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Back in the previous decade, I came up with Sailer’s Law of Female Journalists:

The most heartfelt articles by female journalists tend to be demands that social values be overturned in order that, Come the Revolution, the journalist herself will be considered hotter-looking.

Commenter anon suggests:

Is this the genesis of a new Sailer’s Law?

The most passionate tweets by male journalists tend to be demands that, Come the Revolution, the guys who beat out the journalists in getting the girls in high school will be destroyed in their adult lives.

The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood, in which an old editor, Topping, reflects upon young reporter John Smith. Only Wolfe thinks it all starts ten years younger:

If you ask me, newspaper reporters are created at age six when they first go to school. In the schoolyard boys immediately divide into two types. Immediately! There are those who have the will to be daring and dominate, and those who don’t have it. … But there are boys from the weaker side of the divide who grow up with the same dreams as the stronger … The boy standing before me, John Smith, is one of them. They, too, dream of power, money, fame, and beautiful lovers.

 
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  1. • Replies: @Danindc
    @Pat Casey

    Too obvious. Twitter cucks loved this mash up

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Pat Casey

    Really creative.

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Pat Casey

    Lindsey Graham is a pussy boy politician donor whore from South Carolina.

    Lindsey Graham pushes open borders mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and endless war in the Middle East and West Asia on behalf of Israel.

    I have an ancestor who was born in South Carolina about 1740. His name was Jacob Lampley. The family name was Lamplugh, but it got changed. The Lamplugh people were from Wiltshire, England.

    Lindsey Graham is a horrible baby boomer coward who brings dishonor and shame to the people of South Carolina. Just like Jeff Flake is a fraudulent crybaby fop who brings shame to the people of Arizona.

    Lindsey Graham wants President Trump to get rid of Attorney General Jeff Sessions so Graham and his fellow shysters in the GOP Cheap Labor Faction can bamboozle Trump into some kind of nation-wrecking immigration deal scam that pours more foreigners into the United States.

  2. First!

    • Disagree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @F0337
    @njguy73


    First!
     
    Idiocy. The real reason Taki's had to eliminate comments.
    , @Redneck farmer
    @njguy73

    Maybe Dr. Ford should have broke into "Our Hometown"?

  3. Hey Kavanaugh man up faggot .

    • Replies: @donut
    @donut

    Leonidas at Thermopylae .

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

  4. High School Never Ends

    I came to that conclusion 20 years ago during the Clinton impeachment.

    Hillary was the bitchy NHS/yearbook/student government/school paper busybody, Bill was the Homecoming King, Monica was the school slut and Ken Starr was the principal.

    • Agree: Song For the Deaf
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dr. X

    It funny to compare the reactions and opinions expressed by people at the time. The left seemed to brush it all off without much distress. Anyone who suggested something was inappropriate was a fusty prude.

    Same with the Roman Polanski situation. An underage girl, drugged and raped in a pre-meditated kind of way by the great Jewish artist Mr. Polanski. The whole scenario was framed as a case of American prudery gone berserk. All the stars were lining up to support him, and there was not even a question of guilt. Everyone acknowledged what happened but waved it away like a housefly.

    It's absolutely sickening to witness this spectacle and watch all this grotesque grandstanding.

    , @njguy73
    @Dr. X

    You ever see Election? Tracy Flick was based on Bill and Hillary combined.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

  5. The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood

    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    , @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Reg Cæsar

    I haven't followed the controversy in great detail, but here's Jerry Coyne's critical review:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/his-white-suit-unsullied-by-research-tom-wolfe-tries-to-take-down-charles-darwin/2016/08/31/8ee6d4ee-4936-11e6-90a8-fb84201e0645_story.html?utm_term=.b7f95e13cf73

    As much as I cherish the writings of the late, great Tom Wolfe, it seems that he waded in over his depth with his last book. He seems to have presented the relevant evidence about evolution and linguistics in an incredibly distorted, biased and selective manner---which is perhaps acceptable for a satirical journalist or novelist attempting to tell a compelling/amusing narrative, but certainly not for someone making the case for or against a scientific hypothesis.

    Personally, I wouldn't want to bet against Charles Darwin and Noam Chomsky.

    Also, I find it highly ironic that Mr. Wolfe's excellent novels all powerfully display HBD "in the wild", so to speak,---and indeed also more mundane evolutionary psychology--- and yet he seems to have rejected the idea that evolution is deeply explanatory of human behavior in his last book.

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @Foreign Expert
    @Reg Cæsar

    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    > Asking for InternetAnon to rebut my shitty personal opinion that I wrote in one line

    Get out.


    Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms
     
    You may want to rephrase this, what you write doesn't make sense.

    Chomksy grammars are too bit too constrained to explain human speech patterns, but then again trying to refine the behaviour of neural networks down to deterministic symbolic processing is never going to work completely.
    , @Grumpy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Tom Wolfe's The Kingdom of Speech is fantastic.

    , @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I was in High School Sophomore English, that was called the Bow-Wow Theory.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sorry, opening the link I see it's Scottsdale AZ.

    , @anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Tom Wolfe attacking Chomsky in the intellectual arena is roughly equivalent to if he tried to attack a gorilla in a cage fight.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't really know much about Chomsky, apart from his controversy with Daniel Everett but... the fact is that I really, really don't understand why he is considered a Great Genius who revolutionarized language studies.

    I mean, I really don't get. If I understood it, he had a grand scheme where certain grammatical features had to be present in every language due to them being hardwired in the human brain. After looking around over many languages, he ended up discarding most of what he believed and keeping only the mysterious "recursion", that Everett claims to have disproven with the Pirahã language.

    That sounds like a smart guy starting with a reasonable idea... that eventually was not very productive. OK, it happens all thee time, but we don't treat these people as Darwins and Newtons.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  6. Trying ineptly to pile on:

    https://t.co/6nWt0PI1N4

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Desiderius

    USA Today, "TV on paper".

    Top listing under "Popular Stories:": "LSU basketball player dies of gunshot wounds"

    He could be Meghan Markle's brother.

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Desiderius

    America Today:


    "But credibly accused sex offenders should not coach youth basketball, girls or boys, without deeper investigation. Can’t we all agree on that?"
     
    Life would be a lot easier if people just listened more to what America Today comes up with. Simple rules, simple solutions, less stress and unpleasantness for the suffering masses in front of their TVs!

    Replies: @Desiderius

  7. If you ask me, newspaper reporters are created at age six when they first go to school.

    This was true for my cousin in Northern California. As a schoolboy he typed up his own neighborhood newspaper and stuck it in people’s mailboxes.

    As an adult he went to work for the local paper. Eventually he began buying a page for himself, selling ad space for it and writing his own column down the middle. He has always been very enterprising.

    Then my cousin started his own paper to compete with his former employer. He rented a warehouse and had everything in there: printing equipment, desks, very early word processing computers. He and his team could write, assemble, print and distribute a local newspaper from that one site. I remember a police scanner was always on when I visited. Any story that came up was an occasion to rush out and cover it.

    Eventually he sold his paper and got himself elected mayor.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Hey that's a great story, with a happy ending - He Got Elected Mayor.

    I hope I have something similar as I am now a rather underemployed, frustrated writer, teacher with lots of successful relatives that are terrible as* kissers, PC Lib Leftist college professors, cuckservatives etc.

  8. Busy Philipps now tells us she was raped at 14:

    https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/celebrities/busy-philipps-rape-1.21287299

    What’s surprising is that with the name Busy, and children Birdie and Cricket, she’s not part of the crazy John Phillips clan.

    But note the strange spelling. Like in “the Philippines”.

    She was born in Oak Park, a topic much covered by Steve. But she grew up in Scottsdale. Who wants to lay odds on the demographic of the perpetrator?

    But, unlike with Mackenzie, it probably wasn’t her father.

    • Replies: @Earl Lemongrab
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've met Busy Phillips' dad. He's a very straight arrow retired nuclear power plant engineer and as far as I could tell his daughter seems to adore him.

    , @njguy73
    @Reg Cæsar

    Her real name is Elizabeth Jean Philipps.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    I can't even listen to a Mammas and Pappas song anymore. If one comes on the radio, I change the station. John Phillips was such an evil, repellant, degenerate piece of human garbage, that I can't stand to even listen to anything with which he was associated.

    Replies: @tyrone

    , @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm sure you mean Oak Park, IL, but I'm not sure you mean Scottsdale AZ. There's a neighborhood on the Far Southwest Side of Chicago called Scottsdale.

  9. Hero Brett Kavanaugh saved a woman from being date-raped by a drunken frat boy at Yale:

    I’ve Witnessed Him ‘Stumbling Drunk’: Brett Kavanaugh’s Classmate Says Supreme Court Nominee Is ‘Blatantly Lying’

    Brookes also told Cuomo that she had drank to “excess many nights with Brett Kavanaugh” and spoke about a particular incident in which the Supreme Court nominee and a friend allegedly barged into a room “where a guy and girl had gone off together and embarrassed that woman.”

    What would have happened to her if he hadn’t checked up on them? Was the lady inebriated? Could she give consent?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

  10. @donut
    Hey Kavanaugh man up faggot .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peEA-fqmwDU

    Replies: @donut

    Leonidas at Thermopylae .

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @donut

    Gilgamesh and Enkidu. At Uruk.

  11. “Back in the previous decade, I came up with Sailer’s Law of Female Journalists:”

    Yeah but how does this even compare to Robin DiAngelo coining the culture shaking term “white fragility”?

  12. @Desiderius
    Trying ineptly to pile on:

    https://t.co/6nWt0PI1N4

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

    USA Today, “TV on paper”.

    Top listing under “Popular Stories:”: “LSU basketball player dies of gunshot wounds”

    He could be Meghan Markle’s brother.

  13. Yeah and White boys do it best :

    They always do .

  14. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    No.

    I know Steve thinks he’s a great man, but I think he’s a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I’m not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don’t like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents’ and tribe’s Marxist perspective really shows and it’s annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, “What have you got to lose?”

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Buzz Mohawk


    If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.
     
    No, but the 1950s were a time when discrete mathematics in its simplest forms found a variety of novel applications in various areas of the humanities and what have now come to be called the social sciences, and Chomsky's transformation grammar seemed very promising in its insights. It's only when the immediate excitement settled down that linguistic historians with a broad knowledge of the field pointed out that formal generative rules in grammar went back to perhaps the 5th century BC and the Sanskrit grammar of Panini, who in turn, influenced a number of Western linguists in the 19th century AD.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%81%E1%B9%87ini#Modern_linguistics

    Replies: @candid_observer

    , @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Buzz Mohawk


    His parents’ and tribe’s Marxist perspective really shows and it’s annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.
     
    Yeah, I'm sure you'd really warm up to Chomsky if he'd spent his career criticizing the nominal geopolitical enemies of the US (e.g. Iran and Russia) and slavishly defending the actions of the US government and armed forces. There's nothing that the UR comments section loves more than Jews who do that.

    I'm as anti-Marxist as any educated man of the 21st century is, but I find Chomsky's Marxism the least objectionable kind.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I graduated with a linguistics B.A. before Chomsky had gone full-bore radical, and I don't know if transformational grammar is overrated or in any respect represents what is really going on in the brain, but I loved it (and Chomsky's work in phonology also) because it was beautiful. It was logical and made sense (with a few messy loose ends). It was like Newton applying math to planetary physics. It just seemed so right.

    I did love Tom Wolff's Darwin-Chomsky book, however. Great writing, and a quick, short read, something you ususally don't get from Wolff. In the internet age I am less concerned with whether a book is "correct," because no matter what I read I am on Wikipedia and various web sites the entire time following up on stuff, so any problems with a book's facts or reasoning are quickly noticed and corralled.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @anonymous

    , @Roderick Spode
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don't care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.'s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles' sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike1, @Anon, @J.Ross

    , @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    At some point the technology will be sufficient to hunt for words and sentences in the neural networks. TG or one of its descendants may provide the theoretical structure to know what to look for and to understand how the parts fit together. It will then be seen as a seminal theory that was way ahead of its time.
    Or not. Who knows?
    And I agree about his politics. He's right on a number of issues, but he has a bad attitude. He's a Jewish schoolboy who loathes the blond beast.

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I wholeheartedly agree. Especially since you quote CSN&Y.
    All four of them have a better understanding of language as actually being used than Chomsky and all his - transformative supporters combined. Plus: Chomsky sounds just terrible - a bit like a robot, doesn't he?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, better men than you have tried.

    Skinner, Quine, Piaget...the list of great intellectuals who were weighed in the balances against Chomsky and found wanting is long but distinguished.

    Lesser intellects didn't fare any better. Bill Buckley's son will tell you about the time his father was humiliated on national television.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  15. L Woods says:

    Yeah that’s not how things work. At least not today. “Daring” has nothing to do with anything; it’s conformity that determines your social status and therefore your ability to attain the aforementioned litany of life’s rewards. Try “daring” your way into a party with attractive women; even if you’re not thrown out or arrested, you’ll simply be given the cold shoulder as that uninvited weirdo with no social proof.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @L Woods


    Try “daring” your way into a party with attractive women; even if you’re not thrown out or arrested, you’ll simply be given the cold shoulder as that uninvited weirdo with no social proof.
     
    Eh, it could be worse …

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIdNBBTBuqM
  16. Yeah, I’ve been saying the same thing for a while now, that we’re formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000’s when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the “C” students. This is 75% of Americans. What’s it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn’t have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It’s the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight “A” students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the “C” students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight “A” kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we’re such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors “A” students, and they still do. They’re the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you’d have them for life. You’d better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here’s a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart “A” and fairly smart “B” students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population “C” students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins… now!

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @Anon7

    I really don’t think this much reflects reality. Your “tracked” A students are hardly those that enjoyed the most social and sexual success in early life, nor even those that attained the most professional success thereafter. The disgruntled “rejected elite” is one of the oldest archetypes in history. Take it from someone who was “tracked” very early in life and was thought by one and all to have a bright future ahead of him.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Redneck farmer, @Anon7

    , @stillCARealist
    @Anon7

    This is such an excellent case for homeschooling. Save your children from this unnecessary misery!

    I was just talking to a homeschooling mom who told me that in public HS, she would skip classes and go to the river and read. It made no difference to her grades or graduating on time (this would have been in 1998). Her parents never found out and nobody cared. Yeah, she's homeschooling her kids.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anon7

    , @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Anon7


    I ... thought about the “C” students. This is 75% of Americans. ...

    At the other end, you had the straight “A” students... Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat...

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades... They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you’d have them for life. You’d better believe the Democrats know it, too.
     
    You know what else the Democrats figured out?

    Grade inflation. That way even the dummies are in the insufferable, always-correct category.

    Replies: @Anon7

    , @MarkinLA
    @Anon7

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors “A” students, and they still do. They’re the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.


    Sorry, this was me and I never worshipped those kids. I had some sense of balance.

  17. As I fall into the category of a guy who got girls; all I can say is….feels good man

  18. @Pat Casey
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7Unb8_GxtM

    Replies: @Danindc, @ThreeCranes, @Charles Pewitt

    Too obvious. Twitter cucks loved this mash up

  19. Let’s give ‘reatha some RESPECT :

  20. I’m no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we’ve sent kids through the system, I realize even at a ‘good’ school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn’t even really work as a babysitting service. What I’ve found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization…meh. The problem is that it’s not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their ‘identity.’ They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the ‘work’ that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they’ve got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don’t recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a ‘good’ school system. I can’t imagine how bad it is in an ‘average’ school system or a ‘bad’ school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn’t complain too much.

    • Replies: @donut
    @SimpleSong

    TL:DR

    , @J.Ross
    @SimpleSong

    Have you read John Gatto's Underground History of American Public Education?

    , @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    Once you can read and write well, and do some basic math you pretty much know what you need to know. The system is a socialization tool and a babysitting service primarily. It also provides a nice pool of jobs for women who'll generally vote for more big government.

    I'm not sure how we could keep kids busy without it. There won't be a lot of menial work in the future - and I doubt most of the kids today are up for that sort of work anyway. For any child with an interest in things it probably isn't the best environment - particularly these days.

    I was on a country drive and my Dad pointed to a small little barn-ish building and mentioned that was his school when he was a kid. One room, all ages of kids! ...I really don't think they were any the worse off.

    , @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    Totally agree. If you haven't read it, you might enjoy Paul Graham's essay on Why Nerds are Unpopular.

    The sheer scale of the useless busywork that goes on in K-12 education is really staggering when you stop to think about it. There's tons of evidence that most students forget almost everything they learn shortly after learning it, but this remarkable fact seems to have no impact on anything. The whole system just chugs along year after year, and no one really questions it much. As Derb says, "that's the way we do things, because...that's the way we do them." I think it's such a fundamental part of modern society that people can't imagine anything else.

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @Mike1
    @SimpleSong

    One interesting feature of modern schooling that has got no attention is dual immersion programs in Spanish/English. Half the day is taught in English, half in Spanish.
    What the gullible native English speakers parents have yet to work out is that the only point of this is free English education for the kids who only speak Spanish.

  21. @Pat Casey
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7Unb8_GxtM

    Replies: @Danindc, @ThreeCranes, @Charles Pewitt

    Really creative.

  22. @Reg Cæsar
    Busy Philipps now tells us she was raped at 14:


    https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/celebrities/busy-philipps-rape-1.21287299


    What's surprising is that with the name Busy, and children Birdie and Cricket, she's not part of the crazy John Phillips clan.

    But note the strange spelling. Like in "the Philippines".

    She was born in Oak Park, a topic much covered by Steve. But she grew up in Scottsdale. Who wants to lay odds on the demographic of the perpetrator?

    But, unlike with Mackenzie, it probably wasn't her father.

    Replies: @Earl Lemongrab, @njguy73, @Mr. Anon, @Hibernian

    I’ve met Busy Phillips’ dad. He’s a very straight arrow retired nuclear power plant engineer and as far as I could tell his daughter seems to adore him.

  23. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    I really don’t think this much reflects reality. Your “tracked” A students are hardly those that enjoyed the most social and sexual success in early life, nor even those that attained the most professional success thereafter. The disgruntled “rejected elite” is one of the oldest archetypes in history. Take it from someone who was “tracked” very early in life and was thought by one and all to have a bright future ahead of him.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @L Woods

    You may yet.

    , @Redneck farmer
    @L Woods

    You too? Hi there, fellow member of the "he disappointed us" club!

    , @Anon7
    @L Woods

    You never know about smart students. There are the bookish ones who spend a lot of time studying and have little high school social life. That would be me. And then there are the ones like this one girl in my AP physics class who was the prettiest girl in the school, and being surrounded by boys everywhere she went, had no problem securing a social life. I could go on, describing a six foot, lanky guy in that same class who was arrested for reckless motorcycle driving who went on to the Air Force academy and flew fighter planes. I seem to recall that he had an ok social life.

    I think the Rich Dad Guy makes a good point when he says that the “A” students often wind up working for the “B” students, meaning that the bright but well-socialized B students typically do better in the business world, which is a team sport, than loner A students.

    The biggest Chad in my school, an amazing natural athlete who got a full scholarship to an excellent school and who picked professional hockey offers over professional football offers, was driving a garbage truck in his mid-thirties owing to poor financial planning and a blown-out knee.i

    My comments reflect my reality, anyway, even though YMMV.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  24. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    This is such an excellent case for homeschooling. Save your children from this unnecessary misery!

    I was just talking to a homeschooling mom who told me that in public HS, she would skip classes and go to the river and read. It made no difference to her grades or graduating on time (this would have been in 1998). Her parents never found out and nobody cared. Yeah, she’s homeschooling her kids.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @stillCARealist

    And to any white male I would suggest you look for and marry a woman from East Asia (SE or NE). An import. White women are too much of a liability. This will only get worse. There will always be exceptions but unfortunately you can’t risk taling a chance on one.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    , @Anon7
    @stillCARealist

    In my earlier, less woke years, I disdained home schooling and those who did it. After getting two kids through what was once a fine public school system (I live in the same town I grew up in), I now totally understand why parents would want to homeschool and I’d encourage them to do it.

    I have friends who I went to school with who now teach in public schools, and I’m sure they are fine teachers. The public schools as a whole, however, in my opinion, need to be defunded until 1) teachers get rid of their unions or until they agree that poor teachers can be summarily fired for cause and 2) we get control of the curriculum back. What a nightmare. Another publicly supported Leftist backwater that works every day to undermine our Constitution and our democracy.

    “Save your children from this unnecessary misery!”

    Indeed. And the rest of us.

  25. Anonymous[101] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    High School Never Ends
     
    I came to that conclusion 20 years ago during the Clinton impeachment.

    Hillary was the bitchy NHS/yearbook/student government/school paper busybody, Bill was the Homecoming King, Monica was the school slut and Ken Starr was the principal.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @njguy73, @slumber_j

    It funny to compare the reactions and opinions expressed by people at the time. The left seemed to brush it all off without much distress. Anyone who suggested something was inappropriate was a fusty prude.

    Same with the Roman Polanski situation. An underage girl, drugged and raped in a pre-meditated kind of way by the great Jewish artist Mr. Polanski. The whole scenario was framed as a case of American prudery gone berserk. All the stars were lining up to support him, and there was not even a question of guilt. Everyone acknowledged what happened but waved it away like a housefly.

    It’s absolutely sickening to witness this spectacle and watch all this grotesque grandstanding.

  26. @SimpleSong
    I'm no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we've sent kids through the system, I realize even at a 'good' school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn't even really work as a babysitting service. What I've found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization...meh. The problem is that it's not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their 'identity.' They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the 'work' that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they've got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don't recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a 'good' school system. I can't imagine how bad it is in an 'average' school system or a 'bad' school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn't complain too much.

    Replies: @donut, @J.Ross, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Mike1

    TL:DR

  27. @SimpleSong
    I'm no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we've sent kids through the system, I realize even at a 'good' school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn't even really work as a babysitting service. What I've found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization...meh. The problem is that it's not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their 'identity.' They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the 'work' that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they've got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don't recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a 'good' school system. I can't imagine how bad it is in an 'average' school system or a 'bad' school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn't complain too much.

    Replies: @donut, @J.Ross, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Mike1

    Have you read John Gatto’s Underground History of American Public Education?

  28. @Dr. X

    High School Never Ends
     
    I came to that conclusion 20 years ago during the Clinton impeachment.

    Hillary was the bitchy NHS/yearbook/student government/school paper busybody, Bill was the Homecoming King, Monica was the school slut and Ken Starr was the principal.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @njguy73, @slumber_j

    You ever see Election? Tracy Flick was based on Bill and Hillary combined.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @njguy73

    Not BC at all, conceivably Hellary. The character Tracy Flick is awkward and isolated. No friends to speak of, only child, father absent (IIRC, mother widowed). Elizabeth Dole is name checked in Tracy Flick's voice-overs early in the film, so that's one candidate for an inspiration. Florence King once compared Elizabeth Dole to Nurse Ratched. She's like Tracy Flick in that her social matrix doesn't have many people in it. She married a divorce quite late in life; she has no children and her husband has just one; her stepdaughter is a childless spinster; she had no sisters and just one brother, and he was so much older that they didn't grow up together. Her husband was known for working pointlessly long hours and treating his family shabbily (and his staff shabbily as well). You wouldn't marry him for the sweet talk. Passable career move, though.

  29. @Reg Cæsar
    Busy Philipps now tells us she was raped at 14:


    https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/celebrities/busy-philipps-rape-1.21287299


    What's surprising is that with the name Busy, and children Birdie and Cricket, she's not part of the crazy John Phillips clan.

    But note the strange spelling. Like in "the Philippines".

    She was born in Oak Park, a topic much covered by Steve. But she grew up in Scottsdale. Who wants to lay odds on the demographic of the perpetrator?

    But, unlike with Mackenzie, it probably wasn't her father.

    Replies: @Earl Lemongrab, @njguy73, @Mr. Anon, @Hibernian

    Her real name is Elizabeth Jean Philipps.

  30. The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn’t have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that’s perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual–drinking that much sounds awful to me–but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Romanian
    @SimpleSong

    I have always been silently jealous of the US university experience as seen in the movies. It's not that, in the recent past when I studied and graduated, there wasn't any drinking or sex - plenty of that. But the social aspect was much diminished. Your circle of acquaintances was generally small, many people worked (most, I would say, by year 2, including myself) and the whole thing (rightfully) seemed much more transactional and instrumental. You went there for the job you could get during or afterwards. Punch the clock and keep your head down. We had a Student Senate kind of thing to accommodate the social butterflies/politician types, but their presence was hardly felt and they were mostly in their own little world mimicking real politics. We had some student organizations, who got outsized influence because there were so few of them, but they were seen as an instrument as well. I've been told that giving lectures as an accomplished type at events organized by these orgs is a good way to meet girls, so there's that. But there is no "greek system" of socializing for the sake of it, and alumni organizations are few, far between and anemic. Many people don't even have an organized high school reunion kind of thing to go to, and that suits them fine, so there's another US comedy trope gone down the drain. It really does seem to be mostly an Anglo thing. Maybe one of the explanations is that there is very little social stratification going on within universities, since they are all affordable (relatively) and heavily subsidized by the government (50% percent of people in public Uni get a free ride and around 5% get drinking money too - I would hardly call them scholarships, those are the grander types for PhD students). Entry is competitive,school bodies are large, so you get people from a lot of backgrounds in the same places, so you can't get the preppy, children of elites kind of milieu. Some of the Romanian elites have only recently begun sending their children to private schools (and not many of those around, so they are as expensive as any you care to name in the US) and they go abroad to the less demanding Unis for the preppy experience.

    The whole fraternity, fraternity house, traditional organizations, skull & bones, big parties, inter-uni competitions, Haven Monahan and his friends raping people on a bed of glass kind of thing is simply absent here. So is the worst of the social science craziness, but it is starting to be felt.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Almost Missouri
    @SimpleSong

    This is why I love this site. Nerd, jock, wealthy, impoverished, foreign, domestic, man, woman, aristocratic, proletarian, erudite, blunt, extrovert, hermetic, believer, atheist ... it doesn't matter; all rub shoulders here to share RealTalk with a side of good humor. I know of no place else like this.

    It's like Herodotus's description of the ancient Persian nobility: the only things they had to master to be noble were horsemanship, archery and honesty, the rest was details.

    "To ride, shoot straight, and speak the truth--"
    This was the ancient Law for Youth.
    Old times are past, old days done;
    But the law runs true--O little son!


    -- Charles T. Davis

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    I wouldn't get carried away and claim frat boys are the backbone of America but they get so obviously villified out of proportion to any ills they could reasonably be blamed for. Anyone not autistic/lying can tell this. Every day by the MSM we are being served Protocols of the Elders of Deke House forgeries.

    , @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    I don't know if we "sympathize with the jocks" so much as we're not neurotically consumed with high school subculture and projecting our own insecurities from that time onto the adult world. This has to be some sort of new phenomenon in human history I think; people in their 50s (and beyond!) who still view the world in terms of one-dimensional teenaged cliches, still resent the people who got laid a few years before they did or got more people to sign their yearbook. Actually I think the high school class system is kind of a new thing: nerds vs. jocks, brains vs. beauty, the whole weird ecosystem and the million ways that the administration encourages it (dances, elections to determine who the "king" and "queen" will be). Did any of this exist before baby boomers, when half of kids left school at 14 and the other half went home after classes were over to work on the family farm?

    There is also a strong "life imitates art" element at work here: just as a lot of people will watch movies about slavery and the KKK and start to see hate crimes and organized racism where none exists, if you watch enough John Hughes movies you may start to feel like you live in a John Hughes movie. Sailer readers have an advantage here too, as I don't think there's a group of people in this country more immune to media messaging than us.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    @SimpleSong

    Part of this may be our contrarian streak, of course. But I think part of it may be that we talked to everybody and got to see both the good side of the so-called jocks and the bad side of the so-called dweebs.

    This, and the fact that it's not that hard to find smart, thoughtful jocks at Uni - unless you're studying journalism, it seems...

    , @Desiderius
    @SimpleSong

    Well sympathy is a two-way street - it literally means "suffer together" - so while there are a lot of smart dweebs we sympathize with too it is kinda hard to sympathize with people who despise you and want you wiped off the face of the earth. Rules out the together part.

  31. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    I haven’t followed the controversy in great detail, but here’s Jerry Coyne’s critical review:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/his-white-suit-unsullied-by-research-tom-wolfe-tries-to-take-down-charles-darwin/2016/08/31/8ee6d4ee-4936-11e6-90a8-fb84201e0645_story.html?utm_term=.b7f95e13cf73

    As much as I cherish the writings of the late, great Tom Wolfe, it seems that he waded in over his depth with his last book. He seems to have presented the relevant evidence about evolution and linguistics in an incredibly distorted, biased and selective manner—which is perhaps acceptable for a satirical journalist or novelist attempting to tell a compelling/amusing narrative, but certainly not for someone making the case for or against a scientific hypothesis.

    Personally, I wouldn’t want to bet against Charles Darwin and Noam Chomsky.

    Also, I find it highly ironic that Mr. Wolfe’s excellent novels all powerfully display HBD “in the wild”, so to speak,—and indeed also more mundane evolutionary psychology— and yet he seems to have rejected the idea that evolution is deeply explanatory of human behavior in his last book.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Stolen Valor Detective


    Personally, I wouldn’t want to bet against Charles Darwin and Noam Chomsky.

     

    Darwin no, Chomsky yes. Hasn't Chomsky been discredited and debunked for a few decades by now? His theories didn't work out. Real languages don't work that way. Dead end. Next, please. I believe he's had his campus guru day in the sun w.r.t. politics too. Exit through the gift shop, Noam.
  32. @Dr. X

    High School Never Ends
     
    I came to that conclusion 20 years ago during the Clinton impeachment.

    Hillary was the bitchy NHS/yearbook/student government/school paper busybody, Bill was the Homecoming King, Monica was the school slut and Ken Starr was the principal.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @njguy73, @slumber_j

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn’t really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case–and like Judge Kavanaugh I’m 53 and graduated from high school in 1983–kids in my high school didn’t really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn’t play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I’m getting at is that–at least in my experience–there weren’t so many resentful dorks around. I know that’s the norm, but I didn’t experience it. I wonder whether it isn’t maybe a question of school size–and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    @slumber_j

    I actually think your experience is not atypical. I think there is likely some correlation between intelligence and high school popularity. Not a perfect correlation of course, but some degree of correlation. Hollywood would have you believe that it is anticorrelated but that just isn't true.

    , @Song For the Deaf
    @slumber_j

    That’s an interesting point.

    I went to two high schools, one with around 2,000 students (in my underclassman years) and another with 338 students (my graduating class had 38 kids). It’s safe to say the smaller/poorer/rural school was far easier going on the nerds and misfits than the larger/richer/suburban school. As a misfit/punk rocker who was used to an antagonistic relationship with the jocks at my large suburban school, it never ceased to amaze me how much friendlier the kids at that smaller school were, from the jocks begging me to try out for the basketball team to the rednecks giving me rides after school.

    , @Harvolssen
    @slumber_j

    Dunbar's Number at work

    , @Redneck farmer
    @slumber_j

    There was a study that found kids from schools with graduating classes under 200 do better than kids from larger schools. Basically, the kids from smaller schools could interact better with different kinds of people, because they had to do it in high school.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @Desiderius
    @slumber_j

    Wow, I grew up in Cincinnati a few years after and had an eerily similar experience. The other thing is if you treat the dorks well you don't necessarily see the resentful side manifest itself, and that was before social media so there was a lot more privacy.

  33. It’s the Bad Boys who get the girls, everyone knows that…and there is nothing Badder than a criminal illegal alien….

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @pyrrhus

    If this were true, there wouldn’t be a pattern of illegals raping and murdering young female joggers.

    Replies: @F0337, @Almost Missouri

  34. Anonymous[101] • Disclaimer says:
    @SimpleSong
    I'm no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we've sent kids through the system, I realize even at a 'good' school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn't even really work as a babysitting service. What I've found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization...meh. The problem is that it's not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their 'identity.' They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the 'work' that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they've got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don't recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a 'good' school system. I can't imagine how bad it is in an 'average' school system or a 'bad' school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn't complain too much.

    Replies: @donut, @J.Ross, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Mike1

    Once you can read and write well, and do some basic math you pretty much know what you need to know. The system is a socialization tool and a babysitting service primarily. It also provides a nice pool of jobs for women who’ll generally vote for more big government.

    I’m not sure how we could keep kids busy without it. There won’t be a lot of menial work in the future – and I doubt most of the kids today are up for that sort of work anyway. For any child with an interest in things it probably isn’t the best environment – particularly these days.

    I was on a country drive and my Dad pointed to a small little barn-ish building and mentioned that was his school when he was a kid. One room, all ages of kids! …I really don’t think they were any the worse off.

  35. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    No, but the 1950s were a time when discrete mathematics in its simplest forms found a variety of novel applications in various areas of the humanities and what have now come to be called the social sciences, and Chomsky’s transformation grammar seemed very promising in its insights. It’s only when the immediate excitement settled down that linguistic historians with a broad knowledge of the field pointed out that formal generative rules in grammar went back to perhaps the 5th century BC and the Sanskrit grammar of Panini, who in turn, influenced a number of Western linguists in the 19th century AD.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%81%E1%B9%87ini#Modern_linguistics

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @PiltdownMan

    I remember a student from the math department when I was in grad school who said that it was amazing that Chomsky had achieved such fame because his entire approach was derivative on Emil Post's far more basic theories. I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman's diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    In general, the "triviality" of an approach, as well as its adumbration by some long ago theory, indicates rather little as to its importance or even its originality. An approach becomes important and basic when it is finally elaborated in such a way that it solves real problems in the field. The elaboration is key; the ability to predict is key; the scope of the theory is key.

    Personally, I've never been able to convince myself that Chomsky's Transformational Grammar deserved the same respect that, say, Fisher's work on quantitative genetics does. I just don't know that it makes the same level of reliable prediction as do the scientific theories we hold in high esteem. Maybe it does today -- I'll admit I have never gone deeply enough into it or the controversies to speak with any reasonable conviction. But I certainly have the impression that over the years there has been a huge amount of churn in underlying approaches Chomsky has proposed. So much churn does not suggest a reliable science. And it is not a good sign that he has completely dominated the linguistic scene, and mostly driven out dissenters. He is bad that way, and his followers are worse. One gets the sense that he and his followers are as much polemicists in their science as Chomsky is in his politics: scorched earth, all the time. He has probably had as baleful an influence on the development of linguistics as Marvin Minsky had on the development of neural networks.

    My general sense is that TG has made a certain number of predictions that have been verified. But are those enough really to confirm it? Would other, quite different approaches not be able to do the same or better?

    It strikes me as very hard to get a straight answer on these points at this time from anyone expert.

    Replies: @David, @anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

  36. @donut
    @donut

    Leonidas at Thermopylae .

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    Gilgamesh and Enkidu. At Uruk.

  37. Anonymous [AKA "A Name or SIMPLE Pseudonymic"] says:
    @SimpleSong
    I'm no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we've sent kids through the system, I realize even at a 'good' school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn't even really work as a babysitting service. What I've found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization...meh. The problem is that it's not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their 'identity.' They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the 'work' that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they've got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don't recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a 'good' school system. I can't imagine how bad it is in an 'average' school system or a 'bad' school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn't complain too much.

    Replies: @donut, @J.Ross, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Mike1

    Totally agree. If you haven’t read it, you might enjoy Paul Graham’s essay on Why Nerds are Unpopular.

    The sheer scale of the useless busywork that goes on in K-12 education is really staggering when you stop to think about it. There’s tons of evidence that most students forget almost everything they learn shortly after learning it, but this remarkable fact seems to have no impact on anything. The whole system just chugs along year after year, and no one really questions it much. As Derb says, “that’s the way we do things, because…that’s the way we do them.” I think it’s such a fundamental part of modern society that people can’t imagine anything else.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Anonymous


    There’s tons of evidence that most students forget almost everything they learn shortly after learning it, but this remarkable fact seems to have no impact on anything.

     

    One might say it's immediately forgotten.
  38. Steve is a pot head , passed out face down on his three weeks old sheets . Dreaming of patriots :

    • Agree: donut
    • Replies: @donut
    @donut

    And bunnies running on an endless green California lawn .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peEA-fqmwDU

  39. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Desiderius

    Those who can't teach, report.

    , @Anon7
    @Desiderius

    The version I heard was “A student’s work for the B students, and the C students work for the government”. But, yeah.

    “Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.” As someone who has done both, I’d agree that this old saying is still solid gold.

    Except for academic physicians, that is. Maybe the exception that proves the rule.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @Prester John
    @Desiderius

    "those who can’t, teach."

    Or go into politics.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Desiderius


    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.
     
    And those who can't teach, teach at a phony university with no campus.
    , @Dan Hayes
    @Desiderius

    Desiderius:

    For lawyers: A students become law professors; B students become judges; C students make money!

    (Or so I've been told by a lawyer friend.)

  40. @L Woods
    @Anon7

    I really don’t think this much reflects reality. Your “tracked” A students are hardly those that enjoyed the most social and sexual success in early life, nor even those that attained the most professional success thereafter. The disgruntled “rejected elite” is one of the oldest archetypes in history. Take it from someone who was “tracked” very early in life and was thought by one and all to have a bright future ahead of him.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Redneck farmer, @Anon7

    You may yet.

  41. Along the same lines, I’ve long thought of modern academia as the revenge of the nerds, homosexuals and ugly women.

  42. @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

    I actually think your experience is not atypical. I think there is likely some correlation between intelligence and high school popularity. Not a perfect correlation of course, but some degree of correlation. Hollywood would have you believe that it is anticorrelated but that just isn’t true.

    • Agree: Desiderius, ic1000
  43. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    Skip this comment if you don’t like TMI. This is the intardnet, so “what have you got to lose” by sharing?

    [MORE]

    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you’ve lived up ’til then. Don’t ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you — the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you’re a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They’d learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don’t ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don’t know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into…

    It’s almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, “What have you got to lose?”

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I find myself in the odd position of relating to you. Who knew

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So that’s the special sauce that brings us here:

    +3 SD mind smacked hard by reality somewhere along the way

    “Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.”

    - Bacon

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rosamond Vincy

    , @Clyde
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Great tune, and as everyone knows by now this is Steven Still singing about Judy Collins..... a super beauty back in that day, that era. A queen of folk music, right after Joan Baez, who first brought Joni Mitchell to wide notice and acclaim by singing one or two Joni tunes.
    Sandy Denny via Fairport was way up there too. The only "girl" on a Led Zep album.

    , @Anon7
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine..."

    This could be the reason I stayed in my room studying. But I'm not talking. I'm studying.

    "They are smart, but they don’t know shit."

    Funny story. So, it's June, and I've just graduated from high school and I'm sitting in my living room at lunch time working through a calculus book because either 1) I think it might be useful in college or 2) it zones me out of where I'm physically sitting. My dad is home for lunch, sitting in his customary chair, gently shaking a small glass filled with ice and a clear liquid. He always came home for lunch. Both of my parents were put through college by their parents, let me add. I was accepted at university six months ago, and invited to participate in their honors program.

    So anyway, apropos of nothing, my mother asks me "How do you plan on paying for college?" For people who understand what passes for "planning ahead" in an alcoholic's house, I'm sure they'll laugh at this story. Others may not.

    Anyway, that's how I came to be one of the few honors students sweeping floors next to the "C" students. And yes, it was educational. Except that it turned out that I enjoyed physical work. Who knew? And I eventually worked my way up to management, where I encountered the guys who had MBAs who knew nothing at all about real work life, but still wanted to tell me how to run things in the few moments they could spare from climbing the ladder. The MBAs ye shall always have with you. I think that's in the Bible. They're smart, but they don't know shit.

    I get your wish that the smart, privileged people will get knocked on their asses and have an educational experience. I don't want to be present for the magnitude of cataclysm that would be required to do that, however. But I understand the wish.

    , @RationalExpressions
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Thank you. As you and others have said so well, it’s not so simple. The A students did not have a guaranteed path to a life of happiness. Life is much more complex than that. Many of the A students figure that out real fast, despite what others might be telling them.
    And SJBE was from my youth too - hadn’t listened to it in years. Beautiful.

  44. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    His parents’ and tribe’s Marxist perspective really shows and it’s annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    Yeah, I’m sure you’d really warm up to Chomsky if he’d spent his career criticizing the nominal geopolitical enemies of the US (e.g. Iran and Russia) and slavishly defending the actions of the US government and armed forces. There’s nothing that the UR comments section loves more than Jews who do that.

    I’m as anti-Marxist as any educated man of the 21st century is, but I find Chomsky’s Marxism the least objectionable kind.

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Stolen Valor Detective

    The problem isn't Chomsky. The problem is Chomsky's shrill hangers-on.

  45. Anon[502] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    I graduated with a linguistics B.A. before Chomsky had gone full-bore radical, and I don’t know if transformational grammar is overrated or in any respect represents what is really going on in the brain, but I loved it (and Chomsky’s work in phonology also) because it was beautiful. It was logical and made sense (with a few messy loose ends). It was like Newton applying math to planetary physics. It just seemed so right.

    I did love Tom Wolff’s Darwin-Chomsky book, however. Great writing, and a quick, short read, something you ususally don’t get from Wolff. In the internet age I am less concerned with whether a book is “correct,” because no matter what I read I am on Wikipedia and various web sites the entire time following up on stuff, so any problems with a book’s facts or reasoning are quickly noticed and corralled.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon

    Try Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven't read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

    , @anonymous
    @Anon

    I'm 30 years old.

    It is difficult for me to imagine this on mainstream television: https://youtu.be/3LqUA7W9wfg

  46. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don’t care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.’s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles’ sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Roderick Spode

    That doesn't take any guts. Randomly throw a dart in any university faculty meeting or art exhibition and you will likely hit an anti-Israel Jew.

    , @Mike1
    @Roderick Spode

    Do you know any Jews? Serious question.

    , @Anon
    @Roderick Spode

    I would bet that the ratio of Jews Criticizing Israel and Muslims criticizing the 50+ Muslim states is something like 1,000 to 1.

    Given that there are 50+ Muslim states and millions of Muslims flooding the West who will accept zero criticism of anything Islamic and are backing it up with mass murder and terrorism , I think worrying about Jews/Israel is trivial distraction and not in your best interests.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Song For the Deaf

    , @J.Ross
    @Roderick Spode

    Chomsky's a gatekeeper, he makes limited criticisms to provide a false alternative.

  47. @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

    That’s an interesting point.

    I went to two high schools, one with around 2,000 students (in my underclassman years) and another with 338 students (my graduating class had 38 kids). It’s safe to say the smaller/poorer/rural school was far easier going on the nerds and misfits than the larger/richer/suburban school. As a misfit/punk rocker who was used to an antagonistic relationship with the jocks at my large suburban school, it never ceased to amaze me how much friendlier the kids at that smaller school were, from the jocks begging me to try out for the basketball team to the rednecks giving me rides after school.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
  48. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    I find myself in the odd position of relating to you. Who knew

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @L Woods

    Thank you. This must be a Venn diagram moment.
    https://images.template.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/09213847/Venn-Diagram-2-Circles-Template-Sample-PDF-Download.jpg

  49. Well, speaking as a male journalist, I can’t say I have any resentments from that part of my life. I mostly just hated school and was glad to finally leave. In high school I spent a lot of time skipping class with my buddies to go mess around with cars.

    Had it not been for my dad, I would probably have dropped out, gotten my GED and then went to trade school to become a mechanic. Instead I went to college and into journalism. Journalism was mainly a default choice: I liked to read and knew how to write, but I hated all the literary theory crap they tried to shove down our throats in the English department. The journalism professors, by contrast, were laid back and fun.

    Mostly, journalism has taught me that I should have taken my mom’s advice and become a lawyer. I’ve had to plow through enough legal documents to conclude that those guys don’t do anything I can’t do, and they get paid a hell of a lot more money for it.

    These people who are still hung up on jocks vs. nerds shit are just bizarre.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Blank

    Agreed about the bizarreness high school obsessing. I went to what was supposed to be a pretty good high school and don't remember most of it, and don't care about most of what I do remember.

    Also agree about lawyers. They are above average intelligence, so yes if you are too, you could do what they do. What sets them apart from other high-IQers is 1) they have the diligence to plow through mind-numbing statutory, regulatory and contract language, 2) they have the self discipline to compartmentalize confidential information, and 3) they have a guild. Although in my experience, they are less good at 1) and 2) than they claim to be. They're pretty sharp on 3), though.

    They also regard themselves as a de facto ruling class. They're not necessarily wrong.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous

  50. OT Facebook interferes in Australian election, kills page of candidate they don’t like. But keep looking for Russians.

    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/controversial-queensland-senator-fraser-anning-removed-from-facebook

  51. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Foreign Expert


    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

     

    If it's not innate and it's not an artifact, what's left?

    Darwin thought it could be explained by evolution. So if I got confused here, is it the fault of me, or of Wolfe, or of Chomsky? I'd say we're all guilty.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  52. Was the Bret Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing our first Generation X political moment? Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation, but the whole exercise from the total collapse of consensus, the sexual liberation of the Sixties being revealed as nothing more than a form of nihilistic consumption, the politically correct rejection of such sexual liberation, the references to 1980s teen sex comedies superseding actual lived experience and the rejection of White Male cultural norms could be seen as an embodiment of Generation X politics.

    It looks like the Center may not hold.

    Unlike the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X lacks a defining war so apparently its cultural references are the the class and ethnic struggles of 1980’s teen sex comedies. Perhaps some of the rage expressed by supporters of Professor Ford stems from the fact their lives never matched those promised by such fictional films.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Clifford Brown

    Interesting. So in addition to rejecting modern public education, we need to reject movies. They fill our minds with fantasies that can never satisfy and only leave us resentful and bitter.

    Steve mentioned something a while back about how movies provide furniture for our brains. What was it? Anyway, he made it sound like a good thing and I was highly suspicious. More and more I'm thinking that movies are just sinister and warp our view of reality.

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Clifford Brown

    Generation X will be the generation that kills globalization and financialization and mass immigration and multiculturalism.

    I wrote this in August 2018:

    Generation X

    Generation X the variable or Generation X the Roman numeral for the tenth generation of Americans born since Andrew Jackson was born in 1767?

    1767 to 1788 GENERATION I

    1789 to 1810

    1811 to 1832

    1833 to 1854

    1855 to 1876

    1877 to 1898

    1899 to 1920

    1921 to 1942

    1943 to 1964

    1965 to 1986 GENERATION X

    White Core Americans born between 1965 and 1986 are in the tenth generation of Americans born since the birth year of Andrew Jackson.

    Andrew Jackson was born in colonial America and he became president of the United States.

    Generation X or Generation 10 or Generation Ten will be the generation that removes from power the anti-White ruling class rats that are attacking and destroying the United States.

    The baby boomers will be financially liquidated when the federal funds rate goes back to its normal level of 6 percent. It is now 2 percent or so. The baby boomers must be financially liquidated in order to remove the anti-White ruling class rats from power.

    Remember, in 1981 the federal funds rate went over 20 percent. Currently, a ten percent federal funds rate would vaporize the asset bubbles in bonds, stocks and real estate in two weeks.

    , @slumber_j
    @Clifford Brown


    Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation
     
    I believe Judge Kavanaugh was born in 1965, which would place him (by all accounts I've ever seen, and like me) in the first year of GenX.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Clifford Brown

    Kavanaugh is not a boomer. He's GenX. I think--like the boomers and probably several other generations--there's a dichotomy between the early GenXs born in the 60s (through h.s. in the Reagan administration and on into college) and the late Xs born in the 70s. (Not a GenXer and haven't thought about it much.)

    But he lacks the boomer experience of growing up in the 60s. I can still remember snippets of the "before" America. Guys like Kavanaugh really can not.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  53. Here’s what working class girls think of the girls at the prep school:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/juanita-broaddrick-glad-believe-her-024811948.html

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Rosamond Vincy

    And as someone posted on Yahoo:


    Juanita Broaddrick passed a polygraph test. Ginnifer Flowers stated her affair with Clinton went on for 12 years. Clinton initially denied it to the press yet he admitted it during Grand Jury testimony. He denied assaulting Paula Jones, yet he paid her $800k in a settlement.
    Why didnt Democrats ask for an FBI investigation in any of these cases?
     
  54. @Rosamond Vincy
    Here's what working class girls think of the girls at the prep school:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/juanita-broaddrick-glad-believe-her-024811948.html

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    And as someone posted on Yahoo:

    Juanita Broaddrick passed a polygraph test. Ginnifer Flowers stated her affair with Clinton went on for 12 years. Clinton initially denied it to the press yet he admitted it during Grand Jury testimony. He denied assaulting Paula Jones, yet he paid her $800k in a settlement.
    Why didnt Democrats ask for an FBI investigation in any of these cases?

    • Agree: F0337
  55. Sorry I haven’t commented much lately. I’ve been shopping for lampshades on Wayfair.com. It’s unbelievable how fast time passes when you’re obsessed with something insignificant like lampshades.

    • Replies: @F0337
    @miss marple

    "The Paradox of Choice" -- I encountered it while shopping for lighting fixtures for bathrooms. Thousands of choices so it becomes almost impossible to choose.

    , @Anonymous
    @miss marple

    (((Lampshades!)))

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @miss marple

    Have you tried Ilse's of Buchenwald?

    https://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/Atrocities.html


    https://furtherglory.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/ilsekoch.jpg

  56. Believe it or not, even in the 80’s, high school ended for a lot of people in high school by quitting. I am sure all of y’all know plenty of people who turned out just fine and don’t obsess about it cause they didn’t have time to. I am inclined to think all this obsessing is done by relatively few so called “elites”.

  57. I got extremely drunk at Yale on a few occasions, and it literally NEVER occurred to me to sexually assault anyone even by the definitions of the Stalinist left. I was very far from a Brett K type but I knew some guys like him and they did not do that either.
    On another note:

    (Stuyvesant Leader Physical Ed. at 1:14, ha ha…)

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh - he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

    Replies: @anonguy, @Charles Pewitt

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    I get extremely drunk almost every week, and although I sometimes embarass myself on iSteve, I have never come close to sexually assaulting anyone. My girlfriend has videos of me very inebriated. While not sensible, I am very jolly and amenable. Alcohol brings out your latent personality. As Graham said, if Kavanaugh had been a rapist then, he'd have been a rapist yesterday, and he wasn't.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

  58. I have to say that I’m very impressed with how Trump has handled Kavanaugh’s nomination and Flake betrayal. If he had shown this level of discipline and maturity in the beginning then maybe his approval would be in the black and the GOP wouldn’t be facing a wipeout next month.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Berty

    I'm not so sure the gop "is facing a wipe out." But assuming they are, what makes you so sure it's because of his "behavior?"

    All presidents face this in their first midterm. And congress almost always turns over.

    Replies: @Berty

  59. @Hippopotamusdrome
    Hero Brett Kavanaugh saved a woman from being date-raped by a drunken frat boy at Yale:


    I've Witnessed Him 'Stumbling Drunk': Brett Kavanaugh's Classmate Says Supreme Court Nominee Is 'Blatantly Lying'

    Brookes also told Cuomo that she had drank to “excess many nights with Brett Kavanaugh” and spoke about a particular incident in which the Supreme Court nominee and a friend allegedly barged into a room “where a guy and girl had gone off together and embarrassed that woman.”

     

    What would have happened to her if he hadn't checked up on them? Was the lady inebriated? Could she give consent?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anonymous


    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?
     
    Absolutely.

    And the inventor of Bitcoin is still an elderly model train hobbyist living in Temple City.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

     

    They save money by laying off their proofreaders:



    Brookes also told Cuomo that she had drank...
  60. Truth time:

    I was expelled from my highschool in the final semester of my senior year. The reason? Quote from the vice-principal: “we can’t allow you to continue to set the example you do.”

    I first saw “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” several years after high school. My first thought was “holy fugg that’s me.” My principal even looked like Jeffrey Jones.

    High school, high school never ends. Meme magic thru the years. He’s here, and He speaks to us.

    • Replies: @F0337
    @BenKenobi


    Truth time:
     
    I said to myself: finally someone here is not bragging on the internet, which is about the saddest thing I can think of. Then it turned into yet another humble brag.
  61. anon[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    At some point the technology will be sufficient to hunt for words and sentences in the neural networks. TG or one of its descendants may provide the theoretical structure to know what to look for and to understand how the parts fit together. It will then be seen as a seminal theory that was way ahead of its time.
    Or not. Who knows?
    And I agree about his politics. He’s right on a number of issues, but he has a bad attitude. He’s a Jewish schoolboy who loathes the blond beast.

  62. @Reg Cæsar
    Busy Philipps now tells us she was raped at 14:


    https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/celebrities/busy-philipps-rape-1.21287299


    What's surprising is that with the name Busy, and children Birdie and Cricket, she's not part of the crazy John Phillips clan.

    But note the strange spelling. Like in "the Philippines".

    She was born in Oak Park, a topic much covered by Steve. But she grew up in Scottsdale. Who wants to lay odds on the demographic of the perpetrator?

    But, unlike with Mackenzie, it probably wasn't her father.

    Replies: @Earl Lemongrab, @njguy73, @Mr. Anon, @Hibernian

    I can’t even listen to a Mammas and Pappas song anymore. If one comes on the radio, I change the station. John Phillips was such an evil, repellant, degenerate piece of human garbage, that I can’t stand to even listen to anything with which he was associated.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Mr. Anon

    Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten……except than hat.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  63. @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I graduated with a linguistics B.A. before Chomsky had gone full-bore radical, and I don't know if transformational grammar is overrated or in any respect represents what is really going on in the brain, but I loved it (and Chomsky's work in phonology also) because it was beautiful. It was logical and made sense (with a few messy loose ends). It was like Newton applying math to planetary physics. It just seemed so right.

    I did love Tom Wolff's Darwin-Chomsky book, however. Great writing, and a quick, short read, something you ususally don't get from Wolff. In the internet age I am less concerned with whether a book is "correct," because no matter what I read I am on Wikipedia and various web sites the entire time following up on stuff, so any problems with a book's facts or reasoning are quickly noticed and corralled.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @anonymous

    Try Wolfe’s From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven’t read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Agree. That is a very powerful and very underrated book. It changed the way I viewed politics. As a very young person, I had the impression that politics/philosophy existed separate from other spheres of life. Even the Gulag was a kind fantasy in my mind, like reading "1984." After "Bauhaus", I had an epiphany. "Bauhaus" is about architecture, but once you internalize it, everything becomes significant and connected.

    , @dfordoom
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Try Wolfe’s From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven’t read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.
     
    Agreed. Wolfe's The Painted Word does the same thing for modernist art. Brilliant book.
  64. @L Woods
    Yeah that’s not how things work. At least not today. “Daring” has nothing to do with anything; it’s conformity that determines your social status and therefore your ability to attain the aforementioned litany of life’s rewards. Try “daring” your way into a party with attractive women; even if you’re not thrown out or arrested, you’ll simply be given the cold shoulder as that uninvited weirdo with no social proof.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Try “daring” your way into a party with attractive women; even if you’re not thrown out or arrested, you’ll simply be given the cold shoulder as that uninvited weirdo with no social proof.

    Eh, it could be worse …

  65. @Anonymous
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    Absolutely.

    And the inventor of Bitcoin is still an elderly model train hobbyist living in Temple City.

  66. @L Woods
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I find myself in the odd position of relating to you. Who knew

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Thank you. This must be a Venn diagram moment.

  67. A little off topic. Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven’t had a president born in the 50’s and will we ever have one?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Dtbb

    It's getting kind of late for that. I think after 2016 we won't continue to look for geriatric candidates. (I'm almost 64.)

    , @Art Deco
    @Dtbb

    The birth cohorts between 1924 and 1946 have never produced a President. There have been about 20 notable candidates for the office in that set, but Michael Dukakis, Jerry Brown, John McCain, John Kerry, and Bernie Sanders are the only ones among the set who competed well enough in an adequate matrix such that you could see them winning the office had some contingencies gone the other way. No clue why that is other than the luck of the draw.

    Now that you mention it, there haven't been many consequential candidates born between 1948 and 1961. Alan Keyes (under the envelope), John Edwards, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, and John Kasich. Huckabee was the best competitor in the heats, but he would have faced a wretched environment after that.

    Replies: @Flip

    , @Lurker
    @Dtbb

    I'm sure entire decades have been skipped before?

    , @res
    @Dtbb


    Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven’t had a president born in the 50′s and will we ever have one?
     
    That's an interesting question. I pulled data from this spreadsheet: https://www.loriferber.com/research/presidential-facts-statistics/presidential-birthdates.html
    and took a look at it in R.

    In 2029 the last of that group will turn 70 so I think the next three elections are all possibilities. Presidential inaugural ages are roughly a Bell curve centered at 52.5 and bounded by 40 and 70 so the 50's cohort is already out of the sweet spot.

    The really interesting aspect to this is having three presidents all born between June and August 1946 with inaugural ages of 46, 54, and 70. What might not be as known or obvious is that the largest gap between presidential birthdates is from 1924-10-01 to 1946-06-14. I find a 22 year gap quite surprising. Any thoughts on that one? The second largest is from 1946-08-19 to 1961-08-04 which is what fits in with your question.
  68. But I’d rather go on …

  69. @donut
    Steve is a pot head , passed out face down on his three weeks old sheets . Dreaming of patriots :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkMVscR5YOo

    Replies: @donut

    And bunnies running on an endless green California lawn .

  70. The last time justice was served in the US was when they executed the Rosenburgs .

  71. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    > Asking for InternetAnon to rebut my shitty personal opinion that I wrote in one line

    Get out.

    Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms

    You may want to rephrase this, what you write doesn’t make sense.

    Chomksy grammars are too bit too constrained to explain human speech patterns, but then again trying to refine the behaviour of neural networks down to deterministic symbolic processing is never going to work completely.

  72. Just got home from work, turned on C-SPAN to watch Kavanaugh’s “testimony.” So far he has done nothing but yell at the Senators, fight back tears over his weightlifting as a teen, and shouted about a dozen times, “I LIKE BEER!” He is so UNHINGED he should never serve on ANY court

    — Michael Moore (@MMFlint) 28 September 2018

    Somebody forgot to take out the garbage.

  73. OT, Ravensburg, Germany: asylum seeker (Afghan) stabs three, (happens about twice a week by now), the mayor, a former paratrooper and member of Merkel’s ruling CDU, happens to be at the scene, he intervenes and helps police to arrest the guy. Well done but even the elite can’t shield itself any more, it seems.

    https://www.dw.com/en/teenage-migrant-stabs-3-in-german-town/a-45684012

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1024297/ravensburg-stabbing-germany-knife-attack-marienplatz

    Here they mayor is being nice to Muslim migrants–will he reconsider?
    https://www.schwaebische.de/landkreis/landkreis-ravensburg/ravensburg_artikel,-muslime-setzen-mit-ahorn-ein-zeichen-_arid,10135404.html

    • Replies: @F0337
    @theo the kraut

    Pains me to see photos of European cities now. Even the ones that don't show the mayhem. They're so beautiful and we're throwing it all away.

  74. @njguy73
    First!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrxI_euTX4A

    Replies: @F0337, @Redneck farmer

    First!

    Idiocy. The real reason Taki’s had to eliminate comments.

  75. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Tom Wolfe’s The Kingdom of Speech is fantastic.

  76. @pyrrhus
    It's the Bad Boys who get the girls, everyone knows that...and there is nothing Badder than a criminal illegal alien....

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    If this were true, there wouldn’t be a pattern of illegals raping and murdering young female joggers.

    • Replies: @F0337
    @Dave Pinsen

    Don't get your point. He said the bad boys get the girls.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Dave Pinsen

    Maybe that's what pyrrhus mean by "get".

  77. @miss marple
    Sorry I haven't commented much lately. I've been shopping for lampshades on Wayfair.com. It's unbelievable how fast time passes when you're obsessed with something insignificant like lampshades.

    Replies: @F0337, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    “The Paradox of Choice” — I encountered it while shopping for lighting fixtures for bathrooms. Thousands of choices so it becomes almost impossible to choose.

  78. @Dave Pinsen
    @pyrrhus

    If this were true, there wouldn’t be a pattern of illegals raping and murdering young female joggers.

    Replies: @F0337, @Almost Missouri

    Don’t get your point. He said the bad boys get the girls.

  79. @SporadicMyrmidon
    I got extremely drunk at Yale on a few occasions, and it literally NEVER occurred to me to sexually assault anyone even by the definitions of the Stalinist left. I was very far from a Brett K type but I knew some guys like him and they did not do that either.
    On another note:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBShN8qT4lk
    (Stuyvesant Leader Physical Ed. at 1:14, ha ha...)

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Chrisnonymous

    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh – he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

    • Replies: @anonguy
    @Dave Pinsen


    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh – he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.
     
    Yeah, "the drinking age was still 18 in DC", even though he was 17 and lived in Maryland, not DC, is right up there with Bill Clinton's, "I didn't inhale".
    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Dave Pinsen

    A Leprechaun Beer Swilling Striver Is More Fun Than That Boring Frump Liev Schreiber.

    If David Lynch hadn't put that Watts woman in one of his movies, Schreiber wouldn't have had the chance to enjoy her company for awhile.

    I wish that Limey Christian Bale would have played Macbeth instead of that dope Michael Fassbender, although it wasn't a bad movie.

    Taleb deadlifts pretty good, I would challenge him to a deadlifting contest if I had 5 years to develop more muscle and some deadlifting skills.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  80. @BenKenobi
    Truth time:

    I was expelled from my highschool in the final semester of my senior year. The reason? Quote from the vice-principal: "we can't allow you to continue to set the example you do."

    I first saw "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" several years after high school. My first thought was "holy fugg that's me." My principal even looked like Jeffrey Jones.

    High school, high school never ends. Meme magic thru the years. He's here, and He speaks to us.

    Replies: @F0337

    Truth time:

    I said to myself: finally someone here is not bragging on the internet, which is about the saddest thing I can think of. Then it turned into yet another humble brag.

  81. @theo the kraut
    OT, Ravensburg, Germany: asylum seeker (Afghan) stabs three, (happens about twice a week by now), the mayor, a former paratrooper and member of Merkel's ruling CDU, happens to be at the scene, he intervenes and helps police to arrest the guy. Well done but even the elite can't shield itself any more, it seems.

    https://www.dw.com/en/teenage-migrant-stabs-3-in-german-town/a-45684012

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1024297/ravensburg-stabbing-germany-knife-attack-marienplatz

    Here they mayor is being nice to Muslim migrants--will he reconsider?
    https://www.schwaebische.de/landkreis/landkreis-ravensburg/ravensburg_artikel,-muslime-setzen-mit-ahorn-ein-zeichen-_arid,10135404.html

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Ravensburg_Marienapotheke_Marktstraße.jpg

    Replies: @F0337

    Pains me to see photos of European cities now. Even the ones that don’t show the mayhem. They’re so beautiful and we’re throwing it all away.

  82. OT–no more Mr Nice Dane–Dansk Folkeparti slashes half of public broadcasting.

    https://www.thelocal.dk/20180918/what-next-for-broadcaster-dr-after-far-reaching-cuts

  83. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    So that’s the special sauce that brings us here:

    +3 SD mind smacked hard by reality somewhere along the way

    “Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.”

    – Bacon

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius

    Interesting observation.

    And yes, I claim to extend the pattern.

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @Desiderius


    give me neither poverty nor riches;
    provide me only with the food I need;
    Lest, being full, I deny you,
    saying, "Who is the LORD?"
    Or, being in want, I steal,
    and profane the name of my God.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius

  84. @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

    Dunbar’s Number at work

  85. @njguy73
    First!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrxI_euTX4A

    Replies: @F0337, @Redneck farmer

    Maybe Dr. Ford should have broke into “Our Hometown”?

  86. @stillCARealist
    @Anon7

    This is such an excellent case for homeschooling. Save your children from this unnecessary misery!

    I was just talking to a homeschooling mom who told me that in public HS, she would skip classes and go to the river and read. It made no difference to her grades or graduating on time (this would have been in 1998). Her parents never found out and nobody cared. Yeah, she's homeschooling her kids.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anon7

    And to any white male I would suggest you look for and marry a woman from East Asia (SE or NE). An import. White women are too much of a liability. This will only get worse. There will always be exceptions but unfortunately you can’t risk taling a chance on one.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Anonymous

    What's that got to do with public schooling vs. homeschooling?

  87. Isn’t all of leftism just losers and weirdos feeling insecure and jealous towards normal/better people?

    The jock who used to bully them, the prettier girl who used to get more attention, etc.

    They conceal their butthurt with a mountain of words, but it’s still quite obvious.

  88. @L Woods
    @Anon7

    I really don’t think this much reflects reality. Your “tracked” A students are hardly those that enjoyed the most social and sexual success in early life, nor even those that attained the most professional success thereafter. The disgruntled “rejected elite” is one of the oldest archetypes in history. Take it from someone who was “tracked” very early in life and was thought by one and all to have a bright future ahead of him.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Redneck farmer, @Anon7

    You too? Hi there, fellow member of the “he disappointed us” club!

  89. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    I wholeheartedly agree. Especially since you quote CSN&Y.
    All four of them have a better understanding of language as actually being used than Chomsky and all his – transformative supporters combined. Plus: Chomsky sounds just terrible – a bit like a robot, doesn’t he?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dieter Kief

    Chomsky's (non-academic) speaking style is repetitive to say the least. He always throws in a bald assertion every few sentences then says [x] was already obvious (so why did he say it?). I can't tell if it's arrogance/contempt around interviewers or pedantic habit. Though well versed in English irony and dry understatement he's actually rarely funny except in the way your cranky laconic uncle might be for a few seconds one time during Thanksgiving. I don't believe any of his non-academia groupies who claim to watch & read his output like each was a new Beatles album. They are just bourgeois trying to seem smart. Chomsky is not so different from Bob Woodward or Ta Coates in that way.

  90. @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

    There was a study that found kids from schools with graduating classes under 200 do better than kids from larger schools. Basically, the kids from smaller schools could interact better with different kinds of people, because they had to do it in high school.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Redneck farmer

    That's interesting.

  91. @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    Those who can’t teach, report.

  92. @Berty
    I have to say that I'm very impressed with how Trump has handled Kavanaugh's nomination and Flake betrayal. If he had shown this level of discipline and maturity in the beginning then maybe his approval would be in the black and the GOP wouldn't be facing a wipeout next month.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    I’m not so sure the gop “is facing a wipe out.” But assuming they are, what makes you so sure it’s because of his “behavior?”

    All presidents face this in their first midterm. And congress almost always turns over.

    • Replies: @Berty
    @Polynikes


    I’m not so sure the gop “is facing a wipe out.” But assuming they are, what makes you so sure it’s because of his “behavior?”
     
    Because he's done a remarkable job of alienating suburban women and college-educated whites with his deranged tweets, his childlike unpresidential behavior, and his delight in overall acting like a huge asshole. Polls have shown this again and again. If any of the brilliant "white nationalists" on iSteve think you're ideas can come to fruition without them then boy howdy are you in for a shock.

    At this point if they hold the Senate they'll be lucky,
  93. @Desiderius
    Trying ineptly to pile on:

    https://t.co/6nWt0PI1N4

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dieter Kief

    America Today:

    “But credibly accused sex offenders should not coach youth basketball, girls or boys, without deeper investigation. Can’t we all agree on that?”

    Life would be a lot easier if people just listened more to what America Today comes up with. Simple rules, simple solutions, less stress and unpleasantness for the suffering masses in front of their TVs!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Dieter Kief

    The brand was known as USAToday, but point taken.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  94. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    Great tune, and as everyone knows by now this is Steven Still singing about Judy Collins….. a super beauty back in that day, that era. A queen of folk music, right after Joan Baez, who first brought Joni Mitchell to wide notice and acclaim by singing one or two Joni tunes.
    Sandy Denny via Fairport was way up there too. The only “girl” on a Led Zep album.

  95. aka the Vox Day theory of “gamma”.

  96. Here’s what happened.

    At age 15 the neurotic basket-case played the sophisticated, wise to the world upstart. When someone at the country club, someone she probably didn’t even know, invites her to go to a “real” party with older boys and beer, she jumps at it. At the party, the boys, quickly tiring of her mouth, call her bluff and invite her to go “upstairs.” At the door she very quickly realizes that she has boxed herself in and stops and gets a little shove. The boy(s) give her a good scare while enjoying lots of free feels.

    In the current day it doesn’t really matter who is destroyed, all enemies are interchangeable. It doesn’t matter which cops are shot, which black church goers are killed, or which federal department is bombed. One Haven is as guilty as the next.

  97. @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Reg Cæsar

    I haven't followed the controversy in great detail, but here's Jerry Coyne's critical review:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/his-white-suit-unsullied-by-research-tom-wolfe-tries-to-take-down-charles-darwin/2016/08/31/8ee6d4ee-4936-11e6-90a8-fb84201e0645_story.html?utm_term=.b7f95e13cf73

    As much as I cherish the writings of the late, great Tom Wolfe, it seems that he waded in over his depth with his last book. He seems to have presented the relevant evidence about evolution and linguistics in an incredibly distorted, biased and selective manner---which is perhaps acceptable for a satirical journalist or novelist attempting to tell a compelling/amusing narrative, but certainly not for someone making the case for or against a scientific hypothesis.

    Personally, I wouldn't want to bet against Charles Darwin and Noam Chomsky.

    Also, I find it highly ironic that Mr. Wolfe's excellent novels all powerfully display HBD "in the wild", so to speak,---and indeed also more mundane evolutionary psychology--- and yet he seems to have rejected the idea that evolution is deeply explanatory of human behavior in his last book.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Personally, I wouldn’t want to bet against Charles Darwin and Noam Chomsky.

    Darwin no, Chomsky yes. Hasn’t Chomsky been discredited and debunked for a few decades by now? His theories didn’t work out. Real languages don’t work that way. Dead end. Next, please. I believe he’s had his campus guru day in the sun w.r.t. politics too. Exit through the gift shop, Noam.

  98. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    Totally agree. If you haven't read it, you might enjoy Paul Graham's essay on Why Nerds are Unpopular.

    The sheer scale of the useless busywork that goes on in K-12 education is really staggering when you stop to think about it. There's tons of evidence that most students forget almost everything they learn shortly after learning it, but this remarkable fact seems to have no impact on anything. The whole system just chugs along year after year, and no one really questions it much. As Derb says, "that's the way we do things, because...that's the way we do them." I think it's such a fundamental part of modern society that people can't imagine anything else.

    Replies: @Pericles

    There’s tons of evidence that most students forget almost everything they learn shortly after learning it, but this remarkable fact seems to have no impact on anything.

    One might say it’s immediately forgotten.

  99. @miss marple
    Sorry I haven't commented much lately. I've been shopping for lampshades on Wayfair.com. It's unbelievable how fast time passes when you're obsessed with something insignificant like lampshades.

    Replies: @F0337, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    (((Lampshades!)))

  100. @Roderick Spode
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don't care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.'s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles' sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike1, @Anon, @J.Ross

    That doesn’t take any guts. Randomly throw a dart in any university faculty meeting or art exhibition and you will likely hit an anti-Israel Jew.

  101. Peter Schiff has a pretty good analysis of Kavanaugh/Ford starting at 24:00.

  102. THE RENAISSANCE.
    SAVONAROLA, CESARE BORGIA, JULIUS II. LEO X. MICHAEL ANGELO
    :: BY ARTHUR, COUNT GOBINEAU
    ( Pope Alexander VI. defends his son Cesare Borgia before his sister Lucrezia, whose husband, Don Alphonso d’Aragon, Cesare Borgia has just strangled) :

    He is not a monster, my daughter, but a ruler who could not enter his destined sphere but at the price of the most sustained and sometimes the most pitiless effort. Listen to me, Lucrezia, and don’t raise your hands to heaven. … I am trying to awaken in you what I know to be true, clear-cut and powerful sentiments My daughter, you are as beautiful as Pride, you are Strength itself Hence I will speak to you.

    . . . Know then that for that kind of persons whom fate summons to dominate others, the ordinary rules of life are reversed and duty becomes quite different. Good and evil are lifted to another, to a higher region, to a different plane. The virtues that may be applauded in an ordinary woman would in you become vices, merely because they would only be sources of error and ruin. Now the great law of this world is, not to do this or that, to avoid one thing and run after another : it is to live, to en- large and develop one’s most active and lofty qualities, in such a way that from any sphere we can always hew ourselves out a way to one that is wider, nobler, more elevated. Never forget that. Walk straight on. Do only what pleases you, but only do it, if it likewise serves you. Leave to the small minds, the rabble of underlings, all slackness and scruple. There is only one consideration worthy of you the elevation of the house of Borgia and yourself.

  103. @Mr. Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    I can't even listen to a Mammas and Pappas song anymore. If one comes on the radio, I change the station. John Phillips was such an evil, repellant, degenerate piece of human garbage, that I can't stand to even listen to anything with which he was associated.

    Replies: @tyrone

    Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten……except than hat.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @tyrone

    "Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten"

    Glitter has been unpersoned as far as his back catalogue is concerned - not only never played on BBC radio, they have deleted his appearances on archived TOTP shows (just as they pixelated out Steve Priest's Nazi insignia on Sweet's 'Blockbuster').

    A pity, as you should separate the artist from the work. The Man Who Put The Bang In Gang has a tremendous back catalogue.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

  104. I prefer Tom Robbins’ take:

    “There are two kinds of people in this world: Those who believe there are two kinds of people in this world and those who are smart enough to know better.”

  105. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    When I was in High School Sophomore English, that was called the Bow-Wow Theory.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hibernian


    When I was in High School Sophomore English, that was called the Bow-Wow Theory.

     

    Wolfe mentions the pooh-pooh and ding-dong theories, and some others, but not the bow-wow. Apparently all these names were bestowed by Max Müller at Oxford.
  106. @Dieter Kief
    @Desiderius

    America Today:


    "But credibly accused sex offenders should not coach youth basketball, girls or boys, without deeper investigation. Can’t we all agree on that?"
     
    Life would be a lot easier if people just listened more to what America Today comes up with. Simple rules, simple solutions, less stress and unpleasantness for the suffering masses in front of their TVs!

    Replies: @Desiderius

    The brand was known as USAToday, but point taken.

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Desiderius

    When I awoke this glaring Sunday morning, I thought of my mistake and I - you know: All of a sudden - - - being half awake, you have such misconceptions about time: Like: NOW! it's happening, even though it takes quite a few minutes, but not being fully awake concentrates these minutes in this sensation: NOW I got it - or did it get me? - - - : - - - Now I know, why I was willing to make this mistake in my post (I knew in the back of my had quite clearly, that I was making a mistake when I wrote down the words: America today, but I wrote them down even though, and I - like a kid, who has done something forbidden - waited somehow to be detected by you... - so thanks for noticing, Desiderius).

    Well - then I thought of the American Pravda - Series here on this site and I understood: My post was as much about USA Today, as it (deep down in my head/soul/ brain/body) was about this American Pravda phenomenon, and thus I did not only criticise USA Today but our host's host as well.
    That's what I understood this morning: I had made the USA/America mistake because it was (=felt) plausible (reasonable, almost...).

    Replies: @Desiderius

  107. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    I … thought about the “C” students. This is 75% of Americans. …

    At the other end, you had the straight “A” students… Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat…

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades… They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you’d have them for life. You’d better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    You know what else the Democrats figured out?

    Grade inflation. That way even the dummies are in the insufferable, always-correct category.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Almost Missouri

    I agree, it's the only way that everyone can go to college. Which everyone needs to do, because God knows you don't get a full indoctrination in high school and what would life without a $100,000 millstone tied around your neck at age 22 be like, anyway?

    But then you need to fiddle with college, to grant degrees to people who couldn't really graduate from high school, which you've already fiddled with. And then you need to fiddle with jobs, so that people with worthless high school diplomas and worthless college diplomas can get paid. I think they call this job program "The Government", which also has a "Regulations" component that forces working capitalist companies to hire these f***wits.

  108. @Reg Cæsar
    Busy Philipps now tells us she was raped at 14:


    https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/celebrities/busy-philipps-rape-1.21287299


    What's surprising is that with the name Busy, and children Birdie and Cricket, she's not part of the crazy John Phillips clan.

    But note the strange spelling. Like in "the Philippines".

    She was born in Oak Park, a topic much covered by Steve. But she grew up in Scottsdale. Who wants to lay odds on the demographic of the perpetrator?

    But, unlike with Mackenzie, it probably wasn't her father.

    Replies: @Earl Lemongrab, @njguy73, @Mr. Anon, @Hibernian

    I’m sure you mean Oak Park, IL, but I’m not sure you mean Scottsdale AZ. There’s a neighborhood on the Far Southwest Side of Chicago called Scottsdale.

  109. Anonymous [AKA "About barak"] says:

    Here is one of the finest mulatto thinkers talking about racial angst:

    However, I remember my mum visited me once and we were chatting about this and that. I launched into one of my Malcolm X-wannabe speeches about black people this and white people that. And my mum said, ‘You do remember that I’m white, and I’m your mum, don’t you? I know that you have different experiences to me because of your skin colour, but I’m your mum, I brought you up, so what’s with this whole Black Panther act and you trying to deny half of yourself?’ I started laughing. I realised that because of my negative experiences in Poland, I had retreated into the comfort of feisty racial rhetoric to give myself the illusion of power.

    https://www.spiked-online.com/2018/09/28/my-problem-with-black-identity/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

    It reminds me of B. Obama in high school.

  110. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Sorry, opening the link I see it’s Scottsdale AZ.

  111. SLFJ is similar to Rush Limbaugh’s Undeniable Truth of Life that

    “Feminism was established so as to allow unattractive women access to the mainstream of society.”

  112. @Dtbb
    A little off topic. Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven't had a president born in the 50's and will we ever have one?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Art Deco, @Lurker, @res

    It’s getting kind of late for that. I think after 2016 we won’t continue to look for geriatric candidates. (I’m almost 64.)

  113. OT:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/stories-45654550/the-truth-behind-my-fried-chicken

    Is it racist of the BBC to get a black guy to talk about fried chicken?

  114. Back in the previous decade, I came up with Sailer’s Law of Female Journalists

    When did you first realise that Jews had a massive over-representation in all positions of power and influence?

    What stopped you from relaying this information to the public and you decided instead to go hard on lame substitutes for real power?

    • Replies: @Karl
    @Pat Hannagan

    81 Pat Hannagan > What stopped you from relaying this information to the public


    oh, he tried - at least in the RonUnzian manner (buying a subscription the _The Atlantic_)


    the big problem is that the public doesn't care

  115. @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    I have always been silently jealous of the US university experience as seen in the movies. It’s not that, in the recent past when I studied and graduated, there wasn’t any drinking or sex – plenty of that. But the social aspect was much diminished. Your circle of acquaintances was generally small, many people worked (most, I would say, by year 2, including myself) and the whole thing (rightfully) seemed much more transactional and instrumental. You went there for the job you could get during or afterwards. Punch the clock and keep your head down. We had a Student Senate kind of thing to accommodate the social butterflies/politician types, but their presence was hardly felt and they were mostly in their own little world mimicking real politics. We had some student organizations, who got outsized influence because there were so few of them, but they were seen as an instrument as well. I’ve been told that giving lectures as an accomplished type at events organized by these orgs is a good way to meet girls, so there’s that. But there is no “greek system” of socializing for the sake of it, and alumni organizations are few, far between and anemic. Many people don’t even have an organized high school reunion kind of thing to go to, and that suits them fine, so there’s another US comedy trope gone down the drain. It really does seem to be mostly an Anglo thing. Maybe one of the explanations is that there is very little social stratification going on within universities, since they are all affordable (relatively) and heavily subsidized by the government (50% percent of people in public Uni get a free ride and around 5% get drinking money too – I would hardly call them scholarships, those are the grander types for PhD students). Entry is competitive,school bodies are large, so you get people from a lot of backgrounds in the same places, so you can’t get the preppy, children of elites kind of milieu. Some of the Romanian elites have only recently begun sending their children to private schools (and not many of those around, so they are as expensive as any you care to name in the US) and they go abroad to the less demanding Unis for the preppy experience.

    The whole fraternity, fraternity house, traditional organizations, skull & bones, big parties, inter-uni competitions, Haven Monahan and his friends raping people on a bed of glass kind of thing is simply absent here. So is the worst of the social science craziness, but it is starting to be felt.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Romanian

    You're describing Romanian university life before, or after, 1989?

    Replies: @Romanian

  116. @SimpleSong
    I'm no longer convinced that government K-12 is actually a good thing for society. Now that we've sent kids through the system, I realize even at a 'good' school there is very little actual learning happening. First they spend time on the bus. Then maybe 60 minutes learning something. Then filing to and from various assemblies, PE, music, etc. Then it takes 10 minutes or so before they get settled, then they play with tambourines for 50 minutes. Then there is recess, lunch, about 60 minutes of political indoctrination, some more recess, another 30 minutes of learning, then bus ride home.

    All in all about 90 minutes of learning. They get home ridiculously early in the afternoon so it doesn't even really work as a babysitting service. What I've found is that my kids learn the most over the summer, due to the various camps that we plan for them and just me sitting down with them in the evenings and discussing math or history or whatever.

    People say that schools are valuable for socialization...meh. The problem is that it's not a voluntary community. People who are disruptive or lazy or useless or cause other problems are never removed from the school, so your child learns that being disruptive or lazy or useless has no consequences. In fact those idiots get a bit of outlaw glamour.

    There are no real-world goals or real world tasks so kids fixate on the most trivial, stupid things and make that their 'identity.' They carry around these ridiculous insecurities that were based on nothing, because fundamentally there are few things more unimportant than a high school.

    Most of the 'work' that the kids are asked to do in school, fundamentally, is busywork, and students recognize that their time is being wasted. They are not learning useful skills. There is no market for five paragraph essays about Romeo and Juliet. There is no market for average high school football players. There is no market for jazz trombonists. There is a market for STEM and a market for skilled trades and a market for people who understand what NPV is, but no one who can do those things is going to take a huge pay cut to work in a school with a surly, lazy student body. So they staff the school with what they've got, the otherwise unemployable, innumerate catladies, aging jocks, and sad failed musicians, and force another set of 16 year old boys to read Jane Austen and make three comments per class in group discussion.

    People who come out of this system often don't recognize what real work actually is. They believe that filling out excessive, unnecessary paperwork is a legitimate task, rather than pointless waste of time that should be opposed on principle.

    Anyway, that was my experience with a 'good' school system. I can't imagine how bad it is in an 'average' school system or a 'bad' school system. Of course the kids all seem OK so I guess I shouldn't complain too much.

    Replies: @donut, @J.Ross, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @Mike1

    One interesting feature of modern schooling that has got no attention is dual immersion programs in Spanish/English. Half the day is taught in English, half in Spanish.
    What the gullible native English speakers parents have yet to work out is that the only point of this is free English education for the kids who only speak Spanish.

  117. @Roderick Spode
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don't care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.'s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles' sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike1, @Anon, @J.Ross

    Do you know any Jews? Serious question.

  118. @Dave Pinsen
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh - he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

    Replies: @anonguy, @Charles Pewitt

    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh – he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

    Yeah, “the drinking age was still 18 in DC”, even though he was 17 and lived in Maryland, not DC, is right up there with Bill Clinton’s, “I didn’t inhale”.

  119. @Pat Casey
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7Unb8_GxtM

    Replies: @Danindc, @ThreeCranes, @Charles Pewitt

    Lindsey Graham is a pussy boy politician donor whore from South Carolina.

    Lindsey Graham pushes open borders mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and endless war in the Middle East and West Asia on behalf of Israel.

    I have an ancestor who was born in South Carolina about 1740. His name was Jacob Lampley. The family name was Lamplugh, but it got changed. The Lamplugh people were from Wiltshire, England.

    Lindsey Graham is a horrible baby boomer coward who brings dishonor and shame to the people of South Carolina. Just like Jeff Flake is a fraudulent crybaby fop who brings shame to the people of Arizona.

    Lindsey Graham wants President Trump to get rid of Attorney General Jeff Sessions so Graham and his fellow shysters in the GOP Cheap Labor Faction can bamboozle Trump into some kind of nation-wrecking immigration deal scam that pours more foreigners into the United States.

  120. @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    This is why I love this site. Nerd, jock, wealthy, impoverished, foreign, domestic, man, woman, aristocratic, proletarian, erudite, blunt, extrovert, hermetic, believer, atheist … it doesn’t matter; all rub shoulders here to share RealTalk with a side of good humor. I know of no place else like this.

    It’s like Herodotus’s description of the ancient Persian nobility: the only things they had to master to be noble were horsemanship, archery and honesty, the rest was details.

    “To ride, shoot straight, and speak the truth–”
    This was the ancient Law for Youth.
    Old times are past, old days done;
    But the law runs true–O little son!

    — Charles T. Davis

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Almost Missouri

    Sounds like a Clint Eastwood movie.

  121. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:
    @Roderick Spode
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don't care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.'s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles' sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike1, @Anon, @J.Ross

    I would bet that the ratio of Jews Criticizing Israel and Muslims criticizing the 50+ Muslim states is something like 1,000 to 1.

    Given that there are 50+ Muslim states and millions of Muslims flooding the West who will accept zero criticism of anything Islamic and are backing it up with mass murder and terrorism , I think worrying about Jews/Israel is trivial distraction and not in your best interests.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anon

    Ok we’ll just talk about the Jews and their fellow whites letting them in then.

    , @Song For the Deaf
    @Anon

    Muslims criticize Muslim countries all the time. It's Islam that can't be criticized. Just like Jews criticize Israel all the time, but Jews themselves can't be criticized.

  122. @Dave Pinsen
    @pyrrhus

    If this were true, there wouldn’t be a pattern of illegals raping and murdering young female joggers.

    Replies: @F0337, @Almost Missouri

    Maybe that’s what pyrrhus mean by “get”.

  123. @njguy73
    @Dr. X

    You ever see Election? Tracy Flick was based on Bill and Hillary combined.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Not BC at all, conceivably Hellary. The character Tracy Flick is awkward and isolated. No friends to speak of, only child, father absent (IIRC, mother widowed). Elizabeth Dole is name checked in Tracy Flick’s voice-overs early in the film, so that’s one candidate for an inspiration. Florence King once compared Elizabeth Dole to Nurse Ratched. She’s like Tracy Flick in that her social matrix doesn’t have many people in it. She married a divorce quite late in life; she has no children and her husband has just one; her stepdaughter is a childless spinster; she had no sisters and just one brother, and he was so much older that they didn’t grow up together. Her husband was known for working pointlessly long hours and treating his family shabbily (and his staff shabbily as well). You wouldn’t marry him for the sweet talk. Passable career move, though.

  124. @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So that’s the special sauce that brings us here:

    +3 SD mind smacked hard by reality somewhere along the way

    “Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.”

    - Bacon

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rosamond Vincy

    Interesting observation.

    And yes, I claim to extend the pattern.

  125. @Romanian
    @SimpleSong

    I have always been silently jealous of the US university experience as seen in the movies. It's not that, in the recent past when I studied and graduated, there wasn't any drinking or sex - plenty of that. But the social aspect was much diminished. Your circle of acquaintances was generally small, many people worked (most, I would say, by year 2, including myself) and the whole thing (rightfully) seemed much more transactional and instrumental. You went there for the job you could get during or afterwards. Punch the clock and keep your head down. We had a Student Senate kind of thing to accommodate the social butterflies/politician types, but their presence was hardly felt and they were mostly in their own little world mimicking real politics. We had some student organizations, who got outsized influence because there were so few of them, but they were seen as an instrument as well. I've been told that giving lectures as an accomplished type at events organized by these orgs is a good way to meet girls, so there's that. But there is no "greek system" of socializing for the sake of it, and alumni organizations are few, far between and anemic. Many people don't even have an organized high school reunion kind of thing to go to, and that suits them fine, so there's another US comedy trope gone down the drain. It really does seem to be mostly an Anglo thing. Maybe one of the explanations is that there is very little social stratification going on within universities, since they are all affordable (relatively) and heavily subsidized by the government (50% percent of people in public Uni get a free ride and around 5% get drinking money too - I would hardly call them scholarships, those are the grander types for PhD students). Entry is competitive,school bodies are large, so you get people from a lot of backgrounds in the same places, so you can't get the preppy, children of elites kind of milieu. Some of the Romanian elites have only recently begun sending their children to private schools (and not many of those around, so they are as expensive as any you care to name in the US) and they go abroad to the less demanding Unis for the preppy experience.

    The whole fraternity, fraternity house, traditional organizations, skull & bones, big parties, inter-uni competitions, Haven Monahan and his friends raping people on a bed of glass kind of thing is simply absent here. So is the worst of the social science craziness, but it is starting to be felt.

    Replies: @International Jew

    You’re describing Romanian university life before, or after, 1989?

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @International Jew

    I got my Bachelor degree in 2009. I am 30 now. I am an alumni of the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, one of the largest state unis in the country. I can't attest to Uni life before 1989. My parents are both graduates in different fields, but they never really spoke about it. I assume it was much the same, but student organizations were all state controlled and tied to the party, and the ethos was conservative, so the hanky panky took place under the sheets.

    I have not heard of any major developments taking place in the years since, and I have retained ties to the system because I also had postgraduate education and friendships with academics. There are a few more organizations, especially for Romanian students abroad, but that is about it. No Greek life, anemic alumni outreach and so on.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @International Jew

  126. @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Buzz Mohawk


    His parents’ and tribe’s Marxist perspective really shows and it’s annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.
     
    Yeah, I'm sure you'd really warm up to Chomsky if he'd spent his career criticizing the nominal geopolitical enemies of the US (e.g. Iran and Russia) and slavishly defending the actions of the US government and armed forces. There's nothing that the UR comments section loves more than Jews who do that.

    I'm as anti-Marxist as any educated man of the 21st century is, but I find Chomsky's Marxism the least objectionable kind.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    The problem isn’t Chomsky. The problem is Chomsky’s shrill hangers-on.

  127. @L Woods
    @Anon7

    I really don’t think this much reflects reality. Your “tracked” A students are hardly those that enjoyed the most social and sexual success in early life, nor even those that attained the most professional success thereafter. The disgruntled “rejected elite” is one of the oldest archetypes in history. Take it from someone who was “tracked” very early in life and was thought by one and all to have a bright future ahead of him.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Redneck farmer, @Anon7

    You never know about smart students. There are the bookish ones who spend a lot of time studying and have little high school social life. That would be me. And then there are the ones like this one girl in my AP physics class who was the prettiest girl in the school, and being surrounded by boys everywhere she went, had no problem securing a social life. I could go on, describing a six foot, lanky guy in that same class who was arrested for reckless motorcycle driving who went on to the Air Force academy and flew fighter planes. I seem to recall that he had an ok social life.

    I think the Rich Dad Guy makes a good point when he says that the “A” students often wind up working for the “B” students, meaning that the bright but well-socialized B students typically do better in the business world, which is a team sport, than loner A students.

    The biggest Chad in my school, an amazing natural athlete who got a full scholarship to an excellent school and who picked professional hockey offers over professional football offers, was driving a garbage truck in his mid-thirties owing to poor financial planning and a blown-out knee.i

    My comments reflect my reality, anyway, even though YMMV.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anon7

    https://youtu.be/2FKAr4yEWKE

    The mileage is duly noted. I'd much rather have become a garbage man in Indiana than serving in golden manacles in Mexinchifornia.

  128. @Mr. Blank
    Well, speaking as a male journalist, I can't say I have any resentments from that part of my life. I mostly just hated school and was glad to finally leave. In high school I spent a lot of time skipping class with my buddies to go mess around with cars.

    Had it not been for my dad, I would probably have dropped out, gotten my GED and then went to trade school to become a mechanic. Instead I went to college and into journalism. Journalism was mainly a default choice: I liked to read and knew how to write, but I hated all the literary theory crap they tried to shove down our throats in the English department. The journalism professors, by contrast, were laid back and fun.

    Mostly, journalism has taught me that I should have taken my mom's advice and become a lawyer. I've had to plow through enough legal documents to conclude that those guys don't do anything I can't do, and they get paid a hell of a lot more money for it.

    These people who are still hung up on jocks vs. nerds shit are just bizarre.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Agreed about the bizarreness high school obsessing. I went to what was supposed to be a pretty good high school and don’t remember most of it, and don’t care about most of what I do remember.

    Also agree about lawyers. They are above average intelligence, so yes if you are too, you could do what they do. What sets them apart from other high-IQers is 1) they have the diligence to plow through mind-numbing statutory, regulatory and contract language, 2) they have the self discipline to compartmentalize confidential information, and 3) they have a guild. Although in my experience, they are less good at 1) and 2) than they claim to be. They’re pretty sharp on 3), though.

    They also regard themselves as a de facto ruling class. They’re not necessarily wrong.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Almost Missouri

    They severely overrate the legitimacy and efficacy of that regard though.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Anonymous
    @Almost Missouri

    Not a bad comment. As a corporate partner, I would add more skills required for the high-end, as its a hybrid job that requires brain horsepower, judgment and deep social skills. You also need balls. The plus is you get to avoid courtrooms and most SJW politicking, and just get deals done.

  129. @Clifford Brown
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWKbfoikeg

    Was the Bret Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing our first Generation X political moment? Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation, but the whole exercise from the total collapse of consensus, the sexual liberation of the Sixties being revealed as nothing more than a form of nihilistic consumption, the politically correct rejection of such sexual liberation, the references to 1980s teen sex comedies superseding actual lived experience and the rejection of White Male cultural norms could be seen as an embodiment of Generation X politics.

    It looks like the Center may not hold.

    Unlike the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X lacks a defining war so apparently its cultural references are the the class and ethnic struggles of 1980's teen sex comedies. Perhaps some of the rage expressed by supporters of Professor Ford stems from the fact their lives never matched those promised by such fictional films.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toV3SzyMAFE

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Charles Pewitt, @slumber_j, @AnotherDad

    Interesting. So in addition to rejecting modern public education, we need to reject movies. They fill our minds with fantasies that can never satisfy and only leave us resentful and bitter.

    Steve mentioned something a while back about how movies provide furniture for our brains. What was it? Anyway, he made it sound like a good thing and I was highly suspicious. More and more I’m thinking that movies are just sinister and warp our view of reality.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  130. @stillCARealist
    @Anon7

    This is such an excellent case for homeschooling. Save your children from this unnecessary misery!

    I was just talking to a homeschooling mom who told me that in public HS, she would skip classes and go to the river and read. It made no difference to her grades or graduating on time (this would have been in 1998). Her parents never found out and nobody cared. Yeah, she's homeschooling her kids.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anon7

    In my earlier, less woke years, I disdained home schooling and those who did it. After getting two kids through what was once a fine public school system (I live in the same town I grew up in), I now totally understand why parents would want to homeschool and I’d encourage them to do it.

    I have friends who I went to school with who now teach in public schools, and I’m sure they are fine teachers. The public schools as a whole, however, in my opinion, need to be defunded until 1) teachers get rid of their unions or until they agree that poor teachers can be summarily fired for cause and 2) we get control of the curriculum back. What a nightmare. Another publicly supported Leftist backwater that works every day to undermine our Constitution and our democracy.

    “Save your children from this unnecessary misery!”

    Indeed. And the rest of us.

  131. @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    The version I heard was “A student’s work for the B students, and the C students work for the government”. But, yeah.

    “Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.” As someone who has done both, I’d agree that this old saying is still solid gold.

    Except for academic physicians, that is. Maybe the exception that proves the rule.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anon7

    Veterinarians, too. Really most any medical profession. The difference is that those guys absolutely cannot bullshit. They are operating in real hospitals as they teach, patients with puzzling conditions and harrowing emergencies are constantly presented, and the instructor must react. And his reaction will pass or fail, often in real time.

    Contrast instructors in law (many never even sit the bar exam, hardly any have tried a cade; most went from the Ivy League to a clerkship or two and maybe a token year of Biglaw...). Professors in schools of business don't usually operate any business. Scientists and engineers instructing are usually behind the state of the art in practice or out of touch with gritty realities about implementation (viability for mass production, whether a process or product is profitable enough to be commercialised, the urgent timelines necessary to get to market in time for the widget avoid being scooped by the other fellow's widget, etc.).

    So, yeah, the medical and veterinary schools generally are run by the people you want helping you or your loved ones.

  132. @Anon7
    Yeah, I've been saying the same thing for a while now, that we're formed by our high school experience, and we never get over it. I formulated my version of it in the early 2000's when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and thought about the "C" students. This is 75% of Americans. What's it like to be confined in a prison, and not only told that you are inferior, but you are proven to be inferior on test after test, question after question. No escape, even if you sit in the back row. What if it is proven to you that if you follow the rules, you can never succeed. Would you admire guys who had figured out how to get around the rules? *

    This was intensified when unlimited low-end immigration ended reasonably good paying jobs for guys who could at least stick it out until the end of high school. No college in your future? You might as well start taking the drugs now, and get that Xbox. The Democrats didn't have enough poor black people, so they tried to create them out of poor whites. Sure, you girls go ahead and have those out-of-wedlock children, everyone does it. It's the only way to assure that welfare check, you know, voting Democrat.

    At the other end, you had the straight "A" students; I mean the ones who could take a full slate of real AP classes and get all As. They had the Golden Ticket. Did they ever know how the "C" students felt about them? As one of those kids, I can tell you that I never figured it out. Of course, I almost never ran into any of those kids, being tracked since the fifth grade.

    They really do a number on those straight "A" kids, let me tell you. An entire childhood of raising your hand and being right over and over. We assume everyone will listen to everything that comes out of our mouths, and then write it down next to what Einstein said. No wonder we're such a bunch of a**hats. We go to universities and never leave, becoming the profs who teach the teachers who run the high schools. Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat, minus a few escapees.

    And then there are the kids who could get some "A" grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors "A" students, and they still do. They're the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you'd have them for life. You'd better believe the Democrats know it, too.

    * Here's a bonus question for those who read unreasonably long comments. Who would be more likely to win an election, someone who appealed to the very smart "A" and fairly smart "B" students, or someone who appealed to the 75% of the population "C" students, speaking simply for them all the time. OK, Donald and Hillary, your time begins... now!

    Replies: @L Woods, @stillCARealist, @Desiderius, @Buzz Mohawk, @Almost Missouri, @MarkinLA

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades, so they at least knew how it felt. They worshipped those straight AP honors “A” students, and they still do. They’re the ones who watch Nova and TED talks and dream of being really smart. They all vote Democrat, too.

    Sorry, this was me and I never worshipped those kids. I had some sense of balance.

  133. @Almost Missouri
    @SimpleSong

    This is why I love this site. Nerd, jock, wealthy, impoverished, foreign, domestic, man, woman, aristocratic, proletarian, erudite, blunt, extrovert, hermetic, believer, atheist ... it doesn't matter; all rub shoulders here to share RealTalk with a side of good humor. I know of no place else like this.

    It's like Herodotus's description of the ancient Persian nobility: the only things they had to master to be noble were horsemanship, archery and honesty, the rest was details.

    "To ride, shoot straight, and speak the truth--"
    This was the ancient Law for Youth.
    Old times are past, old days done;
    But the law runs true--O little son!


    -- Charles T. Davis

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Sounds like a Clint Eastwood movie.

  134. @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Blank

    Agreed about the bizarreness high school obsessing. I went to what was supposed to be a pretty good high school and don't remember most of it, and don't care about most of what I do remember.

    Also agree about lawyers. They are above average intelligence, so yes if you are too, you could do what they do. What sets them apart from other high-IQers is 1) they have the diligence to plow through mind-numbing statutory, regulatory and contract language, 2) they have the self discipline to compartmentalize confidential information, and 3) they have a guild. Although in my experience, they are less good at 1) and 2) than they claim to be. They're pretty sharp on 3), though.

    They also regard themselves as a de facto ruling class. They're not necessarily wrong.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous

    They severely overrate the legitimacy and efficacy of that regard though.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius

    They do severely overrate the legitimacy. I wish I could agree that they overrate the efficacy.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  135. @Dave Pinsen
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    One thing about a striver like Kavanaugh - he probably would have been very careful to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

    Replies: @anonguy, @Charles Pewitt

    A Leprechaun Beer Swilling Striver Is More Fun Than That Boring Frump Liev Schreiber.

    If David Lynch hadn’t put that Watts woman in one of his movies, Schreiber wouldn’t have had the chance to enjoy her company for awhile.

    I wish that Limey Christian Bale would have played Macbeth instead of that dope Michael Fassbender, although it wasn’t a bad movie.

    Taleb deadlifts pretty good, I would challenge him to a deadlifting contest if I had 5 years to develop more muscle and some deadlifting skills.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Charles Pewitt

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    https://twitter.com/nntaleb/status/937080606248325121?s=21

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Desiderius

  136. You pride yourself on being a noticer of things no one else will notice well here’s something I’ve noticed and my conclusion about you.

    You’ve made it common knowledge you’re adopted and obviously you’re big into jew with an HBD mindset so naturally enough you’ve done 23AndMe which came back >80% Ashkenazi.

    Hoped to present this as a bigger reveal at some stage but there it is anyway.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    It explains your autism about White things and your adulation of obviously bad political decisions for Whites collectively.

  137. • Replies: @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    @Anonymous

    Very nice case report.

  138. @Pat Hannagan
    You pride yourself on being a noticer of things no one else will notice well here's something I've noticed and my conclusion about you.

    You've made it common knowledge you're adopted and obviously you're big into jew with an HBD mindset so naturally enough you've done 23AndMe which came back >80% Ashkenazi.

    Hoped to present this as a bigger reveal at some stage but there it is anyway.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fAXl97-RFg

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    It explains your autism about White things and your adulation of obviously bad political decisions for Whites collectively.

  139. @Dtbb
    A little off topic. Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven't had a president born in the 50's and will we ever have one?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Art Deco, @Lurker, @res

    The birth cohorts between 1924 and 1946 have never produced a President. There have been about 20 notable candidates for the office in that set, but Michael Dukakis, Jerry Brown, John McCain, John Kerry, and Bernie Sanders are the only ones among the set who competed well enough in an adequate matrix such that you could see them winning the office had some contingencies gone the other way. No clue why that is other than the luck of the draw.

    Now that you mention it, there haven’t been many consequential candidates born between 1948 and 1961. Alan Keyes (under the envelope), John Edwards, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, and John Kasich. Huckabee was the best competitor in the heats, but he would have faced a wretched environment after that.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Art Deco

    Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Trump were all born in 1946. I think it is just a coincidence but who knows.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  140. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:

    Dems have totally overestimated voter interest in this. After the week of Blasey, who impressed nobody not desperate to be impressed by her, I am ready to never hear another thing about spoiled 1982-1983-2018 Maryland teenagers. The nonstop dudgeon just reeks of donor $$$ grubbing and shameless camera whoring. Tuning it out and I hope Flake gets his close-up and that it goes badly.

    • Replies: @Kaz
    @Anonymous

    I think women really care about this stuff. This is great for re-enforcing the single white women vote. Who obsess over the 'darkness' of the rich.

  141. @Clifford Brown
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWKbfoikeg

    Was the Bret Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing our first Generation X political moment? Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation, but the whole exercise from the total collapse of consensus, the sexual liberation of the Sixties being revealed as nothing more than a form of nihilistic consumption, the politically correct rejection of such sexual liberation, the references to 1980s teen sex comedies superseding actual lived experience and the rejection of White Male cultural norms could be seen as an embodiment of Generation X politics.

    It looks like the Center may not hold.

    Unlike the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X lacks a defining war so apparently its cultural references are the the class and ethnic struggles of 1980's teen sex comedies. Perhaps some of the rage expressed by supporters of Professor Ford stems from the fact their lives never matched those promised by such fictional films.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toV3SzyMAFE

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Charles Pewitt, @slumber_j, @AnotherDad

    Generation X will be the generation that kills globalization and financialization and mass immigration and multiculturalism.

    I wrote this in August 2018:

    Generation X

    Generation X the variable or Generation X the Roman numeral for the tenth generation of Americans born since Andrew Jackson was born in 1767?

    1767 to 1788 GENERATION I

    1789 to 1810

    1811 to 1832

    1833 to 1854

    1855 to 1876

    1877 to 1898

    1899 to 1920

    1921 to 1942

    1943 to 1964

    1965 to 1986 GENERATION X

    White Core Americans born between 1965 and 1986 are in the tenth generation of Americans born since the birth year of Andrew Jackson.

    Andrew Jackson was born in colonial America and he became president of the United States.

    Generation X or Generation 10 or Generation Ten will be the generation that removes from power the anti-White ruling class rats that are attacking and destroying the United States.

    The baby boomers will be financially liquidated when the federal funds rate goes back to its normal level of 6 percent. It is now 2 percent or so. The baby boomers must be financially liquidated in order to remove the anti-White ruling class rats from power.

    Remember, in 1981 the federal funds rate went over 20 percent. Currently, a ten percent federal funds rate would vaporize the asset bubbles in bonds, stocks and real estate in two weeks.

  142. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    “Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine…”

    This could be the reason I stayed in my room studying. But I’m not talking. I’m studying.

    “They are smart, but they don’t know shit.”

    Funny story. So, it’s June, and I’ve just graduated from high school and I’m sitting in my living room at lunch time working through a calculus book because either 1) I think it might be useful in college or 2) it zones me out of where I’m physically sitting. My dad is home for lunch, sitting in his customary chair, gently shaking a small glass filled with ice and a clear liquid. He always came home for lunch. Both of my parents were put through college by their parents, let me add. I was accepted at university six months ago, and invited to participate in their honors program.

    So anyway, apropos of nothing, my mother asks me “How do you plan on paying for college?” For people who understand what passes for “planning ahead” in an alcoholic’s house, I’m sure they’ll laugh at this story. Others may not.

    Anyway, that’s how I came to be one of the few honors students sweeping floors next to the “C” students. And yes, it was educational. Except that it turned out that I enjoyed physical work. Who knew? And I eventually worked my way up to management, where I encountered the guys who had MBAs who knew nothing at all about real work life, but still wanted to tell me how to run things in the few moments they could spare from climbing the ladder. The MBAs ye shall always have with you. I think that’s in the Bible. They’re smart, but they don’t know shit.

    I get your wish that the smart, privileged people will get knocked on their asses and have an educational experience. I don’t want to be present for the magnitude of cataclysm that would be required to do that, however. But I understand the wish.

  143. @PiltdownMan
    @Buzz Mohawk


    If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.
     
    No, but the 1950s were a time when discrete mathematics in its simplest forms found a variety of novel applications in various areas of the humanities and what have now come to be called the social sciences, and Chomsky's transformation grammar seemed very promising in its insights. It's only when the immediate excitement settled down that linguistic historians with a broad knowledge of the field pointed out that formal generative rules in grammar went back to perhaps the 5th century BC and the Sanskrit grammar of Panini, who in turn, influenced a number of Western linguists in the 19th century AD.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%81%E1%B9%87ini#Modern_linguistics

    Replies: @candid_observer

    I remember a student from the math department when I was in grad school who said that it was amazing that Chomsky had achieved such fame because his entire approach was derivative on Emil Post’s far more basic theories. I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman’s diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    In general, the “triviality” of an approach, as well as its adumbration by some long ago theory, indicates rather little as to its importance or even its originality. An approach becomes important and basic when it is finally elaborated in such a way that it solves real problems in the field. The elaboration is key; the ability to predict is key; the scope of the theory is key.

    Personally, I’ve never been able to convince myself that Chomsky’s Transformational Grammar deserved the same respect that, say, Fisher’s work on quantitative genetics does. I just don’t know that it makes the same level of reliable prediction as do the scientific theories we hold in high esteem. Maybe it does today — I’ll admit I have never gone deeply enough into it or the controversies to speak with any reasonable conviction. But I certainly have the impression that over the years there has been a huge amount of churn in underlying approaches Chomsky has proposed. So much churn does not suggest a reliable science. And it is not a good sign that he has completely dominated the linguistic scene, and mostly driven out dissenters. He is bad that way, and his followers are worse. One gets the sense that he and his followers are as much polemicists in their science as Chomsky is in his politics: scorched earth, all the time. He has probably had as baleful an influence on the development of linguistics as Marvin Minsky had on the development of neural networks.

    My general sense is that TG has made a certain number of predictions that have been verified. But are those enough really to confirm it? Would other, quite different approaches not be able to do the same or better?

    It strikes me as very hard to get a straight answer on these points at this time from anyone expert.

    • Replies: @David
    @candid_observer

    E. O. Wilson says that for years, Chomsky's terminology and notation made his linguistic theories incomprehensible to everyone, including experts. Wilson says that it was Pinker's enthusiastic popularization of Chomsky's ideas that made them clear enough to be understood and rejected. I don't know enough to say.

    Still, believing in some amount of universal human grammar makes a lot of sense to me.

    Replies: @candid_observer

    , @anonymous
    @candid_observer

    Chomsky himself has specifically rejected that his was a "Kuhnian revolution" saying we really shouldn't overstate how many Newtons and Einsteins we have by throwing that term around.

    He said his work was more "pre-galilean" in that he's "trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed."

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Desiderius

    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    @candid_observer


    I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman’s diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.
     
    "So we joked with the mathematicians: 'We have a new theorem - that mathematicians can prove only trivial theorems, because every theorem that's proved is trivial.' "

    - R. P. Feynman

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  144. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon7

    Skip this comment if you don't like TMI. This is the intardnet, so "what have you got to lose" by sharing?



    What those A students need is to be knocked on their asses by something like OCD right in the middle of high school. That teaches humility and humor, especially if you have been #1 among the strong herd everyplace you've lived up 'til then. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Oh yeah, high school stays with you -- the high school you had to drop out of because you could no longer do a goddamned thing, having fallen from the very top to the very bottom, your mind caught in an infinite loop. You know what an infinite loop is because you had just started writing BASIC programs in school before you went insane.

    Gee, maybe you deserve your day in front of a Senate committee someday! No, you're a handsome white male and your problem is invisible to the outside world. No sympathy for you!

    Maybe give those A students an alcoholic mother who abuses them too, starting at oh, age nine. They'd learn about people then, really learn about them, how to talk down a violent drunk (as a child!), how to please totally unreasonable, violent assholes, how to always have an escape route and an alternate plan. Good life skills not known to typical A students. Don't ask me how I know this either.

    You have touched upon something (yes, within this commenter too). There are those among us, smart but flawed, who can spot jackasses who are equally smart but have never been knocked on their asses the way we have been. They are smart, but they don't know shit. If only we could weed them out and send them to Marine boot camp before they take up the leadership positions they waltz into...

    It's almost worth wishing the shit really does hit the fan. Suddenly logistics would fail, inventory would leave the shelves, and they all would be catching MREs* of the backs of National Guard trucks with mobs of regular people. They suck as leaders, and it would all be their fault.

    *Meals Ready to Eat. What American soldiers consume when they are invading the world or defending Israel. Get to know MREs. You may be enjoying them in the future.

    https://olive-drab.com/images/mre_truckunloading_375.jpg

    Yes, an emotional rant, but again, "What have you got to lose?"

    What have you got to lose? Since everyone continues to post videos and music, I will go ahead and share the beautiful song from my own school years that I was playing in the car today on the way home, in case anyone wants to enjoy it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X21jw_ayvpc

    Replies: @L Woods, @Desiderius, @Clyde, @Anon7, @RationalExpressions

    Thank you. As you and others have said so well, it’s not so simple. The A students did not have a guaranteed path to a life of happiness. Life is much more complex than that. Many of the A students figure that out real fast, despite what others might be telling them.
    And SJBE was from my youth too – hadn’t listened to it in years. Beautiful.

  145. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    I wouldn’t get carried away and claim frat boys are the backbone of America but they get so obviously villified out of proportion to any ills they could reasonably be blamed for. Anyone not autistic/lying can tell this. Every day by the MSM we are being served Protocols of the Elders of Deke House forgeries.

  146. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon7


    I ... thought about the “C” students. This is 75% of Americans. ...

    At the other end, you had the straight “A” students... Of course, practically all these people vote Democrat...

    And then there are the kids who could get some “A” grades... They all vote Democrat, too.

    The Jesuits have known for 400 years that if you could control childhood education, you’d have them for life. You’d better believe the Democrats know it, too.
     
    You know what else the Democrats figured out?

    Grade inflation. That way even the dummies are in the insufferable, always-correct category.

    Replies: @Anon7

    I agree, it’s the only way that everyone can go to college. Which everyone needs to do, because God knows you don’t get a full indoctrination in high school and what would life without a $100,000 millstone tied around your neck at age 22 be like, anyway?

    But then you need to fiddle with college, to grant degrees to people who couldn’t really graduate from high school, which you’ve already fiddled with. And then you need to fiddle with jobs, so that people with worthless high school diplomas and worthless college diplomas can get paid. I think they call this job program “The Government”, which also has a “Regulations” component that forces working capitalist companies to hire these f***wits.

  147. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dieter Kief
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I wholeheartedly agree. Especially since you quote CSN&Y.
    All four of them have a better understanding of language as actually being used than Chomsky and all his - transformative supporters combined. Plus: Chomsky sounds just terrible - a bit like a robot, doesn't he?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Chomsky’s (non-academic) speaking style is repetitive to say the least. He always throws in a bald assertion every few sentences then says [x] was already obvious (so why did he say it?). I can’t tell if it’s arrogance/contempt around interviewers or pedantic habit. Though well versed in English irony and dry understatement he’s actually rarely funny except in the way your cranky laconic uncle might be for a few seconds one time during Thanksgiving. I don’t believe any of his non-academia groupies who claim to watch & read his output like each was a new Beatles album. They are just bourgeois trying to seem smart. Chomsky is not so different from Bob Woodward or Ta Coates in that way.

  148. I think you and Vox Day are projecting, Steve.

  149. @Desiderius
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So that’s the special sauce that brings us here:

    +3 SD mind smacked hard by reality somewhere along the way

    “Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.”

    - Bacon

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Rosamond Vincy

    give me neither poverty nor riches;
    provide me only with the food I need;
    Lest, being full, I deny you,
    saying, “Who is the LORD?”
    Or, being in want, I steal,
    and profane the name of my God.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Rosamond Vincy

    Well chosen.

  150. Look, Steve, you’ve got a sympathetic ear in me tonight lay it all out, I’m hear to listen.

    Reveal your inner animal spirit ( bet it’s an owl)

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, I picked you like a boogie.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFzNhImSngQ

    There are normal human relationships out there

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

  151. @Pat Hannagan
    Look, Steve, you've got a sympathetic ear in me tonight lay it all out, I'm hear to listen.

    Reveal your inner animal spirit ( bet it's an owl)

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, I picked you like a boogie.

    There are normal human relationships out there

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Talk to me, brah, so you've been bleeding all over the internet for years now and no one ever noticed how much you love and identify with the jew?

    I did.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CRu2SWDtRA

  152. @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    Steve, I picked you like a boogie.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFzNhImSngQ

    There are normal human relationships out there

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Talk to me, brah, so you’ve been bleeding all over the internet for years now and no one ever noticed how much you love and identify with the jew?

    I did.

  153. @SporadicMyrmidon
    I got extremely drunk at Yale on a few occasions, and it literally NEVER occurred to me to sexually assault anyone even by the definitions of the Stalinist left. I was very far from a Brett K type but I knew some guys like him and they did not do that either.
    On another note:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBShN8qT4lk
    (Stuyvesant Leader Physical Ed. at 1:14, ha ha...)

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Chrisnonymous

    I get extremely drunk almost every week, and although I sometimes embarass myself on iSteve, I have never come close to sexually assaulting anyone. My girlfriend has videos of me very inebriated. While not sensible, I am very jolly and amenable. Alcohol brings out your latent personality. As Graham said, if Kavanaugh had been a rapist then, he’d have been a rapist yesterday, and he wasn’t.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Chrisnonymous

    It’s true what they say about alcohol; it makes a person reveal their true self. Likewise, even if a person gets blackout drunk, if they are at their core a moral person, they are not going to do something immoral and felonious like rape someone. The kind of person who gets drunk and rapes someone is the kind of person who while sober would have no moral misgivings about raping someone, but doesn’t do it for fear of getting caught.

    , @anon
    @Chrisnonymous

    How do you know? If you have ever been hazy about something, you could be hazy about anything. Why couldn't that include touching a female? If you could not remember touching someone, you could have not remembered touching anyone, like Ford. Is it possible? Yes or no will suffice. I will take your refusal to answer the question as a yes.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  154. Anyway, getting back to Steve’s post, is it really possible to understand the Nomination Process for a new Supreme Court Justice of The United States of America with only the lens of high school socialization to guide us? Let’s give it a try.

    So Brett Kavanaugh is the high school Chad that many girls must have admired, and whose attention they highly desired. He drank beer, he was a good student with a bright future, he was tall and good-looking and attended an elite boy’s school. He was captain of the basketball team, and a football cornerback. He grew up with real privilege, and then busted his hump to make the best use of it to serve his country in various capacities, rather than becoming a rich private practice lawyer.

    Christine Blasey attended a private girl’s school and was (based on photos) a rather plain, somewhat manjawed blonde. She participated in diving, and she accompanied diver Greg Louganis on a trip to the White House to discuss the 1980 Summer Olympics boycott. Greg, unfortunately for Christine, was unattainable, being gay.

    Did she wish for attention from Brett and not get it? Did she dream or fantasize about an encounter with Brett in high school? with other boys? As Brett became more celebrated and accomplished, did she then begin her fantasies?

    Questions for Professor Doctor Christine Ford that were never asked, but maybe we’ll get a shot at asking:

    “Did you ever fantasize about Brett Kavanaugh in high school? In later life?”
    “Are you angry that men like Brett Kavanaugh are given the opportunity to become Supreme Court Justices, while you work at a school nobody has ever heard of?”
    “Would you really move to New Zealand if Mr. Kavanaugh is confirmed, or is this more evidence of your highly active fantasy life?”
    “Do you know what false memories are? Can you apply this standard to yourself?”
    “Are you now a married California Cat Lady whose sexual dreams fade, but whose dreams of life on the national stage are just coming true?”
    “Does your performance before this committee give you fantasies of becoming the next female Senator from California, since Senator Feinstein has one foot in the grave?”

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon7

    Let's hope her center of gravity is shifting onto that foot.

    I personally doubt Blasey Ford ever met Kavanaugh in person in high school. If she is not entirely motivated by politics and entirely dishonest, then I suspect she got some 2nd-hand hearsay about Kavanaugh and worked herself into being its champion.

  155. Shot

    Chaser

    The whole thread is a worthwhile insight into the psyche of a resentment filled Bioleninist.

  156. You’ve made it common knowledge you’re adopted and obviously you’re big into jew with an HBD mindset so naturally enough you’ve done 23AndMe which came back >80% Ashkenazi.

    (with a better rhyme)

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Pat Hannagan

    (02:36:18) Pat_Hannagan: Should Steve Sailer kill himself now that his jewishness is common knowledge?
    (02:36:23) Optimus_Rhine: strap the donkey with dynamite and start down the trail

    Sorry, Steve, only the 3rd rite will save you now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6vOY8QLbK4

  157. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon

    Try Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven't read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

    Agree. That is a very powerful and very underrated book. It changed the way I viewed politics. As a very young person, I had the impression that politics/philosophy existed separate from other spheres of life. Even the Gulag was a kind fantasy in my mind, like reading “1984.” After “Bauhaus”, I had an epiphany. “Bauhaus” is about architecture, but once you internalize it, everything becomes significant and connected.

  158. @Pat Hannagan
    You’ve made it common knowledge you’re adopted and obviously you’re big into jew with an HBD mindset so naturally enough you’ve done 23AndMe which came back >80% Ashkenazi.

    (with a better rhyme)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4E_924b9SU

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    (02:36:18) Pat_Hannagan: Should Steve Sailer kill himself now that his jewishness is common knowledge?
    (02:36:23) Optimus_Rhine: strap the donkey with dynamite and start down the trail

    Sorry, Steve, only the 3rd rite will save you now.

  159. @Anon7
    Anyway, getting back to Steve's post, is it really possible to understand the Nomination Process for a new Supreme Court Justice of The United States of America with only the lens of high school socialization to guide us? Let's give it a try.

    So Brett Kavanaugh is the high school Chad that many girls must have admired, and whose attention they highly desired. He drank beer, he was a good student with a bright future, he was tall and good-looking and attended an elite boy's school. He was captain of the basketball team, and a football cornerback. He grew up with real privilege, and then busted his hump to make the best use of it to serve his country in various capacities, rather than becoming a rich private practice lawyer.

    Christine Blasey attended a private girl's school and was (based on photos) a rather plain, somewhat manjawed blonde. She participated in diving, and she accompanied diver Greg Louganis on a trip to the White House to discuss the 1980 Summer Olympics boycott. Greg, unfortunately for Christine, was unattainable, being gay.

    Did she wish for attention from Brett and not get it? Did she dream or fantasize about an encounter with Brett in high school? with other boys? As Brett became more celebrated and accomplished, did she then begin her fantasies?

    Questions for Professor Doctor Christine Ford that were never asked, but maybe we'll get a shot at asking:

    "Did you ever fantasize about Brett Kavanaugh in high school? In later life?"
    "Are you angry that men like Brett Kavanaugh are given the opportunity to become Supreme Court Justices, while you work at a school nobody has ever heard of?"
    "Would you really move to New Zealand if Mr. Kavanaugh is confirmed, or is this more evidence of your highly active fantasy life?"
    "Do you know what false memories are? Can you apply this standard to yourself?"
    "Are you now a married California Cat Lady whose sexual dreams fade, but whose dreams of life on the national stage are just coming true?"
    "Does your performance before this committee give you fantasies of becoming the next female Senator from California, since Senator Feinstein has one foot in the grave?"

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Let’s hope her center of gravity is shifting onto that foot.

    I personally doubt Blasey Ford ever met Kavanaugh in person in high school. If she is not entirely motivated by politics and entirely dishonest, then I suspect she got some 2nd-hand hearsay about Kavanaugh and worked herself into being its champion.

  160. @Clifford Brown
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWKbfoikeg

    Was the Bret Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing our first Generation X political moment? Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation, but the whole exercise from the total collapse of consensus, the sexual liberation of the Sixties being revealed as nothing more than a form of nihilistic consumption, the politically correct rejection of such sexual liberation, the references to 1980s teen sex comedies superseding actual lived experience and the rejection of White Male cultural norms could be seen as an embodiment of Generation X politics.

    It looks like the Center may not hold.

    Unlike the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X lacks a defining war so apparently its cultural references are the the class and ethnic struggles of 1980's teen sex comedies. Perhaps some of the rage expressed by supporters of Professor Ford stems from the fact their lives never matched those promised by such fictional films.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toV3SzyMAFE

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Charles Pewitt, @slumber_j, @AnotherDad

    Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation

    I believe Judge Kavanaugh was born in 1965, which would place him (by all accounts I’ve ever seen, and like me) in the first year of GenX.

  161. @Pat Hannagan
    Back in the previous decade, I came up with Sailer’s Law of Female Journalists

    When did you first realise that Jews had a massive over-representation in all positions of power and influence?

    What stopped you from relaying this information to the public and you decided instead to go hard on lame substitutes for real power?

    Replies: @Karl

    81 Pat Hannagan > What stopped you from relaying this information to the public

    oh, he tried – at least in the RonUnzian manner (buying a subscription the _The Atlantic_)

    the big problem is that the public doesn’t care

  162. I believe Judge Kavanaugh was born in 1965, which would place him (by all accounts I’ve ever seen, and like me) in the first year of GenX.

    Because of Peter Brimelow’s book Alien Nation, I react like the characters in the Abbott and Costello bit Susquehanna Hat Company whenever I see the year 1965 written out.

    The 1965 Immigration Act was the law that opened the floodgates to mass immigration in the USA. 40 or 50 million foreigners and their spawn are in the USA because of that 1965 immigration bill.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Charles Pewitt

    The 1965 immigration bill was the enabler. Reagan's amnesty and his stupid central American wars with their "refugees" was the seed for the endless migration from Latin America's barrios.

    Without the latter we were well within our rights to kick them out and keep them out.

  163. If Kavanaugh doesn’t make it, Trump should nominate Creepy Porn Lawyer (CPL).

    Let’s just embrace it and go full Reality Politics henceforth. Everyone does loves the guy. Notice nobody mentioned Ronan Farrow in hearing but CPL got a number of mentions.

    Frankly, I’d love having the guy on the court and he’s obviously a sharp guy.

  164. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Tom Wolfe attacking Chomsky in the intellectual arena is roughly equivalent to if he tried to attack a gorilla in a cage fight.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anonymous


    Tom Wolfe attacking Chomsky in the intellectual arena is roughly equivalent to if he tried to attack a gorilla in a cage fight.

     

    Wolfe might (were he still with us) bet Chomsky that he could ask the gorilla a simple question. If the gorilla answers, then Chomsky wins. If not, Wolfe does.

    How can the gorilla win? I don't know... ask him!
  165. OT – here in the HBD Mitten, we learn today why Canada doesn’t have a Detroit.

    https://www.freep.com/story/money/business/john-gallagher/2018/09/28/detroit-blight-race-canada/1442875002/

    Spoiler alert – turns out Canada just doesn’t have enough negroes..

  166. anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar


    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?
     
    No.

    I know Steve thinks he's a great man, but I think he's a twit, and I took a lot of linguistics classes. Of course I'm not worthy to judge such a genius as Steve, um, I mean Chomsky. Well either really.

    My general impression is just that I don't like Noam and that his transformational grammar is overrated. If TG and the concepts behind it were such a revelation and revolution when he invented them, then the linguistics world must have been in its Stone Age at the time.

    His parents' and tribe's Marxist perspective really shows and it's annoying. Yes, many of his criticisms and observations about my country have been correct, but he has studiously focused his scorn mostly on the very teat that has fed him and made him rich. Typical.

    I post this in fear that it will make me look like even more of an ass than I already do. It was quickly typed out because, what the hell. As our president and Crosby,Stills & Nash have said, "What have you got to lose?"

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anon, @Roderick Spode, @anon, @Dieter Kief, @anonymous

    Well, better men than you have tried.

    Skinner, Quine, Piaget…the list of great intellectuals who were weighed in the balances against Chomsky and found wanting is long but distinguished.

    Lesser intellects didn’t fare any better. Bill Buckley’s son will tell you about the time his father was humiliated on national television.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone. White, gentile men need to re-learn this.

    Men have will. They do not have to submit themselves to the perceived superiority of a Chomsky, even if he is correct 90% of the time, and especially if he habitually omits subjects that deserve even more of his skillful criticism.

    Chomsky has usually correctly criticized the nation that feeds him and the parasite nation that feeds on it. Very good. But he has too often left alone or even praised collectivist powers that conform to the socialist ideologies of his parents. Typical. He is a socialist with a portfolio at Goldman Sachs.

    Men have the will to go beyond what is simply an intellectual argument. In fact, intellectual arguments are rarely what determines history or how people live. Until we put this perspective back into ourselves, we will continue to be at the mercy of the will and verbal manipulations of those who want to tell us how to live.

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone, and you don't have to have a superior argument for that.

    Replies: @anonymous

  167. @candid_observer
    @PiltdownMan

    I remember a student from the math department when I was in grad school who said that it was amazing that Chomsky had achieved such fame because his entire approach was derivative on Emil Post's far more basic theories. I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman's diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    In general, the "triviality" of an approach, as well as its adumbration by some long ago theory, indicates rather little as to its importance or even its originality. An approach becomes important and basic when it is finally elaborated in such a way that it solves real problems in the field. The elaboration is key; the ability to predict is key; the scope of the theory is key.

    Personally, I've never been able to convince myself that Chomsky's Transformational Grammar deserved the same respect that, say, Fisher's work on quantitative genetics does. I just don't know that it makes the same level of reliable prediction as do the scientific theories we hold in high esteem. Maybe it does today -- I'll admit I have never gone deeply enough into it or the controversies to speak with any reasonable conviction. But I certainly have the impression that over the years there has been a huge amount of churn in underlying approaches Chomsky has proposed. So much churn does not suggest a reliable science. And it is not a good sign that he has completely dominated the linguistic scene, and mostly driven out dissenters. He is bad that way, and his followers are worse. One gets the sense that he and his followers are as much polemicists in their science as Chomsky is in his politics: scorched earth, all the time. He has probably had as baleful an influence on the development of linguistics as Marvin Minsky had on the development of neural networks.

    My general sense is that TG has made a certain number of predictions that have been verified. But are those enough really to confirm it? Would other, quite different approaches not be able to do the same or better?

    It strikes me as very hard to get a straight answer on these points at this time from anyone expert.

    Replies: @David, @anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    E. O. Wilson says that for years, Chomsky’s terminology and notation made his linguistic theories incomprehensible to everyone, including experts. Wilson says that it was Pinker’s enthusiastic popularization of Chomsky’s ideas that made them clear enough to be understood and rejected. I don’t know enough to say.

    Still, believing in some amount of universal human grammar makes a lot of sense to me.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @David

    The irony of Pinker's support of Chomsky is that in a famous episode of Chomsky's theory churn, Pinker seems to have been kicked to the curb.

    For many years early on, Chomsky heaped great scorn on the idea that evolutionary and biological issues could prove any kind of impediment to Transformational Grammar. Somehow, he imagined those concerns as trivial, mostly irrelevant, and easy to solve. Frankly, one of the reasons I could never get into his approach was that that struck me as an absurd position to take a priori. (The other reason is that TG as practiced is tedious beyond belief. It wins by Argumentum ad Excrutiatum.) I'd have to say that the Original Sin of TG is its dismissal of the question of how we might acquire language, given evolutionary constraints.

    Chomsky seems to have gone from a robust support of a very elaborate set of innate ideas being wired into the human brain into one in which he seems to claim that there are only a few very basic "ideas" so wired, such as "recursion". Now of course Chomsky was pressed into this new position by the rather obvious observation that it seems nearly inconceivable that an elaborate set of ideas have been programmed into the human brain exclusively, considering the extremely short period of time (from an evolutionary point of view) over which those programs might have evolved. Nothing biological changes that fast.

    And among those pressing that case was Pinker himself. The only vaguely plausible account was that these innate ideas somehow got wired in by co-opting some already complex neural structure, repurposing it toward linguistic behavior. But this too seemed hard to accept.

    But Pinker himself mostly bought the pretty elaborate innate ideas theory, and wrote some books defending it.

    But when Chomsky did his huge right turn, it was Pinker who was left holding the bag with all those innate ideas. I think this must have left him feeling a little used.

    Frankly, I've never thought of Pinker as exactly the deepest thinker, and I don't exactly find his judgment trustworthy on these matters. Chomsky mostly bulls his way through a lot of inconsistency because, given his position, he can.

  168. @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    “those who can’t, teach.”

    Or go into politics.

  169. Anon[831] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Post Starbucks/no 911/don’t confront back people, things are proceeding as expected. A gang of at least 17 “youths” has been arrested for knocking off California Apple stores statewide. The MO? Walk in en masse wearing hoodies, pick something up, and walk out, dispersing in different directions.

    Steve Jobs famously hired ex Mossad and FBI guys for Apple security. I expect that they might be less politically correct than Starbucks in their response to flash robs if they increase.

    By the way, I think there’s a third-party blog plug-in opportunity: a button that scans a web page for probable names, does a Google Image search, and displays any results that look like mug shots. Now that the use of the dog whistle word “youths” has been outlawed, “hoodie” was the only hint in news articles that these perps weren’t the Stanford women’s swim team.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anon

    That was the first thing I noticed. All they have to. do is establish that they will prosecute. They are always probing for weakness. Running from cops is now treated like it is an inalienable right. Typical shoplifting is no longer prosecuting.

    Apple Stores are immensely profitable. Apple is a California company and cash cow. They just need to get the word out that Apple is taboo to smash and grab. The rack rate on felony theft is prison time.

  170. @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I graduated with a linguistics B.A. before Chomsky had gone full-bore radical, and I don't know if transformational grammar is overrated or in any respect represents what is really going on in the brain, but I loved it (and Chomsky's work in phonology also) because it was beautiful. It was logical and made sense (with a few messy loose ends). It was like Newton applying math to planetary physics. It just seemed so right.

    I did love Tom Wolff's Darwin-Chomsky book, however. Great writing, and a quick, short read, something you ususally don't get from Wolff. In the internet age I am less concerned with whether a book is "correct," because no matter what I read I am on Wikipedia and various web sites the entire time following up on stuff, so any problems with a book's facts or reasoning are quickly noticed and corralled.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @anonymous

    I’m 30 years old.

    It is difficult for me to imagine this on mainstream television:

  171. anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @candid_observer
    @PiltdownMan

    I remember a student from the math department when I was in grad school who said that it was amazing that Chomsky had achieved such fame because his entire approach was derivative on Emil Post's far more basic theories. I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman's diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    In general, the "triviality" of an approach, as well as its adumbration by some long ago theory, indicates rather little as to its importance or even its originality. An approach becomes important and basic when it is finally elaborated in such a way that it solves real problems in the field. The elaboration is key; the ability to predict is key; the scope of the theory is key.

    Personally, I've never been able to convince myself that Chomsky's Transformational Grammar deserved the same respect that, say, Fisher's work on quantitative genetics does. I just don't know that it makes the same level of reliable prediction as do the scientific theories we hold in high esteem. Maybe it does today -- I'll admit I have never gone deeply enough into it or the controversies to speak with any reasonable conviction. But I certainly have the impression that over the years there has been a huge amount of churn in underlying approaches Chomsky has proposed. So much churn does not suggest a reliable science. And it is not a good sign that he has completely dominated the linguistic scene, and mostly driven out dissenters. He is bad that way, and his followers are worse. One gets the sense that he and his followers are as much polemicists in their science as Chomsky is in his politics: scorched earth, all the time. He has probably had as baleful an influence on the development of linguistics as Marvin Minsky had on the development of neural networks.

    My general sense is that TG has made a certain number of predictions that have been verified. But are those enough really to confirm it? Would other, quite different approaches not be able to do the same or better?

    It strikes me as very hard to get a straight answer on these points at this time from anyone expert.

    Replies: @David, @anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    Chomsky himself has specifically rejected that his was a “Kuhnian revolution” saying we really shouldn’t overstate how many Newtons and Einsteins we have by throwing that term around.

    He said his work was more “pre-galilean” in that he’s “trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed.”

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @anonymous


    “trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed.”
     
    Funny how contemptuous he is of those who criticize his approach in any important way, given that he has no idea how to proceed.
    , @Desiderius
    @anonymous

    So is he John the Baptist or Copernicus?

  172. • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Ibound1

    That’s hard to say.

    I figure he would probably be writing an ostensibly obscure but mysteriously influential blog each night from 10 til 2 while spending his days wandering the world in search of the best golf and waves.

    , @Anonymous
    @Ibound1

    This fancy pants "country artist" that nobody's ever heard of says Jesus would not have voted for Trump? Like Jesus is dead or something? Like he can't immigrate to the U.S. and get citizenship and then vote?

    This fruitcake doesn't even understand a basic tenet about the religion he claims to be a member of.

  173. Attendance of private schools is an interesting indication of the American class system. Whites and Jews I see in high positions seem to be coming out of the private school system from a very young age.

    The Catholic school system Kavanaugh attended might have had more class diversity than the educations of other US elites. His Catholic school background might be part of the reason for US elites suspicion of him. But the fact remains that it is assumed these days to be natural and not worth comment that elite native US persons had elite upbrings from day 0.

    Are there any important Americans that were ‘products’ of public school? Yes, there are some of Asian immigrant heritage. For example FCC Grandee Ajit Pai. So if you are wondering who needs immigration, the Parsons public school system (Pai is the notable alumnus) probably has few success stories among the traditional population.

    Even Asians seem to have a non US public school background. Like Elon Musk, US Asian tech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong is a product of apartheid South Africa.

    Fwiw, Justice Ginsburg graduated from NYC public school. But she represents an older generation A quick look at James Masison HS alumni list shows nothing very interesting after the first wave of Jewish immigrants left.

  174. @Anon
    @Roderick Spode

    I would bet that the ratio of Jews Criticizing Israel and Muslims criticizing the 50+ Muslim states is something like 1,000 to 1.

    Given that there are 50+ Muslim states and millions of Muslims flooding the West who will accept zero criticism of anything Islamic and are backing it up with mass murder and terrorism , I think worrying about Jews/Israel is trivial distraction and not in your best interests.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Song For the Deaf

    Ok we’ll just talk about the Jews and their fellow whites letting them in then.

  175. @Polynikes
    @Berty

    I'm not so sure the gop "is facing a wipe out." But assuming they are, what makes you so sure it's because of his "behavior?"

    All presidents face this in their first midterm. And congress almost always turns over.

    Replies: @Berty

    I’m not so sure the gop “is facing a wipe out.” But assuming they are, what makes you so sure it’s because of his “behavior?”

    Because he’s done a remarkable job of alienating suburban women and college-educated whites with his deranged tweets, his childlike unpresidential behavior, and his delight in overall acting like a huge asshole. Polls have shown this again and again. If any of the brilliant “white nationalists” on iSteve think you’re ideas can come to fruition without them then boy howdy are you in for a shock.

    At this point if they hold the Senate they’ll be lucky,

  176. @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    And those who can’t teach, teach at a phony university with no campus.

  177. OT– hbd chick’s twitter account has been suspended! https://twitter.com/hbdchick

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @theo the kraut

    "hbd chick’s twitter account has been suspended!"

    That is outrageous.


    "First they came for the Daily Stormer
    But I did not speak out, because I was not a National Socialist
    Then they came for Roissy
    But I did not speak out, because I was not a PUA..."
     
  178. @candid_observer
    @PiltdownMan

    I remember a student from the math department when I was in grad school who said that it was amazing that Chomsky had achieved such fame because his entire approach was derivative on Emil Post's far more basic theories. I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman's diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    In general, the "triviality" of an approach, as well as its adumbration by some long ago theory, indicates rather little as to its importance or even its originality. An approach becomes important and basic when it is finally elaborated in such a way that it solves real problems in the field. The elaboration is key; the ability to predict is key; the scope of the theory is key.

    Personally, I've never been able to convince myself that Chomsky's Transformational Grammar deserved the same respect that, say, Fisher's work on quantitative genetics does. I just don't know that it makes the same level of reliable prediction as do the scientific theories we hold in high esteem. Maybe it does today -- I'll admit I have never gone deeply enough into it or the controversies to speak with any reasonable conviction. But I certainly have the impression that over the years there has been a huge amount of churn in underlying approaches Chomsky has proposed. So much churn does not suggest a reliable science. And it is not a good sign that he has completely dominated the linguistic scene, and mostly driven out dissenters. He is bad that way, and his followers are worse. One gets the sense that he and his followers are as much polemicists in their science as Chomsky is in his politics: scorched earth, all the time. He has probably had as baleful an influence on the development of linguistics as Marvin Minsky had on the development of neural networks.

    My general sense is that TG has made a certain number of predictions that have been verified. But are those enough really to confirm it? Would other, quite different approaches not be able to do the same or better?

    It strikes me as very hard to get a straight answer on these points at this time from anyone expert.

    Replies: @David, @anonymous, @Faraday's Bobcat

    I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman’s diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.

    “So we joked with the mathematicians: ‘We have a new theorem – that mathematicians can prove only trivial theorems, because every theorem that’s proved is trivial.’ ”

    – R. P. Feynman

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    https://enviropaul.files.wordpress.com/2016/04/circular-reasoning.gif?w=700&h=218

  179. @David
    @candid_observer

    E. O. Wilson says that for years, Chomsky's terminology and notation made his linguistic theories incomprehensible to everyone, including experts. Wilson says that it was Pinker's enthusiastic popularization of Chomsky's ideas that made them clear enough to be understood and rejected. I don't know enough to say.

    Still, believing in some amount of universal human grammar makes a lot of sense to me.

    Replies: @candid_observer

    The irony of Pinker’s support of Chomsky is that in a famous episode of Chomsky’s theory churn, Pinker seems to have been kicked to the curb.

    For many years early on, Chomsky heaped great scorn on the idea that evolutionary and biological issues could prove any kind of impediment to Transformational Grammar. Somehow, he imagined those concerns as trivial, mostly irrelevant, and easy to solve. Frankly, one of the reasons I could never get into his approach was that that struck me as an absurd position to take a priori. (The other reason is that TG as practiced is tedious beyond belief. It wins by Argumentum ad Excrutiatum.) I’d have to say that the Original Sin of TG is its dismissal of the question of how we might acquire language, given evolutionary constraints.

    Chomsky seems to have gone from a robust support of a very elaborate set of innate ideas being wired into the human brain into one in which he seems to claim that there are only a few very basic “ideas” so wired, such as “recursion”. Now of course Chomsky was pressed into this new position by the rather obvious observation that it seems nearly inconceivable that an elaborate set of ideas have been programmed into the human brain exclusively, considering the extremely short period of time (from an evolutionary point of view) over which those programs might have evolved. Nothing biological changes that fast.

    And among those pressing that case was Pinker himself. The only vaguely plausible account was that these innate ideas somehow got wired in by co-opting some already complex neural structure, repurposing it toward linguistic behavior. But this too seemed hard to accept.

    But Pinker himself mostly bought the pretty elaborate innate ideas theory, and wrote some books defending it.

    But when Chomsky did his huge right turn, it was Pinker who was left holding the bag with all those innate ideas. I think this must have left him feeling a little used.

    Frankly, I’ve never thought of Pinker as exactly the deepest thinker, and I don’t exactly find his judgment trustworthy on these matters. Chomsky mostly bulls his way through a lot of inconsistency because, given his position, he can.

  180. @Anonymous
    @stillCARealist

    And to any white male I would suggest you look for and marry a woman from East Asia (SE or NE). An import. White women are too much of a liability. This will only get worse. There will always be exceptions but unfortunately you can’t risk taling a chance on one.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    What’s that got to do with public schooling vs. homeschooling?

  181. @anonymous
    @candid_observer

    Chomsky himself has specifically rejected that his was a "Kuhnian revolution" saying we really shouldn't overstate how many Newtons and Einsteins we have by throwing that term around.

    He said his work was more "pre-galilean" in that he's "trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed."

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Desiderius

    “trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed.”

    Funny how contemptuous he is of those who criticize his approach in any important way, given that he has no idea how to proceed.

  182. While I’m pretty critical of Chomsky in a lot of ways, I actually think he can often be a useful read on matters of politics.

    I’d say over half of his notions in politics are just nutty. But a good portion of the time he has good arguments and worthwhile insights.

    The combination of good reasoning sometimes and utterly crackpot theories at other times is not so uncommon among academic thinkers.

    You get what you get.

    • Replies: @Jasper Been
    @candid_observer

    IIRC around 2008, Chomsky said he’d prefer a president Hillary Clinton over Ron Paul. I wonder if he still has that preference, after the disaster in Libya. Probably does.

    So I guess he's not so much an anti war / anti imperialist as he is a worthless piece of scum.

  183. @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, better men than you have tried.

    Skinner, Quine, Piaget...the list of great intellectuals who were weighed in the balances against Chomsky and found wanting is long but distinguished.

    Lesser intellects didn't fare any better. Bill Buckley's son will tell you about the time his father was humiliated on national television.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone. White, gentile men need to re-learn this.

    Men have will. They do not have to submit themselves to the perceived superiority of a Chomsky, even if he is correct 90% of the time, and especially if he habitually omits subjects that deserve even more of his skillful criticism.

    Chomsky has usually correctly criticized the nation that feeds him and the parasite nation that feeds on it. Very good. But he has too often left alone or even praised collectivist powers that conform to the socialist ideologies of his parents. Typical. He is a socialist with a portfolio at Goldman Sachs.

    Men have the will to go beyond what is simply an intellectual argument. In fact, intellectual arguments are rarely what determines history or how people live. Until we put this perspective back into ourselves, we will continue to be at the mercy of the will and verbal manipulations of those who want to tell us how to live.

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone, and you don’t have to have a superior argument for that.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Men have reason, beasts have emotion. It is better to reach for the divine than to fall to the animal.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  184. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    I don’t know if we “sympathize with the jocks” so much as we’re not neurotically consumed with high school subculture and projecting our own insecurities from that time onto the adult world. This has to be some sort of new phenomenon in human history I think; people in their 50s (and beyond!) who still view the world in terms of one-dimensional teenaged cliches, still resent the people who got laid a few years before they did or got more people to sign their yearbook. Actually I think the high school class system is kind of a new thing: nerds vs. jocks, brains vs. beauty, the whole weird ecosystem and the million ways that the administration encourages it (dances, elections to determine who the “king” and “queen” will be). Did any of this exist before baby boomers, when half of kids left school at 14 and the other half went home after classes were over to work on the family farm?

    There is also a strong “life imitates art” element at work here: just as a lot of people will watch movies about slavery and the KKK and start to see hate crimes and organized racism where none exists, if you watch enough John Hughes movies you may start to feel like you live in a John Hughes movie. Sailer readers have an advantage here too, as I don’t think there’s a group of people in this country more immune to media messaging than us.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    I agree. I actually agreed at the time. I didn't fit in any particular clique, neither did most of my friends. There were cliques, to be sure, but membership in one was not exclusive of membership in others, and the affiliated traits were on a spectrum for any given member, not a question of binary extremes. I was popular and friendly with football players, rednecks, cheerleaders, stoners, really smart people, actors, musicians, and so on. Some of us were filthy rich and others dirt poor. The business about the cliques really is overplayed, I suspect. But I'm only one man, and maybe we were fortunate and not as douchey at my school.

    Maybe it really is shitty in a Hughesian level most places.

  185. @Charles Pewitt

    I believe Judge Kavanaugh was born in 1965, which would place him (by all accounts I’ve ever seen, and like me) in the first year of GenX.

     

    Because of Peter Brimelow's book Alien Nation, I react like the characters in the Abbott and Costello bit Susquehanna Hat Company whenever I see the year 1965 written out.

    The 1965 Immigration Act was the law that opened the floodgates to mass immigration in the USA. 40 or 50 million foreigners and their spawn are in the USA because of that 1965 immigration bill.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    The 1965 immigration bill was the enabler. Reagan’s amnesty and his stupid central American wars with their “refugees” was the seed for the endless migration from Latin America’s barrios.

    Without the latter we were well within our rights to kick them out and keep them out.

  186. @Anon
    @Roderick Spode

    I would bet that the ratio of Jews Criticizing Israel and Muslims criticizing the 50+ Muslim states is something like 1,000 to 1.

    Given that there are 50+ Muslim states and millions of Muslims flooding the West who will accept zero criticism of anything Islamic and are backing it up with mass murder and terrorism , I think worrying about Jews/Israel is trivial distraction and not in your best interests.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Song For the Deaf

    Muslims criticize Muslim countries all the time. It’s Islam that can’t be criticized. Just like Jews criticize Israel all the time, but Jews themselves can’t be criticized.

  187. @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone. White, gentile men need to re-learn this.

    Men have will. They do not have to submit themselves to the perceived superiority of a Chomsky, even if he is correct 90% of the time, and especially if he habitually omits subjects that deserve even more of his skillful criticism.

    Chomsky has usually correctly criticized the nation that feeds him and the parasite nation that feeds on it. Very good. But he has too often left alone or even praised collectivist powers that conform to the socialist ideologies of his parents. Typical. He is a socialist with a portfolio at Goldman Sachs.

    Men have the will to go beyond what is simply an intellectual argument. In fact, intellectual arguments are rarely what determines history or how people live. Until we put this perspective back into ourselves, we will continue to be at the mercy of the will and verbal manipulations of those who want to tell us how to live.

    It is perfectly all right not to like someone, and you don't have to have a superior argument for that.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Men have reason, beasts have emotion. It is better to reach for the divine than to fall to the animal.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous

    Reason is a tool used by the animal to get what the animal wants.

    I don't ask my sledgehammer and wedge to tell me what to split. I use them to split logs because I want to make fire.

  188. @Desiderius
    @Anon7

    B students work for the C students and the A students teach.

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

    Draw your own conclusions.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon7, @Prester John, @Mr. Anon, @Dan Hayes

    Desiderius:

    For lawyers: A students become law professors; B students become judges; C students make money!

    (Or so I’ve been told by a lawyer friend.)

  189. @Chrisnonymous
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    I get extremely drunk almost every week, and although I sometimes embarass myself on iSteve, I have never come close to sexually assaulting anyone. My girlfriend has videos of me very inebriated. While not sensible, I am very jolly and amenable. Alcohol brings out your latent personality. As Graham said, if Kavanaugh had been a rapist then, he'd have been a rapist yesterday, and he wasn't.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

    It’s true what they say about alcohol; it makes a person reveal their true self. Likewise, even if a person gets blackout drunk, if they are at their core a moral person, they are not going to do something immoral and felonious like rape someone. The kind of person who gets drunk and rapes someone is the kind of person who while sober would have no moral misgivings about raping someone, but doesn’t do it for fear of getting caught.

  190. @Clifford Brown
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWKbfoikeg

    Was the Bret Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearing our first Generation X political moment? Kavanaugh is on the tail end of the Baby Boomer Generation, but the whole exercise from the total collapse of consensus, the sexual liberation of the Sixties being revealed as nothing more than a form of nihilistic consumption, the politically correct rejection of such sexual liberation, the references to 1980s teen sex comedies superseding actual lived experience and the rejection of White Male cultural norms could be seen as an embodiment of Generation X politics.

    It looks like the Center may not hold.

    Unlike the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X lacks a defining war so apparently its cultural references are the the class and ethnic struggles of 1980's teen sex comedies. Perhaps some of the rage expressed by supporters of Professor Ford stems from the fact their lives never matched those promised by such fictional films.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toV3SzyMAFE

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Charles Pewitt, @slumber_j, @AnotherDad

    Kavanaugh is not a boomer. He’s GenX. I think–like the boomers and probably several other generations–there’s a dichotomy between the early GenXs born in the 60s (through h.s. in the Reagan administration and on into college) and the late Xs born in the 70s. (Not a GenXer and haven’t thought about it much.)

    But he lacks the boomer experience of growing up in the 60s. I can still remember snippets of the “before” America. Guys like Kavanaugh really can not.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @AnotherDad

    The 70's were their own special kind of "before" America. If I can't get Great Again America I'd settle for 70's America over this dumpster fire. A dumpster fire that's going pretty damn well on the local level I might add.

  191. https://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2016/08/10/these-wealthy-neighbors-have-been-war-for-nearly-years/gt5NruyEAegG3hrqOpoTCM/story.html

    Sailerific story about a 25 year long territory dispute between two super rich neighbours who doubtless at least preach open borders in current year America.

  192. @tyrone
    @Mr. Anon

    Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten……except than hat.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten”

    Glitter has been unpersoned as far as his back catalogue is concerned – not only never played on BBC radio, they have deleted his appearances on archived TOTP shows (just as they pixelated out Steve Priest’s Nazi insignia on Sweet’s ‘Blockbuster’).

    A pity, as you should separate the artist from the work. The Man Who Put The Bang In Gang has a tremendous back catalogue.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Just so. By all accounts Byron was a scoundrel, Dickens was no saint, Wilde got up to all kinds of shenanigans, and so on. It's stupid to pretend they weren't talented people, geniuses, really, all the same. Yngwie Malmsteen is kind of a dick but people say Eric Johnson is the nicest guy ever. Each could probably pretty convincingly play a challenging piece exactly the same behind a curtain. Would the sound of one emanate kindness and the other arrogance? Of course not. The work stands independently of the artist.

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @YetAnotherAnon

    They still play "Rock 'n' Roll, Part 2" at sports events.

  193. @Reg Cæsar

    The late Tom Wolfe suggested something similar in Back to Blood...
     
    The late Tom Wolfe more than just suggested in The Kingdom of Speech that Noam Chomsky is a fool for claiming that human speech evolved from lower life forms, without any evidence, then or now.

    Anyone want to defend Chomsky?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Foreign Expert, @El Dato, @Grumpy, @Hibernian, @Hibernian, @anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    I don’t really know much about Chomsky, apart from his controversy with Daniel Everett but… the fact is that I really, really don’t understand why he is considered a Great Genius who revolutionarized language studies.

    I mean, I really don’t get. If I understood it, he had a grand scheme where certain grammatical features had to be present in every language due to them being hardwired in the human brain. After looking around over many languages, he ended up discarding most of what he believed and keeping only the mysterious “recursion”, that Everett claims to have disproven with the Pirahã language.

    That sounds like a smart guy starting with a reasonable idea… that eventually was not very productive. OK, it happens all thee time, but we don’t treat these people as Darwins and Newtons.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    How about a Wittgenstein, then?

  194. @Ibound1
    OT: Jesus would not have voted for Trump

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/sep/29/jason-isbell-interview-live-from-ryman-trump

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous

    That’s hard to say.

    I figure he would probably be writing an ostensibly obscure but mysteriously influential blog each night from 10 til 2 while spending his days wandering the world in search of the best golf and waves.

  195. @Charles Pewitt
    @Dave Pinsen

    A Leprechaun Beer Swilling Striver Is More Fun Than That Boring Frump Liev Schreiber.

    If David Lynch hadn't put that Watts woman in one of his movies, Schreiber wouldn't have had the chance to enjoy her company for awhile.

    I wish that Limey Christian Bale would have played Macbeth instead of that dope Michael Fassbender, although it wasn't a bad movie.

    Taleb deadlifts pretty good, I would challenge him to a deadlifting contest if I had 5 years to develop more muscle and some deadlifting skills.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Dave Pinsen

    Noice.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dave Pinsen

    ABSOLUTE UNIT and a real-life Groyper. Fucking outstanding.

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/022/670/easter_toad_template.png

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Dave Pinsen

    Good for him.

    Can he run a mile under 7 minutes without going into cardiac arrest?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @Desiderius
    @Dave Pinsen

    Well done brother.

    Those neck catheters are a bear.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  196. @theo the kraut
    OT-- hbd chick's twitter account has been suspended! https://twitter.com/hbdchick

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “hbd chick’s twitter account has been suspended!”

    That is outrageous.

    “First they came for the Daily Stormer
    But I did not speak out, because I was not a National Socialist
    Then they came for Roissy
    But I did not speak out, because I was not a PUA…”

  197. @Dave Pinsen
    @Charles Pewitt

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    https://twitter.com/nntaleb/status/937080606248325121?s=21

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Desiderius

    Noice.

  198. @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    Part of this may be our contrarian streak, of course. But I think part of it may be that we talked to everybody and got to see both the good side of the so-called jocks and the bad side of the so-called dweebs.

    This, and the fact that it’s not that hard to find smart, thoughtful jocks at Uni – unless you’re studying journalism, it seems…

  199. @Anonymous
    Dems have totally overestimated voter interest in this. After the week of Blasey, who impressed nobody not desperate to be impressed by her, I am ready to never hear another thing about spoiled 1982-1983-2018 Maryland teenagers. The nonstop dudgeon just reeks of donor $$$ grubbing and shameless camera whoring. Tuning it out and I hope Flake gets his close-up and that it goes badly.

    Replies: @Kaz

    I think women really care about this stuff. This is great for re-enforcing the single white women vote. Who obsess over the ‘darkness’ of the rich.

  200. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1046044213991870472

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1046047453881995266

    https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/1046048269107974149

    Replies: @ThirdWorldSteveReader

    Very nice case report.

  201. anon[112] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    I get extremely drunk almost every week, and although I sometimes embarass myself on iSteve, I have never come close to sexually assaulting anyone. My girlfriend has videos of me very inebriated. While not sensible, I am very jolly and amenable. Alcohol brings out your latent personality. As Graham said, if Kavanaugh had been a rapist then, he'd have been a rapist yesterday, and he wasn't.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

    How do you know? If you have ever been hazy about something, you could be hazy about anything. Why couldn’t that include touching a female? If you could not remember touching someone, you could have not remembered touching anyone, like Ford. Is it possible? Yes or no will suffice. I will take your refusal to answer the question as a yes.

    • Troll: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @anon

    Women I've partied with have never started avoiding me.

  202. @Anon7
    @L Woods

    You never know about smart students. There are the bookish ones who spend a lot of time studying and have little high school social life. That would be me. And then there are the ones like this one girl in my AP physics class who was the prettiest girl in the school, and being surrounded by boys everywhere she went, had no problem securing a social life. I could go on, describing a six foot, lanky guy in that same class who was arrested for reckless motorcycle driving who went on to the Air Force academy and flew fighter planes. I seem to recall that he had an ok social life.

    I think the Rich Dad Guy makes a good point when he says that the “A” students often wind up working for the “B” students, meaning that the bright but well-socialized B students typically do better in the business world, which is a team sport, than loner A students.

    The biggest Chad in my school, an amazing natural athlete who got a full scholarship to an excellent school and who picked professional hockey offers over professional football offers, was driving a garbage truck in his mid-thirties owing to poor financial planning and a blown-out knee.i

    My comments reflect my reality, anyway, even though YMMV.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    The mileage is duly noted. I’d much rather have become a garbage man in Indiana than serving in golden manacles in Mexinchifornia.

  203. @Art Deco
    @Dtbb

    The birth cohorts between 1924 and 1946 have never produced a President. There have been about 20 notable candidates for the office in that set, but Michael Dukakis, Jerry Brown, John McCain, John Kerry, and Bernie Sanders are the only ones among the set who competed well enough in an adequate matrix such that you could see them winning the office had some contingencies gone the other way. No clue why that is other than the luck of the draw.

    Now that you mention it, there haven't been many consequential candidates born between 1948 and 1961. Alan Keyes (under the envelope), John Edwards, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, and John Kasich. Huckabee was the best competitor in the heats, but he would have faced a wretched environment after that.

    Replies: @Flip

    Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Trump were all born in 1946. I think it is just a coincidence but who knows.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Flip

    All 3 President born in 1946 went through life with 15 years worth of fewer older men ahead of them clogging up their advancement. Obama, born in 1961, had 15 years tons of older people ahead of his in line so he was going nowhere until he hit upon the black thing.

  204. @Anon7
    @Desiderius

    The version I heard was “A student’s work for the B students, and the C students work for the government”. But, yeah.

    “Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.” As someone who has done both, I’d agree that this old saying is still solid gold.

    Except for academic physicians, that is. Maybe the exception that proves the rule.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Veterinarians, too. Really most any medical profession. The difference is that those guys absolutely cannot bullshit. They are operating in real hospitals as they teach, patients with puzzling conditions and harrowing emergencies are constantly presented, and the instructor must react. And his reaction will pass or fail, often in real time.

    Contrast instructors in law (many never even sit the bar exam, hardly any have tried a cade; most went from the Ivy League to a clerkship or two and maybe a token year of Biglaw…). Professors in schools of business don’t usually operate any business. Scientists and engineers instructing are usually behind the state of the art in practice or out of touch with gritty realities about implementation (viability for mass production, whether a process or product is profitable enough to be commercialised, the urgent timelines necessary to get to market in time for the widget avoid being scooped by the other fellow’s widget, etc.).

    So, yeah, the medical and veterinary schools generally are run by the people you want helping you or your loved ones.

  205. @Flip
    @Art Deco

    Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Trump were all born in 1946. I think it is just a coincidence but who knows.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    All 3 President born in 1946 went through life with 15 years worth of fewer older men ahead of them clogging up their advancement. Obama, born in 1961, had 15 years tons of older people ahead of his in line so he was going nowhere until he hit upon the black thing.

  206. OT:

    A group of five obnoxious Negroes just entered the peaceful cafe where I am eating and reading. The place is nearly empty. Naturally, they have sat at three separate tables yet are conversing all amongst themselves as if they were seated together, smacking their lips and talking through mouthfuls of food as they shout obscenities about “pussy.” One of their number is a boy of about ten years, presumably the son of one of these things.

    I can count on one hand the times a group of Negroes encountered by me did not behave comparably. I refuse to believe they are not some kind of sub-species of human apart from all other races, the few civilised exceptions are freaks, like albino snakes.

    Many here make similar observations of the pattern. We know about their nostrils and complexion and even their lack of future-time orientation and impulse control, and their lechery and violence as results of tropical environmental selectors. But what is this other thing – call it assholery or shamelessness? Is it just an extension of low intelligence preventing self-awareness or perhaps making a spectacle of oneself as a kind of extension of violence (“I will act the centre of the universe because I dare any to remark otherwise!”).

    These are sincere questions. Has any interesting bioevolutionary discussion of it been made?

  207. @Dtbb
    A little off topic. Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven't had a president born in the 50's and will we ever have one?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Art Deco, @Lurker, @res

    I’m sure entire decades have been skipped before?

  208. @Dtbb
    A little off topic. Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven't had a president born in the 50's and will we ever have one?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Art Deco, @Lurker, @res

    Anyone have any thoughts about why we haven’t had a president born in the 50′s and will we ever have one?

    That’s an interesting question. I pulled data from this spreadsheet: https://www.loriferber.com/research/presidential-facts-statistics/presidential-birthdates.html
    and took a look at it in R.

    In 2029 the last of that group will turn 70 so I think the next three elections are all possibilities. Presidential inaugural ages are roughly a Bell curve centered at 52.5 and bounded by 40 and 70 so the 50’s cohort is already out of the sweet spot.

    The really interesting aspect to this is having three presidents all born between June and August 1946 with inaugural ages of 46, 54, and 70. What might not be as known or obvious is that the largest gap between presidential birthdates is from 1924-10-01 to 1946-06-14. I find a 22 year gap quite surprising. Any thoughts on that one? The second largest is from 1946-08-19 to 1961-08-04 which is what fits in with your question.

  209. A common refrain from those who were unpopular in high school is that the popular crowd “peaked in high school”.

    However, I have found that the popular kids I have known in high school used those skills to become successful adults.

    Any thoughts?

  210. @Redneck farmer
    @slumber_j

    There was a study that found kids from schools with graduating classes under 200 do better than kids from larger schools. Basically, the kids from smaller schools could interact better with different kinds of people, because they had to do it in high school.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    That’s interesting.

  211. @Dave Pinsen
    @Charles Pewitt

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    https://twitter.com/nntaleb/status/937080606248325121?s=21

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Desiderius

    ABSOLUTE UNIT and a real-life Groyper. Fucking outstanding.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The squad got its tank for the raid on Palo Alto.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  212. anon[112] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    OT

    Post Starbucks/no 911/don't confront back people, things are proceeding as expected. A gang of at least 17 "youths" has been arrested for knocking off California Apple stores statewide. The MO? Walk in en masse wearing hoodies, pick something up, and walk out, dispersing in different directions.

    Steve Jobs famously hired ex Mossad and FBI guys for Apple security. I expect that they might be less politically correct than Starbucks in their response to flash robs if they increase.

    By the way, I think there's a third-party blog plug-in opportunity: a button that scans a web page for probable names, does a Google Image search, and displays any results that look like mug shots. Now that the use of the dog whistle word "youths" has been outlawed, "hoodie" was the only hint in news articles that these perps weren't the Stanford women's swim team.

    Replies: @anon

    That was the first thing I noticed. All they have to. do is establish that they will prosecute. They are always probing for weakness. Running from cops is now treated like it is an inalienable right. Typical shoplifting is no longer prosecuting.

    Apple Stores are immensely profitable. Apple is a California company and cash cow. They just need to get the word out that Apple is taboo to smash and grab. The rack rate on felony theft is prison time.

  213. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dave Pinsen

    ABSOLUTE UNIT and a real-life Groyper. Fucking outstanding.

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/022/670/easter_toad_template.png

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

    The squad got its tank for the raid on Palo Alto.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack Hanson

    “It’s my territory. It’s your territory. They’re just rentin’ it.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vbAOOhMsEE

  214. @Jack Hanson
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The squad got its tank for the raid on Palo Alto.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “It’s my territory. It’s your territory. They’re just rentin’ it.”

  215. @candid_observer
    While I'm pretty critical of Chomsky in a lot of ways, I actually think he can often be a useful read on matters of politics.

    I'd say over half of his notions in politics are just nutty. But a good portion of the time he has good arguments and worthwhile insights.

    The combination of good reasoning sometimes and utterly crackpot theories at other times is not so uncommon among academic thinkers.

    You get what you get.

    Replies: @Jasper Been

    IIRC around 2008, Chomsky said he’d prefer a president Hillary Clinton over Ron Paul. I wonder if he still has that preference, after the disaster in Libya. Probably does.

    So I guess he’s not so much an anti war / anti imperialist as he is a worthless piece of scum.

  216. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ibound1
    OT: Jesus would not have voted for Trump

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/sep/29/jason-isbell-interview-live-from-ryman-trump

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous

    This fancy pants “country artist” that nobody’s ever heard of says Jesus would not have voted for Trump? Like Jesus is dead or something? Like he can’t immigrate to the U.S. and get citizenship and then vote?

    This fruitcake doesn’t even understand a basic tenet about the religion he claims to be a member of.

  217. @Anonymous
    @SimpleSong

    I don't know if we "sympathize with the jocks" so much as we're not neurotically consumed with high school subculture and projecting our own insecurities from that time onto the adult world. This has to be some sort of new phenomenon in human history I think; people in their 50s (and beyond!) who still view the world in terms of one-dimensional teenaged cliches, still resent the people who got laid a few years before they did or got more people to sign their yearbook. Actually I think the high school class system is kind of a new thing: nerds vs. jocks, brains vs. beauty, the whole weird ecosystem and the million ways that the administration encourages it (dances, elections to determine who the "king" and "queen" will be). Did any of this exist before baby boomers, when half of kids left school at 14 and the other half went home after classes were over to work on the family farm?

    There is also a strong "life imitates art" element at work here: just as a lot of people will watch movies about slavery and the KKK and start to see hate crimes and organized racism where none exists, if you watch enough John Hughes movies you may start to feel like you live in a John Hughes movie. Sailer readers have an advantage here too, as I don't think there's a group of people in this country more immune to media messaging than us.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    I agree. I actually agreed at the time. I didn’t fit in any particular clique, neither did most of my friends. There were cliques, to be sure, but membership in one was not exclusive of membership in others, and the affiliated traits were on a spectrum for any given member, not a question of binary extremes. I was popular and friendly with football players, rednecks, cheerleaders, stoners, really smart people, actors, musicians, and so on. Some of us were filthy rich and others dirt poor. The business about the cliques really is overplayed, I suspect. But I’m only one man, and maybe we were fortunate and not as douchey at my school.

    Maybe it really is shitty in a Hughesian level most places.

  218. @YetAnotherAnon
    @tyrone

    "Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten"

    Glitter has been unpersoned as far as his back catalogue is concerned - not only never played on BBC radio, they have deleted his appearances on archived TOTP shows (just as they pixelated out Steve Priest's Nazi insignia on Sweet's 'Blockbuster').

    A pity, as you should separate the artist from the work. The Man Who Put The Bang In Gang has a tremendous back catalogue.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

    Just so. By all accounts Byron was a scoundrel, Dickens was no saint, Wilde got up to all kinds of shenanigans, and so on. It’s stupid to pretend they weren’t talented people, geniuses, really, all the same. Yngwie Malmsteen is kind of a dick but people say Eric Johnson is the nicest guy ever. Each could probably pretty convincingly play a challenging piece exactly the same behind a curtain. Would the sound of one emanate kindness and the other arrogance? Of course not. The work stands independently of the artist.

  219. @Foreign Expert
    @Reg Cæsar

    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

    If it’s not innate and it’s not an artifact, what’s left?

    Darwin thought it could be explained by evolution. So if I got confused here, is it the fault of me, or of Wolfe, or of Chomsky? I’d say we’re all guilty.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Reg Cæsar


    If it’s not innate and it’s not an artifact, what’s left?
     
    The Holy Ghost
  220. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anon

    Try Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven't read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

    Try Wolfe’s From Bauhaus to Our House if you haven’t read it. Similarly short and sweet, it is what I consider a correct American interpretation of 20th century architecture and related cultural influences.

    Agreed. Wolfe’s The Painted Word does the same thing for modernist art. Brilliant book.

  221. @miss marple
    Sorry I haven't commented much lately. I've been shopping for lampshades on Wayfair.com. It's unbelievable how fast time passes when you're obsessed with something insignificant like lampshades.

    Replies: @F0337, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    Have you tried Ilse’s of Buchenwald?

    https://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/Atrocities.html

  222. @anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Tom Wolfe attacking Chomsky in the intellectual arena is roughly equivalent to if he tried to attack a gorilla in a cage fight.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Tom Wolfe attacking Chomsky in the intellectual arena is roughly equivalent to if he tried to attack a gorilla in a cage fight.

    Wolfe might (were he still with us) bet Chomsky that he could ask the gorilla a simple question. If the gorilla answers, then Chomsky wins. If not, Wolfe does.

    How can the gorilla win? I don’t know… ask him!

  223. @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I was in High School Sophomore English, that was called the Bow-Wow Theory.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    When I was in High School Sophomore English, that was called the Bow-Wow Theory.

    Wolfe mentions the pooh-pooh and ding-dong theories, and some others, but not the bow-wow. Apparently all these names were bestowed by Max Müller at Oxford.

  224. @Faraday's Bobcat
    @candid_observer


    I also knew a very smart young assistant professor in math who in class dismissed Feynman’s diagrams as a derivative triviality, and his Nobel Prize a bit much.
     
    "So we joked with the mathematicians: 'We have a new theorem - that mathematicians can prove only trivial theorems, because every theorem that's proved is trivial.' "

    - R. P. Feynman

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  225. @Anonymous
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar

    That is absolutely shocking. Newsweek is still in business?

    They save money by laying off their proofreaders:

    Brookes also told Cuomo that she had drank

  226. @Roderick Spode
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Chomsky is something like a fraud, but at least he has has the guts, as a Jew, to publicly criticise Israel.

    I actually don't care much about what happens to muh Palestinians, but N.C.'s willingness to set aside ethnocentrism for his principles' sake is a good thing and I wish more Jews could take that proverbial step back from themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike1, @Anon, @J.Ross

    Chomsky’s a gatekeeper, he makes limited criticisms to provide a false alternative.

  227. @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Men have reason, beasts have emotion. It is better to reach for the divine than to fall to the animal.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Reason is a tool used by the animal to get what the animal wants.

    I don’t ask my sledgehammer and wedge to tell me what to split. I use them to split logs because I want to make fire.

  228. @Reg Cæsar
    @Foreign Expert


    Chomsky doesn’t believe language can be explained by evolution.

     

    If it's not innate and it's not an artifact, what's left?

    Darwin thought it could be explained by evolution. So if I got confused here, is it the fault of me, or of Wolfe, or of Chomsky? I'd say we're all guilty.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    If it’s not innate and it’s not an artifact, what’s left?

    The Holy Ghost

  229. @Dave Pinsen
    @Charles Pewitt

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    https://twitter.com/nntaleb/status/937080606248325121?s=21

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Desiderius

    Good for him.

    Can he run a mile under 7 minutes without going into cardiac arrest?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Taleb? No idea. As for me, I'm not sure I could run a 7 minute mile when I was 17. There was a 2 mile run as part of the Army PT test, and I think my time was 15 or 16 minutes for it.

  230. @Dave Pinsen
    @Charles Pewitt

    Maybe one day Taleb will tweet your deadlift.

    https://twitter.com/nntaleb/status/937080606248325121?s=21

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Desiderius

    Well done brother.

    Those neck catheters are a bear.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Desiderius

    Thanks. Yeah, they're no fun. Though at least you can sit up with them. I think the groin ones would keep you on your back.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  231. @SimpleSong
    The iSteve commentariat is an interesting group. They are the high-IQ types who for whatever reason sympathize more with the jocks and the frat boys, rather than the smart dweebs that they are supposed to sympathize with. Personally, while I was never in a fraternity and wouldn't have fit into one, I found fraternity members to be more pleasant than the average undergrad.

    They wanted a different college experience than I did and that's perfectly fine! I imagine they thought I was crazy for the choices I made during college and the feeling was mutual--drinking that much sounds awful to me--but I can never recall any of them being rude or unpleasant to me. On the other hand I can think of multiple professors who insulted me based on my race, or implied that my station in life was due to something other than my own efforts, or attacked me in fairly personal terms because I disagreed with them on a political issue.

    So party on, frat boy, party on.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous, @Anonymous, @ThirdWorldSteveReader, @Desiderius

    Well sympathy is a two-way street – it literally means “suffer together” – so while there are a lot of smart dweebs we sympathize with too it is kinda hard to sympathize with people who despise you and want you wiped off the face of the earth. Rules out the together part.

  232. @slumber_j
    @Dr. X

    Okay, I know what everyone means here. And maybe my (mostly rich-kids, public) high school in Cincinnati was just small enough to make this not the case. We were I guess ~170 kids per class, so we couldn't really break things down into large enough factions for any single group not overlap with others.

    In any case--and like Judge Kavanaugh I'm 53 and graduated from high school in 1983--kids in my high school didn't really break down that way. My friends and I were I suppose charismatic smart kids who were friends with the actually interesting football players or whomever, even though most of us didn't play football.

    For example, I was very involved with the school paper and was a good actor in a lot of plays, and smart and so on. Nevertheless, I dated an officially popular (and very pleasant, and secretly smart) girl in the second half of our senior year. She failed to be elected prom queen, but just barely.

    What I'm getting at is that--at least in my experience--there weren't so many resentful dorks around. I know that's the norm, but I didn't experience it. I wonder whether it isn't maybe a question of school size--and I wonder whether that might not be something to explore about the optimal size for high schools generally.

    Replies: @SimpleSong, @Song For the Deaf, @Harvolssen, @Redneck farmer, @Desiderius

    Wow, I grew up in Cincinnati a few years after and had an eerily similar experience. The other thing is if you treat the dorks well you don’t necessarily see the resentful side manifest itself, and that was before social media so there was a lot more privacy.

  233. @AnotherDad
    @Clifford Brown

    Kavanaugh is not a boomer. He's GenX. I think--like the boomers and probably several other generations--there's a dichotomy between the early GenXs born in the 60s (through h.s. in the Reagan administration and on into college) and the late Xs born in the 70s. (Not a GenXer and haven't thought about it much.)

    But he lacks the boomer experience of growing up in the 60s. I can still remember snippets of the "before" America. Guys like Kavanaugh really can not.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    The 70’s were their own special kind of “before” America. If I can’t get Great Again America I’d settle for 70’s America over this dumpster fire. A dumpster fire that’s going pretty damn well on the local level I might add.

  234. @Rosamond Vincy
    @Desiderius


    give me neither poverty nor riches;
    provide me only with the food I need;
    Lest, being full, I deny you,
    saying, "Who is the LORD?"
    Or, being in want, I steal,
    and profane the name of my God.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Well chosen.

  235. @anonymous
    @candid_observer

    Chomsky himself has specifically rejected that his was a "Kuhnian revolution" saying we really shouldn't overstate how many Newtons and Einsteins we have by throwing that term around.

    He said his work was more "pre-galilean" in that he's "trying to find the right questions to ask, having no idea how to proceed."

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Desiderius

    So is he John the Baptist or Copernicus?

  236. @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't really know much about Chomsky, apart from his controversy with Daniel Everett but... the fact is that I really, really don't understand why he is considered a Great Genius who revolutionarized language studies.

    I mean, I really don't get. If I understood it, he had a grand scheme where certain grammatical features had to be present in every language due to them being hardwired in the human brain. After looking around over many languages, he ended up discarding most of what he believed and keeping only the mysterious "recursion", that Everett claims to have disproven with the Pirahã language.

    That sounds like a smart guy starting with a reasonable idea... that eventually was not very productive. OK, it happens all thee time, but we don't treat these people as Darwins and Newtons.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    How about a Wittgenstein, then?

  237. @YetAnotherAnon
    @tyrone

    "Unlike Gary Glitter he had the good sense to die, today he would be public enemy number one ,for 15 minutes,then forgotten"

    Glitter has been unpersoned as far as his back catalogue is concerned - not only never played on BBC radio, they have deleted his appearances on archived TOTP shows (just as they pixelated out Steve Priest's Nazi insignia on Sweet's 'Blockbuster').

    A pity, as you should separate the artist from the work. The Man Who Put The Bang In Gang has a tremendous back catalogue.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

    They still play “Rock ‘n’ Roll, Part 2” at sports events.

  238. @anon
    @Chrisnonymous

    How do you know? If you have ever been hazy about something, you could be hazy about anything. Why couldn't that include touching a female? If you could not remember touching someone, you could have not remembered touching anyone, like Ford. Is it possible? Yes or no will suffice. I will take your refusal to answer the question as a yes.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Women I’ve partied with have never started avoiding me.

  239. @Desiderius
    @Dave Pinsen

    Well done brother.

    Those neck catheters are a bear.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Thanks. Yeah, they’re no fun. Though at least you can sit up with them. I think the groin ones would keep you on your back.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Dave Pinsen

    My emergency catheter was actually in my chest, but after my second transplant I had an IV port in my neck like your catheter and no, I couldn't really sit up without a lot of hassle since there wasn't enough play in the lines.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  240. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Dave Pinsen

    Good for him.

    Can he run a mile under 7 minutes without going into cardiac arrest?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Taleb? No idea. As for me, I’m not sure I could run a 7 minute mile when I was 17. There was a 2 mile run as part of the Army PT test, and I think my time was 15 or 16 minutes for it.

  241. @Desiderius
    @Dieter Kief

    The brand was known as USAToday, but point taken.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    When I awoke this glaring Sunday morning, I thought of my mistake and I – you know: All of a sudden – – – being half awake, you have such misconceptions about time: Like: NOW! it’s happening, even though it takes quite a few minutes, but not being fully awake concentrates these minutes in this sensation: NOW I got it – or did it get me? – – – : – – – Now I know, why I was willing to make this mistake in my post (I knew in the back of my had quite clearly, that I was making a mistake when I wrote down the words: America today, but I wrote them down even though, and I – like a kid, who has done something forbidden – waited somehow to be detected by you… – so thanks for noticing, Desiderius).

    Well – then I thought of the American Pravda – Series here on this site and I understood: My post was as much about USA Today, as it (deep down in my head/soul/ brain/body) was about this American Pravda phenomenon, and thus I did not only criticise USA Today but our host’s host as well.
    That’s what I understood this morning: I had made the USA/America mistake because it was (=felt) plausible (reasonable, almost…).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Dieter Kief

    This article marks the moment when American Pravda becomes overt.

    We'll see if it matters.

  242. @International Jew
    @Romanian

    You're describing Romanian university life before, or after, 1989?

    Replies: @Romanian

    I got my Bachelor degree in 2009. I am 30 now. I am an alumni of the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, one of the largest state unis in the country. I can’t attest to Uni life before 1989. My parents are both graduates in different fields, but they never really spoke about it. I assume it was much the same, but student organizations were all state controlled and tied to the party, and the ethos was conservative, so the hanky panky took place under the sheets.

    I have not heard of any major developments taking place in the years since, and I have retained ties to the system because I also had postgraduate education and friendships with academics. There are a few more organizations, especially for Romanian students abroad, but that is about it. No Greek life, anemic alumni outreach and so on.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Romanian

    Well that's the sort of thing your communists targeted for elimination and ours still are, so it will take awhile for them to grow back.

    Replies: @Romanian

    , @International Jew
    @Romanian

    Interesting. This being a largely American crowd, you might have also pointed out — however obvious it is to you — that your Romanian university did not have bigtime sports teams, or a social life revolving around attending their games.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Romanian

  243. @Desiderius
    @Almost Missouri

    They severely overrate the legitimacy and efficacy of that regard though.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    They do severely overrate the legitimacy. I wish I could agree that they overrate the efficacy.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Almost Missouri

    Toward their stated ends. Whether toward their actual ends in another matter.

  244. @Dave Pinsen
    @Desiderius

    Thanks. Yeah, they're no fun. Though at least you can sit up with them. I think the groin ones would keep you on your back.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    My emergency catheter was actually in my chest, but after my second transplant I had an IV port in my neck like your catheter and no, I couldn’t really sit up without a lot of hassle since there wasn’t enough play in the lines.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Desiderius

    What did you get transplanted?

    When I woke up, the catheter wasn't connected to a line. They kept it in my neck for a few days in case they needed to reattach the line.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  245. @Almost Missouri
    @Desiderius

    They do severely overrate the legitimacy. I wish I could agree that they overrate the efficacy.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Toward their stated ends. Whether toward their actual ends in another matter.

  246. @Dieter Kief
    @Desiderius

    When I awoke this glaring Sunday morning, I thought of my mistake and I - you know: All of a sudden - - - being half awake, you have such misconceptions about time: Like: NOW! it's happening, even though it takes quite a few minutes, but not being fully awake concentrates these minutes in this sensation: NOW I got it - or did it get me? - - - : - - - Now I know, why I was willing to make this mistake in my post (I knew in the back of my had quite clearly, that I was making a mistake when I wrote down the words: America today, but I wrote them down even though, and I - like a kid, who has done something forbidden - waited somehow to be detected by you... - so thanks for noticing, Desiderius).

    Well - then I thought of the American Pravda - Series here on this site and I understood: My post was as much about USA Today, as it (deep down in my head/soul/ brain/body) was about this American Pravda phenomenon, and thus I did not only criticise USA Today but our host's host as well.
    That's what I understood this morning: I had made the USA/America mistake because it was (=felt) plausible (reasonable, almost...).

    Replies: @Desiderius

    This article marks the moment when American Pravda becomes overt.

    We’ll see if it matters.

  247. @Romanian
    @International Jew

    I got my Bachelor degree in 2009. I am 30 now. I am an alumni of the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, one of the largest state unis in the country. I can't attest to Uni life before 1989. My parents are both graduates in different fields, but they never really spoke about it. I assume it was much the same, but student organizations were all state controlled and tied to the party, and the ethos was conservative, so the hanky panky took place under the sheets.

    I have not heard of any major developments taking place in the years since, and I have retained ties to the system because I also had postgraduate education and friendships with academics. There are a few more organizations, especially for Romanian students abroad, but that is about it. No Greek life, anemic alumni outreach and so on.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @International Jew

    Well that’s the sort of thing your communists targeted for elimination and ours still are, so it will take awhile for them to grow back.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Desiderius

    You are right, of course. Communists cannot abide the "little platoons of society" that may develop into bases for political organization.

    My country's case is more difficult, since we did not have the lengthy Anglo or Western tradition of civil society organization from the bottoms-up, which de Tocqueville observed in the US. Excepting the projects of a very educated and urban elite, Romanian social capital was found in long sedimented and slow changing rural hierarchies which mediated all social contacts and capital formation. Such a system is very resilient, but, once gone, it is gone for good. Whatever grows in its stead from a people unused to more entrepreneurial forms of social capital formation is not going to be as good, at least in the beginning. The Commies also "salted the Earth" by destroying property relations. Today, people view all sorts of productive associations in agriculture with suspicion, as akin to a new collectivization, which means that there are very big agricorps and very many subsistence or small farmers, but few average or mid-level farms that are locally owned and can be competitive by being able to acquire technology and expertise.

    An example - we will have a referendum next week on changing the Constitution to define marriage as being between a man and a woman, like in Poland, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania and a few others. It is literally the first grassroots civic initiative of this magnitude in the country and it will be 30 years in 2019 since the fall of Communism. The NGO alliance (the informal Coalition for the Family) that made it happen worked for quite a few years to gather enough signatures, to perform outreach, to prepare for the media onslaught from the better financed pro-LGBT NGOs etc. Its anybody's game, now, but they have a bit of, in my opinion, unwelcome aid from the Ruling Party, which has seized on the topic to distract from other political problems and to associate itself with something that socially conservative Romanians approve of.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  248. @Romanian
    @International Jew

    I got my Bachelor degree in 2009. I am 30 now. I am an alumni of the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, one of the largest state unis in the country. I can't attest to Uni life before 1989. My parents are both graduates in different fields, but they never really spoke about it. I assume it was much the same, but student organizations were all state controlled and tied to the party, and the ethos was conservative, so the hanky panky took place under the sheets.

    I have not heard of any major developments taking place in the years since, and I have retained ties to the system because I also had postgraduate education and friendships with academics. There are a few more organizations, especially for Romanian students abroad, but that is about it. No Greek life, anemic alumni outreach and so on.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @International Jew

    Interesting. This being a largely American crowd, you might have also pointed out — however obvious it is to you — that your Romanian university did not have bigtime sports teams, or a social life revolving around attending their games.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @International Jew

    Absolutely none. I never even considered it so I could mention it. Zero. Nada. There are a few professional teams named after Universities, but I do not think they have any ties left or what their ties were in the beginning. Ex: FC Universitatea Craiova, FC Sportul Studentesc. All soccer and professional league, with player trading, foreign acquisitions. No students there. Maybe it is different for handball, the other major sport, but it is a distant second.

    If there are any, they are exceptions, not rules, and certainly would not command the kind of attention that College Football gets in the US.

    The new organizations, like Cezar, or the older one, LSRS, focused on students abroad, are for networking, entrepreneurship, and their students leaderships are takimg first steps into politics, like LSRS leader, Sebastian Burduja, who started a party called PACT for reformist young people, but which is silent on divisive social issues, like gay stuff or Christianity, and sticks to corruption and infrastructure, administrative reform etc.

    , @Romanian
    @International Jew

    There is no social life surrounding Universities once you graduate. Alumni do not donate money. Rich ones prefer to set up NGOs to fund scholarships, trainings, and advertise within the Uni. The Uni is viewed more like a public utility, very instrumental. Any exceptions are few and far between. Donations are made by foreign or local corporations making partnerships to set up labs or special curricula for a better pipeline for their labor needs, because there is a lot of legacy infrastructure, including fossil professors who have been teaching mostly the same things the same way for decades.

  249. @International Jew
    @Romanian

    Interesting. This being a largely American crowd, you might have also pointed out — however obvious it is to you — that your Romanian university did not have bigtime sports teams, or a social life revolving around attending their games.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Romanian

    Absolutely none. I never even considered it so I could mention it. Zero. Nada. There are a few professional teams named after Universities, but I do not think they have any ties left or what their ties were in the beginning. Ex: FC Universitatea Craiova, FC Sportul Studentesc. All soccer and professional league, with player trading, foreign acquisitions. No students there. Maybe it is different for handball, the other major sport, but it is a distant second.

    If there are any, they are exceptions, not rules, and certainly would not command the kind of attention that College Football gets in the US.

    The new organizations, like Cezar, or the older one, LSRS, focused on students abroad, are for networking, entrepreneurship, and their students leaderships are takimg first steps into politics, like LSRS leader, Sebastian Burduja, who started a party called PACT for reformist young people, but which is silent on divisive social issues, like gay stuff or Christianity, and sticks to corruption and infrastructure, administrative reform etc.

  250. @International Jew
    @Romanian

    Interesting. This being a largely American crowd, you might have also pointed out — however obvious it is to you — that your Romanian university did not have bigtime sports teams, or a social life revolving around attending their games.

    Replies: @Romanian, @Romanian

    There is no social life surrounding Universities once you graduate. Alumni do not donate money. Rich ones prefer to set up NGOs to fund scholarships, trainings, and advertise within the Uni. The Uni is viewed more like a public utility, very instrumental. Any exceptions are few and far between. Donations are made by foreign or local corporations making partnerships to set up labs or special curricula for a better pipeline for their labor needs, because there is a lot of legacy infrastructure, including fossil professors who have been teaching mostly the same things the same way for decades.

  251. @Desiderius
    @Dave Pinsen

    My emergency catheter was actually in my chest, but after my second transplant I had an IV port in my neck like your catheter and no, I couldn't really sit up without a lot of hassle since there wasn't enough play in the lines.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    What did you get transplanted?

    When I woke up, the catheter wasn’t connected to a line. They kept it in my neck for a few days in case they needed to reattach the line.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Dave Pinsen

    Jan '07 and Nov '17. The emergency catheter was in Jun '04 until my fistula matured. It got too mature and I had it removed last month.

  252. @Desiderius
    @Romanian

    Well that's the sort of thing your communists targeted for elimination and ours still are, so it will take awhile for them to grow back.

    Replies: @Romanian

    You are right, of course. Communists cannot abide the “little platoons of society” that may develop into bases for political organization.

    My country’s case is more difficult, since we did not have the lengthy Anglo or Western tradition of civil society organization from the bottoms-up, which de Tocqueville observed in the US. Excepting the projects of a very educated and urban elite, Romanian social capital was found in long sedimented and slow changing rural hierarchies which mediated all social contacts and capital formation. Such a system is very resilient, but, once gone, it is gone for good. Whatever grows in its stead from a people unused to more entrepreneurial forms of social capital formation is not going to be as good, at least in the beginning. The Commies also “salted the Earth” by destroying property relations. Today, people view all sorts of productive associations in agriculture with suspicion, as akin to a new collectivization, which means that there are very big agricorps and very many subsistence or small farmers, but few average or mid-level farms that are locally owned and can be competitive by being able to acquire technology and expertise.

    An example – we will have a referendum next week on changing the Constitution to define marriage as being between a man and a woman, like in Poland, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania and a few others. It is literally the first grassroots civic initiative of this magnitude in the country and it will be 30 years in 2019 since the fall of Communism. The NGO alliance (the informal Coalition for the Family) that made it happen worked for quite a few years to gather enough signatures, to perform outreach, to prepare for the media onslaught from the better financed pro-LGBT NGOs etc. Its anybody’s game, now, but they have a bit of, in my opinion, unwelcome aid from the Ruling Party, which has seized on the topic to distract from other political problems and to associate itself with something that socially conservative Romanians approve of.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Romanian

    Well you are the last surviving remnant of the Roman Empire after all. I'm sure you'll figure something interesting out. Best man I know is Romanian, living reasonably well now in DC.

    Replies: @Romanian

  253. Anonymous [AKA "iPerryMason"] says:
    @Almost Missouri
    @Mr. Blank

    Agreed about the bizarreness high school obsessing. I went to what was supposed to be a pretty good high school and don't remember most of it, and don't care about most of what I do remember.

    Also agree about lawyers. They are above average intelligence, so yes if you are too, you could do what they do. What sets them apart from other high-IQers is 1) they have the diligence to plow through mind-numbing statutory, regulatory and contract language, 2) they have the self discipline to compartmentalize confidential information, and 3) they have a guild. Although in my experience, they are less good at 1) and 2) than they claim to be. They're pretty sharp on 3), though.

    They also regard themselves as a de facto ruling class. They're not necessarily wrong.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous

    Not a bad comment. As a corporate partner, I would add more skills required for the high-end, as its a hybrid job that requires brain horsepower, judgment and deep social skills. You also need balls. The plus is you get to avoid courtrooms and most SJW politicking, and just get deals done.

  254. @Romanian
    @Desiderius

    You are right, of course. Communists cannot abide the "little platoons of society" that may develop into bases for political organization.

    My country's case is more difficult, since we did not have the lengthy Anglo or Western tradition of civil society organization from the bottoms-up, which de Tocqueville observed in the US. Excepting the projects of a very educated and urban elite, Romanian social capital was found in long sedimented and slow changing rural hierarchies which mediated all social contacts and capital formation. Such a system is very resilient, but, once gone, it is gone for good. Whatever grows in its stead from a people unused to more entrepreneurial forms of social capital formation is not going to be as good, at least in the beginning. The Commies also "salted the Earth" by destroying property relations. Today, people view all sorts of productive associations in agriculture with suspicion, as akin to a new collectivization, which means that there are very big agricorps and very many subsistence or small farmers, but few average or mid-level farms that are locally owned and can be competitive by being able to acquire technology and expertise.

    An example - we will have a referendum next week on changing the Constitution to define marriage as being between a man and a woman, like in Poland, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania and a few others. It is literally the first grassroots civic initiative of this magnitude in the country and it will be 30 years in 2019 since the fall of Communism. The NGO alliance (the informal Coalition for the Family) that made it happen worked for quite a few years to gather enough signatures, to perform outreach, to prepare for the media onslaught from the better financed pro-LGBT NGOs etc. Its anybody's game, now, but they have a bit of, in my opinion, unwelcome aid from the Ruling Party, which has seized on the topic to distract from other political problems and to associate itself with something that socially conservative Romanians approve of.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Well you are the last surviving remnant of the Roman Empire after all. I’m sure you’ll figure something interesting out. Best man I know is Romanian, living reasonably well now in DC.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Desiderius

    Thanks for the good wishes. Too many of our good people are now abroad, unfortunately.

  255. @Dave Pinsen
    @Desiderius

    What did you get transplanted?

    When I woke up, the catheter wasn't connected to a line. They kept it in my neck for a few days in case they needed to reattach the line.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Jan ’07 and Nov ’17. The emergency catheter was in Jun ’04 until my fistula matured. It got too mature and I had it removed last month.

  256. @Buzz Mohawk

    If you ask me, newspaper reporters are created at age six when they first go to school.
     
    This was true for my cousin in Northern California. As a schoolboy he typed up his own neighborhood newspaper and stuck it in people's mailboxes.

    As an adult he went to work for the local paper. Eventually he began buying a page for himself, selling ad space for it and writing his own column down the middle. He has always been very enterprising.

    Then my cousin started his own paper to compete with his former employer. He rented a warehouse and had everything in there: printing equipment, desks, very early word processing computers. He and his team could write, assemble, print and distribute a local newspaper from that one site. I remember a police scanner was always on when I visited. Any story that came up was an occasion to rush out and cover it.

    Eventually he sold his paper and got himself elected mayor.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Hey that’s a great story, with a happy ending – He Got Elected Mayor.

    I hope I have something similar as I am now a rather underemployed, frustrated writer, teacher with lots of successful relatives that are terrible as* kissers, PC Lib Leftist college professors, cuckservatives etc.

  257. @Desiderius
    @Romanian

    Well you are the last surviving remnant of the Roman Empire after all. I'm sure you'll figure something interesting out. Best man I know is Romanian, living reasonably well now in DC.

    Replies: @Romanian

    Thanks for the good wishes. Too many of our good people are now abroad, unfortunately.

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