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From the Daily Mail:

Let us in Joe! Caravan of 1,000 Honduran migrants surges towards the US border in the final days of the Trump administration and asks Biden to ‘honor his commitments’ to asylum seekers when they arrive

The caravan was originally at least twice the size when it left Honduras early on Friday morning

It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is, or if they’ll be able to make it there

Donald Trump demonized Central American caravans ahead of the 2018 midterm elections and put several policies in place to prevent them from crossing into the United States, including Migrant Protection Protocols

Joe Biden has promised to reverse many of Trump’s immigration policies, including the MPP

By HOLDEN WALTER-WARNER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 19:29 EST, 16 January 2021 | UPDATED: 20:59 EST, 16 January 2021

 
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  1. How many Americans read the Daily Mail? There’s no domestic media that will even report on this, so it will never have happened, for all practical purposes. Isn’t even Drudge ignoring this stuff now?

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @Anon

    The Daily Mail has also covered the shooting in Philadelphia of Milan Loncar.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9153917/Mother-shares-heartbreaking-tributes-son-shot-Philadelphia.html

    A search on Google News shows that, as we are often told by writers on this site, this shooting was not covered in the USA except on the local news. There was more coverage in Serbia (Loncar was of Serbian descent) than there was in New York City.

    You can skip most of the Mail's British content by going here:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/ushome/index.html

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    , @notsaying
    @Anon

    I have become a great reader of the Daily Mail because it's free and I can leave comments there but of course I am just one person. There will be many stories of immigrants trying to reach us via the Southern border. All that Biden and the other Democratic presidential candidates said about immigration translates into: Come on in, we will never send you back if you can just cross the border and millions will try it.

    Now that we're down so many millions of jobs and Biden wants to more than double minimum wage, this is exactly the wrong time to increase immigration. But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens? How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals? They won't be able to do something will have to give.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @anon

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Anon

    The Daily Mail: The World’s Newspaper of Record.

    (And a lot of Americans recognize and appreciate this fact!)

  2. Mask usage in the front rank of the phalanx is over 50%. They’re already assimilating!

    • LOL: Abe
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    “It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is.”

    For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California. A contractor I know has made several million dollars by expanding the capacity of houses, including turning garages of homes into dormitories. These guys will be leaf-blower operators. When I sit in my back yard, half the time I have to wear my gun-range sound suppressor because one can hear an angry leaf-blower growling from two blocks away. They are all over the place. I used to listen to the birds tweeting...Coleridge’s advice: to his son Hartley: A life close to nature, my boy! For me this has become a life close to leaf-blowers; and here come more of them.

    Reg, the masks in the front row do not cover the nose — so yes, agreed, perfect assimilation into the existing demographic.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @donut, @HA

  3. California bound, I hope!

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @James Speaks

    Feels good to say if you and your children don’t live or work in Cali, I guess, but it is rather foolish.

    1. If not the new Honduran invaders, some of their offspring will move to other States. Those who eventually apply for college or corporate jobs will be explicitly advantaged over white and Asian Americans.

    2. Even if the latest tranche of low-skilled, net-tax-consumer Hondurans stay in California, taxpayers across the USA will pay for part of their medical care, food stamps, education, and in some cases prosecution and incarceration anyway through the fed gov.

    3. Consumers will pay, too, as massive printing / borrowing of money by the fed gov to bail out the state/city governments in California and their perpetually-poor hordes will cause price and rent inflation.

    4. The half of Americans who pay net federal income tax will have to pay a bit more to make up for the new Hondurans and their offspring getting free cash in the form of “refundable” federal income-tax credits.

    5. If the feds institute a universal — or not so universal - basic income, you brilliant non-Californians will pay for the latest thousand Honduran leeches too.

    6. Those of us who live in California and have (futilely) worked to prevent immivasion don’t deserve the ill will and spiteful chortling. We ought to care about all Americans, including those normal patriotic civilized Americans caught behind what are now almost enemy lines. Watch as it happens to your State next if not happening already.

    We’re all watching our country become an overcrowded, polluted, impoverished, Balkanized, less intelligent, low-trust Third Worldy kind of place. Worse, perhaps, because Third World countries sometimes don’t have large hostile or unassimilated groups of different races and religions to contend with on top of all the other misery — let alone a very large dim witted group trained to hate them, like African-“Americans.”

    May God help us find a way to increase trade, tourism, and charitable works with Honduras to help the good people struggling there. But our first priority is to save or reclaim part of our country from them and any other interlopers whom we simply cannot afford.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @bomag

    , @Hannah Katz
    @James Speaks

    What a bunch of litter bugs! Can I say that? Am I allowed to observe the obvious? Uh oh...

  4. You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    • Agree: obvious
    • Replies: @Abe
    @Cato


    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption
     
    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward- Los Angeles?

    In my Top 10 list of Steve Pith-Riffs is his observation that what blacks and Hispanics really are fleeing is the nightmare that comes of living among their own first, second, and third cousins. After this Summer of Floyd, and my discovery of how bat-sh!t crazy a good 25-30% of fellow whites are (recent example- “FBI urges Americans to stay away from national monuments. Can no longer guarantee the safety of those who come to demolish them...”) I’m more sanguine about the arrival of a few extra Latinos. Another case in point- several big tech names have announced their relocation from California to Texas. The only question is how quickly the a-hole California employees that come in tow vote for the exact same types of candidates and policies there that lead to their exodus in the first place.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Cato

    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility...

    ...are problems that they bring with them.

    , @Dave from Oz
    @Cato


    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility.
     
    Are mostly caused by the people that live there.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @Alfa158
    @Cato

    The US is cutting off the incentive to migrate by working at a frantic pace to make itself just as crappy and dysfunctional as the countries they are fleeing from, therefore removing any reason for them to migrate.
    Problem solved. It’s a stupid solution, but it is the solution the American people have permitted to be foisted on them, so we’re stuck with it.
    Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m heading back to my local beach to resume my project to drain the Pacific Ocean with a little tin pail.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @notsaying
    @Cato

    I said here the other day that I thought we were crazy for not offering help to them and the other countries in Central America devastated by the hurricanes this fall.

    But the problem with helping the poor people of those countries is that too many of their own people stand in the way: the elites, the gangs, the corrupt politicians and criminal justice system.

    How do you suggest we push aside the 10-20% of people exploiting the rest of the people in these countries?

    The answer cannot be that all these exploited people get to come here. On that basis we would have 80-90% of the whole world entitled to come here.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @Cido
    @Cato



    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.
     
    Eugenics ?
    , @Old and Grumpy
    @Cato

    Its the magic dirt theory in full display. People make the difference. Dirt doesn't except if you are a farmer, and we like to call it soil. . If Hondurans are all that, can't they solve their own problems? Instead they will come here bringing with them their crime, sexual harassment, and poverty. Our legal system is already corrupt, and the lack of jobs are killing American's path of upward mobility. So there is that to consider for those courageous Hondurans sporting new sneakers and masks, which will be perfectly clean when the caravan crosses over our border. Funny how that works.

    , @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle
    @Cato

    Why exactly is it our responsibility to solve Honduras's problems?

    Anyway, I believe we should just pay them to stay in place just like we do for that other tribe located in the Middle East.

    Just think, if that other tribe had to live in conditions reminiscent of their neighbors they'd be trying to move here too.

    The simplest solution is to just to pay the Hondurans to stay home. It works just hunky-dory for the tribe.

    And, aren't we about to implement that very scenario in the US as soon as China Biden is sworn into office?

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Cato

    As Douglas Murray has said, when you import the world's peoples, you import the world's problems.

    We've all seen the signs from the virtucrats, "No human is illegal," equally a stupid a phrase as all the others.

    Once, at a a very "oh-so-sincere" dinner party, with people with all the right thoughts, folks were bemoaning the border cages, so I decided to break ranks (after a few glasses of wine), and said to one the more sincere females in the group, "Yeah, tell you what. We'll tell border agents to send all the military age males from Central American with no skills and no English to YOUR house, where things will be bit more comfortable."

    Quite the buzz killer.

    , @Alexander Turok
    @Cato

    I really doubt "sexual harassment" is the motivation for those in the pic.

    , @obvious
    @Cato

    Stop backing their corrupt governments, abolish the War on Drugs, let them have a communist revolution and distribute the land to their own people. It means breaking up the the Western capital interests and higher prices for bananas.

    The USA has vast empty space to accommodate refugees who wish to start fresh and build, anywhere West of the Mississippi. For that matter to rebuild the ruined towns and cities destroyed by white and black alike.

    , @Anon
    @Cato

    Most of the problems you listed do not qualify for amnesty. If it is political amnesty then legally they would apply in Mexico. They are coming here for economic opportunity. But they do not plan to get green cards or citizenship. So they are driving down the wage for common jobs in the US to the level that it make no sense for citizens here to do them.

    As for helping them, I think mostly the US has to stop hurting them. US banks and companies have exploited the nation for a century now. They install dictators to make the country indebted to US banks and to make their businesses run without problems from labor issues and other business costs. However with the election of Biden, the US is back to the old days of interventionism on behalf of banks and corporations, and the refugee problem from this will continue to cause migrations to the US. These immigrants may vote Democrat at first, but once on their feet and have property quickly become conservative.

  5. And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Thomas

    "As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

    Sunny Joe's already making lemonade out of lemons. Sure, Covid killed 2 million people worldwide, but we got 5 million new Democrats!

    , @Peterike
    @Thomas

    “ Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it”

    Lol. 11 million. The same bullshit number they’ve used for years. It’s more like 30 or 40 million. And millions more to follow.

    But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.”

    The cuck chickens are coming home to roost in a very big way.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ron Mexico

    , @notsaying
    @Thomas

    There are no voices of disagreement in this story. And yet I think a majority of Americans are not for all the things mentioned in this article.

    Maybe they can get this all passed in the new Congress. But there will be a lot of disagreement too. 2020 was a lousy year. We will still be spending extra trillions this year over the virus. We will still be down many millions of jobs. Given the miserable rollout of vaccines how many businesses will close due to the virus? How can this be a time to make big commitments to all our illegal immigrants and new promises to much higher numbers of future immigrants?

    This strikes me as a Utopian vision of US immigration, one in which we can absorb infinite numbers of people and not be affected by it or make any sacrifices for it.

    This vision will not survive contact with reality.

    , @Rob
    @Thomas

    It seems clear that either America is dead and gone already or any legalization legalization can be reversed. In the former, the upcoming generation of ‘Americans’ is less than half American. The majority are non-whites of various brands. What do another eleven (will be 30) million matter? The only ways out of that hole are non-democratc.. In the latter, we have to stop thinking of these amnesty plus prizes laws as irreversible. A populist President and Congress can just strip them of their citizenship and deport them. The courts may not approve, but what majority non-white country is a stickler for laws and judges?

    How do we get a populist president after the first populist presidential candidate was such a failure? Easy, the success Trump had playing Candidate Trump in 2016 shows the overwhelming popularity of populism. Think about it, Trump was a very unpopular man, a reality tv figure totally unfit for office. IIRC, the majority of Trump voters thought he should not be President. Any mildly charismatic candidate with only run of the politician personality disorders would have easily won 60% of the popular vote.

    How do we get that candidate? Maybe by withdrawing completely from the culture war red team/blue team fight. We cannot win without white moderates and liberals leaving the globalist coalition. We cannot win them over if they think that voting for peace, deporting aliens, and building manufacturing capacity means abortion will be banned, sex-based anti-discrimination laws are on the chopping block, and so on. The only thing the Republican establishment is willing to do for their base is piss off liberals. However fun that is, the survival of America is important. I don’t know about you, but I would have a trans woman in every bathroom in America if that were the price of keeping America American. Do you really want to see the environment trashed so much that you’ll let America die for it? Worse comes to worse, if you think the green new deal with destroy the economy, the weaker economy will be less of a draw for immigrants.

    Do not vote for tax-cut, Israel first Republicans. Do not support the Republicans at all. Support the Democrats and tell anyone who will listen that you’ll support populists anywhere on the ideological spectrum. If/when there is a populist candidate in a primary, vote for him or her. Volunteer to knock on doors. Talk him up with your friends. Voting Republican only gets us more immigrants, because the Republican elite need the cheap labor for businesses that produce physical products.

    Much like Republicans only willing to give the base angry liberals, the Democrats are not willing to give their white base much of anything. They will soon realize they do not have a future in a Democratic Party that is rapidly importing new voters. Put some sand in the gears. Ask white Democrats why that party will continue representing them once there are enough NAMs to win every election.

    Replies: @IHTG

    , @Old and Grumpy
    @Thomas

    Are we allowed to use carpet, roll, and Harris in the same sentence?

    , @botazefa
    @Thomas


    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.
     
    Thomas, should illegal aliens receive amnesty before African Americans receive reparations? That seems grossly unfair. I wonder if the Congressional Black Caucus will notice this clear injustice.
    , @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle
    @Thomas

    And why shouldn't legalize them. As soon as they become US citizens they're eligible to be conscripted in the Imperial legions.

    With all the new wars needing to be fought during the Biden administration they're gonna need a lot of morons to die in foreign wars for Uncle Sam.

    Between all the domestic terrorists, Russia, China, Iran, North Korea and any other upstart country needing bombed back to democracy they're gonna need lots of useful idiots to do the killing and dying.

  6. Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    • Disagree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @WJ


    What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver.
     
    Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty (assuming the Senate doesn’t get rid of the filibuster). But if Congress does pass an amnesty they will unleash a whirlwind of protest so massive it will cause the ground to shake.

    And remember there is plenty of crazy on the Trump side, too. Trump and some of his overzealous fans cost Republicans those two seats in Georgia. “We don’t them,” they said. “We should teach the RINOs a lesson.” Now do you wish we still had those seats?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    , @AnotherDad
    @WJ


    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.
     
    WJ, you're making this far too binary.

    I was 100% behind Trump, both in the primaries and general in 2016 and for re-election in 2020. For precisely this reason. We need to halt this demographic coup against Americans and reward any politician who stands up to it in the least.

    Trump was the only way to vote, if you care about America. Period.

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don't care about your children's future in America or you're a confused bozo who can't see the forest from the trees.

    But that said: Trump is full of glaring serious flaws that degraded his performance. He's an egotist. He cares more about "Donald Trump" than America. He has great energy but is intellectually lazy. He listens to his mediocre relatives. He turned out to be an exceedingly poor manager--choosing competent people, demanding loyalty, developing a coherent program and a plan to carry it out. (Stuff you'd think a "businessman" would do well.) While a terrific cheerleader for Donald J. Trump, he was exceedingly poor at clear, cogent, logical explanations of his nationalist program. (See debates.) He didn't stand up for his people--core white America--against minoritarian assault and blood libel. He didn't grab opportunities on the Democrats assault on the rule-of-law.

    Trump is a hero for giving us the first quasi-nationalist option in decades. But that said, Trump's flaws made him far less than he could and should have been ... and we must get beyond Trump and do better.

    To acknowledge all that is not to say that the other guy is preferable. No Biden, Harris, the Democrats are a disaster for America.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Goddard, @WJ

    , @Ron Mexico
    @WJ

    Ann will be able sell more books now.

    , @obvious
    @WJ

    How could a "moronic fabulist" that delivered 10% possibly make anything "better"? You know what will REALLY help you? Stop saying "we". You are not a group and do not "have" a country. The promise of America is that ANYONE can BUILD whatever they wish. Did your people ever really build anything, or were they just "immigrants" in their own day?

    I will rarely hire white people under 60 at this point because they mostly make terrible workers. Mostly have health and sobriety problem, and their brains are completely addled. They aren't there to work or do a job, but show up mostly to complain and smoke cigarettes. Your "problems" have little to do with "Hondurans", much more to do with racial degeneration.

  7. I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits. White collar America will finally be prioritized again.

    • LOL: Tusk
    • Replies: @Peterike
    @Supply and Demand

    “ I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.”

    Except now you’re going to get both. And at ten times the numbers.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Supply and Demand

    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.

    Did Biden say he wouldn't take the Indians too? If you've heard something the rest of us haven't, please let us know.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Supply and Demand

    That’s a clever phrase ;) but US Citizens should be prioritized over all non-citizens, whatever the nature of the citizens’ education and work.

  8. One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger
    Matthew Yglesias

    “If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. We can’t compete with the huge population clusters of the global marketplace by keeping our population static or letting it diminish, or with our crumbling transit and unaffordable housing. The winner in the future world is going to have more—more ideas, more ambition, more utilization of resources, more people.”

    Exactly how many Americans do we need to win? According to Matthew Yglesias, one billion.

    • Replies: @Oswald Spengler
    @Anon7

    Stop thinking small, Matty. Why stop at a paltry one billion? Just declare all eight billion people on Earth are now American citizens and have done with it. No human is illegal, after all.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @notsaying
    @Anon7

    This guy is so wrong he makes my head spin.

    He seems to think that loosening all restraints on people will make this a better world. We have had too much unrestrained population growth in the last 100 years and already there's too many people on Earth. We need to stabilize the world's population and slowly reduce it.

    We are ruining the environment for people and all the non-human life on Earth as well. There are not enough resources for the people we have now on Earth or habitats for non-human life. I hope someone somewhere is writing a book to refute his.

    Replies: @Anon7

    , @Anonymous
    @Anon7

    https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1350509372284129281

    Replies: @Voltarde, @Autochthon, @Autochthon

    , @Sebastian Hawks
    @Anon7

    The world can only really support 1-2 billion people living at first world energy requirements. We need to cull the population down to a more manageable level. If there's anything to the whole Global Warming spiel it's the sudden heavy use of fossil fuels by 2 billion developing Asians over the last 30 years when before that only the US, Western Europe, and Japan were using first world energy levels, the rest of the world was a basket-case.

  9. “Donald Trump demonized Central American caravans…”

    Demonized!

    Do leftist politicians like Nancy Pelosi ever “demonize” white people in the eyes of the press?

  10. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    “As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

    Sunny Joe’s already making lemonade out of lemons. Sure, Covid killed 2 million people worldwide, but we got 5 million new Democrats!

  11. Anon[240] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Mask usage in the front rank of the phalanx is over 50%. They're already assimilating!

    Replies: @Anon

    “It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is.”

    For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California. A contractor I know has made several million dollars by expanding the capacity of houses, including turning garages of homes into dormitories. These guys will be leaf-blower operators. When I sit in my back yard, half the time I have to wear my gun-range sound suppressor because one can hear an angry leaf-blower growling from two blocks away. They are all over the place. I used to listen to the birds tweeting…Coleridge’s advice: to his son Hartley: A life close to nature, my boy! For me this has become a life close to leaf-blowers; and here come more of them.

    Reg, the masks in the front row do not cover the nose — so yes, agreed, perfect assimilation into the existing demographic.

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @Anon

    Ugh, yes, the leaf blowers. One asshole too lazy to rake his own yard, hires the mow blow and go service, and makes the whole neighborhood unlivable.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @donut
    @Anon

    https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a10295155/noise-detox/

    , @HA
    @Anon

    "For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California."

    For some reason I'm having trouble understanding, the ones who say they want to flee the gang activity of MS-13 seem particularly drawn to Long Island, NY.

    Because as everyone familiar with Long Island knows, that is precisely where you need to go if you want to be certain that MS-13 will never, ever be able to find you.

  12. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    “It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is.”

    For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California. A contractor I know has made several million dollars by expanding the capacity of houses, including turning garages of homes into dormitories. These guys will be leaf-blower operators. When I sit in my back yard, half the time I have to wear my gun-range sound suppressor because one can hear an angry leaf-blower growling from two blocks away. They are all over the place. I used to listen to the birds tweeting...Coleridge’s advice: to his son Hartley: A life close to nature, my boy! For me this has become a life close to leaf-blowers; and here come more of them.

    Reg, the masks in the front row do not cover the nose — so yes, agreed, perfect assimilation into the existing demographic.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @donut, @HA

    Ugh, yes, the leaf blowers. One asshole too lazy to rake his own yard, hires the mow blow and go service, and makes the whole neighborhood unlivable.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @SimpleSong

    In addition, the Mexican yard services seem to have a special dispensation to park their flat-bed equipment trailers on the side of narrow suburban streets, largely blocking one lane. I would think if you were going to work on someone's lawn, you could park in their driveway, but I suppose it's easier to park in the road and anyway no one does anything about it.

    Replies: @Alfa158

  13. It’s okay, Ann Coulter assured us Trump was terrible on the border so Biden must be an improvement.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  14. @WJ
    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn't deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn't do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @AnotherDad, @Ron Mexico, @obvious

    What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver.

    Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty (assuming the Senate doesn’t get rid of the filibuster). But if Congress does pass an amnesty they will unleash a whirlwind of protest so massive it will cause the ground to shake.

    And remember there is plenty of crazy on the Trump side, too. Trump and some of his overzealous fans cost Republicans those two seats in Georgia. “We don’t them,” they said. “We should teach the RINOs a lesson.” Now do you wish we still had those seats?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    But if Congress does pass an amnesty...
     
    Legal residence is not an "amnesty", it's an unearned welfare benefit. Worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Which devalues our own citizenship.

    Literally.

    Replies: @Clyde

    , @Lot
    @Wilkey

    “ Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty”

    Which may happen. Tillis, Murkowski, Rubio, Collins, Sasse, Portman, Graham, Scott, Paul, Cornyn.

    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle
    @Wilkey

    Those two Rino's of which you speak wouldn't have made a dime's worth of difference.

    They both refused to run on an immigration platform and would have been more than willing to sell out their own constituents to appear bi-partisan in passing amnesty legislation.

  15. @Supply and Demand
    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits. White collar America will finally be prioritized again.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Harry Baldwin, @RadicalCenter

    “ I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.”

    Except now you’re going to get both. And at ten times the numbers.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Peterike

    S&D is a noodle-armed c*nt that teaches in a Chinese university and is high on his own farts. Everything he says can go straight in the trash.

  16. @Anon7
    One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger
    Matthew Yglesias

    “If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. We can’t compete with the huge population clusters of the global marketplace by keeping our population static or letting it diminish, or with our crumbling transit and unaffordable housing. The winner in the future world is going to have more—more ideas, more ambition, more utilization of resources, more people.”

    Exactly how many Americans do we need to win? According to Matthew Yglesias, one billion.

    Replies: @Oswald Spengler, @notsaying, @Anonymous, @Sebastian Hawks

    Stop thinking small, Matty. Why stop at a paltry one billion? Just declare all eight billion people on Earth are now American citizens and have done with it. No human is illegal, after all.

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Oswald Spengler

    7 billion Pre-Americans.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  17. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    “ Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it”

    Lol. 11 million. The same bullshit number they’ve used for years. It’s more like 30 or 40 million. And millions more to follow.

    But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.”

    The cuck chickens are coming home to roost in a very big way.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Peterike


    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.
     
    Camel's nose inside the tent, and not the first. Why not cut to the chase and award everyone citizenship now, before they've even left their own countries? Why not award American citizenship to every single person on earth? It's not as though it's worth anything anymore.
    , @Ron Mexico
    @Peterike

    "But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.” I am laughing and crying at the same time. This perfectly describes some of my Evangelical "conservative" friends to a T. Ben Sasse types. F em.

  18. We should stop them from getting into their little boats.

  19. @Wilkey
    @WJ


    What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver.
     
    Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty (assuming the Senate doesn’t get rid of the filibuster). But if Congress does pass an amnesty they will unleash a whirlwind of protest so massive it will cause the ground to shake.

    And remember there is plenty of crazy on the Trump side, too. Trump and some of his overzealous fans cost Republicans those two seats in Georgia. “We don’t them,” they said. “We should teach the RINOs a lesson.” Now do you wish we still had those seats?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    But if Congress does pass an amnesty…

    Legal residence is not an “amnesty”, it’s an unearned welfare benefit. Worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Which devalues our own citizenship.

    Literally.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Reg Cæsar

    We have tens of millions of foreigners living here who are legal residents, who have no huge desire to become citizens or to start the process of becoming US citizens.
    Having your green card/legal residency is as good as being a US citizen except for--

    You cannot vote (not legally anyways)
    As a US citizen it is easier to import, bring in family to immigrate here. Aka chain migration.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  20. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption

    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward- Los Angeles?

    In my Top 10 list of Steve Pith-Riffs is his observation that what blacks and Hispanics really are fleeing is the nightmare that comes of living among their own first, second, and third cousins. After this Summer of Floyd, and my discovery of how bat-sh!t crazy a good 25-30% of fellow whites are (recent example- “FBI urges Americans to stay away from national monuments. Can no longer guarantee the safety of those who come to demolish them…”) I’m more sanguine about the arrival of a few extra Latinos. Another case in point- several big tech names have announced their relocation from California to Texas. The only question is how quickly the a-hole California employees that come in tow vote for the exact same types of candidates and policies there that lead to their exodus in the first place.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Abe


    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward--Los Angeles?
     
    Speaking of walking a thousand miles in sandals, exactly where do these people sleep at night? Though some have knapsacks, few appear to be carrying so much as a sleeping bag or a few bottles of water. Speaking of--what do they eat, what do they drink, where do they answer the call of nature?

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/01/16/23/38094420-9155479-image-a-16_1610839552726.jpg

    Why is it never raining in the photos? BTW, this Daily Mail pic would never pass muster in the US media--it shows the composition of the pack as roughly 100% military-age males. Way too close to the truth for the MSM here.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  21. @WJ
    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn't deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn't do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @AnotherDad, @Ron Mexico, @obvious

    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    WJ, you’re making this far too binary.

    I was 100% behind Trump, both in the primaries and general in 2016 and for re-election in 2020. For precisely this reason. We need to halt this demographic coup against Americans and reward any politician who stands up to it in the least.

    Trump was the only way to vote, if you care about America. Period.

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don’t care about your children’s future in America or you’re a confused bozo who can’t see the forest from the trees.

    But that said: Trump is full of glaring serious flaws that degraded his performance. He’s an egotist. He cares more about “Donald Trump” than America. He has great energy but is intellectually lazy. He listens to his mediocre relatives. He turned out to be an exceedingly poor manager–choosing competent people, demanding loyalty, developing a coherent program and a plan to carry it out. (Stuff you’d think a “businessman” would do well.) While a terrific cheerleader for Donald J. Trump, he was exceedingly poor at clear, cogent, logical explanations of his nationalist program. (See debates.) He didn’t stand up for his people–core white America–against minoritarian assault and blood libel. He didn’t grab opportunities on the Democrats assault on the rule-of-law.

    Trump is a hero for giving us the first quasi-nationalist option in decades. But that said, Trump’s flaws made him far less than he could and should have been … and we must get beyond Trump and do better.

    To acknowledge all that is not to say that the other guy is preferable. No Biden, Harris, the Democrats are a disaster for America.

    • Agree: Old Prude, Hypnotoad666
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad


    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don’t care about your children’s future in America or you’re a confused bozo who can’t see the forest from the trees.
     
    I didn't vote. I am registered in a solid blue state. No point.

    Sometimes, I think that without the electoral college, the energy of individual voters would be released. For example, I don't participate in campaigns because every vote isn't relevant. But if every vote counted, I would be out there arguing and knocking on doors. My suspicion is that Democrats have already thought about this and won't push to abolish the electoral college. They must know that their base is not mobilizable in this way.
    , @Goddard
    @AnotherDad

    You’ve captured my thoughts exactly. Thank you.

    , @WJ
    @AnotherDad

    Trump was a boorish oaf. I won't deny that but there was simply no option. Well, there was another option and and that was keeping the Senate to block an amnesty bill. Neither happened and we are facing disaster. I am not a dramatic person but I remember what the 86 amnesty did to the country. This is 10x the size of that one. Hoping that Manchin doesn't agree to eliminating filibuster and that GOP squishes hold tight. Not counting on either.

  22. @Anon
    How many Americans read the Daily Mail? There's no domestic media that will even report on this, so it will never have happened, for all practical purposes. Isn't even Drudge ignoring this stuff now?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @notsaying, @Dan Hayes

    The Daily Mail has also covered the shooting in Philadelphia of Milan Loncar.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9153917/Mother-shares-heartbreaking-tributes-son-shot-Philadelphia.html

    A search on Google News shows that, as we are often told by writers on this site, this shooting was not covered in the USA except on the local news. There was more coverage in Serbia (Loncar was of Serbian descent) than there was in New York City.

    You can skip most of the Mail’s British content by going here:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/ushome/index.html

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @James N. Kennett

    As far as I’ve seen, only the NY Post mentioned the suspects are Black.

  23. We hare (still) virus-free in NZ, because we have strict border controls. Even someone as PC as Jacinda Ardern could figure that one out for herself.

    If the new administration is more PC than Jacinda Ardern, then you are surely lost.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @22pp22

    From my experience, the PC you find in the US is more extreme than other Anglo countries (except maybe Canada). It's very hard to outdo America in adherence to PC.

  24. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility…

    …are problems that they bring with them.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  25. Will they arrive in time for their stimulus payout?

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Lurker

    Don't worry, the stimmie will be made retroactive for them -- just like the Biden tax hikes will be made retroactive for you.

    But hey, Jesus didn't believe in borders!

  26. @Supply and Demand
    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits. White collar America will finally be prioritized again.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Harry Baldwin, @RadicalCenter

    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.

    Did Biden say he wouldn’t take the Indians too? If you’ve heard something the rest of us haven’t, please let us know.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Harry Baldwin

    Biden's major priority will be illegals, but he eventually plans to relax h1b restrictions if the economy improves.

    Replies: @Daniel H

  27. @SimpleSong
    @Anon

    Ugh, yes, the leaf blowers. One asshole too lazy to rake his own yard, hires the mow blow and go service, and makes the whole neighborhood unlivable.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    In addition, the Mexican yard services seem to have a special dispensation to park their flat-bed equipment trailers on the side of narrow suburban streets, largely blocking one lane. I would think if you were going to work on someone’s lawn, you could park in their driveway, but I suppose it’s easier to park in the road and anyway no one does anything about it.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Harry Baldwin

    My Whitopia town made the use of gas powered leaf blowers illegal years ago but, because the users are a protected class, namely brown people, it doesn’t write any tickets. Instead they sent letters to every homeowner asking us to ask gardeners to please refrain from using the blowers. I didn’t write back to tell the twits I mow my own damn lawn. (And hey you kids, get off it ! ...dadgumit!)

  28. @Oswald Spengler
    @Anon7

    Stop thinking small, Matty. Why stop at a paltry one billion? Just declare all eight billion people on Earth are now American citizens and have done with it. No human is illegal, after all.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    7 billion Pre-Americans.

    • LOL: James Speaks
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    7 billion Pre-Americans.
     
    Subtract 80 million post-Americans.
  29. The “busting through the Guatemalan border” video made me think of the moment a piñata breaks open.

  30. @22pp22
    We hare (still) virus-free in NZ, because we have strict border controls. Even someone as PC as Jacinda Ardern could figure that one out for herself.

    If the new administration is more PC than Jacinda Ardern, then you are surely lost.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    From my experience, the PC you find in the US is more extreme than other Anglo countries (except maybe Canada). It’s very hard to outdo America in adherence to PC.

  31. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility.

    Are mostly caused by the people that live there.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Dave from Oz

    WTF Dude. It's almost as if you don't know the Doctrine of Tragic Dirt.

  32. @Harry Baldwin
    @Supply and Demand

    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.

    Did Biden say he wouldn't take the Indians too? If you've heard something the rest of us haven't, please let us know.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Biden’s major priority will be illegals, but he eventually plans to relax h1b restrictions if the economy improves.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Biden’s major priority will be illegals, but he eventually plans to relax h1b restrictions if the economy improves.

    And that's why you should wish - as I do - that the economy stays in recession/depression for at least 25 years. They only thing that will save America at this point is economic ruin for a full generation. A generation that will grow up hard, bitter, uncharitable, mean.

  33. @Anon
    How many Americans read the Daily Mail? There's no domestic media that will even report on this, so it will never have happened, for all practical purposes. Isn't even Drudge ignoring this stuff now?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @notsaying, @Dan Hayes

    I have become a great reader of the Daily Mail because it’s free and I can leave comments there but of course I am just one person. There will be many stories of immigrants trying to reach us via the Southern border. All that Biden and the other Democratic presidential candidates said about immigration translates into: Come on in, we will never send you back if you can just cross the border and millions will try it.

    Now that we’re down so many millions of jobs and Biden wants to more than double minimum wage, this is exactly the wrong time to increase immigration. But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens? How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals? They won’t be able to do something will have to give.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @notsaying

    Oh, the Republicans will be able to somehow block the minimum wage increase, but not the amnesty.

    , @anon
    @notsaying

    But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens?

    Why should they? No matter how they abuse the US workers, they still get lots of votes. It's all good for them!

    How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals?

    Why do you assume the DNCe has any use for US workers, except to harvest ballots from them every couple of years?

    They won’t be able to do something will have to give.

    We shall all give, whether we like it or not. Population replacement doesn't just happen all by itself, y'know.

  34. Anon[326] • Disclaimer says:

    I guess Biden will let them in. Too bad we don’t have an effective law-enforcing conservative party that could have defeated Biden last November. Too bad the main alternative to the Democrats is controlled by liars, delusionals, and seditionists who repel normal voters. Maybe we’ll have a responsible conservative party one of these decades.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon

    Too bad we don’t have an effective law-enforcing conservative party that could have defeated Biden last November.

    Evidently, you missed what went on. You should say, "Too bad we don't have an honest news media that informs the people rather than just pimps for the Democrats. And too bad we don't have an impartial social media that doesn't censor conservatives."

    , @Neuday
    @Anon


    Maybe we’ll have a responsible conservative party one of these decades.
     
    Is it somehow more difficult to steal an election from a "responsible conservative party"? It seems to me the apparatus of a police state is being constructed alongside a wholly compliant media, leading toward some sort of global digital currency system that will track the transfer of every monetary unit and monitoring of social interactions. It's not really that far off at all, and any party opposed to it will not be permitted, and certainly not any party attractive to White people. You can "vote" Socialism in but you have to shoot your way out of it. Same with genocide.
  35. @Anon7
    One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger
    Matthew Yglesias

    “If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. We can’t compete with the huge population clusters of the global marketplace by keeping our population static or letting it diminish, or with our crumbling transit and unaffordable housing. The winner in the future world is going to have more—more ideas, more ambition, more utilization of resources, more people.”

    Exactly how many Americans do we need to win? According to Matthew Yglesias, one billion.

    Replies: @Oswald Spengler, @notsaying, @Anonymous, @Sebastian Hawks

    This guy is so wrong he makes my head spin.

    He seems to think that loosening all restraints on people will make this a better world. We have had too much unrestrained population growth in the last 100 years and already there’s too many people on Earth. We need to stabilize the world’s population and slowly reduce it.

    We are ruining the environment for people and all the non-human life on Earth as well. There are not enough resources for the people we have now on Earth or habitats for non-human life. I hope someone somewhere is writing a book to refute his.

    • Agree: Polistra, HammerJack
    • Replies: @Anon7
    @notsaying

    He's not talking about population growth. He's saying that the population of the USA is leveling off around 400 million. He's talking about immigration at a level that gets our population up to a billion by 2100 AD.

    Imagine twenty million Somalis living in America. Five million Venezuelans. A hundred million Han Chinese. Fifty million Indians. Twenty million Ethiopians. Five million Indonesians. Thirty million Mexicans.

    Every little town in America has tens of thousands. Every little village has a thousand "refugees".

    And you're paying for it. Even though there are no jobs for you, a filthy infidel white Christian Nazi. And, based on the wave of immigrants that appeared in Europe in the last five years, at least you won't have trouble finding husbands for your daughters.

    I hope this helps.

  36. I met a Honduran once. Great guy. Spoke no English and struggled with simple tasks. But a real nice guy.

    These Hondurans will contribute greatly to America. I say let them in. We need workers to contribute to American exceptionalism and to defend the Capitol, the temple of freedom.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Just another serf

    https://www.romeduckstore.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Farmer-Woman-Rubber-Duck-slant-right-Rome-Duck-Store-510x510-1.jpg

    Replies: @Autochthon

  37. Meanwhile, the most far left liberal of Congress members are collectively experiencing a certifiable “Losing My Religion” moment regarding border wall efficiency.

    That’s them in the corner…

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
  38. Anon[750] • Disclaimer says:

    I was reading somewhere that slavery got a big boost as an industry because the practice of indentured servitude was dying out, and the elites were desperate to get cheap labor some way or other.

    Being stormed from below the border–elites desperate for cheap labor peons again and realizing they can’t get away with slavery in this day and age.

  39. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    There are no voices of disagreement in this story. And yet I think a majority of Americans are not for all the things mentioned in this article.

    Maybe they can get this all passed in the new Congress. But there will be a lot of disagreement too. 2020 was a lousy year. We will still be spending extra trillions this year over the virus. We will still be down many millions of jobs. Given the miserable rollout of vaccines how many businesses will close due to the virus? How can this be a time to make big commitments to all our illegal immigrants and new promises to much higher numbers of future immigrants?

    This strikes me as a Utopian vision of US immigration, one in which we can absorb infinite numbers of people and not be affected by it or make any sacrifices for it.

    This vision will not survive contact with reality.

  40. Civil War here we come. We are net down 10 million jobs from pre Covid. Open borders, 50 million new immigrants minimum.

    The plan obviously is to use the 50 million plus 50 million amnesty illegals to round up 100 million deplorables in Geely happy joy labor camps.

  41. @Wilkey
    @WJ


    What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver.
     
    Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty (assuming the Senate doesn’t get rid of the filibuster). But if Congress does pass an amnesty they will unleash a whirlwind of protest so massive it will cause the ground to shake.

    And remember there is plenty of crazy on the Trump side, too. Trump and some of his overzealous fans cost Republicans those two seats in Georgia. “We don’t them,” they said. “We should teach the RINOs a lesson.” Now do you wish we still had those seats?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    “ Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty”

    Which may happen. Tillis, Murkowski, Rubio, Collins, Sasse, Portman, Graham, Scott, Paul, Cornyn.

    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Lot


    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.
     
    Voitng “yea” on cloture will be considered a vote for amnesty by any and all groups that track the issue. The gimmick of voting for cloture but against the bill was shown for the lie it is long ago. Enough voters understand that simple concept.

    Most Republicans - even those who generally support more immigration - will want to stick together on this in order to try to regain the majority in 2022. Even guys like Marco Rubio - who would see a path back into favor with conservatives after his betrayal as a member of the Gang of Hate back in 2013 - could vote against it.

    With the economy probably heading for recession, with millions of Americans out of work or substantially poorer, with millions still angry about a real or alleged stolen election, and with Joe Biden doing just about anything to destroy the economy and drive up the deficit, there won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @notsaying

  42. @Dave from Oz
    @Cato


    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility.
     
    Are mostly caused by the people that live there.

    Replies: @Polistra

    WTF Dude. It’s almost as if you don’t know the Doctrine of Tragic Dirt.

  43. @Peterike
    @Thomas

    “ Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it”

    Lol. 11 million. The same bullshit number they’ve used for years. It’s more like 30 or 40 million. And millions more to follow.

    But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.”

    The cuck chickens are coming home to roost in a very big way.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ron Mexico

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    Camel’s nose inside the tent, and not the first. Why not cut to the chase and award everyone citizenship now, before they’ve even left their own countries? Why not award American citizenship to every single person on earth? It’s not as though it’s worth anything anymore.

  44. @Abe
    @Cato


    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption
     
    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward- Los Angeles?

    In my Top 10 list of Steve Pith-Riffs is his observation that what blacks and Hispanics really are fleeing is the nightmare that comes of living among their own first, second, and third cousins. After this Summer of Floyd, and my discovery of how bat-sh!t crazy a good 25-30% of fellow whites are (recent example- “FBI urges Americans to stay away from national monuments. Can no longer guarantee the safety of those who come to demolish them...”) I’m more sanguine about the arrival of a few extra Latinos. Another case in point- several big tech names have announced their relocation from California to Texas. The only question is how quickly the a-hole California employees that come in tow vote for the exact same types of candidates and policies there that lead to their exodus in the first place.

    Replies: @Polistra

    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward–Los Angeles?

    Speaking of walking a thousand miles in sandals, exactly where do these people sleep at night? Though some have knapsacks, few appear to be carrying so much as a sleeping bag or a few bottles of water. Speaking of–what do they eat, what do they drink, where do they answer the call of nature?

    Why is it never raining in the photos? BTW, this Daily Mail pic would never pass muster in the US media–it shows the composition of the pack as roughly 100% military-age males. Way too close to the truth for the MSM here.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Polistra


    Speaking of walking a thousand miles in sandals, exactly where do these people sleep at night? Though some have knapsacks, few appear to be carrying so much as a sleeping bag or a few bottles of water. Speaking of–what do they eat, what do they drink, where do they answer the call of nature?
     
    Those are good questions that would be asked by a curious person who wants to understand the situation. "Journalists," however, are not such people.

    They are utterly incurious about anything except, "will this support the narrative?" So when they refuse to ask questions, you just have to start speculating about why the answers would be counter-narrative.

    In this case, it would seem these are not spontaneous happenings and some third party is sponsoring these people and providing logistics. Who? That must be a counter-narrative answer as well.
  45. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Harry Baldwin

    Biden's major priority will be illegals, but he eventually plans to relax h1b restrictions if the economy improves.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    Biden’s major priority will be illegals, but he eventually plans to relax h1b restrictions if the economy improves.

    And that’s why you should wish – as I do – that the economy stays in recession/depression for at least 25 years. They only thing that will save America at this point is economic ruin for a full generation. A generation that will grow up hard, bitter, uncharitable, mean.

  46. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    The US is cutting off the incentive to migrate by working at a frantic pace to make itself just as crappy and dysfunctional as the countries they are fleeing from, therefore removing any reason for them to migrate.
    Problem solved. It’s a stupid solution, but it is the solution the American people have permitted to be foisted on them, so we’re stuck with it.
    Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m heading back to my local beach to resume my project to drain the Pacific Ocean with a little tin pail.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Alfa158

    The USA is crappy and getting worse by the day but 1) it's still better than the world's worst countries in terms of living standards and 2) the USA offers them Free Stuff which they can't get back home.

    They'll keep coming. What the Dems are about to do will ensure that they'll be coming in much larger numbers than ever before.

  47. Let all the Hondurans come here, every one of them. And then let us go there. And so on.

  48. @Peterike
    @Supply and Demand

    “ I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits.”

    Except now you’re going to get both. And at ten times the numbers.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    S&D is a noodle-armed c*nt that teaches in a Chinese university and is high on his own farts. Everything he says can go straight in the trash.

  49. @Anon
    How many Americans read the Daily Mail? There's no domestic media that will even report on this, so it will never have happened, for all practical purposes. Isn't even Drudge ignoring this stuff now?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @notsaying, @Dan Hayes

    The Daily Mail: The World’s Newspaper of Record.

    (And a lot of Americans recognize and appreciate this fact!)

  50. There are 197 million whites in America out of 330 million people in America. For America to become majority non-white, 60 million non-whites need to stream in under the Joe Biden presidency. That’s a very tough target to meet.

    • Replies: @Dan Smith
    @anonymous

    Joe Biden sez: Hold my beer.

    , @Anonymous Jew
    @anonymous

    For anyone with a modicum of foresight, what matters is births. And US Whites are already below 50%. (For the purpose of maintaining our standards of living, I would also count Fancy Asians with Whites, but they have even less kids).

    Replies: @anonymous

  51. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    I said here the other day that I thought we were crazy for not offering help to them and the other countries in Central America devastated by the hurricanes this fall.

    But the problem with helping the poor people of those countries is that too many of their own people stand in the way: the elites, the gangs, the corrupt politicians and criminal justice system.

    How do you suggest we push aside the 10-20% of people exploiting the rest of the people in these countries?

    The answer cannot be that all these exploited people get to come here. On that basis we would have 80-90% of the whole world entitled to come here.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @notsaying

    The answer is Make The United Fruit Company Great Again!

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy, @Gary in Gramercy

  52. Anon[118] • Disclaimer says:

    Liberals have not thought this whole business through. If Hispanics pour over the southern border into the US, entering a country in which Soro-funded prosecutors have decided not to prosecute anyone for crimes, in other words create a total breakdown of law and order in our cities, well, Hispanics already have a breakdown of law and order at home. They don’t want the same thing in the US.

    If blacks and their white Antifa allies keep burning out Hispanic businesses in our cities, the only way Hispanics are going to be able to run businesses at all is to begin a reign of terror against blacks and liberal whites. With no prosecutions by Soro-funded prosecutors, they’ll be able to get away with it. If Hispanics flood in, both liberal whites and blacks will be targeted by them and forced out of our cities. Hispanic gang violence against blacks will go up by a factor of ten. Hispanics have everything to gain from it. They’ll gain territory, and push out black competition for working class jobs, and they will be able to establish and protect their own businesses from black rioting and theft.

  53. Anon[118] • Disclaimer says:

    Liberals have not thought this whole business through. If Hispanics pour over the southern border into the US, entering a country in which Soros-funded prosecutors have decided not to prosecute anyone for crimes, in other words create a total breakdown of law and order in our cities, well, Hispanics already have a breakdown of law and order at home. They don’t want the same thing in the US.

    If blacks and their white Antifa allies keep burning out Hispanic businesses in our cities, the only way Hispanics are going to be able to run businesses at all is to begin a reign of terror against blacks and liberal whites. With no prosecutions by Soros-funded prosecutors, they’ll be able to get away with it. If Hispanics flood in, both liberal whites and blacks will be targeted by them and forced out of our cities. Hispanic gang violence against blacks will go up by a factor of ten. Hispanics have everything to gain from it. They’ll gain territory, and push out black competition for working class jobs, and they will be able to establish and protect their own businesses from black rioting and theft.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @Anon

    Isn't that the plan? The elites know how to divide and conquer.

  54. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Eugenics ?

  55. Everyone knows that entering places illegally is Who Americans Are.

    That’s why I think of the Capitol Hill rioters as Undocumented Politicians.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @al gore rhythms


    That’s why I think of the Capitol Hill rioters as Undocumented Politicians.
     
    Congress is at least willing to use deadly force to protect its own borders. Maybe the Capitol Hill police should be redeployed to the border.
    , @Anonymous Jew
    @al gore rhythms

    You can play these logic games all day long with leftist arguments. They say if leftists didn’t have double standards they’d have no standards at all. That’s not true. The sole standard they follow is that they’re anti-White. When you understand that leftists are actually pretty consistent.

  56. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    It seems clear that either America is dead and gone already or any legalization legalization can be reversed. In the former, the upcoming generation of ‘Americans’ is less than half American. The majority are non-whites of various brands. What do another eleven (will be 30) million matter? The only ways out of that hole are non-democratc.. In the latter, we have to stop thinking of these amnesty plus prizes laws as irreversible. A populist President and Congress can just strip them of their citizenship and deport them. The courts may not approve, but what majority non-white country is a stickler for laws and judges?

    How do we get a populist president after the first populist presidential candidate was such a failure? Easy, the success Trump had playing Candidate Trump in 2016 shows the overwhelming popularity of populism. Think about it, Trump was a very unpopular man, a reality tv figure totally unfit for office. IIRC, the majority of Trump voters thought he should not be President. Any mildly charismatic candidate with only run of the politician personality disorders would have easily won 60% of the popular vote.

    How do we get that candidate? Maybe by withdrawing completely from the culture war red team/blue team fight. We cannot win without white moderates and liberals leaving the globalist coalition. We cannot win them over if they think that voting for peace, deporting aliens, and building manufacturing capacity means abortion will be banned, sex-based anti-discrimination laws are on the chopping block, and so on. The only thing the Republican establishment is willing to do for their base is piss off liberals. However fun that is, the survival of America is important. I don’t know about you, but I would have a trans woman in every bathroom in America if that were the price of keeping America American. Do you really want to see the environment trashed so much that you’ll let America die for it? Worse comes to worse, if you think the green new deal with destroy the economy, the weaker economy will be less of a draw for immigrants.

    Do not vote for tax-cut, Israel first Republicans. Do not support the Republicans at all. Support the Democrats and tell anyone who will listen that you’ll support populists anywhere on the ideological spectrum. If/when there is a populist candidate in a primary, vote for him or her. Volunteer to knock on doors. Talk him up with your friends. Voting Republican only gets us more immigrants, because the Republican elite need the cheap labor for businesses that produce physical products.

    Much like Republicans only willing to give the base angry liberals, the Democrats are not willing to give their white base much of anything. They will soon realize they do not have a future in a Democratic Party that is rapidly importing new voters. Put some sand in the gears. Ask white Democrats why that party will continue representing them once there are enough NAMs to win every election.

    • Replies: @IHTG
    @Rob

    Just what do you think "populist" means

    Replies: @Rob

  57. @notsaying
    @Anon

    I have become a great reader of the Daily Mail because it's free and I can leave comments there but of course I am just one person. There will be many stories of immigrants trying to reach us via the Southern border. All that Biden and the other Democratic presidential candidates said about immigration translates into: Come on in, we will never send you back if you can just cross the border and millions will try it.

    Now that we're down so many millions of jobs and Biden wants to more than double minimum wage, this is exactly the wrong time to increase immigration. But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens? How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals? They won't be able to do something will have to give.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @anon

    Oh, the Republicans will be able to somehow block the minimum wage increase, but not the amnesty.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
  58. @notsaying
    @Cato

    I said here the other day that I thought we were crazy for not offering help to them and the other countries in Central America devastated by the hurricanes this fall.

    But the problem with helping the poor people of those countries is that too many of their own people stand in the way: the elites, the gangs, the corrupt politicians and criminal justice system.

    How do you suggest we push aside the 10-20% of people exploiting the rest of the people in these countries?

    The answer cannot be that all these exploited people get to come here. On that basis we would have 80-90% of the whole world entitled to come here.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    The answer is Make The United Fruit Company Great Again!

    • Replies: @Old and Grumpy
    @Redneck farmer

    I hate bananas. I hate that Central America allowed itself to be corrupted over bananas. Everything from taste to politics is rotten with bananas.

    , @Gary in Gramercy
    @Redneck farmer

    Golden telephones por todo el mundo!

  59. @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    But if Congress does pass an amnesty...
     
    Legal residence is not an "amnesty", it's an unearned welfare benefit. Worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Which devalues our own citizenship.

    Literally.

    Replies: @Clyde

    We have tens of millions of foreigners living here who are legal residents, who have no huge desire to become citizens or to start the process of becoming US citizens.
    Having your green card/legal residency is as good as being a US citizen except for–

    You cannot vote (not legally anyways)
    As a US citizen it is easier to import, bring in family to immigrate here. Aka chain migration.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Clyde

    You cannot vote (not legally anyways)

    Now that it's confirmed that voting doesn't matter anyway, they're none the worse for it.

  60. @Anon7
    One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger
    Matthew Yglesias

    “If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. We can’t compete with the huge population clusters of the global marketplace by keeping our population static or letting it diminish, or with our crumbling transit and unaffordable housing. The winner in the future world is going to have more—more ideas, more ambition, more utilization of resources, more people.”

    Exactly how many Americans do we need to win? According to Matthew Yglesias, one billion.

    Replies: @Oswald Spengler, @notsaying, @Anonymous, @Sebastian Hawks

    • Replies: @Voltarde
    @Anonymous


    "The United states is running out of people. It is facing an aging population, falling birth rate and economic recession caused by the coronavirus pandemic. These issues will have huge implications on the size of the workforce and the consumer base."
     
    It's more likely that we will run out of unskilled tasks--previously performed by unskilled migrants--that robots and AI can't automate.

    Top 10 Construction Robots in Use Around the World

    https://www.eetimes.com/top-10-construction-robots-in-use-around-the-world/#
    , @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    https://bayareamonitor.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Traffic-for-Web.jpg

    Yessir; too few people around these days – that's the trouble. Whole damned nation is a damned ghost town.

    Say, I wonder if there is historical precedent for a nation with expansive, unsettled land and a relatively finite population, and what that might mean for the ability of that population to prosper and prevent tyranny, and to in turn increasing their own numbers naturally; I also wonder if perhaps overpopulation causes people to fail to increase naturally for want of resources.... Say, maybe some wise old scientist and statesman has already contemplated the idea:


    Land being thus plenty in America, and so cheap as that a labouring Man, that understands Husbandry, can in a short Time save Money enough to purchase a Piece of new Land sufficient for a Plantation, whereon he may subsist a Family; such are not afraid to marry; for if they even look far enough forward to consider how their Children when grown up are to be provided for, they see that more Land is to be had at Rates equally easy, all Circumstances considered.

     

    Replies: @Neoconned

    , @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    https://bayareamonitor.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Traffic-for-Web.jpg

    Yessir; too few people around these days – that's the trouble. Whole damned nation is a damned ghost town.

    Say, I wonder if there is historical precedent for a nation with expansive, unsettled land and a relatively finite population, and what that might mean for the ability of that population to prosper and prevent tyranny, and to in turn increasing their own numbers naturally; I also wonder if perhaps overpopulation causes people to fail to increase naturally for want of resources.... Say, maybe some wise old scientist and statesman has already contemplated the idea:


    Land being thus plenty in America, and so cheap as that a labouring Man, that understands Husbandry, can in a short Time save Money enough to purchase a Piece of new Land sufficient for a Plantation, whereon he may subsist a Family; such are not afraid to marry; for if they even look far enough forward to consider how their Children when grown up are to be provided for, they see that more Land is to be had at Rates equally easy, all Circumstances considered.

     

  61. @AnotherDad
    @WJ


    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.
     
    WJ, you're making this far too binary.

    I was 100% behind Trump, both in the primaries and general in 2016 and for re-election in 2020. For precisely this reason. We need to halt this demographic coup against Americans and reward any politician who stands up to it in the least.

    Trump was the only way to vote, if you care about America. Period.

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don't care about your children's future in America or you're a confused bozo who can't see the forest from the trees.

    But that said: Trump is full of glaring serious flaws that degraded his performance. He's an egotist. He cares more about "Donald Trump" than America. He has great energy but is intellectually lazy. He listens to his mediocre relatives. He turned out to be an exceedingly poor manager--choosing competent people, demanding loyalty, developing a coherent program and a plan to carry it out. (Stuff you'd think a "businessman" would do well.) While a terrific cheerleader for Donald J. Trump, he was exceedingly poor at clear, cogent, logical explanations of his nationalist program. (See debates.) He didn't stand up for his people--core white America--against minoritarian assault and blood libel. He didn't grab opportunities on the Democrats assault on the rule-of-law.

    Trump is a hero for giving us the first quasi-nationalist option in decades. But that said, Trump's flaws made him far less than he could and should have been ... and we must get beyond Trump and do better.

    To acknowledge all that is not to say that the other guy is preferable. No Biden, Harris, the Democrats are a disaster for America.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Goddard, @WJ

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don’t care about your children’s future in America or you’re a confused bozo who can’t see the forest from the trees.

    I didn’t vote. I am registered in a solid blue state. No point.

    Sometimes, I think that without the electoral college, the energy of individual voters would be released. For example, I don’t participate in campaigns because every vote isn’t relevant. But if every vote counted, I would be out there arguing and knocking on doors. My suspicion is that Democrats have already thought about this and won’t push to abolish the electoral college. They must know that their base is not mobilizable in this way.

  62. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    “It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is.”

    For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California. A contractor I know has made several million dollars by expanding the capacity of houses, including turning garages of homes into dormitories. These guys will be leaf-blower operators. When I sit in my back yard, half the time I have to wear my gun-range sound suppressor because one can hear an angry leaf-blower growling from two blocks away. They are all over the place. I used to listen to the birds tweeting...Coleridge’s advice: to his son Hartley: A life close to nature, my boy! For me this has become a life close to leaf-blowers; and here come more of them.

    Reg, the masks in the front row do not cover the nose — so yes, agreed, perfect assimilation into the existing demographic.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @donut, @HA

  63. Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    Thank you for thinking of America, Big Guy, but you are still far too Slow. Staple a green card to their migration documents right when they step across the border! Hope, unity, decency, truth. Let the healing begin.

    This policy has been approved by the Most Eminent Judge of Hula-Hula-Sailor, HI, and a majority of his subordinates in the Supreme Court of the United States.

  64. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    Its the magic dirt theory in full display. People make the difference. Dirt doesn’t except if you are a farmer, and we like to call it soil. . If Hondurans are all that, can’t they solve their own problems? Instead they will come here bringing with them their crime, sexual harassment, and poverty. Our legal system is already corrupt, and the lack of jobs are killing American’s path of upward mobility. So there is that to consider for those courageous Hondurans sporting new sneakers and masks, which will be perfectly clean when the caravan crosses over our border. Funny how that works.

  65. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    Are we allowed to use carpet, roll, and Harris in the same sentence?

  66. @Redneck farmer
    @notsaying

    The answer is Make The United Fruit Company Great Again!

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy, @Gary in Gramercy

    I hate bananas. I hate that Central America allowed itself to be corrupted over bananas. Everything from taste to politics is rotten with bananas.

  67. @Peterike
    @Thomas

    “ Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it”

    Lol. 11 million. The same bullshit number they’ve used for years. It’s more like 30 or 40 million. And millions more to follow.

    But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.”

    The cuck chickens are coming home to roost in a very big way.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ron Mexico

    “But hey, at least ole Joe doesn’t tweet rude things or act “un Presidential.” I am laughing and crying at the same time. This perfectly describes some of my Evangelical “conservative” friends to a T. Ben Sasse types. F em.

  68. @Alfa158
    @Cato

    The US is cutting off the incentive to migrate by working at a frantic pace to make itself just as crappy and dysfunctional as the countries they are fleeing from, therefore removing any reason for them to migrate.
    Problem solved. It’s a stupid solution, but it is the solution the American people have permitted to be foisted on them, so we’re stuck with it.
    Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m heading back to my local beach to resume my project to drain the Pacific Ocean with a little tin pail.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    The USA is crappy and getting worse by the day but 1) it’s still better than the world’s worst countries in terms of living standards and 2) the USA offers them Free Stuff which they can’t get back home.

    They’ll keep coming. What the Dems are about to do will ensure that they’ll be coming in much larger numbers than ever before.

    • Agree: notsaying
  69. @Lot
    @Wilkey

    “ Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty”

    Which may happen. Tillis, Murkowski, Rubio, Collins, Sasse, Portman, Graham, Scott, Paul, Cornyn.

    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.

    Voitng “yea” on cloture will be considered a vote for amnesty by any and all groups that track the issue. The gimmick of voting for cloture but against the bill was shown for the lie it is long ago. Enough voters understand that simple concept.

    Most Republicans – even those who generally support more immigration – will want to stick together on this in order to try to regain the majority in 2022. Even guys like Marco Rubio – who would see a path back into favor with conservatives after his betrayal as a member of the Gang of Hate back in 2013 – could vote against it.

    With the economy probably heading for recession, with millions of Americans out of work or substantially poorer, with millions still angry about a real or alleged stolen election, and with Joe Biden doing just about anything to destroy the economy and drive up the deficit, there won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Wilkey


    There won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.
     
    There will be no actual "debate." We've entered the post-debate phase of US history. At the very most you'll get a "first the verdict, then the trial" variety of scripted song and dance
    , @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

  70. @anonymous
    There are 197 million whites in America out of 330 million people in America. For America to become majority non-white, 60 million non-whites need to stream in under the Joe Biden presidency. That's a very tough target to meet.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Anonymous Jew

    Joe Biden sez: Hold my beer.

  71. @al gore rhythms
    Everyone knows that entering places illegally is Who Americans Are.

    That's why I think of the Capitol Hill rioters as Undocumented Politicians.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Anonymous Jew

    That’s why I think of the Capitol Hill rioters as Undocumented Politicians.

    Congress is at least willing to use deadly force to protect its own borders. Maybe the Capitol Hill police should be redeployed to the border.

    • Agree: al gore rhythms
  72. @James Speaks
    California bound, I hope!

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Hannah Katz

    Feels good to say if you and your children don’t live or work in Cali, I guess, but it is rather foolish.

    1. If not the new Honduran invaders, some of their offspring will move to other States. Those who eventually apply for college or corporate jobs will be explicitly advantaged over white and Asian Americans.

    2. Even if the latest tranche of low-skilled, net-tax-consumer Hondurans stay in California, taxpayers across the USA will pay for part of their medical care, food stamps, education, and in some cases prosecution and incarceration anyway through the fed gov.

    3. Consumers will pay, too, as massive printing / borrowing of money by the fed gov to bail out the state/city governments in California and their perpetually-poor hordes will cause price and rent inflation.

    4. The half of Americans who pay net federal income tax will have to pay a bit more to make up for the new Hondurans and their offspring getting free cash in the form of “refundable” federal income-tax credits.

    5. If the feds institute a universal — or not so universal – basic income, you brilliant non-Californians will pay for the latest thousand Honduran leeches too.

    6. Those of us who live in California and have (futilely) worked to prevent immivasion don’t deserve the ill will and spiteful chortling. We ought to care about all Americans, including those normal patriotic civilized Americans caught behind what are now almost enemy lines. Watch as it happens to your State next if not happening already.

    We’re all watching our country become an overcrowded, polluted, impoverished, Balkanized, less intelligent, low-trust Third Worldy kind of place. Worse, perhaps, because Third World countries sometimes don’t have large hostile or unassimilated groups of different races and religions to contend with on top of all the other misery — let alone a very large dim witted group trained to hate them, like African-“Americans.”

    May God help us find a way to increase trade, tourism, and charitable works with Honduras to help the good people struggling there. But our first priority is to save or reclaim part of our country from them and any other interlopers whom we simply cannot afford.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @RadicalCenter

    You're right, of course. I was trying to suggest that it would be good to have the woke experience the fruits of their labors.

    , @bomag
    @RadicalCenter

    Well said, but some of us in other western states have seen the Californians who enabled this immigration move to our states and start agitating for the same policies that ruined their former home. And I imagine the Hondurans be be along after their work is finished in the golden state to work their magic in another place. Rather maddening that nice things are so hard to keep.

    Gavin Newsom likes the state of Montana; vacations there; named one of his kids Montana; the state's tourist bureau has the slogan, "Last Best Place" (for now.)

  73. @Supply and Demand
    I’ll take Joe’s Muchachos over Don’s Dalits. White collar America will finally be prioritized again.

    Replies: @Peterike, @Harry Baldwin, @RadicalCenter

    That’s a clever phrase 😉 but US Citizens should be prioritized over all non-citizens, whatever the nature of the citizens’ education and work.

  74. @Polistra
    @Abe


    And to flee those blights they set their weary, dusty, sandal-bedecked feet toward--Los Angeles?
     
    Speaking of walking a thousand miles in sandals, exactly where do these people sleep at night? Though some have knapsacks, few appear to be carrying so much as a sleeping bag or a few bottles of water. Speaking of--what do they eat, what do they drink, where do they answer the call of nature?

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/01/16/23/38094420-9155479-image-a-16_1610839552726.jpg

    Why is it never raining in the photos? BTW, this Daily Mail pic would never pass muster in the US media--it shows the composition of the pack as roughly 100% military-age males. Way too close to the truth for the MSM here.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Speaking of walking a thousand miles in sandals, exactly where do these people sleep at night? Though some have knapsacks, few appear to be carrying so much as a sleeping bag or a few bottles of water. Speaking of–what do they eat, what do they drink, where do they answer the call of nature?

    Those are good questions that would be asked by a curious person who wants to understand the situation. “Journalists,” however, are not such people.

    They are utterly incurious about anything except, “will this support the narrative?” So when they refuse to ask questions, you just have to start speculating about why the answers would be counter-narrative.

    In this case, it would seem these are not spontaneous happenings and some third party is sponsoring these people and providing logistics. Who? That must be a counter-narrative answer as well.

    • Agree: Polistra
  75. @Redneck farmer
    @notsaying

    The answer is Make The United Fruit Company Great Again!

    Replies: @Old and Grumpy, @Gary in Gramercy

    Golden telephones por todo el mundo!

  76. I’d just like to take a moment to ponder on how he won the election and is about to inaugurated but nobody is really talking about or thinking about Joe Biden or to give him his true name ‘Not Trump’. In fact you’d be forgiven for thinking President Black Lives Matter was about to take office.

    Although an interesting aside, the decline of religion has gotten to the point that nobody even seems fit to mention Biden being the second Catholic president after JFK. Obviously Biden is unlikely to be observant in 2021 but still, if anyone even remotely cared about him or his ‘policies’ (Read: If you like the status quo, you can keep it) there would be at least some money to be made talking about it.

  77. @notsaying
    @Anon7

    This guy is so wrong he makes my head spin.

    He seems to think that loosening all restraints on people will make this a better world. We have had too much unrestrained population growth in the last 100 years and already there's too many people on Earth. We need to stabilize the world's population and slowly reduce it.

    We are ruining the environment for people and all the non-human life on Earth as well. There are not enough resources for the people we have now on Earth or habitats for non-human life. I hope someone somewhere is writing a book to refute his.

    Replies: @Anon7

    He’s not talking about population growth. He’s saying that the population of the USA is leveling off around 400 million. He’s talking about immigration at a level that gets our population up to a billion by 2100 AD.

    Imagine twenty million Somalis living in America. Five million Venezuelans. A hundred million Han Chinese. Fifty million Indians. Twenty million Ethiopians. Five million Indonesians. Thirty million Mexicans.

    Every little town in America has tens of thousands. Every little village has a thousand “refugees”.

    And you’re paying for it. Even though there are no jobs for you, a filthy infidel white Christian Nazi. And, based on the wave of immigrants that appeared in Europe in the last five years, at least you won’t have trouble finding husbands for your daughters.

    I hope this helps.

  78. @Anon
    I guess Biden will let them in. Too bad we don't have an effective law-enforcing conservative party that could have defeated Biden last November. Too bad the main alternative to the Democrats is controlled by liars, delusionals, and seditionists who repel normal voters. Maybe we'll have a responsible conservative party one of these decades.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Neuday

    Too bad we don’t have an effective law-enforcing conservative party that could have defeated Biden last November.

    Evidently, you missed what went on. You should say, “Too bad we don’t have an honest news media that informs the people rather than just pimps for the Democrats. And too bad we don’t have an impartial social media that doesn’t censor conservatives.”

  79. @Clyde
    @Reg Cæsar

    We have tens of millions of foreigners living here who are legal residents, who have no huge desire to become citizens or to start the process of becoming US citizens.
    Having your green card/legal residency is as good as being a US citizen except for--

    You cannot vote (not legally anyways)
    As a US citizen it is easier to import, bring in family to immigrate here. Aka chain migration.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    You cannot vote (not legally anyways)

    Now that it’s confirmed that voting doesn’t matter anyway, they’re none the worse for it.

  80. @Just another serf
    I met a Honduran once. Great guy. Spoke no English and struggled with simple tasks. But a real nice guy.

    These Hondurans will contribute greatly to America. I say let them in. We need workers to contribute to American exceptionalism and to defend the Capitol, the temple of freedom.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Mestizo duckie, you're the one; you make bath time lots of fun....

  81. @AnotherDad
    @WJ


    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.
     
    WJ, you're making this far too binary.

    I was 100% behind Trump, both in the primaries and general in 2016 and for re-election in 2020. For precisely this reason. We need to halt this demographic coup against Americans and reward any politician who stands up to it in the least.

    Trump was the only way to vote, if you care about America. Period.

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don't care about your children's future in America or you're a confused bozo who can't see the forest from the trees.

    But that said: Trump is full of glaring serious flaws that degraded his performance. He's an egotist. He cares more about "Donald Trump" than America. He has great energy but is intellectually lazy. He listens to his mediocre relatives. He turned out to be an exceedingly poor manager--choosing competent people, demanding loyalty, developing a coherent program and a plan to carry it out. (Stuff you'd think a "businessman" would do well.) While a terrific cheerleader for Donald J. Trump, he was exceedingly poor at clear, cogent, logical explanations of his nationalist program. (See debates.) He didn't stand up for his people--core white America--against minoritarian assault and blood libel. He didn't grab opportunities on the Democrats assault on the rule-of-law.

    Trump is a hero for giving us the first quasi-nationalist option in decades. But that said, Trump's flaws made him far less than he could and should have been ... and we must get beyond Trump and do better.

    To acknowledge all that is not to say that the other guy is preferable. No Biden, Harris, the Democrats are a disaster for America.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Goddard, @WJ

    You’ve captured my thoughts exactly. Thank you.

  82. @Anon7
    One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger
    Matthew Yglesias

    “If the most challenging crisis in living memory has shown us anything, it’s that America has lost the will and the means to lead. We can’t compete with the huge population clusters of the global marketplace by keeping our population static or letting it diminish, or with our crumbling transit and unaffordable housing. The winner in the future world is going to have more—more ideas, more ambition, more utilization of resources, more people.”

    Exactly how many Americans do we need to win? According to Matthew Yglesias, one billion.

    Replies: @Oswald Spengler, @notsaying, @Anonymous, @Sebastian Hawks

    The world can only really support 1-2 billion people living at first world energy requirements. We need to cull the population down to a more manageable level. If there’s anything to the whole Global Warming spiel it’s the sudden heavy use of fossil fuels by 2 billion developing Asians over the last 30 years when before that only the US, Western Europe, and Japan were using first world energy levels, the rest of the world was a basket-case.

  83. @Lurker
    Will they arrive in time for their stimulus payout?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Don’t worry, the stimmie will be made retroactive for them — just like the Biden tax hikes will be made retroactive for you.

    But hey, Jesus didn’t believe in borders!

  84. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    Thomas, should illegal aliens receive amnesty before African Americans receive reparations? That seems grossly unfair. I wonder if the Congressional Black Caucus will notice this clear injustice.

    • Disagree: Realist
  85. @Anon
    Liberals have not thought this whole business through. If Hispanics pour over the southern border into the US, entering a country in which Soros-funded prosecutors have decided not to prosecute anyone for crimes, in other words create a total breakdown of law and order in our cities, well, Hispanics already have a breakdown of law and order at home. They don't want the same thing in the US.

    If blacks and their white Antifa allies keep burning out Hispanic businesses in our cities, the only way Hispanics are going to be able to run businesses at all is to begin a reign of terror against blacks and liberal whites. With no prosecutions by Soros-funded prosecutors, they'll be able to get away with it. If Hispanics flood in, both liberal whites and blacks will be targeted by them and forced out of our cities. Hispanic gang violence against blacks will go up by a factor of ten. Hispanics have everything to gain from it. They'll gain territory, and push out black competition for working class jobs, and they will be able to establish and protect their own businesses from black rioting and theft.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    Isn’t that the plan? The elites know how to divide and conquer.

  86. Where are all the lefties opposing this foreign transfection of scab labor at the behest of the anti-Americans? Does the blue collar Democrat worker welcome increased downward pressure on his wages? Does the USA family welcome increased taxes to pay for unwanted invader minors, maybe even LESS money for their own spawn? Do Blacks welcome the dilution of their own more-money-for-me grift that they foisted on the country? Do they like paying for new emergency rooms to provide medical care?

    Where are the NEW anti-scab foreigner songs? Where are the “Patriotic” lefties?

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Joe Stalin

    I am a Democrat that voted for Trump twice because of immigration. I am sure I am not the only one who disagrees with the Democratic Party over immigration. But the party doesn't take these views into account.

    The Democratic leadership are dominated by the views of the woke and the progressives that are considerably to the left of where Obama left things in 2016.

    As I said above these people have a "Utopian vision of US immigration, one in which we can absorb infinite numbers of people and not be affected by it or make any sacrifices for it.

    This vision will not survive contact with reality."

    Maybe after four years of Biden's approach to immigration some of the Democratic left that actually cares about Americans will finally wake up about immigration and its consequences. We can only hope. It would help if creative types who write songs and scripts and make art would speak up for Americans in their work like they do for immigrants.

  87. @Rob
    @Thomas

    It seems clear that either America is dead and gone already or any legalization legalization can be reversed. In the former, the upcoming generation of ‘Americans’ is less than half American. The majority are non-whites of various brands. What do another eleven (will be 30) million matter? The only ways out of that hole are non-democratc.. In the latter, we have to stop thinking of these amnesty plus prizes laws as irreversible. A populist President and Congress can just strip them of their citizenship and deport them. The courts may not approve, but what majority non-white country is a stickler for laws and judges?

    How do we get a populist president after the first populist presidential candidate was such a failure? Easy, the success Trump had playing Candidate Trump in 2016 shows the overwhelming popularity of populism. Think about it, Trump was a very unpopular man, a reality tv figure totally unfit for office. IIRC, the majority of Trump voters thought he should not be President. Any mildly charismatic candidate with only run of the politician personality disorders would have easily won 60% of the popular vote.

    How do we get that candidate? Maybe by withdrawing completely from the culture war red team/blue team fight. We cannot win without white moderates and liberals leaving the globalist coalition. We cannot win them over if they think that voting for peace, deporting aliens, and building manufacturing capacity means abortion will be banned, sex-based anti-discrimination laws are on the chopping block, and so on. The only thing the Republican establishment is willing to do for their base is piss off liberals. However fun that is, the survival of America is important. I don’t know about you, but I would have a trans woman in every bathroom in America if that were the price of keeping America American. Do you really want to see the environment trashed so much that you’ll let America die for it? Worse comes to worse, if you think the green new deal with destroy the economy, the weaker economy will be less of a draw for immigrants.

    Do not vote for tax-cut, Israel first Republicans. Do not support the Republicans at all. Support the Democrats and tell anyone who will listen that you’ll support populists anywhere on the ideological spectrum. If/when there is a populist candidate in a primary, vote for him or her. Volunteer to knock on doors. Talk him up with your friends. Voting Republican only gets us more immigrants, because the Republican elite need the cheap labor for businesses that produce physical products.

    Much like Republicans only willing to give the base angry liberals, the Democrats are not willing to give their white base much of anything. They will soon realize they do not have a future in a Democratic Party that is rapidly importing new voters. Put some sand in the gears. Ask white Democrats why that party will continue representing them once there are enough NAMs to win every election.

    Replies: @IHTG

    Just what do you think “populist” means

    • Replies: @Rob
    @IHTG

    Ending immigration, ending the forever war, and revamping the economy so living standards improve for people not named Koch. Reducing inequality, too, Though that will happen without endless immigrants and with renewed manufacturing. Populism no longer means social conservatism and fiscal liberalism. Trump changed the brand. Sort of like how ‘liberal’ used to mean libertarian. The brand changed.

  88. @Wilkey
    @Lot


    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.
     
    Voitng “yea” on cloture will be considered a vote for amnesty by any and all groups that track the issue. The gimmick of voting for cloture but against the bill was shown for the lie it is long ago. Enough voters understand that simple concept.

    Most Republicans - even those who generally support more immigration - will want to stick together on this in order to try to regain the majority in 2022. Even guys like Marco Rubio - who would see a path back into favor with conservatives after his betrayal as a member of the Gang of Hate back in 2013 - could vote against it.

    With the economy probably heading for recession, with millions of Americans out of work or substantially poorer, with millions still angry about a real or alleged stolen election, and with Joe Biden doing just about anything to destroy the economy and drive up the deficit, there won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @notsaying

    There won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.

    There will be no actual “debate.” We’ve entered the post-debate phase of US history. At the very most you’ll get a “first the verdict, then the trial” variety of scripted song and dance

    • Agree: Voltarde, HammerJack
  89. @Harry Baldwin
    @SimpleSong

    In addition, the Mexican yard services seem to have a special dispensation to park their flat-bed equipment trailers on the side of narrow suburban streets, largely blocking one lane. I would think if you were going to work on someone's lawn, you could park in their driveway, but I suppose it's easier to park in the road and anyway no one does anything about it.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    My Whitopia town made the use of gas powered leaf blowers illegal years ago but, because the users are a protected class, namely brown people, it doesn’t write any tickets. Instead they sent letters to every homeowner asking us to ask gardeners to please refrain from using the blowers. I didn’t write back to tell the twits I mow my own damn lawn. (And hey you kids, get off it ! …dadgumit!)

  90. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    “It’s not clear what the intended final destination of the caravan is.”

    For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California. A contractor I know has made several million dollars by expanding the capacity of houses, including turning garages of homes into dormitories. These guys will be leaf-blower operators. When I sit in my back yard, half the time I have to wear my gun-range sound suppressor because one can hear an angry leaf-blower growling from two blocks away. They are all over the place. I used to listen to the birds tweeting...Coleridge’s advice: to his son Hartley: A life close to nature, my boy! For me this has become a life close to leaf-blowers; and here come more of them.

    Reg, the masks in the front row do not cover the nose — so yes, agreed, perfect assimilation into the existing demographic.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @donut, @HA

    “For many or most, the destination is expanded-capacity dwellings here in S. California.”

    For some reason I’m having trouble understanding, the ones who say they want to flee the gang activity of MS-13 seem particularly drawn to Long Island, NY.

    Because as everyone familiar with Long Island knows, that is precisely where you need to go if you want to be certain that MS-13 will never, ever be able to find you.

    • LOL: notsaying
  91. @Anon
    I guess Biden will let them in. Too bad we don't have an effective law-enforcing conservative party that could have defeated Biden last November. Too bad the main alternative to the Democrats is controlled by liars, delusionals, and seditionists who repel normal voters. Maybe we'll have a responsible conservative party one of these decades.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Neuday

    Maybe we’ll have a responsible conservative party one of these decades.

    Is it somehow more difficult to steal an election from a “responsible conservative party”? It seems to me the apparatus of a police state is being constructed alongside a wholly compliant media, leading toward some sort of global digital currency system that will track the transfer of every monetary unit and monitoring of social interactions. It’s not really that far off at all, and any party opposed to it will not be permitted, and certainly not any party attractive to White people. You can “vote” Socialism in but you have to shoot your way out of it. Same with genocide.

  92. @AnotherDad
    @WJ


    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn’t deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.
     
    WJ, you're making this far too binary.

    I was 100% behind Trump, both in the primaries and general in 2016 and for re-election in 2020. For precisely this reason. We need to halt this demographic coup against Americans and reward any politician who stands up to it in the least.

    Trump was the only way to vote, if you care about America. Period.

    If you did not vote for Trump, you either don't care about your children's future in America or you're a confused bozo who can't see the forest from the trees.

    But that said: Trump is full of glaring serious flaws that degraded his performance. He's an egotist. He cares more about "Donald Trump" than America. He has great energy but is intellectually lazy. He listens to his mediocre relatives. He turned out to be an exceedingly poor manager--choosing competent people, demanding loyalty, developing a coherent program and a plan to carry it out. (Stuff you'd think a "businessman" would do well.) While a terrific cheerleader for Donald J. Trump, he was exceedingly poor at clear, cogent, logical explanations of his nationalist program. (See debates.) He didn't stand up for his people--core white America--against minoritarian assault and blood libel. He didn't grab opportunities on the Democrats assault on the rule-of-law.

    Trump is a hero for giving us the first quasi-nationalist option in decades. But that said, Trump's flaws made him far less than he could and should have been ... and we must get beyond Trump and do better.

    To acknowledge all that is not to say that the other guy is preferable. No Biden, Harris, the Democrats are a disaster for America.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Goddard, @WJ

    Trump was a boorish oaf. I won’t deny that but there was simply no option. Well, there was another option and and that was keeping the Senate to block an amnesty bill. Neither happened and we are facing disaster. I am not a dramatic person but I remember what the 86 amnesty did to the country. This is 10x the size of that one. Hoping that Manchin doesn’t agree to eliminating filibuster and that GOP squishes hold tight. Not counting on either.

  93. @Wilkey
    @Lot


    Plus 50 Dems that makes 60. And they can even vote no amnesty while yea on cloture.
     
    Voitng “yea” on cloture will be considered a vote for amnesty by any and all groups that track the issue. The gimmick of voting for cloture but against the bill was shown for the lie it is long ago. Enough voters understand that simple concept.

    Most Republicans - even those who generally support more immigration - will want to stick together on this in order to try to regain the majority in 2022. Even guys like Marco Rubio - who would see a path back into favor with conservatives after his betrayal as a member of the Gang of Hate back in 2013 - could vote against it.

    With the economy probably heading for recession, with millions of Americans out of work or substantially poorer, with millions still angry about a real or alleged stolen election, and with Joe Biden doing just about anything to destroy the economy and drive up the deficit, there won’t be a whole lot of support for a massive amnesty. It’s a debate that will tear the country apart.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @notsaying

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that’s what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering — quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don’t want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @notsaying


    But will that make a difference?
     
    Looking at the results of BLM instigated mayhem, it will if people take that as inspiration.

    Remember Chicago 1968?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XzdltsTfvE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_9OJnRnZjU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqNkmZ3n_bc

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @Wilkey
    @notsaying


    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations
     
    Even with all of your other caveats, there are still two problems:
    1) Mass amnesty encourages further illegal immigration
    2) We should never, ever reward people who receive amnesty with citizenship. Legal permanent residence? Ok, if we absolutely had to. But no way in hell they should ever be allowed to vote.

    The difficulty - nay, impossibility - of ensuring that the Left and the other open borders types would ever live up to their end of any bargain we make on this issue is precisely why we can never pass an amnesty. The minute the amnesty is passed they are trying to undermine it. Almost immediately after the 1986 amnesty passed Chuck Schumer was pressing to remove the requirement that amnestied illegals pay back taxes. Then not long after they undid the work verification requirements, on the grounds that it was causing employers to discriminate against Hispanics.

    When the 2007 amnesty was proposed - right after Republicans lost control of the House and Senate - one of the gimmicks in it was that if they could not find grounds to deny an application for amnesty after some very short period of time (I believe it was 48 hours) then the application would automatically be approved.

    We’ve had promises for more border fencing and promises for more border agents for years that have never been kept. Congress created the “Temporary Protected Status” which was supposed to be, well, temporary, yet most of its recipients are still here after decades.

    The Left has been playing the open borders/white genocide game since before we even knew it was a game. They are much better at it than we are.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying

    , @anon
    @notsaying

    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations.

    That was the deal Reagan signed off on in 1986. How did it work out?

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don’t want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Nope.

    Population replacement is what the DNCe wants, whatever blabbing words may be said the actions are obvious. One-party government of a mass of illiterate peons who will pull the Party lever -- that's the goal.

    It's ironic that Mexico has three credible parties - PRD, PAN, PRI - while the US has one - TDS.

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs

    , @jsm
    @notsaying

    More than time to accept the illegals we have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement?

    You obviously weren't around in the Reagan admin when he talked us all into amnestying the "one million" (turned out to be 4 million) illegals here, with the SOLEMN PROMISE that we'd enforce the border going forward, we would NEVER do another amnesty.


    Riiiighhhhht.

    In actual fact the Reagan amnesty was the poison acorn from which the blighted, twisted, evil tree of mass chain immigration of Mexicans sprang.

    Those illegals of Reagan's, who'd been "living in the shadows", came out of the shadows, all right. And promptly rented apartments to shelter and hide, as well as acquired fake work documents for , their cousins Jose, Pedro, Miguel, Juan, Carlos, and Jorge still in Mexico so they could painlessly sneak in -- and then bring in Guadalupe, who promptly gave birth to an anchor baby.

    Without that FIRST wave of amnestied illegals it would have been MUCH HARDER for Jose Pedro Miguel Juan Carlos Jorge Guad and the baby to all survive in America long enough to get the NEXT amnesty, soon to be provided by biden.

    So, you REALLY think compromising, ok, this many but no more, is gonna DO anything?

    , @Rob
    @notsaying

    The only way we should accept an amnesty and prizes for occupying aliens in exchange for enforcement later is if the enforcement later has teeth. Something along the lines of 11 million amnestied today, not one more than that, and they each put up, say, $100,000 in escrow. If there are any new aliens in America, whether ‘legal’ or not in any year for the next, say, 50 years, then the ones who got amnesty and prizes in 2021 forfeit the escrow funds, lose their residency, their paper-American children lose their citizenship and go home.

    Enforcement later immigration laws have been the football that liberal Lucy holds for conservative Charlie Brown. Every time ‘conservatives’ in office ‘fall’ for it. This time, to the extent possible, conservatives in office need to act in the interests of the country and their voters. We should make it clear that blocking amnesty and prizes, along with preventing any other scheme that puts aliens in America, is the new tax cut. It is the only thing we judge them on. Never vote for a Republican who does not fight the infestation.

    Come to think of it, no amnesty and prizes for aliens now is acceptable. The aliens go home. We took 100 million since 1965. America is currently a third world country for the third world peoples within her borders. Blacks do not live in the first world. No first world nation has that kind of criminality, illegitimacy, and Illiterate Mexicans doing stoop labor in the fields do not live like first worlderx. Adding x million more third worlders will not improve the situation of Americans or the aliens already here. They did not immigrate to Mexico del Norte. It is unfair to them to make America more like the homelands they fled. The Hispanics are here to get away from Hispanics.

    Personally, I would sacrifice any other policy goal to get rid of the aliens. Put a tranny in every bathroom. Teach blacks and Hispanics to hate us. Triple the aid to Israel. Invade (or not) any country. Play nuclear brinksmanship with Russia. Ban handguns. Kick conservatives off Twitter. Implement socialism of any sort. Defund the police.

    There is no issue more important than the infestation of aliens. Keeping America American is the most basic issue. Winning on every other policy goal is worthless if the invasion is not stopped and reversed.

  94. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

    But will that make a difference?

    Looking at the results of BLM instigated mayhem, it will if people take that as inspiration.

    Remember Chicago 1968?

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Joe Stalin

    Yes but getting people to take action on immigration is like pulling teeth. People have themselves convinced that they are being rude and nasty to express an opinion about wanting less of it. That certainly is the message that the immigration lobby and the woke progressives tell them all the time.

    I have no faith they will come out and demonstrate for bringing in fewer people in the future. Even people on this website don't mention the big three immigration reduction groups, I assume because they don't know they exist or aren't on their email list. I am though and have been for years.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  95. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    Why exactly is it our responsibility to solve Honduras’s problems?

    Anyway, I believe we should just pay them to stay in place just like we do for that other tribe located in the Middle East.

    Just think, if that other tribe had to live in conditions reminiscent of their neighbors they’d be trying to move here too.

    The simplest solution is to just to pay the Hondurans to stay home. It works just hunky-dory for the tribe.

    And, aren’t we about to implement that very scenario in the US as soon as China Biden is sworn into office?

  96. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    As Douglas Murray has said, when you import the world’s peoples, you import the world’s problems.

    We’ve all seen the signs from the virtucrats, “No human is illegal,” equally a stupid a phrase as all the others.

    Once, at a a very “oh-so-sincere” dinner party, with people with all the right thoughts, folks were bemoaning the border cages, so I decided to break ranks (after a few glasses of wine), and said to one the more sincere females in the group, “Yeah, tell you what. We’ll tell border agents to send all the military age males from Central American with no skills and no English to YOUR house, where things will be bit more comfortable.”

    Quite the buzz killer.

  97. If Republicans can adopt a platform of Medicare for All, Honduran immigrants will turn into Republican voters.

  98. @Joe Stalin
    Where are all the lefties opposing this foreign transfection of scab labor at the behest of the anti-Americans? Does the blue collar Democrat worker welcome increased downward pressure on his wages? Does the USA family welcome increased taxes to pay for unwanted invader minors, maybe even LESS money for their own spawn? Do Blacks welcome the dilution of their own more-money-for-me grift that they foisted on the country? Do they like paying for new emergency rooms to provide medical care?

    Where are the NEW anti-scab foreigner songs? Where are the "Patriotic" lefties?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-rZzKBOMbA

    Replies: @notsaying

    I am a Democrat that voted for Trump twice because of immigration. I am sure I am not the only one who disagrees with the Democratic Party over immigration. But the party doesn’t take these views into account.

    The Democratic leadership are dominated by the views of the woke and the progressives that are considerably to the left of where Obama left things in 2016.

    As I said above these people have a “Utopian vision of US immigration, one in which we can absorb infinite numbers of people and not be affected by it or make any sacrifices for it.

    This vision will not survive contact with reality.”

    Maybe after four years of Biden’s approach to immigration some of the Democratic left that actually cares about Americans will finally wake up about immigration and its consequences. We can only hope. It would help if creative types who write songs and scripts and make art would speak up for Americans in their work like they do for immigrants.

  99. @Thomas
    And Biden and Harris are getting ready to roll out the red carpet.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-01-15/biden-to-send-congress-bill-to-legalize-11-million-immigrants-who-lack-documentation

    Biden plans early legislation to offer legal status to 11 million immigrants without it
     

    During his first days in office, President-elect Joe Biden plans to send a groundbreaking legislative package to Congress to address the long-elusive goal of immigration reform, including what’s certain to be a controversial centerpiece: a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the country without legal status, according to immigrant rights activists in communication with the Biden-Harris transition team.

    The bill also would provide a shorter pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of people with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who were brought to the U.S. as children, and probably also for certain front-line essential workers, vast numbers of whom are immigrants.

    In a significant departure from many previous immigration bills passed under both Democratic and Republican administrations, the proposed legislation would not contain any provisions directly linking an expansion of immigration with stepped-up enforcement and security measures, said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center Immigrant Justice Fund, who has been consulted on the proposal by Biden staffers.

    Both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have said their legislative proposal would include a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status, and The Times has confirmed the bold opening salvo that the new administration plans in its first days doesn’t include the “security first” political concessions of past efforts.

    Hincapié, who was co-chair of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force on Immigration — part of Biden’s outreach to his top primary rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his progressive base — said that Biden’s decision to not prioritize additional enforcement measures was probably a result of lessons learned from the Obama administration’s failed attempt to appease Republicans by backing tighter immigration enforcement in hopes of gaining their support for immigration relief.

    “This notion concerning immigration enforcement and giving Republicans everything they kept asking for … was flawed from the beginning,” she said.

    Biden-Harris transition team officials declined to comment on the record.

    But on Saturday, Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, sent a memo to the administration’s senior staff that said the new president’s agenda includes “the immigration bill he will send to Congress on his first day in office,” which Klain asserted would “restore humanity to our immigration system.”

    Biden’s proposal lays out what would be the most sweeping and comprehensive immigration package since President Reagan’s Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which granted legal status to 3 million people who were in the country without documentation.

    Under Biden’s plan, immigrants would become eligible for legal permanent residence after five years and for U.S. citizenship after an additional three years — a faster path to citizenship than in previous immigration bills.

    But even with Democrats holding the White House and slender majorities in both chambers of Congress, the bill will probably face months of political wrangling on Capitol Hill and pushback from conservative voters and immigration hard-liners.

    Several immigration activists who spoke with The Times praised the reported scope and scale of the bill and expressed surprise at its ambition. A number of legislators and analysts had predicted that the new administration, at least in its first months in power, would be likely to pursue immigration measures that would stir the least controversy and could be achieved by executive actions rather than legislation.

    “I think this bill is going to lay an important marker in our country’s history,” said Lorella Praeli, an immigrant and longtime activist who has been talking with Biden’s staff, noting that the measure “will not seek to trade immigration relief for enforcement, and that’s huge.”

    Praeli, president of Community Change Action, a progressive group based in Washington that advocates for immigrants, described the bill as “an important opening act.”

    “If there is a silver lining to the Trump era, it’s that it should now be clear to everyone that our system needs a massive overhaul and we can no longer lead with detention and deportation,” she said.

    Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) said in a call with reporters Friday that in the meantime, he was working on a bill seeking immediate protection from deportation and a fast-tracked path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers.

    “It’s time for essential workers to no longer be treated as disposable, but to be celebrated and welcomed as American citizens,” he said. “If your labor feeds, builds and cares for our nation, you have earned the right to stay here with full legal protection, free from fear of deportation.”

    In an interview this week with Univision, Harris gave a preview of the bill’s provisions, including automatic green cards for immigrants with TPS and DACA status, a decrease in wait times for U.S. citizenship from 13 to eight years, and an increase in the number of immigration judges to relieve a significant backlog in cases.

    Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Palm Desert), chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in an interview with The Times that he anticipates the Biden administration will present a combination of executive orders, standalone bills and a comprehensive immigration reform package — the building blocks of which are contained in bills already passed by the House. Among them are the Farm Workforce Modernization Act, the Homeland Security Improvement Act, the Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act, the American Dream and Promise Act and the Venezuela TPS Act.

    Ruiz said that now is the time to act on comprehensive immigration reform, and that a “constant barrage” of dehumanizing rhetoric against immigrants led to a rise in white supremacist backlash under the Trump administration.

    “I believe that our nation has been traumatized,” Ruiz said. “We need to be able to change the narrative to heal from that, to build trust amongst communities and to tone down the hateful rhetoric from the Trump administration. And to really show — not only ourselves but the world — that America still at its core is good and will uphold our humanitarian values.”

    President Trump ignited international condemnation early in his administration when it separated more than 5,000 children from their parents starting in 2017 and ramping up in 2018 as part of a “zero-tolerance” policy on unauthorized attempts to enter the United States.

    The policy was eventually stopped as a result of a national outcry, but not before many adults were deported to Central America, leaving behind hundreds of children, from toddlers to teens. Many are still separated from their parents.

    Leon Rodriguez, who was director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services from 2014 to 2017, said that “the public attitude toward immigration enforcement is at a different place in 2021 than it was at any point prior to the Trump administration.”

    “I think there just has been a lot of things about how immigration enforcement was executed under the Trump administration that didn’t sit right with a lot of Americans, and that just creates a different attitude toward these matters and a different political calculation,” he said.

    Though a traditional enforcement component won’t be part of Biden’s initial bill, that doesn’t mean it can’t be approached at a later time, Rodriguez said.

    But he believes Biden’s overall approach will set an entirely different tone.

    “It’s not going to be about walls and keeping people in Mexico,” he said.

    Ruiz said that rather than simply adding more resources for immigration enforcement, the existing apparatus of federal agencies tasked with security should focus on going after guns, drugs and criminals.

    “What we don’t want is to militarize the border,” he said. “We don’t want to demonize and dehumanize and criminalize an immigration process.”

    But Lora Ries, acting deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Trump in 2019 and now a research fellow for homeland security at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington think tank, said granting most immigrants a pathway to citizenship would sow division and erode the country’s immigration system.

    “Such rewards will attract more people to illegally enter the U.S. to await their eventual green card, undermining border security,” she said.

    Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration law professor at UCLA, said any long-term solution to immigration reform has to address why people migrate in the first place.

    “Legalization is essential, but alone is going to mean we’re going to have the same conversation in 25 years or even sooner,” he said. “While I welcome legalization, I think it’s not enough.”

    That’s exactly what happened as a result of the 1986 reform, Motomura said. This time, however, he thinks a comprehensive immigration reform bill stands a better chance at success. Having a Democratic majority in the Senate makes a difference, he said, but beyond that, “the pandemic has exposed the hypocrisy of [relying on] essential workers who don’t have legal status.”

    “We’re seeing the Republican Party go through a lot of internal upheaval about what it stands for,” he said. “Issues on immigration never used to be as polarized along partisan lines. We may have a moment where there’s some movement for people to vote less on party lines.”

    Rodriguez also said the timing of the bill is important. For years, Republican and Democratic presidents have tackled immigration in incremental ways and deferred or procrastinated on passing a large immigration bill.

    “Biden is saying we are not going to do it that way anymore,” Rodriguez said.

    Hincapié said Biden’s team would be able to bypass legislation to quickly make a number of administrative changes.

    She expects him to announce several executive actions that would expand DACA, overturn Trump’s 2017 travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries and rescind Trump’s public charge rule, which allowed authorities to deny green cards to immigrants who use — or whose U.S. citizen children use — food stamps or other public benefits.

    If the broader bill were to die or take too long to pass, Praeli said, there are alternate venues for Democratic leadership to legalize a substantial group of people — specifically the estimated 5 million essential workers now in the country without legal status.

    As part of COVID relief, the president-elect and Democratic leadership could decide to include measures offering legal status to essential workers via a process known as budget reconciliation, and that would only need 51 votes to pass the Senate.

    “We are talking about potentially 5 million workers who have put their own lives on the line as essential workers,” Praeli said. “You cannot be essential and deportable.”

     

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Peterike, @notsaying, @Rob, @Old and Grumpy, @botazefa, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    And why shouldn’t legalize them. As soon as they become US citizens they’re eligible to be conscripted in the Imperial legions.

    With all the new wars needing to be fought during the Biden administration they’re gonna need a lot of morons to die in foreign wars for Uncle Sam.

    Between all the domestic terrorists, Russia, China, Iran, North Korea and any other upstart country needing bombed back to democracy they’re gonna need lots of useful idiots to do the killing and dying.

  100. @Wilkey
    @WJ


    What Trump wouldn’t do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver.
     
    Biden would have to overcome a filibuster to get an amnesty (assuming the Senate doesn’t get rid of the filibuster). But if Congress does pass an amnesty they will unleash a whirlwind of protest so massive it will cause the ground to shake.

    And remember there is plenty of crazy on the Trump side, too. Trump and some of his overzealous fans cost Republicans those two seats in Georgia. “We don’t them,” they said. “We should teach the RINOs a lesson.” Now do you wish we still had those seats?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    Those two Rino’s of which you speak wouldn’t have made a dime’s worth of difference.

    They both refused to run on an immigration platform and would have been more than willing to sell out their own constituents to appear bi-partisan in passing amnesty legislation.

  101. @Anonymous
    @Anon7

    https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1350509372284129281

    Replies: @Voltarde, @Autochthon, @Autochthon

    “The United states is running out of people. It is facing an aging population, falling birth rate and economic recession caused by the coronavirus pandemic. These issues will have huge implications on the size of the workforce and the consumer base.”

    It’s more likely that we will run out of unskilled tasks–previously performed by unskilled migrants–that robots and AI can’t automate.

    Top 10 Construction Robots in Use Around the World

    https://www.eetimes.com/top-10-construction-robots-in-use-around-the-world/#

  102. anon[411] • Disclaimer says:
    @notsaying
    @Anon

    I have become a great reader of the Daily Mail because it's free and I can leave comments there but of course I am just one person. There will be many stories of immigrants trying to reach us via the Southern border. All that Biden and the other Democratic presidential candidates said about immigration translates into: Come on in, we will never send you back if you can just cross the border and millions will try it.

    Now that we're down so many millions of jobs and Biden wants to more than double minimum wage, this is exactly the wrong time to increase immigration. But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens? How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals? They won't be able to do something will have to give.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @anon

    But will the Democrats leadership even acknowledge to themselves that cheap labor employers will latch on to new illegal immigrants to avoid hiring $15 US citizens?

    Why should they? No matter how they abuse the US workers, they still get lots of votes. It’s all good for them!

    How will they reconcile pro US worker goals with pro more immigration goals?

    Why do you assume the DNCe has any use for US workers, except to harvest ballots from them every couple of years?

    They won’t be able to do something will have to give.

    We shall all give, whether we like it or not. Population replacement doesn’t just happen all by itself, y’know.

  103. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations

    Even with all of your other caveats, there are still two problems:
    1) Mass amnesty encourages further illegal immigration
    2) We should never, ever reward people who receive amnesty with citizenship. Legal permanent residence? Ok, if we absolutely had to. But no way in hell they should ever be allowed to vote.

    The difficulty – nay, impossibility – of ensuring that the Left and the other open borders types would ever live up to their end of any bargain we make on this issue is precisely why we can never pass an amnesty. The minute the amnesty is passed they are trying to undermine it. Almost immediately after the 1986 amnesty passed Chuck Schumer was pressing to remove the requirement that amnestied illegals pay back taxes. Then not long after they undid the work verification requirements, on the grounds that it was causing employers to discriminate against Hispanics.

    When the 2007 amnesty was proposed – right after Republicans lost control of the House and Senate – one of the gimmicks in it was that if they could not find grounds to deny an application for amnesty after some very short period of time (I believe it was 48 hours) then the application would automatically be approved.

    We’ve had promises for more border fencing and promises for more border agents for years that have never been kept. Congress created the “Temporary Protected Status” which was supposed to be, well, temporary, yet most of its recipients are still here after decades.

    The Left has been playing the open borders/white genocide game since before we even knew it was a game. They are much better at it than we are.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Wilkey

    I hope you’re right, but I am not optimistic.

    The good news is the pro-amnesty share of the GOP is much smaller than the Bush-Obama years. My list of 10 problem Senators would have been more like 18 at one point. And Graham, Cruz, and Rubio do seem to have moved away from amnesty. And Portman and Sasse aren’t that bad in their actual votes.

    The problem for us is that in the end the Chamber of Commerce will be waving out gigantic checks to any Republican who sells out the nation for cheap wages.

    Perhaps our best hope is the amnesty block can’t agree on third world peasants, Africans, and LGBTQ versus skilled coolies from China and India. I fear they can always just “compromise” and admit both groups.

    I feel like blocking the W and Obama amnesty campaigns were both miraculous close calls and the forces of amnesty probably will have learned from their prior failures.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    I cannot deny that the 1986 amnesty ended up being a joke in terms of discouraging people from coming here and that another amnesty would set a bad precedent.

    But what other choice do we have? Lots of people have been here illegally so long that they'll soon be having grandchildren -- who will be the second generation of citizens in their family. Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes. While there are people here who would deport all the illegal people we have tomorrow, the country as a whole has no stomach for what that would involve.

    As I see it, we are stuck with who we have. The only thing we can change is future immigration -- and changing that is a must before agreeing to another amnesty. We can stall longer on amnesty but it is what we end up doing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @obvious

  104. anon[411] • Disclaimer says:
    @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations.

    That was the deal Reagan signed off on in 1986. How did it work out?

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don’t want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Nope.

    Population replacement is what the DNCe wants, whatever blabbing words may be said the actions are obvious. One-party government of a mass of illiterate peons who will pull the Party lever — that’s the goal.

    It’s ironic that Mexico has three credible parties – PRD, PAN, PRI – while the US has one – TDS.

    • Replies: @Sick of Orcs
    @anon


    It’s ironic that Mexico has three credible parties – PRD, PAN, PRI – while the US has one – TDS.
     
    Plus Mexico has a National Voter ID card.
  105. @Wilkey
    @notsaying


    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations
     
    Even with all of your other caveats, there are still two problems:
    1) Mass amnesty encourages further illegal immigration
    2) We should never, ever reward people who receive amnesty with citizenship. Legal permanent residence? Ok, if we absolutely had to. But no way in hell they should ever be allowed to vote.

    The difficulty - nay, impossibility - of ensuring that the Left and the other open borders types would ever live up to their end of any bargain we make on this issue is precisely why we can never pass an amnesty. The minute the amnesty is passed they are trying to undermine it. Almost immediately after the 1986 amnesty passed Chuck Schumer was pressing to remove the requirement that amnestied illegals pay back taxes. Then not long after they undid the work verification requirements, on the grounds that it was causing employers to discriminate against Hispanics.

    When the 2007 amnesty was proposed - right after Republicans lost control of the House and Senate - one of the gimmicks in it was that if they could not find grounds to deny an application for amnesty after some very short period of time (I believe it was 48 hours) then the application would automatically be approved.

    We’ve had promises for more border fencing and promises for more border agents for years that have never been kept. Congress created the “Temporary Protected Status” which was supposed to be, well, temporary, yet most of its recipients are still here after decades.

    The Left has been playing the open borders/white genocide game since before we even knew it was a game. They are much better at it than we are.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying

    I hope you’re right, but I am not optimistic.

    The good news is the pro-amnesty share of the GOP is much smaller than the Bush-Obama years. My list of 10 problem Senators would have been more like 18 at one point. And Graham, Cruz, and Rubio do seem to have moved away from amnesty. And Portman and Sasse aren’t that bad in their actual votes.

    The problem for us is that in the end the Chamber of Commerce will be waving out gigantic checks to any Republican who sells out the nation for cheap wages.

    Perhaps our best hope is the amnesty block can’t agree on third world peasants, Africans, and LGBTQ versus skilled coolies from China and India. I fear they can always just “compromise” and admit both groups.

    I feel like blocking the W and Obama amnesty campaigns were both miraculous close calls and the forces of amnesty probably will have learned from their prior failures.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Lot


    I feel like blocking the W and Obama amnesty campaigns were both miraculous close calls and the forces of amnesty probably will have learned from their prior failures.
     
    A lot depends on whether Trump puts pressure on Republican Senators. That would be the smart thing to do to remain relevant.
  106. @RadicalCenter
    @James Speaks

    Feels good to say if you and your children don’t live or work in Cali, I guess, but it is rather foolish.

    1. If not the new Honduran invaders, some of their offspring will move to other States. Those who eventually apply for college or corporate jobs will be explicitly advantaged over white and Asian Americans.

    2. Even if the latest tranche of low-skilled, net-tax-consumer Hondurans stay in California, taxpayers across the USA will pay for part of their medical care, food stamps, education, and in some cases prosecution and incarceration anyway through the fed gov.

    3. Consumers will pay, too, as massive printing / borrowing of money by the fed gov to bail out the state/city governments in California and their perpetually-poor hordes will cause price and rent inflation.

    4. The half of Americans who pay net federal income tax will have to pay a bit more to make up for the new Hondurans and their offspring getting free cash in the form of “refundable” federal income-tax credits.

    5. If the feds institute a universal — or not so universal - basic income, you brilliant non-Californians will pay for the latest thousand Honduran leeches too.

    6. Those of us who live in California and have (futilely) worked to prevent immivasion don’t deserve the ill will and spiteful chortling. We ought to care about all Americans, including those normal patriotic civilized Americans caught behind what are now almost enemy lines. Watch as it happens to your State next if not happening already.

    We’re all watching our country become an overcrowded, polluted, impoverished, Balkanized, less intelligent, low-trust Third Worldy kind of place. Worse, perhaps, because Third World countries sometimes don’t have large hostile or unassimilated groups of different races and religions to contend with on top of all the other misery — let alone a very large dim witted group trained to hate them, like African-“Americans.”

    May God help us find a way to increase trade, tourism, and charitable works with Honduras to help the good people struggling there. But our first priority is to save or reclaim part of our country from them and any other interlopers whom we simply cannot afford.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @bomag

    You’re right, of course. I was trying to suggest that it would be good to have the woke experience the fruits of their labors.

  107. Off topic but:

    In today’s “news”, reports of COVID-19 found in ice cream made in China. Supposedly only one batch in one city.

    No word on how that happened either. Someone spit in the spumoni? (Chinese are notorious spitters, despite mass propaganda campaigns to stop it.)

  108. @Wilkey
    @notsaying


    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations
     
    Even with all of your other caveats, there are still two problems:
    1) Mass amnesty encourages further illegal immigration
    2) We should never, ever reward people who receive amnesty with citizenship. Legal permanent residence? Ok, if we absolutely had to. But no way in hell they should ever be allowed to vote.

    The difficulty - nay, impossibility - of ensuring that the Left and the other open borders types would ever live up to their end of any bargain we make on this issue is precisely why we can never pass an amnesty. The minute the amnesty is passed they are trying to undermine it. Almost immediately after the 1986 amnesty passed Chuck Schumer was pressing to remove the requirement that amnestied illegals pay back taxes. Then not long after they undid the work verification requirements, on the grounds that it was causing employers to discriminate against Hispanics.

    When the 2007 amnesty was proposed - right after Republicans lost control of the House and Senate - one of the gimmicks in it was that if they could not find grounds to deny an application for amnesty after some very short period of time (I believe it was 48 hours) then the application would automatically be approved.

    We’ve had promises for more border fencing and promises for more border agents for years that have never been kept. Congress created the “Temporary Protected Status” which was supposed to be, well, temporary, yet most of its recipients are still here after decades.

    The Left has been playing the open borders/white genocide game since before we even knew it was a game. They are much better at it than we are.

    Replies: @Lot, @notsaying

    I cannot deny that the 1986 amnesty ended up being a joke in terms of discouraging people from coming here and that another amnesty would set a bad precedent.

    But what other choice do we have? Lots of people have been here illegally so long that they’ll soon be having grandchildren — who will be the second generation of citizens in their family. Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes. While there are people here who would deport all the illegal people we have tomorrow, the country as a whole has no stomach for what that would involve.

    As I see it, we are stuck with who we have. The only thing we can change is future immigration — and changing that is a must before agreeing to another amnesty. We can stall longer on amnesty but it is what we end up doing.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @notsaying


    Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes.
     
    But we don’t have to give them citizenship. If we don’t get rid of them they’ll just remain here illegally, like they’ve been doing. If that’s tolerable to them then they can live that way. If not, they can leave on their own. It’s nothing to us.

    The moment you make them legal you open a Pandora’s Box. They can vote. They can sponsor family members for chain migration. They qualify for welfare benefits. Their legalization draws more migrants looking for the next amnesty.

    The only reason to give them amnesty is if there’s a huge compromise package that would include dramatic improvements in enforcement (hard to be sure they won’t betray us on), a reduction in legal immigration (ditto), and an end to birthright citizenship (which could be overturned by the current Supreme Court, and would definitely be overturned by a future one).

    15 million new citizens is a shitload of people. It’s more people than live in all of Pennsylvania. If they were a state, they’d be the fifth largest state in the country. Given Hispanic voting patterns you’re talking about a potential net gain of 6 million Democratic Party voters, and at the very least probably 1.5 million. That would turn a lot of states permanently blue, and maybe even the entire country. How is that any sort of bargain?

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @obvious
    @notsaying

    Only the States have constitutional control over "immigration" the way it is commonly understood , which is actually "migration". IMmigration has to do with federal port control, something hopelessly lost on most protectionists. Congress makes the rules for entry to PORTS, States have sat dormant on their native power to determine the residence of foreigners for at least 150 years now.

    It's not even a question of "amnesty", because most federal enforcement is based on the false prosecution of fictional "port entry" that never happened. Nobody ever brings up things like "time limit to enforce immigration law" (just 5 years), because the lawyers always mislead their clients who mostly don't know how to answer a Notice to Appear in removal proceedings, and often don't speak or read English very well either.

    I would like to see even one "conservative" or "nativist" party segregate their own people into protected "white" areas... it never happens because the construct is false identification through and through. Get elected to the commission of even one county... how hard is that? Mormons created a whole State.

  109. David Frum, a never Trumper Republican who writes realistically about immigration, is getting all kinds of rejection on Twitter for speaking about how Biden’s immigration policy can cause trouble. The comments show that Biden’s supporters have drunk the Koolaid and refuse to open their eyes to any contrary facts or difficulties involved.

    The Biden immigration plans could wreck his whole administration from the start. They will invite a border surge that will force Biden to choose between mass detentions or ever-accelerating unauthorized migration. https://t.co/LaeLu0JLE8— David Frum (@davidfrum) January 17, 2021

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @notsaying


    David Frum, a never Trumper Republican who writes realistically about immigration, is getting all kinds of rejection on Twitter...
     
    Is this suit good or bad for people like us?



    BC Supreme Court allows Twitter to be sued for defamation
  110. @James N. Kennett
    @Anon

    The Daily Mail has also covered the shooting in Philadelphia of Milan Loncar.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9153917/Mother-shares-heartbreaking-tributes-son-shot-Philadelphia.html

    A search on Google News shows that, as we are often told by writers on this site, this shooting was not covered in the USA except on the local news. There was more coverage in Serbia (Loncar was of Serbian descent) than there was in New York City.

    You can skip most of the Mail's British content by going here:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/ushome/index.html

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    As far as I’ve seen, only the NY Post mentioned the suspects are Black.

  111. @anonymous
    There are 197 million whites in America out of 330 million people in America. For America to become majority non-white, 60 million non-whites need to stream in under the Joe Biden presidency. That's a very tough target to meet.

    Replies: @Dan Smith, @Anonymous Jew

    For anyone with a modicum of foresight, what matters is births. And US Whites are already below 50%. (For the purpose of maintaining our standards of living, I would also count Fancy Asians with Whites, but they have even less kids).

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Anonymous Jew

    There are also a lot of Latinos and whites having kids. At least 10% of births are from this pairing. The white population is also falling due to race mixing.

  112. @al gore rhythms
    Everyone knows that entering places illegally is Who Americans Are.

    That's why I think of the Capitol Hill rioters as Undocumented Politicians.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Anonymous Jew

    You can play these logic games all day long with leftist arguments. They say if leftists didn’t have double standards they’d have no standards at all. That’s not true. The sole standard they follow is that they’re anti-White. When you understand that leftists are actually pretty consistent.

  113. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

    More than time to accept the illegals we have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement?

    You obviously weren’t around in the Reagan admin when he talked us all into amnestying the “one million” (turned out to be 4 million) illegals here, with the SOLEMN PROMISE that we’d enforce the border going forward, we would NEVER do another amnesty.

    Riiiighhhhht.

    In actual fact the Reagan amnesty was the poison acorn from which the blighted, twisted, evil tree of mass chain immigration of Mexicans sprang.

    Those illegals of Reagan’s, who’d been “living in the shadows”, came out of the shadows, all right. And promptly rented apartments to shelter and hide, as well as acquired fake work documents for , their cousins Jose, Pedro, Miguel, Juan, Carlos, and Jorge still in Mexico so they could painlessly sneak in — and then bring in Guadalupe, who promptly gave birth to an anchor baby.

    Without that FIRST wave of amnestied illegals it would have been MUCH HARDER for Jose Pedro Miguel Juan Carlos Jorge Guad and the baby to all survive in America long enough to get the NEXT amnesty, soon to be provided by biden.

    So, you REALLY think compromising, ok, this many but no more, is gonna DO anything?

    • Agree: Not Raul
  114. @Steve Sailer
    @Oswald Spengler

    7 billion Pre-Americans.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    7 billion Pre-Americans.

    Subtract 80 million post-Americans.

  115. @notsaying
    David Frum, a never Trumper Republican who writes realistically about immigration, is getting all kinds of rejection on Twitter for speaking about how Biden's immigration policy can cause trouble. The comments show that Biden's supporters have drunk the Koolaid and refuse to open their eyes to any contrary facts or difficulties involved.

    The Biden immigration plans could wreck his whole administration from the start. They will invite a border surge that will force Biden to choose between mass detentions or ever-accelerating unauthorized migration. https://t.co/LaeLu0JLE8— David Frum (@davidfrum) January 17, 2021
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    David Frum, a never Trumper Republican who writes realistically about immigration, is getting all kinds of rejection on Twitter…

    Is this suit good or bad for people like us?

    BC Supreme Court allows Twitter to be sued for defamation

  116. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    I cannot deny that the 1986 amnesty ended up being a joke in terms of discouraging people from coming here and that another amnesty would set a bad precedent.

    But what other choice do we have? Lots of people have been here illegally so long that they'll soon be having grandchildren -- who will be the second generation of citizens in their family. Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes. While there are people here who would deport all the illegal people we have tomorrow, the country as a whole has no stomach for what that would involve.

    As I see it, we are stuck with who we have. The only thing we can change is future immigration -- and changing that is a must before agreeing to another amnesty. We can stall longer on amnesty but it is what we end up doing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @obvious

    Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes.

    But we don’t have to give them citizenship. If we don’t get rid of them they’ll just remain here illegally, like they’ve been doing. If that’s tolerable to them then they can live that way. If not, they can leave on their own. It’s nothing to us.

    The moment you make them legal you open a Pandora’s Box. They can vote. They can sponsor family members for chain migration. They qualify for welfare benefits. Their legalization draws more migrants looking for the next amnesty.

    The only reason to give them amnesty is if there’s a huge compromise package that would include dramatic improvements in enforcement (hard to be sure they won’t betray us on), a reduction in legal immigration (ditto), and an end to birthright citizenship (which could be overturned by the current Supreme Court, and would definitely be overturned by a future one).

    15 million new citizens is a shitload of people. It’s more people than live in all of Pennsylvania. If they were a state, they’d be the fifth largest state in the country. Given Hispanic voting patterns you’re talking about a potential net gain of 6 million Democratic Party voters, and at the very least probably 1.5 million. That would turn a lot of states permanently blue, and maybe even the entire country. How is that any sort of bargain?

    • Agree: Rob McX, obvious
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Wilkey

    The other thing accomplished by amnesty is that it increases the critical mass of the electorate in favor of unrestricted immigration in the future.

    Everything you've said is painfully accurate, except for the fact that 1) they're not trying to bargain with us and 2) the discussion might have been meaningful and useful 30 years ago.

    Which is why, of course, no such discussion is ever permitted in the public realm. Even now, when it's frankly past mattering.

  117. @James Speaks
    California bound, I hope!

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Hannah Katz

    What a bunch of litter bugs! Can I say that? Am I allowed to observe the obvious? Uh oh…

  118. @Lot
    @Wilkey

    I hope you’re right, but I am not optimistic.

    The good news is the pro-amnesty share of the GOP is much smaller than the Bush-Obama years. My list of 10 problem Senators would have been more like 18 at one point. And Graham, Cruz, and Rubio do seem to have moved away from amnesty. And Portman and Sasse aren’t that bad in their actual votes.

    The problem for us is that in the end the Chamber of Commerce will be waving out gigantic checks to any Republican who sells out the nation for cheap wages.

    Perhaps our best hope is the amnesty block can’t agree on third world peasants, Africans, and LGBTQ versus skilled coolies from China and India. I fear they can always just “compromise” and admit both groups.

    I feel like blocking the W and Obama amnesty campaigns were both miraculous close calls and the forces of amnesty probably will have learned from their prior failures.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    I feel like blocking the W and Obama amnesty campaigns were both miraculous close calls and the forces of amnesty probably will have learned from their prior failures.

    A lot depends on whether Trump puts pressure on Republican Senators. That would be the smart thing to do to remain relevant.

  119. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    I really doubt “sexual harassment” is the motivation for those in the pic.

  120. @Anonymous Jew
    @anonymous

    For anyone with a modicum of foresight, what matters is births. And US Whites are already below 50%. (For the purpose of maintaining our standards of living, I would also count Fancy Asians with Whites, but they have even less kids).

    Replies: @anonymous

    There are also a lot of Latinos and whites having kids. At least 10% of births are from this pairing. The white population is also falling due to race mixing.

  121. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    Congress has been ignoring the will of the people over immigration for decades. Most people want the same numbers or less. But business and the immigration lobby wants more and that's what we have gotten. In terms of changes in the law for years we have had things at a stalemate, driving presidents to use executive orders.

    It's more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations. But of course we know that is not what Biden is offering -- quite the opposite. He wants us to accept all illegals plus lots more new immigrants plus no deportations and no new enforcement.

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don't want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Wilkey, @anon, @jsm, @Rob

    The only way we should accept an amnesty and prizes for occupying aliens in exchange for enforcement later is if the enforcement later has teeth. Something along the lines of 11 million amnestied today, not one more than that, and they each put up, say, $100,000 in escrow. If there are any new aliens in America, whether ‘legal’ or not in any year for the next, say, 50 years, then the ones who got amnesty and prizes in 2021 forfeit the escrow funds, lose their residency, their paper-American children lose their citizenship and go home.

    Enforcement later immigration laws have been the football that liberal Lucy holds for conservative Charlie Brown. Every time ‘conservatives’ in office ‘fall’ for it. This time, to the extent possible, conservatives in office need to act in the interests of the country and their voters. We should make it clear that blocking amnesty and prizes, along with preventing any other scheme that puts aliens in America, is the new tax cut. It is the only thing we judge them on. Never vote for a Republican who does not fight the infestation.

    Come to think of it, no amnesty and prizes for aliens now is acceptable. The aliens go home. We took 100 million since 1965. America is currently a third world country for the third world peoples within her borders. Blacks do not live in the first world. No first world nation has that kind of criminality, illegitimacy, and Illiterate Mexicans doing stoop labor in the fields do not live like first worlderx. Adding x million more third worlders will not improve the situation of Americans or the aliens already here. They did not immigrate to Mexico del Norte. It is unfair to them to make America more like the homelands they fled. The Hispanics are here to get away from Hispanics.

    Personally, I would sacrifice any other policy goal to get rid of the aliens. Put a tranny in every bathroom. Teach blacks and Hispanics to hate us. Triple the aid to Israel. Invade (or not) any country. Play nuclear brinksmanship with Russia. Ban handguns. Kick conservatives off Twitter. Implement socialism of any sort. Defund the police.

    There is no issue more important than the infestation of aliens. Keeping America American is the most basic issue. Winning on every other policy goal is worthless if the invasion is not stopped and reversed.

  122. @Joe Stalin
    @notsaying


    But will that make a difference?
     
    Looking at the results of BLM instigated mayhem, it will if people take that as inspiration.

    Remember Chicago 1968?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XzdltsTfvE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_9OJnRnZjU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqNkmZ3n_bc

    Replies: @notsaying

    Yes but getting people to take action on immigration is like pulling teeth. People have themselves convinced that they are being rude and nasty to express an opinion about wanting less of it. That certainly is the message that the immigration lobby and the woke progressives tell them all the time.

    I have no faith they will come out and demonstrate for bringing in fewer people in the future. Even people on this website don’t mention the big three immigration reduction groups, I assume because they don’t know they exist or aren’t on their email list. I am though and have been for years.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @notsaying


    Even people on this website don’t mention the big three immigration reduction groups, I assume because they don’t know they exist or aren’t on their email list. I am though and have been for years.
     
    The EASIEST thing to do for people to oppose immigration to sign up to the numbersusa website so that they can send out pre-written oppositional letters and faxes to the appropriate politician.

    https://www.numbersusa.com/

    Moderates, conservatives & liberals working for immigration numbers that serve America's finest goals

    The key factor in immigration policy is choosing the right number of authorized immigrants for future years. To choose a lower number does not imply anything negative about the immigrants who already are legally in this country. We're talking about the future number that is best for both U.S.-born and foreign-born citizens.

    "Every government in the world has the obligation to decide what immigration number is right for the community in its care. My greatest concern is how the number that is chosen will affect our grandchildren's grandchildren. Will we condemn them to live packed in a highly regimented country approaching a billion people? Or will we make it possible for them to enjoy the qualities of life we today hold the most dear?”

    Roy Beck, NumbersUSA Founder & President
     
  123. @Wilkey
    @notsaying


    Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes.
     
    But we don’t have to give them citizenship. If we don’t get rid of them they’ll just remain here illegally, like they’ve been doing. If that’s tolerable to them then they can live that way. If not, they can leave on their own. It’s nothing to us.

    The moment you make them legal you open a Pandora’s Box. They can vote. They can sponsor family members for chain migration. They qualify for welfare benefits. Their legalization draws more migrants looking for the next amnesty.

    The only reason to give them amnesty is if there’s a huge compromise package that would include dramatic improvements in enforcement (hard to be sure they won’t betray us on), a reduction in legal immigration (ditto), and an end to birthright citizenship (which could be overturned by the current Supreme Court, and would definitely be overturned by a future one).

    15 million new citizens is a shitload of people. It’s more people than live in all of Pennsylvania. If they were a state, they’d be the fifth largest state in the country. Given Hispanic voting patterns you’re talking about a potential net gain of 6 million Democratic Party voters, and at the very least probably 1.5 million. That would turn a lot of states permanently blue, and maybe even the entire country. How is that any sort of bargain?

    Replies: @HammerJack

    The other thing accomplished by amnesty is that it increases the critical mass of the electorate in favor of unrestricted immigration in the future.

    Everything you’ve said is painfully accurate, except for the fact that 1) they’re not trying to bargain with us and 2) the discussion might have been meaningful and useful 30 years ago.

    Which is why, of course, no such discussion is ever permitted in the public realm. Even now, when it’s frankly past mattering.

  124. @WJ
    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn't deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn't do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @AnotherDad, @Ron Mexico, @obvious

    Ann will be able sell more books now.

  125. Our enemies promote secession from the USSA better than anyone. (We just need two or three red states with nukes to get there.)

    If fraudsident biden gives amnesty to illegals (true number 40 million, not 11 million) it will be nothing less than an act of war against US citizens.

  126. @anon
    @notsaying

    It’s more than time to accept the illegals we already have in exchange for much lower future immigration levels and effective enforcement that includes plenty of deportations.

    That was the deal Reagan signed off on in 1986. How did it work out?

    I am sure with so many jobs gone and Covid-19 still here people don’t want immigration to be a priority and will hate to see Biden let the people at the border all come in, knowing Biden will never make them leave. But will that make a difference?

    Nope.

    Population replacement is what the DNCe wants, whatever blabbing words may be said the actions are obvious. One-party government of a mass of illiterate peons who will pull the Party lever -- that's the goal.

    It's ironic that Mexico has three credible parties - PRD, PAN, PRI - while the US has one - TDS.

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs

    It’s ironic that Mexico has three credible parties – PRD, PAN, PRI – while the US has one – TDS.

    Plus Mexico has a National Voter ID card.

  127. @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    Stop backing their corrupt governments, abolish the War on Drugs, let them have a communist revolution and distribute the land to their own people. It means breaking up the the Western capital interests and higher prices for bananas.

    The USA has vast empty space to accommodate refugees who wish to start fresh and build, anywhere West of the Mississippi. For that matter to rebuild the ruined towns and cities destroyed by white and black alike.

  128. @WJ
    Where are the moronic Trump haters who despise him because he didn't deport millions or put machine guns on the borders? Ann Coulter?? What Trump wouldn't do is sign this nation destroying amnesty that Biden has promised and that a Democrat controlled House and Senate will deliver. Coulter being the moronic twaut she is could never get past the fact that Trump was a fabulist who could only deliver on 10 percent of what he promised. Still far better than what we are facing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @AnotherDad, @Ron Mexico, @obvious

    How could a “moronic fabulist” that delivered 10% possibly make anything “better”? You know what will REALLY help you? Stop saying “we”. You are not a group and do not “have” a country. The promise of America is that ANYONE can BUILD whatever they wish. Did your people ever really build anything, or were they just “immigrants” in their own day?

    I will rarely hire white people under 60 at this point because they mostly make terrible workers. Mostly have health and sobriety problem, and their brains are completely addled. They aren’t there to work or do a job, but show up mostly to complain and smoke cigarettes. Your “problems” have little to do with “Hondurans”, much more to do with racial degeneration.

  129. Anon[104] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cato
    You have to admire the courage of the people departing Honduras for this chance to get into the US. There is no better country than our own, at least at the present. The things that they flee: crime, sexual harassment, police corruption, poverty, lack of upward mobility. Perhaps there is some intelligent way in which the US could help Hondurans to solve these problems, and in that way cut off the incentive for migration.

    Replies: @Abe, @Harry Baldwin, @Dave from Oz, @Alfa158, @notsaying, @Cido, @Old and Grumpy, @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @Alexander Turok, @obvious, @Anon

    Most of the problems you listed do not qualify for amnesty. If it is political amnesty then legally they would apply in Mexico. They are coming here for economic opportunity. But they do not plan to get green cards or citizenship. So they are driving down the wage for common jobs in the US to the level that it make no sense for citizens here to do them.

    As for helping them, I think mostly the US has to stop hurting them. US banks and companies have exploited the nation for a century now. They install dictators to make the country indebted to US banks and to make their businesses run without problems from labor issues and other business costs. However with the election of Biden, the US is back to the old days of interventionism on behalf of banks and corporations, and the refugee problem from this will continue to cause migrations to the US. These immigrants may vote Democrat at first, but once on their feet and have property quickly become conservative.

  130. @notsaying
    @Wilkey

    I cannot deny that the 1986 amnesty ended up being a joke in terms of discouraging people from coming here and that another amnesty would set a bad precedent.

    But what other choice do we have? Lots of people have been here illegally so long that they'll soon be having grandchildren -- who will be the second generation of citizens in their family. Automatic birthright citizenship for the children of people here temporarily or illegally makes getting rid of people almost impossible as time passes. While there are people here who would deport all the illegal people we have tomorrow, the country as a whole has no stomach for what that would involve.

    As I see it, we are stuck with who we have. The only thing we can change is future immigration -- and changing that is a must before agreeing to another amnesty. We can stall longer on amnesty but it is what we end up doing.

    Replies: @Wilkey, @obvious

    Only the States have constitutional control over “immigration” the way it is commonly understood , which is actually “migration”. IMmigration has to do with federal port control, something hopelessly lost on most protectionists. Congress makes the rules for entry to PORTS, States have sat dormant on their native power to determine the residence of foreigners for at least 150 years now.

    It’s not even a question of “amnesty”, because most federal enforcement is based on the false prosecution of fictional “port entry” that never happened. Nobody ever brings up things like “time limit to enforce immigration law” (just 5 years), because the lawyers always mislead their clients who mostly don’t know how to answer a Notice to Appear in removal proceedings, and often don’t speak or read English very well either.

    I would like to see even one “conservative” or “nativist” party segregate their own people into protected “white” areas… it never happens because the construct is false identification through and through. Get elected to the commission of even one county… how hard is that? Mormons created a whole State.

  131. @notsaying
    @Joe Stalin

    Yes but getting people to take action on immigration is like pulling teeth. People have themselves convinced that they are being rude and nasty to express an opinion about wanting less of it. That certainly is the message that the immigration lobby and the woke progressives tell them all the time.

    I have no faith they will come out and demonstrate for bringing in fewer people in the future. Even people on this website don't mention the big three immigration reduction groups, I assume because they don't know they exist or aren't on their email list. I am though and have been for years.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Even people on this website don’t mention the big three immigration reduction groups, I assume because they don’t know they exist or aren’t on their email list. I am though and have been for years.

    The EASIEST thing to do for people to oppose immigration to sign up to the numbersusa website so that they can send out pre-written oppositional letters and faxes to the appropriate politician.

    https://www.numbersusa.com/

    Moderates, conservatives & liberals working for immigration numbers that serve America’s finest goals

    The key factor in immigration policy is choosing the right number of authorized immigrants for future years. To choose a lower number does not imply anything negative about the immigrants who already are legally in this country. We’re talking about the future number that is best for both U.S.-born and foreign-born citizens.

    “Every government in the world has the obligation to decide what immigration number is right for the community in its care. My greatest concern is how the number that is chosen will affect our grandchildren’s grandchildren. Will we condemn them to live packed in a highly regimented country approaching a billion people? Or will we make it possible for them to enjoy the qualities of life we today hold the most dear?”

    Roy Beck, NumbersUSA Founder & President

  132. @RadicalCenter
    @James Speaks

    Feels good to say if you and your children don’t live or work in Cali, I guess, but it is rather foolish.

    1. If not the new Honduran invaders, some of their offspring will move to other States. Those who eventually apply for college or corporate jobs will be explicitly advantaged over white and Asian Americans.

    2. Even if the latest tranche of low-skilled, net-tax-consumer Hondurans stay in California, taxpayers across the USA will pay for part of their medical care, food stamps, education, and in some cases prosecution and incarceration anyway through the fed gov.

    3. Consumers will pay, too, as massive printing / borrowing of money by the fed gov to bail out the state/city governments in California and their perpetually-poor hordes will cause price and rent inflation.

    4. The half of Americans who pay net federal income tax will have to pay a bit more to make up for the new Hondurans and their offspring getting free cash in the form of “refundable” federal income-tax credits.

    5. If the feds institute a universal — or not so universal - basic income, you brilliant non-Californians will pay for the latest thousand Honduran leeches too.

    6. Those of us who live in California and have (futilely) worked to prevent immivasion don’t deserve the ill will and spiteful chortling. We ought to care about all Americans, including those normal patriotic civilized Americans caught behind what are now almost enemy lines. Watch as it happens to your State next if not happening already.

    We’re all watching our country become an overcrowded, polluted, impoverished, Balkanized, less intelligent, low-trust Third Worldy kind of place. Worse, perhaps, because Third World countries sometimes don’t have large hostile or unassimilated groups of different races and religions to contend with on top of all the other misery — let alone a very large dim witted group trained to hate them, like African-“Americans.”

    May God help us find a way to increase trade, tourism, and charitable works with Honduras to help the good people struggling there. But our first priority is to save or reclaim part of our country from them and any other interlopers whom we simply cannot afford.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @bomag

    Well said, but some of us in other western states have seen the Californians who enabled this immigration move to our states and start agitating for the same policies that ruined their former home. And I imagine the Hondurans be be along after their work is finished in the golden state to work their magic in another place. Rather maddening that nice things are so hard to keep.

    Gavin Newsom likes the state of Montana; vacations there; named one of his kids Montana; the state’s tourist bureau has the slogan, “Last Best Place” (for now.)

  133. @IHTG
    @Rob

    Just what do you think "populist" means

    Replies: @Rob

    Ending immigration, ending the forever war, and revamping the economy so living standards improve for people not named Koch. Reducing inequality, too, Though that will happen without endless immigrants and with renewed manufacturing. Populism no longer means social conservatism and fiscal liberalism. Trump changed the brand. Sort of like how ‘liberal’ used to mean libertarian. The brand changed.


  134. [MORE]

  135. • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1351726203007348738

  136. No worries! Our elite armed forces will protect us.

  137. @Reg Cæsar
    @Just another serf

    https://www.romeduckstore.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Farmer-Woman-Rubber-Duck-slant-right-Rome-Duck-Store-510x510-1.jpg

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Mestizo duckie, you’re the one; you make bath time lots of fun….

  138. @Anonymous
    @Anon7

    https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1350509372284129281

    Replies: @Voltarde, @Autochthon, @Autochthon

    Yessir; too few people around these days – that’s the trouble. Whole damned nation is a damned ghost town.

    Say, I wonder if there is historical precedent for a nation with expansive, unsettled land and a relatively finite population, and what that might mean for the ability of that population to prosper and prevent tyranny, and to in turn increasing their own numbers naturally; I also wonder if perhaps overpopulation causes people to fail to increase naturally for want of resources…. Say, maybe some wise old scientist and statesman has already contemplated the idea:

    Land being thus plenty in America, and so cheap as that a labouring Man, that understands Husbandry, can in a short Time save Money enough to purchase a Piece of new Land sufficient for a Plantation, whereon he may subsist a Family; such are not afraid to marry; for if they even look far enough forward to consider how their Children when grown up are to be provided for, they see that more Land is to be had at Rates equally easy, all Circumstances considered.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Autochthon

    Long time no see Autochon! Hope all is well.

    Weird question.....you don't know where i can find your hilarious old post about how "....if all the illegals crossing the border every week looked like Salma Hayek....American women would shut the gates in a week....." is do you?

    Replies: @Autochthon

  139. @Anonymous
    @Anon7

    https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1350509372284129281

    Replies: @Voltarde, @Autochthon, @Autochthon

    Yessir; too few people around these days – that’s the trouble. Whole damned nation is a damned ghost town.

    Say, I wonder if there is historical precedent for a nation with expansive, unsettled land and a relatively finite population, and what that might mean for the ability of that population to prosper and prevent tyranny, and to in turn increasing their own numbers naturally; I also wonder if perhaps overpopulation causes people to fail to increase naturally for want of resources…. Say, maybe some wise old scientist and statesman has already contemplated the idea:

    Land being thus plenty in America, and so cheap as that a labouring Man, that understands Husbandry, can in a short Time save Money enough to purchase a Piece of new Land sufficient for a Plantation, whereon he may subsist a Family; such are not afraid to marry; for if they even look far enough forward to consider how their Children when grown up are to be provided for, they see that more Land is to be had at Rates equally easy, all Circumstances considered.

  140. @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    https://bayareamonitor.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Traffic-for-Web.jpg

    Yessir; too few people around these days – that's the trouble. Whole damned nation is a damned ghost town.

    Say, I wonder if there is historical precedent for a nation with expansive, unsettled land and a relatively finite population, and what that might mean for the ability of that population to prosper and prevent tyranny, and to in turn increasing their own numbers naturally; I also wonder if perhaps overpopulation causes people to fail to increase naturally for want of resources.... Say, maybe some wise old scientist and statesman has already contemplated the idea:


    Land being thus plenty in America, and so cheap as that a labouring Man, that understands Husbandry, can in a short Time save Money enough to purchase a Piece of new Land sufficient for a Plantation, whereon he may subsist a Family; such are not afraid to marry; for if they even look far enough forward to consider how their Children when grown up are to be provided for, they see that more Land is to be had at Rates equally easy, all Circumstances considered.

     

    Replies: @Neoconned

    Long time no see Autochon! Hope all is well.

    Weird question…..you don’t know where i can find your hilarious old post about how “….if all the illegals crossing the border every week looked like Salma Hayek….American women would shut the gates in a week…..” is do you?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Neoconned

    Thank'ee. Cannaee say; a better question for Mrrs. Unz and Sailer, perhaps. Best I could do would be to post a photograph of my beautiful wife, a white Colombiana....but that would dox me, sure. Best practical advice I can offer is that ye move to the so-called Southern Cone and wed a sane woman. They – perhaps along with Eastern European lasses – are the only hope for the race. When my own wife saw what the Mexicans and Guadalnicaondurans were up to, she immediately recognised all too well what she already had the T-shirt for: Venezualan scum fleeing what they voted for to her own native land, which (successfully) busted its ass so hard to stop the insanity that its president won a Nobel Peace Prize (back when that meant something...).

    Good luck, mate; the glory days are far behind us...shit; best I'll be able to do is show my son old, romanticed movies of what his old man did before "diversity" destroyed technology (but, yes; no officer ever smoked on the bridge...Hollywood, he he.....)

    https://youtu.be/bNxvXj9nff4

    Replies: @Autochthon

  141. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/RichardHanania/status/1351318923728224256

    https://twitter.com/davidfrum/status/1350807057822343171

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  142. @Neoconned
    @Autochthon

    Long time no see Autochon! Hope all is well.

    Weird question.....you don't know where i can find your hilarious old post about how "....if all the illegals crossing the border every week looked like Salma Hayek....American women would shut the gates in a week....." is do you?

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Thank’ee. Cannaee say; a better question for Mrrs. Unz and Sailer, perhaps. Best I could do would be to post a photograph of my beautiful wife, a white Colombiana….but that would dox me, sure. Best practical advice I can offer is that ye move to the so-called Southern Cone and wed a sane woman. They – perhaps along with Eastern European lasses – are the only hope for the race. When my own wife saw what the Mexicans and Guadalnicaondurans were up to, she immediately recognised all too well what she already had the T-shirt for: Venezualan scum fleeing what they voted for to her own native land, which (successfully) busted its ass so hard to stop the insanity that its president won a Nobel Peace Prize (back when that meant something…).

    Good luck, mate; the glory days are far behind us…shit; best I’ll be able to do is show my son old, romanticed movies of what his old man did before “diversity” destroyed technology (but, yes; no officer ever smoked on the bridge…Hollywood, he he…..)

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Autochthon

    BTW: When my wife sees this footage, goofy and Hollydoodised as it is, her reaction is, in essence: "yeah, no wonder no one f**ks iwth you (personally or geopolitically; I feel safe with you)" – that's the reaction and understanding you want of your woman, mate, and if you do not inspire it, get back to work. I mean this respectfully...

  143. @Autochthon
    @Neoconned

    Thank'ee. Cannaee say; a better question for Mrrs. Unz and Sailer, perhaps. Best I could do would be to post a photograph of my beautiful wife, a white Colombiana....but that would dox me, sure. Best practical advice I can offer is that ye move to the so-called Southern Cone and wed a sane woman. They – perhaps along with Eastern European lasses – are the only hope for the race. When my own wife saw what the Mexicans and Guadalnicaondurans were up to, she immediately recognised all too well what she already had the T-shirt for: Venezualan scum fleeing what they voted for to her own native land, which (successfully) busted its ass so hard to stop the insanity that its president won a Nobel Peace Prize (back when that meant something...).

    Good luck, mate; the glory days are far behind us...shit; best I'll be able to do is show my son old, romanticed movies of what his old man did before "diversity" destroyed technology (but, yes; no officer ever smoked on the bridge...Hollywood, he he.....)

    https://youtu.be/bNxvXj9nff4

    Replies: @Autochthon

    BTW: When my wife sees this footage, goofy and Hollydoodised as it is, her reaction is, in essence: “yeah, no wonder no one f**ks iwth you (personally or geopolitically; I feel safe with you)” – that’s the reaction and understanding you want of your woman, mate, and if you do not inspire it, get back to work. I mean this respectfully…

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