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From Pro Publica:

Experts believe the main culprit is the explosive growth of low-lying riverine and coastal development, which has had the double effect of increasing floods (by replacing prairies and other natural sponges that hold water with pavement that deflects water) while moving more property into the path of those floods. An investigation last year by ProPublica and the Texas Tribune found that the Houston area’s impervious surfaces increased by 25 percent from 1996 to 2011, as thousands of new homes were built around its bayous.

From MigrationPolicy.com:

Houston is the most diverse, rapidly growing major U.S. metropolitan area, and immigration has contributed greatly to its growth and diversity. In 2013 the Houston metro area was home to 6.3 million people, of whom 1.4 million were foreign born—an increase of nearly 60 percent from 2000, which is almost twice the national growth rate.

 
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  1. It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don’t see this as something they “take out”, as if they magically don’t use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage – nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant – including payment on the national and state debts – but it never is made.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Cwhatfuture

    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.
    Speaking of old infrastructure look when the two dams and reservoirs north of Houston were built. They are now overflowing for the first time


    In response — and echoing similar flood-control projects throughout the country — the Corps of Engineers finished constructing the Barker Dam and Watershed (which sits on the south side of I-10) in 1945 and the Addicks Dam and Watershed (located on the north side of I-10) in 1948. The once mighty fail-safes, two of Harris County's 22 watersheds, were originally able to protect Houston from a 1,000-year flood.
     
    http://www.houstonpress.com/news/if-the-addicks-and-barker-dams-fail-6594886

    ***more Houston dam/reservoir info at the source

    , @CJ
    @Cwhatfuture

    And no one ever counts infrastructure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don’t see this as something they “take out”, as if they magically don’t use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    And schools, hospitals, parks, pools, DMVs and a bunch of other things. So strong agreement, but my AGREE button isn't active.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @DodgUSA24
    @Cwhatfuture

    Excellent comment, Cwhatfuture.

    It saddens me to think back to a movie like Bad News Bears 2 where they show Houston as an all-American city. Houston is now a multi-cultural hellhole with some balkanized areas of pre-1965 Americans.

    I used to make fun of liberal cities like S.F. for using environmental law to restrict development. But the joke is on the red state cities like Houston. By completely opening up to any kind of development, Houston has been swamped with a massive non-American population. I don't see a way back. SAD.

    , @Anonym
    @Cwhatfuture

    But Steve, the houses were rotting in the lumber yards!

    , @Bill Jones
    @Cwhatfuture

    Why spend any money on US infrastucture when you can spend a trillion dolllars a year destroying that of other countries?

  2. Perhaps some of the former residents of New Orleans who moved to Houston following Katrina can now return to their former home?

    • Replies: @fish
    @Barnard


    Perhaps some of the former residents of New Orleans who moved to Houston following Katrina can now return to their former home?
     
    Yeah…..if they leave now they can go by boat!
    , @ATX Hipster
    @Barnard

    I had the same thought. Maybe the Cajun Navy can take them on their way back.

  3. The Houston Metro area had a population of 2.6 million in 1985 and 6.6 million today, and is much more diverse and vibrant now.

    The Houston metro area gained over 750,000 people since 2010 according the the US Census Bureau…not sure if the Census Bureau has expanded the area of the Houston Metro area during the last decade.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Travis

    Never seen the attraction of Houston. Coastal plain, sweaty. After graduation did a summer there--during Steve's "Rice Years"--at Johnson Space Center. Since I was starting grad school at Texas, one day I drove over to Austin, to get the lay of the land. Normal summer day, Austin was hotter--around 95--but quite tolerable. I was driving back in the evening, well past sundown and as approached Houston I could feel the layer of slime building up on me. Probably the most unpleasant weather I've experienced--given civilization existing--was one week in July when it was in the low 100s with that same 90% humidity. Hellish. (The only competitor would be the next winter--'78-79 in Chicago.)

    I don't love living in Florida now--that's AnotherMom's thing. But at least AnotherMom and I can walk to the beach. In Houston you're in the sweatbox ... and the closest beach in an hour's drive away! And really not that awesome. Probably pretty nice when Glen Campbell was singing about it 50 years ago ... less so now with more crowding and "diversity".

  4. The diverse local politicians of Houston ignored the Republican governor’s recommendation that people evacuate and told them to shelter in place instead. How’s that working out?

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Dutch Boy

    In his defense the evacuation during hurricane Rita resulted in several deaths. So he had recent memory to rely on. People need to learn to take their own survival personally, which is an odd thing to have to tell people. Unfortunately that's where we are as people now.

    , @Forbes
    @Dutch Boy

    Is it too much to imagine that 16 years after 9/11 or 12 years after Katrina that states and cities have disaster preparedness plans? I.e. contingency plans regarding evacuation and/or shelter in-place, and the resources (materiel, personnel, logistics, staging areas) to carry out either or any such plans.

    At the least, the governor and mayor should not be supplying conflicting/contradictory orders or recommendations. It's not as if severe rainfall and flooding is foreign to Houston and south Texas.

    , @TheBoom
    @Dutch Boy

    The only thing we know for sure is that it is Trump's fault.

    , @anon
    @Dutch Boy

    No one in the Houston area (conservatives and Republicans included) is saying this. That is because there are "costs" and feasibility issues in evacuating 6 million plus people.

    I was in Houston in 2005 during the Rita scare (one month after Katrina) where the metropolis tried a mass evacuation. It was absolute chaos with all outbound highways at a standstill. Cars moving basically nowhere for 20+ hours. Cars dying or running out of gas clogging the road, health emergencies with no way for EMS to react, people/families taking shits on the side of the road, etc etc.

    Gov. Abbott was playing dirty cuckservative politics-- he gets to look good if disaster strikes, his tweet recommendation is forgotten if nothing happened.

    Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

  5. @Barnard
    Perhaps some of the former residents of New Orleans who moved to Houston following Katrina can now return to their former home?

    Replies: @fish, @ATX Hipster

    Perhaps some of the former residents of New Orleans who moved to Houston following Katrina can now return to their former home?

    Yeah…..if they leave now they can go by boat!

  6. This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    “I’m sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it’s like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call “the big joke.””

    • LOL: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @fish
    @Tiny Duck


    Dat be a little not as stoopid as you usually be Tiny


    - Leonard Pitts
     
    , @William Badwhite
    @Tiny Duck

    You've moved past Lennard Pittz, congrats!

    , @Anonymous
    @Tiny Duck

    1) The original post has nothing do with PC. 2) This isn't a grammatically correct sentence or even a coherent thought. 3) Not going to read your external link, tiny... ahem... [duck].

    , @mad anthony
    @Tiny Duck

    Spectacular insight, champ

    , @anonymous
    @Tiny Duck

    Whaa???

    Time for your meds, TD.

    , @Ragno
    @Tiny Duck

    I got chills reading that. Woke as f#*k!

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Tiny Duck

    What a disgusting little cuck. He should write more about self-hate, he certainly knows a lot about it.

  7. Two words people who make love to SCIENCE have never heard of: impervious surface.

    The other meme going around in support of Houston’s very diverse mayor’s non-evacuation order is “do you know how hard it is to evacuate a City?” But I imagine Houston’s spread and sprawl and highways would make evacuating low lying areas in Houston a different and more achievable exercise than evacuating a centrally dense City like New Orleans.

    • Replies: @JerryC
    @Alec Leamas

    They evacuated for Hurricane Rita in 2005 and it didn't go well. That probably had a lot to do with the decision to not issue an evacuation order.

    Replies: @Rod1963, @Forbes

    , @Kit
    @Alec Leamas

    Nope. 1. The flooding is in eight counties and about a dozen cities. Any evacuation requires coordination between all those entities.

    2. There have been ten confirmed deaths. Seven of them were people in cars washed away by flood waters. By comparison, 100 people died in the horrible Rita evacuation.

    3. Finally, Houston has three large highways that could be escape routes: Interstates 10 and 45, and federal 290 to Austin. 10 and 290 were in the projected path of the storm. 45 ends in Galveston, meaning that one end of it was part of the significant flooding, and that getting to 45 involves travel on other, probably flooded, roads. If you can tell us how to get 6 million people out of a city in two days on one highway, FEMA has a job for you.

    All of you -- there were no good answers. Harvey was a gigantic storm covering an enormous and densely populated area. There are 25 STATES with fewer people in them than live in the Houston metro area. Stop complaining and do something useful.

    , @Sammler
    @Alec Leamas

    Houston is literally an order of magnitude larger than New Orleans.

  8. Experts believe the main culprit is the explosive growth of low-lying riverine and coastal development, which has had the double effect of increasing floods (by replacing prairies and other natural sponges that hold water with pavement that deflects water) while moving more property into the path of those floods.

    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    @Mike Zwick


    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.
     
    It's like that in a lot of places, i.e., the Jersey Shore, where it was popular and lucrative to fill in the "swamps" in the back bays of the barrier islands and on the bayside shore for decades, while building houses that crowd the lot almost to the edge from shore to bay. So now a good drenching floods streets and can strand cars - but the media will swear that it's a byproduct of global warming.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Mike Zwick

    Even more malevolent is the constant destruction of fertile farmland in DuPage County. In 1965 it was so rural that when Bell Labs decided to build in Naperville, hunters were using shotguns across the street. Now West Chicago (Fermi Lab) is now known half-jokingly as West Chicano. Immigration is a self-inflicted cancer to the future well being of "the children."

  9. Yet one more example, as if any more were necessary, that a United States that had limited itself to natural population increase in 1965 and consisted of perhaps 220-225 million people, would be eminently more livable than what exists today.

    • Agree: NickG, Forbes, Anon 2
    • Replies: @Ragno
    @Diversity Heretic

    Sshhhh!

    No one's supposed to ever say that!

    , @Father O'Hara
    @Diversity Heretic

    Yeah,but Jews.

    , @europeasant
    @Diversity Heretic

    I agree but someone, somewhere is hell-bent on a population increase beyond that.
    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate. That's why ((they, whoever they are?)) will import the necessary third world peoples to continue the growth.
    We will face the consequences of that population growth at some time in the future.

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Henry Bowman

  10. @Barnard
    Perhaps some of the former residents of New Orleans who moved to Houston following Katrina can now return to their former home?

    Replies: @fish, @ATX Hipster

    I had the same thought. Maybe the Cajun Navy can take them on their way back.

  11. @Alec Leamas
    Two words people who make love to SCIENCE have never heard of: impervious surface.

    The other meme going around in support of Houston's very diverse mayor's non-evacuation order is "do you know how hard it is to evacuate a City?" But I imagine Houston's spread and sprawl and highways would make evacuating low lying areas in Houston a different and more achievable exercise than evacuating a centrally dense City like New Orleans.

    Replies: @JerryC, @Kit, @Sammler

    They evacuated for Hurricane Rita in 2005 and it didn’t go well. That probably had a lot to do with the decision to not issue an evacuation order.

    • Replies: @Rod1963
    @JerryC

    Did it ever occur to the authorities to plan and practice for such a event? No!

    Apparently we have become so incompetent as a people we're not even capable of planning for emergencies.

    Which means you're on your own. If you live in a flood plain or concrete jungle and have elderly or small children. You pack up your belongings and leave no matter what some idiot mayor says.

    Especially when the governor is basically screaming at people to GTFO.

    It's not hard either. You grab your kids, clothes and important items, lock up the home and leave ASAP, do not wait until the last minute. You get out of the danger zone. And yeah if you have kids or elderly, you don't take chances, you leave. Or you end up like those fools in the shelters with nothing.

    Which brings me to the next point. If you live in a zone where natural disasters occur, prepare for them. Doubly so if you live in a city because they become death traps once the power goes out and traffic clogs up the roads.

    Have a evac pack of supplies and gear to last you at least 96 hours. Such a pack can be put together cheaply. If you can afford a Ipod or Cell phone you can afford to have emergency supplies.

    Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    , @Forbes
    @JerryC

    I think that's called making the perfect the enemy of the good.

    Leaving thousands (100s of thousands) at risk because, in 2005, an evacuation bus caught fire and killed 23 nursing home evacuees--a freak, though tragic incident--is the height of ignorance in the face of the known flooding that will occur with measured and anticipated rainfall.

  12. By restricting immigration, Donald Trump is the greatest environmentalist President the United States has ever had.

    The problem with immigration / population is that this splits the left in two with SWPL on one side and ethnics on the other. To combat this schism “environmentalists” have had to develop a scotoma that prevents people from noticing anything that might allow others to exploit the rift. What was once discussed openly on the left (and right) is now verboten so we get diversity talk instead.

    To help this, the focus is now on global warming, the most abstract concept possible which allows anybody to interpret it in any way they please. The bad actors deny it. The righteous use it to virtue signal. And the new diverse Americans and their allies on the left get to pretend that their scheisse does not stink too and that it is all the fault of the bad whites who have to go to make more room for the new diverse eaters / gas emitters / and sprawlers.

    We don’t need no stinking bike paths.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Prof. Woland

    Great comment Professor. I had never before thought of the Global Climate Disruption(TM) as a diversion to get the attention off of the cognitive dissonance of "More people = more environmental problems, but immigration is always good, so ... ohhh, my poor head, we'd better legalize THE POT protomundo!"

    VDare has written about the specifics of the Sierra Club - one of the 1st and biggest environmental organizations and their 20-years-ago decision to go for the bucks over the environment - here is Peak Stupidity's take on the destruction of California. (also here and here.

    , @Anonymous
    @Prof. Woland

    It splits the left because the left's SWPLs and wealthy elites are adherents of right wing illiberal economics. They want a servant class but they don't want development and growth which serve as economic competition and threaten their status. Environmentalism serves this economics by maintaining the scarcity of current assets and inhibiting development. The right can't exploit split because it's the party of liberal economics.

    , @Anonymous
    @Prof. Woland

    I was surprised to see that Ms. Hynde fille seems to have a somewhat rational view of The Donald:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrPi6UR5VkE

    Odd, because mumsy blasted him pretty bad during a recent show opening up for Stevie Nicks.
    Can't find the video just yet.

  13. Steve’s got some facts to explain
    ’bout prairies and asphalt and rain.
    Storms come and they go;
    Waters fall and then flow.
    But the Zeroth must ever remain.

  14. @Mike Zwick

    Experts believe the main culprit is the explosive growth of low-lying riverine and coastal development, which has had the double effect of increasing floods (by replacing prairies and other natural sponges that hold water with pavement that deflects water) while moving more property into the path of those floods.
     
    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @Joe Stalin

    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.

    It’s like that in a lot of places, i.e., the Jersey Shore, where it was popular and lucrative to fill in the “swamps” in the back bays of the barrier islands and on the bayside shore for decades, while building houses that crowd the lot almost to the edge from shore to bay. So now a good drenching floods streets and can strand cars – but the media will swear that it’s a byproduct of global warming.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Alec Leamas

    Old environmentalism vs new.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

  15. Brett Stevens of Amerika.org (NOT Bret Stephens of the WSJ) has written some fascinating articles about the link between Houston’s repeated flooding and diversity:

    http://www.amerika.org/politics/houston-shows-us-the-future-of-the-usa/

    http://www.amerika.org/politics/the-great-houston-flood-of-2016-and-the-consequences-of-minority-rule/

  16. These patterns of development are rampant throughout the New South. There are sections in the suburbs of Memphis along river sheds emptying into the Mississippi River that were off limits to development for decades and protected by environmental regulation. In the early 1980’s it was not unusual to see the stragglers fleeing similar low lying areas with their valued possessions stuffed into the back of their pickups.

    As the urban core fell to the undertow populations and became unpalatable for commercial ventures, many multi-million dollar commercial and medical buildings have built well into this hundred year suburban flood plain. The waters in the 2011 flood backed up into the parking lots of these businesses and storefronts a little more than a decade after they were built. This sort of bad city planning is fueled by the desire for revenue is not limited to Memphis. The development in the Baton Rouge metro area is 10x worse.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @MarcB.

    Atlanta, lots of North Georgia actually, is a sea of pavement and reflective building glass. Fortunately, Nancy Creek and the Chattahoochee drain the place pretty well.

    Atlanta's Achilles' heel is traffic. A dusting of ice traps millions in place. Urban conflict would do the same thing--when the exodus begins, you are going to be stuck on the highways for hours.

    Cities are becoming diseconomies of scale.

  17. @Alec Leamas
    @Mike Zwick


    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.
     
    It's like that in a lot of places, i.e., the Jersey Shore, where it was popular and lucrative to fill in the "swamps" in the back bays of the barrier islands and on the bayside shore for decades, while building houses that crowd the lot almost to the edge from shore to bay. So now a good drenching floods streets and can strand cars - but the media will swear that it's a byproduct of global warming.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist

    Old environmentalism vs new.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @yaqub the mad scientist


    Old environmentalism vs new.
     
    Yes and no. There's a difference between keeping things the way they are because you don't like people enjoying themselves and finding a useful purpose for the swamps (renamed wetlands).

    Filling those swamps also cut down on the emergence of biting insects like greenheads which made people miserable.
  18. The flood insurance claims will be mostly payed by the federal government, costing taxpayers more than building a wall along our southern border…

  19. The media likes to run stories on Houston’s diversity like this one: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-houston-diversity-2017-htmlstory.html

    The triumphalism over sticking it to those backward Texans can’t be contained. From a prof at Steve’s alma mater:

    “Suddenly these are 100% American kids, and they’re falling in love with each other, making multiracial babies,” Klineberg said.

    A “psychology of inevitability” begins to set in around immigration, he said — it’s happening, and it might not be a bad thing

    He accidentally gives the game away when he says, “Maybe I can make money off of this.”

    Houston being more diverse than NYC is always held up as something to be proud of, as if good ol’ boys outside the beltway are going to hear that and say, “That’ll show them Yankees we ain’t racist!” Harris County offering ballots in Spanish, Vietnamese, and Chinese is the result of a natural (and lucky!) process by which demographics magically change, rather than a byproduct of a deliberate attempt to elect a new people.

    • Replies: @cynthia curran
    @ATX Hipster

    Big deal, Houston is just a cheaper version of Los Angeles. In fact on Briebart someone made a nasty remarked about Phoenix and protest against Trump. Trump had more protesters on his campaign in Houston. Harris County went about 13 percent for Clinton. As I have told Sailer many times, Harris County is not that great. Oklahoma City is actually better for white folks. Phoenix-Maricopia grew in whites only that can not be said for Houston-Harris County. The cheapest housing now for young people is actually in the plains states and not the south. Oklahoma is not cheaper for young people than Texas is.

  20. See this video while Youtube while still let you.

    The Goyim are learning. Youtube is having to engage in “Oy Vey, Shut it down!!!” with increasing speed and fright.

    From the excellent Vertigo Politix channel which is never afraid to violate the principle of TWMNBN!!!

    The Tactics of Immigration – VertigoPolitix
    (Esoteric Nous)

    Here is Youtube’s “Safe Space” warning

    Certain features have been disabled for this video
    In response to user reports, we have disabled some features, such as comments, sharing, and suggested videos, because this video contains content that may be inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.

    See this video while you still can!!!

  21. OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Paul Mendez


    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?
     
    Terrific idea Paul, as we pull our iSteve contributions together.

    I'd be interesting in a social meetup with iSteve readers in both Central Florida or the PNW.

    Don't know exactly how to arrange such things openly on-line without potential SJW harrassment. Maybe Steve could toss a thread out there every few months and motivated volunteers in particular areas could take it from their. Temp email addresses, relative annonimity.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Joe Stalin

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Paul Mendez


    Paul Mendez says:
    August 29, 2017 at 4:40 pm GMT

    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

     

    Now we know who the Fed is . . . .
    , @Gman
    @Paul Mendez

    If anyone is interested in a Chicago iSteve fan dinner, I'd be down

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    10 or 15 of us Haven Monahans got together at a bar in Tysons a few years ago to drink and talk all things Steve. There have been no midnight knocks at my door. So far.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

  22. @Travis
    The Houston Metro area had a population of 2.6 million in 1985 and 6.6 million today, and is much more diverse and vibrant now.

    The Houston metro area gained over 750,000 people since 2010 according the the US Census Bureau...not sure if the Census Bureau has expanded the area of the Houston Metro area during the last decade.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Never seen the attraction of Houston. Coastal plain, sweaty. After graduation did a summer there–during Steve’s “Rice Years”–at Johnson Space Center. Since I was starting grad school at Texas, one day I drove over to Austin, to get the lay of the land. Normal summer day, Austin was hotter–around 95–but quite tolerable. I was driving back in the evening, well past sundown and as approached Houston I could feel the layer of slime building up on me. Probably the most unpleasant weather I’ve experienced–given civilization existing–was one week in July when it was in the low 100s with that same 90% humidity. Hellish. (The only competitor would be the next winter–’78-79 in Chicago.)

    I don’t love living in Florida now–that’s AnotherMom’s thing. But at least AnotherMom and I can walk to the beach. In Houston you’re in the sweatbox … and the closest beach in an hour’s drive away! And really not that awesome. Probably pretty nice when Glen Campbell was singing about it 50 years ago … less so now with more crowding and “diversity”.

  23. This article explains you sad people

    Why are you spamming this article in the comments at multiple websites? Who is paying you?

  24. @Paul Mendez
    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Gman, @Jim Don Bob

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Terrific idea Paul, as we pull our iSteve contributions together.

    I’d be interesting in a social meetup with iSteve readers in both Central Florida or the PNW.

    Don’t know exactly how to arrange such things openly on-line without potential SJW harrassment. Maybe Steve could toss a thread out there every few months and motivated volunteers in particular areas could take it from their. Temp email addresses, relative annonimity.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @AnotherDad

    Not sure Washington DC area would work, you need somewhere with a police force that is not hostile to you. Otherwise the police simply look the other way while you are assaulted, then arrest you for defending yourself. See:
    - Charlottesville, VA.
    - Hospital scene in Godfather I.
    The best bet is more rural red state areas in which the police are more poorly paid. In large cities police are looking at being able to retire at 50 with six figure pensions, full free benefits for the lives of them and their spouses, plus cost of living increases.
    Someone else looked up the police officers in San Jose who enabled the SJW attacks on Trump supporter last year. In California the pay off all public employees is required to be available on-line. Some of those cops, not commanding officers but street cops in patrol cars, made $300,000 with overtime in 2015. With that at stake, no matter how much an individual cop might secretly sympathize with you, they will follow any orders whatsoever to make sure they don't jeopardize the jackpot. If they are ordered to load you into railroad cars travelling in an easterly direction, they will do it.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @mad anthony, @Rod1963

    , @Joe Stalin
    @AnotherDad

    How about the "First meeting of the iSteve Military Arms Fan Club. Show & Tell. Bring your favorite arms." Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  25. Another big factor was the monster HIGH pressure over the southwest. This was the same HIGH that has been cooking Kali for the last 4 days; 109 in the Bay Area!!!

    The HIGH blocked the westward, inland, storm track a hurricane normally follows. Once it gets over land, no water to suck up and it dies. But the HIGH has kept the storm over the Gulf and it’s raining like it’s the Bible.

    So it was just a ‘perfect’ storm to get this amount of rain and flooding.

    OT I wonder how Tiny Dick is able to resolve the fact that a country, founded and run by white guys, is also the country every dirt colored bugger is trying to get to. They wouldn’t be trying to get here if they thought the same way as Tiny Dick; that the US is a hellhole….

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @AB-

    Saw an illustration of that high pressure dome on the telly last night. You are quite correct. It has effectively blocked Harvey from moving much of anywhere. And since the water is warm and it has nowhere to go, it just sucks up more Gulf water and deposits it on SE Texas. And since it can't go inland very far it can't break down. A "perfect storm", similar to Sandi which featured a three-in-one parlay including a hurricane, a nor'easter and a full moon, which blended into a lethal brew.

  26. @Mike Zwick

    Experts believe the main culprit is the explosive growth of low-lying riverine and coastal development, which has had the double effect of increasing floods (by replacing prairies and other natural sponges that hold water with pavement that deflects water) while moving more property into the path of those floods.
     
    This is what they say is the cause of the 100 year floods that occur every other year now along the Des Plaines River in the Chicago Area.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @Joe Stalin

    Even more malevolent is the constant destruction of fertile farmland in DuPage County. In 1965 it was so rural that when Bell Labs decided to build in Naperville, hunters were using shotguns across the street. Now West Chicago (Fermi Lab) is now known half-jokingly as West Chicano. Immigration is a self-inflicted cancer to the future well being of “the children.”

  27. @Dutch Boy
    The diverse local politicians of Houston ignored the Republican governor's recommendation that people evacuate and told them to shelter in place instead. How's that working out?

    Replies: @Ed, @Forbes, @TheBoom, @anon

    In his defense the evacuation during hurricane Rita resulted in several deaths. So he had recent memory to rely on. People need to learn to take their own survival personally, which is an odd thing to have to tell people. Unfortunately that’s where we are as people now.

  28. @AnotherDad
    @Paul Mendez


    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?
     
    Terrific idea Paul, as we pull our iSteve contributions together.

    I'd be interesting in a social meetup with iSteve readers in both Central Florida or the PNW.

    Don't know exactly how to arrange such things openly on-line without potential SJW harrassment. Maybe Steve could toss a thread out there every few months and motivated volunteers in particular areas could take it from their. Temp email addresses, relative annonimity.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Joe Stalin

    Not sure Washington DC area would work, you need somewhere with a police force that is not hostile to you. Otherwise the police simply look the other way while you are assaulted, then arrest you for defending yourself. See:
    – Charlottesville, VA.
    – Hospital scene in Godfather I.
    The best bet is more rural red state areas in which the police are more poorly paid. In large cities police are looking at being able to retire at 50 with six figure pensions, full free benefits for the lives of them and their spouses, plus cost of living increases.
    Someone else looked up the police officers in San Jose who enabled the SJW attacks on Trump supporter last year. In California the pay off all public employees is required to be available on-line. Some of those cops, not commanding officers but street cops in patrol cars, made $300,000 with overtime in 2015. With that at stake, no matter how much an individual cop might secretly sympathize with you, they will follow any orders whatsoever to make sure they don’t jeopardize the jackpot. If they are ordered to load you into railroad cars travelling in an easterly direction, they will do it.

    • Agree: AB-
    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Alfa158

    No need for cops.

    I set a date & general geographic location for dinner.

    You must be an iSteve commenter with at least 1 year of activity to request an invite. You create a temporary email and post it under your usual iSteve pseudonym in a special thread Steve creates. Your previous posts are vetted to weed out trolls.

    At the very last moment, I email you details. Restaurant reservation name is something secret and mundane so SJWs can't call around looking for us.

    Any further security suggestions?

    PS: Jared Taylor is hosting an AmRen BBQ this month at his home near DC and isn't afraid to publicize the date or his address.

    Replies: @Milo Minderbinder

    , @mad anthony
    @Alfa158

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It's still majority white. Don't expect to see an aftermath that resembles Katrina in any way whatsoever, except in some areas on the North side.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @AnotherDad

    , @Rod1963
    @Alfa158

    Yep, police are not our friends or protectors.

    And they aren't going to shoot it out with bad guys or us either. Too much to lose.

    I remember the King Riots in LA, when they were going down the LAPD and Sheriffs vanished. I lived some 70 miles outside the riot area and you couldn't even find cops where I was.

    They were gone. The only thing I saw were car loads of cholos and dindus cruising in areas they usually never went. It was the only time I ever carried.

    The point is when things go pear shaped in a city the police will vanish. Especially if the gangs come out, given they are the principal gun owners in most cities. The cops have no problem confronting a couple armed goons, but several hundred to several thousand? No. They aren't soldiers, they are over paid clerks.

    All those "cosmic" or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.

    Consider this. Most police don't live in the cities they guard. They live in the suburbs or even semi-rural areas. They have no skin in the game if the city goes up in flames. Most know that our major cities, if they ever break down will descend into murder and mayhem quite rapidly and being out numbered 10,000 to 1 makes it a suicide option to maintain order.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @anonguy

  29. Houston is diverse due to its relative housing affordability which allows people to work crappy service jobs & still maintain a modicum of a modern lifestyle.

    Unfortunately in due time it will devolve into a slum on par with the favelas in Rio.

    It should be pointed out that Houston tends to held up as a good example by many in the conservative intellectual community for being diverse, affordable with a free market ethos.

  30. @AnotherDad
    @Paul Mendez


    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?
     
    Terrific idea Paul, as we pull our iSteve contributions together.

    I'd be interesting in a social meetup with iSteve readers in both Central Florida or the PNW.

    Don't know exactly how to arrange such things openly on-line without potential SJW harrassment. Maybe Steve could toss a thread out there every few months and motivated volunteers in particular areas could take it from their. Temp email addresses, relative annonimity.

    Replies: @Alfa158, @Joe Stalin

    How about the “First meeting of the iSteve Military Arms Fan Club. Show & Tell. Bring your favorite arms.” Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Joe Stalin


    Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.
     
    Not a bad idea. NRA HQ is just outside DC near the intersection of I66 and Route 50. They have a great indoor range. Saw a guy fire a Thompson sub-machine there once. Guy went through probably $100 of ammo is less than 10 seconds, but it was awesome.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  31. @MarcB.
    These patterns of development are rampant throughout the New South. There are sections in the suburbs of Memphis along river sheds emptying into the Mississippi River that were off limits to development for decades and protected by environmental regulation. In the early 1980's it was not unusual to see the stragglers fleeing similar low lying areas with their valued possessions stuffed into the back of their pickups.

    As the urban core fell to the undertow populations and became unpalatable for commercial ventures, many multi-million dollar commercial and medical buildings have built well into this hundred year suburban flood plain. The waters in the 2011 flood backed up into the parking lots of these businesses and storefronts a little more than a decade after they were built. This sort of bad city planning is fueled by the desire for revenue is not limited to Memphis. The development in the Baton Rouge metro area is 10x worse.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Atlanta, lots of North Georgia actually, is a sea of pavement and reflective building glass. Fortunately, Nancy Creek and the Chattahoochee drain the place pretty well.

    Atlanta’s Achilles’ heel is traffic. A dusting of ice traps millions in place. Urban conflict would do the same thing–when the exodus begins, you are going to be stuck on the highways for hours.

    Cities are becoming diseconomies of scale.

  32. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Alec Leamas

    Old environmentalism vs new.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Old environmentalism vs new.

    Yes and no. There’s a difference between keeping things the way they are because you don’t like people enjoying themselves and finding a useful purpose for the swamps (renamed wetlands).

    Filling those swamps also cut down on the emergence of biting insects like greenheads which made people miserable.

  33. @Paul Mendez
    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Gman, @Jim Don Bob

    Paul Mendez says:
    August 29, 2017 at 4:40 pm GMT

    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Now we know who the Fed is . . . .

  34. Pair of 70-year-old dams and a levee overflow, adding to Houston floodwater
    Chicago Tribune · 35 minutes ago
    A pair of 70-year-old reservoir dams that protect downtown Houston and a levee in a suburban subdivision began overflowing Tuesday, adding to the rising floodwaters from Harvey that have crippled the area after five consecutive days of rain that set a new U.S. record for rainfall for a tropical system.

    Brazoria County authorities posted a message on Twitter warning that the levee at Columbia Lakes south of Houston had been breached and telling people to “GET OUT NOW!!!” Brazoria County Judge Matt Sebesta said residents were warned that the levee would be overtopped at some point, and a mandatory evacuation order was given Sunday.

    ***water running down the spillways of two dams

  35. @Alec Leamas
    Two words people who make love to SCIENCE have never heard of: impervious surface.

    The other meme going around in support of Houston's very diverse mayor's non-evacuation order is "do you know how hard it is to evacuate a City?" But I imagine Houston's spread and sprawl and highways would make evacuating low lying areas in Houston a different and more achievable exercise than evacuating a centrally dense City like New Orleans.

    Replies: @JerryC, @Kit, @Sammler

    Nope. 1. The flooding is in eight counties and about a dozen cities. Any evacuation requires coordination between all those entities.

    2. There have been ten confirmed deaths. Seven of them were people in cars washed away by flood waters. By comparison, 100 people died in the horrible Rita evacuation.

    3. Finally, Houston has three large highways that could be escape routes: Interstates 10 and 45, and federal 290 to Austin. 10 and 290 were in the projected path of the storm. 45 ends in Galveston, meaning that one end of it was part of the significant flooding, and that getting to 45 involves travel on other, probably flooded, roads. If you can tell us how to get 6 million people out of a city in two days on one highway, FEMA has a job for you.

    All of you — there were no good answers. Harvey was a gigantic storm covering an enormous and densely populated area. There are 25 STATES with fewer people in them than live in the Houston metro area. Stop complaining and do something useful.

  36. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    Dat be a little not as stoopid as you usually be Tiny

    – Leonard Pitts

  37. @Paul Mendez
    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Gman, @Jim Don Bob

    If anyone is interested in a Chicago iSteve fan dinner, I’d be down

  38. David Brooks says Houston should be the future for White Core Americans everywhere. David Brooks, in a column attacking a recent immigration reduction law in the US Senate, said that Houston proves that mass immigration is the way to go for America. David Brooks wants White Core America to be submerged in a flood of mass immigration.

    David Brooks had these little bits in a recent column:

    For the life of me, I can’t figure out why so many Republicans prefer a dying white America to a place like, say, Houston.

    The large immigrant population has paradoxically given the city(Houston) a very strong, very patriotic and cohesive culture, built around being welcoming to newcomers and embracing the future. As the Houston urban analyst Tory Gattis points out, the Houston Rodeo has so many volunteers it has recently limited their special privileges. In 2015 it had the healthiest philanthropic sector in the nation. The city is coming together to solve its pension problems better than just about any other big place.

    Source for David Brooks bits:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/24/opinion/the-national-death-wish.html?mcubz=3

    Houston is a frigging Third World hellhole that is under ten feet of flood water. David Brooks says people in Houston are “embracing the future” of mass immigration and multiculturalism. That was a bunch of propaganda crud from Brooks. People in Houston are now embracing life jackets so they don’t get their arses bitten off by a 15 foot long alligator or get shot by a looter.

  39. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    You’ve moved past Lennard Pittz, congrats!

  40. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    British TV news is *obsessed* with the Houston floods, to the point of saturation coverage, (no pun intended). Seemingly half the program is devoted to Houston.
    400 odd Africans being buried alive in a land slip in Sierra Leone, the other week, barely raised a mention on UK TV news.
    Similarly, any sort of natural disaster in continental Europe, although only a couple of hours’ flying time from the UK, would only get a cursory mention.
    In the same vein, the fisticuffs at Charlottesville or the Michael Brown brouhaha are shouting-screaming jobs for the UK news media.

    My personal observation is that, in the UK, at line at least, a manic, obsessive preoccupation with America and all things American – this includes the most obsequious mimicry – for example, Tony Blair and New Labour, as well as the BBC and The Economist, is the real hallmark of a second-rate mind.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous

    Their can't talk about their own disasters because most of them are either Muslim-created or would implicate their own liberal politicians in mass stupidity.

  41. @Cwhatfuture
    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don't see this as something they "take out", as if they magically don't use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage - nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant - including payment on the national and state debts - but it never is made.

    Replies: @Clyde, @CJ, @DodgUSA24, @Anonym, @Bill Jones

    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.
    Speaking of old infrastructure look when the two dams and reservoirs north of Houston were built. They are now overflowing for the first time

    In response — and echoing similar flood-control projects throughout the country — the Corps of Engineers finished constructing the Barker Dam and Watershed (which sits on the south side of I-10) in 1945 and the Addicks Dam and Watershed (located on the north side of I-10) in 1948. The once mighty fail-safes, two of Harris County’s 22 watersheds, were originally able to protect Houston from a 1,000-year flood.

    http://www.houstonpress.com/news/if-the-addicks-and-barker-dams-fail-6594886

    ***more Houston dam/reservoir info at the source

  42. @Alfa158
    @AnotherDad

    Not sure Washington DC area would work, you need somewhere with a police force that is not hostile to you. Otherwise the police simply look the other way while you are assaulted, then arrest you for defending yourself. See:
    - Charlottesville, VA.
    - Hospital scene in Godfather I.
    The best bet is more rural red state areas in which the police are more poorly paid. In large cities police are looking at being able to retire at 50 with six figure pensions, full free benefits for the lives of them and their spouses, plus cost of living increases.
    Someone else looked up the police officers in San Jose who enabled the SJW attacks on Trump supporter last year. In California the pay off all public employees is required to be available on-line. Some of those cops, not commanding officers but street cops in patrol cars, made $300,000 with overtime in 2015. With that at stake, no matter how much an individual cop might secretly sympathize with you, they will follow any orders whatsoever to make sure they don't jeopardize the jackpot. If they are ordered to load you into railroad cars travelling in an easterly direction, they will do it.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @mad anthony, @Rod1963

    No need for cops.

    I set a date & general geographic location for dinner.

    You must be an iSteve commenter with at least 1 year of activity to request an invite. You create a temporary email and post it under your usual iSteve pseudonym in a special thread Steve creates. Your previous posts are vetted to weed out trolls.

    At the very last moment, I email you details. Restaurant reservation name is something secret and mundane so SJWs can’t call around looking for us.

    Any further security suggestions?

    PS: Jared Taylor is hosting an AmRen BBQ this month at his home near DC and isn’t afraid to publicize the date or his address.

    • Replies: @Milo Minderbinder
    @Paul Mendez

    I would be interested in attending such a dinner in the Philadelphia/Tri-State/PA/NJ/DE area.

  43. Amerika.org has been writing about Houston and floods for a while:

    Houston gets glimpses of its future during these floods (May 2015 and April 2016): a vast concrete jungle, staffed by incompetents, filled with the apathetic, in which the white-maintained services and institutions on which its citizens were induced to rely have been replaced by third-world versions. The illusion of easy money holds up until the system is challenged, and then its fundamental bankruptcy is laid bare, but there is no one left who cares.

    http://www.amerika.org/politics/the-great-houston-flood-of-2016-and-the-consequences-of-minority-rule/

  44. @Dutch Boy
    The diverse local politicians of Houston ignored the Republican governor's recommendation that people evacuate and told them to shelter in place instead. How's that working out?

    Replies: @Ed, @Forbes, @TheBoom, @anon

    Is it too much to imagine that 16 years after 9/11 or 12 years after Katrina that states and cities have disaster preparedness plans? I.e. contingency plans regarding evacuation and/or shelter in-place, and the resources (materiel, personnel, logistics, staging areas) to carry out either or any such plans.

    At the least, the governor and mayor should not be supplying conflicting/contradictory orders or recommendations. It’s not as if severe rainfall and flooding is foreign to Houston and south Texas.

  45. @JerryC
    @Alec Leamas

    They evacuated for Hurricane Rita in 2005 and it didn't go well. That probably had a lot to do with the decision to not issue an evacuation order.

    Replies: @Rod1963, @Forbes

    Did it ever occur to the authorities to plan and practice for such a event? No!

    Apparently we have become so incompetent as a people we’re not even capable of planning for emergencies.

    Which means you’re on your own. If you live in a flood plain or concrete jungle and have elderly or small children. You pack up your belongings and leave no matter what some idiot mayor says.

    Especially when the governor is basically screaming at people to GTFO.

    It’s not hard either. You grab your kids, clothes and important items, lock up the home and leave ASAP, do not wait until the last minute. You get out of the danger zone. And yeah if you have kids or elderly, you don’t take chances, you leave. Or you end up like those fools in the shelters with nothing.

    Which brings me to the next point. If you live in a zone where natural disasters occur, prepare for them. Doubly so if you live in a city because they become death traps once the power goes out and traffic clogs up the roads.

    Have a evac pack of supplies and gear to last you at least 96 hours. Such a pack can be put together cheaply. If you can afford a Ipod or Cell phone you can afford to have emergency supplies.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    @Rod1963

    They were too busy partying in Paris to worry about things that have happened before:

    https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/partying-in-paris-instead-preparing-in-houston/

  46. @Dutch Boy
    The diverse local politicians of Houston ignored the Republican governor's recommendation that people evacuate and told them to shelter in place instead. How's that working out?

    Replies: @Ed, @Forbes, @TheBoom, @anon

    The only thing we know for sure is that it is Trump’s fault.

  47. Anonymous [AKA "U R Fowl"] says:
    @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    1) The original post has nothing do with PC. 2) This isn’t a grammatically correct sentence or even a coherent thought. 3) Not going to read your external link, tiny… ahem… [duck].

  48. @JerryC
    @Alec Leamas

    They evacuated for Hurricane Rita in 2005 and it didn't go well. That probably had a lot to do with the decision to not issue an evacuation order.

    Replies: @Rod1963, @Forbes

    I think that’s called making the perfect the enemy of the good.

    Leaving thousands (100s of thousands) at risk because, in 2005, an evacuation bus caught fire and killed 23 nursing home evacuees–a freak, though tragic incident–is the height of ignorance in the face of the known flooding that will occur with measured and anticipated rainfall.

  49. Yep.

    Sound environmentalism is one of the best reasons to oppose mass immigration, anything goes development.

    Here on the SS of Chicago, by the Lake – Liberals have torn down all the high rise public housing and basically ethnically/class cleansed poor Black AA off our beautiful lakefront. Most all the outdoor basketball courts have been taken down, replaced by prairie restoration projects with bogs for flood control.

    Got to love the green bigots who prefer nature to destructive humans.

    • Replies: @MadDog
    @jack ryan

    I live in Chicago and love the area by the zoo. It is beautiful. The prairie grass and wild flowers.

  50. Houston has been swamped by mass immigration. Houston has allowed sprawl to pave over wetlands and other natural areas. Houston sits on red clay soil that doesn’t drain well. Houston is a real estate boom disaster and a cheap labor boom disaster and a mass immigration boom disaster.

    The Wall Street Journal had this succinct bit on Monday:

    Houston’s geography and historically lax building regulations have made the city more prone to flooding, experts say. The city is low-lying, with soil composed mainly of clay, which drains slowly. Houston’s rapid expansion over the years has increased the risk of flooding as wetlands and prairie have been paved over. Its drainage system is antiquated.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/rescue-efforts-tax-houston-area-emergency-resources-1503880588

    Emmylou Harris sings Red Dirt Girl. Texas and Alabama have red dirt belts. Red dirt means clay. Houston sits on clay:

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Charles Pewitt

    Is clay soil actually good for any sort of farming? I'm guessing a "Red Dirt Girl" is by definition sort of "the back of the tracks " .

  51. Can’t there be zoning requirements to put Houston houses on 20 foot stilts? Underneath can be garages housing undocumented landscape workers who get swept away every ten years by floods.

    • LOL: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @jack ryan

    Houston has no zoning. It's part of its charm.

    , @EdwardM
    @jack ryan

    Like the Bolivar Peninsula across the channel from Galveston. Miles and miles of houses on stilts like this: https://disastersafety.org/fortified/safer-living/.

    Funny to see.

  52. Off topic or maybe on topic:

    Richard Florida finally realized his theories of urban development were bullshit

    If you live in an urban center in North America, the United Kingdom, or Australia, you are living in Richard Florida’s world. Fifteen years ago, he argued that an influx of what he called the “creative classes” — artists, hipsters, tech workers — were sparking economic growth in places like the Bay Area. Their tolerance, flexibility, and eccentricity dissolved the rigid structures of industrial production and replaced them with the kinds of workplaces and neighborhoods that attracted more young people and, importantly, more investment.

    His observations quickly formed the basis of a set of breezy technical solutions. If decaying cities wanted to survive, they had to open cool bars, shabby-chic coffee shops, and art venues that attract young, educated, and tolerant residents. Eventually, the mysterious alchemy of the creative economy would build a new and prosperous urban core.

    Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes. The problems that once plagued inner cities have moved to the suburbs.

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/08/starbucks-is-not-answer.html?m=1

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @27 year old

    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn't make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @A1

    , @Wilkey
    @27 year old

    "Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes."

    This isn't in any way shocking. I remember reading a decade or so ago, after some jobs data was released showing a very unhip, heavily black Southern city doing well in job growth, Florida protesting that most of the jobs were crappy, low skill jobs. Yes, even people in unhip, poorly educated cities need jobs, and those jobs aren't going to be in rocket surgery.

    The problem with Florida's ideas was that they placed the interests of the city, as an entity, above the interests of its residents. In Florida's moral universe it would be perfectly acceptable for a city to double its per capita income by kicking out the current population and replacing it with people who earn twice as much. Great for the reputation of the city, but doesn't do much for the people who lived there.

    That's not to say that none of what Florida said wasn't true. It's more to say that what was true ain't new and what was new ain't true. The idea that bringing intelligent people to a city can boost its economic vitality? Well go figure. Or that tolerance is good for a city, too? No flippin way! But there is a very simple way to measure tolerance that's been around for ages. It's called the crime rate. That explains the difference between, say, Detroit and Salt Lake. From a legal perspective gays didn't have any more rights in Salt Lake than in Detroit - maybe less. Salt Lake was still the far more tolerant in the way that mattered most, and economically it has zoomed past Detroit.

    Replies: @27 year old

  53. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    Spectacular insight, champ

  54. @Alfa158
    @AnotherDad

    Not sure Washington DC area would work, you need somewhere with a police force that is not hostile to you. Otherwise the police simply look the other way while you are assaulted, then arrest you for defending yourself. See:
    - Charlottesville, VA.
    - Hospital scene in Godfather I.
    The best bet is more rural red state areas in which the police are more poorly paid. In large cities police are looking at being able to retire at 50 with six figure pensions, full free benefits for the lives of them and their spouses, plus cost of living increases.
    Someone else looked up the police officers in San Jose who enabled the SJW attacks on Trump supporter last year. In California the pay off all public employees is required to be available on-line. Some of those cops, not commanding officers but street cops in patrol cars, made $300,000 with overtime in 2015. With that at stake, no matter how much an individual cop might secretly sympathize with you, they will follow any orders whatsoever to make sure they don't jeopardize the jackpot. If they are ordered to load you into railroad cars travelling in an easterly direction, they will do it.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @mad anthony, @Rod1963

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white. Don’t expect to see an aftermath that resembles Katrina in any way whatsoever, except in some areas on the North side.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @mad anthony


    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white
     
    According to the US Census, Houston has not been majority white since 2010.

    Today, it's barely one-quarter white.

    https://statisticalatlas.com/place/Texas/Houston/Race-and-Ethnicity

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    , @AnotherDad
    @mad anthony


    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white.
     
    Anthony, while your point about the Houstonians higher competence level rings true, this bit is not.

    Houston is only a bit more black than national, and maybe 50% more Asian but it is considerably more --2.5x--Hispanic and/or mestizo than the nation. Non-Hispanic whites are now < 30% of even Harris county, not to mention Houston, while they are still 62% of the nation and just under 50% of American births.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harris_County,_Texas#Demographics
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston#Demographics
  55. @27 year old
    Off topic or maybe on topic:

    Richard Florida finally realized his theories of urban development were bullshit


    If you live in an urban center in North America, the United Kingdom, or Australia, you are living in Richard Florida’s world. Fifteen years ago, he argued that an influx of what he called the “creative classes” — artists, hipsters, tech workers — were sparking economic growth in places like the Bay Area. Their tolerance, flexibility, and eccentricity dissolved the rigid structures of industrial production and replaced them with the kinds of workplaces and neighborhoods that attracted more young people and, importantly, more investment.

    His observations quickly formed the basis of a set of breezy technical solutions. If decaying cities wanted to survive, they had to open cool bars, shabby-chic coffee shops, and art venues that attract young, educated, and tolerant residents. Eventually, the mysterious alchemy of the creative economy would build a new and prosperous urban core.

    Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes. The problems that once plagued inner cities have moved to the suburbs.

     

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/08/starbucks-is-not-answer.html?m=1

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Wilkey

    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn’t make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Dave Pinsen


    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn’t make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.
     
    Florida is a Cargo-Cultist.

    I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women.

    It's probably a bonus that young straight men don't need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.

    Replies: @Forbes, @AB-

    , @A1
    @Dave Pinsen

    Agree. Cause and effect and reversible or irreversible processes. I mean art and such make for a nicer place but they don't mean much in the way of economic development. Funny how Florida always focuses on the arts never sports as everyone knows economics of sport are dodgy at best.

    Scale and diversity are the other two concepts Florida gets wrong. Scale screws up development and cities as the increased specialisation is not great to live around. Yes a neighbourhood pub is great, as maybe are two but who wants to live near a bar strip?

    Diversity is another one - yes some diversity is good but can there be too much? What is needed is diversity of thought and product not necessarily ethnic diversity. For example the above mentioned bar strip will function better with a bunch of different types of bars and restaurants, with different offerings and different price points etc. Guys like Florida associate diversity with variety but this is not always the case as you can get mono though within an ethnic group.

  56. @Paul Mendez
    @Alfa158

    No need for cops.

    I set a date & general geographic location for dinner.

    You must be an iSteve commenter with at least 1 year of activity to request an invite. You create a temporary email and post it under your usual iSteve pseudonym in a special thread Steve creates. Your previous posts are vetted to weed out trolls.

    At the very last moment, I email you details. Restaurant reservation name is something secret and mundane so SJWs can't call around looking for us.

    Any further security suggestions?

    PS: Jared Taylor is hosting an AmRen BBQ this month at his home near DC and isn't afraid to publicize the date or his address.

    Replies: @Milo Minderbinder

    I would be interested in attending such a dinner in the Philadelphia/Tri-State/PA/NJ/DE area.

  57. @Cwhatfuture
    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don't see this as something they "take out", as if they magically don't use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage - nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant - including payment on the national and state debts - but it never is made.

    Replies: @Clyde, @CJ, @DodgUSA24, @Anonym, @Bill Jones

    And no one ever counts infrastructure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don’t see this as something they “take out”, as if they magically don’t use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    And schools, hospitals, parks, pools, DMVs and a bunch of other things. So strong agreement, but my AGREE button isn’t active.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @CJ


    And schools, hospitals, parks, pools, DMVs and a bunch of other things
     
    The rejoinder from our (evil) doppelgangers is that immigrants are going to fix our roads; shore up our levees; staff our schools, etc.

    Akin to claiming more bodies in the lifeboat is a good thing, because now there are more hands to bail water.
  58. @Alfa158
    @AnotherDad

    Not sure Washington DC area would work, you need somewhere with a police force that is not hostile to you. Otherwise the police simply look the other way while you are assaulted, then arrest you for defending yourself. See:
    - Charlottesville, VA.
    - Hospital scene in Godfather I.
    The best bet is more rural red state areas in which the police are more poorly paid. In large cities police are looking at being able to retire at 50 with six figure pensions, full free benefits for the lives of them and their spouses, plus cost of living increases.
    Someone else looked up the police officers in San Jose who enabled the SJW attacks on Trump supporter last year. In California the pay off all public employees is required to be available on-line. Some of those cops, not commanding officers but street cops in patrol cars, made $300,000 with overtime in 2015. With that at stake, no matter how much an individual cop might secretly sympathize with you, they will follow any orders whatsoever to make sure they don't jeopardize the jackpot. If they are ordered to load you into railroad cars travelling in an easterly direction, they will do it.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @mad anthony, @Rod1963

    Yep, police are not our friends or protectors.

    And they aren’t going to shoot it out with bad guys or us either. Too much to lose.

    I remember the King Riots in LA, when they were going down the LAPD and Sheriffs vanished. I lived some 70 miles outside the riot area and you couldn’t even find cops where I was.

    They were gone. The only thing I saw were car loads of cholos and dindus cruising in areas they usually never went. It was the only time I ever carried.

    The point is when things go pear shaped in a city the police will vanish. Especially if the gangs come out, given they are the principal gun owners in most cities. The cops have no problem confronting a couple armed goons, but several hundred to several thousand? No. They aren’t soldiers, they are over paid clerks.

    All those “cosmic” or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.

    Consider this. Most police don’t live in the cities they guard. They live in the suburbs or even semi-rural areas. They have no skin in the game if the city goes up in flames. Most know that our major cities, if they ever break down will descend into murder and mayhem quite rapidly and being out numbered 10,000 to 1 makes it a suicide option to maintain order.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Rod1963

    And don't forget, in a SHTF situation police officers are going to stay home to protect their own families and property, as would any normal person.

    , @anonguy
    @Rod1963


    All those “cosmic” or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.
     
    More hysteria. In truth, our underclass, like the rest of the millenials, ain't what it used to be in terms of aggressiveness, violence, and mayhem.

    They are, relatively, as lazy, feminized (this is a good thing if you support feminism), self-esteemed, obese, and pharma-ed out as the rest of the population and don't have the energy/conviction/desperation for 1992 LA in them again.

    Which is good, since their opponents, the police, as you note, don't either. We'll all just go home and couch out, watch it all on the net.

    This isn't my opinion, is actually fact.

    This civil war is going to be determined by the amount of likes, clicks, eyeballs, shares rather than by carnage,for the most part.

  59. @Dave Pinsen
    @27 year old

    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn't make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @A1

    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn’t make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.

    Florida is a Cargo-Cultist.

    I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women.

    It’s probably a bonus that young straight men don’t need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    It’s probably a bonus that young straight men don’t need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.
     
    Other than NYC (possibly living near the loop in Chicago), can you get away without owning a car in any large American city?

    Doesn't seem likely.

    Replies: @Marty T, @Marat Said

    , @AB-
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    "I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women."

    After the gays chase most of the feral minorities out of a soon to be desirable neighborhood, the straight guys are the next to show up. Not having kids or being femail, they can live in a somewhat sketchy 'hood.

    The straight womyn find the 'hood when they start dating the straight guys; but they live in a 'safe' place and only visit while dating.

    It's only after the formerly feral neighborhood is completely pacified do the womyn start living there. At least as pacified as you can get in an urban environment. The feral ones are still able to travel into it.

    If you get married couples with kids, it's primetime realty. Like Brooklyn.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  60. @Prof. Woland
    By restricting immigration, Donald Trump is the greatest environmentalist President the United States has ever had.

    The problem with immigration / population is that this splits the left in two with SWPL on one side and ethnics on the other. To combat this schism "environmentalists" have had to develop a scotoma that prevents people from noticing anything that might allow others to exploit the rift. What was once discussed openly on the left (and right) is now verboten so we get diversity talk instead.

    To help this, the focus is now on global warming, the most abstract concept possible which allows anybody to interpret it in any way they please. The bad actors deny it. The righteous use it to virtue signal. And the new diverse Americans and their allies on the left get to pretend that their scheisse does not stink too and that it is all the fault of the bad whites who have to go to make more room for the new diverse eaters / gas emitters / and sprawlers.

    We don't need no stinking bike paths.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Great comment Professor. I had never before thought of the Global Climate Disruption(TM) as a diversion to get the attention off of the cognitive dissonance of “More people = more environmental problems, but immigration is always good, so … ohhh, my poor head, we’d better legalize THE POT protomundo!”

    VDare has written about the specifics of the Sierra Club – one of the 1st and biggest environmental organizations and their 20-years-ago decision to go for the bucks over the environment – here is Peak Stupidity’s take on the destruction of California. (also here and here.

  61. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Considering the storm is supposed to move back over the city on Wednesday, it looks like several more feet of water is still to come, and that’s going to be devastating to Houston and its businesses. Supposedly, the water flooded about 14 feet higher back in the 1930s, so the potential is there.

    Recrimination is going to destroy the mayor who decided not to evacuate, but then Sylvester Turner probably looked at what happened to his counterpart in New Orleans during Katrina, and thought it was better to let people stay. But people who are trapped in their houses and unable to get food and potable water are not going to forgive Turner. People who could have driven out and preserved their car will now lose their car as well as their house, which is a greater financial disaster.

    It’s beginning to be obvious that Republican state officials decided beforehand to let the Democratic city of Houston go hang. Houston’s now 75% non-white and it votes strongly Democratic. This event will tend to push Houston voters into thinking that Democrats can’t run things, which is certainly something Republicans will benefit from. I also note that the Corp of Engineers wasn’t letting out water from the dams earliers, despite having a good three days’ warning before the hurricane hit. This would have given the dams more capacity to take on the excess flow coming in. Now, they’re in risk of having breaches or being overtopped.

    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    @Anon


    It’s beginning to be obvious that Republican state officials decided beforehand to let the Democratic city of Houston go hang. Houston’s now 75% non-white and it votes strongly Democratic. This event will tend to push Houston voters into thinking that Democrats can’t run things, which is certainly something Republicans will benefit from. I also note that the Corp of Engineers wasn’t letting out water from the dams earliers, despite having a good three days’ warning before the hurricane hit. This would have given the dams more capacity to take on the excess flow coming in. Now, they’re in risk of having breaches or being overtopped.
     
    Are you nuts? Other than maybe evacuate the city, what the heck else do you think anyone can do in this situation? It's been amply discussed on this an other threads what the state of development is in the Houston area, how much is covered in non-draining concrete, etc.

    This is a situation where there is absolutely nothing to do really until it quits raining. You might want to do lots, but there is nothing you can do besides provide emergency personnel.

    Anything that could be done, should have been done decades ago, and would involve a paradigm shift.

    As for the dams, gee show me some calculations that say these dams can spill water faster than it is building up at this point. Or that doing as you say would have made much difference. Seems like peeing on a bonfire. Whatever their design features I'm fairly sure they are outside of their design parameters at this point.

    Regardless of your politics, or who is in office there is basically nothing these guys can really do at this stage.

    As an aside, you commonly hear lot of incredible numbers that get floated about dollar amounts of damage when something like this happens. If it is as widespread as is being reported, it is probably going to be an incredible hit to the insurance industry, or basically Uncle Sam since he is the guy who underwrites Flood Insurance in the end.

    Maybe it was on this board, but I think a saw one estimate it could be incredibly high. High enough to rate with the cost of the Afghan War.
  62. I see you have met Mr. Invite The World, how about Invite’s evil twin Invade?

    The trillions of $$$ spent in Iraqistan might have bought some flood control, or perhaps instead of building the cheapest housing possible, Houston could have built high rise housing leaving more Bayou untouched to absorb water. Houston might have been able to entertain Mr Invite, or Mr Invade, but not both at the same time.

    BTW the recent V-22 crash is a reminder that maybe every V-22 should be parked in a desert until the aerodynamics are understood well enough to fly them safely.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @George

    That was the best part about "Transformers III:" the U.S. military attacks the Bad Transforming Robots with their own V-22 transformers, which prove about as fragile as you'd expect.

  63. “Why Houston Flooding Isn’t a Sign of Climate Change”

    “Water levels were 16 feet higher in the flood of 1935”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/08/28/why-houston-flooding-isnt-a-sign-of-climate-change/

  64. @Cwhatfuture
    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don't see this as something they "take out", as if they magically don't use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage - nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant - including payment on the national and state debts - but it never is made.

    Replies: @Clyde, @CJ, @DodgUSA24, @Anonym, @Bill Jones

    Excellent comment, Cwhatfuture.

    It saddens me to think back to a movie like Bad News Bears 2 where they show Houston as an all-American city. Houston is now a multi-cultural hellhole with some balkanized areas of pre-1965 Americans.

    I used to make fun of liberal cities like S.F. for using environmental law to restrict development. But the joke is on the red state cities like Houston. By completely opening up to any kind of development, Houston has been swamped with a massive non-American population. I don’t see a way back. SAD.

  65. Texans love their cheap labor. Keep importing it.

  66. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @AB-
    Another big factor was the monster HIGH pressure over the southwest. This was the same HIGH that has been cooking Kali for the last 4 days; 109 in the Bay Area!!!

    The HIGH blocked the westward, inland, storm track a hurricane normally follows. Once it gets over land, no water to suck up and it dies. But the HIGH has kept the storm over the Gulf and it's raining like it's the Bible.

    So it was just a 'perfect' storm to get this amount of rain and flooding.

    OT I wonder how Tiny Dick is able to resolve the fact that a country, founded and run by white guys, is also the country every dirt colored bugger is trying to get to. They wouldn't be trying to get here if they thought the same way as Tiny Dick; that the US is a hellhole....

    Replies: @anonymous

    Saw an illustration of that high pressure dome on the telly last night. You are quite correct. It has effectively blocked Harvey from moving much of anywhere. And since the water is warm and it has nowhere to go, it just sucks up more Gulf water and deposits it on SE Texas. And since it can’t go inland very far it can’t break down. A “perfect storm”, similar to Sandi which featured a three-in-one parlay including a hurricane, a nor’easter and a full moon, which blended into a lethal brew.

  67. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    Whaa???

    Time for your meds, TD.

  68. @Alec Leamas
    Two words people who make love to SCIENCE have never heard of: impervious surface.

    The other meme going around in support of Houston's very diverse mayor's non-evacuation order is "do you know how hard it is to evacuate a City?" But I imagine Houston's spread and sprawl and highways would make evacuating low lying areas in Houston a different and more achievable exercise than evacuating a centrally dense City like New Orleans.

    Replies: @JerryC, @Kit, @Sammler

    Houston is literally an order of magnitude larger than New Orleans.

  69. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    I got chills reading that. Woke as f#*k!

  70. I guess I am not the only one who “hates humans” now; shame on you, Mr. Sailer, for also understanding mathematics.

  71. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Prof. Woland
    By restricting immigration, Donald Trump is the greatest environmentalist President the United States has ever had.

    The problem with immigration / population is that this splits the left in two with SWPL on one side and ethnics on the other. To combat this schism "environmentalists" have had to develop a scotoma that prevents people from noticing anything that might allow others to exploit the rift. What was once discussed openly on the left (and right) is now verboten so we get diversity talk instead.

    To help this, the focus is now on global warming, the most abstract concept possible which allows anybody to interpret it in any way they please. The bad actors deny it. The righteous use it to virtue signal. And the new diverse Americans and their allies on the left get to pretend that their scheisse does not stink too and that it is all the fault of the bad whites who have to go to make more room for the new diverse eaters / gas emitters / and sprawlers.

    We don't need no stinking bike paths.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    It splits the left because the left’s SWPLs and wealthy elites are adherents of right wing illiberal economics. They want a servant class but they don’t want development and growth which serve as economic competition and threaten their status. Environmentalism serves this economics by maintaining the scarcity of current assets and inhibiting development. The right can’t exploit split because it’s the party of liberal economics.

  72. @Diversity Heretic
    Yet one more example, as if any more were necessary, that a United States that had limited itself to natural population increase in 1965 and consisted of perhaps 220-225 million people, would be eminently more livable than what exists today.

    Replies: @Ragno, @Father O'Hara, @europeasant

    Sshhhh!

    No one’s supposed to ever say that!

  73. This event will tend to push Houston voters into thinking that Democrats can’t run things, which is certainly something Republicans will benefit from.

    This never happens. Your cynicism has not caught up with reality yet.

  74. The appeal of Houston comes from their low cost of living combined with high wages. In fact, Houston probably has the highest average wages -to- cost of living ratio in the country. Pretty much the exact inverse of say, Miami. As an example, this bears out on the Federal Employee GS schedule, which varies by locality based upon what private industry supposedly pays in the area. Houston has the third highest locality pay, behind only San Francisco and New York.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    In the early 20th Century, British foreign office employees posted to the Houston consulate were give the same tropical bonus pay as employees posted to Lagos.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @anonguy
    @Hapalong Cassidy


    The appeal of Houston comes from their low cost of living combined with high wages. In fact, Houston probably has the highest average wages -to- cost of living ratio in the country.
     
    Exactly. Houston has been an engine of growth, progress, prosperity, and civilization if you take out the moaning by white revanchists here. The equivalent is Detroit in its 20s-50s glory days, nobody cared about some indians moaning about the fishing spots they lost.

    You'd think the "traditional Americans" would be proud of the progress they've bequeathed to the rest of the world in the example of Houston. But no, all I keep hearing about is Shakespeare or something.

    Houston is a triumph of Western Civ, guys, a beacon for the rest of the world to strive towards to fulfill their dreams.

    How is this bad? Because all of you wanted to move someday to some antiquated anglo white redneck dustly little texas town if things had gone your way and Houston had "stayed the same"? You gotta be f*cking kidding me.
  75. @Cwhatfuture
    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don't see this as something they "take out", as if they magically don't use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage - nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant - including payment on the national and state debts - but it never is made.

    Replies: @Clyde, @CJ, @DodgUSA24, @Anonym, @Bill Jones

    But Steve, the houses were rotting in the lumber yards!

  76. Finally someone comes out and says it: all white people are racist; so, give us money.

    https://wearyourvoicemag.com/identities/race/name-iconic-duo-white-feminism-white-liberalism

  77. Wiki says Harris County had 32k Vietnamese in 2005. That number is ridiculously out of date. The Vietnamese, more than any other group, are the World Champions at chain migration. They’ll eventually be running the place.

  78. @Cwhatfuture
    It is apparent to anyone with eyes that our infrastructure is not keeping up with our population growth.

    And no one ever counts infrastrucure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don't see this as something they "take out", as if they magically don't use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    Crowded roads, dirty cities, packed airports, overwhelmed drainage - nothing considered as a cost they impose upon us.

    An overhead calculation should be made for every immigrant - including payment on the national and state debts - but it never is made.

    Replies: @Clyde, @CJ, @DodgUSA24, @Anonym, @Bill Jones

    Why spend any money on US infrastucture when you can spend a trillion dolllars a year destroying that of other countries?

  79. +1 on the Comment Section Meetups.

    This is one reason why I respectfully asked Mr. Unz in a previous thread to consider implementing a Direct Message function on the comment system. Easier than posting all that info publicly.

    Off Topic: The SJWs are intending to weaponize the tax code

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/29/opinion/white-supremacists-tax-exemptions.html

    Wait a minute, I thought this guy sounded familiar…. aha!

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-explains-why-the-sailer-strategy-worked/#comment-1704105

    “Law professor” must once have been a respectable profession, before it was totally corrupted…

  80. @27 year old
    Off topic or maybe on topic:

    Richard Florida finally realized his theories of urban development were bullshit


    If you live in an urban center in North America, the United Kingdom, or Australia, you are living in Richard Florida’s world. Fifteen years ago, he argued that an influx of what he called the “creative classes” — artists, hipsters, tech workers — were sparking economic growth in places like the Bay Area. Their tolerance, flexibility, and eccentricity dissolved the rigid structures of industrial production and replaced them with the kinds of workplaces and neighborhoods that attracted more young people and, importantly, more investment.

    His observations quickly formed the basis of a set of breezy technical solutions. If decaying cities wanted to survive, they had to open cool bars, shabby-chic coffee shops, and art venues that attract young, educated, and tolerant residents. Eventually, the mysterious alchemy of the creative economy would build a new and prosperous urban core.

    Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes. The problems that once plagued inner cities have moved to the suburbs.

     

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/08/starbucks-is-not-answer.html?m=1

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Wilkey

    “Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes.”

    This isn’t in any way shocking. I remember reading a decade or so ago, after some jobs data was released showing a very unhip, heavily black Southern city doing well in job growth, Florida protesting that most of the jobs were crappy, low skill jobs. Yes, even people in unhip, poorly educated cities need jobs, and those jobs aren’t going to be in rocket surgery.

    The problem with Florida’s ideas was that they placed the interests of the city, as an entity, above the interests of its residents. In Florida’s moral universe it would be perfectly acceptable for a city to double its per capita income by kicking out the current population and replacing it with people who earn twice as much. Great for the reputation of the city, but doesn’t do much for the people who lived there.

    That’s not to say that none of what Florida said wasn’t true. It’s more to say that what was true ain’t new and what was new ain’t true. The idea that bringing intelligent people to a city can boost its economic vitality? Well go figure. Or that tolerance is good for a city, too? No flippin way! But there is a very simple way to measure tolerance that’s been around for ages. It’s called the crime rate. That explains the difference between, say, Detroit and Salt Lake. From a legal perspective gays didn’t have any more rights in Salt Lake than in Detroit – maybe less. Salt Lake was still the far more tolerant in the way that mattered most, and economically it has zoomed past Detroit.

    • Replies: @27 year old
    @Wilkey


    The problem with Florida’s ideas was that they placed the interests of the city, as an entity, above the interests of its residents.
     
    That's a classic example of a feature not a bug
  81. @Anon
    Considering the storm is supposed to move back over the city on Wednesday, it looks like several more feet of water is still to come, and that's going to be devastating to Houston and its businesses. Supposedly, the water flooded about 14 feet higher back in the 1930s, so the potential is there.

    Recrimination is going to destroy the mayor who decided not to evacuate, but then Sylvester Turner probably looked at what happened to his counterpart in New Orleans during Katrina, and thought it was better to let people stay. But people who are trapped in their houses and unable to get food and potable water are not going to forgive Turner. People who could have driven out and preserved their car will now lose their car as well as their house, which is a greater financial disaster.

    It's beginning to be obvious that Republican state officials decided beforehand to let the Democratic city of Houston go hang. Houston's now 75% non-white and it votes strongly Democratic. This event will tend to push Houston voters into thinking that Democrats can't run things, which is certainly something Republicans will benefit from. I also note that the Corp of Engineers wasn't letting out water from the dams earliers, despite having a good three days' warning before the hurricane hit. This would have given the dams more capacity to take on the excess flow coming in. Now, they're in risk of having breaches or being overtopped.

    Replies: @Sunbeam

    It’s beginning to be obvious that Republican state officials decided beforehand to let the Democratic city of Houston go hang. Houston’s now 75% non-white and it votes strongly Democratic. This event will tend to push Houston voters into thinking that Democrats can’t run things, which is certainly something Republicans will benefit from. I also note that the Corp of Engineers wasn’t letting out water from the dams earliers, despite having a good three days’ warning before the hurricane hit. This would have given the dams more capacity to take on the excess flow coming in. Now, they’re in risk of having breaches or being overtopped.

    Are you nuts? Other than maybe evacuate the city, what the heck else do you think anyone can do in this situation? It’s been amply discussed on this an other threads what the state of development is in the Houston area, how much is covered in non-draining concrete, etc.

    This is a situation where there is absolutely nothing to do really until it quits raining. You might want to do lots, but there is nothing you can do besides provide emergency personnel.

    Anything that could be done, should have been done decades ago, and would involve a paradigm shift.

    As for the dams, gee show me some calculations that say these dams can spill water faster than it is building up at this point. Or that doing as you say would have made much difference. Seems like peeing on a bonfire. Whatever their design features I’m fairly sure they are outside of their design parameters at this point.

    Regardless of your politics, or who is in office there is basically nothing these guys can really do at this stage.

    As an aside, you commonly hear lot of incredible numbers that get floated about dollar amounts of damage when something like this happens. If it is as widespread as is being reported, it is probably going to be an incredible hit to the insurance industry, or basically Uncle Sam since he is the guy who underwrites Flood Insurance in the end.

    Maybe it was on this board, but I think a saw one estimate it could be incredibly high. High enough to rate with the cost of the Afghan War.

  82. @Dave Pinsen
    @27 year old

    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn't make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @A1

    Agree. Cause and effect and reversible or irreversible processes. I mean art and such make for a nicer place but they don’t mean much in the way of economic development. Funny how Florida always focuses on the arts never sports as everyone knows economics of sport are dodgy at best.

    Scale and diversity are the other two concepts Florida gets wrong. Scale screws up development and cities as the increased specialisation is not great to live around. Yes a neighbourhood pub is great, as maybe are two but who wants to live near a bar strip?

    Diversity is another one – yes some diversity is good but can there be too much? What is needed is diversity of thought and product not necessarily ethnic diversity. For example the above mentioned bar strip will function better with a bunch of different types of bars and restaurants, with different offerings and different price points etc. Guys like Florida associate diversity with variety but this is not always the case as you can get mono though within an ethnic group.

  83. @Paul Mendez
    OT:

    Would anyone be interested in an iSteve Fan dinner in the Washington DC area if it could be organized with airtight security?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Gman, @Jim Don Bob

    10 or 15 of us Haven Monahans got together at a bar in Tysons a few years ago to drink and talk all things Steve. There have been no midnight knocks at my door. So far.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Jim Don Bob

    If you have the time, mind sending me any tips on how you organized the event at Tysons?

    mendezp2014 AT gmail DOT com

    Thanks!

  84. @Joe Stalin
    @AnotherDad

    How about the "First meeting of the iSteve Military Arms Fan Club. Show & Tell. Bring your favorite arms." Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.

    Not a bad idea. NRA HQ is just outside DC near the intersection of I66 and Route 50. They have a great indoor range. Saw a guy fire a Thompson sub-machine there once. Guy went through probably $100 of ammo is less than 10 seconds, but it was awesome.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Jim Don Bob

    My vision is this: in the 1990s a guy shot a biker dude with his full-auto Mini-14GB .223 in self-defense. The biker dude's buddies showed up outside the business where the guy was employed. Understandably, the employees were not too happy being surrounded by bikers. The employees armed themselves with MP-5 sub-machine guns. How did they do that you ask?

    The guy worked at Heckler & Koch.

  85. @jack ryan
    Can't there be zoning requirements to put Houston houses on 20 foot stilts? Underneath can be garages housing undocumented landscape workers who get swept away every ten years by floods.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @EdwardM

    Houston has no zoning. It’s part of its charm.

  86. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Dave Pinsen


    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn’t make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.
     
    Florida is a Cargo-Cultist.

    I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women.

    It's probably a bonus that young straight men don't need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.

    Replies: @Forbes, @AB-

    It’s probably a bonus that young straight men don’t need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.

    Other than NYC (possibly living near the loop in Chicago), can you get away without owning a car in any large American city?

    Doesn’t seem likely.

    • Replies: @Marty T
    @Forbes

    San Francisco...maybe DC?

    , @Marat Said
    @Forbes

    Boston.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  87. @Diversity Heretic
    Yet one more example, as if any more were necessary, that a United States that had limited itself to natural population increase in 1965 and consisted of perhaps 220-225 million people, would be eminently more livable than what exists today.

    Replies: @Ragno, @Father O'Hara, @europeasant

    Yeah,but Jews.

  88. @Hapalong Cassidy
    The appeal of Houston comes from their low cost of living combined with high wages. In fact, Houston probably has the highest average wages -to- cost of living ratio in the country. Pretty much the exact inverse of say, Miami. As an example, this bears out on the Federal Employee GS schedule, which varies by locality based upon what private industry supposedly pays in the area. Houston has the third highest locality pay, behind only San Francisco and New York.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonguy

    In the early 20th Century, British foreign office employees posted to the Houston consulate were give the same tropical bonus pay as employees posted to Lagos.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    My grandfather had an opportunity to transfer to the Houston area with DuPont in the 50s. He passed, at some cost to his career prospects.

    Replies: @Flip

  89. @Diversity Heretic
    Yet one more example, as if any more were necessary, that a United States that had limited itself to natural population increase in 1965 and consisted of perhaps 220-225 million people, would be eminently more livable than what exists today.

    Replies: @Ragno, @Father O'Hara, @europeasant

    I agree but someone, somewhere is hell-bent on a population increase beyond that.
    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate. That’s why ((they, whoever they are?)) will import the necessary third world peoples to continue the growth.
    We will face the consequences of that population growth at some time in the future.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @europeasant

    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate.

    What evidence or theory do you have to support this proposition?

    Replies: @europeasant

    , @Henry Bowman
    @europeasant

    Its not like 1925-1970 prove that is total crap, never mind automation.

  90. @George
    I see you have met Mr. Invite The World, how about Invite's evil twin Invade?

    The trillions of $$$ spent in Iraqistan might have bought some flood control, or perhaps instead of building the cheapest housing possible, Houston could have built high rise housing leaving more Bayou untouched to absorb water. Houston might have been able to entertain Mr Invite, or Mr Invade, but not both at the same time.

    BTW the recent V-22 crash is a reminder that maybe every V-22 should be parked in a desert until the aerodynamics are understood well enough to fly them safely.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    That was the best part about “Transformers III:” the U.S. military attacks the Bad Transforming Robots with their own V-22 transformers, which prove about as fragile as you’d expect.

  91. @Tiny Duck
    This article explains you sad people

    http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/02/23/p.c.-culture-vs.-the-big-joke

    "I'm sitting here at point of paralysis, trying to casually explain the rise of internet trolls, 4 chan, hardcore gamer culture, lulz, twitter-eggs, gamergate, pepe the frog, the alt-right, the rich asshole and how they came all crashing together in spectacular ugliness, but it's like trying to explain the mathematics of quantum mechanics (this article actually does a good job). But for the purposes of this conversation just know that all display a combo of 1) being virulently anti-PC. 2) being the kinds of people who have really sad, internal existences and internet they can be anonymous and escape into. And 3) a core philosophy that sees the value of what I will call "the big joke.""

    Replies: @fish, @William Badwhite, @Anonymous, @mad anthony, @anonymous, @Ragno, @Daniel Chieh

    What a disgusting little cuck. He should write more about self-hate, he certainly knows a lot about it.

  92. Off-topic,

    David Brooks on how “How Trump Kills the G.O.P.”

    The G.O.P. was founded to fight slavery, and through most of its history it had a decent record on civil rights. A greater percentage of congressional Republicans voted for the Civil Rights Act than Democrats.

    It’s become more of a white party in recent years, of course, and adopted some wrongheaded positions on civil rights enforcement, but it was still possible to be a Republican without feeling like you were violating basic decency on matters of race.

    Of course, the goal-posts have shifted a tad….moving from ending Jim Crow to asserting that massive levels of non-European immigration to the USA is a basic human right….

    Between 1984 and 2003 I worked at National Review, The Washington Times, the Wall Street Journal editorial page and The Weekly Standard. Most of my friends were Republicans.

    In that time, I never heard blatantly racist comments at dinner parties, and there were probably fewer than a dozen times I heard some veiled comment that could have suggested racism. To be honest, I heard more racial condescension in progressive circles than in conservative ones.

    DR3 boilerplate…..

    Recent surveys suggest that roughly 47 percent of Republicans are what you might call conservative universalists and maybe 40 percent are what you might call conservative white identitarians.

    “Conservative universalism” is an oxymoron, Dave. Conservativism is about the local and the particular.Try reading some Edmund Burke sometime….Or maybe just talking to some of your Israeli friends…..

    White universalists believe in conservative principles and think they apply to all people and their white identity is not particularly salient to them. White identitarians are conservative, but their white identity is quite important to them, sometimes even more important than their conservatism.

    So, “White universalists” basically have no identity…..Rather makes me wonder what Mr Brooks thinks about “Jewish universalists”…….You know, what with him having a son serving in the Israeli military….

    These white identitarians have taken the multicultural worldview taught in schools, universities and the culture and, rightly or wrongly, have applied it to themselves. As Marxism saw history through the lens of class conflict, multiculturalism sees history through the lens of racial conflict and group oppression.

    Sounds rather like how Zionists view the world……

    <blockquote>But three things are clear: First, identity politics on the right is at least as corrosive as identity politics on the left, probably more so. If you reduce the complex array of identities that make up a human being into one crude ethno-political category, you’re going to do violence to yourself and everything around you.

    I’m guessing that we’re supposed to understand that there’s an implicit asterisk here….*None of this applies to Israel…..

    Second, it is wrong to try to make a parallel between Black Lives Matter and White Lives Matter. To pretend that these tendencies are somehow comparable is to ignore American history and current realities.

    “Current realities” …….You mean the ones where someone who argues for an end to non-European immigration risks being fired from his job?

    Third, white identity politics as it plays out in the political arena is completely noxious.

    But Black and Latinx and Muslim identity politics are totally kosher…..

    And this is where the dissolution of the G.O.P. comes in. Conservative universalists are coming to realize their party has become a vehicle for white identity and racial conflict. This faction is prior to and deeper than Trump.

    What I’m saying here is that we need to have a GOP that’s only concerned with tax-cuts for big biz and massive levels of military spending….plus maybe token noises about being anti-abortion (gotta toss those Christian rubes in the sticks a bone)

    When you have an intraparty fight about foreign or domestic issues, you think your rivals are wrong. When you have an intraparty fight on race, you think your rivals are disgusting.

    That’s why I can’t be friends with someone who wants open borders for Israel…..

    It may someday be possible to reduce the influence of white identity politics,

    But Remember, Dave Brooks is a friend to the POC (at least the ones outside of Israel)….So POC Identity Politics are A-OK….

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/29/opinion/trump-identity-politics.html

  93. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Dave Pinsen


    Steve pointed out years ago that Florida confused cause with effect. The artists didn’t make Houston rich; energy sector engineers and businessmen did. Rich Houston attracted the artists.
     
    Florida is a Cargo-Cultist.

    I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women.

    It's probably a bonus that young straight men don't need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.

    Replies: @Forbes, @AB-

    “I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women.”

    After the gays chase most of the feral minorities out of a soon to be desirable neighborhood, the straight guys are the next to show up. Not having kids or being femail, they can live in a somewhat sketchy ‘hood.

    The straight womyn find the ‘hood when they start dating the straight guys; but they live in a ‘safe’ place and only visit while dating.

    It’s only after the formerly feral neighborhood is completely pacified do the womyn start living there. At least as pacified as you can get in an urban environment. The feral ones are still able to travel into it.

    If you get married couples with kids, it’s primetime realty. Like Brooklyn.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AB-

    The ultimate nirvana of gentrification is neighborhoods populated by white families with children, and the children walk to their neighborhood public schools.

    It would be interesting to measure how often gentrification has actually proceeded that far. Perhaps in Park Slope in Brooklyn?

    Replies: @Desiderius

  94. I don’t doubt the negative commentary about Houston’s “diversity”, but I have to say the area is coming off very well in the news coverage. Houstonians – victims and rescuers alike, and including all races – seem to be about as level-headed and calm on average as one could expect in the circumstances. Perhaps it’s selective coverage, but the people of the area seem like a reasonably sensible, prosperous bunch with a lot on the ball. They seem, on camera at least, nice, and their homes and neighborhoods look comfortable. I haven’t heard reports of looting, and there is a minimum of helpless wailing and omnidirectional anger. The contrast with New Orleans after Katrina is stark.

    One difference is that most people with any financial or intellectual wherewithal left NO, so we saw only the lowest end of society. Houston was not evacuated, so we’re seeing a broader cross-section of a larger and more prosperous metropolitan area. Also, heavily wooded sprawl looks better in a flood than a dirty, crowded city. In that sense, it’s not really a fair comparison – but the comparison will be made, and Houston will come out much better. Compared to New Orleans, Houston looks like paradise … a very wet paradise at the moment, of course.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SteveO

    Like Barbara Bush implied after Katrina, Houston is a better culture and economy for blacks than New Orleans.

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans' hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @AM

    , @Joe Schmoe
    @SteveO


    The contrast with New Orleans after Katrina is stark.
     
    The competent people didn't leave Houston because there weren't evacuation orders. The normal people were still there. In Katrina, competent people left.
  95. Slate is saying that this means we need more immigration because of the supposed labor shortage:

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2017/08/28/houston_might_not_have_enough_construction_workers_to_rebuild_after_harvey.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @t


    Slate is saying...
     
    Using the usual crappy stats and analysis.

    We built and moved tremendous things 120 years ago with horses and simple tools, and a lot fewer people.
  96. @AB-
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    "I think there may be something to the idea that gentrifying gays attract young straight women to an area, which in turn attracts young straight men and so forth. But there has to be some excess production/disposable income to dispose of on trendy consumer goods and food/drink while chasing the young straight women."

    After the gays chase most of the feral minorities out of a soon to be desirable neighborhood, the straight guys are the next to show up. Not having kids or being femail, they can live in a somewhat sketchy 'hood.

    The straight womyn find the 'hood when they start dating the straight guys; but they live in a 'safe' place and only visit while dating.

    It's only after the formerly feral neighborhood is completely pacified do the womyn start living there. At least as pacified as you can get in an urban environment. The feral ones are still able to travel into it.

    If you get married couples with kids, it's primetime realty. Like Brooklyn.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The ultimate nirvana of gentrification is neighborhoods populated by white families with children, and the children walk to their neighborhood public schools.

    It would be interesting to measure how often gentrification has actually proceeded that far. Perhaps in Park Slope in Brooklyn?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.

    Replies: @syonredux

  97. @SteveO
    I don't doubt the negative commentary about Houston's "diversity", but I have to say the area is coming off very well in the news coverage. Houstonians - victims and rescuers alike, and including all races - seem to be about as level-headed and calm on average as one could expect in the circumstances. Perhaps it's selective coverage, but the people of the area seem like a reasonably sensible, prosperous bunch with a lot on the ball. They seem, on camera at least, nice, and their homes and neighborhoods look comfortable. I haven't heard reports of looting, and there is a minimum of helpless wailing and omnidirectional anger. The contrast with New Orleans after Katrina is stark.

    One difference is that most people with any financial or intellectual wherewithal left NO, so we saw only the lowest end of society. Houston was not evacuated, so we're seeing a broader cross-section of a larger and more prosperous metropolitan area. Also, heavily wooded sprawl looks better in a flood than a dirty, crowded city. In that sense, it's not really a fair comparison - but the comparison will be made, and Houston will come out much better. Compared to New Orleans, Houston looks like paradise ... a very wet paradise at the moment, of course.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Schmoe

    Like Barbara Bush implied after Katrina, Houston is a better culture and economy for blacks than New Orleans.

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans’ hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer


    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans’ hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.
     
    It's not bad if you've got a trust-fund, though.....
    , @AM
    @Steve Sailer


    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans’ hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.
     
    Very much agreed. Blacks do better in respectability based cultures. Catholics have those, but Protestants are far more consistent in producing them.
  98. @CJ
    @Cwhatfuture

    And no one ever counts infrastructure pressure in the calculation of immigrant costs because you don’t see this as something they “take out”, as if they magically don’t use existing roads, existing drains, existing airports.

    And schools, hospitals, parks, pools, DMVs and a bunch of other things. So strong agreement, but my AGREE button isn't active.

    Replies: @bomag

    And schools, hospitals, parks, pools, DMVs and a bunch of other things

    The rejoinder from our (evil) doppelgangers is that immigrants are going to fix our roads; shore up our levees; staff our schools, etc.

    Akin to claiming more bodies in the lifeboat is a good thing, because now there are more hands to bail water.

  99. @europeasant
    @Diversity Heretic

    I agree but someone, somewhere is hell-bent on a population increase beyond that.
    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate. That's why ((they, whoever they are?)) will import the necessary third world peoples to continue the growth.
    We will face the consequences of that population growth at some time in the future.

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Henry Bowman

    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate.

    What evidence or theory do you have to support this proposition?

    • Replies: @europeasant
    @Opinionator

    I was watching TV one late nite and the St Louis Fed guy was talking. He said that if the population does not grow at a certain rate then the USA will not be able to meet certain payments and would rigger
    new rounds of tax/cost increases.
    I have not been able to find that video. Seems maybe history is being scrubbed, ALA 1984?
    Look at what happened during the housing/mortgage crisis in 2008. There were quite a few people who were very worried.
    We live in interesting times.
    Old people like me don't care but young people will be impacted, especially the ones who are accustomed to a soft lifestyle.

  100. @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    10 or 15 of us Haven Monahans got together at a bar in Tysons a few years ago to drink and talk all things Steve. There have been no midnight knocks at my door. So far.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    If you have the time, mind sending me any tips on how you organized the event at Tysons?

    mendezp2014 AT gmail DOT com

    Thanks!

  101. @Wilkey
    @27 year old

    "Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes."

    This isn't in any way shocking. I remember reading a decade or so ago, after some jobs data was released showing a very unhip, heavily black Southern city doing well in job growth, Florida protesting that most of the jobs were crappy, low skill jobs. Yes, even people in unhip, poorly educated cities need jobs, and those jobs aren't going to be in rocket surgery.

    The problem with Florida's ideas was that they placed the interests of the city, as an entity, above the interests of its residents. In Florida's moral universe it would be perfectly acceptable for a city to double its per capita income by kicking out the current population and replacing it with people who earn twice as much. Great for the reputation of the city, but doesn't do much for the people who lived there.

    That's not to say that none of what Florida said wasn't true. It's more to say that what was true ain't new and what was new ain't true. The idea that bringing intelligent people to a city can boost its economic vitality? Well go figure. Or that tolerance is good for a city, too? No flippin way! But there is a very simple way to measure tolerance that's been around for ages. It's called the crime rate. That explains the difference between, say, Detroit and Salt Lake. From a legal perspective gays didn't have any more rights in Salt Lake than in Detroit - maybe less. Salt Lake was still the far more tolerant in the way that mattered most, and economically it has zoomed past Detroit.

    Replies: @27 year old

    The problem with Florida’s ideas was that they placed the interests of the city, as an entity, above the interests of its residents.

    That’s a classic example of a feature not a bug

  102. @t
    Slate is saying that this means we need more immigration because of the supposed labor shortage:

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2017/08/28/houston_might_not_have_enough_construction_workers_to_rebuild_after_harvey.

    Replies: @bomag

    Slate is saying…

    Using the usual crappy stats and analysis.

    We built and moved tremendous things 120 years ago with horses and simple tools, and a lot fewer people.

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    In the early 20th Century, British foreign office employees posted to the Houston consulate were give the same tropical bonus pay as employees posted to Lagos.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    My grandfather had an opportunity to transfer to the Houston area with DuPont in the 50s. He passed, at some cost to his career prospects.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Desiderius

    Howard Hughes was from there but didn't stay. He called it a "pestilential swamp."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  104. @Steve Sailer
    @AB-

    The ultimate nirvana of gentrification is neighborhoods populated by white families with children, and the children walk to their neighborhood public schools.

    It would be interesting to measure how often gentrification has actually proceeded that far. Perhaps in Park Slope in Brooklyn?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Desiderius


    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.
     
    Not the first wave, true. White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they've secured the beaches....

    Replies: @AM

  105. @mad anthony
    @Alfa158

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It's still majority white. Don't expect to see an aftermath that resembles Katrina in any way whatsoever, except in some areas on the North side.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @AnotherDad

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white

    According to the US Census, Houston has not been majority white since 2010.

    Today, it’s barely one-quarter white.

    https://statisticalatlas.com/place/Texas/Houston/Race-and-Ethnicity

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
    @Paul Mendez

    Within the city of Houston are small overwhelmingly white cities such as Piney Point Village, Hunter's Creek Village, Hedwig Village, Spring Valley, Bunker Hill Village, Hillshire Village, West University, Bellaire, Southside Place. As cities, they have their own police, fire and city government. These cities are enclaves within the city limits of Houston. They are not suburbs. They are close in to town.

  106. @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.

    Not the first wave, true. White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they’ve secured the beaches….

    • Replies: @AM
    @syonredux


    White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they’ve secured the beaches….
     
    Only if they're diluted and only if housing prices come down (or go up) to those attractive for families.

    Open homosexuality pretending to play house is brand new. Homosexual areas in IRL, for most of time, were seedy red light type districts.

    If there were gay men gentrifying an area in the past, it was because they had a family, however reluctantly.

    Replies: @AB-

  107. @Steve Sailer
    @SteveO

    Like Barbara Bush implied after Katrina, Houston is a better culture and economy for blacks than New Orleans.

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans' hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @AM

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans’ hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    It’s not bad if you’ve got a trust-fund, though…..

  108. @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    My grandfather had an opportunity to transfer to the Houston area with DuPont in the 50s. He passed, at some cost to his career prospects.

    Replies: @Flip

    Howard Hughes was from there but didn’t stay. He called it a “pestilential swamp.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Flip

    Air conditioning was a vast blessing to Houston.

    That's a theme in Tom Wolfe's "The Right Stuff." Everyplace the astronauts go is "air-conditioned Texas-style: that is, to within an inch of your life." The Mercury astronauts are always developing cricks in their necks from the ferocious air-conditioning.

  109. @Flip
    @Desiderius

    Howard Hughes was from there but didn't stay. He called it a "pestilential swamp."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Air conditioning was a vast blessing to Houston.

    That’s a theme in Tom Wolfe’s “The Right Stuff.” Everyplace the astronauts go is “air-conditioned Texas-style: that is, to within an inch of your life.” The Mercury astronauts are always developing cricks in their necks from the ferocious air-conditioning.

  110. Apres nous, le deluge.

  111. @Anonymous
    British TV news is *obsessed* with the Houston floods, to the point of saturation coverage, (no pun intended). Seemingly half the program is devoted to Houston.
    400 odd Africans being buried alive in a land slip in Sierra Leone, the other week, barely raised a mention on UK TV news.
    Similarly, any sort of natural disaster in continental Europe, although only a couple of hours' flying time from the UK, would only get a cursory mention.
    In the same vein, the fisticuffs at Charlottesville or the Michael Brown brouhaha are shouting-screaming jobs for the UK news media.

    My personal observation is that, in the UK, at line at least, a manic, obsessive preoccupation with America and all things American - this includes the most obsequious mimicry - for example, Tony Blair and New Labour, as well as the BBC and The Economist, is the real hallmark of a second-rate mind.

    Replies: @Anon

    Their can’t talk about their own disasters because most of them are either Muslim-created or would implicate their own liberal politicians in mass stupidity.

  112. @Jim Don Bob
    @Joe Stalin


    Maybe the NRA could rent you some space in their HQ.
     
    Not a bad idea. NRA HQ is just outside DC near the intersection of I66 and Route 50. They have a great indoor range. Saw a guy fire a Thompson sub-machine there once. Guy went through probably $100 of ammo is less than 10 seconds, but it was awesome.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    My vision is this: in the 1990s a guy shot a biker dude with his full-auto Mini-14GB .223 in self-defense. The biker dude’s buddies showed up outside the business where the guy was employed. Understandably, the employees were not too happy being surrounded by bikers. The employees armed themselves with MP-5 sub-machine guns. How did they do that you ask?

    The guy worked at Heckler & Koch.

  113. I have an answer to Houston’s overpopulation problem.
    Start digging ditches and Deep Tunnels.
    This will momentarily give people something to do and
    maybe fix the flooding problems.
    Where will the money come from?
    Same place as everwaz!

  114. @syonredux
    @Desiderius


    Uh, Steve, most white gentrifiers are not the childbearing kind, if you get my meaning.
     
    Not the first wave, true. White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they've secured the beaches....

    Replies: @AM

    White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they’ve secured the beaches….

    Only if they’re diluted and only if housing prices come down (or go up) to those attractive for families.

    Open homosexuality pretending to play house is brand new. Homosexual areas in IRL, for most of time, were seedy red light type districts.

    If there were gay men gentrifying an area in the past, it was because they had a family, however reluctantly.

    • Replies: @AB-
    @AM

    "Open homosexuality pretending to play house is brand new.

    If there were gay men gentrifying an area in the past, it was because they had a family, however reluctantly."

    SF was probably the biggest episode of gays taking over minority 'hoods. I imagine NYC, LA, Chicago among others had it happen too.

    Not having wives or kids, the crappy schools weren't a concern; being guys, they had a better chance of fighting off the feral locals. But getting a home downtown, without paying downtown prices was the big attraction.

    It's like Steve says, the minorities in 50 years will be amazed where grandma used to live....

  115. @Steve Sailer
    @SteveO

    Like Barbara Bush implied after Katrina, Houston is a better culture and economy for blacks than New Orleans.

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans' hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @AM

    As I got so much outrage for pointing out, New Orleans’ hedonistic let the good times roll culture is especially bad for blacks.

    Very much agreed. Blacks do better in respectability based cultures. Catholics have those, but Protestants are far more consistent in producing them.

  116. @jack ryan
    Yep.

    Sound environmentalism is one of the best reasons to oppose mass immigration, anything goes development.

    Here on the SS of Chicago, by the Lake - Liberals have torn down all the high rise public housing and basically ethnically/class cleansed poor Black AA off our beautiful lakefront. Most all the outdoor basketball courts have been taken down, replaced by prairie restoration projects with bogs for flood control.

    Got to love the green bigots who prefer nature to destructive humans.

    Replies: @MadDog

    I live in Chicago and love the area by the zoo. It is beautiful. The prairie grass and wild flowers.

  117. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Dutch Boy
    The diverse local politicians of Houston ignored the Republican governor's recommendation that people evacuate and told them to shelter in place instead. How's that working out?

    Replies: @Ed, @Forbes, @TheBoom, @anon

    No one in the Houston area (conservatives and Republicans included) is saying this. That is because there are “costs” and feasibility issues in evacuating 6 million plus people.

    I was in Houston in 2005 during the Rita scare (one month after Katrina) where the metropolis tried a mass evacuation. It was absolute chaos with all outbound highways at a standstill. Cars moving basically nowhere for 20+ hours. Cars dying or running out of gas clogging the road, health emergencies with no way for EMS to react, people/families taking shits on the side of the road, etc etc.

    Gov. Abbott was playing dirty cuckservative politics– he gets to look good if disaster strikes, his tweet recommendation is forgotten if nothing happened.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    @anon


    Gov. Abbott was playing dirty cuckservative politics– he gets to look good if disaster strikes, his tweet recommendation is forgotten if nothing happened.
     
    I think you have the wrong view of Abbott. He is definitely not a cuckservative and you sound like a moron.
  118. @Forbes
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    It’s probably a bonus that young straight men don’t need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.
     
    Other than NYC (possibly living near the loop in Chicago), can you get away without owning a car in any large American city?

    Doesn't seem likely.

    Replies: @Marty T, @Marat Said

    San Francisco…maybe DC?

  119. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Prof. Woland
    By restricting immigration, Donald Trump is the greatest environmentalist President the United States has ever had.

    The problem with immigration / population is that this splits the left in two with SWPL on one side and ethnics on the other. To combat this schism "environmentalists" have had to develop a scotoma that prevents people from noticing anything that might allow others to exploit the rift. What was once discussed openly on the left (and right) is now verboten so we get diversity talk instead.

    To help this, the focus is now on global warming, the most abstract concept possible which allows anybody to interpret it in any way they please. The bad actors deny it. The righteous use it to virtue signal. And the new diverse Americans and their allies on the left get to pretend that their scheisse does not stink too and that it is all the fault of the bad whites who have to go to make more room for the new diverse eaters / gas emitters / and sprawlers.

    We don't need no stinking bike paths.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    I was surprised to see that Ms. Hynde fille seems to have a somewhat rational view of The Donald:

    Odd, because mumsy blasted him pretty bad during a recent show opening up for Stevie Nicks.
    Can’t find the video just yet.

  120. In Katrina, the problem was flooding not the hurricane storm itself.

    In Harvey, the problem was flooding not the hurricane storm itself.

    In Katrina, people were told to evacuate, and competent people did.

    In Harvey, people were told not to evacuate, and the competent people didn’t.

    In Katrina, there were needy but very few competent helpers.

    In Harvey, there were needy and all the competent people were still in the area to act as helpers.

  121. @Opinionator
    @europeasant

    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate.

    What evidence or theory do you have to support this proposition?

    Replies: @europeasant

    I was watching TV one late nite and the St Louis Fed guy was talking. He said that if the population does not grow at a certain rate then the USA will not be able to meet certain payments and would rigger
    new rounds of tax/cost increases.
    I have not been able to find that video. Seems maybe history is being scrubbed, ALA 1984?
    Look at what happened during the housing/mortgage crisis in 2008. There were quite a few people who were very worried.
    We live in interesting times.
    Old people like me don’t care but young people will be impacted, especially the ones who are accustomed to a soft lifestyle.

  122. @Paul Mendez
    @mad anthony


    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white
     
    According to the US Census, Houston has not been majority white since 2010.

    Today, it's barely one-quarter white.

    https://statisticalatlas.com/place/Texas/Houston/Race-and-Ethnicity

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    Within the city of Houston are small overwhelmingly white cities such as Piney Point Village, Hunter’s Creek Village, Hedwig Village, Spring Valley, Bunker Hill Village, Hillshire Village, West University, Bellaire, Southside Place. As cities, they have their own police, fire and city government. These cities are enclaves within the city limits of Houston. They are not suburbs. They are close in to town.

  123. @SteveO
    I don't doubt the negative commentary about Houston's "diversity", but I have to say the area is coming off very well in the news coverage. Houstonians - victims and rescuers alike, and including all races - seem to be about as level-headed and calm on average as one could expect in the circumstances. Perhaps it's selective coverage, but the people of the area seem like a reasonably sensible, prosperous bunch with a lot on the ball. They seem, on camera at least, nice, and their homes and neighborhoods look comfortable. I haven't heard reports of looting, and there is a minimum of helpless wailing and omnidirectional anger. The contrast with New Orleans after Katrina is stark.

    One difference is that most people with any financial or intellectual wherewithal left NO, so we saw only the lowest end of society. Houston was not evacuated, so we're seeing a broader cross-section of a larger and more prosperous metropolitan area. Also, heavily wooded sprawl looks better in a flood than a dirty, crowded city. In that sense, it's not really a fair comparison - but the comparison will be made, and Houston will come out much better. Compared to New Orleans, Houston looks like paradise ... a very wet paradise at the moment, of course.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Schmoe

    The contrast with New Orleans after Katrina is stark.

    The competent people didn’t leave Houston because there weren’t evacuation orders. The normal people were still there. In Katrina, competent people left.

  124. @AM
    @syonredux


    White Gay men are the shock troops of gentrification. Heteros come in after they’ve secured the beaches….
     
    Only if they're diluted and only if housing prices come down (or go up) to those attractive for families.

    Open homosexuality pretending to play house is brand new. Homosexual areas in IRL, for most of time, were seedy red light type districts.

    If there were gay men gentrifying an area in the past, it was because they had a family, however reluctantly.

    Replies: @AB-

    “Open homosexuality pretending to play house is brand new.

    If there were gay men gentrifying an area in the past, it was because they had a family, however reluctantly.”

    SF was probably the biggest episode of gays taking over minority ‘hoods. I imagine NYC, LA, Chicago among others had it happen too.

    Not having wives or kids, the crappy schools weren’t a concern; being guys, they had a better chance of fighting off the feral locals. But getting a home downtown, without paying downtown prices was the big attraction.

    It’s like Steve says, the minorities in 50 years will be amazed where grandma used to live….

  125. @Rod1963
    @Alfa158

    Yep, police are not our friends or protectors.

    And they aren't going to shoot it out with bad guys or us either. Too much to lose.

    I remember the King Riots in LA, when they were going down the LAPD and Sheriffs vanished. I lived some 70 miles outside the riot area and you couldn't even find cops where I was.

    They were gone. The only thing I saw were car loads of cholos and dindus cruising in areas they usually never went. It was the only time I ever carried.

    The point is when things go pear shaped in a city the police will vanish. Especially if the gangs come out, given they are the principal gun owners in most cities. The cops have no problem confronting a couple armed goons, but several hundred to several thousand? No. They aren't soldiers, they are over paid clerks.

    All those "cosmic" or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.

    Consider this. Most police don't live in the cities they guard. They live in the suburbs or even semi-rural areas. They have no skin in the game if the city goes up in flames. Most know that our major cities, if they ever break down will descend into murder and mayhem quite rapidly and being out numbered 10,000 to 1 makes it a suicide option to maintain order.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @anonguy

    And don’t forget, in a SHTF situation police officers are going to stay home to protect their own families and property, as would any normal person.

  126. @Rod1963
    @JerryC

    Did it ever occur to the authorities to plan and practice for such a event? No!

    Apparently we have become so incompetent as a people we're not even capable of planning for emergencies.

    Which means you're on your own. If you live in a flood plain or concrete jungle and have elderly or small children. You pack up your belongings and leave no matter what some idiot mayor says.

    Especially when the governor is basically screaming at people to GTFO.

    It's not hard either. You grab your kids, clothes and important items, lock up the home and leave ASAP, do not wait until the last minute. You get out of the danger zone. And yeah if you have kids or elderly, you don't take chances, you leave. Or you end up like those fools in the shelters with nothing.

    Which brings me to the next point. If you live in a zone where natural disasters occur, prepare for them. Doubly so if you live in a city because they become death traps once the power goes out and traffic clogs up the roads.

    Have a evac pack of supplies and gear to last you at least 96 hours. Such a pack can be put together cheaply. If you can afford a Ipod or Cell phone you can afford to have emergency supplies.

    Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    They were too busy partying in Paris to worry about things that have happened before:

    https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2017/08/26/partying-in-paris-instead-preparing-in-houston/

  127. @anon
    @Dutch Boy

    No one in the Houston area (conservatives and Republicans included) is saying this. That is because there are "costs" and feasibility issues in evacuating 6 million plus people.

    I was in Houston in 2005 during the Rita scare (one month after Katrina) where the metropolis tried a mass evacuation. It was absolute chaos with all outbound highways at a standstill. Cars moving basically nowhere for 20+ hours. Cars dying or running out of gas clogging the road, health emergencies with no way for EMS to react, people/families taking shits on the side of the road, etc etc.

    Gov. Abbott was playing dirty cuckservative politics-- he gets to look good if disaster strikes, his tweet recommendation is forgotten if nothing happened.

    Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    Gov. Abbott was playing dirty cuckservative politics– he gets to look good if disaster strikes, his tweet recommendation is forgotten if nothing happened.

    I think you have the wrong view of Abbott. He is definitely not a cuckservative and you sound like a moron.

  128. @Rod1963
    @Alfa158

    Yep, police are not our friends or protectors.

    And they aren't going to shoot it out with bad guys or us either. Too much to lose.

    I remember the King Riots in LA, when they were going down the LAPD and Sheriffs vanished. I lived some 70 miles outside the riot area and you couldn't even find cops where I was.

    They were gone. The only thing I saw were car loads of cholos and dindus cruising in areas they usually never went. It was the only time I ever carried.

    The point is when things go pear shaped in a city the police will vanish. Especially if the gangs come out, given they are the principal gun owners in most cities. The cops have no problem confronting a couple armed goons, but several hundred to several thousand? No. They aren't soldiers, they are over paid clerks.

    All those "cosmic" or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.

    Consider this. Most police don't live in the cities they guard. They live in the suburbs or even semi-rural areas. They have no skin in the game if the city goes up in flames. Most know that our major cities, if they ever break down will descend into murder and mayhem quite rapidly and being out numbered 10,000 to 1 makes it a suicide option to maintain order.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @anonguy

    All those “cosmic” or good whites along with those urban gentrifiers are dead meat if that happens.

    More hysteria. In truth, our underclass, like the rest of the millenials, ain’t what it used to be in terms of aggressiveness, violence, and mayhem.

    They are, relatively, as lazy, feminized (this is a good thing if you support feminism), self-esteemed, obese, and pharma-ed out as the rest of the population and don’t have the energy/conviction/desperation for 1992 LA in them again.

    Which is good, since their opponents, the police, as you note, don’t either. We’ll all just go home and couch out, watch it all on the net.

    This isn’t my opinion, is actually fact.

    This civil war is going to be determined by the amount of likes, clicks, eyeballs, shares rather than by carnage,for the most part.

  129. @Charles Pewitt
    Houston has been swamped by mass immigration. Houston has allowed sprawl to pave over wetlands and other natural areas. Houston sits on red clay soil that doesn't drain well. Houston is a real estate boom disaster and a cheap labor boom disaster and a mass immigration boom disaster.

    The Wall Street Journal had this succinct bit on Monday:

    Houston’s geography and historically lax building regulations have made the city more prone to flooding, experts say. The city is low-lying, with soil composed mainly of clay, which drains slowly. Houston’s rapid expansion over the years has increased the risk of flooding as wetlands and prairie have been paved over. Its drainage system is antiquated.

     

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/rescue-efforts-tax-houston-area-emergency-resources-1503880588

    Emmylou Harris sings Red Dirt Girl. Texas and Alabama have red dirt belts. Red dirt means clay. Houston sits on clay:


    https://youtu.be/nzwnYC_wJ1g

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Is clay soil actually good for any sort of farming? I’m guessing a “Red Dirt Girl” is by definition sort of “the back of the tracks ” .

  130. @Hapalong Cassidy
    The appeal of Houston comes from their low cost of living combined with high wages. In fact, Houston probably has the highest average wages -to- cost of living ratio in the country. Pretty much the exact inverse of say, Miami. As an example, this bears out on the Federal Employee GS schedule, which varies by locality based upon what private industry supposedly pays in the area. Houston has the third highest locality pay, behind only San Francisco and New York.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anonguy

    The appeal of Houston comes from their low cost of living combined with high wages. In fact, Houston probably has the highest average wages -to- cost of living ratio in the country.

    Exactly. Houston has been an engine of growth, progress, prosperity, and civilization if you take out the moaning by white revanchists here. The equivalent is Detroit in its 20s-50s glory days, nobody cared about some indians moaning about the fishing spots they lost.

    You’d think the “traditional Americans” would be proud of the progress they’ve bequeathed to the rest of the world in the example of Houston. But no, all I keep hearing about is Shakespeare or something.

    Houston is a triumph of Western Civ, guys, a beacon for the rest of the world to strive towards to fulfill their dreams.

    How is this bad? Because all of you wanted to move someday to some antiquated anglo white redneck dustly little texas town if things had gone your way and Houston had “stayed the same”? You gotta be f*cking kidding me.

  131. @europeasant
    @Diversity Heretic

    I agree but someone, somewhere is hell-bent on a population increase beyond that.
    The US economy cannot survive a stagnant population growth rate. That's why ((they, whoever they are?)) will import the necessary third world peoples to continue the growth.
    We will face the consequences of that population growth at some time in the future.

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Henry Bowman

    Its not like 1925-1970 prove that is total crap, never mind automation.

  132. @ATX Hipster
    The media likes to run stories on Houston's diversity like this one: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-houston-diversity-2017-htmlstory.html

    The triumphalism over sticking it to those backward Texans can't be contained. From a prof at Steve's alma mater:

    “Suddenly these are 100% American kids, and they’re falling in love with each other, making multiracial babies,” Klineberg said.

    A “psychology of inevitability” begins to set in around immigration, he said — it’s happening, and it might not be a bad thing
     
    He accidentally gives the game away when he says, "Maybe I can make money off of this."

    Houston being more diverse than NYC is always held up as something to be proud of, as if good ol' boys outside the beltway are going to hear that and say, "That'll show them Yankees we ain't racist!" Harris County offering ballots in Spanish, Vietnamese, and Chinese is the result of a natural (and lucky!) process by which demographics magically change, rather than a byproduct of a deliberate attempt to elect a new people.

    Replies: @cynthia curran

    Big deal, Houston is just a cheaper version of Los Angeles. In fact on Briebart someone made a nasty remarked about Phoenix and protest against Trump. Trump had more protesters on his campaign in Houston. Harris County went about 13 percent for Clinton. As I have told Sailer many times, Harris County is not that great. Oklahoma City is actually better for white folks. Phoenix-Maricopia grew in whites only that can not be said for Houston-Harris County. The cheapest housing now for young people is actually in the plains states and not the south. Oklahoma is not cheaper for young people than Texas is.

  133. @Forbes
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    It’s probably a bonus that young straight men don’t need cars in cities to showcase their fitness while chasing young straight women.
     
    Other than NYC (possibly living near the loop in Chicago), can you get away without owning a car in any large American city?

    Doesn't seem likely.

    Replies: @Marty T, @Marat Said

    Boston.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Marat Said

    Boston is NOT a major city in terms of size; it's a flyspeck on the likes of Houston or LA.

    You can, however, live without a car. I did it for 3 years when I lived in Brighton and worked in the Financial District.

  134. @mad anthony
    @Alfa158

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It's still majority white. Don't expect to see an aftermath that resembles Katrina in any way whatsoever, except in some areas on the North side.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @AnotherDad

    Houston is only slightly more diverse (i.e. has more nonwhites as a proportion of population) than the country in aggregate. It’s still majority white.

    Anthony, while your point about the Houstonians higher competence level rings true, this bit is not.

    Houston is only a bit more black than national, and maybe 50% more Asian but it is considerably more –2.5x–Hispanic and/or mestizo than the nation. Non-Hispanic whites are now < 30% of even Harris county, not to mention Houston, while they are still 62% of the nation and just under 50% of American births.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harris_County,_Texas#Demographics
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston#Demographics

  135. Upon completing my MBA in 2000 at the University of Florida, I received a decent job off from ExxonMobile for a position in Houston. I turned it down and landed in Kansas City instead for an enjoyable few years.

  136. @Marat Said
    @Forbes

    Boston.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Boston is NOT a major city in terms of size; it’s a flyspeck on the likes of Houston or LA.

    You can, however, live without a car. I did it for 3 years when I lived in Brighton and worked in the Financial District.

  137. @jack ryan
    Can't there be zoning requirements to put Houston houses on 20 foot stilts? Underneath can be garages housing undocumented landscape workers who get swept away every ten years by floods.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @EdwardM

    Like the Bolivar Peninsula across the channel from Galveston. Miles and miles of houses on stilts like this: https://disastersafety.org/fortified/safer-living/.

    Funny to see.

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