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From Medium:

George Floyd’s Life Mattered
by Hillary Clinton

Jun 4 · 2 min read

… If you’re in a place to give, donate today to support groups working to end systemic racial injustice, increase the elected representation of Black people, and fight Republican efforts to suppress Black votes.
Through their Education Fund, the Collective is working to recruit, train, and fund Black judicial, prosecutorial and attorney general candidates to ensure more representative leaders for the criminal justice system. Color of Change is a national online force dedicated to holding corporations and elected leaders accountable in the fight to end practices and systems that unfairly hold Black people back. Higher Heights supports the Black women’s leadership pipeline. And the NAACP Legal Defense Fund works toward racial justice through litigation, advocacy, and public education.

… But we can recognize our privilege, practice humility, and speak out against white supremacy in all its forms.

For many white people, conversations about systemic racism and our own privilege are uncomfortable.

Here’s what I’ve learned over the years: That discomfort is a good thing. It’s a necessary part of examining our own biases and actions, and our own role in perpetuating inequality.

One of the most important steps we can take is to educate ourselves. … If you’re looking for fiction, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple and Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye both tackle race, gender, and violence through the lens of Black womanhood. …

Onward,
Hillary

I added the bold, but Hillary (or her staff) decided upon what to capitalize and what not to capitalize.

This little gesture of capitalizing the B in “black” while pointedly not capitalizing the W in “white” has been spreading among the Woke in recent years. You can tell if somebody is a good person from which world they capitalize and which word they don’t. Black people tend to enjoy this kind of childish thing, so it seems rather petty to deny them the pleasure they get from this due to you clinging to outmoded concepts like dignity or racial equality.

iSteve commenter Harry Baldwin adds:

They need to add a punctuation mark to “Black,” something like “~Black~” indicating that we must genuflect as we read or say the sacred word. Or maybe “Black” is so sacred that we shouldn’t completely write it out, but write “B—k”, like Orthodox Jews write “G-d” instead of God.

It’s impossible to err on the side of obsequiousness, so let’s get cracking!

To abolish whiteness, we could strike over the hated word white.

 
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  1. So, Alice Walker hasn’t been unpersoned for praising one of David Ike’s books.

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
    @jimmyriddle

    I typed her name into Google News. I got the New York Times, Vogue, the LA Times, the James Corden Show, The Chicago Sun-Times, The Salt Lake Tribune and many, many more, all recommending her books in just the last week!

    Anyone in the world would be grateful for that kind of "unpersoning".

  2. I prefer “negro”

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @DextersLabRat

    Don't even think about it.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SYkbqzWVHZI

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Known Fact
    @DextersLabRat

    I still like "negro" best myself. E.G. negro riots, negro district, negro projects. I still smile at how my grandfather, a man without a hateful bone in his body, would refer to them as "the coloreds" and just shake his head sadly.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  3. Onward,
    Hillary

    She can’t move onward fast enough to suit me.

  4. wren says:

    Maybe some acronym like PBUH after each use of black.

    Superior To Foster Us or something lile that.

    Speaking of Hillary’s discomfort, how is Bill’s BLACK!!! son, or the guy who thought he was, anyway?

    I am pretty sick of all of this kind of talk.

    I haven’t spoken with my black co-workers, acquaintances and friends since the lockdown and then all of this started.

    Hopefully they are okay.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @wren

    PBUH - Police Be Upon Him/Her.

  5. o hai hillary! yeh I remember you

  6. “Offer up your best defence, this is end, of innocence.”

    Btw, ‘The Way It Is’ is now a song about White* people.

    *I’ve been harping on the capitalization issue for a long time now, glad that everyone has come around.

  7. But we can recognize our privilege

    What’s with that “we” you overstuffed, over the hill racoon?

    Like Henry Kissinger, we just can’t be rid of her.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Franz

    What's wrong with Kissinger?

    Replies: @Franz, @Frank McGar

  8. People might confuse “B—k” with “Book”, aka the Bible; so, it’s better to only hyphen out the vowels, like Orthodox Jews do with “G-d”, making “Bl-ck”.

  9. “White comfort” is one of those Critical Race Theory buzzwords. James Lindsay doesn’t have an entry for it yet in this Encyclopedia of Social Justice, but he does have an entry for “white equilibrium,” a related concept.

    https://newdiscourses.com/tftw-white-equilibrium/

    The new Red Guard fully intend that you should suffer for the crimes of “whiteness”. And Hillary is not some fringe beatnik telling you this.

  10. If you’re looking for fiction,

    Wait a second, everything up to this point wasn’t fictional??

  11. Superpredators matter:

  12. @DextersLabRat
    I prefer "negro"

    Replies: @International Jew, @Known Fact

    Don’t even think about it.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @International Jew

    I come from the tech world and have occasionally come across Nigerian or Eastern African immigrants/second-generation kids. They'll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then. I'm willing to wager most US whites are descended from people that came over later than the last slaves did.


    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but "black". "African-American" screams "1990s white bien-pensant" to me.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

  13. All these media companies are staffed with nothing but ditzes and dopes deciding what we should think. Tons of females who are borderline cult-cases. Gay guys working their hateful grudges. And childish POC.

    How is this sustained? Look for the smart White males who enable it. I promise they are there. From company founders to software engineers. I’m getting convinced it’s the smart White guys who are too comfy with liberals that allow this to happen.

    • Replies: @anon
    @RichardTaylor

    " Look for the smart White males who enable it."

    yup
    Plenty of people are tricked on all sides. I've seen some things that look obviously faked like picturing alleged/suspected or otherwise white supremacists with a black person. Saying alleged/suspected homophobes are gay or transgendered etc... It's par for the course of the split in my opinion.

  14. Anon[797] • Disclaimer says:

    The cap B for black is fairly common in various publication internal style books these days, as is the cap I in indigenous, which I think the AP has adopted. Heather Mac Donald in her last book writes about how an emeritus UCLA professor lost the seminar he was teaching partly because he lowercased the I’s in indigenous, as well as making grammar and spelling corrections. The entire purpose of the seminar was to get help in polishing up your thesis before submission.

    There’s some explanation about why the w in white isn’t capitalized, but I forget what it is.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    My father told me that in his youth, newspapers routinely printed "(Negro)" or just "(N)" after a black person's name so that the reader would understand it wasn't an ordinary white person they were talking about. Obviously, that practice went out of fashion later, but now it's back in a new form.

    One of the ironic things about the Civil Rights Era and its aftermath is how what's old is what's new. We went from segregation to desegregation to resegregation, from race-based rights to equality back to raced-based rights, from racial awareness to racial blindness and now to racial hyper-awareness: racial wokeness.

    , @Neuday
    @Anon


    There’s some explanation about why the w in white isn’t capitalized, but I forget what it is.
     
    IIRC, "Black" is capitalized because its a people, like "Chinese", or "Brazilian", where as white is a color, not a people. Funny, you don't capitalize "Mongrel".

    In any event, we Americans of European descent will need a name for our people, lest the foe provide one. Since our ancestors arrived by their own volition, perhaps Voluntary Americans, or Volams, distinct from Involuntary Americans or Paperwork Americans? The coming conflagration could be Volams vs. Golems.

    Replies: @Tracy

  15. To abolish whiteness, we could strike over the hated word white.

    Don’t give them ideas, Mr. Sailer.

    • Replies: @Tracy
    @PiltdownMan

    As a Catholic, what came to my mind is that we could genuflect at the word "bl_ck" and strike our breast when pronouncing the word " white." Three strikes along with "mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa" would likely go down well with the woke clerisy types.

  16. Black Loot Matters.

  17. Ah, don’t you just love it when people who are grossly more richer and more powerful than you’ll ever be lecture you on your “privilege”, particularly when they were the same people tacitly approving draconian legal and policing policies in the 1990s?

    More to the political point: long-term, I strongly doubt that the other members of the “coalition of the fringes” are going to be thrilled at the idea of constantly playing second fiddle to an increasingly and often socioeconomically inferior demographic who they don’t necessarily get along with. The UMC is the true ideological driving force of the Democratic Party, though, which means their black-philia-born mainly out of status seeking within their own spheres, and kept alive precisely because of their insular, comforted lives-is the narrative for the time being. It’s a precarious narrative that relies on them being the nucleus of the new Democratic Party and keeping the various factions unified: which is not at all an assured outcome. Or to put it a bit more crudely: intersectionality only exists in the fantasy worlds of affluent white (and resident minority) left-liberals, doubly so when the pasty likes of Antifa rear their heads. Just ask the Latin Kings of Cicero, Illinois how they reacted to Antifa and BLM coming in.

    How much the donors actually believe the cultural Bolshevik drivel is a matter of debate, but it doesn’t really matter because they are happy to go along with it for the reasons you’d expect: if the proles are busy blaming each other, they have less time to tax them or bust their monopolies. That’s a fully bipartisan game, BTW: GOP donors are mouthing many of the same pro-BLM platitudes.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @nebulafox

    We don't have draconian law enforcement anywhere, with the qualified exception of what scams US Attorneys can get away with under the federal criminal code and code of criminal procedure. Well, 90% of our convicts are not found in federal prisons, and many of those who are are white-collar criminals.

  18. @International Jew
    @DextersLabRat

    Don't even think about it.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SYkbqzWVHZI

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I come from the tech world and have occasionally come across Nigerian or Eastern African immigrants/second-generation kids. They’ll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then. I’m willing to wager most US whites are descended from people that came over later than the last slaves did.

    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but “black”. “African-American” screams “1990s white bien-pensant” to me.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @nebulafox

    And so have I. I'll wager I'm older than you. The children of these nice, civilized African immigrants aren't so nice, however. They assimilate to black American norms. I believe Steve Sailer has wondered about that. This is what I've seen.

    Haitian-Americans, for some reason I can't figure out, are an exception to this.

    Now, here's the real question.

    Is "African-American" out, to be replaced by "Black" with a capitol B? Because I'm all in for that, but I'll leave out the initial cap.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon

    , @Anonymous
    @nebulafox


    They’ll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then.
     
    This is an incredibly naive comment. Do you really think the founding population of the descendants of American slaves was a representative sample of Africans at the time, much less West Africans, much less Nigerians, much less East Africans, much less African immigrants to the United States in the past 30 years?
    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    @nebulafox


    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but “black”. “African-American” screams “1990s white bien-pensant” to me.
     
    They're going back to Black as a nod to Black Lives Matter. "African-American Lives Matter" isn't very punchy, so they went with the classic.
  19. @nebulafox
    Ah, don't you just love it when people who are grossly more richer and more powerful than you'll ever be lecture you on your "privilege", particularly when they were the same people tacitly approving draconian legal and policing policies in the 1990s?

    More to the political point: long-term, I strongly doubt that the other members of the "coalition of the fringes" are going to be thrilled at the idea of constantly playing second fiddle to an increasingly and often socioeconomically inferior demographic who they don't necessarily get along with. The UMC is the true ideological driving force of the Democratic Party, though, which means their black-philia-born mainly out of status seeking within their own spheres, and kept alive precisely because of their insular, comforted lives-is the narrative for the time being. It's a precarious narrative that relies on them being the nucleus of the new Democratic Party and keeping the various factions unified: which is not at all an assured outcome. Or to put it a bit more crudely: intersectionality only exists in the fantasy worlds of affluent white (and resident minority) left-liberals, doubly so when the pasty likes of Antifa rear their heads. Just ask the Latin Kings of Cicero, Illinois how they reacted to Antifa and BLM coming in.

    How much the donors actually believe the cultural Bolshevik drivel is a matter of debate, but it doesn't really matter because they are happy to go along with it for the reasons you'd expect: if the proles are busy blaming each other, they have less time to tax them or bust their monopolies. That's a fully bipartisan game, BTW: GOP donors are mouthing many of the same pro-BLM platitudes.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    We don’t have draconian law enforcement anywhere, with the qualified exception of what scams US Attorneys can get away with under the federal criminal code and code of criminal procedure. Well, 90% of our convicts are not found in federal prisons, and many of those who are are white-collar criminals.

  20. So, Hillary’s capitalization of the word “black” implies she is using Black as noun (cf, Deplorables).

    In Boston, back in the 60s, Blacks were referred to as Coloreds (pronounced Cullids by polite, white, and provincial, Boston dialect speakers. Negro was used by the younger cosmopolitans. Less polite and cosmopolitan Bostonians used the mispronounced version of Negro that is still quite popular today.

    Why did the terminology used by “polite society” change but not the terminology used by “non-polite society?”

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Coemgen

    Polite society always be virtue signallin'.

  21. Hillary Rodham Clinton = Da matronly hor chillin’.

  22. Hey , how about using (black) ? Could even use more of them (((( )))) to really make a point.

  23. Is it now OK to call the Holy and Saintly Population from mostly African descent “Black” and not “African-American” or does Hillary believe she can get away with such a gross act of cultural appropiation?

  24. In effect, a faction of the ruling class gets a cowardly mob to bully everybody into smiling and saying “yes boss”. But they never quite believe it, therefore endless loyalty tests.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  25. @wren
    Maybe some acronym like PBUH after each use of black.

    Superior To Foster Us or something lile that.

    Speaking of Hillary's discomfort, how is Bill's BLACK!!! son, or the guy who thought he was, anyway?

    I am pretty sick of all of this kind of talk.

    I haven't spoken with my black co-workers, acquaintances and friends since the lockdown and then all of this started.

    Hopefully they are okay.

    Replies: @Lurker

    PBUH – Police Be Upon Him/Her.

    • LOL: Charon
  26. @nebulafox
    @International Jew

    I come from the tech world and have occasionally come across Nigerian or Eastern African immigrants/second-generation kids. They'll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then. I'm willing to wager most US whites are descended from people that came over later than the last slaves did.


    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but "black". "African-American" screams "1990s white bien-pensant" to me.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    And so have I. I’ll wager I’m older than you. The children of these nice, civilized African immigrants aren’t so nice, however. They assimilate to black American norms. I believe Steve Sailer has wondered about that. This is what I’ve seen.

    Haitian-Americans, for some reason I can’t figure out, are an exception to this.

    Now, here’s the real question.

    Is “African-American” out, to be replaced by “Black” with a capitol B? Because I’m all in for that, but I’ll leave out the initial cap.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jane Plain

    In Tom Wolfe's "Back to Blood," the snobbish Haitian immigrant college professor is super racist against blacks, like his son, and in favor of mulattos like his daughter.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    , @anon
    @Jane Plain

    Well, Woke fashion is now moving to BIPOC - black, indigenous, people of colour. AAIPOC just doesn’t work. Too easily confused with AIPAC, for starters.


    Time will tell if BIPOC evolves into something ridiculously awkward as the thing that went from gay to lgbt to lgbtq to lgbtqwerty. Arabs, for instance may resent being lumped in as POC with Filipinos and Bangladeshis and insist upon BIPOCA. And so on.

    Replies: @Pop Warner, @J.Ross

  27. Both White and Black should be capitalized because we give that distinction to most every other racial and ethnic group we put in writing, such as Hispanic, East Asian, Jewish, Chinese, etc.

    Yes, the other words originate from geographical names and religious names, which are always capitalized, but White and Black are so significant as races and demographic groups that they end up being written about right alongside all the others. It does diminish them in comparison to make their names (whether as nouns or adjectives) smaller.

    I’ve made it a point for a while, when I’ve bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly “White” because we get diminished all the time — and, uhh, I are one.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I’ve made it a point for a while, when I’ve bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly “White” ...
     
    So you follow the example of Jet Magazine. I'll stick with tradition.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Jane Plain
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No, that would destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.

    I'm not letting BLM destroy the basics of the English language.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  28. anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    We sure dodged a bullet in not having her as president.

  29. My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black:

    [MORE]

    All,

    More than a week has passed since the killing of George Floyd. I know for so many of us it has seemed like a year. Watching the video of white Minneapolis police officers holding down and callously choking the life out of a black man was stunning to anyone who has human emotions. It’s hard to find the right words to express what I feel. I am disgusted. And I am ashamed. Those are just two inadequate words for emotions I’ve had that are indescribable.

    I have an even harder time imagining how it must feel to be Black and watch what happened. I don’t know what it is like to fear that racial violence could harm my children and my family. And I am horrified that Black people must live with the dread of having an encounter with the police that looks like George Floyd’s – and may already have had encounters with police that were dehumanizing.

    Fear and dread give way to rage, and then to action. For all of us who work in the executive branch of our government — we are in a position to act on our resolve. We have put more people of color in positions of power in Illinois government than ever before in our history. I did this for a reason. It isn’t enough to just have allies in positions of power. There must be people with the lived experiences actually occupying the chairs “in the room where it happens.” That work continues every day of our administration.

    The peaceful protesters have offered us a unique opportunity to push for change from inside the halls of power. I feel tremendous responsibility to act – to put the same energy into pushing for reform that we put into our response to COVID over the last few months. I am already working to develop a comprehensive set of proposals – both legislative and administrative – to address racial inequities in our state that have existed since its very founding. I am also actively engaging with leaders in Illinois and around the country to evaluate ideas and bear the responsibility of charting the path forward.

    I support peaceful protest – I have engaged in it and have seen the positive influence it can have on policy. I believe deeply that we must address the grievances expressed by the peaceful protestors, and I’m committed to taking substantive and timely actions.

    Words are not enough. We need action. I was elected with a mandate for big change, and I fully intend to utilize that mandate in the months and years ahead to dismantle the architecture of inequity. I cannot fix this all at once – but I can promise you we will work every day to make real change – no matter how difficult.

    On a more personal note, I want to make sure the Black members of our state government know that I’m aware that the responsibilities of your job may have made the last week that much more difficult to bear. I encourage you to reach out to any senior members of our administration. It’s our job to look out for one another – to move forward with kindness and empathy. I take very seriously the health and well-being of all the people who work for me and for the state. I stand with each of you and am deeply grateful for your service.

    Sincerely,

    Governor Pritzker

    • Replies: @Charon
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    I want to make sure the Black members of our state government know that I’m aware that the responsibilities of your job
     
    Oh, my sides. My sides.
    , @Anonymous
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black.
     
    And what did she comment about it?

    I am wondering if her training or experience as a sociologist has given her some unique insights about word usage, terminology, capitalization, etc. that you could share with us.

    Replies: @RSDB, @Mike Tre

  30. @Jane Plain
    @nebulafox

    And so have I. I'll wager I'm older than you. The children of these nice, civilized African immigrants aren't so nice, however. They assimilate to black American norms. I believe Steve Sailer has wondered about that. This is what I've seen.

    Haitian-Americans, for some reason I can't figure out, are an exception to this.

    Now, here's the real question.

    Is "African-American" out, to be replaced by "Black" with a capitol B? Because I'm all in for that, but I'll leave out the initial cap.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon

    In Tom Wolfe’s “Back to Blood,” the snobbish Haitian immigrant college professor is super racist against blacks, like his son, and in favor of mulattos like his daughter.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Steve Sailer

    You mean the snobbish Haitian college professor has a black son and a mulatto daughter?

  31. @MikeatMikedotMike
    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black:




    All,



    More than a week has passed since the killing of George Floyd. I know for so many of us it has seemed like a year. Watching the video of white Minneapolis police officers holding down and callously choking the life out of a black man was stunning to anyone who has human emotions. It’s hard to find the right words to express what I feel. I am disgusted. And I am ashamed. Those are just two inadequate words for emotions I’ve had that are indescribable.



    I have an even harder time imagining how it must feel to be Black and watch what happened. I don’t know what it is like to fear that racial violence could harm my children and my family. And I am horrified that Black people must live with the dread of having an encounter with the police that looks like George Floyd’s – and may already have had encounters with police that were dehumanizing.



    Fear and dread give way to rage, and then to action. For all of us who work in the executive branch of our government — we are in a position to act on our resolve. We have put more people of color in positions of power in Illinois government than ever before in our history. I did this for a reason. It isn’t enough to just have allies in positions of power. There must be people with the lived experiences actually occupying the chairs “in the room where it happens.” That work continues every day of our administration.



    The peaceful protesters have offered us a unique opportunity to push for change from inside the halls of power. I feel tremendous responsibility to act – to put the same energy into pushing for reform that we put into our response to COVID over the last few months. I am already working to develop a comprehensive set of proposals – both legislative and administrative – to address racial inequities in our state that have existed since its very founding. I am also actively engaging with leaders in Illinois and around the country to evaluate ideas and bear the responsibility of charting the path forward.



    I support peaceful protest – I have engaged in it and have seen the positive influence it can have on policy. I believe deeply that we must address the grievances expressed by the peaceful protestors, and I’m committed to taking substantive and timely actions.



    Words are not enough. We need action. I was elected with a mandate for big change, and I fully intend to utilize that mandate in the months and years ahead to dismantle the architecture of inequity. I cannot fix this all at once – but I can promise you we will work every day to make real change – no matter how difficult.



    On a more personal note, I want to make sure the Black members of our state government know that I’m aware that the responsibilities of your job may have made the last week that much more difficult to bear. I encourage you to reach out to any senior members of our administration. It’s our job to look out for one another - to move forward with kindness and empathy. I take very seriously the health and well-being of all the people who work for me and for the state. I stand with each of you and am deeply grateful for your service.



    Sincerely,

    Governor Pritzker

    Replies: @Charon, @Anonymous

    I want to make sure the Black members of our state government know that I’m aware that the responsibilities of your job

    Oh, my sides. My sides.

  32. “Orthodox Jews write “G-d”

    There are no vowels in Hebrew. So you would have to write Blck.

    • Replies: @donut
    @anon

    Would this be correct as well ? Nggr ?

  33. anon[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @RichardTaylor
    All these media companies are staffed with nothing but ditzes and dopes deciding what we should think. Tons of females who are borderline cult-cases. Gay guys working their hateful grudges. And childish POC.

    How is this sustained? Look for the smart White males who enable it. I promise they are there. From company founders to software engineers. I'm getting convinced it's the smart White guys who are too comfy with liberals that allow this to happen.

    Replies: @anon

    ” Look for the smart White males who enable it.”

    yup
    Plenty of people are tricked on all sides. I’ve seen some things that look obviously faked like picturing alleged/suspected or otherwise white supremacists with a black person. Saying alleged/suspected homophobes are gay or transgendered etc… It’s par for the course of the split in my opinion.

  34. @DextersLabRat
    I prefer "negro"

    Replies: @International Jew, @Known Fact

    I still like “negro” best myself. E.G. negro riots, negro district, negro projects. I still smile at how my grandfather, a man without a hateful bone in his body, would refer to them as “the coloreds” and just shake his head sadly.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Known Fact

    Maybe taking pride in "not have a hateful bone" in our bodies and being content merely to "shake our head sadly" was how we got into this mess. Maybe there are times to hate, and people to hate.

    Not sniping at you or your grandfather, I mean it as a general point about our inclination to be fair and gentle to a fault.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  35. They need to add a punctuation mark to “Black,” something like “~Black~” indicating that we must genuflect as we read or say the sacred word.

    Problem is that that suggests poorly approximating black. Given how loudly and often we are beaten over the head with their blackness, might I suggest

    ∞BLACK∞

  36. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox
    @International Jew

    I come from the tech world and have occasionally come across Nigerian or Eastern African immigrants/second-generation kids. They'll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then. I'm willing to wager most US whites are descended from people that came over later than the last slaves did.


    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but "black". "African-American" screams "1990s white bien-pensant" to me.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    They’ll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then.

    This is an incredibly naive comment. Do you really think the founding population of the descendants of American slaves was a representative sample of Africans at the time, much less West Africans, much less Nigerians, much less East Africans, much less African immigrants to the United States in the past 30 years?

  37. It’s like Hillary is trying to lose the 2016 election all over again.

  38. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike
    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black:




    All,



    More than a week has passed since the killing of George Floyd. I know for so many of us it has seemed like a year. Watching the video of white Minneapolis police officers holding down and callously choking the life out of a black man was stunning to anyone who has human emotions. It’s hard to find the right words to express what I feel. I am disgusted. And I am ashamed. Those are just two inadequate words for emotions I’ve had that are indescribable.



    I have an even harder time imagining how it must feel to be Black and watch what happened. I don’t know what it is like to fear that racial violence could harm my children and my family. And I am horrified that Black people must live with the dread of having an encounter with the police that looks like George Floyd’s – and may already have had encounters with police that were dehumanizing.



    Fear and dread give way to rage, and then to action. For all of us who work in the executive branch of our government — we are in a position to act on our resolve. We have put more people of color in positions of power in Illinois government than ever before in our history. I did this for a reason. It isn’t enough to just have allies in positions of power. There must be people with the lived experiences actually occupying the chairs “in the room where it happens.” That work continues every day of our administration.



    The peaceful protesters have offered us a unique opportunity to push for change from inside the halls of power. I feel tremendous responsibility to act – to put the same energy into pushing for reform that we put into our response to COVID over the last few months. I am already working to develop a comprehensive set of proposals – both legislative and administrative – to address racial inequities in our state that have existed since its very founding. I am also actively engaging with leaders in Illinois and around the country to evaluate ideas and bear the responsibility of charting the path forward.



    I support peaceful protest – I have engaged in it and have seen the positive influence it can have on policy. I believe deeply that we must address the grievances expressed by the peaceful protestors, and I’m committed to taking substantive and timely actions.



    Words are not enough. We need action. I was elected with a mandate for big change, and I fully intend to utilize that mandate in the months and years ahead to dismantle the architecture of inequity. I cannot fix this all at once – but I can promise you we will work every day to make real change – no matter how difficult.



    On a more personal note, I want to make sure the Black members of our state government know that I’m aware that the responsibilities of your job may have made the last week that much more difficult to bear. I encourage you to reach out to any senior members of our administration. It’s our job to look out for one another - to move forward with kindness and empathy. I take very seriously the health and well-being of all the people who work for me and for the state. I stand with each of you and am deeply grateful for your service.



    Sincerely,

    Governor Pritzker

    Replies: @Charon, @Anonymous

    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black.

    And what did she comment about it?

    I am wondering if her training or experience as a sociologist has given her some unique insights about word usage, terminology, capitalization, etc. that you could share with us.

    • Troll: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @RSDB
    @Anonymous

    A social worker is not necessarily (and usually isn't) a sociologist.

    Still might be interesting what she has to say.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Anonymous

    She's not a sociologist, fool, she's a social worker. And she writes case assessments. For about 25 years. So her understanding of English syntax far exceeds yours and most people's.

    And you may be mentally retarded if you need to ask about the capitalization of the word black in the context of this discussion.

  39. @Franz

    But we can recognize our privilege
     
    What's with that "we" you overstuffed, over the hill racoon?

    Like Henry Kissinger, we just can't be rid of her.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    What’s wrong with Kissinger?

    • Replies: @Franz
    @Art Deco


    What’s wrong with Kissinger?
     
    Some useful (not perfect) background:

    The Trial of Henry Kissinger

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trial_of_Henry_Kissinger

    And an interesting background piece from The Intercept from 2016

    https://theintercept.com/2016/02/12/henry-kissingers-war-crimes-are-central-to-the-divide-between-hillary-clinton-and-bernie-sanders/

    Here's the thing though: There's a bias that only "the left" has a beef with Henry. I had neighbors who were in the John Birch Society, right wing, and they hated Henry with a passion. No leftist could be as bad, or have such an extensive list. Whether Vietnam or Chile or China, Henry sold the US out as often as possible. Anyway that's what they think.
    , @Frank McGar
    @Art Deco

    The Nixon/Kissinger Southeast Asia strategy (namely, bombing Laos and Cambodia) is one of the main dividing lines when it comes to Kissinger. In my own personal experience, this particular moment in history is a good Rorschach test for where one stands politically. Those who support the policies of the Nixon/Kissinger administration generally tend to support subsequent interventionist policies (Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, etc). So in that sense, Bush and Hillary Clinton are more aligned in terms of foreign policy than Hillary and Bernie. In fact, Bernie maligned Hillary's support for Kissinger in their 2016 debates.

  40. @Anon
    The cap B for black is fairly common in various publication internal style books these days, as is the cap I in indigenous, which I think the AP has adopted. Heather Mac Donald in her last book writes about how an emeritus UCLA professor lost the seminar he was teaching partly because he lowercased the I's in indigenous, as well as making grammar and spelling corrections. The entire purpose of the seminar was to get help in polishing up your thesis before submission.

    There's some explanation about why the w in white isn't capitalized, but I forget what it is.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Neuday

    My father told me that in his youth, newspapers routinely printed “(Negro)” or just “(N)” after a black person’s name so that the reader would understand it wasn’t an ordinary white person they were talking about. Obviously, that practice went out of fashion later, but now it’s back in a new form.

    One of the ironic things about the Civil Rights Era and its aftermath is how what’s old is what’s new. We went from segregation to desegregation to resegregation, from race-based rights to equality back to raced-based rights, from racial awareness to racial blindness and now to racial hyper-awareness: racial wokeness.

    • Agree: Just another serf
  41. @Coemgen
    So, Hillary's capitalization of the word "black" implies she is using Black as noun (cf, Deplorables).

    In Boston, back in the 60s, Blacks were referred to as Coloreds (pronounced Cullids by polite, white, and provincial, Boston dialect speakers. Negro was used by the younger cosmopolitans. Less polite and cosmopolitan Bostonians used the mispronounced version of Negro that is still quite popular today.

    Why did the terminology used by "polite society" change but not the terminology used by "non-polite society?"

    https://youtu.be/9qph-SIAL9E

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Polite society always be virtue signallin’.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  42. @Anon
    The cap B for black is fairly common in various publication internal style books these days, as is the cap I in indigenous, which I think the AP has adopted. Heather Mac Donald in her last book writes about how an emeritus UCLA professor lost the seminar he was teaching partly because he lowercased the I's in indigenous, as well as making grammar and spelling corrections. The entire purpose of the seminar was to get help in polishing up your thesis before submission.

    There's some explanation about why the w in white isn't capitalized, but I forget what it is.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Neuday

    There’s some explanation about why the w in white isn’t capitalized, but I forget what it is.

    IIRC, “Black” is capitalized because its a people, like “Chinese”, or “Brazilian”, where as white is a color, not a people. Funny, you don’t capitalize “Mongrel”.

    In any event, we Americans of European descent will need a name for our people, lest the foe provide one. Since our ancestors arrived by their own volition, perhaps Voluntary Americans, or Volams, distinct from Involuntary Americans or Paperwork Americans? The coming conflagration could be Volams vs. Golems.

    • Replies: @Tracy
    @Neuday

    I've proposed "European and European-Derived" people -- "EEDS" -- for the cause of labeling white people in a new way that might sneak past the censors for a while.

  43. I’m not saying a word in print until they can tell me whether it’s “systemic” or “systematic”, “supremist” or “supremacist”.

  44. “Black people tend to enjoy this kind of childish thing”

    Perhaps. But blacks don’t deal in words the way white leftists do.

    It’s white leftists who _really_ enjoy creating and consuming these ridiculous language rules. Hence “Political Correctness.”

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  45. @nebulafox
    @International Jew

    I come from the tech world and have occasionally come across Nigerian or Eastern African immigrants/second-generation kids. They'll bluntly tell you US blacks are just as culturally foreign to them as other Americans are: which should make sense, given the uniquely disrupted circumstances of their origins, as well as the sheer length of time that has eclipsed since then. I'm willing to wager most US whites are descended from people that came over later than the last slaves did.


    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but "black". "African-American" screams "1990s white bien-pensant" to me.

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @Anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    And no, I cannot recall a black person ever referring to themselves as anything but “black”. “African-American” screams “1990s white bien-pensant” to me.

    They’re going back to Black as a nod to Black Lives Matter. “African-American Lives Matter” isn’t very punchy, so they went with the classic.

  46. The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Dave3


    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?
     
    My wife’s best friend in high school and the first few years of college was a black girl from an intact, solidly middle class family- both parents, while not doctors, had solidly respectable medical technician jobs at a hospital. They would often joke that my wife (coming from a rougher, more whiskey-tango-ish background) acted more black than this black friend- I’m sure the two of them made an endearing coed version of the typical 80’s black cop/white cop pairing.

    In any case, my wife told me the friend’s father would regularly wait for her to come out of the shower and perform cunnilingus on her. So, no, don’t think that part is fictional (didn’t PRECIOUS also have an incest element in its story?)

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Dave3


    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to 🐪 their own daughters...
     
    Who else would?

    "A fesse only a father could love..."

  47. it is the job of the establishment political parties to vampire the energy from these movements (tea party, MAGA, BLM, etc.) to sustain and maintain their own power. Nice to see sHill keeping the tradition alive

  48. “it seems rather petty to deny them the pleasure they get from this due to you clinging to outmoded concepts like dignity or racial equality.”

    Much less clinging to outmoded concepts such as proper rules of grammar, capitalization, as well as correct spelling.

  49. George Floyd’s Life Mattered
    by Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton’s didn’t.

    I added the bold, but Hillary (or her staff) decided upon what to capitalize and what not to capitalize.

    This little gesture of capitalizing the B in “black” while pointedly not capitalizing the W in “white”…

    Lower-case white was used by Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Carlyle, Theodore Roosevelt, Madison Grant, Lothrop Stoddard, and Winston Churchill — men with testicles. That should be good enough for us.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    That should be good enough for us.
     
    Sorry, Reg, but you’ll be further left behind in enervated elegiac quaintsville when the style evolves to BLACK! and WHITE! The game tactic of “agree and amplify” has humorous qualities that should not be overlooked.
  50. @Buzz Mohawk
    Both White and Black should be capitalized because we give that distinction to most every other racial and ethnic group we put in writing, such as Hispanic, East Asian, Jewish, Chinese, etc.

    Yes, the other words originate from geographical names and religious names, which are always capitalized, but White and Black are so significant as races and demographic groups that they end up being written about right alongside all the others. It does diminish them in comparison to make their names (whether as nouns or adjectives) smaller.

    I've made it a point for a while, when I've bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly "White" because we get diminished all the time -- and, uhh, I are one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jane Plain

    I’ve made it a point for a while, when I’ve bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly “White” …

    So you follow the example of Jet Magazine. I’ll stick with tradition.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have never read Jet Magazine, and I hardly know it exists. I arrived at my own conclusion via logic. How very White of me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  51. @anon
    "Orthodox Jews write “G-d"

    There are no vowels in Hebrew. So you would have to write Blck.

    Replies: @donut

    Would this be correct as well ? Nggr ?

  52. No need to overthink it, Steve.

  53. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I’ve made it a point for a while, when I’ve bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly “White” ...
     
    So you follow the example of Jet Magazine. I'll stick with tradition.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I have never read Jet Magazine, and I hardly know it exists. I arrived at my own conclusion via logic. How very White of me.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I have never read Jet Magazine, and I hardly know it exists. I arrived at my own conclusion via logic. How very White of me.
     
    https://kwize.com/pics/John-Maynard-Keynes-quote-about-intelligence-from-The-General-Theory-of-Employment%2C-Interest-and-Money-1a10946.jpg
  54. anon[752] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jane Plain
    @nebulafox

    And so have I. I'll wager I'm older than you. The children of these nice, civilized African immigrants aren't so nice, however. They assimilate to black American norms. I believe Steve Sailer has wondered about that. This is what I've seen.

    Haitian-Americans, for some reason I can't figure out, are an exception to this.

    Now, here's the real question.

    Is "African-American" out, to be replaced by "Black" with a capitol B? Because I'm all in for that, but I'll leave out the initial cap.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon

    Well, Woke fashion is now moving to BIPOC – black, indigenous, people of colour. AAIPOC just doesn’t work. Too easily confused with AIPAC, for starters.

    Time will tell if BIPOC evolves into something ridiculously awkward as the thing that went from gay to lgbt to lgbtq to lgbtqwerty. Arabs, for instance may resent being lumped in as POC with Filipinos and Bangladeshis and insist upon BIPOCA. And so on.

    • Replies: @Pop Warner
    @anon

    LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC should consider a merger

    , @J.Ross
    @anon

    Excellent examples: Arabs in the Umma use Pinoys and Bangladeshis (among others, but heavily those) as servants and workers. Of course they want to be distinguished from people who work.

  55. “I added the bold, but Hillary (or her staff) decided upon what to capitalize and what not to capitalize.”

    i pointed out this discrepancy on here 15 years ago at least. maybe 20 years ago, back during the isteve era.

    not just for africans, but almost all groups were capitalized, whereas european designations were lower case.

    this stuff isn’t new at all. it’s a decades long culture battle primarily being waged by (you know who).

    that’s it’s reached complete and total mainstream acceptance is the difference between back then and today.

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @Jane Plain

    In Tom Wolfe's "Back to Blood," the snobbish Haitian immigrant college professor is super racist against blacks, like his son, and in favor of mulattos like his daughter.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    You mean the snobbish Haitian college professor has a black son and a mulatto daughter?

  57. @Buzz Mohawk
    Both White and Black should be capitalized because we give that distinction to most every other racial and ethnic group we put in writing, such as Hispanic, East Asian, Jewish, Chinese, etc.

    Yes, the other words originate from geographical names and religious names, which are always capitalized, but White and Black are so significant as races and demographic groups that they end up being written about right alongside all the others. It does diminish them in comparison to make their names (whether as nouns or adjectives) smaller.

    I've made it a point for a while, when I've bothered to think about it, to capitalize them, particularly "White" because we get diminished all the time -- and, uhh, I are one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jane Plain

    No, that would destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.

    I’m not letting BLM destroy the basics of the English language.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jane Plain


    No, that would destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.
     
    Dear Miss English Teacher:

    I am no longer willing to allow myself, my kin, and my glorious ancestors, to be defined as "common."

    Language evolves. Currently, the evolution is almost entirely anti-White. Therefore, I aim to counteract that, even though I respect the English language as much as you do. I fully understand your point, BTW.

    We should not allow White or Black to remain common nouns because that would relegate them to subordinate status to all other nouns and adjectives that describe peoples.

    This matters. Think Sapir-Whorf, if it helps.

    It would not "destroy the difference between proper and common nouns." On the contrary, it would elevate White and Black to proper nouns. Do you understand the whole point of this, or not?

  58. @Jane Plain
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No, that would destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.

    I'm not letting BLM destroy the basics of the English language.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    No, that would destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.

    Dear Miss English Teacher:

    I am no longer willing to allow myself, my kin, and my glorious ancestors, to be defined as “common.”

    Language evolves. Currently, the evolution is almost entirely anti-White. Therefore, I aim to counteract that, even though I respect the English language as much as you do. I fully understand your point, BTW.

    We should not allow White or Black to remain common nouns because that would relegate them to subordinate status to all other nouns and adjectives that describe peoples.

    This matters. Think Sapir-Whorf, if it helps.

    It would not “destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.” On the contrary, it would elevate White and Black to proper nouns. Do you understand the whole point of this, or not?

  59. Dear Miss English Teacher:

    I’m not.

    It would not “destroy the difference between proper and common nouns.” On the contrary, it would elevate White and Black to proper nouns. Do you understand the whole point of this, or not?

    I understand that you’re nuts. You’d rather pick a fight about a minor matter than see what the real stakes here are? I do understand that.

    With guys like you, whites can’t help but lose.

  60. @anon
    @Jane Plain

    Well, Woke fashion is now moving to BIPOC - black, indigenous, people of colour. AAIPOC just doesn’t work. Too easily confused with AIPAC, for starters.


    Time will tell if BIPOC evolves into something ridiculously awkward as the thing that went from gay to lgbt to lgbtq to lgbtqwerty. Arabs, for instance may resent being lumped in as POC with Filipinos and Bangladeshis and insist upon BIPOCA. And so on.

    Replies: @Pop Warner, @J.Ross

    LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC should consider a merger

  61. @jimmyriddle
    So, Alice Walker hasn't been unpersoned for praising one of David Ike's books.

    Replies: @Not Only Wrathful

    I typed her name into Google News. I got the New York Times, Vogue, the LA Times, the James Corden Show, The Chicago Sun-Times, The Salt Lake Tribune and many, many more, all recommending her books in just the last week!

    Anyone in the world would be grateful for that kind of “unpersoning”.

  62. Abe says:
    @Dave3
    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?

    Replies: @Abe, @Reg Cæsar

    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?

    My wife’s best friend in high school and the first few years of college was a black girl from an intact, solidly middle class family- both parents, while not doctors, had solidly respectable medical technician jobs at a hospital. They would often joke that my wife (coming from a rougher, more whiskey-tango-ish background) acted more black than this black friend- I’m sure the two of them made an endearing coed version of the typical 80’s black cop/white cop pairing.

    In any case, my wife told me the friend’s father would regularly wait for her to come out of the shower and perform cunnilingus on her. So, no, don’t think that part is fictional (didn’t PRECIOUS also have an incest element in its story?)

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Abe

    >he would wait for the shower

    That's awful, what a germaphobe.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Abe

    Recently I went to a bar in New Glarus territory and got Totally Naked in the presence of my daughter. The barmaid said not to worry, it happens all the time there.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Abe

    That would make a great porn video, right up there with some teen's step mom boinking him.

  63. Or as the religious Muslims say for the prophet Muhammad, PBUH (peace be upon him). For the “BLACKS,” perhaps it should be PBUT (peace be upon them).

  64. To paraphrase the “First Law of Majority-Minority Relations in Liberal Society,” as conceived by Lawrence Auster:

    The worse the behavior of a designated minority, the higher its pedestal.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jonathan Silber

    Thanks.

  65. George Floyd’s violent drug-using criminal life mattered, especially once his martyrdom got his family money. Hillary Clinton’s did not matter so she should shut up and sit down.
    Seriously though if I was black I would be angry that Hillary is trying to attach herself remora-like to Floyd’s gold coffin. I be like “White people! You have wronged me! Whachu got to say bout it!” And they be like they didn’t hear. And I be like “Don’t make me come over there!” And they would mumble, “well, okay, uh, we’ll send someone over to eulogize.” And I’d ask, “is that the same thing as apologize? And who? Who will be doing the eulogizing?” And they’d mumble something under their breath. “What was that, I didn’t hear that?” And they’d admit, “Hillary Clinton.” “What? Are real white politicians busy? Is Bill busy? Bill (who won elections) was supposed to be the first black president so I imagine he’s feeling pretty upset.” “Well she really wants to come, she says she doesn’t feel no ways tired.” “Yeah, keep her.”

  66. @Abe
    @Dave3


    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?
     
    My wife’s best friend in high school and the first few years of college was a black girl from an intact, solidly middle class family- both parents, while not doctors, had solidly respectable medical technician jobs at a hospital. They would often joke that my wife (coming from a rougher, more whiskey-tango-ish background) acted more black than this black friend- I’m sure the two of them made an endearing coed version of the typical 80’s black cop/white cop pairing.

    In any case, my wife told me the friend’s father would regularly wait for her to come out of the shower and perform cunnilingus on her. So, no, don’t think that part is fictional (didn’t PRECIOUS also have an incest element in its story?)

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    >he would wait for the shower

    That’s awful, what a germaphobe.

  67. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have never read Jet Magazine, and I hardly know it exists. I arrived at my own conclusion via logic. How very White of me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I have never read Jet Magazine, and I hardly know it exists. I arrived at my own conclusion via logic. How very White of me.

  68. @Anonymous
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black.
     
    And what did she comment about it?

    I am wondering if her training or experience as a sociologist has given her some unique insights about word usage, terminology, capitalization, etc. that you could share with us.

    Replies: @RSDB, @Mike Tre

    A social worker is not necessarily (and usually isn’t) a sociologist.

    Still might be interesting what she has to say.

  69. @anon
    @Jane Plain

    Well, Woke fashion is now moving to BIPOC - black, indigenous, people of colour. AAIPOC just doesn’t work. Too easily confused with AIPAC, for starters.


    Time will tell if BIPOC evolves into something ridiculously awkward as the thing that went from gay to lgbt to lgbtq to lgbtqwerty. Arabs, for instance may resent being lumped in as POC with Filipinos and Bangladeshis and insist upon BIPOCA. And so on.

    Replies: @Pop Warner, @J.Ross

    Excellent examples: Arabs in the Umma use Pinoys and Bangladeshis (among others, but heavily those) as servants and workers. Of course they want to be distinguished from people who work.

  70. @Dave3
    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?

    Replies: @Abe, @Reg Cæsar

    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to 🐪 their own daughters…

    Who else would?

    “A fesse only a father could love…”

  71. One way to measure print media genuflection (and other media) in the George Floyd news is to note what isn’t reported about him. In today’s Houston Chronicle, his original hometown paper (now a totally Marxist/Dem Hearst propaganda outlet), there is a three page bio “story” about Mr. Floyd. This accompanies a three quarter page line drawing of his face on page 1.

    Especially interesting in the lengthy muck of words is what isn’t mentioned, or properly discussed. His three children. Not interviewed and all with different baby mamas. These women aren’t interviewed either. So what’s the story on child support (mothers were not married to him)? You might expect an objective account by this slavishly feminist rag to address child support. Nope. Might even be some legal paperwork about that (common in Texas for child welfare to try and collect that on behalf of children from absent fathers). No. Unpaid child support is a very common “crime” for arrest here. News story blank-out on that. So black men get a pass on that in the Chronicle?

    Three sentence mention of Mr. Floyd’s numerous conviction for drugs, theft and assault. No details. No interview with female victim of his armed home invasion (possibly a drug rip). Why wasn’t she interviewed? What about his arrest record (non convictions)? What you can barely detect is that all of his drug/crime charges were pled down. Even the home invasion only got four years in the slam. Zero anonymous law enforcement were interviewed about him (no one of course would go on record.) They would know a lot about him. I’m sure his file is thick.

    His work history nonexistent, though a reference to “not 9 to 5.” We are told only that he lived at his mama’s apartment in welfare housing off and on until she died. His buddies liked him. His promising basketball high school career mysteriously ended at a minor college level, no degree. A second college stint also mysteriously ended. Again no details. He was supposedly taking a commercial truck drivers course, but only a brief mention of how he was about to complete the course “when he stopped coming.” That in Minneapolis. Probably on some welfare grant scholarship deal. He originally went to Minneapolis to do a drug rehab stint (didn’t work out though) again, no mention of who paid for that. Taxpayers probably. His other “jobs” there were nightclub bouncer, rapper “security” (no license, obviously for that). But he had “plans” for great things. No actual “former employer” ever interviewed. Odd, no?

    He was at death an aging street rat, old and fat and unhealthy from a drug lifestyle. His old Houston rapper clique (Floyd didn’t rap himself, evidently) were all “screw” rappers (i.e. narcotic cough syrup “purple drank”addicts) who mostly died in the 90s from their own habit. Some killed, others by accident. So Floyd outlived this group. Floyd was everyone’s friend there.

    Anyway, basic non worshipful facts about him are absent. He wasn’t a Big Bad Criminal, just a low level drug hustler, thief, etc. and was always on the grift. Abandoned his baby mamas and kids (though we are told repeatedly how much he loved “getting them Pampers” at midnight at his mama’s apartment, etc.).

    Not merely trying to speak ill of the dead. But as a Black Martyr he is extremely ordinary. A failed father and man. Yes, his pals liked him (though how would we know otherwise?) and he didn’t deserve to die by malign neglect while being arrested yet again.

    His life does serve, if the truth is ever allowed out, as a lesson. Being a decent high school athlete who gets a free ride doesn’t guarantee some fat NBA contract, or NFL. Scholarships require attendance. Growing up in some “project” from which you can escape requires purpose and education. Value to others. Street cred with your low life jailbird pals isn’t a real career. He was a Loser. Being black doesn’t turn that into some kind of Winner either. Being a cop Victim doesn’t make him less of a Loser. He was a cop Victim mainly because he was a high-on-drugs Loser. Not just because he was black. This is the Forbidden Truth about Mr. Floyd. An unlucky Loser who tangled with the wrong cop. He might have been a nice guy to his friends, but then again, who isn’t?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Muggles


    Yes, his pals liked him (though how would we know otherwise?) and he didn’t deserve to die by malign neglect while being arrested yet again.
     
    The police didn’t “neglect” him, and they weren’t “malign.” He fought them when they tried to arrest him. They had no choice but to pin him. They were unaware of his true distress.
  72. @Art Deco
    @Franz

    What's wrong with Kissinger?

    Replies: @Franz, @Frank McGar

    What’s wrong with Kissinger?

    Some useful (not perfect) background:

    The Trial of Henry Kissinger

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trial_of_Henry_Kissinger

    And an interesting background piece from The Intercept from 2016

    https://theintercept.com/2016/02/12/henry-kissingers-war-crimes-are-central-to-the-divide-between-hillary-clinton-and-bernie-sanders/

    Here’s the thing though: There’s a bias that only “the left” has a beef with Henry. I had neighbors who were in the John Birch Society, right wing, and they hated Henry with a passion. No leftist could be as bad, or have such an extensive list. Whether Vietnam or Chile or China, Henry sold the US out as often as possible. Anyway that’s what they think.

  73. @Reg Cæsar

    George Floyd’s Life Mattered
    by Hillary Clinton
     
    Hillary Clinton's didn't.

    I added the bold, but Hillary (or her staff) decided upon what to capitalize and what not to capitalize.

    This little gesture of capitalizing the B in “black” while pointedly not capitalizing the W in “white”...

     

    Lower-case white was used by Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Carlyle, Theodore Roosevelt, Madison Grant, Lothrop Stoddard, and Winston Churchill -- men with testicles. That should be good enough for us.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That should be good enough for us.

    Sorry, Reg, but you’ll be further left behind in enervated elegiac quaintsville when the style evolves to BLACK! and WHITE! The game tactic of “agree and amplify” has humorous qualities that should not be overlooked.

  74. For many white people, conversations about systemic racism and our own privilege are uncomfortable.

    No, it’s just irritating at this point.

  75. @Art Deco
    @Franz

    What's wrong with Kissinger?

    Replies: @Franz, @Frank McGar

    The Nixon/Kissinger Southeast Asia strategy (namely, bombing Laos and Cambodia) is one of the main dividing lines when it comes to Kissinger. In my own personal experience, this particular moment in history is a good Rorschach test for where one stands politically. Those who support the policies of the Nixon/Kissinger administration generally tend to support subsequent interventionist policies (Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, etc). So in that sense, Bush and Hillary Clinton are more aligned in terms of foreign policy than Hillary and Bernie. In fact, Bernie maligned Hillary’s support for Kissinger in their 2016 debates.

  76. Blacks have no limiting factor in their ideology. You can see in how they have pressured everyone into maximizing BLM to the fullest extent. No logic to it, although in a way the lack of logic is logical in that it dominates the mind and pushes the movement to the furthest it can go without any self-doubt.

    Very Mohammedan.

    Just think: a white America with its industriousness, led by a black America with its charisma and meglomania. The power of black culture internationally makes this a very powerful combination.

  77. Capitalizing ‘black’ but not ‘white’ is obviously meant as a gesture of disrespect to white people. I don’t capitalize either one, because I never have and I’m just going to stay consistent.

    Many of my Facebook friends don’t capitalize Donald Trump’s name, because they think this is some sort of profound rhetorical gesture. To me it’s just more evidence that DJT is the greatest real estate mogul of all time, with 99 year rent-free leases in all their heads.

    • Agree: West Reanimator
  78. @Anonymous
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    My wife is a social worker in Illinois. Here is an email sent to all Illinois DCFS staff regarding the Floyd death by Governor Pritzker that he sent last week. My wife immediately noticed the capitalization of the word black.
     
    And what did she comment about it?

    I am wondering if her training or experience as a sociologist has given her some unique insights about word usage, terminology, capitalization, etc. that you could share with us.

    Replies: @RSDB, @Mike Tre

    She’s not a sociologist, fool, she’s a social worker. And she writes case assessments. For about 25 years. So her understanding of English syntax far exceeds yours and most people’s.

    And you may be mentally retarded if you need to ask about the capitalization of the word black in the context of this discussion.

  79. @Abe
    @Dave3


    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?
     
    My wife’s best friend in high school and the first few years of college was a black girl from an intact, solidly middle class family- both parents, while not doctors, had solidly respectable medical technician jobs at a hospital. They would often joke that my wife (coming from a rougher, more whiskey-tango-ish background) acted more black than this black friend- I’m sure the two of them made an endearing coed version of the typical 80’s black cop/white cop pairing.

    In any case, my wife told me the friend’s father would regularly wait for her to come out of the shower and perform cunnilingus on her. So, no, don’t think that part is fictional (didn’t PRECIOUS also have an incest element in its story?)

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    Recently I went to a bar in New Glarus territory and got Totally Naked in the presence of my daughter. The barmaid said not to worry, it happens all the time there.

  80. @Jonathan Silber
    To paraphrase the "First Law of Majority-Minority Relations in Liberal Society," as conceived by Lawrence Auster:

    The worse the behavior of a designated minority, the higher its pedestal.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  81. @Known Fact
    @DextersLabRat

    I still like "negro" best myself. E.G. negro riots, negro district, negro projects. I still smile at how my grandfather, a man without a hateful bone in his body, would refer to them as "the coloreds" and just shake his head sadly.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    Maybe taking pride in “not have a hateful bone” in our bodies and being content merely to “shake our head sadly” was how we got into this mess. Maybe there are times to hate, and people to hate.

    Not sniping at you or your grandfather, I mean it as a general point about our inclination to be fair and gentle to a fault.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Sam Malone

    I hear you. My grandfather's and father's generations had plenty to deal with already, it's the cloud of white guilt I see in my fellow Boomers -- even 30 or 40 years ago -- that has led to where we are today. This inability to deal with the truth only seems to be getting worse among younger people, who will one day be facing some difficult lessons.

  82. Anonymous[110] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles
    One way to measure print media genuflection (and other media) in the George Floyd news is to note what isn't reported about him. In today's Houston Chronicle, his original hometown paper (now a totally Marxist/Dem Hearst propaganda outlet), there is a three page bio "story" about Mr. Floyd. This accompanies a three quarter page line drawing of his face on page 1.

    Especially interesting in the lengthy muck of words is what isn't mentioned, or properly discussed. His three children. Not interviewed and all with different baby mamas. These women aren't interviewed either. So what's the story on child support (mothers were not married to him)? You might expect an objective account by this slavishly feminist rag to address child support. Nope. Might even be some legal paperwork about that (common in Texas for child welfare to try and collect that on behalf of children from absent fathers). No. Unpaid child support is a very common "crime" for arrest here. News story blank-out on that. So black men get a pass on that in the Chronicle?

    Three sentence mention of Mr. Floyd's numerous conviction for drugs, theft and assault. No details. No interview with female victim of his armed home invasion (possibly a drug rip). Why wasn't she interviewed? What about his arrest record (non convictions)? What you can barely detect is that all of his drug/crime charges were pled down. Even the home invasion only got four years in the slam. Zero anonymous law enforcement were interviewed about him (no one of course would go on record.) They would know a lot about him. I'm sure his file is thick.

    His work history nonexistent, though a reference to "not 9 to 5." We are told only that he lived at his mama's apartment in welfare housing off and on until she died. His buddies liked him. His promising basketball high school career mysteriously ended at a minor college level, no degree. A second college stint also mysteriously ended. Again no details. He was supposedly taking a commercial truck drivers course, but only a brief mention of how he was about to complete the course "when he stopped coming." That in Minneapolis. Probably on some welfare grant scholarship deal. He originally went to Minneapolis to do a drug rehab stint (didn't work out though) again, no mention of who paid for that. Taxpayers probably. His other "jobs" there were nightclub bouncer, rapper "security" (no license, obviously for that). But he had "plans" for great things. No actual "former employer" ever interviewed. Odd, no?

    He was at death an aging street rat, old and fat and unhealthy from a drug lifestyle. His old Houston rapper clique (Floyd didn't rap himself, evidently) were all "screw" rappers (i.e. narcotic cough syrup "purple drank"addicts) who mostly died in the 90s from their own habit. Some killed, others by accident. So Floyd outlived this group. Floyd was everyone's friend there.

    Anyway, basic non worshipful facts about him are absent. He wasn't a Big Bad Criminal, just a low level drug hustler, thief, etc. and was always on the grift. Abandoned his baby mamas and kids (though we are told repeatedly how much he loved "getting them Pampers" at midnight at his mama's apartment, etc.).

    Not merely trying to speak ill of the dead. But as a Black Martyr he is extremely ordinary. A failed father and man. Yes, his pals liked him (though how would we know otherwise?) and he didn't deserve to die by malign neglect while being arrested yet again.

    His life does serve, if the truth is ever allowed out, as a lesson. Being a decent high school athlete who gets a free ride doesn't guarantee some fat NBA contract, or NFL. Scholarships require attendance. Growing up in some "project" from which you can escape requires purpose and education. Value to others. Street cred with your low life jailbird pals isn't a real career. He was a Loser. Being black doesn't turn that into some kind of Winner either. Being a cop Victim doesn't make him less of a Loser. He was a cop Victim mainly because he was a high-on-drugs Loser. Not just because he was black. This is the Forbidden Truth about Mr. Floyd. An unlucky Loser who tangled with the wrong cop. He might have been a nice guy to his friends, but then again, who isn't?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yes, his pals liked him (though how would we know otherwise?) and he didn’t deserve to die by malign neglect while being arrested yet again.

    The police didn’t “neglect” him, and they weren’t “malign.” He fought them when they tried to arrest him. They had no choice but to pin him. They were unaware of his true distress.

  83. @Sam Malone
    @Known Fact

    Maybe taking pride in "not have a hateful bone" in our bodies and being content merely to "shake our head sadly" was how we got into this mess. Maybe there are times to hate, and people to hate.

    Not sniping at you or your grandfather, I mean it as a general point about our inclination to be fair and gentle to a fault.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I hear you. My grandfather’s and father’s generations had plenty to deal with already, it’s the cloud of white guilt I see in my fellow Boomers — even 30 or 40 years ago — that has led to where we are today. This inability to deal with the truth only seems to be getting worse among younger people, who will one day be facing some difficult lessons.

  84. @Abe
    @Dave3


    The Color Purple taught me that black men like to fuck their own daughters (at least two men do it in the movie). Was that part fictional?
     
    My wife’s best friend in high school and the first few years of college was a black girl from an intact, solidly middle class family- both parents, while not doctors, had solidly respectable medical technician jobs at a hospital. They would often joke that my wife (coming from a rougher, more whiskey-tango-ish background) acted more black than this black friend- I’m sure the two of them made an endearing coed version of the typical 80’s black cop/white cop pairing.

    In any case, my wife told me the friend’s father would regularly wait for her to come out of the shower and perform cunnilingus on her. So, no, don’t think that part is fictional (didn’t PRECIOUS also have an incest element in its story?)

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar, @Jim Don Bob

    That would make a great porn video, right up there with some teen’s step mom boinking him.

  85. @PiltdownMan

    To abolish whiteness, we could strike over the hated word white.
     
    Don't give them ideas, Mr. Sailer.

    Replies: @Tracy

    As a Catholic, what came to my mind is that we could genuflect at the word “bl_ck” and strike our breast when pronouncing the word ” white.” Three strikes along with “mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa” would likely go down well with the woke clerisy types.

  86. @Neuday
    @Anon


    There’s some explanation about why the w in white isn’t capitalized, but I forget what it is.
     
    IIRC, "Black" is capitalized because its a people, like "Chinese", or "Brazilian", where as white is a color, not a people. Funny, you don't capitalize "Mongrel".

    In any event, we Americans of European descent will need a name for our people, lest the foe provide one. Since our ancestors arrived by their own volition, perhaps Voluntary Americans, or Volams, distinct from Involuntary Americans or Paperwork Americans? The coming conflagration could be Volams vs. Golems.

    Replies: @Tracy

    I’ve proposed “European and European-Derived” people — “EEDS” — for the cause of labeling white people in a new way that might sneak past the censors for a while.

  87. Writing/Typing ‘black’ as ‘~Black~’ from now on shouldn’t be an issue!
    After all, don’t we already have the ‘ǃKung’ as a precedent? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C7%83Kung_people

    My PERSONAL suggestion, however, is to write black as “black” – since it makes it look blacker, and of course, Fortune favours the bold!

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