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Hogarth's Paintings Now Come with a Trigger Warning
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William Hogarth was the great satirical painter and printmaker of 18th Century England. He was, arguably, the first political cartoonist and, perhaps, the inventor of the comic strip. He’s a little like if Norman Rockwell had started out not as an illustrator but as a traditional easel painter, then got into comic drawings for reproductions that became massively popular, but with sharper satirical elbows than Rockwell.

Hogarth was so influential that English-speaking political cartoonists tended to follow his style of cramming huge amounts of amusing detail into their caricatures for generations until everybody finally got sick of that look.

One of Hogarth’s social reform crusades (in conjunction with his friend Henry Fielding, author of Tom Jones) was to encourage the English to drink beer, with its lower alcohol and greater nutritional value, rather than gin. Thus his prosperous “Beer Street” where native English ale is quaffed vs. slovenly “Gin Lane” where alcoholics over-indulge in Dutch-derived spirits:

But these days, the new exhibition of Hogarth’s works at the Tate Britain Museum comes with a trigger warning:

 
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  1. For the sake of inclusivity, the trigger warning should be repeated in multiple languages, so everyone can get the joke.

  2. Maybe Stonetoss will end up in a 24th century museum

  3. I read “Curating Revolution” by Yale’s Denise Ho when it first came out, just a few years ago. Mao’s thinking was that most people are not good at assimilating a new culture when it is presented only through abstract ideas. However, if presented through tangible objects, at an exhibit, the cadre can get new perspectives to be assimilated. The new docents at the Chicago museum will utilize this. Little did I realize when I read “Curating Revolution” how prescient it would prove to be.

  4. The deginerates look like the ancestors of today’s antifa activists.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    @Rob McX

    "Deginerates - I see what you did there.

  5. There’s a reason–several actually–why the late Lawrence Auster called the UK “the Isle of the Dead”.

  6. Who are they stereotyping? Some of the whores look a bit like pikeys, but there certainly are no blacks.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Amon Dool

    DID YOU JUST CLAIM THAT ENGLAND IN HOGARTH'S DAY WAS A WHITE COUNTRY?

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    , @Peterg123
    @Amon Dool

    There is one cartoon of Hogarth's depicting two extremely wealthy and aristocratic gentlemen visiting a black whore in London...so interestingly we discover that there were such at that time. But the caricature is aimed at the rich white Johns, not at the prostitute. This single item must be the "racism" that of course these little red guards had to "uncover".

    There are more comments attached to paintings and works generally of Hogarth at this exhibition, some so mind numbingly stupid that one's brain hurts.

    Replies: @Johnny Whoop

  7. First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    • Thanks: S Johnson
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The great 18th Century rococo architect François de Cuvilliés got his start as a court dwarf.

    , @jcd1974
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The dwarf is not by Goya. It's by Diego Velazquez.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Badger Down

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.
     
    That's because Old Pieter Breughel had already seen, spoken of, and delineated our future centuries before. Precisely 354 years before, but in exactly the same spot where he lived.
    https://www.artflakes.com/en/products/die-tolle-grete-die-dulle-griet?id=die-tolle-grete-die-dulle-griet&locale=en

    https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plik:Pieter_Bruegel_d._%C3%84._069.jpg

    Ain't life funny?

    , @Elmer T. Jones
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Have they come for Robert Crumb yet?

  8. WARNING: This comment contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.

    These are like the notices on milk chocolate that say “Contains: milk” and soy yogurt that say “Contains: soy” and peanut butter that say “Contains: peanuts”. It’s about deflecting lawsuits.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.ibb.co/qn7pTC9/this-product-contains-peanuts.jpg

    Replies: @Fox

  9. The march into societal regression is still quite intense. Hogarth is in their way though, that’s clear. So – where is the woke-train headin’? – The thing with utopias is, the harder one tries to reach them, the more they slip away – somebody should tell those enthusiasts of a new humanity about this – ages old, really – insight. It might be about time to rid them of their most destructive illusion: To install Paradise Now!

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    If a German politician was blatantly incompetent and lazy, how would German voters react? Do Germans have the same tolerance for ineptitude as the American public? Or do they have high expectations?

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent. There's a higher bar in Germany than the U.S. If a leader is a good talker and bullsh1tter who screws up a lot, Germans will get disgusted by him.

    Any truth to that?

    Or has Germany become Americanized to the point at which leaders can be buffoons and still get reelected?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Odin, @Dieter Kief

  10. The Steve Sailer of his time, apparently.

  11. @Bardon Kaldian
    First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    https://image.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/two-tahitian-women-by-paul-600w-751010593.jpg

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Vel%C3%A1zquez_%E2%80%93_Buf%C3%B3n_don_Sebasti%C3%A1n_de_Morra_%28Museo_del_Prado%2C_c._1645%29.jpg

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    https://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/blackrembrandt-474x672.jpg

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Steve Sailer, @jcd1974, @Expletive Deleted, @Elmer T. Jones

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for \$ 110 million:

    • LOL: BB753, Alden
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldian

    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/976/cpsprodpb/05FB/production/_96113510_8c10a672-bbbe-4cb0-8b20-49d9862060d3.jpg

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.thecrimson.com/photos/2019/12/23/142555_1341777.png

    , @Escher
    @Bardon Kaldian

    My 5 year old just threw away something like this.
    Damn, we coulda been millionaires and Kangz.

    , @animalogic
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:"
    Oh, bargain!

    , @Obstinate Cymric
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I wonder - are there previous examples in art history of painters whose works sold for huge (in their day) prices but which today are worth much less?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Alden
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Don’t knock it. Pays a lot better than being a horror comic book artist or doing make up wigs and costumes for cheap horror movies. And easier too.

  12. Simpletons are storming the Seats of Power.
    Perhaps this will end as a radical therapy to show that Simpletons should do menial work only and leave tasks which require intelligence and the ability to not look at other people as dimwits to those who actually can speak in whole sentences and who can think thoughts not supplied by outside sources by themselves.
    Satire, jokes, witticisms, irony, all of these require a kind of intelligence that seems to be absent from the new rulers. Huhu, I foresee that this will not end in happy scenes.

  13. One of Hogarth’s series is literally the invention of the Goofus and Gallant comic, with one character using his apprentice wages to buy liquor and whores, while the other puts religion first and rests on holidays. (He goes into cathedrals and lies prostrate on the floor.) The bad guy ends up standing before the good guy, now a respected city council level figure, who reluctantly but justly sentences him to Transportation.
    Gin Lane is similarly a diptych, its counterpart is Beer Road, which shows how great everything can be if you would only drink more beer (instead of hardstuff).

  14. @Amon Dool
    Who are they stereotyping? Some of the whores look a bit like pikeys, but there certainly are no blacks.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Peterg123

    DID YOU JUST CLAIM THAT ENGLAND IN HOGARTH’S DAY WAS A WHITE COUNTRY?

    • Thanks: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @J.Ross

    Well of course that would have been unpossible. Because that's not who we are.
    https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1977-U-543

    [top tip; if you're old like me and your eyes are shot, y'kin zoom in; bring plenty of neatsfoot oil & flannels]

  15. I wonder what kind of warnings they will need for Hieronymus Bosch, or even Casper Freidrich?

    Andy Warhol?

  16. Reminds me of America.

    By the way, here’s the trailer of a really cool British show called “Creeped Out.” Very popular with lots of teens and even younger kids. It’s on NetFlix.

    BBC produced this show.

    It’s like a gentler version of “Black Mirror,” aimed at a younger audience. Much better, in my opinion. More family-friendly too.

  17. Hogarth’s 1750s depiction of potential French invaders vs. Englishmen is quite amusing:

    https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/work-of-art/the-invasion-plate-1-france-1

    https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/work-of-art/the-invasion-plate-2-england-1

    The Frenchmen, living in an impoverished Papist tyranny, are downcast and underfed, whereas the Englishmen are in jolly good spirits thanks to their robust diet of roast beef. (At least, that’s what I remember from Tim Blanning’s excellent book The Pursuit of Glory.)

  18. @Dieter Kief
    The march into societal regression is still quite intense. Hogarth is in their way though, that's clear. So - where is the woke-train headin'? - The thing with utopias is, the harder one tries to reach them, the more they slip away - somebody should tell those enthusiasts of a new humanity about this - ages old, really - insight. It might be about time to rid them of their most destructive illusion: To install Paradise Now!

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    If a German politician was blatantly incompetent and lazy, how would German voters react? Do Germans have the same tolerance for ineptitude as the American public? Or do they have high expectations?

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent. There’s a higher bar in Germany than the U.S. If a leader is a good talker and bullsh1tter who screws up a lot, Germans will get disgusted by him.

    Any truth to that?

    Or has Germany become Americanized to the point at which leaders can be buffoons and still get reelected?

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It is not the German voters who select more competent politicians, it is the nature of the German party system. The party selects the leader, not the voters. The voters select the party. This means competent but uncharismatic figures like Armin Laschet, Merkel, Scholz etc. often rise to the top based on their organizational abilities, allies they have made on the way up and often as a compromise between factions. An empty vessel like Obama or a blowhard like Trump would have a difficult time becoming leader of Germany. Otoh, easy to imagine a master of party factionalism like Stalin rising to the top in the German system.

    , @Odin
    @JohnnyWalker123


    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent.
     
    I read somewhere about a German leader who admitted a million-plus migrants in a move that was none of the above.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Dieter Kief
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Hard to tell.
    I do sense that public dicourse is more of a thing in Germany than in the US. And it sure is good, that there are more parties there than just two, I wholeheartedly agre here with Peter Akuleyev.
    I'm very hesitant at the moment to judge either system. - What I can definitely say is, that the Swiss system - balanced by dircect votes by the Swiss citizans, is definitely better - not least much more differentiated with regard to the arguements that are brought forqard in - literally - each and every subject of public/political interest . So - I'm a Swis at heart.

    The Swiss process of decision making is (often) painstaikingly slow and consumes enourmous amounts of civil enagement. - That's why a reoccuring theme in Switzerland is, whether the system can continue to exist in ever more complex modern world. Well - it did so far - and with impressive results.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  19. That cartoon of Gin Lane could be Kensington Ave., Philadelphia, 2021.

    The more things change…

  20. @Rob McX
    The deginerates look like the ancestors of today's antifa activists.

    Replies: @Macumazahn

    “Deginerates – I see what you did there.

  21. 18th century English satirists had amazing social consciences. As a chief magistrate, Henry Fielding and his blind half-brother invented modern crime statistics ‘to bring the World… together into one Place’, predating Bentham’s panopticon by over a decade.

    Humorists then didn’t just snipe from the sidelines but actually came up with good ideas to change things.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @S Johnson

    My paternal g-g-grandparents were married by Henry Fielding the nephew (I think, have to look it up) of the writer. I wish he hadn't bothered.

  22. @J.Ross
    @Amon Dool

    DID YOU JUST CLAIM THAT ENGLAND IN HOGARTH'S DAY WAS A WHITE COUNTRY?

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    Well of course that would have been unpossible. Because that’s not who we are.
    https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1977-U-543

    [top tip; if you’re old like me and your eyes are shot, y’kin zoom in; bring plenty of neatsfoot oil & flannels]

  23. @Bardon Kaldian
    First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    https://image.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/two-tahitian-women-by-paul-600w-751010593.jpg

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Vel%C3%A1zquez_%E2%80%93_Buf%C3%B3n_don_Sebasti%C3%A1n_de_Morra_%28Museo_del_Prado%2C_c._1645%29.jpg

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    https://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/blackrembrandt-474x672.jpg

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Steve Sailer, @jcd1974, @Expletive Deleted, @Elmer T. Jones

    The great 18th Century rococo architect François de Cuvilliés got his start as a court dwarf.

  24. @S Johnson
    18th century English satirists had amazing social consciences. As a chief magistrate, Henry Fielding and his blind half-brother invented modern crime statistics ‘to bring the World… together into one Place’, predating Bentham’s panopticon by over a decade.

    https://twitter.com/GeorgianLords/status/1434087374879928323?s=20

    Humorists then didn’t just snipe from the sidelines but actually came up with good ideas to change things.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    My paternal g-g-grandparents were married by Henry Fielding the nephew (I think, have to look it up) of the writer. I wish he hadn’t bothered.

    • LOL: S Johnson
  25. @Reg Cæsar

    WARNING: This comment contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.
     
    These are like the notices on milk chocolate that say "Contains: milk" and soy yogurt that say "Contains: soy" and peanut butter that say "Contains: peanuts". It's about deflecting lawsuits.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    • Replies: @Fox
    @Adam Smith

    Thanks. Great picture. We do live in times in which the obvious is not obvious anymore. Is this even a legally relevant statement? Can peanuts contain peanuts? Can something that is a certain entity contain said entity? Or is the product referred to above the box? (which does contain the peanuts).


    This kind of stuff is eating up a lot of good energy. The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  26. @Bardon Kaldian
    First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    https://image.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/two-tahitian-women-by-paul-600w-751010593.jpg

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Vel%C3%A1zquez_%E2%80%93_Buf%C3%B3n_don_Sebasti%C3%A1n_de_Morra_%28Museo_del_Prado%2C_c._1645%29.jpg

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    https://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/blackrembrandt-474x672.jpg

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Steve Sailer, @jcd1974, @Expletive Deleted, @Elmer T. Jones

    The dwarf is not by Goya. It’s by Diego Velazquez.

    • Agree: S Johnson
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @jcd1974

    True. I meant Goya, who is emblematic because his dwarf is full of hatred & disgust, while Velazquez's is resigned to his fate:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4d/Goya_-_Un_enano_%28A_Dwarf%29.jpg/1200px-Goya_-_Un_enano_%28A_Dwarf%29.jpg

    , @Badger Down
    @jcd1974

    I'm SHOCKED that you would call a famous Spanish painter a "Diego"!

  27. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

  28. @Bardon Kaldian
    First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    https://image.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/two-tahitian-women-by-paul-600w-751010593.jpg

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Vel%C3%A1zquez_%E2%80%93_Buf%C3%B3n_don_Sebasti%C3%A1n_de_Morra_%28Museo_del_Prado%2C_c._1645%29.jpg

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    https://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/blackrembrandt-474x672.jpg

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Steve Sailer, @jcd1974, @Expletive Deleted, @Elmer T. Jones

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    That’s because Old Pieter Breughel had already seen, spoken of, and delineated our future centuries before. Precisely 354 years before, but in exactly the same spot where he lived.
    https://www.artflakes.com/en/products/die-tolle-grete-die-dulle-griet?id=die-tolle-grete-die-dulle-griet&locale=en

    Ain’t life funny?

  29. On behalf of all the Rocket Scientists on here, I ask, “Who’s Hogarth?”

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @obwandiyag

    Or rather, "How many divisions does Hogarth have?"

    , @Anonymous
    @obwandiyag


    On behalf of all the Rocket Scientists on here, I ask, “Who’s Hogarth?”
     
    https://lmgtfy.app/?q=Hogarth
  30. @Adam Smith
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://i.ibb.co/qn7pTC9/this-product-contains-peanuts.jpg

    Replies: @Fox

    Thanks. Great picture. We do live in times in which the obvious is not obvious anymore. Is this even a legally relevant statement? Can peanuts contain peanuts? Can something that is a certain entity contain said entity? Or is the product referred to above the box? (which does contain the peanuts).

    This kind of stuff is eating up a lot of good energy. The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.

    • Thanks: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Fox


    The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.
     
    "The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute [Shylocks] makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire."

    realisation
     
    You're not a Yank. Ask any American at random why such signs are necessary. Yes, necessary.

    tire
     
    Okay, maybe Canadian.





    https://images.dailyhive.com/20200410075951/canadian-tire.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fox

  31. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

    My 5 year old just threw away something like this.
    Damn, we coulda been millionaires and Kangz.

  32. @Fox
    @Adam Smith

    Thanks. Great picture. We do live in times in which the obvious is not obvious anymore. Is this even a legally relevant statement? Can peanuts contain peanuts? Can something that is a certain entity contain said entity? Or is the product referred to above the box? (which does contain the peanuts).


    This kind of stuff is eating up a lot of good energy. The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.

    “The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute [Shylocks] makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.”

    realisation

    You’re not a Yank. Ask any American at random why such signs are necessary. Yes, necessary.

    tire

    Okay, maybe Canadian.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's all so tire-some.

    , @Fox
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks,
    no, I am not a resident of the Northeast states of the Union of the North American states. I think the image of the deflated tire is universally appealing to describe moments of a feeling of hopeless resignation. Only for moments, though. Because there is the certain knowledge that an edifice erected by morons will collapse under its own weight. Not soon enough, but it will.
    But why is such a sign necessary? It seems that it satisfies in the first place inane, insane lawyer cant, the common man and woman, and child still knows that peanuts are peanuts and therefore represent peanuts.

  33. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

    “They were selling Basquiat painting for \$ 110 million:”
    Oh, bargain!

    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  34. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:

    Apparently, when the memorial to the Duke of Wellington was unveiled in Victorian times, several ladies present actually swooned and fainted when confronted with the sight of the rather boisterous and well endowed nude ‘heroic’ Grecian warrior figure which graced the bronze composition – which quickly led to that good old fashioned standby a strategically placed fig leaf to preserve female modesty.

    A persistent myth is that the Victorians figleafed all of the male genitalia of classical era statuary they could find, but this is untrue, as any cursory visit to the British Museum could tell you. The story that Victorian prudery dictated the covering of turned piano legs is also a myth.

    • Replies: @Fox
    @Anonymous

    I think Ashcroft in Bush the Younger's era had the nude lady torsos in the Capitol building draped with cloth to affect modesty.

  35. @obwandiyag
    On behalf of all the Rocket Scientists on here, I ask, "Who's Hogarth?"

    Replies: @Pericles, @Anonymous

    Or rather, “How many divisions does Hogarth have?”

  36. @Reg Cæsar
    @Fox


    The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.
     
    "The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute [Shylocks] makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire."

    realisation
     
    You're not a Yank. Ask any American at random why such signs are necessary. Yes, necessary.

    tire
     
    Okay, maybe Canadian.





    https://images.dailyhive.com/20200410075951/canadian-tire.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fox

    It’s all so tire-some.

  37. @jcd1974
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The dwarf is not by Goya. It's by Diego Velazquez.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Badger Down

    True. I meant Goya, who is emblematic because his dwarf is full of hatred & disgust, while Velazquez’s is resigned to his fate:

  38. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

    I wonder – are there previous examples in art history of painters whose works sold for huge (in their day) prices but which today are worth much less?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don't hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church's "Heart of the Andes" I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I'm looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @LP5, @S Johnson, @J.Ross

  39. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    If a German politician was blatantly incompetent and lazy, how would German voters react? Do Germans have the same tolerance for ineptitude as the American public? Or do they have high expectations?

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent. There's a higher bar in Germany than the U.S. If a leader is a good talker and bullsh1tter who screws up a lot, Germans will get disgusted by him.

    Any truth to that?

    Or has Germany become Americanized to the point at which leaders can be buffoons and still get reelected?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Odin, @Dieter Kief

    It is not the German voters who select more competent politicians, it is the nature of the German party system. The party selects the leader, not the voters. The voters select the party. This means competent but uncharismatic figures like Armin Laschet, Merkel, Scholz etc. often rise to the top based on their organizational abilities, allies they have made on the way up and often as a compromise between factions. An empty vessel like Obama or a blowhard like Trump would have a difficult time becoming leader of Germany. Otoh, easy to imagine a master of party factionalism like Stalin rising to the top in the German system.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  40. @obwandiyag
    On behalf of all the Rocket Scientists on here, I ask, "Who's Hogarth?"

    Replies: @Pericles, @Anonymous

    On behalf of all the Rocket Scientists on here, I ask, “Who’s Hogarth?”

    https://lmgtfy.app/?q=Hogarth

  41. The Tate website is pretty woke.

    https://www.tate.org.uk/art

    Q&A: Ajamu
    The Huddersfield-born, London-based artist and sex activist talks about his photographs that challenge notions of identity and desire

    Queer Cornwall
    Discover the stories of three LGBTQIA+ trailblazers who made their home on the Cornish coast

    BLACK ATLANTIC
    Black Atlantic describes the fusion of black cultures with other cultures from around the Atlantic

    Strangely, if the Alice Insley responsible (with Martin Myrone) for the captions is the one who’s just got married to Ben Thorpe, she seems to have gone for a traditional wedding in a pretty country church, followed by a reception at Calke Abbey riding school (packages start at £7k), which is a rather gorgeous National Trust property. Dr Insley previously taught art history at Stowe School, one of the top UK public schools. Who was it who said that the upper classes “talked 60s but lived 50s” ?

  42. @Obstinate Cymric
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I wonder - are there previous examples in art history of painters whose works sold for huge (in their day) prices but which today are worth much less?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don’t hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church’s “Heart of the Andes” I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I’m looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    “An Education” shows the Jewish wideboy property investors picking up notable Pre-Raphaelite works for a song during the mid-20th century dip in their reputation. I think they buy a large painting by Burne-Jones for 200 guineas in 1961 money, whereas Millais’s Ophelia had sold for 748 a century earlier. Now the Pre-Raphaelites command huge prices again.

    Similarly Evelyn Waugh enjoyed buying large Victorian realist works by painters who’d been well known in his father’s time but had gone out of fashion.

    , @LP5
    @Steve Sailer


    I wonder – are there previous examples in art history of painters whose works sold for huge (in their day) prices but which today are worth much less?

     

    Hunter Biden, next cancel candidate.

    Too soon?
    , @S Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    Some of his larger paintings still sell for over a million, but Church’s ‘Icebergs’ sold for $2.5m in 1979 at Sotheby’s in New York, then the most expensive American painting ever, not far off the top Old Master prices.

    Another Hudson School painter, William Bradford, was famous in his lifetime for accompanying Arctic expeditions and painting them. He had a piece commissioned by Queen Victoria and hung in Windsor Castle, but his paintings sell in the tens of thousands today, pretty small change in the art world. Maybe worth investing in.

    Because art is often used as an investment it’s probably more subject to fluctuations in reputation than literature or music.

    , @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Rubens' famous Night Watch was found abandoned in a school cafeteria before being placed in a museum. And there's pretty much all Socialist art and architecture, maximally fashionable at its creation, unpopular once the people are permitted to admit it's ugly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

  43. @Steve Sailer
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don't hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church's "Heart of the Andes" I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I'm looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @LP5, @S Johnson, @J.Ross

    “An Education” shows the Jewish wideboy property investors picking up notable Pre-Raphaelite works for a song during the mid-20th century dip in their reputation. I think they buy a large painting by Burne-Jones for 200 guineas in 1961 money, whereas Millais’s Ophelia had sold for 748 a century earlier. Now the Pre-Raphaelites command huge prices again.

    Similarly Evelyn Waugh enjoyed buying large Victorian realist works by painters who’d been well known in his father’s time but had gone out of fashion.

  44. @Bardon Kaldian
    First they came for Gauguin. I did not speak out, because I was not Gauguin.

    https://image.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/two-tahitian-women-by-paul-600w-751010593.jpg

    Then they came for Goya. I did not speak out, because I was not Goya.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Vel%C3%A1zquez_%E2%80%93_Buf%C3%B3n_don_Sebasti%C3%A1n_de_Morra_%28Museo_del_Prado%2C_c._1645%29.jpg

    Then they came for Rembrandt. I did not speak out, because I was not Rembrandt.

    https://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/blackrembrandt-474x672.jpg

    Then they came for me, Hogarth. And there was no one left to speak for me.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Steve Sailer, @jcd1974, @Expletive Deleted, @Elmer T. Jones

    Have they come for Robert Crumb yet?

  45. Next up, James Gillray…

  46. It’s only a matter of time before “they” start systematically destroying old paintings and manuscripts, and calling you a Nazi if you object.

    And it won’t be random destruction by raging mobs in most cases. The sort of people who will do this are already in charge at the museums and libraries. They will know which pieces are the most important and destroy those first.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don't hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church's "Heart of the Andes" I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I'm looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @LP5, @S Johnson, @J.Ross

    I wonder – are there previous examples in art history of painters whose works sold for huge (in their day) prices but which today are worth much less?

    Hunter Biden, next cancel candidate.

    Too soon?

    • LOL: Obstinate Cymric
  48. This would make a great t-shirt:

    CONTENT GUIDANCE

    This person contains derogatory
    stereotyped opinions of
    race, gender and disability

  49. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    If a German politician was blatantly incompetent and lazy, how would German voters react? Do Germans have the same tolerance for ineptitude as the American public? Or do they have high expectations?

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent. There's a higher bar in Germany than the U.S. If a leader is a good talker and bullsh1tter who screws up a lot, Germans will get disgusted by him.

    Any truth to that?

    Or has Germany become Americanized to the point at which leaders can be buffoons and still get reelected?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Odin, @Dieter Kief

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent.

    I read somewhere about a German leader who admitted a million-plus migrants in a move that was none of the above.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Odin

    Merkel has a Chemistry PHD.

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don't hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church's "Heart of the Andes" I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I'm looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @LP5, @S Johnson, @J.Ross

    Some of his larger paintings still sell for over a million, but Church’s ‘Icebergs’ sold for \$2.5m in 1979 at Sotheby’s in New York, then the most expensive American painting ever, not far off the top Old Master prices.

    Another Hudson School painter, William Bradford, was famous in his lifetime for accompanying Arctic expeditions and painting them. He had a piece commissioned by Queen Victoria and hung in Windsor Castle, but his paintings sell in the tens of thousands today, pretty small change in the art world. Maybe worth investing in.

    Because art is often used as an investment it’s probably more subject to fluctuations in reputation than literature or music.

  51. @Amon Dool
    Who are they stereotyping? Some of the whores look a bit like pikeys, but there certainly are no blacks.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Peterg123

    There is one cartoon of Hogarth’s depicting two extremely wealthy and aristocratic gentlemen visiting a black whore in London…so interestingly we discover that there were such at that time. But the caricature is aimed at the rich white Johns, not at the prostitute. This single item must be the “racism” that of course these little red guards had to “uncover”.

    There are more comments attached to paintings and works generally of Hogarth at this exhibition, some so mind numbingly stupid that one’s brain hurts.

    • Replies: @Johnny Whoop
    @Peterg123

    There is also this:

    https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-yzgoj/images/stencil/1280x1280/products/1576192/4832579/apilr5lun__84819.1626730418.jpg?c=2

  52. @Steve Sailer
    @Obstinate Cymric

    Frederick Edwin Church was a superstar landscape painter in mid-19th Century America, then many of his paintings were sold in thrift shops, then he rose back to stardom in the 1980s, and lately you don't hear much about him. I have a big reproduction of Church's "Heart of the Andes" I bought 30 years ago, which I loved then, but now I'm looking to give it away.

    The longer you live, the more things go in and out of fashion.

    Replies: @S Johnson, @LP5, @S Johnson, @J.Ross

    Rubens’ famous Night Watch was found abandoned in a school cafeteria before being placed in a museum. And there’s pretty much all Socialist art and architecture, maximally fashionable at its creation, unpopular once the people are permitted to admit it’s ugly.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @J.Ross

    Rembrandt's

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @S Johnson
    @J.Ross

    Not sure about that. There was a Caravaggio found in a Jesuit Fathers’ dining room in Dublin which may be what you’re thinking of. But that seems to be more a case of not realising they had a Caravaggio on their hands until they tried to sell it.

    Rembrandt’s Baroque style had gone out of fashion by the time of his death but he was still recognised as a pre-eminent genius by the painters of the next generation, like Goya. It didn’t take long for him to recover. But the dip may be instructive regarding what would have happened to Shakespeare if he’d outlived his prime and the First Folio hadn’t been rapidly published. If his boosters in the next decades had had to hunt around to assemble accurate copies of his plays in the 1660s he might not have emerged as the leading figure of world literature he’s been acknowledged as ever since.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  53. @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Rubens' famous Night Watch was found abandoned in a school cafeteria before being placed in a museum. And there's pretty much all Socialist art and architecture, maximally fashionable at its creation, unpopular once the people are permitted to admit it's ugly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

    Rembrandt’s

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Ah, you're right. I did think the picture I had in my head was fuzzy ... sort of a Whale-Oil Ladyland ...

    Replies: @Badger Down

  54. @Steve Sailer
    @J.Ross

    Rembrandt's

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Ah, you’re right. I did think the picture I had in my head was fuzzy … sort of a Whale-Oil Ladyland

    • Replies: @Badger Down
    @J.Ross

    Shouldn't that last word be beef-hooked?
    You know: Whale-oil beef-hooked.

  55. @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Rubens' famous Night Watch was found abandoned in a school cafeteria before being placed in a museum. And there's pretty much all Socialist art and architecture, maximally fashionable at its creation, unpopular once the people are permitted to admit it's ugly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @S Johnson

    Not sure about that. There was a Caravaggio found in a Jesuit Fathers’ dining room in Dublin which may be what you’re thinking of. But that seems to be more a case of not realising they had a Caravaggio on their hands until they tried to sell it.

    Rembrandt’s Baroque style had gone out of fashion by the time of his death but he was still recognised as a pre-eminent genius by the painters of the next generation, like Goya. It didn’t take long for him to recover. But the dip may be instructive regarding what would have happened to Shakespeare if he’d outlived his prime and the First Folio hadn’t been rapidly published. If his boosters in the next decades had had to hunt around to assemble accurate copies of his plays in the 1660s he might not have emerged as the leading figure of world literature he’s been acknowledged as ever since.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @S Johnson


    But just as Rembrandt was relegated to near oblivion for over 100 years after his death, so too was this to be Bouguereau's fate. One of the most famous stories about Rembrandt concerns his painting Night Watch. After his death, no one wanted it. Finally, a gymnasium agreed to hang it on their back wall if the top foot of the painting would be cut off so it would fit. Today, this artistic masterpiece is known only in a mutilated form.
     
    https://www.artrenewal.org/Article/Title/art-scam

    Replies: @S Johnson

  56. @Odin
    @JohnnyWalker123


    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent.
     
    I read somewhere about a German leader who admitted a million-plus migrants in a move that was none of the above.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Merkel has a Chemistry PHD.

  57. @S Johnson
    @J.Ross

    Not sure about that. There was a Caravaggio found in a Jesuit Fathers’ dining room in Dublin which may be what you’re thinking of. But that seems to be more a case of not realising they had a Caravaggio on their hands until they tried to sell it.

    Rembrandt’s Baroque style had gone out of fashion by the time of his death but he was still recognised as a pre-eminent genius by the painters of the next generation, like Goya. It didn’t take long for him to recover. But the dip may be instructive regarding what would have happened to Shakespeare if he’d outlived his prime and the First Folio hadn’t been rapidly published. If his boosters in the next decades had had to hunt around to assemble accurate copies of his plays in the 1660s he might not have emerged as the leading figure of world literature he’s been acknowledged as ever since.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    But just as Rembrandt was relegated to near oblivion for over 100 years after his death, so too was this to be Bouguereau’s fate. One of the most famous stories about Rembrandt concerns his painting Night Watch. After his death, no one wanted it. Finally, a gymnasium agreed to hang it on their back wall if the top foot of the painting would be cut off so it would fit. Today, this artistic masterpiece is known only in a mutilated form.

    https://www.artrenewal.org/Article/Title/art-scam

    • Replies: @S Johnson
    @J.Ross

    “Gymnasium” isn’t really the accurate English word. ‘The Night Watch’ was commissioned for the great hall of the Kloveniersdoelen, literally musketeers’ shooting range, but more like a guildhall. The walls were decorated with pictures of the various companies that made up Amsterdam’s well-regulated militias, one of which was the subject of Rembrandt’s painting. It stayed there until 1715 when it was moved up to Amsterdam town hall, where it got trimmed on two sides to fit in the new location. That was pretty common and isn’t a sign of depreciation; Rembrandt paintings were already valuable. ‘The Night Watch’ is massive, about 12x14ft. I saw it two years ago at its home since 1885, the Rijksmuseum.

  58. @J.Ross
    @S Johnson


    But just as Rembrandt was relegated to near oblivion for over 100 years after his death, so too was this to be Bouguereau's fate. One of the most famous stories about Rembrandt concerns his painting Night Watch. After his death, no one wanted it. Finally, a gymnasium agreed to hang it on their back wall if the top foot of the painting would be cut off so it would fit. Today, this artistic masterpiece is known only in a mutilated form.
     
    https://www.artrenewal.org/Article/Title/art-scam

    Replies: @S Johnson

    “Gymnasium” isn’t really the accurate English word. ‘The Night Watch’ was commissioned for the great hall of the Kloveniersdoelen, literally musketeers’ shooting range, but more like a guildhall. The walls were decorated with pictures of the various companies that made up Amsterdam’s well-regulated militias, one of which was the subject of Rembrandt’s painting. It stayed there until 1715 when it was moved up to Amsterdam town hall, where it got trimmed on two sides to fit in the new location. That was pretty common and isn’t a sign of depreciation; Rembrandt paintings were already valuable. ‘The Night Watch’ is massive, about 12x14ft. I saw it two years ago at its home since 1885, the Rijksmuseum.

  59. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    If a German politician was blatantly incompetent and lazy, how would German voters react? Do Germans have the same tolerance for ineptitude as the American public? Or do they have high expectations?

    My sense (and I could be wrong) is that Germans expect their leaders to be logical, knowledgeable, and competent. There's a higher bar in Germany than the U.S. If a leader is a good talker and bullsh1tter who screws up a lot, Germans will get disgusted by him.

    Any truth to that?

    Or has Germany become Americanized to the point at which leaders can be buffoons and still get reelected?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Odin, @Dieter Kief

    Hard to tell.
    I do sense that public dicourse is more of a thing in Germany than in the US. And it sure is good, that there are more parties there than just two, I wholeheartedly agre here with Peter Akuleyev.
    I’m very hesitant at the moment to judge either system. – What I can definitely say is, that the Swiss system – balanced by dircect votes by the Swiss citizans, is definitely better – not least much more differentiated with regard to the arguements that are brought forqard in – literally – each and every subject of public/political interest . So – I’m a Swis at heart.

    The Swiss process of decision making is (often) painstaikingly slow and consumes enourmous amounts of civil enagement. – That’s why a reoccuring theme in Switzerland is, whether the system can continue to exist in ever more complex modern world. Well – it did so far – and with impressive results.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Dieter Kief

    Sorry for the typos. correction din't work plus - I'm not quite awake yet.

  60. @Dieter Kief
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Hard to tell.
    I do sense that public dicourse is more of a thing in Germany than in the US. And it sure is good, that there are more parties there than just two, I wholeheartedly agre here with Peter Akuleyev.
    I'm very hesitant at the moment to judge either system. - What I can definitely say is, that the Swiss system - balanced by dircect votes by the Swiss citizans, is definitely better - not least much more differentiated with regard to the arguements that are brought forqard in - literally - each and every subject of public/political interest . So - I'm a Swis at heart.

    The Swiss process of decision making is (often) painstaikingly slow and consumes enourmous amounts of civil enagement. - That's why a reoccuring theme in Switzerland is, whether the system can continue to exist in ever more complex modern world. Well - it did so far - and with impressive results.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Sorry for the typos. correction din’t work plus – I’m not quite awake yet.

  61. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Bardon Kaldian

    And not only there was no one to speak for me, Hogarth.

    They were selling Basquiat painting for $ 110 million:

    https://kuow-prod.imgix.net/store/22b1c6df10cf4790544b6b8087d76435.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Escher, @animalogic, @Obstinate Cymric, @Alden

    Don’t knock it. Pays a lot better than being a horror comic book artist or doing make up wigs and costumes for cheap horror movies. And easier too.

  62. @jcd1974
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The dwarf is not by Goya. It's by Diego Velazquez.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Badger Down

    I’m SHOCKED that you would call a famous Spanish painter a “Diego”!

  63. @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Ah, you're right. I did think the picture I had in my head was fuzzy ... sort of a Whale-Oil Ladyland ...

    Replies: @Badger Down

    Shouldn’t that last word be beef-hooked?
    You know: Whale-oil beef-hooked.

  64. @Peterg123
    @Amon Dool

    There is one cartoon of Hogarth's depicting two extremely wealthy and aristocratic gentlemen visiting a black whore in London...so interestingly we discover that there were such at that time. But the caricature is aimed at the rich white Johns, not at the prostitute. This single item must be the "racism" that of course these little red guards had to "uncover".

    There are more comments attached to paintings and works generally of Hogarth at this exhibition, some so mind numbingly stupid that one's brain hurts.

    Replies: @Johnny Whoop

    There is also this:

  65. @Reg Cæsar
    @Fox


    The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute morons makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire.
     
    "The realisation that our fate is in the hands of absolute [Shylocks] makes life appear at times like a punctured deflated tire."

    realisation
     
    You're not a Yank. Ask any American at random why such signs are necessary. Yes, necessary.

    tire
     
    Okay, maybe Canadian.





    https://images.dailyhive.com/20200410075951/canadian-tire.jpg

    Replies: @Pericles, @Fox

    Thanks,
    no, I am not a resident of the Northeast states of the Union of the North American states. I think the image of the deflated tire is universally appealing to describe moments of a feeling of hopeless resignation. Only for moments, though. Because there is the certain knowledge that an edifice erected by morons will collapse under its own weight. Not soon enough, but it will.
    But why is such a sign necessary? It seems that it satisfies in the first place inane, insane lawyer cant, the common man and woman, and child still knows that peanuts are peanuts and therefore represent peanuts.

  66. @Anonymous
    Apparently, when the memorial to the Duke of Wellington was unveiled in Victorian times, several ladies present actually swooned and fainted when confronted with the sight of the rather boisterous and well endowed nude 'heroic' Grecian warrior figure which graced the bronze composition - which quickly led to that good old fashioned standby a strategically placed fig leaf to preserve female modesty.

    A persistent myth is that the Victorians figleafed all of the male genitalia of classical era statuary they could find, but this is untrue, as any cursory visit to the British Museum could tell you. The story that Victorian prudery dictated the covering of turned piano legs is also a myth.

    Replies: @Fox

    I think Ashcroft in Bush the Younger’s era had the nude lady torsos in the Capitol building draped with cloth to affect modesty.

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