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From CNN:

South Korea has ‘passed the peak’ of the coronavirus outbreak, health minister hopes

By Paula Hancocks and Yoonjung Seo, CNN

Updated 10:05 PM ET, Mon March 9, 2020

Seoul, South Korea (CNN)South Korea’s top public health official hopes that the country has already gone through the worst of the novel coronavirus outbreak that has infected thousands inside the country.

“We are hoping that we have passed the peak, taking the numbers into consideration, and cautiously expecting we have passed the peak,” South Korean Health Minister Park Neunghoo said in an exclusive interview with CNN.

More than 7,300 coronavirus infections have been confirmed throughout South Korea, killing more than 50. It is one of the largest outbreaks outside mainland China, where the deadly virus was first identified. However, the number of new daily infections in South Korea has declined in recent days.

Park said that while he believes the aggregate number of infections is high, he is confident in the job South Korea did to combat the virus’ spread and would advise other governments who are dealing with outbreaks to focus efforts on early testing and global cooperation.

The South Korean government has been among the most ambitious when it comes to providing the public with free and easy testing options. It has the ability run about 15,000 diagnostic test per day and has conducted 196,000 tests to date nationwide, free of charge. Authorities in the city of Goyang even set up drive-thru testing booths.

As I mentioned last Friday, the recent stats out of Wuhan are also better than might be expected. The lesson of this news is not that we don’t have a huge problem, it’s that there appear to be solutions.

 
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  1. The drive through testing centers is an idea that I had for my city,Chicago,and state. Good to know I had a workable idea!
    Are we going to get easily available free testing? I heard Blue Cross will pay for testing. That sounds wise.
    Free,or dirt cheap,and widely available,that’s the ticket.

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Drive-through testing for small children's earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    Replies: @Anon, @MrLiberty, @SunBakedSuburb

    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    @Father O'Hara

    Just make sure the drive-through doesn't run out of chicken sandwiches. You know how south siders get when drive-throughs run out of them.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Father O'Hara

    They're working on a drive through sanitizer that disinfects you while you sit in the comfort of your automobile. They hook up a hose to your exhaust pipe and blow sanitizer/sterilizer with powerful back pressure right on through till it comes out your dash vents, fumigating your engine, the driver and all the passengers. Sort of like getting religion in one of those behemoth Texas-sized drive-in churches.

    https://www.khou.com/article/news/collin-county-pastor-launches-drive-in-church/341099714

  2. @Father O'Hara
    The drive through testing centers is an idea that I had for my city,Chicago,and state. Good to know I had a workable idea!
    Are we going to get easily available free testing? I heard Blue Cross will pay for testing. That sounds wise.
    Free,or dirt cheap,and widely available,that's the ticket.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MikeatMikedotMike, @ThreeCranes

    Drive-through testing for small children’s earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Drive-through testing for small children’s earaches would be a big help in normal times.
     
    I’ve always thought there should be two types of ENT: Pediatric ENT and normal or adult ENT. Not only do adults have to wait in a waiting room full of screaming, infectious kids, the practice itself is optimized for kids and making money of off their complaints. Adults just aren’t welcome. Charge me more, but take me seriously and get rid of the kids.
    , @MrLiberty
    @Steve Sailer

    If there were actually FREEDOM in medicine, rather than a government-protected CARTEL, all options that were financially viable and that satisfied customer needs, would indeed be available. But when a hospital has to get permission even to add one bed to its complement, or change anything it does, FREEDOM clearly does not exist. Keeping fighting against government's involvement in medicine, and good things might finally come our way.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve Sailer

    Sounds like a good revenue stream for Taco Bell.

  3. A portion of the Unz Review commenariat believes that the epidemic is a media hoax. If so, then The Atlantic is off-track because it is holding the CDC’s feet to the fire regarding inadequate testing. That demand for data is hardly consistent with a media hoax.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/03/coronavirus-testing-numbers/607714/

    • Replies: @UK
    @Bert

    They don't think it is a hoax, they just don't see the need for panic.

    The media are obviously constantly upping the sense of panic, and your link does not stand in opposition to that.

    The vast majority of people who get the Coronavirus aren't even certain they were ever ill. It just isn't very deadly and the 3% number is really 3% of those who get sick enough to get one of a very limited supply of tests.

    Replies: @Bert

    , @J.Ross
    @Bert

    I wouldn't say that it's a "hoax" (there is a virus, there are people dying, there are precautions we should participate in), but it's screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump's economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical), would you try to scare people? The Trump-hating newsmedia are the ones both betting that it's nothing and milking it to manipulate low-information voters.

    Replies: @Bert, @ThreeCranes

  4. OT: Greek-Turkish border in danger of being overrun by migrants

    Poland sent 100 police officers and Austria – 13 to help bolster
    the Greek defenses

    • Thanks: John Regan
    • Replies: @Johnny Smoggins
    @Anon 2

    They can't even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.

    Replies: @bomag, @AnotherDad

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anon 2

    Europe's treatment of Greece is just appalling.

    Show some solidarity--financially and directly with boots on the ground. All this blather about "ever closer union", but no idea what that is, how your build it.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @MBlanc46

  5. So as far as solutions go in this case, can we say that a bit of group solidarity and central control seems to be beating open borders, individualism and liberalism?

    • Agree: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @RichardTaylor


    So as far as solutions go in this case, can we say that a bit of group solidarity and central control seems to be beating open borders, individualism and liberalism?
     
    Yeah, that's true but the Interagency Group (or whomever actually controls the executive branch) will not allow that with Trump as President and we do not want that if Hillary (or Biden) is President.

    Hillary would have declared martial law weeks ago and "irredeemables" would likely be on their (our?) way to the "basket of deplorables."

    In other words, freedom is dangerous but it's a lot less dangerous than tyranny.
    , @Lockean Proviso
    @RichardTaylor

    America has responded to public health challenges in the past, such as polio, yellow fever, and typhoid fever. Liberal capitalist democracy that respects individual rights can do that without becoming a totalitarian dictatorship, but as the average IQ falls, corporate oligarchy dominates, and a culture of therapeutic gratification supersedes one of responsibility and dignity, it becomes harder. Nevertheless, it is not incompatible. Korea is not China and it is handling the outbreak well. We don't have to become boot-lickers to be effective.

  6. @Father O'Hara
    The drive through testing centers is an idea that I had for my city,Chicago,and state. Good to know I had a workable idea!
    Are we going to get easily available free testing? I heard Blue Cross will pay for testing. That sounds wise.
    Free,or dirt cheap,and widely available,that's the ticket.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MikeatMikedotMike, @ThreeCranes

    Just make sure the drive-through doesn’t run out of chicken sandwiches. You know how south siders get when drive-throughs run out of them.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Chicken-sandwiches are of special importance because chicken meat is good against the flu! - So: Extra caution will be necessary here!

  7. Anon[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Drive-through testing for small children's earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    Replies: @Anon, @MrLiberty, @SunBakedSuburb

    Drive-through testing for small children’s earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    I’ve always thought there should be two types of ENT: Pediatric ENT and normal or adult ENT. Not only do adults have to wait in a waiting room full of screaming, infectious kids, the practice itself is optimized for kids and making money of off their complaints. Adults just aren’t welcome. Charge me more, but take me seriously and get rid of the kids.

  8. The Korean fatality rate is therefore around .7%. That’s not wonderful, but it appears that Trump’s hunch was right — the fatality rate of 3+% that was being bandied about in the media was way too high.

    • Replies: @Altai
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    It's hard to judge the fatality rate til it's over. In Italy it first spread through a hospital and general practice doctor, a lot more vulnerable people were exposed. Additionally older people are a higher percentage of the population in Italy and are more socially active. One factor of protection for older people in a lot of places is that they go out less and have a lower chance of contracting the virus in the first place.

    In Korea that church was new and didn't seem to have a very old congregation.

    In the US the Kirkland nursing home being the first area for outbreak also led to much higher death rate estimates.

    In Iran I suspect much greater Friday prayer attendance by older people (And the sheer scale of mosque congregations, even at the height of religion in the West, you'd build two churches to handle the numbers they sometimes get in mosques) in the period before the spread was realised could have led to many more of them being infected as a proportion of the total. It could also just be that the outbreak is so bad that the severe cases who show up at hospital have a better chance of being tested and dying than the legion asymptomatic.

    It could also be genetic and related to variants related to IFITM genes.

    , @anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    "But again, they don't know about the easy cases because the easy cases don't go to the hospital. They don't report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases," Trump said. "So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent."
     
    Trump's hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Replies: @Charon, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Adam Smith, @Trutherator

    , @eee
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    It has a 0.7% death rate if the outbreak is handled competently and hospitals don't get overwhelmed.

    , @Twinkie
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Italy has roughly the same number of the infected, but has 5% mortality rate. Disease management policies matter.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  9. Anon[249] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The election is eons away, and anything could upend expectations, including one or all of the candidates dying from the plague. But one take that seems to be popular in the media now is that it’s curtains for Trump now that the pandemic has come and the econony is tanking.

    But here’s another side of that: Many younguns with poor taste on Twitter and elsewhere are joking (or are serious) about the idea that the older generation will be killed off, leaving the U.S. to the open borders, trans friendly socialist kids. Here’s another way it could go: Trump could highlight the glee being taking over all the dead pandemiced geezers and say that anti-senior bias is who the Democrats are. Seniors are a big block who come out and vote. My mom, who doesn’t really like Trump, but is moderate or conservative, would probably have no problem with Biden. But if she thinks her entitlements will be in danger, hello Trump second term.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Anon


    My mom, who doesn’t really like Trump, but is moderate or conservative, would probably have no problem with Biden. But if she thinks her entitlements will be in danger, hello Trump second term.
     
    Trump and Biden had better watch their step. Your mom sounds very powerful.
  10. Unfortunately for the US, the outbreak in NY continues to rage. Still unclear how it started in the Orthodox community in New Rochelle, presumably somebody visited Northern Italy but there have been a few international cases caught in much less effected places, even one of a big group of Greek tourists being infected in Israel from their tour bus driver. (This was a week or two ago too)

    If this thing breaks out in a city with a dense subway system… It still hasn’t been confirmed to be spreading much in NYC. The Israelis are clearly concerned that given the spread to other Orthodox communities through contact with New Rochelle (One case in an orthodox suburb in Kansas city, one case in Far Rockaway in NY) that Purim might have led to it spreading there. We’ll see if their two week quarantine came early enough.

  11. It’s pretty much still just like Dr. Bruce Aylward, head of WHO Covid-19-Mission to China says in his report.

    Or what James Thompson said here on his blog Psycholgical Commenter: This illness is a real-world IQ/Rationality test for governments.

    South Korea, Singapur and China seem to be quite good. Might turn out Switzerland too. Anatoly Karlin said Russia acted quite reasonably and I read lately, that Slowakia seemed to be quite prepared.

  12. @The Last Real Calvinist
    The Korean fatality rate is therefore around .7%. That's not wonderful, but it appears that Trump's hunch was right -- the fatality rate of 3+% that was being bandied about in the media was way too high.

    Replies: @Altai, @anonymous, @eee, @Twinkie

    It’s hard to judge the fatality rate til it’s over. In Italy it first spread through a hospital and general practice doctor, a lot more vulnerable people were exposed. Additionally older people are a higher percentage of the population in Italy and are more socially active. One factor of protection for older people in a lot of places is that they go out less and have a lower chance of contracting the virus in the first place.

    In Korea that church was new and didn’t seem to have a very old congregation.

    In the US the Kirkland nursing home being the first area for outbreak also led to much higher death rate estimates.

    In Iran I suspect much greater Friday prayer attendance by older people (And the sheer scale of mosque congregations, even at the height of religion in the West, you’d build two churches to handle the numbers they sometimes get in mosques) in the period before the spread was realised could have led to many more of them being infected as a proportion of the total. It could also just be that the outbreak is so bad that the severe cases who show up at hospital have a better chance of being tested and dying than the legion asymptomatic.

    It could also be genetic and related to variants related to IFITM genes.

  13. anonymous[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    The Korean fatality rate is therefore around .7%. That's not wonderful, but it appears that Trump's hunch was right -- the fatality rate of 3+% that was being bandied about in the media was way too high.

    Replies: @Altai, @anonymous, @eee, @Twinkie

    “But again, they don’t know about the easy cases because the easy cases don’t go to the hospital. They don’t report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases,” Trump said. “So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent.”

    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @anonymous


    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.
     
    Trump has never had a thought that he didn't speak out loud, usually within a second or two.
    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @anonymous


    “But again, they don’t know about the easy cases because the easy cases don’t go to the hospital. They don’t report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases,” Trump said. “So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent.”
     
    That may be the first time I've ever heard a president say something coherently numerate. He explained selection bias in plain sixth grade language.
    , @Adam Smith
    @anonymous


    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%.
     
    As preposterous as this may seem, I think his hunch is correct.

    80% of coronavirus cases show no symptoms or very mild symptoms. Some people will run off to the doctor for every little fever, sniffle or cough. Most do not. Asymptomatic people will go largely unaccounted.

    Are you going to run off to the doctor or hospital because you have a low grade fever and feel a little shitty for an evening?

    Or... Are you the sort who will take a hot shower, eat a big pot of chicken soup and go to bed early? Maybe take a day off. Drink plenty of vitamin c. etc.

    Plenty of people will get over the coronavirus by doing nothing.

    Replies: @Marquandian Hero

    , @Trutherator
    @anonymous

    I've seen articles with figures MUCH lower than that.
    You can't let the Mockingbird Media freak you out. The U.S. (& the world) will have a pandemic one of these days before the Tribulation gets here. The U. S. has a judgment thing coming, but not yet, IMO.

  14. anon[198] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    I for one welcome our new bot overlords:

    Johansson countered attacks on his methods [using a computer program to write wikipedia articles] by noting that if the bot does not write articles, “otherwise they’re mainly written by young, white, male nerds and reflect male interests.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lsjbot

    • Replies: @bomag
    @anon

    LOL, but weird that a bot has written 90% of some wiki canon. I'm wondering if it mainly translates.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @kihowi
    @anon

    I can't help but notice that Johansson is a young white nerdy man.

    His parents failed him. In the modern age, a parent's duty towards a son is to teach him that no matter what the tv says, hating people like yourself isn't cool. Because when you hate those like yourself, you hate yourself.

  15. @Anon
    OT

    The election is eons away, and anything could upend expectations, including one or all of the candidates dying from the plague. But one take that seems to be popular in the media now is that it’s curtains for Trump now that the pandemic has come and the econony is tanking.

    But here’s another side of that: Many younguns with poor taste on Twitter and elsewhere are joking (or are serious) about the idea that the older generation will be killed off, leaving the U.S. to the open borders, trans friendly socialist kids. Here’s another way it could go: Trump could highlight the glee being taking over all the dead pandemiced geezers and say that anti-senior bias is who the Democrats are. Seniors are a big block who come out and vote. My mom, who doesn’t really like Trump, but is moderate or conservative, would probably have no problem with Biden. But if she thinks her entitlements will be in danger, hello Trump second term.

    Replies: @Charon

    My mom, who doesn’t really like Trump, but is moderate or conservative, would probably have no problem with Biden. But if she thinks her entitlements will be in danger, hello Trump second term.

    Trump and Biden had better watch their step. Your mom sounds very powerful.

  16. @anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    "But again, they don't know about the easy cases because the easy cases don't go to the hospital. They don't report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases," Trump said. "So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent."
     
    Trump's hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Replies: @Charon, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Adam Smith, @Trutherator

    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Trump has never had a thought that he didn’t speak out loud, usually within a second or two.

  17. I have to say I’m shocked to hear that this is acting like another variation of Asian flu that comes along every so often and isn’t the apocalyptic pandemic the Twitter experts lead me to believe. Shocked…I tell ya’.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  18. Did the South Koreans piss away billions in medical resources for AIDs and puberty blockers?

  19. @Anon 2
    OT: Greek-Turkish border in danger of being overrun by migrants

    Poland sent 100 police officers and Austria - 13 to help bolster
    the Greek defenses

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @AnotherDad

    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Johnny Smoggins

    I'm hoping this is a temporary loss of willpower; when the West comes back to its senses, it will help if there is something remaining from which to restart.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Johnny Smoggins


    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.
     
    I'm sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Corvinus

  20. @anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    "But again, they don't know about the easy cases because the easy cases don't go to the hospital. They don't report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases," Trump said. "So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent."
     
    Trump's hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Replies: @Charon, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Adam Smith, @Trutherator

    “But again, they don’t know about the easy cases because the easy cases don’t go to the hospital. They don’t report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases,” Trump said. “So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent.”

    That may be the first time I’ve ever heard a president say something coherently numerate. He explained selection bias in plain sixth grade language.

  21. UK says:
    @Bert
    A portion of the Unz Review commenariat believes that the epidemic is a media hoax. If so, then The Atlantic is off-track because it is holding the CDC's feet to the fire regarding inadequate testing. That demand for data is hardly consistent with a media hoax.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/03/coronavirus-testing-numbers/607714/

    Replies: @UK, @J.Ross

    They don’t think it is a hoax, they just don’t see the need for panic.

    The media are obviously constantly upping the sense of panic, and your link does not stand in opposition to that.

    The vast majority of people who get the Coronavirus aren’t even certain they were ever ill. It just isn’t very deadly and the 3% number is really 3% of those who get sick enough to get one of a very limited supply of tests.

    • Replies: @Bert
    @UK

    The Atlantic article called for information, quantitative data on the rate of infection in the US, with which to decide upon the appropriate social distancing measures. Data don't spread panic, and you can't call the Atlantic dishonest for asking for it.

    Covid-19 is ten times more deadly than typical influenza and has a two or three times greater transmissibility (Ro). That combination means that if a country takes no action to slow the spread of the virus, then its health care system will be overwhelmed. The low single digit mortality rate depends on weeks of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation. When the ICU units are full, the mortality rate will increase substantially. Apparently you missed the news that this happened in Wuhan and is currently happening in Italy.

    You clearly don't understand exponential growth, what exponential expansion of the epidemic means for functioning of health care systems, and what that means for patients critically in need of medical care for other diseases. Listen to the epidemiologist on this video and learn. Don't be one of Unz's Uneducables.

    Replies: @Bert, @UK, @ken

  22. This will all blow over in a couple of weeks. Take advantage of the huge drop in air fare and get tickets for a summer vacation.

    This reminds me of that episode of South Park where one of the kids got SARS and started giving away all his possessions because he “only has 99% chance of surviving this”

    Hopefully this will teach everyone that going on cruises is for wankers.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Johnny Smoggins

    "This will all blow over in a couple of weeks."

    No. But positive thinking is helpful.

    "going on cruises is for wankers"

    Yes. I can't associate with anyone who would willingly board a cruise ship. Before COVID-19 cruise ships were infested with norovirus and morons who think cruise ships are fun. If I'm going to cruise the Caribbean it'll be on a 35 ft boat complete with scuba gear to dive on wrecks.

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins

  23. If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style….

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style…
     
    Blame Berklee College of Music:

    Berklee's Korean Legacy: How South Korean alumni became leaders in Seoul’s music industry.


    https://i.imgur.com/ZY2Xk.jpg

    It's about time Boston had a "Sound" of its own. The big Hub bands of the '70s and '80s were all led by New Yorkers or Ohioans, and the Standells of "Dirty Water" fame hailed from Los Angeles.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @The Alarmist

  24. More than fifty…lets assume 59, out of 4700 infections, is a .012% death rate. …of sick old people. no doubt.

    By dint of enormous effort the traffic fatality rate in the USA is down to something like 12 per 100,000 per year, every year.

    Get back to me when corona virus starts being as deadly as bad drivers. Or we could convulse the entire world over a virus no where near as deadly as viral pneumonia; wtf, just fly the Yellow Jack and shut the world down.

    • Replies: @anon
    @theMann

    The inequality that matters:

    Covid-19 < Lightning strikes + Dog bites + Snake bites + .....

    But Covid-19 causes recession and political change.

    Rational people we are, my foot.

  25. @MikeatMikedotMike
    @Father O'Hara

    Just make sure the drive-through doesn't run out of chicken sandwiches. You know how south siders get when drive-throughs run out of them.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Chicken-sandwiches are of special importance because chicken meat is good against the flu! – So: Extra caution will be necessary here!

  26. @Johnny Smoggins
    @Anon 2

    They can't even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.

    Replies: @bomag, @AnotherDad

    I’m hoping this is a temporary loss of willpower; when the West comes back to its senses, it will help if there is something remaining from which to restart.

  27. @anon
    OT:

    I for one welcome our new bot overlords:

    Johansson countered attacks on his methods [using a computer program to write wikipedia articles] by noting that if the bot does not write articles, "otherwise they're mainly written by young, white, male nerds and reflect male interests."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lsjbot

    Replies: @bomag, @kihowi

    LOL, but weird that a bot has written 90% of some wiki canon. I’m wondering if it mainly translates.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @bomag

    It might not be a bad thing. There might be some Cebuyan-only adolescent nerd on some island in the southern Philippines who stumbles upon the million Wikipedia articles concocted by this Swedish guy's robots and thinks: Wow, this is great!

  28. @bomag
    @anon

    LOL, but weird that a bot has written 90% of some wiki canon. I'm wondering if it mainly translates.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    It might not be a bad thing. There might be some Cebuyan-only adolescent nerd on some island in the southern Philippines who stumbles upon the million Wikipedia articles concocted by this Swedish guy’s robots and thinks: Wow, this is great!

  29. @The Last Real Calvinist
    The Korean fatality rate is therefore around .7%. That's not wonderful, but it appears that Trump's hunch was right -- the fatality rate of 3+% that was being bandied about in the media was way too high.

    Replies: @Altai, @anonymous, @eee, @Twinkie

    It has a 0.7% death rate if the outbreak is handled competently and hospitals don’t get overwhelmed.

  30. “The coronavirus panic is dumb” – Elon Musk

    • LOL: James Speaks
  31. Someone posted a link to this guy in my comments. https://wmbriggs.com/post/29734/

    A moneyball for pandemics would be a good topic I bet. Maybe instead of panic, smart white guys, who like math, could model the spread of viruses in a way that the general public can grasp.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    Right. I haven't heard yet about a Moneyball for Pandemics community of 140 IQ amateur analysts. There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Corvinus

    , @Coemgen
    @The Z Blog

    For that matter, why aren't the mass media reporting about mathematical models for the COVID-19 pandemic?

    Aren't pandemics a very well studied area of public health?

    Aren't pandemic models much more reliable than the climate models we hear so much about?

  32. Indeed good news.

    But unfortunately the minoritarianized US no longer has the sense nor capability of South Korea.

    So this will likely be worse here. (Unless there really is a strong racial element to infection rate and severity.)

    • Replies: @Old and Grumpy
    @AnotherDad

    Our other problem is we don't make antibiotics and equipment here. Domestic production just isn't efficient according to our financial wizards. I did read the South Koreans experimented with things like high dosage Vitamin C and preemptive oxygen at the early stages. Don't know if those reports are right, but can you imagine our doctors defying their insurance overlords with out of the box thinking? I can't.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  33. For the US gov, Protecting people from a deadly disease is only relevant to the extent that it impacts “the economy”. Politicians and pundits are actually being very open about this.

    Korea gov is worried about Koreans. US gov is worried about line goes up. Different domains. Different responses.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Not my economy

    Some famous economist rephrased for modern times the famous quote of President Coolidge:

    "After all, the chief business of the American people is business. They are profoundly concerned with producing, buying, selling, investing and prospering in the world."

    Thus:

    "America is an economy masquerading as a nation"

  34. @Anon 2
    OT: Greek-Turkish border in danger of being overrun by migrants

    Poland sent 100 police officers and Austria - 13 to help bolster
    the Greek defenses

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @AnotherDad

    Europe’s treatment of Greece is just appalling.

    Show some solidarity–financially and directly with boots on the ground. All this blather about “ever closer union”, but no idea what that is, how your build it.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @AnotherDad

    If ever there was a need for a "Euroarmy," the time is now!

    , @MBlanc46
    @AnotherDad

    Because when the EU vermin say “Ever closer union”, they don’t say ever closer with whom.

  35. Anon[122] • Disclaimer says:

    The solution is to “go medieval”, shut down all schools, offices, have everyone self-quarantine.

    Unfortunately that’s something libtards won’t do. These touchy-feely snowflakes could never do what is hard but necessary.

    WA’s King County just sent out a directive saying schools can only close if they can guarantee every single student has equal access to online learning, and can provide one-on-one instruction to any kid who needs it, which is ridiculous to ask of a district with 20,000+ students.

    But the message is clear: As long as there’s one student who can’t get online or get his free lunch, we should all die together.

    I guess that’s what socialism is. Equity at all cost.

    • Replies: @but an humble craftsman
    @Anon

    As long as you use "socialism" as a smear ans as a smear only, there is no way you will ever be free of the people who manipulate your country into ruin.

    (And don't take this as a defence of socialism. It's a defence of proper usage)

  36. @Johnny Smoggins
    @Anon 2

    They can't even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.

    Replies: @bomag, @AnotherDad

    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.

    I’m sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    • Replies: @Johnny Smoggins
    @AnotherDad

    Turkey needs Europe far more than Europe needs Turkey. If Europeans are such pussies that they won't physically stop this invasion they could at least put tariffs on Turkish goods, bar Turkish Airlines from flying to European cities and force (if they aren't already) Turks who want to come to Europe to go through an expensive and long process to get an EU visa. Turkey would submit in under a week.

    But of course they won't do anything about it.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @AnotherDad


    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)
     
    It is almost as if they want to eliminate the peoples of European heritage.

    It is the complete opposite of the inspirational, multi-century story of the Reconquista.
    , @Corvinus
    @AnotherDad

    "I’m sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards."

    LOL, right. Why don't you rally them? You know, lead the charge, rather than hope someone else does your dirty work.

  37. As you said …

    The lesson of this news is not that we don’t have a huge problem, it’s that there appear to be solutions.

    Early. Testing,

    Until we know who the asymptomatic carriers are, the disease will continue to spread.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @James Speaks

    The Chinese went from door to door with test kits in Wuhan.

  38. @AnotherDad
    Indeed good news.

    But unfortunately the minoritarianized US no longer has the sense nor capability of South Korea.

    So this will likely be worse here. (Unless there really is a strong racial element to infection rate and severity.)

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy

    Our other problem is we don’t make antibiotics and equipment here. Domestic production just isn’t efficient according to our financial wizards. I did read the South Koreans experimented with things like high dosage Vitamin C and preemptive oxygen at the early stages. Don’t know if those reports are right, but can you imagine our doctors defying their insurance overlords with out of the box thinking? I can’t.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Old and Grumpy

    What did the Koreans find about Vitamin C and oxygen?

    Replies: @res

  39. @The Z Blog
    Someone posted a link to this guy in my comments. https://wmbriggs.com/post/29734/

    A moneyball for pandemics would be a good topic I bet. Maybe instead of panic, smart white guys, who like math, could model the spread of viruses in a way that the general public can grasp.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Coemgen

    Right. I haven’t heard yet about a Moneyball for Pandemics community of 140 IQ amateur analysts. There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Steve Sailer

    There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.



    To borrow from Vince Lombardi "Baseball is not a matter of life and death,it's much more important than that!"

    , @Corvinus
    @Steve Sailer

    Why don't you take the lead, Mr. Sailer? I'm sure you know someone who knows someone who knows Trump. Inform him of your superior NOTICING skills and create a team of experts. Lord knows Trump needs non-swamp creatures instead of government shills. And all this time you've been cagey on his other proclivities and inclinations, so he knows you are on his side. Get gummint pay and bennies, too!

    You owe it to your nation in this time of crisis.

  40. @Old and Grumpy
    @AnotherDad

    Our other problem is we don't make antibiotics and equipment here. Domestic production just isn't efficient according to our financial wizards. I did read the South Koreans experimented with things like high dosage Vitamin C and preemptive oxygen at the early stages. Don't know if those reports are right, but can you imagine our doctors defying their insurance overlords with out of the box thinking? I can't.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    What did the Koreans find about Vitamin C and oxygen?

    • Replies: @res
    @Steve Sailer

    Here is a collection of information about vitamin C and coronavirus. Be aware that Andrew Saul is very pro-vitamin C.
    https://www.europereloaded.com/news-media-attacks-vitamin-c-treatment-of-covid-19-coronavirus-video/

    Here is an article about a single person in Korea getting better with oxygen:
    https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2020/02/14/Oxygen-therapy-working-for-coronavirus-patient-Seoul-says/6651581696794/

    A quote from the WHO:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51701039


    It urged countries to stock up on ventilators, saying "oxygen therapy is a major treatment intervention for patients with severe Covid-19".
     

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  41. @James Speaks
    As you said ...

    The lesson of this news is not that we don’t have a huge problem, it’s that there appear to be solutions.
     
    Early. Testing,

    Until we know who the asymptomatic carriers are, the disease will continue to spread.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    The Chinese went from door to door with test kits in Wuhan.

  42. @theMann
    More than fifty...lets assume 59, out of 4700 infections, is a .012% death rate. ...of sick old people. no doubt.



    By dint of enormous effort the traffic fatality rate in the USA is down to something like 12 per 100,000 per year, every year.


    Get back to me when corona virus starts being as deadly as bad drivers. Or we could convulse the entire world over a virus no where near as deadly as viral pneumonia; wtf, just fly the Yellow Jack and shut the world down.

    Replies: @anon

    The inequality that matters:

    Covid-19 < Lightning strikes + Dog bites + Snake bites + …..

    But Covid-19 causes recession and political change.

    Rational people we are, my foot.

  43. @AnotherDad
    @Anon 2

    Europe's treatment of Greece is just appalling.

    Show some solidarity--financially and directly with boots on the ground. All this blather about "ever closer union", but no idea what that is, how your build it.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @MBlanc46

    If ever there was a need for a “Euroarmy,” the time is now!

  44. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Drive-through testing for small children's earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    Replies: @Anon, @MrLiberty, @SunBakedSuburb

    If there were actually FREEDOM in medicine, rather than a government-protected CARTEL, all options that were financially viable and that satisfied customer needs, would indeed be available. But when a hospital has to get permission even to add one bed to its complement, or change anything it does, FREEDOM clearly does not exist. Keeping fighting against government’s involvement in medicine, and good things might finally come our way.

  45. @The Z Blog
    Someone posted a link to this guy in my comments. https://wmbriggs.com/post/29734/

    A moneyball for pandemics would be a good topic I bet. Maybe instead of panic, smart white guys, who like math, could model the spread of viruses in a way that the general public can grasp.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Coemgen

    For that matter, why aren’t the mass media reporting about mathematical models for the COVID-19 pandemic?

    Aren’t pandemics a very well studied area of public health?

    Aren’t pandemic models much more reliable than the climate models we hear so much about?

  46. @RichardTaylor
    So as far as solutions go in this case, can we say that a bit of group solidarity and central control seems to be beating open borders, individualism and liberalism?

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Lockean Proviso

    So as far as solutions go in this case, can we say that a bit of group solidarity and central control seems to be beating open borders, individualism and liberalism?

    Yeah, that’s true but the Interagency Group (or whomever actually controls the executive branch) will not allow that with Trump as President and we do not want that if Hillary (or Biden) is President.

    Hillary would have declared martial law weeks ago and “irredeemables” would likely be on their (our?) way to the “basket of deplorables.”

    In other words, freedom is dangerous but it’s a lot less dangerous than tyranny.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    Drive-through testing for small children's earaches would be a big help in normal times.

    Replies: @Anon, @MrLiberty, @SunBakedSuburb

    Sounds like a good revenue stream for Taco Bell.

  48. @Johnny Smoggins
    This will all blow over in a couple of weeks. Take advantage of the huge drop in air fare and get tickets for a summer vacation.

    This reminds me of that episode of South Park where one of the kids got SARS and started giving away all his possessions because he "only has 99% chance of surviving this"

    Hopefully this will teach everyone that going on cruises is for wankers.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “This will all blow over in a couple of weeks.”

    No. But positive thinking is helpful.

    “going on cruises is for wankers”

    Yes. I can’t associate with anyone who would willingly board a cruise ship. Before COVID-19 cruise ships were infested with norovirus and morons who think cruise ships are fun. If I’m going to cruise the Caribbean it’ll be on a 35 ft boat complete with scuba gear to dive on wrecks.

    • Replies: @Johnny Smoggins
    @SunBakedSuburb

    "No. But positive thinking is helpful."

    It's on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore). Yes it's going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.

    By summer we'll be down 8000 octogenarians and this will all be a (very expensive) memory.

    This is Sars version 2.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  49. China is also using a Mr. Bean lookalike called Mr. Pea to spread propaganda. Easily the weirdest thing I’ve seen since yesterday.

    https://nypost.com/2020/03/10/mr-bean-impersonator-being-used-to-praise-china-for-coronavirus-response/?fbclid=IwAR0EwC3NfUrkMVqVbxDeQikqRfHkSFRvFHNUg_FHOrki-ClpXojewB1iSQc

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @Old and Grumpy

    What did the Koreans find about Vitamin C and oxygen?

    Replies: @res

    Here is a collection of information about vitamin C and coronavirus. Be aware that Andrew Saul is very pro-vitamin C.
    https://www.europereloaded.com/news-media-attacks-vitamin-c-treatment-of-covid-19-coronavirus-video/

    Here is an article about a single person in Korea getting better with oxygen:
    https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2020/02/14/Oxygen-therapy-working-for-coronavirus-patient-Seoul-says/6651581696794/

    A quote from the WHO:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51701039

    It urged countries to stock up on ventilators, saying “oxygen therapy is a major treatment intervention for patients with severe Covid-19”.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @res

    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this. You are too smart not to. What am I talking about?


    Jeong Eun-kyeong, director of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said one of the remaining 21 COVID-19 patients in the country was still in critical condition this week. The patient's symptoms have been improving after oxygen was administered using a face mask, local news service Newsis reported.

    Jeong said the therapy raises the degree of oxygen saturation in the patient through the delivery of high concentrations of oxygen. The therapy does not require the use of a respirator, the South Korean official said.
     
    They just put an oxygen mask on a patient. That is a really, really basic intervention. Not ICU stuff. This is not a new intervention for a severe patient, they are just talking about putting an oxygen mask on a previously unmasked patient. That means a patient who was not very critical and just needs a little help. Not relevant for most severe cases. If it were really effective for most patients, they wouldn't have had such problems in Wuhan because oxygen masks are everywhere, first-line interventions for respiratory problems. Ventilators, which the WHO is recommending, are not for delivering oxygen per se, they are for delivering oxygen to patients whose lungs are not doing the inflation and gas-exchange things properly. They are not for delivering oxygen but for delivering breathing rates, various air pressure settings, etc. (Read up on ARDS--Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.) The idea that just giving someone oxygen is an overlooked simple solution is so stupid. So stupid.

    And I'm not going to bother with Vitamin C, because ditto.

    Replies: @res

  51. @Not my economy
    For the US gov, Protecting people from a deadly disease is only relevant to the extent that it impacts “the economy”. Politicians and pundits are actually being very open about this.

    Korea gov is worried about Koreans. US gov is worried about line goes up. Different domains. Different responses.

    Replies: @anon

    Some famous economist rephrased for modern times the famous quote of President Coolidge:

    “After all, the chief business of the American people is business. They are profoundly concerned with producing, buying, selling, investing and prospering in the world.”

    Thus:

    “America is an economy masquerading as a nation”

    • Agree: Bert
  52. As I mentioned last Friday, the recent stats out of Wuhan are also better than might be expected. The lesson of this news is not that we don’t have a huge problem, it’s that there appear to be solutions.

    If official reports are to be believed. Money hungry Asian countries are desperate to get back to business as usual.

  53. @anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    "But again, they don't know about the easy cases because the easy cases don't go to the hospital. They don't report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases," Trump said. "So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent."
     
    Trump's hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Replies: @Charon, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Adam Smith, @Trutherator

    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%.

    As preposterous as this may seem, I think his hunch is correct.

    80% of coronavirus cases show no symptoms or very mild symptoms. Some people will run off to the doctor for every little fever, sniffle or cough. Most do not. Asymptomatic people will go largely unaccounted.

    Are you going to run off to the doctor or hospital because you have a low grade fever and feel a little shitty for an evening?

    Or… Are you the sort who will take a hot shower, eat a big pot of chicken soup and go to bed early? Maybe take a day off. Drink plenty of vitamin c. etc.

    Plenty of people will get over the coronavirus by doing nothing.

    • Replies: @Marquandian Hero
    @Adam Smith

    Agree. He could be right.

    Unlikely, but for all I know, I had it two weeks ago (I live and work in Manhattan). I started to feel bad on Saturday night. By Sunday night was sniffling and running a low grade fever. I continued to feel bad and run a fever between 99 and 100 the next two days with sniffling/coughing. My stomach was a bit unsettled. I stayed home from work and slept most of the day Monday and Tuesday, doing a small amount of time sensitive work from home. By Wednesday I began to feel better and worked the full day from home. By Thursday morning most symptoms except for fatigue had abated completely; nonetheless, out of consideration for others and to ensure I got plenty of rest, I worked from home the rest of the week, spent the weekend resting, and came in Monday.

    Medications: orange juice, ginger ale, hot tea, plenty of food, and sleep. One ibuprofen on Wednesday when I decided the fever had continued long enough.

    I would have had to have a real, three digit fever and consistent chills, be coughing badly, and consistently feel awful to go to a doctor or the ER.

    Could have just been a bad cold, a non-vax strain of the flu, or COVID.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Adam Smith

  54. @The Last Real Calvinist
    The Korean fatality rate is therefore around .7%. That's not wonderful, but it appears that Trump's hunch was right -- the fatality rate of 3+% that was being bandied about in the media was way too high.

    Replies: @Altai, @anonymous, @eee, @Twinkie

    Italy has roughly the same number of the infected, but has 5% mortality rate. Disease management policies matter.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Twinkie


    Italy has roughly the same number of the infected, but has 5% mortality rate. Disease management policies matter.
     
    Demographics also matter.

    The demographics of where the contagion started and who/how it is being spread. And the demographics of who has actually been tested. (And hence is in the denominator of these mortality rates.)
  55. An Italian anon claims Europe is following China’s lead in messing with the count:

    https://twitter.com/IoFausto/status/1237305207576580097

    Video is in italian, so this is what he said:
    1) Germany delegate healthcare to landers.
    2) Every lander do as it like.
    3) People who die, are not registred as corona-death if they have other serious illness.
    4) They hide how many tests they did, how many people are in ICU, how many patients …

    So, this is germany: 1224 infected … just 2 deaths. WOW … best healtcare in the world …

    Or the most ridicolous liars in the world.

  56. @anon
    OT:

    I for one welcome our new bot overlords:

    Johansson countered attacks on his methods [using a computer program to write wikipedia articles] by noting that if the bot does not write articles, "otherwise they're mainly written by young, white, male nerds and reflect male interests."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lsjbot

    Replies: @bomag, @kihowi

    I can’t help but notice that Johansson is a young white nerdy man.

    His parents failed him. In the modern age, a parent’s duty towards a son is to teach him that no matter what the tv says, hating people like yourself isn’t cool. Because when you hate those like yourself, you hate yourself.

  57. @The Alarmist
    If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CH1XGdu-hzQ

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style…

    Blame Berklee College of Music:

    Berklee’s Korean Legacy: How South Korean alumni became leaders in Seoul’s music industry.


    It’s about time Boston had a “Sound” of its own. The big Hub bands of the ’70s and ’80s were all led by New Yorkers or Ohioans, and the Standells of “Dirty Water” fame hailed from Los Angeles.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Reg Cæsar

    Psy is not the K-pop star we are looking for:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR8Mrt1IpXg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhTeiaCezwM

    , @The Alarmist
    @Reg Cæsar


    It’s about time Boston had a “Sound” of its own.
     
    What about the eponymous Boston!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef65cLi1gpY

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

  58. @Bert
    A portion of the Unz Review commenariat believes that the epidemic is a media hoax. If so, then The Atlantic is off-track because it is holding the CDC's feet to the fire regarding inadequate testing. That demand for data is hardly consistent with a media hoax.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/03/coronavirus-testing-numbers/607714/

    Replies: @UK, @J.Ross

    I wouldn’t say that it’s a “hoax” (there is a virus, there are people dying, there are precautions we should participate in), but it’s screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump’s economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical), would you try to scare people? The Trump-hating newsmedia are the ones both betting that it’s nothing and milking it to manipulate low-information voters.

    • Replies: @Bert
    @J.Ross

    My post pointed out a constructive article from the Atlantic. I did not make a defense of the media in general. But I do hate Trump because he did not deliver on a border fence. He sucked the steam out of the pro-white vote. We got played by Trump, but you don't realize it.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @MBlanc46

    , @ThreeCranes
    @J.Ross


    but it’s screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump’s economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical)
     
    Agree. Exactly. Well said.
  59. @AnotherDad
    @Johnny Smoggins


    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.
     
    I'm sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Corvinus

    Turkey needs Europe far more than Europe needs Turkey. If Europeans are such pussies that they won’t physically stop this invasion they could at least put tariffs on Turkish goods, bar Turkish Airlines from flying to European cities and force (if they aren’t already) Turks who want to come to Europe to go through an expensive and long process to get an EU visa. Turkey would submit in under a week.

    But of course they won’t do anything about it.

  60. Is this the same thing? It’s definitely from the same group but this might not be the same thing as Covid-19. Emphasis added.

    In an article published in Nature Medicine1 on 9 November, scientists investigated a virus called SHC014, which is found in horseshoe bats in China. The researchers created a chimaeric virus, made up of a surface protein of SHC014 and the backbone of a SARS virus that had been adapted to grow in mice and to mimic human disease. The chimaera infected human airway cells — proving that the surface protein of SHC014 has the necessary structure to bind to a key receptor on the cells and to infect them. It also caused disease in mice, but did not kill them.

    https://www.nature.com/news/engineered-bat-virus-stirs-debate-over-risky-research-1.18787?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews

  61. @Adam Smith
    @anonymous


    Trump’s hunch is that the rate is way under 1%.
     
    As preposterous as this may seem, I think his hunch is correct.

    80% of coronavirus cases show no symptoms or very mild symptoms. Some people will run off to the doctor for every little fever, sniffle or cough. Most do not. Asymptomatic people will go largely unaccounted.

    Are you going to run off to the doctor or hospital because you have a low grade fever and feel a little shitty for an evening?

    Or... Are you the sort who will take a hot shower, eat a big pot of chicken soup and go to bed early? Maybe take a day off. Drink plenty of vitamin c. etc.

    Plenty of people will get over the coronavirus by doing nothing.

    Replies: @Marquandian Hero

    Agree. He could be right.

    Unlikely, but for all I know, I had it two weeks ago (I live and work in Manhattan). I started to feel bad on Saturday night. By Sunday night was sniffling and running a low grade fever. I continued to feel bad and run a fever between 99 and 100 the next two days with sniffling/coughing. My stomach was a bit unsettled. I stayed home from work and slept most of the day Monday and Tuesday, doing a small amount of time sensitive work from home. By Wednesday I began to feel better and worked the full day from home. By Thursday morning most symptoms except for fatigue had abated completely; nonetheless, out of consideration for others and to ensure I got plenty of rest, I worked from home the rest of the week, spent the weekend resting, and came in Monday.

    Medications: orange juice, ginger ale, hot tea, plenty of food, and sleep. One ibuprofen on Wednesday when I decided the fever had continued long enough.

    I would have had to have a real, three digit fever and consistent chills, be coughing badly, and consistently feel awful to go to a doctor or the ER.

    Could have just been a bad cold, a non-vax strain of the flu, or COVID.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Marquandian Hero

    They say if it stay in your upper respiratory tract, you should be fine.

    I have been lucky to have not had a cold that goes below a post nasal drip in 30 years. Some people just don’t get lower respiratory tract infections as often. If anyone know the genetics of it, please inform us.

    , @Adam Smith
    @Marquandian Hero

    I'm glad you're feeling better. You were smart to stay home, to get plenty of rest and to not expose others. (It really is the polite thing to do. Thank you for your courtesy.)

    Was it COVID? Probably not. (You'll never know if it was.) As you know, there are plenty of things going around in late February and early March that could cause the symptoms you described. Most likely you had a cold or the flu.

    Sodium ascorbate powder is my go to medicine. I mix about 1/8 of a teaspoon in a quart of water and drink it daily this time of year. If I feel a cold coming on the dose goes up. It seems to stop colds dead in their tracks.

    I wouldn't have seen a doctor either.

    Thanks for your comment and cheers to your health.

  62. @Twinkie
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Italy has roughly the same number of the infected, but has 5% mortality rate. Disease management policies matter.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Italy has roughly the same number of the infected, but has 5% mortality rate. Disease management policies matter.

    Demographics also matter.

    The demographics of where the contagion started and who/how it is being spread. And the demographics of who has actually been tested. (And hence is in the denominator of these mortality rates.)

  63. @UK
    @Bert

    They don't think it is a hoax, they just don't see the need for panic.

    The media are obviously constantly upping the sense of panic, and your link does not stand in opposition to that.

    The vast majority of people who get the Coronavirus aren't even certain they were ever ill. It just isn't very deadly and the 3% number is really 3% of those who get sick enough to get one of a very limited supply of tests.

    Replies: @Bert

    The Atlantic article called for information, quantitative data on the rate of infection in the US, with which to decide upon the appropriate social distancing measures. Data don’t spread panic, and you can’t call the Atlantic dishonest for asking for it.

    Covid-19 is ten times more deadly than typical influenza and has a two or three times greater transmissibility (Ro). That combination means that if a country takes no action to slow the spread of the virus, then its health care system will be overwhelmed. The low single digit mortality rate depends on weeks of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation. When the ICU units are full, the mortality rate will increase substantially. Apparently you missed the news that this happened in Wuhan and is currently happening in Italy.

    You clearly don’t understand exponential growth, what exponential expansion of the epidemic means for functioning of health care systems, and what that means for patients critically in need of medical care for other diseases. Listen to the epidemiologist on this video and learn. Don’t be one of Unz’s Uneducables.

    • Replies: @Bert
    @Bert

    For UK
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcJDpV-igjs

    , @UK
    @Bert

    You completely failed to address my point and just repeated the same nonsense. We only know how deadly this is for people who are tested and likely only a tiny and especially sick minority are tested. This means that its lethality is vastly overstated.

    For example, in China only 2.4% of cases were children. Yet about 24% of the population are children. This clearly isn't because children aren't exposed to it. They have probably been exposed to it much more. It is instead because they don't get very sick, and so they don't get tested.

    Perhaps we can very roughly estimate that people who get Coronavirus but aren't very sick are about 10 times less likely to be tested. This brings down its lethality tremendously. Indeed, you may have already had it and didn't even realise.

    Also your pointing to a single sensible article to try to argue that the media isn't tending to push a wave of panic is just so stupid.

    , @ken
    @Bert

    10x more deadly sounds horrible, but it doesn't even get you to 3%.

  64. @J.Ross
    @Bert

    I wouldn't say that it's a "hoax" (there is a virus, there are people dying, there are precautions we should participate in), but it's screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump's economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical), would you try to scare people? The Trump-hating newsmedia are the ones both betting that it's nothing and milking it to manipulate low-information voters.

    Replies: @Bert, @ThreeCranes

    My post pointed out a constructive article from the Atlantic. I did not make a defense of the media in general. But I do hate Trump because he did not deliver on a border fence. He sucked the steam out of the pro-white vote. We got played by Trump, but you don’t realize it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Bert

    Yeah, we should have voted for the people who want us to die violently, that'd really show them, plus American teenagers such as ourselves should totally get down with the hip and poppin' fresh Atlantic, because they're not "the media," and the strident meticulous concern act is totally not what they have been doing for four years every time Trump misspells a word.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Bert

    Yeah, we realize that we’ve been had. But would our situation be better had Clinton won in 2016? Will we be better off with President Biden than with another term of President Trump?

  65. @Bert
    @UK

    The Atlantic article called for information, quantitative data on the rate of infection in the US, with which to decide upon the appropriate social distancing measures. Data don't spread panic, and you can't call the Atlantic dishonest for asking for it.

    Covid-19 is ten times more deadly than typical influenza and has a two or three times greater transmissibility (Ro). That combination means that if a country takes no action to slow the spread of the virus, then its health care system will be overwhelmed. The low single digit mortality rate depends on weeks of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation. When the ICU units are full, the mortality rate will increase substantially. Apparently you missed the news that this happened in Wuhan and is currently happening in Italy.

    You clearly don't understand exponential growth, what exponential expansion of the epidemic means for functioning of health care systems, and what that means for patients critically in need of medical care for other diseases. Listen to the epidemiologist on this video and learn. Don't be one of Unz's Uneducables.

    Replies: @Bert, @UK, @ken

    For UK

  66. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style…
     
    Blame Berklee College of Music:

    Berklee's Korean Legacy: How South Korean alumni became leaders in Seoul’s music industry.


    https://i.imgur.com/ZY2Xk.jpg

    It's about time Boston had a "Sound" of its own. The big Hub bands of the '70s and '80s were all led by New Yorkers or Ohioans, and the Standells of "Dirty Water" fame hailed from Los Angeles.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @The Alarmist

    Psy is not the K-pop star we are looking for:

    • Agree: The Alarmist
  67. @AnotherDad
    @Johnny Smoggins


    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.
     
    I'm sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Corvinus

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    It is almost as if they want to eliminate the peoples of European heritage.

    It is the complete opposite of the inspirational, multi-century story of the Reconquista.

  68. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Johnny Smoggins

    "This will all blow over in a couple of weeks."

    No. But positive thinking is helpful.

    "going on cruises is for wankers"

    Yes. I can't associate with anyone who would willingly board a cruise ship. Before COVID-19 cruise ships were infested with norovirus and morons who think cruise ships are fun. If I'm going to cruise the Caribbean it'll be on a 35 ft boat complete with scuba gear to dive on wrecks.

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins

    “No. But positive thinking is helpful.”

    It’s on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore). Yes it’s going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.

    By summer we’ll be down 8000 octogenarians and this will all be a (very expensive) memory.

    This is Sars version 2.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Johnny Smoggins


    It’s on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore).
     
    It's "on the wane" in South Korea and China because Seoul and Beijing were very aggressive in dealing with it. Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan were also ahead of the curve in their responses to the virus.

    Africa is too young for it to be a serious problem. Fatalities for this virus are almost exclusively among people who are over 60, and Africa is a very young continent. Only 3 percent of Nigeria, for example, is over 65 years old. Kids are almost unaffected by it. 42 percent of Nigeria is 14 or younger. The climate in Africa (and much of South America) might also be beneficial in preventing its spread.

    Yes it’s going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.
     
    The stupidity, though, is being driven by people who don't take the virus seriously. We know how to stop it, but when you don't take it seriously enough to try and stop it, then it becomes a serious threat.

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins

  69. UK says:
    @Bert
    @UK

    The Atlantic article called for information, quantitative data on the rate of infection in the US, with which to decide upon the appropriate social distancing measures. Data don't spread panic, and you can't call the Atlantic dishonest for asking for it.

    Covid-19 is ten times more deadly than typical influenza and has a two or three times greater transmissibility (Ro). That combination means that if a country takes no action to slow the spread of the virus, then its health care system will be overwhelmed. The low single digit mortality rate depends on weeks of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation. When the ICU units are full, the mortality rate will increase substantially. Apparently you missed the news that this happened in Wuhan and is currently happening in Italy.

    You clearly don't understand exponential growth, what exponential expansion of the epidemic means for functioning of health care systems, and what that means for patients critically in need of medical care for other diseases. Listen to the epidemiologist on this video and learn. Don't be one of Unz's Uneducables.

    Replies: @Bert, @UK, @ken

    You completely failed to address my point and just repeated the same nonsense. We only know how deadly this is for people who are tested and likely only a tiny and especially sick minority are tested. This means that its lethality is vastly overstated.

    For example, in China only 2.4% of cases were children. Yet about 24% of the population are children. This clearly isn’t because children aren’t exposed to it. They have probably been exposed to it much more. It is instead because they don’t get very sick, and so they don’t get tested.

    Perhaps we can very roughly estimate that people who get Coronavirus but aren’t very sick are about 10 times less likely to be tested. This brings down its lethality tremendously. Indeed, you may have already had it and didn’t even realise.

    Also your pointing to a single sensible article to try to argue that the media isn’t tending to push a wave of panic is just so stupid.

  70. @Bert
    @J.Ross

    My post pointed out a constructive article from the Atlantic. I did not make a defense of the media in general. But I do hate Trump because he did not deliver on a border fence. He sucked the steam out of the pro-white vote. We got played by Trump, but you don't realize it.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @MBlanc46

    Yeah, we should have voted for the people who want us to die violently, that’d really show them, plus American teenagers such as ourselves should totally get down with the hip and poppin’ fresh Atlantic, because they’re not “the media,” and the strident meticulous concern act is totally not what they have been doing for four years every time Trump misspells a word.

  71. Koreans are doing it about the most optimum at the moment; benefited from key leaders who were watching China closely early on and did critical key planning to meet it when it broke into their country.

    Best to keep things in perspective; for some folks, running around with their hair on fire is kind of baked in to their personality. Most of us are on the sliding scale of laconic.

    Ok, we’ve heard the klaxon rousting us to General Quarters, and we’ve closed the watertight doors (at the individual/family level), broke out the ammo, and are at battle-stations. You have our attention. At a certain point, diminishing returns sets in, and we don’t need the klaxon to keep going. Now its time to roll up our sleeves, get down to business and do what needs to be done.

    Pres Trump is doing probably about as good as possible as a leader in a very large republic; he has other burdens he has to balance that other global leaders don’t, or that they can take easy shortcuts on. Because of that we’ll muddle through the early stages, then identify what works/what doesn’t and reinforce success. He’s an American, so he is very sensitive to concerns about civil liberty; he’s a businessman, so he knows that business generates all the key critical needs to get after the virus (testing kits, medical equipment, tools, hospital treatment space); he always has the option is his back pocket to mobilize a lot of military assets (active duty, National Guard, Reserves) to apply if needed; we have mobile surgical hospital units that can be brought online quickly if the virus pulls a Wuhan in on or more big urban centers; plus there are commercial spaces that can be quickly converted to treatment centers as needed for the MASH units. Point is, there is capacity to deal with the problem. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Italian government does something similar in Lombardy in the next 24-36 hours. If Pres Trump or one of his key subordinates gacks up a critical path, he’ll/they’ll be held accountable at the appropriate time; in the meantime, let’s stop Monday morning-quarterbacking this before its even got anywhere close to Iran/Italy serious. America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million. I’m no Isaac Newton, but I’m pretty sure that’s a low number; and plenty of State/City/local governments where the infections are occurring are taking proactive measures; and many more where there no infections are leaning forward now; in some places, I too am questioning if they are right/go far enough, but I’m not on the ground with the local health experts/community leaders to say so with any definitive assessment. In my own locality in Maryland, no infections in the county, but a handful in adjacent counties, and they are either in the hospital under observation, or under self-quarantine. I think by now no one wants to be that asshole who kept doing stuff while showing symptoms.

    What’s important to realize is…this virus really hits Grandma and Grandpa hard; most of us here and around the world really love our grandparents; they’re the key living connection to our ancestors and, even those of us who no longer have them around still fondly remember the affection and attention we got when they were. Don’t care about the Boomer vs Z vs Millenial stuff; in due time the generations coming up will be in the same spot as the Greatest/Silents/Boomers. I still think they will love and take care of their grandparents just as much as we do.

  72. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    If there is any justice, the virus will have taken out Psy before it was whipped gangnam style…
     
    Blame Berklee College of Music:

    Berklee's Korean Legacy: How South Korean alumni became leaders in Seoul’s music industry.


    https://i.imgur.com/ZY2Xk.jpg

    It's about time Boston had a "Sound" of its own. The big Hub bands of the '70s and '80s were all led by New Yorkers or Ohioans, and the Standells of "Dirty Water" fame hailed from Los Angeles.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @The Alarmist

    It’s about time Boston had a “Sound” of its own.

    What about the eponymous Boston!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    What about the eponymous Boston!
     
    That unit's CPU, Tom Scholz:

    Tom Scholz was born in Toledo, Ohio and raised in the suburb of Ottawa Hills. His father, Don Scholz, was a homebuilder who garnered considerable wealth from his designs of prefabricated luxury houses and founded Scholz Design, the forerunner of Scholz Homes Inc...

    Before his musical career, Scholz received both a bachelor's degree (1969) and a master's degree (1970) in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and worked for Polaroid Corporation as a senior product design engineer. Scholz would then reside in Boston.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Scholz#Early_life
     

    Ric Ocasek was the other successful, if more downscale, Buckeye native in Boston. Aerosmith and the J. Geils Band were fronted by New Yorkers.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    @The Alarmist

    The quintessential sound of Boston is Bill Burr talking about a Mark Wahlberg movie.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAWzxwRy4pY

  73. America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million.

    You don’t know that; stop being silly. A country that has done almost no testing has almost no knowledge.

    The fault there is not Trump’s but the CDC’s. Trump, however, will carry the can because (i) he’s their nominal boss, and (ii) he keeps saying stupid things about the threat.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @dearieme

    Expected rate of infections according to epidemiology experts:

    https://www.corriere.it/salute/malattie_infettive/20_marzo_10/coronavirus-altri-paesi-saranno-uguali-all-italia-entro-9-14-giorni-bdc1e9b2-62e5-11ea-a693-c7191bf8b498.shtml

    , @danand
    @dearieme


    “America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million.”
     
    Dearieme, hopefully the infected number is close to that low (822). Seems almost mind boggling that other nations are able to test 1,000’s every day:

    2:21 p.m. California has backlog of up to 200 tests: The state has 180-200 tests backlogged, which commercial lab Quest is going to help process, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. Testing kits do not have all of the components needed to actually complete a test, Newsom said, which is one reason why there has been confusion about how many tests are available at the federal and local level. “Testing kits are not a test,” Newsom said. “Many of these test kits are like printers but without ink.”

    2:06 p.m. California expands testing capability: The state now has 18 labs with 7,675 tests currently available, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. A 19th lab will begin testing shortly. The first commercial lab, Quest in San Juan Capistrano, began testing Monday, and has tested 100 individuals so far. In the coming weeks, that lab should have the capacity to process 1,200 tests. In addition, two other Quest labs are expected to open by roughly March 24, Newsom said. After all three Quest labs are up and running, commercial testing is expected to have the capacity to test 5,000 to 5,500 individuals per day. Two state hospitals are conducting their own tests, and more hospitals are expected to do the same. Only 800 people had been tested as of Monday.
     
  74. @Johnny Smoggins
    @SunBakedSuburb

    "No. But positive thinking is helpful."

    It's on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore). Yes it's going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.

    By summer we'll be down 8000 octogenarians and this will all be a (very expensive) memory.

    This is Sars version 2.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    It’s on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore).

    It’s “on the wane” in South Korea and China because Seoul and Beijing were very aggressive in dealing with it. Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan were also ahead of the curve in their responses to the virus.

    Africa is too young for it to be a serious problem. Fatalities for this virus are almost exclusively among people who are over 60, and Africa is a very young continent. Only 3 percent of Nigeria, for example, is over 65 years old. Kids are almost unaffected by it. 42 percent of Nigeria is 14 or younger. The climate in Africa (and much of South America) might also be beneficial in preventing its spread.

    Yes it’s going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.

    The stupidity, though, is being driven by people who don’t take the virus seriously. We know how to stop it, but when you don’t take it seriously enough to try and stop it, then it becomes a serious threat.

    • Replies: @Johnny Smoggins
    @Pincher Martin

    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can't or won't deal with it as Asian countries have.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end. You will almost certainly not catch it seriously enough to die from it and the worst case for 99% of people will be two weeks off from work at home ordering in food, shopping online and taking it easy.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  75. @Pincher Martin
    @Johnny Smoggins


    It’s on the wane in both South Korea and China and never really got off the ground in South America, Africa and SE Asia (other than Singapore).
     
    It's "on the wane" in South Korea and China because Seoul and Beijing were very aggressive in dealing with it. Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan were also ahead of the curve in their responses to the virus.

    Africa is too young for it to be a serious problem. Fatalities for this virus are almost exclusively among people who are over 60, and Africa is a very young continent. Only 3 percent of Nigeria, for example, is over 65 years old. Kids are almost unaffected by it. 42 percent of Nigeria is 14 or younger. The climate in Africa (and much of South America) might also be beneficial in preventing its spread.

    Yes it’s going to get worse, possibly much worse, in America and other western countries in the next couple weeks but that will be due to stupidity not inherent danger from the virus itself.
     
    The stupidity, though, is being driven by people who don't take the virus seriously. We know how to stop it, but when you don't take it seriously enough to try and stop it, then it becomes a serious threat.

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins

    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can’t or won’t deal with it as Asian countries have.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end. You will almost certainly not catch it seriously enough to die from it and the worst case for 99% of people will be two weeks off from work at home ordering in food, shopping online and taking it easy.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Johnny Smoggins


    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can’t or won’t deal with it as Asian countries have.
     
    What undermines your claim is that the Asian countries took it seriously. Quarantines; social distancing; face masks; plenty of testing; etc.

    They took it seriously. That's the only way to beat it.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end.
     
    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?

    One just hopes the stupid people aren't in control of the government or the CDC.

    Replies: @Lurker

  76. A little late in the game, but I guess no harm in posting this email I received from a distant acquaintance a couple of weeks back. The only item of minor interest is “preparation” item # 4 (in bold).

    “Subject: How to prevent infection w COVID19

    Dear Colleagues, as some of you may recall, when I was a professor of pathology at the University of California San Diego, I was one of the first molecular virologists in the world to work on coronaviruses (the 1970s). I was the first to demonstrate the number of genes the virus contained. Since then, I have kept up with the coronavirus field and its multiple clinical transfers into the human population (e.g., SARS, MERS), from different animal sources.

    The current projections for its expansion in the US are only probable, due to continued insufficient worldwide data, but it is most likely to be widespread in the US by mid to late March and April.

    Here is what I have done and the precautions that I take and will take. These are the same precautions I currently use during our influenza seasons, except for the mask and gloves.:
    1) NO HANDSHAKING! Use a fist bump, slight bow, elbow bump, etc.
    2) Use ONLY your knuckle to touch light switches. elevator buttons, etc.. Lift the gasoline dispenser with a paper towel or use a disposable glove.
    3) Open doors with your closed fist or hip – do not grasp the handle with your hand, unless there is no other way to open the door. Especially important on bathroom and post office/commercial doors.
    4) Use disinfectant wipes at the stores when they are available, including wiping the handle and child seat in grocery carts.
    5) Wash your hands with soap for 10-20 seconds and/or use a greater than 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer whenever you return home from ANY activity that involves locations where other people have been.
    6) Keep a bottle of sanitizer available at each of your home’s entrances. AND in your car for use after getting gas or touching other contaminated objects when you can’t immediately wash your hands.
    7) If possible, cough or sneeze into a disposable tissue and discard. Use your elbow only if you have to. The clothing on your elbow will contain infectious virus that can be passed on for up to a week or more!

    What I have stocked in preparation for the pandemic spread to the US:
    1) Latex or nitrile latex disposable gloves for use when going shopping, using the gasoline pump, and all other outside activity when you come in contact with contaminated areas.
    Note: This virus is spread in large droplets by coughing and sneezing. This means that the air will not infect you! BUT all the surfaces where these droplets land are infectious for about a week on average – everything that is associated with infected people will be contaminated and potentially infectious. The virus is on surfaces and you will not be infected unless your unprotected face is directly coughed or sneezed upon. This virus only has cell receptors for lung cells (it only infects your lungs) The only way for the virus to infect you is through your nose or mouth via your hands or an infected cough or sneeze onto or into your nose or mouth.
    2) Stock up now with disposable surgical masks and use them to prevent you from touching your nose and/or mouth (We touch our nose/mouth 90X/day without knowing it!). This is the only way this virus can infect you – it is lung-specific. The mask will not prevent the virus in a direct sneeze from getting into your nose or mouth – it is only to keep you from touching your nose or mouth.
    3) Stock up now with hand sanitizers and latex/nitrile gloves (get the appropriate sizes for your family). The hand sanitizers must be alcohol-based and greater than 60% alcohol to be effective.
    4) Stock up now with zinc lozenges. These lozenges have been proven to be effective in blocking coronavirus (and most other viruses) from multiplying in your throat and nasopharynx. Use as directed several times each day when you begin to feel ANY “cold-like” symptoms beginning. It is best to lie down and let the lozenge dissolve in the back of your throat and nasopharynx. Cold-Eeze lozenges is one brand available, but there are other brands available.

    I, as many others do, hope that this pandemic will be reasonably contained, BUT I personally do not think it will be. Humans have never seen this snake-associated virus before and have no internal defense against it. Tremendous worldwide efforts are being made to understand the molecular and clinical virology of this virus. Unbelievable molecular knowledge about the genomics, structure, and virulence of this virus has already been achieved. BUT, there will be NO drugs or vaccines available this year to protect us or limit the infection within us. Only symptomatic support is available.

    I hope these personal thoughts will be helpful during this potentially catastrophic pandemic.

    You are welcome to share this email. Good luck to all of us!”

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @danand

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a65c8cfd7ccdcd57953e228210c742e39191360252fa18f936bc8c239ade71f3.jpg

  77. @The Alarmist
    @Reg Cæsar


    It’s about time Boston had a “Sound” of its own.
     
    What about the eponymous Boston!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef65cLi1gpY

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    What about the eponymous Boston!

    That unit’s CPU, Tom Scholz:

    Tom Scholz was born in Toledo, Ohio and raised in the suburb of Ottawa Hills. His father, Don Scholz, was a homebuilder who garnered considerable wealth from his designs of prefabricated luxury houses and founded Scholz Design, the forerunner of Scholz Homes Inc…

    Before his musical career, Scholz received both a bachelor’s degree (1969) and a master’s degree (1970) in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and worked for Polaroid Corporation as a senior product design engineer. Scholz would then reside in Boston.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Scholz#Early_life

    Ric Ocasek was the other successful, if more downscale, Buckeye native in Boston. Aerosmith and the J. Geils Band were fronted by New Yorkers.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Reg Cæsar

    What's with Ohio? They gave us Chrissy Hynde of the Pretenders and most of Devo too.

  78. @The Alarmist
    @Reg Cæsar


    It’s about time Boston had a “Sound” of its own.
     
    What about the eponymous Boston!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef65cLi1gpY

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    The quintessential sound of Boston is Bill Burr talking about a Mark Wahlberg movie.

  79. @res
    @Steve Sailer

    Here is a collection of information about vitamin C and coronavirus. Be aware that Andrew Saul is very pro-vitamin C.
    https://www.europereloaded.com/news-media-attacks-vitamin-c-treatment-of-covid-19-coronavirus-video/

    Here is an article about a single person in Korea getting better with oxygen:
    https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2020/02/14/Oxygen-therapy-working-for-coronavirus-patient-Seoul-says/6651581696794/

    A quote from the WHO:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-51701039


    It urged countries to stock up on ventilators, saying "oxygen therapy is a major treatment intervention for patients with severe Covid-19".
     

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this. You are too smart not to. What am I talking about?

    Jeong Eun-kyeong, director of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said one of the remaining 21 COVID-19 patients in the country was still in critical condition this week. The patient’s symptoms have been improving after oxygen was administered using a face mask, local news service Newsis reported.

    Jeong said the therapy raises the degree of oxygen saturation in the patient through the delivery of high concentrations of oxygen. The therapy does not require the use of a respirator, the South Korean official said.

    They just put an oxygen mask on a patient. That is a really, really basic intervention. Not ICU stuff. This is not a new intervention for a severe patient, they are just talking about putting an oxygen mask on a previously unmasked patient. That means a patient who was not very critical and just needs a little help. Not relevant for most severe cases. If it were really effective for most patients, they wouldn’t have had such problems in Wuhan because oxygen masks are everywhere, first-line interventions for respiratory problems. Ventilators, which the WHO is recommending, are not for delivering oxygen per se, they are for delivering oxygen to patients whose lungs are not doing the inflation and gas-exchange things properly. They are not for delivering oxygen but for delivering breathing rates, various air pressure settings, etc. (Read up on ARDS–Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.) The idea that just giving someone oxygen is an overlooked simple solution is so stupid. So stupid.

    And I’m not going to bother with Vitamin C, because ditto.

    • Replies: @res
    @Chrisnonymous

    Feel free to post a better answer to iSteve's question.


    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this.
     
    It's pretty funny you make a comment like that after tone policing me over in AE's blog.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  80. Bernie, Biden, and Trump are in their 70’s. Corona-19 is a threat to all of these men. William Henry Harrison (Tippecanoe) died in office from pneumonia. I wonder what would happen if both Bernie and Biden both got deathly ill, would Tulsi win by default? Delegate leader (Buttigeig) win?

  81. Turkey is now shooting into Greece. The WHO reminds you that it’s not a “war” until 3,000 people are dead, and anyway, we have decided to not use the word.

  82. @Father O'Hara
    The drive through testing centers is an idea that I had for my city,Chicago,and state. Good to know I had a workable idea!
    Are we going to get easily available free testing? I heard Blue Cross will pay for testing. That sounds wise.
    Free,or dirt cheap,and widely available,that's the ticket.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MikeatMikedotMike, @ThreeCranes

    They’re working on a drive through sanitizer that disinfects you while you sit in the comfort of your automobile. They hook up a hose to your exhaust pipe and blow sanitizer/sterilizer with powerful back pressure right on through till it comes out your dash vents, fumigating your engine, the driver and all the passengers. Sort of like getting religion in one of those behemoth Texas-sized drive-in churches.

    https://www.khou.com/article/news/collin-county-pastor-launches-drive-in-church/341099714

  83. @J.Ross
    @Bert

    I wouldn't say that it's a "hoax" (there is a virus, there are people dying, there are precautions we should participate in), but it's screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump's economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical), would you try to scare people? The Trump-hating newsmedia are the ones both betting that it's nothing and milking it to manipulate low-information voters.

    Replies: @Bert, @ThreeCranes

    but it’s screamingly obvious that the same people who want open borders are happy about this and eager to see it crash Trump’s economic credibility. Their self-contradictions indict their seriousness, not ours. If you believed there was a plague going around, would you continue to advocate for free flowing cross-border traffic, would you attempt to attack quarantining (complaining, or trying to characterize it as impractical)

    Agree. Exactly. Well said.

  84. @dearieme
    America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million.

    You don't know that; stop being silly. A country that has done almost no testing has almost no knowledge.

    The fault there is not Trump's but the CDC's. Trump, however, will carry the can because (i) he's their nominal boss, and (ii) he keeps saying stupid things about the threat.

    Replies: @epebble, @danand

  85. @Johnny Smoggins
    @Pincher Martin

    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can't or won't deal with it as Asian countries have.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end. You will almost certainly not catch it seriously enough to die from it and the worst case for 99% of people will be two weeks off from work at home ordering in food, shopping online and taking it easy.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can’t or won’t deal with it as Asian countries have.

    What undermines your claim is that the Asian countries took it seriously. Quarantines; social distancing; face masks; plenty of testing; etc.

    They took it seriously. That’s the only way to beat it.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end.

    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?

    One just hopes the stupid people aren’t in control of the government or the CDC.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Pincher Martin


    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?
     
    I don't think they're expecting to poop more or that they expect stocks to run out. Most people are concerned that they will be quarantined at home for 14 days (maybe more?) and thus obtaining supplies will become complicated. My nearest supermarket has run out of dry pasta, rice, tinned tomato and baked beans every day for the last week although it's been completely restocked every time. A Polish girl working in the store told me it was similar in Poland and her sister (in Canada) reports the same.

    (Chez Lurker is now fully stocked in case of lock-down)

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  86. @dearieme
    America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million.

    You don't know that; stop being silly. A country that has done almost no testing has almost no knowledge.

    The fault there is not Trump's but the CDC's. Trump, however, will carry the can because (i) he's their nominal boss, and (ii) he keeps saying stupid things about the threat.

    Replies: @epebble, @danand

    “America has a total of 822 infections as of today, in a population of 330 million.”

    Dearieme, hopefully the infected number is close to that low (822). Seems almost mind boggling that other nations are able to test 1,000’s every day:

    2:21 p.m. California has backlog of up to 200 tests: The state has 180-200 tests backlogged, which commercial lab Quest is going to help process, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. Testing kits do not have all of the components needed to actually complete a test, Newsom said, which is one reason why there has been confusion about how many tests are available at the federal and local level. “Testing kits are not a test,” Newsom said. “Many of these test kits are like printers but without ink.”

    2:06 p.m. California expands testing capability: The state now has 18 labs with 7,675 tests currently available, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. A 19th lab will begin testing shortly. The first commercial lab, Quest in San Juan Capistrano, began testing Monday, and has tested 100 individuals so far. In the coming weeks, that lab should have the capacity to process 1,200 tests. In addition, two other Quest labs are expected to open by roughly March 24, Newsom said. After all three Quest labs are up and running, commercial testing is expected to have the capacity to test 5,000 to 5,500 individuals per day. Two state hospitals are conducting their own tests, and more hospitals are expected to do the same. Only 800 people had been tested as of Monday.

  87. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Marquandian Hero
    @Adam Smith

    Agree. He could be right.

    Unlikely, but for all I know, I had it two weeks ago (I live and work in Manhattan). I started to feel bad on Saturday night. By Sunday night was sniffling and running a low grade fever. I continued to feel bad and run a fever between 99 and 100 the next two days with sniffling/coughing. My stomach was a bit unsettled. I stayed home from work and slept most of the day Monday and Tuesday, doing a small amount of time sensitive work from home. By Wednesday I began to feel better and worked the full day from home. By Thursday morning most symptoms except for fatigue had abated completely; nonetheless, out of consideration for others and to ensure I got plenty of rest, I worked from home the rest of the week, spent the weekend resting, and came in Monday.

    Medications: orange juice, ginger ale, hot tea, plenty of food, and sleep. One ibuprofen on Wednesday when I decided the fever had continued long enough.

    I would have had to have a real, three digit fever and consistent chills, be coughing badly, and consistently feel awful to go to a doctor or the ER.

    Could have just been a bad cold, a non-vax strain of the flu, or COVID.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Adam Smith

    They say if it stay in your upper respiratory tract, you should be fine.

    I have been lucky to have not had a cold that goes below a post nasal drip in 30 years. Some people just don’t get lower respiratory tract infections as often. If anyone know the genetics of it, please inform us.

  88. @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    Right. I haven't heard yet about a Moneyball for Pandemics community of 140 IQ amateur analysts. There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Corvinus

    There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.

    To borrow from Vince Lombardi “Baseball is not a matter of life and death,it’s much more important than that!”

  89. I still have some contacts in S. Korea. FWIW they hate the current president and think he handled this poorly.

  90. @AnotherDad
    @Johnny Smoggins


    They can’t even be bothered to show up to defend their own continent. Let the Moslems and Africans have Europe, they want it more.
     
    I'm sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.

    But the girls and girly-men in charge of European governments make it a priority to prevent young men from behaving in such a fashion, in fact using police power and throwing them in jail if they try and do so. (State power they refuse to use against the invaders.)

    Replies: @Johnny Smoggins, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Corvinus

    “I’m sure there are millions of young men across Europe who would love to go to Greece if they could *actively* be involving in repulsing the muzzie hoards.”

    LOL, right. Why don’t you rally them? You know, lead the charge, rather than hope someone else does your dirty work.

  91. @Steve Sailer
    @The Z Blog

    Right. I haven't heard yet about a Moneyball for Pandemics community of 140 IQ amateur analysts. There might be one, and if so let me know, but, once again, it strikes me that our society could benefit from unleashing a little bit of the analytic talent that white guys have displayed when it comes to baseball on other topics.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Corvinus

    Why don’t you take the lead, Mr. Sailer? I’m sure you know someone who knows someone who knows Trump. Inform him of your superior NOTICING skills and create a team of experts. Lord knows Trump needs non-swamp creatures instead of government shills. And all this time you’ve been cagey on his other proclivities and inclinations, so he knows you are on his side. Get gummint pay and bennies, too!

    You owe it to your nation in this time of crisis.

  92. @Chrisnonymous
    @res

    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this. You are too smart not to. What am I talking about?


    Jeong Eun-kyeong, director of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said one of the remaining 21 COVID-19 patients in the country was still in critical condition this week. The patient's symptoms have been improving after oxygen was administered using a face mask, local news service Newsis reported.

    Jeong said the therapy raises the degree of oxygen saturation in the patient through the delivery of high concentrations of oxygen. The therapy does not require the use of a respirator, the South Korean official said.
     
    They just put an oxygen mask on a patient. That is a really, really basic intervention. Not ICU stuff. This is not a new intervention for a severe patient, they are just talking about putting an oxygen mask on a previously unmasked patient. That means a patient who was not very critical and just needs a little help. Not relevant for most severe cases. If it were really effective for most patients, they wouldn't have had such problems in Wuhan because oxygen masks are everywhere, first-line interventions for respiratory problems. Ventilators, which the WHO is recommending, are not for delivering oxygen per se, they are for delivering oxygen to patients whose lungs are not doing the inflation and gas-exchange things properly. They are not for delivering oxygen but for delivering breathing rates, various air pressure settings, etc. (Read up on ARDS--Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.) The idea that just giving someone oxygen is an overlooked simple solution is so stupid. So stupid.

    And I'm not going to bother with Vitamin C, because ditto.

    Replies: @res

    Feel free to post a better answer to iSteve’s question.

    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this.

    It’s pretty funny you make a comment like that after tone policing me over in AE’s blog.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @res

    Yeah. I apologize. I had some drinks last night.

  93. OT but a warning about letting legislators run wild: Australian gun laws are so incoherently retarded that they are talking about charging the top police official of one province for having visited the shooting range, as a friendly gesture, when he visited a prison’s staff area. The laws prohibit anyone from touching certain guns, even at a government shooting range and under direct supervision by a cop.

    In NSW, it is legal for an unlicensed person to handle a firearm at a shooting range, provided they fill out a declaration answering several questions, including whether they have previously been prohibited from holding a firearms licence, been the subject of a Firearms Prohibition Order, or committed a serious offence in the past 10 years.

    The declaration does not permit them to handle prohibited weapons, including those Mr Elliott was photographed holding.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/nsw-police-minister-david-elliott-in-the-gun-for-criminal-charges/news-story/446251d4e3e5eb2017542fb5bc45089a

    This is how they’ll handle corona: there’ll be nothing for long enough to let it spread, then they’ll ban things which have nothing to do with the disease.

  94. @danand
    A little late in the game, but I guess no harm in posting this email I received from a distant acquaintance a couple of weeks back. The only item of minor interest is “preparation” item # 4 (in bold).


    “Subject: How to prevent infection w COVID19

    Dear Colleagues, as some of you may recall, when I was a professor of pathology at the University of California San Diego, I was one of the first molecular virologists in the world to work on coronaviruses (the 1970s). I was the first to demonstrate the number of genes the virus contained. Since then, I have kept up with the coronavirus field and its multiple clinical transfers into the human population (e.g., SARS, MERS), from different animal sources.

    The current projections for its expansion in the US are only probable, due to continued insufficient worldwide data, but it is most likely to be widespread in the US by mid to late March and April.

    Here is what I have done and the precautions that I take and will take. These are the same precautions I currently use during our influenza seasons, except for the mask and gloves.:
    1) NO HANDSHAKING! Use a fist bump, slight bow, elbow bump, etc.
    2) Use ONLY your knuckle to touch light switches. elevator buttons, etc.. Lift the gasoline dispenser with a paper towel or use a disposable glove.
    3) Open doors with your closed fist or hip - do not grasp the handle with your hand, unless there is no other way to open the door. Especially important on bathroom and post office/commercial doors.
    4) Use disinfectant wipes at the stores when they are available, including wiping the handle and child seat in grocery carts.
    5) Wash your hands with soap for 10-20 seconds and/or use a greater than 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer whenever you return home from ANY activity that involves locations where other people have been.
    6) Keep a bottle of sanitizer available at each of your home's entrances. AND in your car for use after getting gas or touching other contaminated objects when you can't immediately wash your hands.
    7) If possible, cough or sneeze into a disposable tissue and discard. Use your elbow only if you have to. The clothing on your elbow will contain infectious virus that can be passed on for up to a week or more!

    What I have stocked in preparation for the pandemic spread to the US:
    1) Latex or nitrile latex disposable gloves for use when going shopping, using the gasoline pump, and all other outside activity when you come in contact with contaminated areas.
    Note: This virus is spread in large droplets by coughing and sneezing. This means that the air will not infect you! BUT all the surfaces where these droplets land are infectious for about a week on average - everything that is associated with infected people will be contaminated and potentially infectious. The virus is on surfaces and you will not be infected unless your unprotected face is directly coughed or sneezed upon. This virus only has cell receptors for lung cells (it only infects your lungs) The only way for the virus to infect you is through your nose or mouth via your hands or an infected cough or sneeze onto or into your nose or mouth.
    2) Stock up now with disposable surgical masks and use them to prevent you from touching your nose and/or mouth (We touch our nose/mouth 90X/day without knowing it!). This is the only way this virus can infect you - it is lung-specific. The mask will not prevent the virus in a direct sneeze from getting into your nose or mouth - it is only to keep you from touching your nose or mouth.
    3) Stock up now with hand sanitizers and latex/nitrile gloves (get the appropriate sizes for your family). The hand sanitizers must be alcohol-based and greater than 60% alcohol to be effective.
    4) Stock up now with zinc lozenges. These lozenges have been proven to be effective in blocking coronavirus (and most other viruses) from multiplying in your throat and nasopharynx. Use as directed several times each day when you begin to feel ANY "cold-like" symptoms beginning. It is best to lie down and let the lozenge dissolve in the back of your throat and nasopharynx. Cold-Eeze lozenges is one brand available, but there are other brands available.

    I, as many others do, hope that this pandemic will be reasonably contained, BUT I personally do not think it will be. Humans have never seen this snake-associated virus before and have no internal defense against it. Tremendous worldwide efforts are being made to understand the molecular and clinical virology of this virus. Unbelievable molecular knowledge about the genomics, structure, and virulence of this virus has already been achieved. BUT, there will be NO drugs or vaccines available this year to protect us or limit the infection within us. Only symptomatic support is available.

    I hope these personal thoughts will be helpful during this potentially catastrophic pandemic.

    You are welcome to share this email. Good luck to all of us!”

     

    Replies: @Lurker

  95. @Pincher Martin
    @Johnny Smoggins


    I disagree. The stupidity is being driven by people who are taking the virus too seriously as well as government officials who can’t or won’t deal with it as Asian countries have.
     
    What undermines your claim is that the Asian countries took it seriously. Quarantines; social distancing; face masks; plenty of testing; etc.

    They took it seriously. That's the only way to beat it.

    Some people are prepping like the world is going to end.
     
    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?

    One just hopes the stupid people aren't in control of the government or the CDC.

    Replies: @Lurker

    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?

    I don’t think they’re expecting to poop more or that they expect stocks to run out. Most people are concerned that they will be quarantined at home for 14 days (maybe more?) and thus obtaining supplies will become complicated. My nearest supermarket has run out of dry pasta, rice, tinned tomato and baked beans every day for the last week although it’s been completely restocked every time. A Polish girl working in the store told me it was similar in Poland and her sister (in Canada) reports the same.

    (Chez Lurker is now fully stocked in case of lock-down)

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Lurker

    I still think it's weird. Even if we experience a quarantine, whether it's of our families or our localities, surely deliveries of food and other necessities will continue. Amazon will still deliver.

  96. @Lurker
    @Pincher Martin


    Some people are always going to be stupid. I have no idea, for example, why there are daily runs on toilet paper in my area. Are people expecting to poop more in the coming pandemic?
     
    I don't think they're expecting to poop more or that they expect stocks to run out. Most people are concerned that they will be quarantined at home for 14 days (maybe more?) and thus obtaining supplies will become complicated. My nearest supermarket has run out of dry pasta, rice, tinned tomato and baked beans every day for the last week although it's been completely restocked every time. A Polish girl working in the store told me it was similar in Poland and her sister (in Canada) reports the same.

    (Chez Lurker is now fully stocked in case of lock-down)

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    I still think it’s weird. Even if we experience a quarantine, whether it’s of our families or our localities, surely deliveries of food and other necessities will continue. Amazon will still deliver.

  97. @AnotherDad
    @Anon 2

    Europe's treatment of Greece is just appalling.

    Show some solidarity--financially and directly with boots on the ground. All this blather about "ever closer union", but no idea what that is, how your build it.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @MBlanc46

    Because when the EU vermin say “Ever closer union”, they don’t say ever closer with whom.

  98. South Korea has gone a long way. Even as recently as the 1980’s, it was still somewhat of a third world country that made low quality products. Not anymore…Korean products like Samsung or LG are much better than the crap America makes, and their cities are more clean and modern than many cities in American or Europe. So its not surprising to me that their response to the corona virus has put everyone else to shame.

  99. @Anon
    The solution is to "go medieval", shut down all schools, offices, have everyone self-quarantine.

    Unfortunately that's something libtards won't do. These touchy-feely snowflakes could never do what is hard but necessary.

    WA's King County just sent out a directive saying schools can only close if they can guarantee every single student has equal access to online learning, and can provide one-on-one instruction to any kid who needs it, which is ridiculous to ask of a district with 20,000+ students.

    But the message is clear: As long as there's one student who can't get online or get his free lunch, we should all die together.

    I guess that's what socialism is. Equity at all cost.

    Replies: @but an humble craftsman

    As long as you use “socialism” as a smear ans as a smear only, there is no way you will ever be free of the people who manipulate your country into ruin.

    (And don’t take this as a defence of socialism. It’s a defence of proper usage)

  100. @Bert
    @J.Ross

    My post pointed out a constructive article from the Atlantic. I did not make a defense of the media in general. But I do hate Trump because he did not deliver on a border fence. He sucked the steam out of the pro-white vote. We got played by Trump, but you don't realize it.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @MBlanc46

    Yeah, we realize that we’ve been had. But would our situation be better had Clinton won in 2016? Will we be better off with President Biden than with another term of President Trump?

  101. Korea might have been better prepared than the other countries. I can imagine the US being overwhelmed the way Wuhan was. The US has not solved an important problem as a nation in more than 20 yrs, so I am not optimistic.

    Korea has almost 11 hospital beds per 1000 people

    China, Italy, and the US more like 3 per 1000 people.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_OECD_countries_by_hospital_beds

  102. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    What about the eponymous Boston!
     
    That unit's CPU, Tom Scholz:

    Tom Scholz was born in Toledo, Ohio and raised in the suburb of Ottawa Hills. His father, Don Scholz, was a homebuilder who garnered considerable wealth from his designs of prefabricated luxury houses and founded Scholz Design, the forerunner of Scholz Homes Inc...

    Before his musical career, Scholz received both a bachelor's degree (1969) and a master's degree (1970) in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and worked for Polaroid Corporation as a senior product design engineer. Scholz would then reside in Boston.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Scholz#Early_life
     

    Ric Ocasek was the other successful, if more downscale, Buckeye native in Boston. Aerosmith and the J. Geils Band were fronted by New Yorkers.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    What’s with Ohio? They gave us Chrissy Hynde of the Pretenders and most of Devo too.

  103. @RichardTaylor
    So as far as solutions go in this case, can we say that a bit of group solidarity and central control seems to be beating open borders, individualism and liberalism?

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Lockean Proviso

    America has responded to public health challenges in the past, such as polio, yellow fever, and typhoid fever. Liberal capitalist democracy that respects individual rights can do that without becoming a totalitarian dictatorship, but as the average IQ falls, corporate oligarchy dominates, and a culture of therapeutic gratification supersedes one of responsibility and dignity, it becomes harder. Nevertheless, it is not incompatible. Korea is not China and it is handling the outbreak well. We don’t have to become boot-lickers to be effective.

  104. @res
    @Chrisnonymous

    Feel free to post a better answer to iSteve's question.


    Please, res, do some basic research before you post dumb shit like this.
     
    It's pretty funny you make a comment like that after tone policing me over in AE's blog.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Yeah. I apologize. I had some drinks last night.

    • Thanks: res
  105. @Bert
    @UK

    The Atlantic article called for information, quantitative data on the rate of infection in the US, with which to decide upon the appropriate social distancing measures. Data don't spread panic, and you can't call the Atlantic dishonest for asking for it.

    Covid-19 is ten times more deadly than typical influenza and has a two or three times greater transmissibility (Ro). That combination means that if a country takes no action to slow the spread of the virus, then its health care system will be overwhelmed. The low single digit mortality rate depends on weeks of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation. When the ICU units are full, the mortality rate will increase substantially. Apparently you missed the news that this happened in Wuhan and is currently happening in Italy.

    You clearly don't understand exponential growth, what exponential expansion of the epidemic means for functioning of health care systems, and what that means for patients critically in need of medical care for other diseases. Listen to the epidemiologist on this video and learn. Don't be one of Unz's Uneducables.

    Replies: @Bert, @UK, @ken

    10x more deadly sounds horrible, but it doesn’t even get you to 3%.

  106. @Marquandian Hero
    @Adam Smith

    Agree. He could be right.

    Unlikely, but for all I know, I had it two weeks ago (I live and work in Manhattan). I started to feel bad on Saturday night. By Sunday night was sniffling and running a low grade fever. I continued to feel bad and run a fever between 99 and 100 the next two days with sniffling/coughing. My stomach was a bit unsettled. I stayed home from work and slept most of the day Monday and Tuesday, doing a small amount of time sensitive work from home. By Wednesday I began to feel better and worked the full day from home. By Thursday morning most symptoms except for fatigue had abated completely; nonetheless, out of consideration for others and to ensure I got plenty of rest, I worked from home the rest of the week, spent the weekend resting, and came in Monday.

    Medications: orange juice, ginger ale, hot tea, plenty of food, and sleep. One ibuprofen on Wednesday when I decided the fever had continued long enough.

    I would have had to have a real, three digit fever and consistent chills, be coughing badly, and consistently feel awful to go to a doctor or the ER.

    Could have just been a bad cold, a non-vax strain of the flu, or COVID.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Adam Smith

    I’m glad you’re feeling better. You were smart to stay home, to get plenty of rest and to not expose others. (It really is the polite thing to do. Thank you for your courtesy.)

    Was it COVID? Probably not. (You’ll never know if it was.) As you know, there are plenty of things going around in late February and early March that could cause the symptoms you described. Most likely you had a cold or the flu.

    Sodium ascorbate powder is my go to medicine. I mix about 1/8 of a teaspoon in a quart of water and drink it daily this time of year. If I feel a cold coming on the dose goes up. It seems to stop colds dead in their tracks.

    I wouldn’t have seen a doctor either.

    Thanks for your comment and cheers to your health.

  107. Epidemiologists are predicting almost half million dead in the US:

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2020/03/coronavirus-professor-s-best-guess-has-half-a-million-americans-dead.html

    Same numbers quoted by Michael Osterholm here:

  108. @anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    "But again, they don't know about the easy cases because the easy cases don't go to the hospital. They don't report to doctors or the hospital, in many cases," Trump said. "So I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent."
     
    Trump's hunch is that the rate is way under 1%. Damned fool for speaking that out loud.

    Replies: @Charon, @Dr. DoomNGloom, @Adam Smith, @Trutherator

    I’ve seen articles with figures MUCH lower than that.
    You can’t let the Mockingbird Media freak you out. The U.S. (& the world) will have a pandemic one of these days before the Tribulation gets here. The U. S. has a judgment thing coming, but not yet, IMO.

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