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In the 20th Century, there were famous sociologists.

But in this century, economists are much more likely to get publicity, even on non-monetary sociological topics such as crime rates. For example, U. of Chicago economist Steven “Freakonomics” Levitt has a new paper out about how he was right after all about legalized abortion cutting crime. (I haven’t read it, but I wanted to mention it.)

Similarly, Raj Chetty’s popular Big Data analysis class at Harvard is offered under the Econ rubric, but it’s more like a combination of market research data techniques and sociology content.

The reasons economics have been imperializing adjacent disciplines like sociology, political science, anthropology, and geography (with perhaps psychology holding out as a separate, somewhat imperialist pole) are numerous. One is that economists are slightly less neutered by political correctness that academics in other disciplines. Another is that you can make a fair amount of money as an economist, so it attracts the ambitious and practical.

But another reason is that the number of economics majors at elite colleges is bloated by the refusal of most to allow undergrads to major in Business or Finance or some other get-a-job field. (Penn is one of the few Ivy League colleges to allow undergrads, such as Donald Trump, to major in Finance.)

(Harvard, of course, has a famous Business School with extremely well-paid professors, but you have to be about 27 years old to be admitted to the MBA program.)

So, if you go to Harvard, the way you signal to employers, such as Wall Street, that you find money interesting and appealing is by majoring in Economics.

Hence, at many elite colleges, the Economics department is prospering, while other departments are withering. If the other social sciences wanted to cut Economics down to size on their campuses, they would demand the creation of Business majors.

 
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  1. For the very brightest 18 year old students, business courses are superficial and unedifying. Top universities are right to force top-tier students to study deeper topics, and learn business later as a career skill.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  2. JimDandy says:

    Many forms of genocide would reduce crime.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  3. So, if you go to Harvard, the way you signal to employers, such as Wall Street, that you find money interesting and appealing is by majoring in Economics.

    Hence, at many elite colleges, the Economics department is prospering, while other departments are withering. If the other social sciences wanted to cut Economics down to size on their campuses, they would demand the creation of Business majors.

    At Oxford they have no pure economics course but they do have PPE, which is for most highly ambitious (albeit mostly politically) strivers, and then ‘Economics and Management’. Even people who do this regard the management component as a joke and it signals that you are probably rather boring.

  4. @Peter Johnson

    My impression is kind of the opposite. The subject matter of MBA school courses — Is there a market for gourmet frozen dog food? — were more fun for my 21-23 year old brain than undergrad courses about, say, What should Napoleon have done instead of invade Russia?

  5. Anon[133] • Disclaimer says:

    2/3 of abortions are to Nonwhite women. Much of the remaining third are to White women from lower-income backgrounds, many of whom are impregnated by Nonwhite men.

    Middle and upper income White women have a low abortion rate.

    Abortion whitens the population and promotes eugenic selection. It’s the lower half of the Bell Curve who abortion off babies they can’t afford.

    If most Conservatives knew this, the Pro Life movement would collapse tomorrow.

  6. I think there’s merit to your suggestion, but i don’t think that’s the crux of it.

    I really think the heart of it is the PC issue you mentioned, which dovetails with economists being more male, smarter, not innumerate.

    — Economics draws smart guys–mostly men. The mean isn’t quite physics caliber but it’s pretty close to the top, well above the other social sciences.

    — Economists aren’t innumerate. In fact the whole thrust of the discipline is mathematical. Theories are elucidated with equations and “proven” with math. Innumeracy and feminine aversion to just basing and testing theories on data rather than feelings are at the heart of the b.s. we see today.

    So it’s not really any surprise economists are now taking turf from disciplines increasingly infested with innumerate, feminized verbalists.

  7. @Steve Sailer

    Who would you rather hang out with, a history buff, or a dogfood maven?

    (Not to say that studying the market for dogfood won’t develop skills applicable to other subjects.)

  8. Conservative youngsters who want to major in bankable subjects like business show that they tend to plan their lives better. They want to become employable and self-reliant right out of college, unlike the students who major in useless and imaginary subjects in the humanities and the social sciences.

    BTW, speaking of the useless and the imaginary, the data show that degrees in theology, religious studies and related fields don’t pay off in terms of job prospects at livable wages. These majors fall into the employability neighborhood of sociology, LGBQT studies and the like.

    Notice that this has happened through impersonal market forces, given the market’s ability to sort through a tremendous about of data to find the combinations of factors which produce the most net value in the economy. It didn’t happen because some mean atheists have successfully discredited traditional religious beliefs.

    • LOL: Desiderius
  9. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Not a big fan of the tribe it seems.

    America was created as a white nation of course. Your tweet is in English, that whitest of all major languages.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
  10. @AnotherDad

    Economists aren’t innumerate. In fact the whole thrust of the discipline is mathematical. Theories are elucidated with equations and “proven” with math. Innumeracy and feminine aversion to just basing and testing theories on data rather than feelings are at the heart of the b.s. we see today.

    While I largely agree with what you’ve said, I believe that the tradition of math-intensive a priori reasoning (what your first sentence alludes to) is not the best thing economics has going for it. The best of economics is what you mention in your second sentence — the part that combines deep interest in real institutions with rigorous data analysis.

    Excellence with the first is what will get you hired at a Harvard or Princeton. But fortunately there’s plenty of the second kind of work getting done too.

  11. @Anon

    Er, you haven’t been paying attention to pro-life groups’ rhetoric, have you?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Anon
  12. 1.Create Business schools
    2.Once some members of aforementioned business schools get some real success, advertise that “Our school is a great place for your psychology major daughter to get her MRS. degree”.
    3. Profit!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  13. @Redneck farmer

    Film schools for undergrads can be good advertising for a college because celebrities get written about all the time, and writers often pop in some detail about what college they went to.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  14. Lugash says:
    @Steve Sailer

    What should Napoleon have done instead of invade Russia?

    Develop gourmet frozen dog food?

    • LOL: TomSchmidt
    • Replies: @SFG
    , @(((Owen)))
  15. I wish you hadn’t a lumped in the Geography majors with political “science”, anthropology, and sociology, Steve. Geography is really cool stuff, and can involve plenty of math if you get into the remote sensing area. It’s not about naming the capitals of all the countries in Africa.

    Here ya’ go, speaking of Economics, there’s a branch called Economic Geography, in which you study why cities form here rather than there, why aluminum is made here rather than there, the reasons for building trans-shipment points, etc. Until I took one class, I never had though about why Coca~cola was bottled locally and stuff like that.

    Put it this way – I’d hire a Geographer from one of the more mathematical branches over and economist any day of the week. The Geographer at least would not be a bullshitter as most of the economists are pretty much forced to be, from studying anything past Econ 101.

    ————————————————–

    Since this is just what I do, here is the only hit from the Geography-Rock genre that I know of (sorry for the PC tokens – of course – even in this 1988 video):

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @ThreeCranes
  16. SFG says:
    @Lugash

    It would play to strengths of French culture such as gastronomy and branding.

  17. @Redneck farmer

    I give the pro-life crowd lots of credit for integrity, R.F. One guy’s been standing on the same piece of grass at a busy intersection with his signs for 30 years now*. (OK, for him, it’s more persistence than integrity.)

    No, they don’t want to know about the practical aspect that Steve and Steven have mentioned. I am with the pro-life crowd in spirit, but I completely understand the benefit explained by the 2 Steves.

    .

    * Yes, I’m sure he goes home at night.

  18. @Achmed E. Newman

    But Geography has pretty much been annihilated as an academic subject. That’s one reason for Jared Diamond’s popularity: he knows a lot about the interesting academic field of geography (his latest bailiwick), which nobody else does anymore.

  19. L Woods says:
    @AnotherDad

    From what I understand, it’s neoclassical economics in particular that’s so heavily quantitative in nature — it’s not necessarily intrinsic to the discipline. And this brand is preeminent mainly in the US, and only relatively recently.

  20. @AnotherDad

    How do explain Nomi Prins then? She doesn’t exude much over-the-top emotionalism. She is pretty much all business on C-SPAN, more so than any of them.

    A lot of young people may be majoring in economics because of the flimsy bubble economy. Due to the tentativeness of fiat money, even rich youths may be worried about the structural solidity of the American economy, much less people who grew up in less cushy circumstances.

    Even non-mathematical, non-youthful Americans are more interested in the economy. We are trying to figure out what went wrong. We were all raised on the notion that the USA is a middle-class nation—NOT.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  21. @Anon

    Abortion whitens the population…

    White population of the US, 1970: 87.7%

    White population of the US, 2010: 72.4%

    Non-Hispanic white population, 1970: 83.5%

    Non-Hispanic white population, 2010: 63.7%

    White/black ratio, 1970: 7.5-1

    White/black ratio, 201o: 5-1

    Middle and upper income White women have a low abortion rate.

    Because they have a low pregnancy rate. You can’t abort what isn’t there. (Actually, you can. I’ve read that as many as 1/10 of all abortions may be performed on women who turn out not to be pregnant.)

    Elective abortion increases the fear of pregnancy, so white women avoid both, and concentrate on careers. Then they marry at 38, and spend half their income at the IVF clinic. Often in vain.

    Imagine what that does to our demographics.

  22. @Steve Sailer

    Really? I know I haven’t kept up, but that’s a shame. It was in the humanities college I think.

    I’ll tell you this, just on the small scale, as in understanding directions and reading maps, yeah, for most people geography is dead. I got so pissed at a guy that came to get some extra siding and … ahhh, here’s a link to the story: “Smart Devices / Dumb People – Will Moore’s Law hold?”

  23. @Reg Cæsar

    Wait, Reg. Wouldn’t that abortion rate be taken as a ratio to pregnancies, not just how many per lifetime? I think everyone here understands the demographic, errr, difficulty we are in. The point is that it would have been even worse by now.

  24. A Harvard degree majoring in applied mathematics is also a good route to Wall Street jobs.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  25. @Anonymouse55uu

    But that sounds harder.

    Granted, they’ve made economics a harder major over the years at most places. When I majored in it at Rice, the 101 and 102 courses were rather difficult, but the rest of the major was just applying basic concepts from your freshman year to different topics like anti-trust.

    Now there’s normally some math involved to be an econ major.

  26. Anon[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    You can major in business at Cal State or a community college, and that’s probably where such majors belong.

    There’s nothing wrong with business, just as there’s nothing wrong with plumbing, but like plumbing it’s not a university subject. It’s a vocational subject. Only ten or twenty percent of the population should be going to college. College should not be contorting itself so much to accommodate fifty percent of the population. Make more undergrad, and secondary ed, institutions.

  27. @Steve Sailer

    If my personal experience is any indicator, the humanities are just completely wasted on young people. When I was young and had little to no life experience, and few real responsibilities, I got a lot out of studying STEM and business and other practical things, and not much out of studying the humanities. Shakespeare, Aeschylus, Plato…I was forced to read it, but it was all just pearls cast before swine. In midlife it was a different story.

  28. dearieme says:
    @SimpleSong

    the humanities are just completely wasted on young people: perhaps so. I remember reading novels when I was a teenager and missing a lot of what they were about.

    But I disagree about Shakespeare: we read many of his plays at school and I did get a lot out of them – either because a play suits youngsters more than novels do, or perhaps just because of the form his genius took.

  29. Mike1 says:
    @AnotherDad

    “Economists aren’t innumerate. In fact the whole thrust of the discipline is mathematical”.

    A lot of people with PHD’s in economics are innumerate. They can’t do basic math in their head and have weak or non existent comprehension of the most basic of mathematical concepts.

  30. But another reason is that the number of economics majors at elite colleges is bloated by the refusal of most to allow undergrads to major in Business or Finance or some other get-a-job field.

    How is this different from wannabe doctors not being able to major in “pre-med”? They have to take a real discipline.

    We didn’t use to require a degree for a career in business, only a diploma. You were ready to go right out of high school. In Europe, post-secondary business education takes place at “institutes”, not universities.

    Ernst & Young wised up to this a few years ago:

    Ernst & Young Removes University Degree Classification From Entry Criteria As There’s ‘No Evidence’ It Equals Success

    Why do they call it “Business Administration”, anyway? That’s uninspiringly bureaucratic.

  31. @SimpleSong

    If my personal experience is any indicator, the humanities are just completely wasted on young people.

    In the words of Sammy Cahn, so is youth itself:

    They say Paris is wasted on the French, but was that true of Nicole Maurey?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @jim jones
  32. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    That was exactly where I was going to go, though I’d not have used Der Bingle since he was such a shit to his kids.

  33. KL says:

    Economics is just better. Professors in those adjacent areas aren’t smart enough to do math. Psychology is a dumpster fire, with a huge replication crisis. Amy Cuddy’s “power posing” was considered to be a “theory” instead of a silly assertion.

    Sociology and Anthropology canonized Margaret Meade, despite Derek Freeman showing she was hoaxed by re-interviewing her original sources. Feynman wrote that those areas are doing “cargo cult science”, foolish religion masquerading as science.

    • Agree: Travis
  34. Tyto Alba says:
    @Steve Sailer

    When I was last in University, the geography courses were among my favorites.
    Even though it was in Europe, my professor’s favorite case studies were about southern California.
    He was quite obsessed. One study I recall examining showed how synergies of having talent & experience in the crafts essential for aerospace & defense industries were exploited for some great innovations in the entertainment & amusement parks & recreation businesses. That kind of path dependency in economic geography was really fascinating.

    In Germany for example they offer 118 different graduate degree programs in geography.
    http://vgdh.geographie.de/studium-forschung/masterstudiengange-geographie/

    Before he lost his mind to terminal Trump Derangement Syndrome, Paul Krugman’s territory was essentially economic geography, international trade & regional industrial clusters for which he was eventually recognized for The Sveriges Riksbank Prize.

    What Raj Chetty is trying to do is also basically economic geography…

    Others from the field that come to mind who’ve made a name for themselves in popular media include Joel Kotkin, at Chapman University in Orange, CA and groan, hucksters like Richard Florida.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  35. Tyto Alba says:
    @Steve Sailer

    When I was last in University, the geography courses were among my favorites.
    Even though it was in Europe, my professor’s favorite case studies were about southern California.
    He was quite obsessed. One study I recall examining showed how synergies of having talent & experience in the crafts essential for aerospace & defense industries were exploited for some great innovations in the entertainment & amusement parks & recreation businesses. That kind of path dependency in economic geography was really fascinating.

    In Germany for example they offer 118 different graduate degree programs in geography.
    http://vgdh.geographie.de/studium-forschung/masterstudiengange-geographie/

    Before he lost his mind to terminal Trump Derangement Syndrome, Paul Krugman’s territory was essentially economic geography, international trade & regional industrial clusters for which he was eventually recognized for The Sveriges Riksbank Prize.

    What Raj Chetty is trying to do is also basically economic geography…

    Others from the field that come to mind who’ve made a name for themselves in popular media include Joel Kotkin, at Chapman University in Orange, CA and groan, hucksters like Richard Florida.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  36. Travis says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    it is quite interesting when you loot the growth of the Black population in the United states. It more than doubles every 50 years. no evidence of genocide, the ethnic cleansing is just starting.

    census— 1930 — 1970 — 2010 — 2050*
    Whites – 110 M – 178 M – 197 M –185 M
    Blacks -— 12 M — 23 M — 43 M —67 M

    White population grew 11% from 1970-2010
    Black population grew 83% from 1970-2010

    * Census projections. Blacks include mixed race blacks like Kamala Harris and Jussie Smollett. The 2010 census counted 39 million Blacks and 4 million mixed race Blacks.

  37. L Woods says:
    @KL

    When you put it that way, yes, the other social sciences are even more of a joke. But none of them deserve to be called “sciences.”

  38. Art Deco says:

    But another reason is that the number of economics majors at elite colleges is bloated by the refusal of most to allow undergrads to major in Business or Finance or some other get-a-job field.

    The number of youths who finish a BA with a business degree of one sort of another exceeds the number who graduate with an economics degree 11-12 fold. There’s ample opportunity to cadge an undergraduate degree in a business discipline if that’s what you want to do. It’s just that you cannot usually do it at a prestige college (which have few if any options in vocational majors, graduate or undergraduate) or private research university. Only about 10-12% of the undergraduate population attends such institutions, so they’re not hard to avoid.

    As we speak, about 1.7% of all BA degrees are issued in economics, so I’m not seeing how econ departments are ‘bloated’. The share issued in history, sociology, and political science are 1.3%, 1.5%, and 2.2% respectively. In 2004, the share issued in economics was 1.7% as well. That in the other three disciplines was 2.1%, 1.9%, and 3.0% respectively. They’ve lost relative position, but only the history department has seen an absolute decline in the number of students.

    Creatures like Bryan Caplan and Levitt are staging raids on political science and sociology, not history. And it’s a reasonable wager they do it because they’re bored with the subject matter of economics and dissertation advisers and journal editors are willing to allow such raids.

  39. Art Deco says:
    @KL

    Professors in those adjacent areas aren’t smart enough to do math.

    Use of quantitative methods is common among sociologists. It’s atypical among political scientists, but not rare. Among geographers who do empirical research, quantitative methods are the mode.

  40. Anon[100] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer

    It’s rhetoric designed for our contemporary society.

    The average pro-life voter does not care if Margaret Sanger was a racist.

  41. @Anon

    Everyone knows it implicitly, that’s why people living in cities with a large sub-Saharan population are so hardcore pro-abortion. Of course they’ll find some other way to rationalize it.

    I think pro-lifers just want more Americans and less immigrants, plus many have seen ultrasounds of their own children, which makes abortion hard to stomach.

  42. @KL

    That’s not fair to religion. They’re more akin to cults.

  43. @SimpleSong

    It takes a good teacher who is in tune with where his students are at and what issues are most pressing to them, then you select literature that speaks to those issues through characters they can identify with.

  44. Anon[100] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    What would the demographics be without abortion?

    Abortion is slowing Nonwhite population growth, especially of Blacks and Mulattos.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  45. dvorak says:

    Hence, at many elite colleges, the Economics department is prospering, while other departments are withering.

    MIT has disproven iSteve’s idea. The UG Econ graduating class is reduced to a handful, as iSteve predicted, with everyone going to Sloan instead. But the economists’ power is as high as ever, because of their Grad school program.

    The real weapon of economists is their math machete, with which they can hack into any social science domain.

  46. jim jones says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Paris is exactly what the French deserve:

  47. anon[378] • Disclaimer says:

    From NYFed data the under-employment rate (graduate working in jobs that do not require university degrees) for Business Management graduate is 61.3%. BA (Business) is for burger flippers.

  48. @International Jew

    IJ wrote:

    Who would you rather hang out with, a history buff, or a dogfood maven?

    A history buff.

    But, with one exception, none of the history majors I knew were history buffs. It was just an easy way to get a college diploma, and for a few (very few!) an easy way to make a living.

    Indeed, most of the history majors I have known were hilariously ignorant of history (e.g., one guy with a BA in history who could not distinguish the Mogul/Mughal Empire in India from the Mongol Empire — he insisted that in referring to the “Moguls” I was mispronouncing the word by leaving out the “n”!).

    Most of the history buffs I’ve known were in STEM (myself included).

    • Replies: @bomag
  49. @KL

    KL wrote:

    Sociology and Anthropology canonized Margaret Meade…

    Well, yes. But there are smart sociologists and anthropologists. Check out Christopher Hallpike’s politically incorrect On Primitive Society : And Other Forbidden Topics or Randall Collins’ Four Sociological Traditions. Or almost anything by Ernest Gellner (if you like the middle-European intellectual style).

    Indeed, even some officially “left-wing” guys who happen to be smart have important (and politically incorrect) things to say; see the book by the “cultural materialist” Marvin Harris: Why Nothing Works : The Anthropology of Daily Life — much of the book reads as if it were written by a conservative or libertarian. (Hmmm…. maybe he was, and the “cultural materialism” thing was just protective coloration!)

    Or even the recent books by the anthropologist David Graeber, one of the founders of the Occupy movement: The Utopia of Rules or Bullshit Jobs; Graebere tries to indict capitalism, but almost all of his actual examples are due to government.

    So, don’t give up on sociology and anthropology. You just have to be selective. Very selective.

  50. @anonymous

    Has that swastika been photoshopped on?

  51. @Tyto Alba

    Thanks.

    Walt Disney was originally going to build Disneyland in Burbank near Lockheed, where my dad worked, but couldn’t assemble enough land.

  52. @AnotherDad

    “innumerate, feminized verbalists” explains almost the entirety of our current dysfunctional state, states and State.

  53. @International Jew

    Dogfood maven for sure. Anyone who has eaten enough dogfood to become “an expert or connoisseur” (Dictionary.com) has got to have some interesting quirks and stories to tell.

  54. @Achmed E. Newman

    Geography also overlaps with high order land and ocean Surveying, GIS, GPS etc. Mathematic modeling of the globe and so forth (why your handheld GPS is inaccurate in Tahiti).

    Before every county, state and federal government could create reliable spreadsheet type GIS (geographic information system) systems of mapping, they first had to have extremely accurate maps. Otherwise, none of the data layers would lay on top on one another with enough precision to be useful. So, all existing data about stream location, wetlands, elevations, population, locations of utilities, businesses etc had to be transposed into the new coherent, comprehensive system. This is done through aerial photographs of targets placed on USGS monuments in the ground by survey crews.

    GIS allows someone to do visually, with maps, what an office clerk does with a spreadsheet. Any two or more variables can be compared. Chetty does this all the time. In fact, that’s all he does. Looks at two variables on a map and tries to identify a third variable that accounts for their appearing together or not.

  55. RT Rider says:

    Way, way back when I did my MBA, economics was focused on micro, or economics of the firm and financial economics. Not much, if any, macro other than the usual Keynesian blather. I like to think that while microeconomics is very useful, macro (political economics) is a field more suited to charlatans and bullshit artists, which is why it’s so appealing to politicians.

  56. @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    It’s not that geography has been “pretty much annihilated as an academic subject.” It still exists as a university subject and as a university department, especially at some of the state schools. Last I checked, Texas high schools required a course on the geography of Texas to graduate, but it’s pretty much eliminated at the high schools.

    I think you could say that it disappeared from the high school curriculum in most states in the USA, just as civics disappeared.

    Geography in the USA *as done by geographers at universities* is so fragmented that it’s to tell what it is at a glance. Many people doing research in GIS and remote sensing are geographers, as are some of the people editing the journal that published the hoax article on “rape culture in dog parks.”

    The standard reading is still this. A little dated.

    http://geog.ucsb.edu/~kclarke/G200B/four_20traditions_20of_20geography.pdf

  57. David says:
    @International Jew

    Maven is the only word I know of that comes from Hebrew and has no Biblical connotation. Sycamore might be another.

  58. @Steve Sailer

    Film schools are the un dergrad equivalent of law schools for colleges: a cash cow. It’s hard to start one now, but I’ve had dealings with a few: they’re happy to take young people’s money and saddle them with unplayable loans to provide sinecures to bureaucrats.

    They actually do a good job teaching the craft, but there are SO few slots at the table that it will always be a losing proposition for almost all the students.

  59. Art Deco says:
    @Tyto Alba

    Paul Krugman’s territory was essentially economic geography,

    He wrote one monograph for general audiences, the essence of which was a complaint that geographers had failed to assemble a defensible body of literature and needed to have economists fix their discipline. IIRC, the book was quite America-centric, which is strange because American geographers are in the back of a bus driven by their British counterparts.

  60. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It wasn’t annihilated. It’s just an odd subject here, and it has some systematic problems as a discipline which it’s practitioners in this country never cleaned up. Maybe 3-4% of the baccalaureate degrees in social research disciplines (excluding psychology from the set) are granted in geography. As a rule, you’re not going to have a critical mass of interested students at institutions where undergraduate enrollment falls below a certain thresh-hold (~5,000 FTE, I think), so there’s no point in setting up a department at most teaching institutions. Also, it’s been normal to have unfocused programs with faculty pursuing an odd jumble of research interests. In addition to that, where you have departments, some of the budget is devoted to hiring people who trade in ‘social theory’ rather than empirical social research. Among the most prominent academic geographers in the country has long been David Harvey, who was hired away from the University of Bristol in 1969. He hasn’t published anything in the field since he came to America. His research programme consists of cogitating on Marxism. If you want an object lesson in academe as a patronage dump for commies, note that David Harvey was eventually hired by the CUNY graduate center to teach ‘anthropology’, a discipline about which he knows bupkis.

    IMO, geographers have shot themselves in the foot by not setting the boundary conditions which differentiate their discipline from the other disciplines in social research, by not building a variety of departments whose programs have focus, and by not developing reciprocal understandings with other faculties. Krugman blabbed on and on about geographers’ failure to build ‘models’, as if everyone’s theoretical constructions had to hit all the tick-boxes necessary for you to get published in economics journals; I can’t imagine he read much literature in geography outside of the segment concerned with industrial location.

  61. bomag says:
    @PhysicistDave

    LOL

    Reminds me of historians talking to John von Neumann who soon realized that he knew more history than they did.

  62. @Endgame Napoleon

    Define “middle-class” please.

  63. The problem with this idea is that most business schools–at least at top universities–are dominated by economists. Finance departments today are comprised entirely of economists, accounting departments are also comprised of faculty trained through the lens of economics, strategy and management departments at the top schools are mostly comprised of economists with the occasional sociologist thrown in (though at mid-tier schools there are still those who apply regressions to substantive problems), marketing departments are a mix of economists and psychologists with the occasional statistician or anthropologist thrown in

  64. @Anon

    What would the demographics be without abortion?

    Abortion is slowing Nonwhite population growth, especially of Blacks and Mulattos.

    Only among the legally married. The bastard population has exploded since 1973.

    The end of illegitimacy. Another broken promise.

  65. “Similarly, Raj Chetty’s popular Big Data analysis class at Harvard is offered under the Econ rubric, but it’s more like a combination of market research data techniques and sociology content.”

    …not to mention access to data no one else can get. Not that replication of results or offering alternative hypotheses to see if they better explain the data is of _any_ service to the social pseudosciences.

  66. Truth says:
    @Anon

    Roughly 400,000 white women abort babies yearly.

  67. @Anonymous

    Your tweet is in English, that whitest of all major languages.

    Of the major languages, Russian and German are clearly more white than English. English is the language of African colonies and multicultural empire. The African anglophones will soon dominate all English speakers around the world, with Nigeria in the lead as the principal anglophone nation.

    Possibly French is, too, but that’s hard to say for certain given the exponential rapid population growth in francophone Africa.

  68. @Lugash

    What should Napoleon have done instead of invade Russia?

    Develop gourmet frozen dog food?

    Napoleon paid large bounties for the development of food storage technologies for armies conquering Europe which funded the development of the first canning technologies. And given the quality of early canning techniques, the food was often of quality suitable for dogs.

    So Napoleon in some sense did develop canned gourmet dog food.

    But not frozen gourmet dog food. That would have to wait for American Willis Carrier to invent reliable freezers and American Clarence Birdseye to invent flash freezing.

    (Strange how when I Google ‘American inventors,’ nobody like Carrier or Birdseye ever shows up…)

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