either silly or the enemy. I used to pitch story ideas about artists working in trad ways to editors in NYC and got shot down 99.9% of the time.

    Hey, another thing rich paleoconservatives might think of financially sponsoring: an online publication or outlet that brings together, covers and cheerleads for worthy cultural work in trad forms.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Paleo Retiree


    rich paleoconservatives
     
    See also: jumbo shrimp, military intelligence
    , @guest
    @Paleo Retiree

    Rich people get their brains rotted by the culture, too. If they haven't, they can be ripped off by wolves in sheep's clothing (see the conservative movement). Or if, against all odds, they manage to set up actual, true-blue traditional institutions, leftists take them over in a generation.

  173. @Desiderius
    @Anonymous

    Our skin didn't get to be white from the lack of sun in the Olduvai Gorge. Someone's ancestors kicked someone else's to the curb somewhere along the way.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    Our skin got to be white because we moved north and paler skins could make more vitamin D, so our darker-skinned forebears slowly died out or were outbred, as people with rickets weren’t of high mate value.

    This won’t happen today, because governments/health centres can recommend synthesised vitamin D, so incomers to northern regions will stay dark.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36846894

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anonymous Nephew

    You've missed the point with uncommon verve and precision.

    Do you imagine we moved north because our inherent pathological altruism led us to decide to leave the best land to the ancestors of today's blacks out of the kindness of our hearts?

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

  174. @Lot
    @Marie

    Well her bead dolls and Murano style glass sculptures may not be great fine art, but it is better than 95% of the post-1970 garbage that sells for a million dollars at auctions.

    I'd call them good folk art, often cute or clever. No need to hate on her just because some foundation wants to give her a million dollars and call her a top artist.

    Replies: @Marie

    She would be resigned to selling her work on the regional art and craft fair circuit were it not for:

    -her privileged racial class

    -her politically fashionable decision (in the postmodern method of mediocre artists everywhere) to bank on the profitable niche of SJW art

    I don’t doubt she put a lot of time into her pieces, particularly with the laborious tasks of hand-stitching and glassblowing – but come on, this is a (supposedly prestigious, wholly merit-based and extremely competitive) MacArthur Fellowship and Genius Grant! Classical visual artists who also applied, undoubtedly more aesthetically talented in their work than this woman, were rejected in favor of this affirmative-action choice and her social-justice art.

    She obviously got it because of the blackness/SJWness.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Marie

    She looks barely black ....about 20%. Still she gets them racial set asides and bennies from the MacArthur Foundation. Her art is convoluted bag lady level junk. Many at home artists do such for self-satisfaction, fine. But they not elevated and given $600,000 rewards.

    Replies: @Marie

    , @Lot
    @Marie

    I agree with all that except that she didn't apply for the fellowship, they do not have nominations or application, just a mysterious internal process then a call saying you get a million dollars.

    Replies: @BB753

  175. @Kylie
    @Marie

    There's no end to it and no escaping it, is there?

    Btw I don't usually reply to your posts but I really enjoy them.

    Replies: @Marie

    Thanks! What with the daily Cultural Revolution and its outrages, you just have to wonder if Herbert Marcuse is in the grave watching it all, cackling with glee and reveling in the destruction of the West.

    • Agree: Kylie
  176. @Marie
    @Lot

    She would be resigned to selling her work on the regional art and craft fair circuit were it not for:

    -her privileged racial class

    -her politically fashionable decision (in the postmodern method of mediocre artists everywhere) to bank on the profitable niche of SJW art

    I don't doubt she put a lot of time into her pieces, particularly with the laborious tasks of hand-stitching and glassblowing - but come on, this is a (supposedly prestigious, wholly merit-based and extremely competitive) MacArthur Fellowship and Genius Grant! Classical visual artists who also applied, undoubtedly more aesthetically talented in their work than this woman, were rejected in favor of this affirmative-action choice and her social-justice art.

    She obviously got it because of the blackness/SJWness.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Lot

    She looks barely black ….about 20%. Still she gets them racial set asides and bennies from the MacArthur Foundation. Her art is convoluted bag lady level junk. Many at home artists do such for self-satisfaction, fine. But they not elevated and given $600,000 rewards.

    • Replies: @Marie
    @Clyde

    She looks exactly like the type I imagine Rachel Dolezal (in her heyday) would've wanted to bring along to the NAACP picnic in the role of fake mom.

  177. @Clyde
    @Marie

    She looks barely black ....about 20%. Still she gets them racial set asides and bennies from the MacArthur Foundation. Her art is convoluted bag lady level junk. Many at home artists do such for self-satisfaction, fine. But they not elevated and given $600,000 rewards.

    Replies: @Marie

    She looks exactly like the type I imagine Rachel Dolezal (in her heyday) would’ve wanted to bring along to the NAACP picnic in the role of fake mom.

  178. @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill Jones

    Agree completely. Jonah Goldberg pointed out repeatedly in his book Liberal Fascism (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W917ZG) (which is quite good) that Progressives have been invoking the moral equivalent of war since Woodrow Wilson. Short translation is that what we are doing is too important to be left to the votes of the plebes who might disagree out of ignorance.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Harry Baldwin, @Mr. Anon

    Entitling a book “Liberal Fascism” proves that he doesn’t know what fascism is. Liberals (as we use the term in contemporary America) are not fascist. The word fascism doesn’t simply mean “any political movement I don’t like”. Goldberg is a light-weight.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Mr. Anon

    "Liberal fascism" was coined by H.G. Wells, I believe in earnest. Maybe you're a lightweight.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    It's been a long long time since Liberal meant liberal.

    , @guest
    @Mr. Anon

    By the way, I don't remember enough about that book to say how much of it was "liberals are fascists," though there was a lot of it. There was also a lot of confusion over the origins of fascism, and just what it meant. However, Goldberg did score some very excellent points. One concerns the reaction of liberals to fascism, which was more admiring and envious than we've been led to believe.

    Another follows from that envy. Liberals saw what the fascists were pulling off and said, "Why aren't we doing that?" So they set about to do their own version; fascism with a smiley face, if you will.

    The book was not Dems R the Real Nazis. I remember him going double-barrels on Hillary and Pat Buchanan at the end. Which helps explain why this election is so painful to Conservatism, Inc. water carriers like Goldberg. Because Hillary is the same Hillary, and Trump is Buchanan, only more liberal.

  179. @Truth
    @Kylie

    After 10 years here, you know that's not true, Sportette.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Djinn Fizz, @Mr. Anon

    It’s evident from everything you’ve ever written, cockroach. Subtlety doesn’t seem to be a black specialty. It certainly isn’t yours.

    And…..of course…….you pop up here where the topic is “blackness” – the only topic you care about.

  180. @oddsbodkins
    @susie

    I'm sure none of the white people reading this blog have the habit of always viewing the world through the lens of race.

    Replies: @IA

    I’m sure none of the white people reading this blog have the habit of always viewing the world through the lens of race.

    We never made it into a shakedown business. We never called the Smithsonian Institute the European-American Institute. We didn’t call the National Gallery the Gallery of European Art, nor the American Museum of Technology the European-American Museum of Technology. Etc., etc., etc. BTW, the opening of the Smithsonian’s African-American Museum is tomorrow, Sep. 24, 2016. This is huge.

  181. @Foreign Expert
    After micro aggressions can only come nanoagressions.

    Replies: @CCZ

    What also comes next is “cultural appropriation” (along with more diversity and cultural sensitivity re-education and indoctrination no doubt).

    “Cultural appropriation is the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of another culture. Cultural appropriation is seen by some as controversial, notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority; this is seen as wrongfully oppressing the minority culture or stripping it of its group identity and intellectual property rights.” (Wikipedia)

    Students, Cornell Athletics Respond to ‘Culturally Insensitive’ Football Coach Tweet
    Daily Cornell Sun

    Fresh off the heels of Cornell football’s first win of the season, offensive coordinator and line coach Roy Istvan received backlash after tweeting a picture of players in sombreros, with the caption “Eman and Fosta! THE BIG SOMBRERO!”

    The tweet was criticized by Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán de Cornell, or MEChA. a student organization that “promotes higher education, cultura and historia,” according to their national website.

    “I think this is indicative of the problem that a decent portion of Cornellians kind of don’t have sympathy for one another,” said Barbara Cruz ’19, the secretary of MEChA de Cornell. “Cornell prides itself on ‘any student, any study,’ but it kind of feels as if a lot of people don’t want us here.”

    “[I am] absolutely embarrassed to attend a university that publicly, or not publicly, supports this [tweet], and hope to work collaboratively to ensure that university communications, and all staff and faculty, receive much needed diversity and cultural sensitivity training,” Matthew Indimine ’18, the executive vice president of the Student Assembly wrote in a comment on MEChA’s post.

    Responding to criticism, Istvan took to twitter to explain his tweet, saying, “I award the big hat to team members who represent the best teamwork and winning spirit on and off the field. I am truly sorry for the cultural insensitivity and understand how our expression of pride came at the expense of others in the Cornell community.”

    Head football coach David Archer ’05 also expressed his regret about the incident, issuing a statement apologizing to the Cornell community for the tweet’s implications.

    “Along with the coaches and players in my program, I regret that an image of our players, that was intended to share our pride and accomplishments, offended anybody in our community,” he said. “I apologize for any disrespect it caused.”

    The University, too, has reached out to MEChA and apologized for the “misuse of important cultural symbols.”

    “Choosing a sombrero to celebrate accomplishments by Cornell University Athletics sent the wrong message to the community,” athletic director Andy Noel wrote in an email to leaders of MEChA de Cornell. “Even when in celebration, misappropriating these symbols can devalue cultures, extend negative stereotypes and needlessly offend others.”

    Hoping to mend the wounds caused by this incident, Noel added that he and the athletic department aim to address the cultural insensitivity problem across campus.

    • Replies: @guest
    @CCZ

    "notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority"

    Yeah, because why should it matter the other way? Blacks have so few things of their own that they need every little bit. Like a kid with his blankie.

    Was that an entry in the "How many times can you say 'culture' in one paragraph" contest, by the way? Because I could have done better, but only on purpose.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @CCZ

    Perhaps we shouldn't be outraged by the "outrage" over the "outrage."

    There is reason to chill, based on the comments on that article in the Cornell Daily Sun. Note the comments from Hispanics.


    I mean God, it’s just a hat… I’m from Mexican heritage and to put simply, who cares. Way to make a big deal out of nothing. (by the way, who are you to assume these students don’t have Mexican heritage???)

     


    Sorry – as an Hispanic alum I just don’t see the fuss. I’d recommend that the students that were offended save their fire/credibility for real issues.
     

    Despite the outcry, Gustavo Dorsett, a sophomore safety on the football team of Mexican descent, does not believe the tweet is offensive, and instead said he believes it celebrates his heritage.

    “I am having trouble seeing how this in any way is so offensive,” he wrote on MEChA’s post. “If I showed this picture to my family in Mexico they would certainly laugh and be excited that our team incorporates a part of the Mexican heritage in celebrating our player awards. This is being blown up by sensitive people on social media who aren’t even of relevance to the Mexican culture.”
     

    “Where in this photo and caption are they being racially insensitive?” sophomore running back Steven Rodriguez added. “There are no racially insensitive descriptions. If I took a photo wearing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots would you have the same reaction? Don’t think so. They are only being recognized for their outstanding performance in a game.”
     

    Replies: @Desiderius

  182. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jim Don Bob

    Jonah Goldberg is such an ass as a commentator I've been wondering if he actually wrote that book.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I met Jonah Goldberg at a small gathering about 5 years ago and he was quite personable, though he did quite forcefully defend NR’s sacking of The Derb for his Talk column. The next day he gave a speech to about a hundred people and was quite good.

    I am surprised he, along with people like Kevin Willliamson at NR, got on the NeverTrup band wagon. The only explanation that makes any sense is $; these people fear that a President Trump won’t need them and their “conservative” ideas and think tanks. I’ll bet Trump has a long memory.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Jim Don Bob

    Maybe, but I doubt it. My read on Mr. Williamson is that he believes in open borders / free trade, he doesn't have much sympathy for the underclasses (because a good share of failure is explained by poor choices / lack of effort), and he just plain doesn't like Mr. Trump.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  183. @Paleo Retiree
    Why don't rich paleoconservatives hand out money to support what they think of as important and deserving science and arts people? Enough with the whining, let's have some positive action.

    I don't know science, alas, but I know the arts well enough to vouch for the fact that deserving people are out there: novelists doing story-centric fiction; poets, painters and composers using traditional forms; architects and urbanists working in classical and local styles ... You won't learn much about them from the usual outlets, of course. To them, this stuff is either silly or the enemy. I used to pitch story ideas about artists working in trad ways to editors in NYC and got shot down 99.9% of the time.

    Hey, another thing rich paleoconservatives might think of financially sponsoring: an online publication or outlet that brings together, covers and cheerleads for worthy cultural work in trad forms.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @guest

    rich paleoconservatives

    See also: jumbo shrimp, military intelligence

  184. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Desiderius

    Our skin got to be white because we moved north and paler skins could make more vitamin D, so our darker-skinned forebears slowly died out or were outbred, as people with rickets weren't of high mate value.

    This won't happen today, because governments/health centres can recommend synthesised vitamin D, so incomers to northern regions will stay dark.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36846894

    Replies: @Desiderius

    You’ve missed the point with uncommon verve and precision.

    Do you imagine we moved north because our inherent pathological altruism led us to decide to leave the best land to the ancestors of today’s blacks out of the kindness of our hearts?

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Desiderius

    Are you arguing that those who left Africa were the people who couldn't cut it as "big men" back on the equator?

    You may be right (difficult to prove), though I suspect the motive was more likely that people wanted to see what was over the next hill, if there was more room/game/fish/women/whatever and just kept going. The Pilgrim Fathers for example weren't exactly having their butts kicked when they headed for the Americas, although they were religious exiles in Holland. Nor were the first English colonists in Africa. And as for the Spanish in South America ...

    Replies: @Desiderius

  185. @sayless
    @susie

    Blacks always see the world through the lens of race. Always.

    Aren't any public black intellectuals interested in ideas? Are they only interested in being black? Do they understand what a frigging bore they all are?

    Replies: @Kylie

    No.

    Yes.

    No.

  186. @Djinn Fizz
    @Truth

    Man oh man Harry Baldwin's comment (number 31) is hilarious. Pick on Kylie all you want, but you gotta admit, little fella, that is comedy gold.

    Replies: @Kylie

    Was Truth picking on me? I didn’t notice.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Kylie

    That spanking I promised you is years past due.

  187. @Marie
    @Lot

    She would be resigned to selling her work on the regional art and craft fair circuit were it not for:

    -her privileged racial class

    -her politically fashionable decision (in the postmodern method of mediocre artists everywhere) to bank on the profitable niche of SJW art

    I don't doubt she put a lot of time into her pieces, particularly with the laborious tasks of hand-stitching and glassblowing - but come on, this is a (supposedly prestigious, wholly merit-based and extremely competitive) MacArthur Fellowship and Genius Grant! Classical visual artists who also applied, undoubtedly more aesthetically talented in their work than this woman, were rejected in favor of this affirmative-action choice and her social-justice art.

    She obviously got it because of the blackness/SJWness.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Lot

    I agree with all that except that she didn’t apply for the fellowship, they do not have nominations or application, just a mysterious internal process then a call saying you get a million dollars.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Lot

    A million dollars ought to buy a lot of sex from a "genious" young woman, newly grateful for her award!

  188. @PiltdownMan
    @Bill Jones

    Making the beading used to be a high-skill aspect of woodworking. Decades ago, my school wood-shop was all manual, except for a lathe. I foolishly picked a project that required me to create a simple beaded border and learned how very hard it is to do.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Bill Jones

    Precisely. Study the beadwork on William and Mary drawer or carcase fronts for instance. Now reproduce or recreate it by hand, with sharp tools. Now add several different methods of construction (scratch, cock, applied…).

    Every last millimeter of the run possesses at least twelve cosmic dimensions of potential f-up. It’s uncanny really, and one of the many reasons I’ve always perceived woodworking as one of the quintessential time-and-space-travel disciplines.

    The gentlemen to whom I earlier referred were assigned that sort of carving as part of their apprenticeships…in their early teens. They had mastered it at a younger age than today’s teens have detached from the teat. Producing it was part of earning their keep.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  189. @Lot
    @Marie

    I agree with all that except that she didn't apply for the fellowship, they do not have nominations or application, just a mysterious internal process then a call saying you get a million dollars.

    Replies: @BB753

    A million dollars ought to buy a lot of sex from a “genious” young woman, newly grateful for her award!

  190. @Desiderius
    @Anonymous


    For those of you who have never interacted intimately with Blacks over extended periods of time, this sort of imperious command may seem bizarre and exceptional. Let me assure you that it is the norm.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33zPlnhymCU

    Replies: @sayless

    Thank you, Desiderius! Laughter is the best medicine.

  191. @Desiderius
    @Anonymous Nephew

    You've missed the point with uncommon verve and precision.

    Do you imagine we moved north because our inherent pathological altruism led us to decide to leave the best land to the ancestors of today's blacks out of the kindness of our hearts?

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    Are you arguing that those who left Africa were the people who couldn’t cut it as “big men” back on the equator?

    You may be right (difficult to prove), though I suspect the motive was more likely that people wanted to see what was over the next hill, if there was more room/game/fish/women/whatever and just kept going. The Pilgrim Fathers for example weren’t exactly having their butts kicked when they headed for the Americas, although they were religious exiles in Holland. Nor were the first English colonists in Africa. And as for the Spanish in South America …

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anonymous Nephew


    Are you arguing that those who left Africa were the people who couldn’t cut it as “big men” back on the equator?
     
    All your examples are of second sons at best.

    The dominant don't go looking for greener pastures, which was the original question. This suggests it may not be the most prudent thing in the world to treat blacks as innocent little children just waiting for superior whites to lift them up.

    Progressivism is the last bastion of (a false) white supremacism.
  192. @Paleo Retiree
    Why don't rich paleoconservatives hand out money to support what they think of as important and deserving science and arts people? Enough with the whining, let's have some positive action.

    I don't know science, alas, but I know the arts well enough to vouch for the fact that deserving people are out there: novelists doing story-centric fiction; poets, painters and composers using traditional forms; architects and urbanists working in classical and local styles ... You won't learn much about them from the usual outlets, of course. To them, this stuff is either silly or the enemy. I used to pitch story ideas about artists working in trad ways to editors in NYC and got shot down 99.9% of the time.

    Hey, another thing rich paleoconservatives might think of financially sponsoring: an online publication or outlet that brings together, covers and cheerleads for worthy cultural work in trad forms.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @guest

    Rich people get their brains rotted by the culture, too. If they haven’t, they can be ripped off by wolves in sheep’s clothing (see the conservative movement). Or if, against all odds, they manage to set up actual, true-blue traditional institutions, leftists take them over in a generation.

  193. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Desiderius

    Are you arguing that those who left Africa were the people who couldn't cut it as "big men" back on the equator?

    You may be right (difficult to prove), though I suspect the motive was more likely that people wanted to see what was over the next hill, if there was more room/game/fish/women/whatever and just kept going. The Pilgrim Fathers for example weren't exactly having their butts kicked when they headed for the Americas, although they were religious exiles in Holland. Nor were the first English colonists in Africa. And as for the Spanish in South America ...

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Are you arguing that those who left Africa were the people who couldn’t cut it as “big men” back on the equator?

    All your examples are of second sons at best.

    The dominant don’t go looking for greener pastures, which was the original question. This suggests it may not be the most prudent thing in the world to treat blacks as innocent little children just waiting for superior whites to lift them up.

    Progressivism is the last bastion of (a false) white supremacism.

  194. @Jim Don Bob
    @Harry Baldwin

    I met Jonah Goldberg at a small gathering about 5 years ago and he was quite personable, though he did quite forcefully defend NR's sacking of The Derb for his Talk column. The next day he gave a speech to about a hundred people and was quite good.

    I am surprised he, along with people like Kevin Willliamson at NR, got on the NeverTrup band wagon. The only explanation that makes any sense is $; these people fear that a President Trump won't need them and their "conservative" ideas and think tanks. I'll bet Trump has a long memory.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Maybe, but I doubt it. My read on Mr. Williamson is that he believes in open borders / free trade, he doesn’t have much sympathy for the underclasses (because a good share of failure is explained by poor choices / lack of effort), and he just plain doesn’t like Mr. Trump.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Neil Templeton

    KW wrote this fairly sympathetic piece on Appalachia - http://www.nationalreview.com/article/367903/white-ghetto-kevin-d-williamson

  195. @Mr. Anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Entitling a book "Liberal Fascism" proves that he doesn't know what fascism is. Liberals (as we use the term in contemporary America) are not fascist. The word fascism doesn't simply mean "any political movement I don't like". Goldberg is a light-weight.

    Replies: @guest, @Bill Jones, @guest

    “Liberal fascism” was coined by H.G. Wells, I believe in earnest. Maybe you’re a lightweight.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @guest

    Maybe H.G. Wells was a light-weight, as you yourself are.

    Replies: @guest

  196. @CCZ
    @Foreign Expert

    What also comes next is “cultural appropriation” (along with more diversity and cultural sensitivity re-education and indoctrination no doubt).

    “Cultural appropriation is the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of another culture. Cultural appropriation is seen by some as controversial, notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority; this is seen as wrongfully oppressing the minority culture or stripping it of its group identity and intellectual property rights.” (Wikipedia)


    Students, Cornell Athletics Respond to ‘Culturally Insensitive’ Football Coach Tweet
    Daily Cornell Sun

    Fresh off the heels of Cornell football’s first win of the season, offensive coordinator and line coach Roy Istvan received backlash after tweeting a picture of players in sombreros, with the caption “Eman and Fosta! THE BIG SOMBRERO!”

    The tweet was criticized by Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán de Cornell, or MEChA. a student organization that “promotes higher education, cultura and historia,” according to their national website.

    “I think this is indicative of the problem that a decent portion of Cornellians kind of don’t have sympathy for one another,” said Barbara Cruz ’19, the secretary of MEChA de Cornell. “Cornell prides itself on ‘any student, any study,’ but it kind of feels as if a lot of people don’t want us here.”

    “[I am] absolutely embarrassed to attend a university that publicly, or not publicly, supports this [tweet], and hope to work collaboratively to ensure that university communications, and all staff and faculty, receive much needed diversity and cultural sensitivity training,” Matthew Indimine ’18, the executive vice president of the Student Assembly wrote in a comment on MEChA’s post.

    Responding to criticism, Istvan took to twitter to explain his tweet, saying, “I award the big hat to team members who represent the best teamwork and winning spirit on and off the field. I am truly sorry for the cultural insensitivity and understand how our expression of pride came at the expense of others in the Cornell community.”

    Head football coach David Archer ’05 also expressed his regret about the incident, issuing a statement apologizing to the Cornell community for the tweet’s implications.

    “Along with the coaches and players in my program, I regret that an image of our players, that was intended to share our pride and accomplishments, offended anybody in our community,” he said. “I apologize for any disrespect it caused.”

    The University, too, has reached out to MEChA and apologized for the “misuse of important cultural symbols.”

    “Choosing a sombrero to celebrate accomplishments by Cornell University Athletics sent the wrong message to the community,” athletic director Andy Noel wrote in an email to leaders of MEChA de Cornell. “Even when in celebration, misappropriating these symbols can devalue cultures, extend negative stereotypes and needlessly offend others.”

    Hoping to mend the wounds caused by this incident, Noel added that he and the athletic department aim to address the cultural insensitivity problem across campus.

     

    Replies: @guest, @PiltdownMan

    “notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority”

    Yeah, because why should it matter the other way? Blacks have so few things of their own that they need every little bit. Like a kid with his blankie.

    Was that an entry in the “How many times can you say ‘culture’ in one paragraph” contest, by the way? Because I could have done better, but only on purpose.

  197. @CCZ
    @Foreign Expert

    What also comes next is “cultural appropriation” (along with more diversity and cultural sensitivity re-education and indoctrination no doubt).

    “Cultural appropriation is the adoption or use of elements of one culture by members of another culture. Cultural appropriation is seen by some as controversial, notably when elements of a minority culture are used by members of the cultural majority; this is seen as wrongfully oppressing the minority culture or stripping it of its group identity and intellectual property rights.” (Wikipedia)


    Students, Cornell Athletics Respond to ‘Culturally Insensitive’ Football Coach Tweet
    Daily Cornell Sun

    Fresh off the heels of Cornell football’s first win of the season, offensive coordinator and line coach Roy Istvan received backlash after tweeting a picture of players in sombreros, with the caption “Eman and Fosta! THE BIG SOMBRERO!”

    The tweet was criticized by Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán de Cornell, or MEChA. a student organization that “promotes higher education, cultura and historia,” according to their national website.

    “I think this is indicative of the problem that a decent portion of Cornellians kind of don’t have sympathy for one another,” said Barbara Cruz ’19, the secretary of MEChA de Cornell. “Cornell prides itself on ‘any student, any study,’ but it kind of feels as if a lot of people don’t want us here.”

    “[I am] absolutely embarrassed to attend a university that publicly, or not publicly, supports this [tweet], and hope to work collaboratively to ensure that university communications, and all staff and faculty, receive much needed diversity and cultural sensitivity training,” Matthew Indimine ’18, the executive vice president of the Student Assembly wrote in a comment on MEChA’s post.

    Responding to criticism, Istvan took to twitter to explain his tweet, saying, “I award the big hat to team members who represent the best teamwork and winning spirit on and off the field. I am truly sorry for the cultural insensitivity and understand how our expression of pride came at the expense of others in the Cornell community.”

    Head football coach David Archer ’05 also expressed his regret about the incident, issuing a statement apologizing to the Cornell community for the tweet’s implications.

    “Along with the coaches and players in my program, I regret that an image of our players, that was intended to share our pride and accomplishments, offended anybody in our community,” he said. “I apologize for any disrespect it caused.”

    The University, too, has reached out to MEChA and apologized for the “misuse of important cultural symbols.”

    “Choosing a sombrero to celebrate accomplishments by Cornell University Athletics sent the wrong message to the community,” athletic director Andy Noel wrote in an email to leaders of MEChA de Cornell. “Even when in celebration, misappropriating these symbols can devalue cultures, extend negative stereotypes and needlessly offend others.”

    Hoping to mend the wounds caused by this incident, Noel added that he and the athletic department aim to address the cultural insensitivity problem across campus.

     

    Replies: @guest, @PiltdownMan

    Perhaps we shouldn’t be outraged by the “outrage” over the “outrage.”

    There is reason to chill, based on the comments on that article in the Cornell Daily Sun. Note the comments from Hispanics.

    I mean God, it’s just a hat… I’m from Mexican heritage and to put simply, who cares. Way to make a big deal out of nothing. (by the way, who are you to assume these students don’t have Mexican heritage???)

    Sorry – as an Hispanic alum I just don’t see the fuss. I’d recommend that the students that were offended save their fire/credibility for real issues.

    Despite the outcry, Gustavo Dorsett, a sophomore safety on the football team of Mexican descent, does not believe the tweet is offensive, and instead said he believes it celebrates his heritage.

    “I am having trouble seeing how this in any way is so offensive,” he wrote on MEChA’s post. “If I showed this picture to my family in Mexico they would certainly laugh and be excited that our team incorporates a part of the Mexican heritage in celebrating our player awards. This is being blown up by sensitive people on social media who aren’t even of relevance to the Mexican culture.”

    “Where in this photo and caption are they being racially insensitive?” sophomore running back Steven Rodriguez added. “There are no racially insensitive descriptions. If I took a photo wearing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots would you have the same reaction? Don’t think so. They are only being recognized for their outstanding performance in a game.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @PiltdownMan


    There is reason to chill, based on the comments on that article in the Cornell Daily Sun. Note the comments from Hispanics.
     
    One way out of this mess is for minorities to recognize that they're being used by one group of whites to give noogies to another.
  198. @PiltdownMan
    @CCZ

    Perhaps we shouldn't be outraged by the "outrage" over the "outrage."

    There is reason to chill, based on the comments on that article in the Cornell Daily Sun. Note the comments from Hispanics.


    I mean God, it’s just a hat… I’m from Mexican heritage and to put simply, who cares. Way to make a big deal out of nothing. (by the way, who are you to assume these students don’t have Mexican heritage???)

     


    Sorry – as an Hispanic alum I just don’t see the fuss. I’d recommend that the students that were offended save their fire/credibility for real issues.
     

    Despite the outcry, Gustavo Dorsett, a sophomore safety on the football team of Mexican descent, does not believe the tweet is offensive, and instead said he believes it celebrates his heritage.

    “I am having trouble seeing how this in any way is so offensive,” he wrote on MEChA’s post. “If I showed this picture to my family in Mexico they would certainly laugh and be excited that our team incorporates a part of the Mexican heritage in celebrating our player awards. This is being blown up by sensitive people on social media who aren’t even of relevance to the Mexican culture.”
     

    “Where in this photo and caption are they being racially insensitive?” sophomore running back Steven Rodriguez added. “There are no racially insensitive descriptions. If I took a photo wearing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots would you have the same reaction? Don’t think so. They are only being recognized for their outstanding performance in a game.”
     

    Replies: @Desiderius

    There is reason to chill, based on the comments on that article in the Cornell Daily Sun. Note the comments from Hispanics.

    One way out of this mess is for minorities to recognize that they’re being used by one group of whites to give noogies to another.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  199. The connection here is that Rankine spent most of her career at Pomona College. Cecilia Conrad, past Dean at Pomona, now essentially runs MacArthur Foundation. They were long time sjw type activists together. So this isn’t just a black award, its in insider crony reward your fellow black friends award.

  200. @guest
    @Mr. Anon

    "Liberal fascism" was coined by H.G. Wells, I believe in earnest. Maybe you're a lightweight.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Maybe H.G. Wells was a light-weight, as you yourself are.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Mr. Anon

    I don't doubt I am. Wells definitely wasn't.

    For the record, Goldberg I consider middling for his profession. Up until recently, when he descended to become an outright hack.

  201. @Kylie
    @Djinn Fizz

    Was Truth picking on me? I didn't notice.

    Replies: @Truth

    That spanking I promised you is years past due.

  202. @Mr. Anon
    @guest

    Maybe H.G. Wells was a light-weight, as you yourself are.

    Replies: @guest

    I don’t doubt I am. Wells definitely wasn’t.

    For the record, Goldberg I consider middling for his profession. Up until recently, when he descended to become an outright hack.

  203. @Neil Templeton
    @Jim Don Bob

    Maybe, but I doubt it. My read on Mr. Williamson is that he believes in open borders / free trade, he doesn't have much sympathy for the underclasses (because a good share of failure is explained by poor choices / lack of effort), and he just plain doesn't like Mr. Trump.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    KW wrote this fairly sympathetic piece on Appalachia – http://www.nationalreview.com/article/367903/white-ghetto-kevin-d-williamson

  204. @Mr. Anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Entitling a book "Liberal Fascism" proves that he doesn't know what fascism is. Liberals (as we use the term in contemporary America) are not fascist. The word fascism doesn't simply mean "any political movement I don't like". Goldberg is a light-weight.

    Replies: @guest, @Bill Jones, @guest

    It’s been a long long time since Liberal meant liberal.

  205. @PiltdownMan
    @Bill Jones

    Making the beading used to be a high-skill aspect of woodworking. Decades ago, my school wood-shop was all manual, except for a lathe. I foolishly picked a project that required me to create a simple beaded border and learned how very hard it is to do.

    Replies: @Olorin, @Bill Jones

    I notice that I get less satisfaction from, and therefore do less, woodworking as by collection of power tools has increased.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Bill Jones


    I notice that I get less satisfaction from, and therefore do less, woodworking as by collection of power tools has increased.
     
    It's similar to poetry writing in that respect. The harder it is the easier it is.
  206. @Mr. Anon
    @Jim Don Bob

    Entitling a book "Liberal Fascism" proves that he doesn't know what fascism is. Liberals (as we use the term in contemporary America) are not fascist. The word fascism doesn't simply mean "any political movement I don't like". Goldberg is a light-weight.

    Replies: @guest, @Bill Jones, @guest

    By the way, I don’t remember enough about that book to say how much of it was “liberals are fascists,” though there was a lot of it. There was also a lot of confusion over the origins of fascism, and just what it meant. However, Goldberg did score some very excellent points. One concerns the reaction of liberals to fascism, which was more admiring and envious than we’ve been led to believe.

    Another follows from that envy. Liberals saw what the fascists were pulling off and said, “Why aren’t we doing that?” So they set about to do their own version; fascism with a smiley face, if you will.

    The book was not Dems R the Real Nazis. I remember him going double-barrels on Hillary and Pat Buchanan at the end. Which helps explain why this election is so painful to Conservatism, Inc. water carriers like Goldberg. Because Hillary is the same Hillary, and Trump is Buchanan, only more liberal.

  207. @Bill Jones
    @PiltdownMan

    I notice that I get less satisfaction from, and therefore do less, woodworking as by collection of power tools has increased.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    I notice that I get less satisfaction from, and therefore do less, woodworking as by collection of power tools has increased.

    It’s similar to poetry writing in that respect. The harder it is the easier it is.

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