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Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?
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Many sectors of the Soviet economy tended to grow pretty robustly in the 1960s, but then in the 1970s things started to go wrong, often for obscure reasons, and by the 1980s clearly something was wrong.

The big problem of course was the communist system and its lack of incentives. But the difference in outcomes between the Soviet Union and the capitalist world hadn’t seem all that huge in the 1960s. (My guess is that in the 1960s Soviet workers were still pretty scared from the Stalin Era, but also found their current Khrushchev Era bosses rather likable in that they weren’t as cruel as the old guys. But during the Brezhnev Era, workers lost their fear that they’d get sent to the Gulag and slacked off.)

As the world entered the “malaise” era of the 1970s (to use Jimmy Carter’s term for his time), the Soviets seemed to get hit even harder by malaise.

A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off, both in work and in personal standards (e.g., not bothering to buckle their safety belts or getting into brawls with other airline passengers). Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing. Workers would rather play office politics over social media than, you know, work:

These attitudes have spread to even video game design companies, like RockStar, maker of the lucrative Grand Theft Auto game that lets you pretend to be a gang member.

A reader points out a Daily Mail article from yesterday:

Zuckerberg fails to hide his irritation at worker who asked if extra ‘vacation’ days will continue post-pandemic – then doubles down by telling lazy staff ‘some of you might just say this place isn’t for you… and that’s ok with me’
Mark Zuckerberg was allegedly ‘visibly frustrated’ after being asked the question by one of Facebook’s Chicago-based employees
He told he all-hands meeting on June 30 that there are a ‘bunch of people’ at his company who ‘shouldn’t be here’
It’s the latest of the [Silicon Valley] CEO’s latest crack down on ‘lazy’ staff after he provided a deluge of cushy benefits for employees during the coronavirus pandemic
In response, a Meta spokesperson said ‘Any company that wants to have a lasting impact must practice disciplined prioritization and work with a high level of intensity to reach goals’

By CLAUDIA AORAHA, SENIOR REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 13:35 EDT, 26 July 2022 | UPDATED: 19:16 EDT, 26 July 2022

It’s hardly surprising that workers aren’t enthusiastic about reapplying their noses to the grindstone to make their billionaire bosses even richer.

The comments come after Zuckerberg fell out of the top ten list of the world’s richest billionaires in March due to his plummeting Meta stock. He currently ranks No. 17 on the list and has lost a marked \$64.4 billion – more than his current net worth of \$61.1 billion.

What’s interesting, though, are the various ways Wokeness is used to justify the New Laziness.

Will the tech billionaires figure out the connections between Wokeness and slacking off and cut back on Wokeness?

 
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  1. A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off

    Speaking for those of us who actually manage operations in the real world, I would smash the “No Shit, Sherlock” button if there was one. Tell me again why you supported the lockdowns.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Steve’s one of the better pundits about going against his own team when the data’s strong enough. It’s one of the reasons a lot of people read him.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  2. I love comparisons and analogies because they make everything seem so neat and predictable. However, I am afraid we have created our own unique hell on earth. The end may be the worst of all possible outcomes. Both the left and right will recoil at the America of 2024 they race towards creating.

    • Agree: Paul Mendez
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Thea

    Well, say more, Thea, I'm positively on tenterhooks.

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Thea


    I love comparisons and analogies because they make everything seem so neat and predictable. However, I am afraid we have created our own unique hell on earth.
     
    Uh - we can not only make predictions about nice things to happen.
  3. A lot of whites want to act like underclass blacks, while expecting not to live like underclass blacks.

    • Agree: JR Ewing, ScarletNumber
    • Disagree: Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Redneck farmer

    Everywhere I go I see White people working hard. Usually with no chance of promotion. Others are also working hard (they will get promotions).

    There are the lazy gov't workers, teachers, etc, but that's not new. If anything, I'd say young Whites work harder than the previous generation and will get little for it. Of course, that seems to be just fine with the "spend your life working 60 hours a week because that's how God wants it" crowd.

  4. Rockstar’s attitude is more a combination of them wanting to do something more than the same game but better graphics and the notoriously poor working conditions of most game studios, particularly ones which aren’t independent like Rockstar.

    They simply have the luxury not to be bothered about getting it out the door anytime soon (GTA 5 made an obscene amount of money in it’s first year and still prints sizable amounts of revenue all these years later) in an industry that treats staff poorly. (Partly because in our society execs tend not to give much weight to ‘computer stuff’, feeling like it’s a lot easier than it is)

    The opposite of what Rockstar is doing is what CD Projekt Red did with Cyberpunk 2077, stick to an unrealistic deadline and work their staff to breaking point and ship a buggy mess to meet a deadline rather than finish it first. It was highly profitable, however but long-term not so much for their reputation and not to the profit of society which got a shoddy product and burnt out staff.

    Video games are a weird industry where the ability to release patches to fix the game allows unfinished or broken products to be shipped and tolerated in a way they wouldn’t be elsewhere. It’s also a weird industry where meeting those deadlines with excessive unpaid overtime ‘crunch’ is tolerated to produce even these unfinished results.

    This is partly due to a slowing down in the pace of computational power meaning they can’t compensate for increased expectations and abilities with as much procedural or automated systems, too much still has to be done with intense human input.

  5. Anonymous[377] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anonymous

    Short Rockstar shares.

    , @James of Africa
    @Anonymous

    It doesn't affect me, I liked the older more cartoonlike GTA games, especially the original Vice City, which was a fine parody of 80's fashion and TV. A whole world full of walking talking jokes and stereotypes. The newer more realistic looking games seem charmless compared to what I remember, lots of comedy material about fat people, poor people, gays, women, and some racial and ethnic jokes as a bonus!

    I'm really satisfied with old entertainment since I don't expect young people to have a sense of humour nowadays. The upside to thinking like that is being pleasantly surprised by them now and then, although not often.

  6. A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • LOL: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    , @Stan Adams
    @Paul Mendez

    Okay, boomer.

    This soon-to-be-37-year-old obese millennial virgin who lives with his mother is doing amazing things like ... like ... like ... fueling his malignant narcissism.



    https://i.ibb.co/njs6CbB/millennial1.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/gFvjdqT/millennial2.jpg

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paul Mendez

    I've encountered this as well. I was a lot harder working and more put together at their age. The worst are the gauges; what tf are you thinking?

    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual? More earnings just mean more taxes to support the Spic-Nig Cycle and all the government eaters. Even their own churches want them replaced with Squatemalans, Muslims, and Africans.

    Now, approaching the twilight years, I look around at a lot of broken dreams and corrupt institutions and think, what was the point.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @HammerJack

    , @Anon
    @Paul Mendez

    Every person I know who was working during WuFu was working their butt off because the Trump stimulus caused business to soar. Everyone was buying stuff right and left. Our coastal ports were jammed. People I know became exhausted from overwork.

    , @Anonymous
    @Paul Mendez

    Progress always comes from civilizations that have a lot of leisure time. This hard work crap is Puritan nonsense.

    People in slave societies work plenty hard and never progress for thousands of years.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    , @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Paul Mendez

    The biggest moral wimps were the "Greatest Generation" and the Baby Boomers. They were handed an entire continent that better men had conquered and settled.

    But they were too pathetic to even maintain a free gift.

  7. The lack of progress for Grand Theft Auto 6 has been encouraged by Rockstar getting rid of the “boys club” atmosphere of the company (read: less white males) (https://www.eurogamer.net/grand-theft-auto-6-at-least-two-years-off-report-suggests-highlighting-positive-changes-within-rockstar) and embracing a more chill work culture.

    I’m expecting the eventual release of the game to be a disappointment, particularly because it’ll lack the merciless, cruel, extremely non-woke humour of the previous games in the series.

    Good opportunity for other game developers; they can hire the white males so despised by the woke studios. Or alternatively, those white males can go it alone and develop indie games. Predictably, indie games have been booming for years now, despite tiny budgets, and are overwhelmingly crafted by white and Asian men.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  8. The morons who run this country — and that includes Trump — not only paid people not to work for a year, they foolishly paid most people an extra \$600/week not to work.

    Now we’re surprised people don’t want to get up at 6:00 am to do crap jobs at their pre-Covid pay, or aren’t doing those jobs well?

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Whitey2


    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable
     
    .

    Agree.

    Now, what about our future problems?

    Imagine a world where food, energy and housing are scarce, but governments can no longer print endless amounts of cash.

    Will people go back to waking up at 6:00am and taking three busses to a crap job that doesn’t pay the bills?
    , @Rob McX
    @Whitey2


    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.
     
    True - and, to a great extent, deliberately created.
    , @WorkingClass
    @Whitey2

    The morons of which you speak don't know that an extra 600 bucks per week is big money to us proles. For them it's pocket change. They don't actually know anything about the real world. We give them too much credit when we say they are evil. Heleocoptor money was supposd to be a joke.

  9. Brezhnevite Malais

    Oh, we should be so lucky. A Brezhnevite Malais is not where we’re headed. Heck, that sounds like a posh district overlooking Cap Ferrat.

    Sorry, if you want to see where we’re headed, choose your favorite third-world pi\$\$hole and add a heaping helping of screeching tranny harpies, with a veneer of chosenite overclass.

    Sounds like heaven, right? Don’t mention Brazil. We won’t be that lucky.

    • Agree: Thea, Charon
  10. “I don’t care how good they are. Unless they get a kick in the ass every six weeks, they’ll slack off.“ — – – – Ernest King. Steve used the phrase “slack off” (twice) so it brought to mind that famous Adm. King quote. King was right; even the best people need a KITA. To some degree. But slacking-off has reached new levels in the U.S., and one big reason is the importing of a more relaxed, “good enough” culture. It is contagious. Boeing Max. I would proofread this, but what the heck.

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @SafeNow

    I know I can slack off because they can't find anyone as good as I am. Mind you, I am not that good, but they can't find anyone better. That's why I can comment on Unz while at work.

    Oops gotta go! Boss showed up...

  11. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    Related:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    , @clifford brown
    @Anonymous

    Call me a Zuckerberg bootlicker, but imagine the GALL you must have to be a well paid Silicon Valley employee and the first question you ask the billionaire founder of one of the most powerful companies in the world (that is facing perhaps a terminal decline) is "What about my vacation days?"

    What the hell is wrong with these people? Whatever happened to an email to HR? Posting the question to the internal Slack platform. Flirt with and make the HR crew laugh and they will take care of you. Do not get on their bad side.

    I have never believed this Silicon Valley radical transparency business. As you quickly learn, radical transparency simply leads to unadulterated hyper conformity. It is one thing to promote open discussion on business matters which actually can be beneficial, but if people are free to post every random political belief or moral position to a company internal chatroom, only those who agree with the company dogma post and then this bias leads to more and more radical manifestations of said dogma. The only real freedom in a totally transparent corporate environment are the exterior signifiers like blue hair and tattoos. If you are expected to post your random internal monologues on your company monitored social platform, you very quickly forgo your right to a private sense of mind. You lose your internal moral compass.

    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook's bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Hypnotoad666

  12. @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 – 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences – no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values …

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @epebble


    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990.
     
    I'm going to disagree a little bit with your timeline.

    Yes, the removal of the Soviet Union as an existential opponent also removed one of the West's main motivations.

    However, I think there was enough inertia in the West to get us all the way to 2001, when the Dotcom bubble popped and something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Thea
    @epebble

    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.

    Replies: @epebble, @Gordo

    , @Cato
    @epebble


    1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency
     
    This might explain a lot: we lost the reasons to stand together against the world, and we began to develop our individualities, our separate group identities. A counter-argument would be that this coming apart seems to have begun earlier, in the late 1960s, perhaps due to the rise of the Civil Rights movement.
    , @Paul Mendez
    @epebble


    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?
     
    I agree with you. I would like to add my own observation that there’s a great amount of generational inertia.

    I’m a late-Boomer raised by parents and grandparents who lived through the Depression and WW2. I didn’t go lazy/irresponsible /hedonistic the day after The Wall fell.

    Likewise, the Millennials I know personally and professionally are not going to shape up should TSHTF tomorrow. They’ll die whimpering that financial collapse, famine and hypothermia “isn’t fair.”

    Replies: @Thea

    , @JimDandy
    @epebble

    This is a typically-selfish myopic-American conversation. The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @tyrone, @Sam Malone

    , @Mark G.
    @epebble


    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything.
     
    The main purpose for most people has always been to improve their own personal lives and the lives of their family. If people get rewarded for working hard then that gives them an incentive to work hard. The malaise is coming from the government increasingly rigging things so that the product of one's labor is getting diverted to the nonproductive, thus eliminating the incentive to exert oneself.

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?
     
    At least during the 1991-2020 period the large Boomer generation, including myself, were mostly in the workforce. The next thirty years they will mostly all be retired and receiving government benefits instead of working and paying taxes. In 1990 the national debt was three trillion dollars and now it is 30 trillion. The debt-to-GDP ratio went from 54% in 1990 to 124% now. As interest rates are increased to combat inflation, interest payments on that debt will skyrocket. The next 30 years will be much worse than the last 30. I'm a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist. The next 30 years will be so bad it will completely discredit the current system and by the middle of the century massive reforms will finally be made that improve things. I'm 66 so I probably won't be around to see if my prediction comes true.
    , @Joe862
    @epebble

    There's not a lot to aspire to most places. I'm mid-forties and I don't see the point in working a ton more than I need to to pay the bills, etc. I find what I think we're calling the managerial class more disgusting than anything. They're mostly just a bunch of manipulators, bullshitters, etc. I want as little contact with them as I can get. Joining it sounds awful. It's clear that white guys are the last choice in anything so if I kill myself in the hope of advancement I'll most likely be passed over anyway.

    The modern office is also very much a women's world. They're fundamentally oriented differently than men. Female conversations are constant noise, no breaks, hard to participate in. Most of their attention focuses on peripheral things, minutia that doesn't need to be discussed in detail.

    , @Anon
    @epebble


    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything.
     
    It’s not so abstract, collective.

    The reason is that people have stopped having children, forming families. Children provide people with a huge incentive to work and build wealth.
  13. There is a simply brilliant novel about the Soviet postwar economy – Red Plenty by Francis Spufford. For a brief moment at the start of the 60s, Soviet citizens, and even Westerners, really thought communism was going to deliver a materialist utopia. I cannot recommend it too highly, just a fascinating book.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    @DuanDiRen

    Thanks.

  14. I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer’s dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid – – probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It’s possible but I doubt it – the man has better things to do. It couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized – everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she’s just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @fish
    @Jack D

    … and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:



    Absolutely brutal! I loved it!

    , @Dnought
    @Jack D

    The contrast between that stylized cartoon image meant to serve as her icon, and the real thing depicted in the photo provides a very good microcosm. The lack of self-awareness and willingness to live in a fantasy world that a large majority of the journalists who've managed to score that kind of gig consistently demonstrate, is kind of childlike, actually.

    Replies: @old hispanic geezer

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice.

    Pure gold.

    , @Daniel H
    @Jack D

    She is a toxic troublemaker and deserved to be canned but I have no doubt that she will take legal action and walk away with a substantial (6 figure? 7 fighre? ) settlement. They always do. They always win, to some extent.

    Just look at the recently hired black lady in some Carolina town. Her toxicity was so extreme (and it revealed itself immediately, she has only been on the job a few months) that the entire police force had quit. She was fired from a similar role only a few years back. She will be fired from this position but will almost certainly walk away with a settlement.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @old hispanic geezer
    @Jack D

    Remarkable, on so many levels. The disparity between her idealized view of self and the reality mirrors her perceived insights vs her actual abilities. Oh my, really rather appalling.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D

    My guess--a barren twig.

    But that's just a flyer, maybe she's got six kids. But when a white woman's life is whining about the racism and sexism of white men ... not so likely.

    Was probably pleasantly high average as a coed, but instead of working toward a family she prized the status of working at the New Yorker--whooeee.

    Now she no longer works at the New Yorker--which would have happened anyway in ten years or so--but instead of seeing her children graduate college, get married and being a smart, interesting, fun grandmom ... she'll be sharing her pastries with her cats.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Jack D

    From the Daily Beast article:


    “I do feel like this is a concentrated effort to target someone who wouldn’t shut up about certain issues that the magazine wanted them to shut up about,” Overbey told Confider.

    The former archive editor, who says she was “shocked” when she was fired on Friday, claimed she’d been in multiple discussions with colleagues about the lack of Black editors on The New Yorker’s masthead. “This is specifically about the lack of diversity and the lack of pay equality at the magazine,” Overbey, who is white, told us.
     
    So if they replace her with a better paid black will she finally shut up?

    For some reason, I am trying to imagine an all-black version of the The New Yorker, and it seems hilarious.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Seneca44

    , @William Badwhite
    @Jack D

    Gotta give credit where credit is due. So as much as I bash you for your thousands of Putin posts, "Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice" was pretty good.

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Jack D

    Jack, I don't know if you listen to local sports radio but there was an episode even more delicious than this. Philadelphia Radio personality Mike Missanelli, who is a typically oleaginous character who often peppers his sports commentary with facile left wing talking points, had hosted an afternoon drive show on one of the two major sports talk radio stations in the area. Missanelli has been a fixture in local sports commentary for at least three decades. On a few occasions Missanelli together with his on-air producer Tyrone Johnson (who is a black man), and Natalie Egenolf (a white woman) mused about how hard it is for minorities and women to establish careers in sports talk radio, and how internship standards and hiring should be altered to attract more women and minorities into the industry. Missanelli led the band in these conversations, full-throatedly supporting affirmative action in hiring in sports talk radio in order to "diversify" its personnel.

    Earlier this year, 97.5 declined to renew Missanelli's contract, and has handed hosting duties over to Johnson. Johnson will be joined by other on air talent including a woman in the near future.

    Just desserts if I ever saw it.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @recently_based
    @Jack D

    The average American woman weighs 171 pounds (and it's about the same for women in prime dating years 20 - 39 -- 168 pounds). 170 pounds. Let that sink in.

    You wanna know what makes men "listless," there it is.

    Obviously, I'm not totally serious, and it's also true that 75% of American men are medically defined as either overweight or obese, but Jesus.

  15. Has Steve been reading the z man? Here are quotes from yesterday’s entry, “Management Cycle” from the z man blog:

    When you step back and look at the American economy as a whole, it is clear that bloat is the way to describe it. It is packed with jobs that have no real reason to exist, other than the rules created by managers…

    This may be a clue as to where managerialism ends…

    It has been forgotten, but there was a tremendous amount of optimism in the USSR after the war into the 1960’s. Experts were building and rebuilding the Soviet economy along scientific lines. Many people, even in the West, thought that maybe the communist would catch or even surpass the West economically. That collapsed with the overthrow of Khrushchev. [“Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?”] The experimentation and optimism were replaced with dull technocratic conservatism. The managers were back in charge.

    That is the way to think about the last twenty-five years of the USSR. It was a lot like the American car makers in the 1970’s. The lack of competition meant that all the bad habits of the managers went unchecked. Before long, the workers stopped caring because why would anyone care when the bosses do not care? By the end of the Soviet era, the Russian economy was festooned with people who produced reports no one read and attended meetings where nothing was decided.

    Emphases mine

    • Agree: Unit472
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Asian women are the healing elixir for the white man's country, and white women's worst nightmare, because they are the most beautiful, most devoted and productive women on Earth. We must facilitate the large scale movement of more Asian women in to the West, and marry them.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  16. @Anonymous
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/MailOnline/status/1552056424003506179

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @clifford brown

    Thanks.

  17. Well Rockstar may be in no hurry, but some NYers just couldn’t wait for the next version of the game.

    “The video shows the victim being thrown into the air before he lands on the street.”

    The first robber was a “male, dark complexion, thin build, Afro hair,” the NYPD said. He was last seen wearing black pants, black sneakers and a hooded sweatshirt.

    The second was also described as a “male, dark complexion, thin build, Afro hair.” He was last seen wearing light-colored sweatpants, a black hooded sweatshirt and sneakers.

    Just a couple of Pro gamers trying to keep their skills up between versions.

    https://nypost.com/2022/07/24/bronx-pedestrian-hit-by-car-and-then-robbed-while-struggling-to-survive-on-nyc-street/

  18. The money is diminishing in buying power, the outside is not safe to visit, homes are being taken away from ownership, marriage and family are more difficult than ever for totally artificial reasons, and the standard of living is diminishing — why does anyone do anything?

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    @J.Ross

    Precisely.

    What is there to work hard for?

    , @Gordo
    @J.Ross


    The money is diminishing in buying power, the outside is not safe to visit, homes are being taken away from ownership, marriage and family are more difficult than ever for totally artificial reasons, and the standard of living is diminishing — why does anyone do anything?
     
    Agree.

    We will work like the Devil for ourselves, our families and our people, but for this?
  19. @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Okay, boomer.

    This soon-to-be-37-year-old obese millennial virgin who lives with his mother is doing amazing things like … like … like … fueling his malignant narcissism.

    [MORE]

  20. @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    I’ve encountered this as well. I was a lot harder working and more put together at their age. The worst are the gauges; what tf are you thinking?

    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual? More earnings just mean more taxes to support the Spic-Nig Cycle and all the government eaters. Even their own churches want them replaced with Squatemalans, Muslims, and Africans.

    Now, approaching the twilight years, I look around at a lot of broken dreams and corrupt institutions and think, what was the point.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual?
     
    On one level, I can’t argue with you. The fact that the US military admits it’s not going to reach its recruiting goals for the foreseeable future fills me with glee.

    On another level, however, I must point out that Millennial rolling over and playing dead because “The System” despises them is very gay. History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world. Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.

    Replies: @aNewBanner, @Anonymous

    , @HammerJack
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Something ineffably sad about your post, not that I disagree with any of it...

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  21. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990.

    I’m going to disagree a little bit with your timeline.

    Yes, the removal of the Soviet Union as an existential opponent also removed one of the West’s main motivations.

    However, I think there was enough inertia in the West to get us all the way to 2001, when the Dotcom bubble popped and something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @The Wild Geese Howard


    something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.
     
    Does this refer to 9-11? If not, what is it? If so, why was that the definitive event?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  22. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Thea

    Gini has increased from 0.43 to 0.49 between 1990 -2020. That is not good, but hardly a tragedy.

    If you made 50K in 1990 while I was making 100K and now you are making 100K but I make 300K (in real money), will you be very depressed that the ratio went from 2 to 3 or happy that your real income doubled? Real incomes matter most to most people. Only some armchair leftists sulk over inequality as the absolute evil.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/219643/gini-coefficient-for-us-individuals-families-and-households/

    Replies: @Anon, @bomag, @Thea

    , @Gordo
    @Thea


    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.
     
    Agreed, I would place the point of inflection at 1973 though it took some years before it bacame obvious.

    Also 1973 the cultural left turned their corner and never lost a batle from then on in.
  23. @Anonymous
    Related:

    https://twitter.com/MailOnline/status/1552056424003506179

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @clifford brown

    Call me a Zuckerberg bootlicker, but imagine the GALL you must have to be a well paid Silicon Valley employee and the first question you ask the billionaire founder of one of the most powerful companies in the world (that is facing perhaps a terminal decline) is “What about my vacation days?”

    What the hell is wrong with these people? Whatever happened to an email to HR? Posting the question to the internal Slack platform. Flirt with and make the HR crew laugh and they will take care of you. Do not get on their bad side.

    I have never believed this Silicon Valley radical transparency business. As you quickly learn, radical transparency simply leads to unadulterated hyper conformity. It is one thing to promote open discussion on business matters which actually can be beneficial, but if people are free to post every random political belief or moral position to a company internal chatroom, only those who agree with the company dogma post and then this bias leads to more and more radical manifestations of said dogma. The only real freedom in a totally transparent corporate environment are the exterior signifiers like blue hair and tattoos. If you are expected to post your random internal monologues on your company monitored social platform, you very quickly forgo your right to a private sense of mind. You lose your internal moral compass.

    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook’s bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @clifford brown


    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook’s bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.
     
    I would not be at all surprised to hear Zuckman is working on doing just that. Why should he have to tolerate anyone else's social media site when he practically rules the world?

    Web 2.0 (of which Facebook has been an important part) has been all about promoting self-absorption as the highest virtue along with the pernicious ideas a) you deserve to have everything you want by dint of drawing breath, and, b) if you don't like what someone else says or does, he should not be allowed to either open his mouth or do anything ever again.

    Now Zuckman is upset that the chickens have come home to roost and his own workers have become mouthy, self-indulgent sorts who are not afraid to brazenly chisel him. Can't they just shut their mouths and get back to the Really Important Work of keeping all the wrong opinions off of his site?

    I am going to thoroughly enjoy watching Zuckman and the rest of Silicon Valley face the fact that you reap what you sow and, while money can delay it to some extent, you cannot hold back the inexorable.

    Good luck, Mr. Zuckman, with convincing your workers that, when you told them they were going to change the world and anyone who disagreed was Hitler, that wasn't what you really meant.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    Don't forget, Zuck spent $300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He's now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Chrisnonymous, @Muggles

  24. Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?

    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off… Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.

    I think this is true, particularly among the late Millennials and Zoomers, but it’s not the whole story.

    Wokeness is the culmination of decades of political correctness and anti-white maleness in the workplace. Thirty years ago employers were blatantly looking to hire and promote blacks over whites. As workplaces have become feminized, social skills take priority over actual work. The way to make money is not to actually do any work — the guys who do that are either paid shit or their jobs have been offshored — but to socially maneuver your way into a paying position based on who you know or being part of a given clique. Better yet, the way to make money is to get some kind of unionized government employment (and then go on disability) or be involved in some kind of rent-seeking grift where your wages are essentially paid by the government.

    Failing that, there’s not much worth doing. I’m an early Gen Xer, too young to retire but too old to deal with and maneuver through all the bullshit. I’m not gainfully employed at the moment, but don’t really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled. None of them pay enough to make much of a difference in my life. My \$150k house (\$70k when I bought it) has long been paid off. My cars are paid off. I have no debt. What’s the point of doing some shitty retail or service job for \$15 an hour? It’s not enough to upgrade to a \$500k house or a \$70k car. None of the wages that are being paid will keep up with inflation. (Frankly I consider \$20-25 and hour to be the effective minimum wage that would stir my interest at this point). All I would do is make somebody else rich and take up the dwindling amount of time I have left. I’ll probably be dead in 25 years, I’m not going to spend it working an idiotic job for which I’ll have to get a COVID jab and wear a stupid mask and do sexual harassment training and put up with petty bullshit. I’ve had a couple of jobs like that, and I’m not interested in any more of them.

    I’d rather check out of society as much as possible rather than try to “get ahead,” I don’t think that’s possible any more unless you’re a criminal, a grifter, or a real bastard. You certainly can’t “get ahead” by working for an hourly wage. Hell, it was way back in 1978 that Merle Haggard sang “The Workin’ Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today,” it’s only gotten worse since then.

    I suppose I’ll have to get something at the end of the summer, but right now I’d much rather have my time, even if I use it to just screw off.

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    @Dr. X

    Yeah me too.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Dr. X


    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.
     
    Biden = Brezhnev = senescent malaise, semi-animated corpse

    Merrick Garland = Andropov = vindictive deep state hard man

    Kamala Harris = Chernenko = bumbling POC incompetent

    So that leaves ...

    DeSantis(?) = Gorbachev = well-meaning reformer who gets to oversee the unintentional dissolution of the empire

    ---------

    Re the rest of your comment, yah I feel ya bro.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    , @Muggles
    @Dr. X


    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.
     
    Great observation.

    Here's a thought for you. Instead of working for wages for someone else, figure out what you like to do and your skill set. Then start a business doing that.

    All you have to do is find something worth doing that you can do better than most. Once you find your value added niche you'll be set.

    Passively expecting someone else to "pay you what you're worth" is magical thinking.

    That process of discovery for your talent might be trial and error but it exists.

    I was in a profession until retirement, where the sole proprietor model was being pushed to extinction. Yet I found clients and found the routine work rewarding since I had considerable latitude about what to do and for whom, when. I helped them and they paid me. Great!

    I could have made more money in a bigger environment where customers were brought to me, but money isn't everything. I didn't attend meetings unless clients wanted them. No HR and very little useless overhead. Most of my larger competitors were not very good with clients (customers) and were often not worth what they charged.

    So it's out there. Or you can vegetate and watch TV and insipid cartoon sourced "films."

    Free advice you probably don't want to read...
    , @ScarletNumber
    @Dr. X


    I’m not gainfully employed at the moment, but don’t really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled.
     
    Tell me you're not married without telling me you're not married
  25. Many sectors of the Soviet economy tended to grow pretty robustly in the 1960s, but then in the 1970s things started to go wrong, often for obscure reasons, and by the 1980s clearly something was wrong.

    The Soviets benefitted from high oil prices in the 1970s and suffered from low oil prices in the 1980s. Brezhnev is remembered unfairly positively, and Gorby is remembered unfairly poorly, by Russians as a result.

  26. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    … and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    Absolutely brutal! I loved it!

    • Agree: HammerJack
  27. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency

    This might explain a lot: we lost the reasons to stand together against the world, and we began to develop our individualities, our separate group identities. A counter-argument would be that this coming apart seems to have begun earlier, in the late 1960s, perhaps due to the rise of the Civil Rights movement.

  28. “Brezhnevite Malaise”

    I’m just a simple working class guy. I have no idea what this is or means, and I don’t really give a shit.
    I imagine a bunch of uptight self important people sipping champagne with their pinky fingers sticking out off the flute stem throwing phrases like this back at each other trying to sound smart. Something Sailer doesn’t really need to do. Seriously, imagine trying to slip the phrase “Brezhnevite Malaise” into a normal conversation and not being told to STFU.

    What we are doing, is entering the final turn of the Logjammin’ ride at a typical Six Flags amusement park, right before we take the final plunge off the deep end. The only difference is nobody’s going to be buying the overpriced photo showing how scared they were at the moment the big fake log boat goes over the side.

  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    Has Steve been reading the z man? Here are quotes from yesterday's entry, "Management Cycle" from the z man blog:

    When you step back and look at the American economy as a whole, it is clear that bloat is the way to describe it. It is packed with jobs that have no real reason to exist, other than the rules created by managers...
     

    This may be a clue as to where managerialism ends...
     

    It has been forgotten, but there was a tremendous amount of optimism in the USSR after the war into the 1960’s. Experts were building and rebuilding the Soviet economy along scientific lines. Many people, even in the West, thought that maybe the communist would catch or even surpass the West economically. That collapsed with the overthrow of Khrushchev. ["Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?"] The experimentation and optimism were replaced with dull technocratic conservatism. The managers were back in charge.
     

    That is the way to think about the last twenty-five years of the USSR. It was a lot like the American car makers in the 1970’s. The lack of competition meant that all the bad habits of the managers went unchecked. Before long, the workers stopped caring because why would anyone care when the bosses do not care? By the end of the Soviet era, the Russian economy was festooned with people who produced reports no one read and attended meetings where nothing was decided.
     
    Emphases mine

    Replies: @Anon

    Asian women are the healing elixir for the white man’s country, and white women’s worst nightmare, because they are the most beautiful, most devoted and productive women on Earth. We must facilitate the large scale movement of more Asian women in to the West, and marry them.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    Signed,

    Asian 5

  30. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paul Mendez

    I've encountered this as well. I was a lot harder working and more put together at their age. The worst are the gauges; what tf are you thinking?

    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual? More earnings just mean more taxes to support the Spic-Nig Cycle and all the government eaters. Even their own churches want them replaced with Squatemalans, Muslims, and Africans.

    Now, approaching the twilight years, I look around at a lot of broken dreams and corrupt institutions and think, what was the point.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @HammerJack

    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual?

    On one level, I can’t argue with you. The fact that the US military admits it’s not going to reach its recruiting goals for the foreseeable future fills me with glee.

    On another level, however, I must point out that Millennial rolling over and playing dead because “The System” despises them is very gay. History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world. Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.

    • Replies: @aNewBanner
    @Paul Mendez

    Building a whole new world is a daunting task. It is beyond the ability of most men. It requires a Vision. We shouldn’t expect quite so much from the mass of mankind who just want to grill on the weekends.

    Half-assing it is a perfectly viable option against an unjust system with immense power and few scruples. It frustrates our enemies. It makes them realize the limits of their power. It can spur future developments.

    You don’t realize the power of a slowdown until your five-year old takes an hour to put his shoes on.

    , @Anonymous
    @Paul Mendez


    History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world.
     
    Name one

    Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.
     
    The American nation was on the side of the American people in 1776. George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson were not despised by the American nation.

    Germans were on their own side after WWI. They had their own system. This was true for Germans across generational lines. They were pro-German.

    We don’t have that today with whites at all. Do we see legions of baby boomer whites marching on behalf of white people? And to put the blame on 18 year olds is the silliest thing I can imagine. As if they’re the most culpable for the destruction of our people.

    You people want to believe that “hard work” is a substitute for the moral courage previous generations failed to show. It isn’t.
  31. As an older Millennial, I can see that there’s another side to the great slowdown. There aren’t many opportunities for advancement in the larger, bureaucratic companies, and this can’t just be blamed on COVID and WFH policies. Senior personnel are working longer and are refusing to pass authority off to their protégés. Worse, open positions tend to be filled by rule followers and enforcers who, for their effort, get to follow and to enforce more rules. Finally, software has given corporations the illusion that they can reduce training on technical tasks and focus on HR issues. Practically, a younger worker can expect very little focused on-the-job training unless he is willing to learn something on his own time. Even then, he won’t be rewarded to compensate his effort. Why try if there’s no way to win?

    Also, the smart Millennials know that we are getting screwed. We spent got 2% pay bumps for nearly a decade, had COVID kill our professional development, and now have another recession to endure. Oh joy. We have been told for years to maintain a good work-life balance. Well, if the alternatives are spend more time with my family or get an extra 0.25% pay bump, then I know what I’ll choose.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @aNewBanner

    I totally get where you're coming from with all this, but the problem is that by now this kind of critique is a bit passé. The time for disengaging from the Neoliberal economic order was 15-17 years ago, before the GFC when everybody was acting like the boom times would never end. That would have been the opportune moment to rein in financialization and to insist on a more equitable distribution of wealth through sweeping labor reforms. But it didn't happen, because nobody wanted it to happen. There were people who were talking about these very issues back then; I know, because I was one of them. You would have been hard pressed in those days to find anyone who didn't want to buy stocks, flip houses, and shop in the consumerist utopia, and they didn't even seem to care that their McJobs were dehumanizing.

    Now we are entering an era where work has to be done whether anybody can get ahead or not, because an immense amount of labor is needed to recapitalize the economy and discharge the debt.

  32. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    I agree with you. I would like to add my own observation that there’s a great amount of generational inertia.

    I’m a late-Boomer raised by parents and grandparents who lived through the Depression and WW2. I didn’t go lazy/irresponsible /hedonistic the day after The Wall fell.

    Likewise, the Millennials I know personally and professionally are not going to shape up should TSHTF tomorrow. They’ll die whimpering that financial collapse, famine and hypothermia “isn’t fair.”

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Paul Mendez

    My generation, gen-x, whined through the 90s like oversized toddlers. If anything, Millennials learned it from us.

    Some complaints were legitimate but the overarching therapy culture that began in the 1990s reigns supreme.
    Manufacturing jobs left and with it my generation’s hopes of family formation. Sure we got the dot com boom. Millennials didn’t get that.

  33. Meanwhile in China, the youth unemployment rate has hit a record 19.3%:

    Why China’s Youth Unemployment Has Hit A Record 19.3%

    https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/why-chinas-youth-unemployment-has-hit-record-193

    China has a new pandemic to worry about: Unemployment, underemployment and disillusionment is steadily spreading throughout China’s highly-educated youngest generation.

    In a parallel to the United States, too few Chinese are attending vocational schools, which have been deeply stigmatized by society, along with the factory jobs they enable. Add it all up, and China has far too many applicants for IT positions and too few willing to fill open positions for those who build and repair things.

    A sort of listlessness is taking hold, summarized by a Chinese phrase that became popular last year: “tang ping,” which translates into “lying flat.” It’s emblematic of a lifestyle that eschews the rat race and embraces low expectations for professional and financial success.

    As youth unemployment steadily rises, Bloomberg reports a more ominous phrase is now emerging: “bailan.” It means “let it rot.”

    You just love to see it.

  34. @Thea
    I love comparisons and analogies because they make everything seem so neat and predictable. However, I am afraid we have created our own unique hell on earth. The end may be the worst of all possible outcomes. Both the left and right will recoil at the America of 2024 they race towards creating.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dieter Kief

    Well, say more, Thea, I’m positively on tenterhooks.

  35. @Whitey2
    The morons who run this country — and that includes Trump — not only paid people not to work for a year, they foolishly paid most people an extra $600/week not to work.

    Now we're surprised people don't want to get up at 6:00 am to do crap jobs at their pre-Covid pay, or aren't doing those jobs well?

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Rob McX, @WorkingClass

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable

    .

    Agree.

    Now, what about our future problems?

    Imagine a world where food, energy and housing are scarce, but governments can no longer print endless amounts of cash.

    Will people go back to waking up at 6:00am and taking three busses to a crap job that doesn’t pay the bills?

  36. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    This is a typically-selfish myopic-American conversation. The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    You mean by posing for Vogue Magazine?

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2022/07/27/ukraines-zelensky-and-wife-pose-for-vogue-while-their-country-is-invaded/

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @JimDandy, @AndrewR

    , @tyrone
    @JimDandy


    The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.
     
    ....STOP! ,STOP! , you're cracking me up!
    , @Sam Malone
    @JimDandy

    lol

  37. @Paul Mendez
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual?
     
    On one level, I can’t argue with you. The fact that the US military admits it’s not going to reach its recruiting goals for the foreseeable future fills me with glee.

    On another level, however, I must point out that Millennial rolling over and playing dead because “The System” despises them is very gay. History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world. Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.

    Replies: @aNewBanner, @Anonymous

    Building a whole new world is a daunting task. It is beyond the ability of most men. It requires a Vision. We shouldn’t expect quite so much from the mass of mankind who just want to grill on the weekends.

    Half-assing it is a perfectly viable option against an unjust system with immense power and few scruples. It frustrates our enemies. It makes them realize the limits of their power. It can spur future developments.

    You don’t realize the power of a slowdown until your five-year old takes an hour to put his shoes on.

    • Agree: fish, Johnny Smoggins
  38. @Whitey2
    The morons who run this country — and that includes Trump — not only paid people not to work for a year, they foolishly paid most people an extra $600/week not to work.

    Now we're surprised people don't want to get up at 6:00 am to do crap jobs at their pre-Covid pay, or aren't doing those jobs well?

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Rob McX, @WorkingClass

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.

    True – and, to a great extent, deliberately created.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • Troll: Corvinus
  39. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    The contrast between that stylized cartoon image meant to serve as her icon, and the real thing depicted in the photo provides a very good microcosm. The lack of self-awareness and willingness to live in a fantasy world that a large majority of the journalists who’ve managed to score that kind of gig consistently demonstrate, is kind of childlike, actually.

    • Replies: @old hispanic geezer
    @Dnought

    Remarkable, on so many levels. The disparity between her idealized view of self and the reality mirrors her perceived insights vs her actual abilities. Oh my, really rather appalling.

  40. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice.

    Pure gold.

    • Agree: fish
    • Thanks: Muggles
  41. Laziness and malaise are a down-river product of inflation. When you ladle money on a society you never know how things will end up. Social relationships and hierarchies will be disrupted. What America has done since 2008 has essentially been a reverse mortgage on the dollar through QE. The money been hoarded by a relative few, this has bred resentment. The spiraling prices inculcates laziness two ways. If you are at the coal-face of inflation; you’re not a homeowner, there comes a time when participating in the rat-race in pointless. The post-pandemic rent and house-price spiral probably was that point for a lot of people. Secondly; because their is so much money around, some is bound to flow your way eventually. Stimmies! bitcoin! Hiring bonuses! shares! Sure the money will slip through you fingers like water, but you don’t have to get up at the crack of dawn and work your fingers to the bone you get money in this day and age.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @Irishman

    well stated. The quantitative easing was done to keep real estate from falling further and to maintain the stock market. Printing billions of dollars to prop up the markets had the consequence of keeping housing unaffordable and this resulted in reduced family formation, lower marriage rates, and reduced fertility. The Lockdowns combined with increased deficit spending resulted in costlier housing, increased inflation and lower fertility. The great awakening also added economic pain to Americans by blocking oil and gas drilling and granting incentives to expensive energy sources like wind and solar.

    A big reason the birth rate has fallen 20% since 2008 is because of the economic destruction created by quantitative easing adn the lockdowns. 25% of millennials still live home with their parents. Less than half are married with children because it is near impossible to maintain a middle class lifestyle with a wife and two children and buy a home in a town with good schools.

    Since millennials are not having children, they have less incentive to work hard and spend a huge amount of money to live in an area with "good" schools. Childless adults can afford to live in diverse urban areas close to their jobs and maintain an urban lifestyle by having roommates and no need for a car or insurance etc...

  42. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    She is a toxic troublemaker and deserved to be canned but I have no doubt that she will take legal action and walk away with a substantial (6 figure? 7 fighre? ) settlement. They always do. They always win, to some extent.

    Just look at the recently hired black lady in some Carolina town. Her toxicity was so extreme (and it revealed itself immediately, she has only been on the job a few months) that the entire police force had quit. She was fired from a similar role only a few years back. She will be fired from this position but will almost certainly walk away with a settlement.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Daniel H

    Yep. There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.


    https://i.ibb.co/5MSk0CV/Screenshot-20220728-040215-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @rebel yell

  43. As the world entered the “malaise” era of the 1970s (to use Jimmy Carter’s term for his time)

    Carter never actually used that word. Nor did George Mallory (let alone Edmund Hillary) say “Because it us there.” Both were the words of reporters writing about them.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nor according to Bill Oakley, Josh Weinstein, and The Simpsons in "Marge In Chains" (421, May 6, 1993)

    https://twitter.com/charlesapple/status/1150768156467695617

  44. @Thea
    @epebble

    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.

    Replies: @epebble, @Gordo

    Gini has increased from 0.43 to 0.49 between 1990 -2020. That is not good, but hardly a tragedy.

    If you made 50K in 1990 while I was making 100K and now you are making 100K but I make 300K (in real money), will you be very depressed that the ratio went from 2 to 3 or happy that your real income doubled? Real incomes matter most to most people. Only some armchair leftists sulk over inequality as the absolute evil.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/219643/gini-coefficient-for-us-individuals-families-and-households/

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Anon
    @epebble

    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It's still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife's career. So you've seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/241530/birth-rate-by-family-income-in-the-us/

    Replies: @epebble, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    , @bomag
    @epebble

    Somewhere we ran up against the phenomenon that more money doesn't bring more happiness; more money can mean more responsibility and more stress.

    , @Thea
    @epebble

    You’re correct that people at those incomes would enjoy the same lifestyle during those years.


    But psychologically, motivation matters. How do most millennials feel about the 2008 bailouts that resulted in million dollar bonuses for bankers that wrecked their businesses? Ordinary tax payers paid that bill. How can one not feel the system is corrupt and question the point of honest labor?

    The latest problem income divide has created is that some can and cannot afford private security from the criminals that have recently been unleashed. Supporting BLM as Bezos with armed guards is easy. A normal, hard working family cannot afford that now.

    That is an existential difference. It is not one of superficial comfort as between $100 k and $300 k.

    Replies: @epebble

  45. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    More to the point Steve, is the fifty year long stagnation of American typical take home pay – surely something that is *unprecedented* in virtually any industrialised economy in any time period since the widespread substitution of machinery for human labor.

    Ever since Adam Smith penned ‘The Wealth of Nations’ it has been assumed that the whole point of economic policy is to facilitate a steady increase in citizens’ incomes year by year, but the USA of the last half century has shown itself incapable of doing that. One manifestation of all this is that Americans are no longer viewed as ‘fabulously wealthy’ by western Europeans, which was the commonplace for at least a century and a half.

    It seems that Leonid Brezhnev was a rank amateur in the stagnation game compared to the people who run American economic policy.

  46. All those billions, and Zuckerberg can’t afford an eyebrow pencil.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Ralph L

    Superb! Thanks for that.

  47. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    Remarkable, on so many levels. The disparity between her idealized view of self and the reality mirrors her perceived insights vs her actual abilities. Oh my, really rather appalling.

  48. @Dnought
    @Jack D

    The contrast between that stylized cartoon image meant to serve as her icon, and the real thing depicted in the photo provides a very good microcosm. The lack of self-awareness and willingness to live in a fantasy world that a large majority of the journalists who've managed to score that kind of gig consistently demonstrate, is kind of childlike, actually.

    Replies: @old hispanic geezer

    Remarkable, on so many levels. The disparity between her idealized view of self and the reality mirrors her perceived insights vs her actual abilities. Oh my, really rather appalling.

    • Agree: Dnought
  49. Erin Overbey @erinoverbey
    Let’s talk about racism! Most white people at prestigious magazines don’t ever want to talk about race or diversity at all. Why? It’s primarily because they’ve been allowed to exist in a world where their mastheads resemble member registries at Southern country clubs circa 1950..

    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?

    • LOL: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Twinkie



    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?
     
    Classic.

    That's a great tweet. I'm guessing you're not on twitter, but if you know someone ...

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Anonymous
    @Twinkie


    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?
     
    Describes Cuckstable CC in South Carolina to a T, it’s Lindsey Graham’s home course..
  50. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    My guess–a barren twig.

    But that’s just a flyer, maybe she’s got six kids. But when a white woman’s life is whining about the racism and sexism of white men … not so likely.

    Was probably pleasantly high average as a coed, but instead of working toward a family she prized the status of working at the New Yorker–whooeee.

    Now she no longer works at the New Yorker–which would have happened anyway in ten years or so–but instead of seeing her children graduate college, get married and being a smart, interesting, fun grandmom … she’ll be sharing her pastries with her cats.

  51. @Twinkie

    Erin Overbey @erinoverbey
    Let’s talk about racism! Most white people at prestigious magazines don’t ever want to talk about race or diversity at all. Why? It's primarily because they’ve been allowed to exist in a world where their mastheads resemble member registries at Southern country clubs circa 1950..
     
    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?

    Classic.

    That’s a great tweet. I’m guessing you’re not on twitter, but if you know someone …

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @AnotherDad

    Thanks.

    I think the young lady in question is just a little confused: I do know country clubs on the West Coast and in the Northeast that do resemble "the mastheads of the prestigious magazines" in this country - they hold a lot of parties for 12 to 13-year-olds.* But you knew that already. ;)

    I better boogie before Jack D accuses me (for the umpteenth time) of anti-Semitism for not agreeing with the tragic notion that white liberal cat ladies at magazines might (just might, per Jack D) be replaced by Asian liberal cat ladies!

    *In case you didn't get that, bat/bar mitzvah celebrations.

  52. @clifford brown
    @Anonymous

    Call me a Zuckerberg bootlicker, but imagine the GALL you must have to be a well paid Silicon Valley employee and the first question you ask the billionaire founder of one of the most powerful companies in the world (that is facing perhaps a terminal decline) is "What about my vacation days?"

    What the hell is wrong with these people? Whatever happened to an email to HR? Posting the question to the internal Slack platform. Flirt with and make the HR crew laugh and they will take care of you. Do not get on their bad side.

    I have never believed this Silicon Valley radical transparency business. As you quickly learn, radical transparency simply leads to unadulterated hyper conformity. It is one thing to promote open discussion on business matters which actually can be beneficial, but if people are free to post every random political belief or moral position to a company internal chatroom, only those who agree with the company dogma post and then this bias leads to more and more radical manifestations of said dogma. The only real freedom in a totally transparent corporate environment are the exterior signifiers like blue hair and tattoos. If you are expected to post your random internal monologues on your company monitored social platform, you very quickly forgo your right to a private sense of mind. You lose your internal moral compass.

    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook's bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Hypnotoad666

    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook’s bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.

    I would not be at all surprised to hear Zuckman is working on doing just that. Why should he have to tolerate anyone else’s social media site when he practically rules the world?

    Web 2.0 (of which Facebook has been an important part) has been all about promoting self-absorption as the highest virtue along with the pernicious ideas a) you deserve to have everything you want by dint of drawing breath, and, b) if you don’t like what someone else says or does, he should not be allowed to either open his mouth or do anything ever again.

    Now Zuckman is upset that the chickens have come home to roost and his own workers have become mouthy, self-indulgent sorts who are not afraid to brazenly chisel him. Can’t they just shut their mouths and get back to the Really Important Work of keeping all the wrong opinions off of his site?

    I am going to thoroughly enjoy watching Zuckman and the rest of Silicon Valley face the fact that you reap what you sow and, while money can delay it to some extent, you cannot hold back the inexorable.

    Good luck, Mr. Zuckman, with convincing your workers that, when you told them they were going to change the world and anyone who disagreed was Hitler, that wasn’t what you really meant.

  53. @Thea
    I love comparisons and analogies because they make everything seem so neat and predictable. However, I am afraid we have created our own unique hell on earth. The end may be the worst of all possible outcomes. Both the left and right will recoil at the America of 2024 they race towards creating.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dieter Kief

    I love comparisons and analogies because they make everything seem so neat and predictable. However, I am afraid we have created our own unique hell on earth.

    Uh – we can not only make predictions about nice things to happen.

  54. (…) covid as an excuse to slack off, both in work and in personal standards (e.g., not bothering to buckle their safety belts or getting into brawls with other airline passengers). Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.

    Douglas Murray noticed the overall feeling of exhaustion in his pre-pandemic book The Strange Death of Europe. Progress just didn’t look that proising any more and the left reacted by embracing regression*****. Note that being at Wokism Central means to resist to reproduce (LGBTQ). –

    Dougla smurray walked in the footsteps of french novelist Michael Houellebecq, who tackeld this thought too: The Western system looses faith and lacks optimism, trust in the future etc. – Its The Center Can Not Hold…redivivus.

    ****Dave Rubin catched that mood too with his perfectly fitiing claim The Regressive Left

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe)? After Covid, did Germans/Euros become increasingly lazy, demotivated, and entitled? Have you noticed a change in the people in your community?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  55. @Dieter Kief

    (...) covid as an excuse to slack off, both in work and in personal standards (e.g., not bothering to buckle their safety belts or getting into brawls with other airline passengers). Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.
     
    Douglas Murray noticed the overall feeling of exhaustion in his pre-pandemic book The Strange Death of Europe. Progress just didn't look that proising any more and the left reacted by embracing regression*****. Note that being at Wokism Central means to resist to reproduce (LGBTQ). -

    Dougla smurray walked in the footsteps of french novelist Michael Houellebecq, who tackeld this thought too: The Western system looses faith and lacks optimism, trust in the future etc. - Its The Center Can Not Hold...redivivus.

    ****Dave Rubin catched that mood too with his perfectly fitiing claim The Regressive Left

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe)? After Covid, did Germans/Euros become increasingly lazy, demotivated, and entitled? Have you noticed a change in the people in your community?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe*****)?
     
    All civil servants and teachers and the like wholeheartedly embraced the Covid-pause. Some offices in the civil service branch still have Covid-restrictions at work, what keeps the clients out of their offices...(surreal that...) - and life pleasant... 

    (That was significantly different in Switzerland: The non-panickers there had a much easier stand, not least because this exhaustion/relaxation mode was kept at a significantly lower level. Economically, Switzerland did much better during the pandemic than Germany and has by now almost completely compensated the losses, whereas in Germany, the severe Covid-recession is followed by a overwhelmingly self-inflicted de-industrialisation processes - which are now - half suffering and and half willingly (!) enhanced by the Ukraine conflict and the ensuing energy-crisis. - A downward spiral.

    The almost total political success of the Green party* can be understood as a form of progress-tiredness and progress obstruction even.

    * all other parties willing to work together (= all other parties with the exception of the (mildly) right wing AfD) are green now
      
      ***** What Europe is concerned - I do think that Douglas Murray (as I said in my first comment above: in the footsteps of French novelist Michel Houllebecq, a true visionary of Europe's - metaphysical (!) crisis not least - - - ) nailed it with his exhaustion remark - which in Murray's case too has a metaphysical side.

    But it's not just metaphysics - it's also, that economical and scientific progress was for some decades after the war working quite well for central Europe, but then the post-war (and later the post Soviet-block) super-positive economic trends vaned -  not least, because Asia appeared on the scene diminishing the (economic worth of) the European know-how advantage.

    Since that, life has become economically harder, and the pleasures of the popular culture lost lots of their magic (another Houellecq theme: Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal - a deep loss, frustrating/confusing/demotivating lots of hedonists) while at the same time the Christian tradition is losing its magic... (its binding powers, as the sociologists say) big style. - So: The central European soul is hit from two, if not from three sides quite heavily.

    So - these are three strong tendencies at work in central Europe (=the old core of the EU), which are by and large not too well understood. Douglas Murray's friend Jordan B. Peterson gets a chunk of this problem-constellation too, as did German historian/ essayist Rolf-Peter Sieferle (Das Migrationsproblem (132 p., 2017) and - Finis Germania (110 (small!) p., 2018) - and Thilo Sarranzin (Deutschland schafft sich ab 201o and five more books since then - the rather rational / atheist Thilo Sarrazin is blind on the side of the softer/socio-psychological/metaphysical/ religious aspects of the problems of the present day situation though).

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

  56. @Ralph L
    All those billions, and Zuckerberg can't afford an eyebrow pencil.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Superb! Thanks for that.

  57. There’s a bunch of pertinent charts over at WTF Happened in 1971: https://wtfhappenedin1971.com/

    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Cagey Beast

    They don't actually answer the question but it's clear what their thesis is: Nixon closed the gold window.

    When the US was still young and white we could power through it. The private sector would produce despite the constant undertow of inflation. But a lot of credit was pledged by a young and white nation that will (not) be paid by an old and non-white nation. We can no longer back the dollar with the same level of productivity and competence. And inflation is corrosive. It channels capital into financialization and tricks people into thinking we can afford indulgences like POC Uplift and that Tik-Tok represents productive economic activity. Like someone said elsewhere, Brazil would be a "good" outcome.

    We could have introduced some realism back into the system by letting the chips fall in 2008, but instead we just re-inflated. The rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    The economists over at Marginal Revolution think we can just import the Global South (paper over the gap with mass quantity) while Tyler Cowen screams at everybody to Stop Drinking, Study Progress, and Practice Effective Altruism. Sorry gentlemen, the die has been cast.

  58. @AnotherDad
    @Twinkie



    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?
     
    Classic.

    That's a great tweet. I'm guessing you're not on twitter, but if you know someone ...

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Thanks.

    I think the young lady in question is just a little confused: I do know country clubs on the West Coast and in the Northeast that do resemble “the mastheads of the prestigious magazines” in this country – they hold a lot of parties for 12 to 13-year-olds.* But you knew that already. 😉

    I better boogie before Jack D accuses me (for the umpteenth time) of anti-Semitism for not agreeing with the tragic notion that white liberal cat ladies at magazines might (just might, per Jack D) be replaced by Asian liberal cat ladies!

    *In case you didn’t get that, bat/bar mitzvah celebrations.

  59. @Redneck farmer
    A lot of whites want to act like underclass blacks, while expecting not to live like underclass blacks.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Everywhere I go I see White people working hard. Usually with no chance of promotion. Others are also working hard (they will get promotions).

    There are the lazy gov’t workers, teachers, etc, but that’s not new. If anything, I’d say young Whites work harder than the previous generation and will get little for it. Of course, that seems to be just fine with the “spend your life working 60 hours a week because that’s how God wants it” crowd.

  60. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Paul Mendez

    I've encountered this as well. I was a lot harder working and more put together at their age. The worst are the gauges; what tf are you thinking?

    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual? More earnings just mean more taxes to support the Spic-Nig Cycle and all the government eaters. Even their own churches want them replaced with Squatemalans, Muslims, and Africans.

    Now, approaching the twilight years, I look around at a lot of broken dreams and corrupt institutions and think, what was the point.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @HammerJack

    Something ineffably sad about your post, not that I disagree with any of it…

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @HammerJack

    It's been hard to watch the institutions crumble, but Jerry Pournelle told us that was always going to happen. There are going to be a lot of Catholic worlds rocked when it crumbles too.

  61. @Daniel H
    @Jack D

    She is a toxic troublemaker and deserved to be canned but I have no doubt that she will take legal action and walk away with a substantial (6 figure? 7 fighre? ) settlement. They always do. They always win, to some extent.

    Just look at the recently hired black lady in some Carolina town. Her toxicity was so extreme (and it revealed itself immediately, she has only been on the job a few months) that the entire police force had quit. She was fired from a similar role only a few years back. She will be fired from this position but will almost certainly walk away with a settlement.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Yep. There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @HammerJack


    There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.

     

    Kamikaze Cash on YouTube has all kinds of great ideas to get paid for doing nothing:

    https://youtube.com/c/KamikazeCash
    , @rebel yell
    @HammerJack

    That's a great lawsuit.
    1. A 5 year old girl was ignored. Every woman in America will be outraged.
    2. It's easy to prove, since all you need is a video of the child (one child among hundreds) not being singled out for attention.
    3. The theme park can't disprove it, since they won't have video of one of their characters talking to the girl.
    4. She's black, so the theme park is barred from denying the charges in the first place
    5. It's not really about the court room trial. The theme park loses in the court of public opinion the day the lawsuit is filed and their only recourse is to settle as fast as possible.

  62. It’s hardly surprising that workers aren’t enthusiastic about reapplying their noses to the grindstone to make their billionaire bosses even richer.

    In addition, a lot of men developed addictions to gaming, internet porn, booze, and cheap fentanyl during the lock down. The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @JimB


    The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.
     
    I believe this is the "disease" model of addiction you are describing, is that correct? While I do not doubt that addiction changes the brain (as does any action performed repeatedly over time), I am not sure I subscribe to the theory that says, "once addicted, always addicted."

    I have only just started it, but Marc Lewis has written a book titled, The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. What makes the book interesting is not that Lewis is a neuroscientist (which one might expect), but that he is a former addict himself.

    From what I gather, Lewis views the disease model of addiction as a barrier (rather than a means) to effective treatment. However, I do not know whether his view has found widespread acceptance or if Lewis is considered a maverick (to put it politely).

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most). However, I am not sure I buy into a model that seems to say, in essence, "people are helpless and that is all there is to it."

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin, @JimB

  63. Anonymous[389] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve has hit it. As with very many things, this seems to be a global phenomenon, which has apparently hit the People’s Republic of China (PRC) [1]. Apparently the catch phrase there has changed from “lie flat” to “let it rot”.

    Both places have hit an end point of their social/industrial systems. In Spengler’s terms, they have done everything that their social system can conceive of. The US has a deadwood society that supports almost everybody, even the inner city, unconditionally. PRC has lifted its people out of poverty. The US was told to stop working so hard back in the 1960s revolution (and heeded the call); the PRC/China isn’t telling people that, but is unable to reward them for working hard. It has ended the competitive society that it had a decade or so ago in order to preserve its social system, with the PRC on top. The two systems are very similar in this respect.

    Edward Dutton’s The Past is a Future Country uses heritability of IQ, fertility index, basic biology, and historical measurements to point out that IQ and fundamental innovations are both declining and expected to continue declining. This trend is documented as starting in 1870. He and his group have apparently written a non-stochastic simulation of this process. The simulation can be criticized, but raises some important points. Dutton suspects that current industrial society is in drastic retreat [2], as the population grows too damned stupid to maintain it.
    Dutton predicts that the industrial state would retreat into enclaves (as the Roman state did to Constantinople after around AD 400). The rather obvious retreat to Texas would be an example. He also points out that the IQ drop will persist in these enclaves, and that industrial society will eventually be lost (this is the cue for contemporary Marxists to applaud) in a sort of Idiocracy dystopia.

    So: “let it rot”. Don’t try to make the elephant stand up when it wants a nap, or it’s sick and dying.

    But maybe not quite yet. There is no percentage in going to NYC and living in the Black vote farm. I know somebody who tried it.
    *********************************************************
    1] https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/why-chinas-youth-unemployment-has-hit-record-193
    2] Retreat since WW II was also documented back in the 1990s, see: Martin van Creveld, “Fate of the State”, _Parameters_. Text at: https://press.armywarcollege.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1764&context=parameters

  64. It is not “laziness”. Many European countries are progressing more than the US, their workers have more rights & they work much less. And they are more productive.

    Soviet Union was a miserable hole all the time & their economy was horrible re. standard of living. Simple things like types of food, clothing, wash machines, housing… misery in comparison with which Putin’s first few years looked like paradise for average citizen.

    The US is anything but “lazy” and greedy rich are one of the problems, but the fundamental problem is too many non- Euro-Americans & the fact hardly anyone can design a system which would be more fair & country not a hysterical plutocracy.

    US could simply copy some of, say, Australian measures on higher education & health system and the country would become more affordable & livable, with all the burden of BIPOCs & others, but it wants to remain a schizoid supermodern 3rd world country.

  65. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    From the Daily Beast article:

    “I do feel like this is a concentrated effort to target someone who wouldn’t shut up about certain issues that the magazine wanted them to shut up about,” Overbey told Confider.

    The former archive editor, who says she was “shocked” when she was fired on Friday, claimed she’d been in multiple discussions with colleagues about the lack of Black editors on The New Yorker’s masthead. “This is specifically about the lack of diversity and the lack of pay equality at the magazine,” Overbey, who is white, told us.

    So if they replace her with a better paid black will she finally shut up?

    For some reason, I am trying to imagine an all-black version of the The New Yorker, and it seems hilarious.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Hypnotoad666

    "On the internet, everybody knows you're a ho."

    , @Seneca44
    @Hypnotoad666

    That could Dave Chapelle gold!

    There could be new jobs like Ebonics Editor or Go-Fer for Malt Liquor.

  66. @clifford brown
    @Anonymous

    Call me a Zuckerberg bootlicker, but imagine the GALL you must have to be a well paid Silicon Valley employee and the first question you ask the billionaire founder of one of the most powerful companies in the world (that is facing perhaps a terminal decline) is "What about my vacation days?"

    What the hell is wrong with these people? Whatever happened to an email to HR? Posting the question to the internal Slack platform. Flirt with and make the HR crew laugh and they will take care of you. Do not get on their bad side.

    I have never believed this Silicon Valley radical transparency business. As you quickly learn, radical transparency simply leads to unadulterated hyper conformity. It is one thing to promote open discussion on business matters which actually can be beneficial, but if people are free to post every random political belief or moral position to a company internal chatroom, only those who agree with the company dogma post and then this bias leads to more and more radical manifestations of said dogma. The only real freedom in a totally transparent corporate environment are the exterior signifiers like blue hair and tattoos. If you are expected to post your random internal monologues on your company monitored social platform, you very quickly forgo your right to a private sense of mind. You lose your internal moral compass.

    Ironically, the best thing that Zuckerberg could do to help Facebook's bottom line is not to enter the meta verse, but use his considerable political clout and lobbying funds to have TikTok banned.

    Something I would heartily endorse.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Hypnotoad666

    Don’t forget, Zuck spent \$300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He’s now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn’t happen to a nicer guy.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind, Coemgen
    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Hypnotoad666

    Right! ,it's hard to see past the blind hatred .....a smoking hole where his empire once lay help with that.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Hypnotoad666

    Yes. Without his interference, Trump may have won, and I'm sure Trump would have been more open to banning TikTok. LOL on Zuck.

    , @Muggles
    @Hypnotoad666


    Don’t forget, Zuck spent $300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He’s now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn’t happen to a nicer guy.
     
    Yes, not soon enough.

    Few millennials or Zoomers, who dream of getting rich doing silly crap on the various Internet channels and proprietary forums, realize these are just oligarch owned Ad Farms.

    What wealth that is "created" is done by renting out eyeballs to merchants. No matter what the business, it's all hustling ads. Surely you'v noticed those.

    Now "streaming" was supposed to replace "free TV" (largely now black TV and reruns) or cable TV, now stuffed full of unwatchable old films and obscure reruns/remakes that nobody sees. Streaming TV as a whole is a giant money suck. The paid fees for this (remember the old fear of "pay TV"?, well, its called streaming) don't pay for the content creation. Not by half.

    So the ad biz is now creeping into Pay TV.

    Meanwhile brain damaged cell phone addict kids and teens are the main audience for Zuck's creations along with Twitter (infested with Kommie Karens) and other such net businesses.

    Who really wants to watch ad infested Internet crap?

    The Biden-Pelosi-Yellen Recession will kick the ad biz in their proverbial nuts. As with it, ad supported "social media" marketing. Few need ads in a down consumer cycle. Sorry Zuck, no one cares about your website hustle any more. Ditto Twitter and the Twerking forums.

    Hear those oligarchs howl!
  67. @aNewBanner
    As an older Millennial, I can see that there’s another side to the great slowdown. There aren’t many opportunities for advancement in the larger, bureaucratic companies, and this can’t just be blamed on COVID and WFH policies. Senior personnel are working longer and are refusing to pass authority off to their protégés. Worse, open positions tend to be filled by rule followers and enforcers who, for their effort, get to follow and to enforce more rules. Finally, software has given corporations the illusion that they can reduce training on technical tasks and focus on HR issues. Practically, a younger worker can expect very little focused on-the-job training unless he is willing to learn something on his own time. Even then, he won’t be rewarded to compensate his effort. Why try if there’s no way to win?

    Also, the smart Millennials know that we are getting screwed. We spent got 2% pay bumps for nearly a decade, had COVID kill our professional development, and now have another recession to endure. Oh joy. We have been told for years to maintain a good work-life balance. Well, if the alternatives are spend more time with my family or get an extra 0.25% pay bump, then I know what I’ll choose.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    I totally get where you’re coming from with all this, but the problem is that by now this kind of critique is a bit passé. The time for disengaging from the Neoliberal economic order was 15-17 years ago, before the GFC when everybody was acting like the boom times would never end. That would have been the opportune moment to rein in financialization and to insist on a more equitable distribution of wealth through sweeping labor reforms. But it didn’t happen, because nobody wanted it to happen. There were people who were talking about these very issues back then; I know, because I was one of them. You would have been hard pressed in those days to find anyone who didn’t want to buy stocks, flip houses, and shop in the consumerist utopia, and they didn’t even seem to care that their McJobs were dehumanizing.

    Now we are entering an era where work has to be done whether anybody can get ahead or not, because an immense amount of labor is needed to recapitalize the economy and discharge the debt.

  68. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Dieter Kief

    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe)? After Covid, did Germans/Euros become increasingly lazy, demotivated, and entitled? Have you noticed a change in the people in your community?

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe*****)?

    All civil servants and teachers and the like wholeheartedly embraced the Covid-pause. Some offices in the civil service branch still have Covid-restrictions at work, what keeps the clients out of their offices…(surreal that…) – and life pleasant… 

    (That was significantly different in Switzerland: The non-panickers there had a much easier stand, not least because this exhaustion/relaxation mode was kept at a significantly lower level. Economically, Switzerland did much better during the pandemic than Germany and has by now almost completely compensated the losses, whereas in Germany, the severe Covid-recession is followed by a overwhelmingly self-inflicted de-industrialisation processes – which are now – half suffering and and half willingly (!) enhanced by the Ukraine conflict and the ensuing energy-crisis. – A downward spiral.

    The almost total political success of the Green party* can be understood as a form of progress-tiredness and progress obstruction even.

    * all other parties willing to work together (= all other parties with the exception of the (mildly) right wing AfD) are green now
      
      ***** What Europe is concerned – I do think that Douglas Murray (as I said in my first comment above: in the footsteps of French novelist Michel Houllebecq, a true visionary of Europe’s – metaphysical (!) crisis not least – – – ) nailed it with his exhaustion remark – which in Murray’s case too has a metaphysical side.

    But it’s not just metaphysics – it’s also, that economical and scientific progress was for some decades after the war working quite well for central Europe, but then the post-war (and later the post Soviet-block) super-positive economic trends vaned –  not least, because Asia appeared on the scene diminishing the (economic worth of) the European know-how advantage.

    Since that, life has become economically harder, and the pleasures of the popular culture lost lots of their magic (another Houellecq theme: Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal – a deep loss, frustrating/confusing/demotivating lots of hedonists) while at the same time the Christian tradition is losing its magic… (its binding powers, as the sociologists say) big style. – So: The central European soul is hit from two, if not from three sides quite heavily.

    So – these are three strong tendencies at work in central Europe (=the old core of the EU), which are by and large not too well understood. Douglas Murray’s friend Jordan B. Peterson gets a chunk of this problem-constellation too, as did German historian/ essayist Rolf-Peter Sieferle (Das Migrationsproblem (132 p., 2017) and – Finis Germania (110 (small!) p., 2018) – and Thilo Sarranzin (Deutschland schafft sich ab 201o and five more books since then – the rather rational / atheist Thilo Sarrazin is blind on the side of the softer/socio-psychological/metaphysical/ religious aspects of the problems of the present day situation though).

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Dieter Kief

    Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal

    That's a very good point. The pornification of sex has done more damage to Millennials and younger than they realize. Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West's transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Drive-by poster

  69. The USSR growth pattern looks a lot like Rustbelt USA so there’s probably nothing uniquely Soviet about it.

  70. @JimDandy
    @epebble

    This is a typically-selfish myopic-American conversation. The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @tyrone, @Sam Malone

    You mean by posing for Vogue Magazine?

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2022/07/27/ukraines-zelensky-and-wife-pose-for-vogue-while-their-country-is-invaded/

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Mike Tre


    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

     

    Kind of hard to figure that one out.

    One the one hand, can anyone imagine Churchill doing the same thing during the middle of World War II? In that sense, posing for a fashion magazine is a sign of not being particularly serious.

    On the other, the world has changed and the people who "support Ukraine" are mostly unserious and get currency from unserious things, like posing for a fashion magazine. So if he wants those NATO missiles, he would be decidedly un-churchillian not to do whatever was necessary to get them.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    , @JimDandy
    @Mike Tre

    Zelensky is Ben Stiller's hero. Stiller went there and told him that personally. More like Ben Shiller, amirite?

    , @AndrewR
    @Mike Tre

    Sailer just went out and bought ten copies. Huzzah!

  71. We’re currently in the Winter of a seasonal cycle that began with Spring in 1946. All the big institutions established at the end of the last Winter, e.g. UN, NATO, IMF, CIA are old and decrepit. By 2030 we will be entering a new Spring with renewed enthusiasm.

  72. @DuanDiRen
    There is a simply brilliant novel about the Soviet postwar economy - Red Plenty by Francis Spufford. For a brief moment at the start of the 60s, Soviet citizens, and even Westerners, really thought communism was going to deliver a materialist utopia. I cannot recommend it too highly, just a fascinating book.

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer

    Thanks.

  73. @J.Ross
    The money is diminishing in buying power, the outside is not safe to visit, homes are being taken away from ownership, marriage and family are more difficult than ever for totally artificial reasons, and the standard of living is diminishing -- why does anyone do anything?

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Gordo

    Precisely.

    What is there to work hard for?

  74. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    Don't forget, Zuck spent $300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He's now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Chrisnonymous, @Muggles

    Right! ,it’s hard to see past the blind hatred …..a smoking hole where his empire once lay help with that.

  75. @JimDandy
    @epebble

    This is a typically-selfish myopic-American conversation. The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @tyrone, @Sam Malone

    The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    ….STOP! ,STOP! , you’re cracking me up!

  76. @Dr. X

    Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?
     
    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we're probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off... Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.
     
    I think this is true, particularly among the late Millennials and Zoomers, but it's not the whole story.

    Wokeness is the culmination of decades of political correctness and anti-white maleness in the workplace. Thirty years ago employers were blatantly looking to hire and promote blacks over whites. As workplaces have become feminized, social skills take priority over actual work. The way to make money is not to actually do any work -- the guys who do that are either paid shit or their jobs have been offshored -- but to socially maneuver your way into a paying position based on who you know or being part of a given clique. Better yet, the way to make money is to get some kind of unionized government employment (and then go on disability) or be involved in some kind of rent-seeking grift where your wages are essentially paid by the government.

    Failing that, there's not much worth doing. I'm an early Gen Xer, too young to retire but too old to deal with and maneuver through all the bullshit. I'm not gainfully employed at the moment, but don't really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled. None of them pay enough to make much of a difference in my life. My $150k house ($70k when I bought it) has long been paid off. My cars are paid off. I have no debt. What's the point of doing some shitty retail or service job for $15 an hour? It's not enough to upgrade to a $500k house or a $70k car. None of the wages that are being paid will keep up with inflation. (Frankly I consider $20-25 and hour to be the effective minimum wage that would stir my interest at this point). All I would do is make somebody else rich and take up the dwindling amount of time I have left. I'll probably be dead in 25 years, I'm not going to spend it working an idiotic job for which I'll have to get a COVID jab and wear a stupid mask and do sexual harassment training and put up with petty bullshit. I've had a couple of jobs like that, and I'm not interested in any more of them.

    I'd rather check out of society as much as possible rather than try to "get ahead," I don't think that's possible any more unless you're a criminal, a grifter, or a real bastard. You certainly can't "get ahead" by working for an hourly wage. Hell, it was way back in 1978 that Merle Haggard sang "The Workin' Man Can't Get Nowhere Today," it's only gotten worse since then.

    I suppose I'll have to get something at the end of the summer, but right now I'd much rather have my time, even if I use it to just screw off.

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Almost Missouri, @Muggles, @ScarletNumber

    Yeah me too.

  77. Entered isn’t the word I’d use, we’ve been in the malaise for a while. If you want to look at things like infrastructure or logistics resiliency, for decades. More like “everybody outside our elites and their lackeys knows it now”. “Waken up to it”, if you want to be snappier.

    One of the less recognized symptoms is a complete lack of imagination or looking toward the future in pop culture, FWIW. The hoary obsession with WWII in Hollywood or with vid games epitomizes this. Latter day USSR wasn’t that dissimilar, but more haunting to me was the fate of the late Qing dynasty in China, which had a recognizable complacency about the world.

  78. @Intelligent Dasein

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off
     
    Speaking for those of us who actually manage operations in the real world, I would smash the "No Shit, Sherlock" button if there was one. Tell me again why you supported the lockdowns.

    Replies: @SFG

    Steve’s one of the better pundits about going against his own team when the data’s strong enough. It’s one of the reasons a lot of people read him.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @SFG

    Yeah, Steve's real cool.

    The lockdowns and vaccines were only the biggest crime ever committed against humanity, but Steve is very brave for standing against the few commenters on his niche blog who knew better---and with the entire Neoliberal world order. What a profile in courage.

  79. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble
    @Thea

    Gini has increased from 0.43 to 0.49 between 1990 -2020. That is not good, but hardly a tragedy.

    If you made 50K in 1990 while I was making 100K and now you are making 100K but I make 300K (in real money), will you be very depressed that the ratio went from 2 to 3 or happy that your real income doubled? Real incomes matter most to most people. Only some armchair leftists sulk over inequality as the absolute evil.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/219643/gini-coefficient-for-us-individuals-families-and-households/

    Replies: @Anon, @bomag, @Thea

    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It’s still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career. So you’ve seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/241530/birth-rate-by-family-income-in-the-us/

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anon

    as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career

    That is extremely rare, career or no-career; very few married couples go for a 3rd or 4th child. It may happen mostly due to second and subsequent marriages, fairly common nowadays and nonmarital births, also fairly common now. I ran an experiment recently to check if any of my relatives had more than 2 children, and the most recent birth (of a 3rd or higher child) I could identify happened before 1990.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Art Deco

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Anon


    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It’s still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career. So you’ve seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.
     
    I think the wife's career is a contributing factor in low birthrates among the upper income cohorts, but I think the fact that the "life script" for success is filtered through a four year University degree and likely some post college graduate degree as well is as large a factor. That combined $300K couple wants their kid(s) to achieve similar status, so they understand that they can't afford to keep their current status and pay for four selective University degrees. (This income cohort is probably between the true high earners who can cut tuition checks comfortably and a lower bracket which qualifies for lots of financial aid). They decide that the best way forward is 1.3 "trophy" children, who then will get all of the parents' combined resources. This is probably not beneficial for the parent-child relationship, and it's a lot of pressure to project on one kid to be the combined scholar-jock-social activist who would have a shot at admission to selective Universities. Kids are funny that way - they don't always want to be who their parents want them to be.
  80. @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    You mean by posing for Vogue Magazine?

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2022/07/27/ukraines-zelensky-and-wife-pose-for-vogue-while-their-country-is-invaded/

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @JimDandy, @AndrewR

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    Kind of hard to figure that one out.

    One the one hand, can anyone imagine Churchill doing the same thing during the middle of World War II? In that sense, posing for a fashion magazine is a sign of not being particularly serious.

    On the other, the world has changed and the people who “support Ukraine” are mostly unserious and get currency from unserious things, like posing for a fashion magazine. So if he wants those NATO missiles, he would be decidedly un-churchillian not to do whatever was necessary to get them.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @JR Ewing


    One the one hand, can anyone imagine Churchill doing the same thing during the middle of World War II?
     
    It isn't widely discussed these days, but Churchill did a three-page, semi-nude spread in The Times early in the war in an effort to boost morale.

    (Unfortunately, Churchill overlooked the fact that the sight of a grossly overweight old man with a bit of fur strategically draped over him was more likely to have quite the opposite effect.)

    I understand Hitler insisted on buying a few copies of the paper so he could cut out the pictures and paste them on the walls of the Führerbunker (though Joachim Fest is strangely silent on the subject).
  81. I just finished The Mandibles last night.

    No doubt when it was published in 2016, the economic collapse part felt a lot more fiction-y to contemporaneous readers than it does today. The GFC was more or less in the rearview mirror by then and commodity prices were low and it didn’t feel like the world was necessarily ending.

    My biggest problem reading the book now, when I did, was that all of the stuff about collapsing currencies and rising inflation and poor consumer confidence and building famine feels more like current events and I found myself conflating the timeline in the book with the current news cycle.

    The stuff at the end about exploding heads and instantaneous tax collection and negative interest rates felt a little further off, if not still eventually plausible.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  82. @JimB

    It’s hardly surprising that workers aren’t enthusiastic about reapplying their noses to the grindstone to make their billionaire bosses even richer.
     
    In addition, a lot of men developed addictions to gaming, internet porn, booze, and cheap fentanyl during the lock down. The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.

    I believe this is the “disease” model of addiction you are describing, is that correct? While I do not doubt that addiction changes the brain (as does any action performed repeatedly over time), I am not sure I subscribe to the theory that says, “once addicted, always addicted.”

    I have only just started it, but Marc Lewis has written a book titled, The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. What makes the book interesting is not that Lewis is a neuroscientist (which one might expect), but that he is a former addict himself.

    From what I gather, Lewis views the disease model of addiction as a barrier (rather than a means) to effective treatment. However, I do not know whether his view has found widespread acceptance or if Lewis is considered a maverick (to put it politely).

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most). However, I am not sure I buy into a model that seems to say, in essence, “people are helpless and that is all there is to it.”

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Luddite in Chief

    "It's not your fault you can't control yourself" is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.

    I also remember - must have been a long time ago, at the beginning of the Great Awokening - when some baseball team gave a former coked-up superstar a contract after he had been out of the league awhile - for some reason I want to say it was the Dodgers and Dwight Gooden and Tommy Lasorda? - and the manager made a comment like, "if he makes good decisions and stays clean, he has a chance".

    The manager was ROASTED for implying that the player had any agency at all and wasn't just a victim of disease.

    Then the player flamed out 1-2 years later after getting back on the cocaine and the manager essentially said the same thing about the drug habit and ended up getting forced out.

    Maybe I'm misremembering badly. Too lazy to look it up.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Luddite in Chief

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Luddite in Chief

    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years. She eventually got clean and is no longer possessed by the demon. To say, "Once an addict, always an addict" is a bit misleading. An insightful drug counselor we spoke with distinguished between being a drug addict and being someone who abuses drugs. The former eventually has a complete, irreversible, warping of their personality. The latter can clean themselves up and return to their former selves.

    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful. That aspect of our daughter's personality now indulges itself with vaping rather than heroin. Not ideal but a marked improvement.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @ScarletNumber

    , @JimB
    @Luddite in Chief


    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most).
     
    The disease model of addiction should be taught to middle school kids instead of the progressive dogma that experimentation with sex and drugs is part of self-exploration necessary for maturation. Getting high ends up being a disastrous impediment to meaningful self-actualization that comes only from constructive goal oriented action pursued in the context of well ordered daily routine.
  83. @HammerJack
    @Daniel H

    Yep. There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.


    https://i.ibb.co/5MSk0CV/Screenshot-20220728-040215-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @rebel yell

    There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.

    Kamikaze Cash on YouTube has all kinds of great ideas to get paid for doing nothing:

    https://youtube.com/c/KamikazeCash

  84. “Will the tech billionaires figure out the connections between Wokeness and slacking off and cut back on Wokeness?“

    Maybe but only if business in the coming era operates like a business and not a large institution less tethered to notions of profitability. The lockdown killed small businesses with a hard earned knife’s edge focus and replaced them with . . . what, exactly?

    A lot of the behemoths are a kind of government. Twitter it turns out is a fake company in business terms.

  85. @J.Ross
    The money is diminishing in buying power, the outside is not safe to visit, homes are being taken away from ownership, marriage and family are more difficult than ever for totally artificial reasons, and the standard of living is diminishing -- why does anyone do anything?

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Gordo

    The money is diminishing in buying power, the outside is not safe to visit, homes are being taken away from ownership, marriage and family are more difficult than ever for totally artificial reasons, and the standard of living is diminishing — why does anyone do anything?

    Agree.

    We will work like the Devil for ourselves, our families and our people, but for this?

  86. @JR Ewing
    @Mike Tre


    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

     

    Kind of hard to figure that one out.

    One the one hand, can anyone imagine Churchill doing the same thing during the middle of World War II? In that sense, posing for a fashion magazine is a sign of not being particularly serious.

    On the other, the world has changed and the people who "support Ukraine" are mostly unserious and get currency from unserious things, like posing for a fashion magazine. So if he wants those NATO missiles, he would be decidedly un-churchillian not to do whatever was necessary to get them.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    One the one hand, can anyone imagine Churchill doing the same thing during the middle of World War II?

    It isn’t widely discussed these days, but Churchill did a three-page, semi-nude spread in The Times early in the war in an effort to boost morale.

    (Unfortunately, Churchill overlooked the fact that the sight of a grossly overweight old man with a bit of fur strategically draped over him was more likely to have quite the opposite effect.)

    I understand Hitler insisted on buying a few copies of the paper so he could cut out the pictures and paste them on the walls of the Führerbunker (though Joachim Fest is strangely silent on the subject).

  87. @Thea
    @epebble

    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.

    Replies: @epebble, @Gordo

    Income inequality has been rising since 1979 while worker production increased. What could be more demotivating?

    I have a hard time faulting young adults for not wanting to work hard when it goes unrewarded or the benefits go to the fat cats.

    Agreed, I would place the point of inflection at 1973 though it took some years before it bacame obvious.

    Also 1973 the cultural left turned their corner and never lost a batle from then on in.

  88. Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?

    Wasn’t there an old Soviet joke whose punchline was ‘We shall close the curtains and pretend the train is moving’

  89. @Luddite in Chief
    @JimB


    The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.
     
    I believe this is the "disease" model of addiction you are describing, is that correct? While I do not doubt that addiction changes the brain (as does any action performed repeatedly over time), I am not sure I subscribe to the theory that says, "once addicted, always addicted."

    I have only just started it, but Marc Lewis has written a book titled, The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. What makes the book interesting is not that Lewis is a neuroscientist (which one might expect), but that he is a former addict himself.

    From what I gather, Lewis views the disease model of addiction as a barrier (rather than a means) to effective treatment. However, I do not know whether his view has found widespread acceptance or if Lewis is considered a maverick (to put it politely).

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most). However, I am not sure I buy into a model that seems to say, in essence, "people are helpless and that is all there is to it."

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin, @JimB

    “It’s not your fault you can’t control yourself” is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.

    I also remember – must have been a long time ago, at the beginning of the Great Awokening – when some baseball team gave a former coked-up superstar a contract after he had been out of the league awhile – for some reason I want to say it was the Dodgers and Dwight Gooden and Tommy Lasorda? – and the manager made a comment like, “if he makes good decisions and stays clean, he has a chance”.

    The manager was ROASTED for implying that the player had any agency at all and wasn’t just a victim of disease.

    Then the player flamed out 1-2 years later after getting back on the cocaine and the manager essentially said the same thing about the drug habit and ended up getting forced out.

    Maybe I’m misremembering badly. Too lazy to look it up.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @JR Ewing

    Just looked it up and I butchered it quite a bit: the player was Darryl Strawberry going to the Dodgers in the prime of his career... but the Tommy Lasorda "it's a weakness" part was correct.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @JR Ewing


    “It’s not your fault you can’t control yourself” is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.
     
    It's also a large part of why the crime rate in the UK is through the roof right now.

    The argument the criminals make is, "I can't control myself, so if I steal, it's society's fault for not stopping me and saving me from myself."

    I just cannot be doing with that tosh.

    Theodore Dalrymple has related how he used to have to listen to that sort of thing when he was a prison doctor. Once he made it clear to the patient that the excuse-making did not cut any ice with him, the reaction of the patient was often laughter and a willingness to come clean and admit that, yes, they enjoyed what they did, and the enjoyment was why they did not want to stop doing it.

    PS: I liked the Lasorda/Strawberry story. I wish I could say I was surprised at the reaction of the mob, but I was not. It is exactly that kind of "the lad can't help himself" crap that has made the UK what it is today (i.e. almost unliveable)>
  90. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/jasonschreier/status/1552277826669248514

    https://twitter.com/jasonschreier/status/1552278150192693248

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @James of Africa

    Short Rockstar shares.

  91. @Cagey Beast
    There's a bunch of pertinent charts over at WTF Happened in 1971: https://wtfhappenedin1971.com/

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    They don’t actually answer the question but it’s clear what their thesis is: Nixon closed the gold window.

    When the US was still young and white we could power through it. The private sector would produce despite the constant undertow of inflation. But a lot of credit was pledged by a young and white nation that will (not) be paid by an old and non-white nation. We can no longer back the dollar with the same level of productivity and competence. And inflation is corrosive. It channels capital into financialization and tricks people into thinking we can afford indulgences like POC Uplift and that Tik-Tok represents productive economic activity. Like someone said elsewhere, Brazil would be a “good” outcome.

    We could have introduced some realism back into the system by letting the chips fall in 2008, but instead we just re-inflated. The rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    The economists over at Marginal Revolution think we can just import the Global South (paper over the gap with mass quantity) while Tyler Cowen screams at everybody to Stop Drinking, Study Progress, and Practice Effective Altruism. Sorry gentlemen, the die has been cast.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast, Mark G.
  92. Most Men of Unz long for an idealized version of 1950’s in which people had big families, everyone went to church, men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren’t many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
    Reality check: those days are dead and buried, and aren’t coming back. Make the best of the here and now.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @prosa123

    Men of Unz (note Global South phenotypes):

    https://i.imgur.com/OhOqbv9.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Cagey Beast
    @prosa123

    But making the best of the here-and-now requires an appreciation of the Fifties. The Long Fifties, or Glorious Thirty* (as the French call it) was the time just before the current era, so there's a lot to be gained from looking closely at it.


    [...] men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren’t many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
     
    Self-styled progressives still feel the need to demonise the Fifties because Progress has proven itself to be a false god. Apart from smartphones and a few other things, we're seeing nothing like the progress they witnessed -- on and off -- from the 1870's to the 1970's. So progressives fall back on symbolic wins: "only the third transgender Black woman to ring the opening bell at any stock exchange!". It's pathetic and far more corrosive than any nostalgia for the the Glorious Thirty.

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trente_Glorieuses
    , @Random Anonymous
    @prosa123

    The future is not written.

    https://counter-currents.com/2014/06/the-slow-cleanse/

    , @mc23
    @prosa123

    That pretty much describes the 60's as well. Social cohesion started to break at that time. Mid 70's is where things finally fractured

  93. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything.

    The main purpose for most people has always been to improve their own personal lives and the lives of their family. If people get rewarded for working hard then that gives them an incentive to work hard. The malaise is coming from the government increasingly rigging things so that the product of one’s labor is getting diverted to the nonproductive, thus eliminating the incentive to exert oneself.

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    At least during the 1991-2020 period the large Boomer generation, including myself, were mostly in the workforce. The next thirty years they will mostly all be retired and receiving government benefits instead of working and paying taxes. In 1990 the national debt was three trillion dollars and now it is 30 trillion. The debt-to-GDP ratio went from 54% in 1990 to 124% now. As interest rates are increased to combat inflation, interest payments on that debt will skyrocket. The next 30 years will be much worse than the last 30. I’m a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist. The next 30 years will be so bad it will completely discredit the current system and by the middle of the century massive reforms will finally be made that improve things. I’m 66 so I probably won’t be around to see if my prediction comes true.

  94. @Dr. X

    Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?
     
    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we're probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off... Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.
     
    I think this is true, particularly among the late Millennials and Zoomers, but it's not the whole story.

    Wokeness is the culmination of decades of political correctness and anti-white maleness in the workplace. Thirty years ago employers were blatantly looking to hire and promote blacks over whites. As workplaces have become feminized, social skills take priority over actual work. The way to make money is not to actually do any work -- the guys who do that are either paid shit or their jobs have been offshored -- but to socially maneuver your way into a paying position based on who you know or being part of a given clique. Better yet, the way to make money is to get some kind of unionized government employment (and then go on disability) or be involved in some kind of rent-seeking grift where your wages are essentially paid by the government.

    Failing that, there's not much worth doing. I'm an early Gen Xer, too young to retire but too old to deal with and maneuver through all the bullshit. I'm not gainfully employed at the moment, but don't really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled. None of them pay enough to make much of a difference in my life. My $150k house ($70k when I bought it) has long been paid off. My cars are paid off. I have no debt. What's the point of doing some shitty retail or service job for $15 an hour? It's not enough to upgrade to a $500k house or a $70k car. None of the wages that are being paid will keep up with inflation. (Frankly I consider $20-25 and hour to be the effective minimum wage that would stir my interest at this point). All I would do is make somebody else rich and take up the dwindling amount of time I have left. I'll probably be dead in 25 years, I'm not going to spend it working an idiotic job for which I'll have to get a COVID jab and wear a stupid mask and do sexual harassment training and put up with petty bullshit. I've had a couple of jobs like that, and I'm not interested in any more of them.

    I'd rather check out of society as much as possible rather than try to "get ahead," I don't think that's possible any more unless you're a criminal, a grifter, or a real bastard. You certainly can't "get ahead" by working for an hourly wage. Hell, it was way back in 1978 that Merle Haggard sang "The Workin' Man Can't Get Nowhere Today," it's only gotten worse since then.

    I suppose I'll have to get something at the end of the summer, but right now I'd much rather have my time, even if I use it to just screw off.

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Almost Missouri, @Muggles, @ScarletNumber

    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    Biden = Brezhnev = senescent malaise, semi-animated corpse

    Merrick Garland = Andropov = vindictive deep state hard man

    Kamala Harris = Chernenko = bumbling POC incompetent

    So that leaves …

    DeSantis(?) = Gorbachev = well-meaning reformer who gets to oversee the unintentional dissolution of the empire

    ———

    Re the rest of your comment, yah I feel ya bro.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Almost Missouri

    And somewhere out there there's an American Putin. I doubt he's spending his time collecting Funko toys.

  95. @JR Ewing
    @Luddite in Chief

    "It's not your fault you can't control yourself" is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.

    I also remember - must have been a long time ago, at the beginning of the Great Awokening - when some baseball team gave a former coked-up superstar a contract after he had been out of the league awhile - for some reason I want to say it was the Dodgers and Dwight Gooden and Tommy Lasorda? - and the manager made a comment like, "if he makes good decisions and stays clean, he has a chance".

    The manager was ROASTED for implying that the player had any agency at all and wasn't just a victim of disease.

    Then the player flamed out 1-2 years later after getting back on the cocaine and the manager essentially said the same thing about the drug habit and ended up getting forced out.

    Maybe I'm misremembering badly. Too lazy to look it up.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Luddite in Chief

    Just looked it up and I butchered it quite a bit: the player was Darryl Strawberry going to the Dodgers in the prime of his career… but the Tommy Lasorda “it’s a weakness” part was correct.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @JR Ewing

    The irony is that Darryl would eventually clean himself up and had five productive seasons at the end of his career with the Yankees (95-99) where they won three World Series. He and Gooden were both members of the 96 Yankees which ended their longest World Series drought. This bothers Mets fans to no end, especially since they haven't won since 86.

  96. @HammerJack
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Something ineffably sad about your post, not that I disagree with any of it...

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    It’s been hard to watch the institutions crumble, but Jerry Pournelle told us that was always going to happen. There are going to be a lot of Catholic worlds rocked when it crumbles too.

  97. @prosa123
    Most Men of Unz long for an idealized version of 1950's in which people had big families, everyone went to church, men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren't many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
    Reality check: those days are dead and buried, and aren't coming back. Make the best of the here and now.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Cagey Beast, @Random Anonymous, @mc23

    Men of Unz (note Global South phenotypes):

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Compare to photos of real Confederate (or Union) soldiers: the bodies are both scrawny and potbellied and the clothes poorly made, ill-fitting and worn slovenly. A sad commentary on our times, and the fact that likely many people cannot see what I am talking about in that photo only makes things worse.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

  98. @Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Asian women are the healing elixir for the white man's country, and white women's worst nightmare, because they are the most beautiful, most devoted and productive women on Earth. We must facilitate the large scale movement of more Asian women in to the West, and marry them.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Signed,

    Asian 5

  99. @prosa123
    Most Men of Unz long for an idealized version of 1950's in which people had big families, everyone went to church, men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren't many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
    Reality check: those days are dead and buried, and aren't coming back. Make the best of the here and now.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Cagey Beast, @Random Anonymous, @mc23

    But making the best of the here-and-now requires an appreciation of the Fifties. The Long Fifties, or Glorious Thirty* (as the French call it) was the time just before the current era, so there’s a lot to be gained from looking closely at it.

    […] men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren’t many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.

    Self-styled progressives still feel the need to demonise the Fifties because Progress has proven itself to be a false god. Apart from smartphones and a few other things, we’re seeing nothing like the progress they witnessed — on and off — from the 1870’s to the 1970’s. So progressives fall back on symbolic wins: “only the third transgender Black woman to ring the opening bell at any stock exchange!”. It’s pathetic and far more corrosive than any nostalgia for the the Glorious Thirty.

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trente_Glorieuses

    • Agree: Mark G.
  100. @Almost Missouri
    @Dr. X


    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.
     
    Biden = Brezhnev = senescent malaise, semi-animated corpse

    Merrick Garland = Andropov = vindictive deep state hard man

    Kamala Harris = Chernenko = bumbling POC incompetent

    So that leaves ...

    DeSantis(?) = Gorbachev = well-meaning reformer who gets to oversee the unintentional dissolution of the empire

    ---------

    Re the rest of your comment, yah I feel ya bro.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    And somewhere out there there’s an American Putin. I doubt he’s spending his time collecting Funko toys.

  101. @Hypnotoad666
    @Jack D

    From the Daily Beast article:


    “I do feel like this is a concentrated effort to target someone who wouldn’t shut up about certain issues that the magazine wanted them to shut up about,” Overbey told Confider.

    The former archive editor, who says she was “shocked” when she was fired on Friday, claimed she’d been in multiple discussions with colleagues about the lack of Black editors on The New Yorker’s masthead. “This is specifically about the lack of diversity and the lack of pay equality at the magazine,” Overbey, who is white, told us.
     
    So if they replace her with a better paid black will she finally shut up?

    For some reason, I am trying to imagine an all-black version of the The New Yorker, and it seems hilarious.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Seneca44

    “On the internet, everybody knows you’re a ho.”

  102. @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    You mean by posing for Vogue Magazine?

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2022/07/27/ukraines-zelensky-and-wife-pose-for-vogue-while-their-country-is-invaded/

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @JimDandy, @AndrewR

    Zelensky is Ben Stiller’s hero. Stiller went there and told him that personally. More like Ben Shiller, amirite?

  103. @Anon
    @epebble

    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It's still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife's career. So you've seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/241530/birth-rate-by-family-income-in-the-us/

    Replies: @epebble, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career

    That is extremely rare, career or no-career; very few married couples go for a 3rd or 4th child. It may happen mostly due to second and subsequent marriages, fairly common nowadays and nonmarital births, also fairly common now. I ran an experiment recently to check if any of my relatives had more than 2 children, and the most recent birth (of a 3rd or higher child) I could identify happened before 1990.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @epebble

    A friend of mine from college was "very Catholic" and after a brief military career, he found a good wife who was like minded. They ended up with 10 kids, the oldest of which is 20 years old now and the youngest just 2. Basically, his wife was pregnant every other year from 2000 to 2020. In our college alumni group, where two kids is a "large family" and three is unheard of, he was something of a celebrity. His entry in our 25th reunion directory was a faux-interview where he answered unasked questions with answers like, "Two 10 person passenger vans like they have at nursing homes." Very good humored.

    He just passed away from cancer, diagnosed shortly after the youngest one was born.

    Life has a way of making you shake your head.

    Replies: @epebble, @duncsbaby

    , @Art Deco
    @epebble

    That is extremely rare

    You need to get out more. We have four young women among our proximate relatives with 3+ children by the same husband. All of the children were born after 2003.

    Replies: @epebble, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

  104. @SFG
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Steve’s one of the better pundits about going against his own team when the data’s strong enough. It’s one of the reasons a lot of people read him.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Yeah, Steve’s real cool.

    The lockdowns and vaccines were only the biggest crime ever committed against humanity, but Steve is very brave for standing against the few commenters on his niche blog who knew better—and with the entire Neoliberal world order. What a profile in courage.

    • Agree: BB753
  105. @epebble
    @Thea

    Gini has increased from 0.43 to 0.49 between 1990 -2020. That is not good, but hardly a tragedy.

    If you made 50K in 1990 while I was making 100K and now you are making 100K but I make 300K (in real money), will you be very depressed that the ratio went from 2 to 3 or happy that your real income doubled? Real incomes matter most to most people. Only some armchair leftists sulk over inequality as the absolute evil.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/219643/gini-coefficient-for-us-individuals-families-and-households/

    Replies: @Anon, @bomag, @Thea

    Somewhere we ran up against the phenomenon that more money doesn’t bring more happiness; more money can mean more responsibility and more stress.

  106. @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    You mean by posing for Vogue Magazine?

    Ukraine’s Zelensky and Wife Pose for Vogue While Their Country Is Invaded

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2022/07/27/ukraines-zelensky-and-wife-pose-for-vogue-while-their-country-is-invaded/

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @JimDandy, @AndrewR

    Sailer just went out and bought ten copies. Huzzah!

    • LOL: JimDandy
  107. @Dieter Kief
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Would you say the same phenomenon is present in Germany (and other parts of Western Europe*****)?
     
    All civil servants and teachers and the like wholeheartedly embraced the Covid-pause. Some offices in the civil service branch still have Covid-restrictions at work, what keeps the clients out of their offices...(surreal that...) - and life pleasant... 

    (That was significantly different in Switzerland: The non-panickers there had a much easier stand, not least because this exhaustion/relaxation mode was kept at a significantly lower level. Economically, Switzerland did much better during the pandemic than Germany and has by now almost completely compensated the losses, whereas in Germany, the severe Covid-recession is followed by a overwhelmingly self-inflicted de-industrialisation processes - which are now - half suffering and and half willingly (!) enhanced by the Ukraine conflict and the ensuing energy-crisis. - A downward spiral.

    The almost total political success of the Green party* can be understood as a form of progress-tiredness and progress obstruction even.

    * all other parties willing to work together (= all other parties with the exception of the (mildly) right wing AfD) are green now
      
      ***** What Europe is concerned - I do think that Douglas Murray (as I said in my first comment above: in the footsteps of French novelist Michel Houllebecq, a true visionary of Europe's - metaphysical (!) crisis not least - - - ) nailed it with his exhaustion remark - which in Murray's case too has a metaphysical side.

    But it's not just metaphysics - it's also, that economical and scientific progress was for some decades after the war working quite well for central Europe, but then the post-war (and later the post Soviet-block) super-positive economic trends vaned -  not least, because Asia appeared on the scene diminishing the (economic worth of) the European know-how advantage.

    Since that, life has become economically harder, and the pleasures of the popular culture lost lots of their magic (another Houellecq theme: Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal - a deep loss, frustrating/confusing/demotivating lots of hedonists) while at the same time the Christian tradition is losing its magic... (its binding powers, as the sociologists say) big style. - So: The central European soul is hit from two, if not from three sides quite heavily.

    So - these are three strong tendencies at work in central Europe (=the old core of the EU), which are by and large not too well understood. Douglas Murray's friend Jordan B. Peterson gets a chunk of this problem-constellation too, as did German historian/ essayist Rolf-Peter Sieferle (Das Migrationsproblem (132 p., 2017) and - Finis Germania (110 (small!) p., 2018) - and Thilo Sarranzin (Deutschland schafft sich ab 201o and five more books since then - the rather rational / atheist Thilo Sarrazin is blind on the side of the softer/socio-psychological/metaphysical/ religious aspects of the problems of the present day situation though).

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal

    That’s a very good point. The pornification of sex has done more damage to Millennials and younger than they realize. Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Peter Akuleyev


    ...has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields.
     
    In addition to social mine fields, what were normal courting and mating behaviors are now financial and legal minefields as well.
    , @Drive-by poster
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.
     
    It's funny you should mention that. I have always wondered about the prevalence of mental illness among those who have sex for money vs. those who do not, but who nonetheless sleep with lots of other people in a casual, no-strings-attached way.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    (It's as though there is a little less left of you after each time you do it.)

    I say this because, as you point out, mental illnesses like anhedonia seem more common today than they once were. Not so long ago, it was only prostitutes who seemed to end up mental wrecks after having loveless sex for years on end.

    Now, having access to the "easy come, easy go" sexual marketplace, it's as though everyone (or seemingly everyone) is off his/her rocker. I should have thought the Sexual Revolution would have put a permanent smile on everyone's face, but the long-term effect appears to have been quite the opposite.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @bomag, @Mark G.

  108. @Irishman
    Laziness and malaise are a down-river product of inflation. When you ladle money on a society you never know how things will end up. Social relationships and hierarchies will be disrupted. What America has done since 2008 has essentially been a reverse mortgage on the dollar through QE. The money been hoarded by a relative few, this has bred resentment. The spiraling prices inculcates laziness two ways. If you are at the coal-face of inflation; you're not a homeowner, there comes a time when participating in the rat-race in pointless. The post-pandemic rent and house-price spiral probably was that point for a lot of people. Secondly; because their is so much money around, some is bound to flow your way eventually. Stimmies! bitcoin! Hiring bonuses! shares! Sure the money will slip through you fingers like water, but you don't have to get up at the crack of dawn and work your fingers to the bone you get money in this day and age.

    Replies: @Travis

    well stated. The quantitative easing was done to keep real estate from falling further and to maintain the stock market. Printing billions of dollars to prop up the markets had the consequence of keeping housing unaffordable and this resulted in reduced family formation, lower marriage rates, and reduced fertility. The Lockdowns combined with increased deficit spending resulted in costlier housing, increased inflation and lower fertility. The great awakening also added economic pain to Americans by blocking oil and gas drilling and granting incentives to expensive energy sources like wind and solar.

    A big reason the birth rate has fallen 20% since 2008 is because of the economic destruction created by quantitative easing adn the lockdowns. 25% of millennials still live home with their parents. Less than half are married with children because it is near impossible to maintain a middle class lifestyle with a wife and two children and buy a home in a town with good schools.

    Since millennials are not having children, they have less incentive to work hard and spend a huge amount of money to live in an area with “good” schools. Childless adults can afford to live in diverse urban areas close to their jobs and maintain an urban lifestyle by having roommates and no need for a car or insurance etc…

  109. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @epebble


    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990.
     
    I'm going to disagree a little bit with your timeline.

    Yes, the removal of the Soviet Union as an existential opponent also removed one of the West's main motivations.

    However, I think there was enough inertia in the West to get us all the way to 2001, when the Dotcom bubble popped and something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.

    Does this refer to 9-11? If not, what is it? If so, why was that the definitive event?

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Almost Missouri


    Does this refer to 9-11?
     
    Yes.

    If so, why was that the definitive event?
     
    There are a few reasons I feel this way.

    Looking back at the event itself and how it was presented, it was the first event that was really presented on the news in a cinematic, hyperreal fashion.

    To me, that makes it the event where the people in charge of the American Empire finally decided, "Okay, we're going to run the world on pure narrative now. Reality is whatever we say it is."

    In a larger context, the event was the first major attack on the heart of US financial, media, and political power. I don't count Pearl Harbor because Hawaii was an imperial hinterland and the majority of the ships lost were obsolete.

    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.

    So, following the event the US immediately decided to go on a holy crusade against what it claimed as Islamic terrorism. This is when the monstrous aspects of the US really got turned up to 11. The security/surveillance state, war crimes canonized as official military operational doctrine, torture sanctioned as standard human intelligence gathering, or even just torture for torture's sake as seen at Abu Ghraib.

    For me, that's when the darkness really descended on the US and the rot was really exposed.

    I realize many of the older readers are likely to disagree with my view and argue the malaise set in with the JFK assassination and Vietnam.

    I think there is merit to that view. I will never truly grasp it since I was not alive to experience those events. On the other hand, I do think that some of the prior optimism in the US was recovered as the 80s arrived, opening with hugely symbolic victory over the Soviet hockey team in the Winter Olympics.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

  110. @HammerJack
    @Daniel H

    Yep. There are all sorts of ways to make money nowadays, people! Just have to be resourceful.


    https://i.ibb.co/5MSk0CV/Screenshot-20220728-040215-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @rebel yell

    That’s a great lawsuit.
    1. A 5 year old girl was ignored. Every woman in America will be outraged.
    2. It’s easy to prove, since all you need is a video of the child (one child among hundreds) not being singled out for attention.
    3. The theme park can’t disprove it, since they won’t have video of one of their characters talking to the girl.
    4. She’s black, so the theme park is barred from denying the charges in the first place
    5. It’s not really about the court room trial. The theme park loses in the court of public opinion the day the lawsuit is filed and their only recourse is to settle as fast as possible.

    • Agree: Charon
  111. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    When a person like Erin Somebody keeps raising the issue of gender parity in a company in which the jobs are already filled, she is basically demanding a lot of white guys get fired for no reason at all except for gender parity, something that would tick the guys off. Or she is demanding a promotion for herself. Chief editor David Remnick is 63, about 2 years from retirement, so it seems like Erin Somebody was trying to grievance-monger and bitch her way into getting his job. No wonder Remnick got sick of her and decided to can her ass.

  112. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    Gotta give credit where credit is due. So as much as I bash you for your thousands of Putin posts, “Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice” was pretty good.

  113. @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Every person I know who was working during WuFu was working their butt off because the Trump stimulus caused business to soar. Everyone was buying stuff right and left. Our coastal ports were jammed. People I know became exhausted from overwork.

  114. @Hypnotoad666
    @Jack D

    From the Daily Beast article:


    “I do feel like this is a concentrated effort to target someone who wouldn’t shut up about certain issues that the magazine wanted them to shut up about,” Overbey told Confider.

    The former archive editor, who says she was “shocked” when she was fired on Friday, claimed she’d been in multiple discussions with colleagues about the lack of Black editors on The New Yorker’s masthead. “This is specifically about the lack of diversity and the lack of pay equality at the magazine,” Overbey, who is white, told us.
     
    So if they replace her with a better paid black will she finally shut up?

    For some reason, I am trying to imagine an all-black version of the The New Yorker, and it seems hilarious.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Seneca44

    That could Dave Chapelle gold!

    There could be new jobs like Ebonics Editor or Go-Fer for Malt Liquor.

  115. I think COVID may have exposed a lot of people to the fact that their jobs don’t really produce much. It’s been reported that most employers haven’t reported a decline in worker production during the work-at-home era. But there’s no way that people are as productive with all of the distractions of home (spouse, children, food, television, etc.) as at the office unless lots of time at the office is wasted on makework and b.s. like chitchatting and making coffee. I’ve heard plenty of people say things like “I can get my day’s work done in like two hours working from home.” This is a real world test of “Parkinson’s Law” that “work expands to fill the time allotted for its completion.” At the office, people fill the extra time with nonsense, but since working from home allows the reward of free time if the work is efficiently and expeditiously completed, lots of people do all of their work in a compressed time frame and reward themselves with the difference. So my surmise is that people would rather spend the six hours of slack time caring for their kids or pursuing an afternoon delight with the old lady rather than dealing with typical office makework, pretending to be busy and other office bull.

    Perhaps with this unexpected spasm of freedom people decided that they actually like their spouses and children and their homes and being together, and that replacing that with hours a day of office nonsense and commuting isn’t desirable?

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    It has also dawned on a lot of employers that most white-collar employees are unproductive useless eaters ( to quote that great philanthropist and lover of humanity Bill Gates).
    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

  116. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    Jack, I don’t know if you listen to local sports radio but there was an episode even more delicious than this. Philadelphia Radio personality Mike Missanelli, who is a typically oleaginous character who often peppers his sports commentary with facile left wing talking points, had hosted an afternoon drive show on one of the two major sports talk radio stations in the area. Missanelli has been a fixture in local sports commentary for at least three decades. On a few occasions Missanelli together with his on-air producer Tyrone Johnson (who is a black man), and Natalie Egenolf (a white woman) mused about how hard it is for minorities and women to establish careers in sports talk radio, and how internship standards and hiring should be altered to attract more women and minorities into the industry. Missanelli led the band in these conversations, full-throatedly supporting affirmative action in hiring in sports talk radio in order to “diversify” its personnel.

    Earlier this year, 97.5 declined to renew Missanelli’s contract, and has handed hosting duties over to Johnson. Johnson will be joined by other on air talent including a woman in the near future.

    Just desserts if I ever saw it.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Thanks for the story but no, I had no idea who Missanelli is or was. I am moderately interested in sports, in particular I watch most Phillies games, but I have zero interest in listening to people TALK about sports. In fact I have no interest in "talk radio" in general. I have no patience for the entire format, whether they are talking about sports or politics or whatever. I would rather listen to fingernails scratching on a blackboard than listen to aimless yapping.

  117. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Dieter Kief

    Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal

    That's a very good point. The pornification of sex has done more damage to Millennials and younger than they realize. Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West's transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Drive-by poster

    …has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields.

    In addition to social mine fields, what were normal courting and mating behaviors are now financial and legal minefields as well.

  118. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Dieter Kief

    Sex as the driver of lots of pop-culture pleasures just lost its appeal

    That's a very good point. The pornification of sex has done more damage to Millennials and younger than they realize. Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West's transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Drive-by poster

    Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.

    It’s funny you should mention that. I have always wondered about the prevalence of mental illness among those who have sex for money vs. those who do not, but who nonetheless sleep with lots of other people in a casual, no-strings-attached way.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    (It’s as though there is a little less left of you after each time you do it.)

    I say this because, as you point out, mental illnesses like anhedonia seem more common today than they once were. Not so long ago, it was only prostitutes who seemed to end up mental wrecks after having loveless sex for years on end.

    Now, having access to the “easy come, easy go” sexual marketplace, it’s as though everyone (or seemingly everyone) is off his/her rocker. I should have thought the Sexual Revolution would have put a permanent smile on everyone’s face, but the long-term effect appears to have been quite the opposite.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Drive-by poster

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers....most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @SFG, @BB753, @Paul Mendez

    , @bomag
    @Drive-by poster

    Good comment.

    Society used to guard against self-destructive behavior: prostitution; porn; drugs; homosexuality; transgenderism.

    Apologists will tell us that these things have always been with us.

    Something about not promoting them seems relevant.

    , @Mark G.
    @Drive-by poster


    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

     

    I've not heard that before but find it plausible. I have seen studies showing people in long-term mutually monogamous relationships live longer. If it improves physical health, then why not mental health too?

    As a libertarian, I've always thought exchanging sex for money should be legal. However, I have never had any desire to do that, particularly with large numbers of females, and even feel slightly repelled by the idea of doing that. Like you, I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can't quite put my finger on why I feel that. I've thought about attributing my lack of desire to social conditioning from growing up in a middle-class environment where such activities are seen as deviant behavior. I've also thought there may be genetic programming towards monogamy because there would be an evolutionary advantage for men to stay with one female and help raise their children together. Those two things may be part of it, but I feel like something more is involved here.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  119. @Almost Missouri
    @The Wild Geese Howard


    something happened in the Fall.

    After Fall 2001 it was abundantly clear that the West had taken on a deluge of water after striking the iceberg.
     
    Does this refer to 9-11? If not, what is it? If so, why was that the definitive event?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Does this refer to 9-11?

    Yes.

    If so, why was that the definitive event?

    There are a few reasons I feel this way.

    Looking back at the event itself and how it was presented, it was the first event that was really presented on the news in a cinematic, hyperreal fashion.

    To me, that makes it the event where the people in charge of the American Empire finally decided, “Okay, we’re going to run the world on pure narrative now. Reality is whatever we say it is.”

    In a larger context, the event was the first major attack on the heart of US financial, media, and political power. I don’t count Pearl Harbor because Hawaii was an imperial hinterland and the majority of the ships lost were obsolete.

    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.

    So, following the event the US immediately decided to go on a holy crusade against what it claimed as Islamic terrorism. This is when the monstrous aspects of the US really got turned up to 11. The security/surveillance state, war crimes canonized as official military operational doctrine, torture sanctioned as standard human intelligence gathering, or even just torture for torture’s sake as seen at Abu Ghraib.

    For me, that’s when the darkness really descended on the US and the rot was really exposed.

    I realize many of the older readers are likely to disagree with my view and argue the malaise set in with the JFK assassination and Vietnam.

    I think there is merit to that view. I will never truly grasp it since I was not alive to experience those events. On the other hand, I do think that some of the prior optimism in the US was recovered as the 80s arrived, opening with hugely symbolic victory over the Soviet hockey team in the Winter Olympics.

    • Thanks: Thea
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    When Reagan was elected it was like a switch was flipped. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Then 9/11. Then the 2008 Bust. Watershed decade: government will get as powerful as it wants, will spend as much money as it wants, and the rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @SFG

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @The Wild Geese Howard


    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.
     
    There's a broadcast channel in my area that shows old reruns of once popular shows. Cheers was for me an artifact of the 1980s in America, but Roseanne is an artifact of the 1990s.

    Watching those half hour comedy shows really takes you back to the foreign country that is the America that was. At the time it premiered in the Fall of 1988 Roseanne was billed as somewhat raunchy, verite, "the-way-we-live-now-warts-and-all" look at the American family but it's positively quaint in 2022. There were seeds of the decline in it, and Roseanne likely was another small seed of it, but a real innocence is still there. Putting food on the table, the boss being a jerk, and raising errant kids were the core problems to be wrestled with and resolved, with no real whiff of the identity politics that was brewing but constrained to Universities then when 90%+ of the characters were middle American whites and it went without complaint. In the real world, the upswing of an economic bubble was on the horizon and the average Boomer was about to become flush with cash.

    The Fall of 2001 and the aftermath lasting for some time was actually in some ways positive - the red, white and blue, the feeling that Americans were a people and that even though the adversary attacked the heart of the cosmopolitan financial and cultural capital people in rural Mississippi felt it as an attack on their people. Of course early globohomo managed to invert that in the years after - Islam is a religion of peace, and in fact it was in many ways the real victim here. The only fair thing to do is build them za'atar flavored versions of America in the desert complete with girls in goatherd villages going to school. We just killed the terrorist operation's number two (aside - who would ever want that job? It was the guy who was killed every week in GWOT the Reality Show), the number one can't be far from our grasp and rinse, lather, repeat for twenty years. No, we can't just bomb them, install a brutal puppet dictator to keep everyone in line and go home to a ticker tape parade. We have to fight 'em over there so we don't have to fight 'em over here!
  120. As the world entered the “malaise” era of the 1970s (to use Jimmy Carter’s term for his time), the Soviets seemed to get hit even harder by malaise.

    I say:

    That Jimmy Carter slob didn’t have so-called MALAISE in his heart when that rabbit attacked Carter’s canoe. Jimmy just about went swimmy to evade that rabitt.

    Eddie Rabbit bought or rented a place that my people had in Tennessee.

    One of the great divides in American politics is the Rabbit camp and the Cohn camp, and I’m in the Rabbit camp. I’d rather listen to that catchy Rainy Night bit instead of that rancid Walking In Memphis crapola from Marc Cohn.

    Prewitt’s and Carter’s and Randolph’s and Byrd’s and Washington’s, and the most honorable of the bunch by far was Henry Prewitt.

    Remember that that rancid politician whore Jimmy Carter ramped up the nation-wrecking REFUGEE OVERLOAD in 1980.

    Tweet from 2015:

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @Charles Pewitt

    Fun Fact: Eddie Rabbitt was born in Brooklyn and grew up in New Jersey. "Drivin' My Life Away" is a great tune. "I Love A Rainy Night" was way overplayed on my local top 40 station when I was a kid. "Kentucky Rain" by Elvis is cheeseball genius. Songs w/Rain in the title are usually pretty good.

  121. @Luddite in Chief
    @JimB


    The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.
     
    I believe this is the "disease" model of addiction you are describing, is that correct? While I do not doubt that addiction changes the brain (as does any action performed repeatedly over time), I am not sure I subscribe to the theory that says, "once addicted, always addicted."

    I have only just started it, but Marc Lewis has written a book titled, The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. What makes the book interesting is not that Lewis is a neuroscientist (which one might expect), but that he is a former addict himself.

    From what I gather, Lewis views the disease model of addiction as a barrier (rather than a means) to effective treatment. However, I do not know whether his view has found widespread acceptance or if Lewis is considered a maverick (to put it politely).

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most). However, I am not sure I buy into a model that seems to say, in essence, "people are helpless and that is all there is to it."

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin, @JimB

    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years. She eventually got clean and is no longer possessed by the demon. To say, “Once an addict, always an addict” is a bit misleading. An insightful drug counselor we spoke with distinguished between being a drug addict and being someone who abuses drugs. The former eventually has a complete, irreversible, warping of their personality. The latter can clean themselves up and return to their former selves.

    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful. That aspect of our daughter’s personality now indulges itself with vaping rather than heroin. Not ideal but a marked improvement.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Baldwin


    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful.
     
    I agree that some people are more susceptible to abusing drink and drugs because of genetics.

    What I do not agree with is the argument that, once in the grip of drink/drugs, people have no agency whatever and the drink/drugs do them rather than the other way around.

    I get that making good decisions may be harder (sometimes gut-wrenchingly so), but I do not believe it is impossible. I am very much afraid that, by giving people an excuse not to make decisions for themselves, you are giving them an "out," and it is part of human nature to take advantage of an "out."

    (I believe that is part of the argument Lewis is making when he says the disease model of addiction is more hindrance than help. However, I have only started The Biology of Desire, and I do not want to put words into his mouth.)
    , @ScarletNumber
    @Harry Baldwin


    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years
     
    How much fellatio did she give to satisfy that habit?
  122. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Jack D

    Jack, I don't know if you listen to local sports radio but there was an episode even more delicious than this. Philadelphia Radio personality Mike Missanelli, who is a typically oleaginous character who often peppers his sports commentary with facile left wing talking points, had hosted an afternoon drive show on one of the two major sports talk radio stations in the area. Missanelli has been a fixture in local sports commentary for at least three decades. On a few occasions Missanelli together with his on-air producer Tyrone Johnson (who is a black man), and Natalie Egenolf (a white woman) mused about how hard it is for minorities and women to establish careers in sports talk radio, and how internship standards and hiring should be altered to attract more women and minorities into the industry. Missanelli led the band in these conversations, full-throatedly supporting affirmative action in hiring in sports talk radio in order to "diversify" its personnel.

    Earlier this year, 97.5 declined to renew Missanelli's contract, and has handed hosting duties over to Johnson. Johnson will be joined by other on air talent including a woman in the near future.

    Just desserts if I ever saw it.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Thanks for the story but no, I had no idea who Missanelli is or was. I am moderately interested in sports, in particular I watch most Phillies games, but I have zero interest in listening to people TALK about sports. In fact I have no interest in “talk radio” in general. I have no patience for the entire format, whether they are talking about sports or politics or whatever. I would rather listen to fingernails scratching on a blackboard than listen to aimless yapping.

  123. @Anon
    @epebble

    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It's still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife's career. So you've seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/241530/birth-rate-by-family-income-in-the-us/

    Replies: @epebble, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    A large portion of inequality has been driven by assortative mating. It’s still fairly rare to see someone making 300k (around 93rd percentile of earners).

    But a husband and wife making 200k-300k combined is more common. And this is also incredibly dysgenic, since an otherwise intelligent, industrious couple will end up having 1-2 children, as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career. So you’ve seen a massive drop in birthrates in the top 1/3rd of households.

    In a normal, healthy society, these families would be having the most children.

    I think the wife’s career is a contributing factor in low birthrates among the upper income cohorts, but I think the fact that the “life script” for success is filtered through a four year University degree and likely some post college graduate degree as well is as large a factor. That combined \$300K couple wants their kid(s) to achieve similar status, so they understand that they can’t afford to keep their current status and pay for four selective University degrees. (This income cohort is probably between the true high earners who can cut tuition checks comfortably and a lower bracket which qualifies for lots of financial aid). They decide that the best way forward is 1.3 “trophy” children, who then will get all of the parents’ combined resources. This is probably not beneficial for the parent-child relationship, and it’s a lot of pressure to project on one kid to be the combined scholar-jock-social activist who would have a shot at admission to selective Universities. Kids are funny that way – they don’t always want to be who their parents want them to be.

  124. @JR Ewing
    @Luddite in Chief

    "It's not your fault you can't control yourself" is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.

    I also remember - must have been a long time ago, at the beginning of the Great Awokening - when some baseball team gave a former coked-up superstar a contract after he had been out of the league awhile - for some reason I want to say it was the Dodgers and Dwight Gooden and Tommy Lasorda? - and the manager made a comment like, "if he makes good decisions and stays clean, he has a chance".

    The manager was ROASTED for implying that the player had any agency at all and wasn't just a victim of disease.

    Then the player flamed out 1-2 years later after getting back on the cocaine and the manager essentially said the same thing about the drug habit and ended up getting forced out.

    Maybe I'm misremembering badly. Too lazy to look it up.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Luddite in Chief

    “It’s not your fault you can’t control yourself” is how we got gay marriage. And monkeypox.

    It’s also a large part of why the crime rate in the UK is through the roof right now.

    The argument the criminals make is, “I can’t control myself, so if I steal, it’s society’s fault for not stopping me and saving me from myself.”

    I just cannot be doing with that tosh.

    Theodore Dalrymple has related how he used to have to listen to that sort of thing when he was a prison doctor. Once he made it clear to the patient that the excuse-making did not cut any ice with him, the reaction of the patient was often laughter and a willingness to come clean and admit that, yes, they enjoyed what they did, and the enjoyment was why they did not want to stop doing it.

    PS: I liked the Lasorda/Strawberry story. I wish I could say I was surprised at the reaction of the mob, but I was not. It is exactly that kind of “the lad can’t help himself” crap that has made the UK what it is today (i.e. almost unliveable)>

  125. Nothing Facebook or video game makers do is actually all that important. No great loss if they all suck at work.

    • Replies: @MGB
    @ReadyFreddy

    That’s the primary reason that they suck. They know it’s meaningless shit. No religion, no national purpose, no real pride.

  126. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Almost Missouri


    Does this refer to 9-11?
     
    Yes.

    If so, why was that the definitive event?
     
    There are a few reasons I feel this way.

    Looking back at the event itself and how it was presented, it was the first event that was really presented on the news in a cinematic, hyperreal fashion.

    To me, that makes it the event where the people in charge of the American Empire finally decided, "Okay, we're going to run the world on pure narrative now. Reality is whatever we say it is."

    In a larger context, the event was the first major attack on the heart of US financial, media, and political power. I don't count Pearl Harbor because Hawaii was an imperial hinterland and the majority of the ships lost were obsolete.

    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.

    So, following the event the US immediately decided to go on a holy crusade against what it claimed as Islamic terrorism. This is when the monstrous aspects of the US really got turned up to 11. The security/surveillance state, war crimes canonized as official military operational doctrine, torture sanctioned as standard human intelligence gathering, or even just torture for torture's sake as seen at Abu Ghraib.

    For me, that's when the darkness really descended on the US and the rot was really exposed.

    I realize many of the older readers are likely to disagree with my view and argue the malaise set in with the JFK assassination and Vietnam.

    I think there is merit to that view. I will never truly grasp it since I was not alive to experience those events. On the other hand, I do think that some of the prior optimism in the US was recovered as the 80s arrived, opening with hugely symbolic victory over the Soviet hockey team in the Winter Olympics.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    When Reagan was elected it was like a switch was flipped. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Then 9/11. Then the 2008 Bust. Watershed decade: government will get as powerful as it wants, will spend as much money as it wants, and the rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    You are part of the rich! as a lawyer. You protect those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @SFG
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    The woke stuff followed in the early 2010s. Some people think its promotion was an attempt to distract the left after occupy Wall Street; I am not sure, personally, about that.

  127. @Harry Baldwin
    @Luddite in Chief

    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years. She eventually got clean and is no longer possessed by the demon. To say, "Once an addict, always an addict" is a bit misleading. An insightful drug counselor we spoke with distinguished between being a drug addict and being someone who abuses drugs. The former eventually has a complete, irreversible, warping of their personality. The latter can clean themselves up and return to their former selves.

    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful. That aspect of our daughter's personality now indulges itself with vaping rather than heroin. Not ideal but a marked improvement.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @ScarletNumber

    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful.

    I agree that some people are more susceptible to abusing drink and drugs because of genetics.

    What I do not agree with is the argument that, once in the grip of drink/drugs, people have no agency whatever and the drink/drugs do them rather than the other way around.

    I get that making good decisions may be harder (sometimes gut-wrenchingly so), but I do not believe it is impossible. I am very much afraid that, by giving people an excuse not to make decisions for themselves, you are giving them an “out,” and it is part of human nature to take advantage of an “out.”

    (I believe that is part of the argument Lewis is making when he says the disease model of addiction is more hindrance than help. However, I have only started The Biology of Desire, and I do not want to put words into his mouth.)

  128. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Almost Missouri


    Does this refer to 9-11?
     
    Yes.

    If so, why was that the definitive event?
     
    There are a few reasons I feel this way.

    Looking back at the event itself and how it was presented, it was the first event that was really presented on the news in a cinematic, hyperreal fashion.

    To me, that makes it the event where the people in charge of the American Empire finally decided, "Okay, we're going to run the world on pure narrative now. Reality is whatever we say it is."

    In a larger context, the event was the first major attack on the heart of US financial, media, and political power. I don't count Pearl Harbor because Hawaii was an imperial hinterland and the majority of the ships lost were obsolete.

    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.

    So, following the event the US immediately decided to go on a holy crusade against what it claimed as Islamic terrorism. This is when the monstrous aspects of the US really got turned up to 11. The security/surveillance state, war crimes canonized as official military operational doctrine, torture sanctioned as standard human intelligence gathering, or even just torture for torture's sake as seen at Abu Ghraib.

    For me, that's when the darkness really descended on the US and the rot was really exposed.

    I realize many of the older readers are likely to disagree with my view and argue the malaise set in with the JFK assassination and Vietnam.

    I think there is merit to that view. I will never truly grasp it since I was not alive to experience those events. On the other hand, I do think that some of the prior optimism in the US was recovered as the 80s arrived, opening with hugely symbolic victory over the Soviet hockey team in the Winter Olympics.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Anyway, what is more important is the complete change of course in US behavior following the event. Up to the that point, the US had mostly been cruising along basking in the post-Soviet glow and enjoying the peace dividend. I discount Somalia and Bosnia as sideshows largely intended to distract from domestic issues. I realize many will differ from that view.

    There’s a broadcast channel in my area that shows old reruns of once popular shows. Cheers was for me an artifact of the 1980s in America, but Roseanne is an artifact of the 1990s.

    Watching those half hour comedy shows really takes you back to the foreign country that is the America that was. At the time it premiered in the Fall of 1988 Roseanne was billed as somewhat raunchy, verite, “the-way-we-live-now-warts-and-all” look at the American family but it’s positively quaint in 2022. There were seeds of the decline in it, and Roseanne likely was another small seed of it, but a real innocence is still there. Putting food on the table, the boss being a jerk, and raising errant kids were the core problems to be wrestled with and resolved, with no real whiff of the identity politics that was brewing but constrained to Universities then when 90%+ of the characters were middle American whites and it went without complaint. In the real world, the upswing of an economic bubble was on the horizon and the average Boomer was about to become flush with cash.

    The Fall of 2001 and the aftermath lasting for some time was actually in some ways positive – the red, white and blue, the feeling that Americans were a people and that even though the adversary attacked the heart of the cosmopolitan financial and cultural capital people in rural Mississippi felt it as an attack on their people. Of course early globohomo managed to invert that in the years after – Islam is a religion of peace, and in fact it was in many ways the real victim here. The only fair thing to do is build them za’atar flavored versions of America in the desert complete with girls in goatherd villages going to school. We just killed the terrorist operation’s number two (aside – who would ever want that job? It was the guy who was killed every week in GWOT the Reality Show), the number one can’t be far from our grasp and rinse, lather, repeat for twenty years. No, we can’t just bomb them, install a brutal puppet dictator to keep everyone in line and go home to a ticker tape parade. We have to fight ’em over there so we don’t have to fight ’em over here!

    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
  129. @epebble
    @Anon

    as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career

    That is extremely rare, career or no-career; very few married couples go for a 3rd or 4th child. It may happen mostly due to second and subsequent marriages, fairly common nowadays and nonmarital births, also fairly common now. I ran an experiment recently to check if any of my relatives had more than 2 children, and the most recent birth (of a 3rd or higher child) I could identify happened before 1990.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Art Deco

    A friend of mine from college was “very Catholic” and after a brief military career, he found a good wife who was like minded. They ended up with 10 kids, the oldest of which is 20 years old now and the youngest just 2. Basically, his wife was pregnant every other year from 2000 to 2020. In our college alumni group, where two kids is a “large family” and three is unheard of, he was something of a celebrity. His entry in our 25th reunion directory was a faux-interview where he answered unasked questions with answers like, “Two 10 person passenger vans like they have at nursing homes.” Very good humored.

    He just passed away from cancer, diagnosed shortly after the youngest one was born.

    Life has a way of making you shake your head.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @JR Ewing

    So how does a 45-year-old woman with no marketable skills and 10 children, 2- to 20-year-old, support her family now?

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @JR Ewing, @Thea

    , @duncsbaby
    @JR Ewing

    No GoFundMe is ever going to paper over that loss. Damn shame for all the kids but especially the young ones. I don't see too many 40 something guys wanting to date a single mom w/10 kids. Still, life goes on.

  130. @epebble
    @Thea

    Gini has increased from 0.43 to 0.49 between 1990 -2020. That is not good, but hardly a tragedy.

    If you made 50K in 1990 while I was making 100K and now you are making 100K but I make 300K (in real money), will you be very depressed that the ratio went from 2 to 3 or happy that your real income doubled? Real incomes matter most to most people. Only some armchair leftists sulk over inequality as the absolute evil.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/219643/gini-coefficient-for-us-individuals-families-and-households/

    Replies: @Anon, @bomag, @Thea

    You’re correct that people at those incomes would enjoy the same lifestyle during those years.

    But psychologically, motivation matters. How do most millennials feel about the 2008 bailouts that resulted in million dollar bonuses for bankers that wrecked their businesses? Ordinary tax payers paid that bill. How can one not feel the system is corrupt and question the point of honest labor?

    The latest problem income divide has created is that some can and cannot afford private security from the criminals that have recently been unleashed. Supporting BLM as Bezos with armed guards is easy. A normal, hard working family cannot afford that now.

    That is an existential difference. It is not one of superficial comfort as between \$100 k and \$300 k.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Thea

    cannot afford private security from the criminals

    That is an absolute decrease in quality of life, not because Bezos owns 5 mansions, 4 jets, 3 yachts, 2 islands etc., A citizen in normal society should not need private security. Now, if Bezos doesn't pay taxes, and that denies good police service, that is a case of poor public policy, but people voted for it.

  131. Your impression of the lives of ordinary workers during the Stalin period is badly out of date. Since the archives opened up after the collapse of the USSR, a lot of Soviet history has had to be drastically revised. There is now much more hard evidence to go by, less need for guesses and speculation. Take a look, for example, at Robert W. Thurston, LIFE AND TERROR IN STALIN’S RUSSIA 1934 – 1941, especially chapter 6, “Life in the Factories.” [Yale University Press 1996]

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Close Reader


    Your impression of the lives of ordinary workers during the Stalin period is badly out of date. Since the archives opened up after the collapse of the USSR, a lot of Soviet history has had to be drastically revised.
     
    Has Robert Conquest's stuff held up do you know?

    Replies: @Patrick McNally

  132. Well, I don’t know but in the 1960s the true believers in Russian communism may have been dying or died off. All that remained was the general mass of people who had been subjugated for 50 years and the cynical political entrepreneurs. Because there was a form of capitalism but the money was political status; you led a better life if you had crawled your way up that ladder. I think the US is kind of like that today where “societal influence” is one way to make your fortune even though there’s still the elite who are already wealthy or the new megawealthy who create unphysical “places” where you can show videos of your cats; because nobody believes in that George Washington stuff – the old US where you had to do something productive.

  133. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    Don't forget, Zuck spent $300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He's now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Chrisnonymous, @Muggles

    Yes. Without his interference, Trump may have won, and I’m sure Trump would have been more open to banning TikTok. LOL on Zuck.

  134. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @prosa123

    Men of Unz (note Global South phenotypes):

    https://i.imgur.com/OhOqbv9.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Compare to photos of real Confederate (or Union) soldiers: the bodies are both scrawny and potbellied and the clothes poorly made, ill-fitting and worn slovenly. A sad commentary on our times, and the fact that likely many people cannot see what I am talking about in that photo only makes things worse.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Chrisnonymous

    They're Brazilian Confederados. American Confederates, to my observation, look worse.

    , @Jack D
    @Chrisnonymous

    It's even more remarkable considering that the sewing machine was just coming in so that most of the actual Confederate uniforms would have been sewn by hand.

    OTOH, this means that a Confederate uniform would have been tailor made (at least for an officer) so it would have fit properly in a way that an off the rack garment would not. And you wouldn't have a closet full of clothes - you might literally have only the uniform that you were wearing or perhaps one change of clothes, especially in the field. This uniform represented a large part of your identity and was not some cheap Halloween costume that you put on for "reenactments" and then took off as soon as you got home, where you have a whole closet full of other clothes. (Houses in those days didn't even have closets - no one had so many clothes that they needed a separate room in which to keep them.)

    In addition, when you see photos of Civil War troops, getting your picture taken was a big deal so they would be careful to look their best for the photo.

    Modern Americans have a different relationship to clothing and to photography. Due to mass production and technology, both have become incredibly inexpensive relative to income. Photographs are practically free. Anything that is plentiful is taken for granted and not given a lot of care and attention.

  135. So, a friend just returned from a two month training assignment for a customer in the Indian foothills of the Himalayas.

    Two weeks in the manager along for the ride perceives frustration and infighting among the team of eight.

    He calls them into a conference room at the hotel, sits them down, and tells them all, “…to close your eyes, imagine yourselves as leaves floating on a river…and just let it all go…”

    Did I mention this manager is a former active duty Marine that attended Annapolis?

    Anyway, it turns out the real reason the team was frustrated because they were two weeks into the assignment and training equipment for the students had not arrived.

    Ensuring this equipment was available was one of this manager’s duties.

    Obligatory:

  136. @SafeNow
    “I don't care how good they are. Unless they get a kick in the ass every six weeks, they'll slack off.“ — - - - Ernest King. Steve used the phrase “slack off” (twice) so it brought to mind that famous Adm. King quote. King was right; even the best people need a KITA. To some degree. But slacking-off has reached new levels in the U.S., and one big reason is the importing of a more relaxed, “good enough” culture. It is contagious. Boeing Max. I would proofread this, but what the heck.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    I know I can slack off because they can’t find anyone as good as I am. Mind you, I am not that good, but they can’t find anyone better. That’s why I can comment on Unz while at work.

    Oops gotta go! Boss showed up…

    • LOL: Paul Mendez
  137. @Paul Mendez
    @epebble


    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?
     
    I agree with you. I would like to add my own observation that there’s a great amount of generational inertia.

    I’m a late-Boomer raised by parents and grandparents who lived through the Depression and WW2. I didn’t go lazy/irresponsible /hedonistic the day after The Wall fell.

    Likewise, the Millennials I know personally and professionally are not going to shape up should TSHTF tomorrow. They’ll die whimpering that financial collapse, famine and hypothermia “isn’t fair.”

    Replies: @Thea

    My generation, gen-x, whined through the 90s like oversized toddlers. If anything, Millennials learned it from us.

    Some complaints were legitimate but the overarching therapy culture that began in the 1990s reigns supreme.
    Manufacturing jobs left and with it my generation’s hopes of family formation. Sure we got the dot com boom. Millennials didn’t get that.

  138. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Progress always comes from civilizations that have a lot of leisure time. This hard work crap is Puritan nonsense.

    People in slave societies work plenty hard and never progress for thousands of years.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Anonymous


    Progress always comes from civilizations that have a lot of leisure time. This hard work crap is Puritan nonsense
     
    Guess that explains why sub-Saharan Africa is so advanced, while Japan and Korea are still primitive backwaters.

    Progress comes from productivity. Productivity comes from hard-working civilizations that want to work even harder. Why would a civilization with a lot of leisure time bother to invent the computer, when it had pencil and paper?
  139. @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/jasonschreier/status/1552277826669248514

    https://twitter.com/jasonschreier/status/1552278150192693248

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @James of Africa

    It doesn’t affect me, I liked the older more cartoonlike GTA games, especially the original Vice City, which was a fine parody of 80’s fashion and TV. A whole world full of walking talking jokes and stereotypes. The newer more realistic looking games seem charmless compared to what I remember, lots of comedy material about fat people, poor people, gays, women, and some racial and ethnic jokes as a bonus!

    I’m really satisfied with old entertainment since I don’t expect young people to have a sense of humour nowadays. The upside to thinking like that is being pleasantly surprised by them now and then, although not often.

  140. @Dr. X

    Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?
     
    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we're probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off... Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.
     
    I think this is true, particularly among the late Millennials and Zoomers, but it's not the whole story.

    Wokeness is the culmination of decades of political correctness and anti-white maleness in the workplace. Thirty years ago employers were blatantly looking to hire and promote blacks over whites. As workplaces have become feminized, social skills take priority over actual work. The way to make money is not to actually do any work -- the guys who do that are either paid shit or their jobs have been offshored -- but to socially maneuver your way into a paying position based on who you know or being part of a given clique. Better yet, the way to make money is to get some kind of unionized government employment (and then go on disability) or be involved in some kind of rent-seeking grift where your wages are essentially paid by the government.

    Failing that, there's not much worth doing. I'm an early Gen Xer, too young to retire but too old to deal with and maneuver through all the bullshit. I'm not gainfully employed at the moment, but don't really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled. None of them pay enough to make much of a difference in my life. My $150k house ($70k when I bought it) has long been paid off. My cars are paid off. I have no debt. What's the point of doing some shitty retail or service job for $15 an hour? It's not enough to upgrade to a $500k house or a $70k car. None of the wages that are being paid will keep up with inflation. (Frankly I consider $20-25 and hour to be the effective minimum wage that would stir my interest at this point). All I would do is make somebody else rich and take up the dwindling amount of time I have left. I'll probably be dead in 25 years, I'm not going to spend it working an idiotic job for which I'll have to get a COVID jab and wear a stupid mask and do sexual harassment training and put up with petty bullshit. I've had a couple of jobs like that, and I'm not interested in any more of them.

    I'd rather check out of society as much as possible rather than try to "get ahead," I don't think that's possible any more unless you're a criminal, a grifter, or a real bastard. You certainly can't "get ahead" by working for an hourly wage. Hell, it was way back in 1978 that Merle Haggard sang "The Workin' Man Can't Get Nowhere Today," it's only gotten worse since then.

    I suppose I'll have to get something at the end of the summer, but right now I'd much rather have my time, even if I use it to just screw off.

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Almost Missouri, @Muggles, @ScarletNumber

    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we’re probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    Great observation.

    Here’s a thought for you. Instead of working for wages for someone else, figure out what you like to do and your skill set. Then start a business doing that.

    All you have to do is find something worth doing that you can do better than most. Once you find your value added niche you’ll be set.

    Passively expecting someone else to “pay you what you’re worth” is magical thinking.

    That process of discovery for your talent might be trial and error but it exists.

    I was in a profession until retirement, where the sole proprietor model was being pushed to extinction. Yet I found clients and found the routine work rewarding since I had considerable latitude about what to do and for whom, when. I helped them and they paid me. Great!

    I could have made more money in a bigger environment where customers were brought to me, but money isn’t everything. I didn’t attend meetings unless clients wanted them. No HR and very little useless overhead. Most of my larger competitors were not very good with clients (customers) and were often not worth what they charged.

    So it’s out there. Or you can vegetate and watch TV and insipid cartoon sourced “films.”

    Free advice you probably don’t want to read…

  141. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul Mendez
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    In their defense, why bust your ass for personal advancement and working so hard for a system that despises you for being born white and heterosexual?
     
    On one level, I can’t argue with you. The fact that the US military admits it’s not going to reach its recruiting goals for the foreseeable future fills me with glee.

    On another level, however, I must point out that Millennial rolling over and playing dead because “The System” despises them is very gay. History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world. Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.

    Replies: @aNewBanner, @Anonymous

    History is full of examples of young men & women telling The System FU and building their own world.

    Name one

    Too late/tired to write a thesis, but America was founded by people The System despised. Post-WW1 young German men didn’t turn into Soy Boys.

    The American nation was on the side of the American people in 1776. George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson were not despised by the American nation.

    Germans were on their own side after WWI. They had their own system. This was true for Germans across generational lines. They were pro-German.

    We don’t have that today with whites at all. Do we see legions of baby boomer whites marching on behalf of white people? And to put the blame on 18 year olds is the silliest thing I can imagine. As if they’re the most culpable for the destruction of our people.

    You people want to believe that “hard work” is a substitute for the moral courage previous generations failed to show. It isn’t.

  142. @epebble
    @Anon

    as opposed to 3-4, due to the wife’s career

    That is extremely rare, career or no-career; very few married couples go for a 3rd or 4th child. It may happen mostly due to second and subsequent marriages, fairly common nowadays and nonmarital births, also fairly common now. I ran an experiment recently to check if any of my relatives had more than 2 children, and the most recent birth (of a 3rd or higher child) I could identify happened before 1990.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Art Deco

    That is extremely rare

    You need to get out more. We have four young women among our proximate relatives with 3+ children by the same husband. All of the children were born after 2003.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Art Deco

    U.S. women, on average, stopped having a third child by 1965. It is at or near 2 since 1972. Your experience is unusual, not the norm.

    https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/children-born-per-woman?tab=chart&country=~USA

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Art Deco

    Average TFR has been 2 or less since the 1970s. Aren't you childless?

    , @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence. Usually it's the other way around - someone will say "I know someone who has 5 kids" and you will reply " The average American family in 2021 consisted of 3.13 persons."

    If you want to be statistical rather than anecdotal, as of 2014, 24% of mothers had 3 children and 14% had 4 or more. This is among women who are mothers at all. Something like 25% will never have any children. So when you put it all together, almost 1 in 3 women will ultimately have 3 or more children, a not insignificant fraction. However, I suspect that they are concentrated in certain groups which largely (but not entirely) do not included college educated white women. The fact that only 14% of mothers have 4 or more children among all groups is especially telling - in earlier generations have 6, 8 or 10 kids was not unusual. It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of - surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2015/05/07/family-size-among-mothers/

    https://ifstudies.org/blog/the-rise-of-childless-america

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Art Deco

  143. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    When Reagan was elected it was like a switch was flipped. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Then 9/11. Then the 2008 Bust. Watershed decade: government will get as powerful as it wants, will spend as much money as it wants, and the rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @SFG

    You are part of the rich! as a lawyer. You protect those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Corvinus

    Lawyers are not neessarily rich. Three questions:

    What kind of law do you think I practice?
    Why do you think my specialty protects "those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?"
    Who are "those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?"

    Replies: @Corvinus

  144. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    Don't forget, Zuck spent $300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He's now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

    Replies: @tyrone, @Chrisnonymous, @Muggles

    Don’t forget, Zuck spent \$300 million or whatever of his own money to corrupt the election and get Biden elected. He’s now getting what he wanted, good and hard. Couldn’t happen to a nicer guy.

    Yes, not soon enough.

    Few millennials or Zoomers, who dream of getting rich doing silly crap on the various Internet channels and proprietary forums, realize these are just oligarch owned Ad Farms.

    What wealth that is “created” is done by renting out eyeballs to merchants. No matter what the business, it’s all hustling ads. Surely you’v noticed those.

    Now “streaming” was supposed to replace “free TV” (largely now black TV and reruns) or cable TV, now stuffed full of unwatchable old films and obscure reruns/remakes that nobody sees. Streaming TV as a whole is a giant money suck. The paid fees for this (remember the old fear of “pay TV”?, well, its called streaming) don’t pay for the content creation. Not by half.

    So the ad biz is now creeping into Pay TV.

    Meanwhile brain damaged cell phone addict kids and teens are the main audience for Zuck’s creations along with Twitter (infested with Kommie Karens) and other such net businesses.

    Who really wants to watch ad infested Internet crap?

    The Biden-Pelosi-Yellen Recession will kick the ad biz in their proverbial nuts. As with it, ad supported “social media” marketing. Few need ads in a down consumer cycle. Sorry Zuck, no one cares about your website hustle any more. Ditto Twitter and the Twerking forums.

    Hear those oligarchs howl!

  145. @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    You are part of the rich! as a lawyer. You protect those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Lawyers are not neessarily rich. Three questions:

    What kind of law do you think I practice?
    Why do you think my specialty protects “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?”
    Who are “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?”

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "Lawyers are not necessarily rich."

    More often than not, they do quite well for themselves.

    "Three questions:"

    LOL, that's rich coming from you, considering I asked that same number of questions in response to some ridiculous claims you made.

    But I'll play along.

    --What kind of law do you think I practice? Corporate.

    --Why do you think my specialty protects “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” Tax loopholes, corporate raiding of pensions, offshoring, eradication of unions.

    --Who are “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” The corporcrats and their elitist toadie lawyers.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  146. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Corvinus

    Lawyers are not neessarily rich. Three questions:

    What kind of law do you think I practice?
    Why do you think my specialty protects "those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?"
    Who are "those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?"

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Lawyers are not necessarily rich.”

    More often than not, they do quite well for themselves.

    “Three questions:”

    LOL, that’s rich coming from you, considering I asked that same number of questions in response to some ridiculous claims you made.

    But I’ll play along.

    –What kind of law do you think I practice? Corporate.

    –Why do you think my specialty protects “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” Tax loopholes, corporate raiding of pensions, offshoring, eradication of unions.

    –Who are “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” The corporcrats and their elitist toadie lawyers.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Corvinus

    Nope; and what is "corporate," do tell.

    Nope, no idea.

    Sure, among some very particular others, but you don't really know how the world works. I doubt, for example, that you've ever formed a business corporation.

    Here's what we know about you:

    Your URL shows you live in a parasitic, dysfunctional polity.

    You're a Continental mutt who harbors a visceral hatred for America's founding stock.

    Your posting volume and content suggests net tax consumption.

    You're a complete misogynist.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  147. @Drive-by poster
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.
     
    It's funny you should mention that. I have always wondered about the prevalence of mental illness among those who have sex for money vs. those who do not, but who nonetheless sleep with lots of other people in a casual, no-strings-attached way.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    (It's as though there is a little less left of you after each time you do it.)

    I say this because, as you point out, mental illnesses like anhedonia seem more common today than they once were. Not so long ago, it was only prostitutes who seemed to end up mental wrecks after having loveless sex for years on end.

    Now, having access to the "easy come, easy go" sexual marketplace, it's as though everyone (or seemingly everyone) is off his/her rocker. I should have thought the Sexual Revolution would have put a permanent smile on everyone's face, but the long-term effect appears to have been quite the opposite.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @bomag, @Mark G.

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers….most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco


    Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.
     
    Is the "why" of this explained anywhere? Three generations seems like too short a timeframe for evolution to be at play.

    Is this being attributed to, say, heavily soy-based diets, or the environment?
    , @SFG
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Well, given that they can hit you with a false accusation in many industries and cause you to lose your job, not to mention that given everyone (male and female) has gotten fatter over the years and the bottom quarter of men would be going after larger women…you can see why a lot of guys would rather stay home and play Call of Warcraft.

    , @BB753
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    That's because he was getting free Viagra.
    https://youtu.be/oMeulTWdqiY

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco


    Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers….most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.
     
    So, you’re saying jerking off to midget porn doesn’t count?
  148. @JR Ewing
    @epebble

    A friend of mine from college was "very Catholic" and after a brief military career, he found a good wife who was like minded. They ended up with 10 kids, the oldest of which is 20 years old now and the youngest just 2. Basically, his wife was pregnant every other year from 2000 to 2020. In our college alumni group, where two kids is a "large family" and three is unheard of, he was something of a celebrity. His entry in our 25th reunion directory was a faux-interview where he answered unasked questions with answers like, "Two 10 person passenger vans like they have at nursing homes." Very good humored.

    He just passed away from cancer, diagnosed shortly after the youngest one was born.

    Life has a way of making you shake your head.

    Replies: @epebble, @duncsbaby

    So how does a 45-year-old woman with no marketable skills and 10 children, 2- to 20-year-old, support her family now?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @epebble

    Reality show.

    , @JR Ewing
    @epebble

    @duncsbaby

    I think they will be fine.

    He had two Ivy League degrees and after business school co-founded a startup that was sold to a major hospital company, where he was an executive at the end. They were of substantial means and, while I'm not privy to their finances, he was the type of guy who would have had ample life insurance.

    While I cannot speak to his widow's dating prospects, I will say that she had also founded a successful startup herself along the way (not sure where she found the time, frankly) which itself was starting to generate income by the time he died.

    I guess this goes back to proving the argument upthread that having large families is a luxury, but at least this large family was able to justify it financially.

    , @Thea
    @epebble

    It’s not that hard. You can’t live in San Francisco or take luxury vacations but 10 children do not cost 10 times as much as 1. Live near extended family and exchange help. Hand-me downs, part-time summer jobs for teens, share rooms. I won’t go into specifics but my situation has some similarities to the one above

    Having a lot of children is easier in some ways, in fact.

  149. @Art Deco
    @epebble

    That is extremely rare

    You need to get out more. We have four young women among our proximate relatives with 3+ children by the same husband. All of the children were born after 2003.

    Replies: @epebble, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

    U.S. women, on average, stopped having a third child by 1965. It is at or near 2 since 1972. Your experience is unusual, not the norm.

    https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/children-born-per-woman?tab=chart&country=~USA

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @epebble

    Do you understand the difference between 'not as common' and 'extremely rare' (evidently Anti-Gnostic does not)?

  150. @Close Reader
    Your impression of the lives of ordinary workers during the Stalin period is badly out of date. Since the archives opened up after the collapse of the USSR, a lot of Soviet history has had to be drastically revised. There is now much more hard evidence to go by, less need for guesses and speculation. Take a look, for example, at Robert W. Thurston, LIFE AND TERROR IN STALIN'S RUSSIA 1934 - 1941, especially chapter 6, "Life in the Factories." [Yale University Press 1996]

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    Your impression of the lives of ordinary workers during the Stalin period is badly out of date. Since the archives opened up after the collapse of the USSR, a lot of Soviet history has had to be drastically revised.

    Has Robert Conquest’s stuff held up do you know?

    • Replies: @Patrick McNally
    @Luddite in Chief

    Not with regards to the more dramatic assertions (artificial famine, tens of millions, et cetera). A useful overview of the archival Gulag data is given here:

    https://sovietinfo.tripod.com/GTY-Penal_System.pdf

    The original article was from The American Historical Review, October 1993. The above link is just a reproduction of the AHR piece.

    Likewise, Mark Tauger has debunked the myth that the famines of 1931-3 were "manmade" rather than being closely linked with natural disasters that were not well understood by Soviet authorities. This piece "Natural Disaster and Human Actions in the Soviet Famine" is just one of many landmark studies by Tauger:

    http://carlbeckpapers.pitt.edu/ojs/index.php/cbp/article/view/89/90

  151. @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "Lawyers are not necessarily rich."

    More often than not, they do quite well for themselves.

    "Three questions:"

    LOL, that's rich coming from you, considering I asked that same number of questions in response to some ridiculous claims you made.

    But I'll play along.

    --What kind of law do you think I practice? Corporate.

    --Why do you think my specialty protects “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” Tax loopholes, corporate raiding of pensions, offshoring, eradication of unions.

    --Who are “those who wish to destroy the white lower and middle class?” The corporcrats and their elitist toadie lawyers.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Nope; and what is “corporate,” do tell.

    Nope, no idea.

    Sure, among some very particular others, but you don’t really know how the world works. I doubt, for example, that you’ve ever formed a business corporation.

    Here’s what we know about you:

    Your URL shows you live in a parasitic, dysfunctional polity.

    You’re a Continental mutt who harbors a visceral hatred for America’s founding stock.

    Your posting volume and content suggests net tax consumption.

    You’re a complete misogynist.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    You're acting like a pavement ape as you did on your shuttered blog anytime someone had the audacity to question you. You are undoubtedly a corporate lawyer, and your wife is a schoolteacher. Both of your Virginia residential snouts are smack dab in the net tax eater trough.

    My URL shows I live in a solid middle class community, and I am a proud Continental Mutt like tens of millions of my fellow white brethren, bigot. As far as being a misogynst, that is decidedly more your territory than mine. But if it makes you feel outwardly better to label others in that fashion, go right ahead.

  152. @Art Deco
    @epebble

    That is extremely rare

    You need to get out more. We have four young women among our proximate relatives with 3+ children by the same husband. All of the children were born after 2003.

    Replies: @epebble, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

    Average TFR has been 2 or less since the 1970s. Aren’t you childless?

  153. @Chrisnonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Compare to photos of real Confederate (or Union) soldiers: the bodies are both scrawny and potbellied and the clothes poorly made, ill-fitting and worn slovenly. A sad commentary on our times, and the fact that likely many people cannot see what I am talking about in that photo only makes things worse.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

    They’re Brazilian Confederados. American Confederates, to my observation, look worse.

  154. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Drive-by poster

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers....most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @SFG, @BB753, @Paul Mendez

    Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Is the “why” of this explained anywhere? Three generations seems like too short a timeframe for evolution to be at play.

    Is this being attributed to, say, heavily soy-based diets, or the environment?

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  155. @Paul Mendez

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off…
     
    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    Hate to be the stereotypical geezer bitching about the younger generation, but Millennials are truly worthless. Spoiled, entitled, lazy and thin-skinned. Can’t read, write or do even basic math without a computer. Socially inept. Convinced sporting the same sloppy clothes, sloppy hair and garish tattoos as all their peers makes them nonconformists.

    Worst of all, they truly believe the sole purpose of life is to be happy. Anything that makes them unhappy must be evil.

    Excuse me, but it’s time for my prune juice & Metamucil night cap.

    Replies: @epebble, @Stan Adams, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anon, @Anonymous, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    The biggest moral wimps were the “Greatest Generation” and the Baby Boomers. They were handed an entire continent that better men had conquered and settled.

    But they were too pathetic to even maintain a free gift.

  156. @Charles Pewitt
    As the world entered the “malaise” era of the 1970s (to use Jimmy Carter’s term for his time), the Soviets seemed to get hit even harder by malaise.

    I say:

    That Jimmy Carter slob didn't have so-called MALAISE in his heart when that rabbit attacked Carter's canoe. Jimmy just about went swimmy to evade that rabitt.

    Eddie Rabbit bought or rented a place that my people had in Tennessee.

    One of the great divides in American politics is the Rabbit camp and the Cohn camp, and I'm in the Rabbit camp. I'd rather listen to that catchy Rainy Night bit instead of that rancid Walking In Memphis crapola from Marc Cohn.

    Prewitt's and Carter's and Randolph's and Byrd's and Washington's, and the most honorable of the bunch by far was Henry Prewitt.

    Remember that that rancid politician whore Jimmy Carter ramped up the nation-wrecking REFUGEE OVERLOAD in 1980.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/569605551434420224?s=20&t=oxUOCsaORCzHN-RANPHg1Q

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Fun Fact: Eddie Rabbitt was born in Brooklyn and grew up in New Jersey. “Drivin’ My Life Away” is a great tune. “I Love A Rainy Night” was way overplayed on my local top 40 station when I was a kid. “Kentucky Rain” by Elvis is cheeseball genius. Songs w/Rain in the title are usually pretty good.

  157. @epebble
    @JR Ewing

    So how does a 45-year-old woman with no marketable skills and 10 children, 2- to 20-year-old, support her family now?

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @JR Ewing, @Thea

    Reality show.

  158. @JR Ewing
    @epebble

    A friend of mine from college was "very Catholic" and after a brief military career, he found a good wife who was like minded. They ended up with 10 kids, the oldest of which is 20 years old now and the youngest just 2. Basically, his wife was pregnant every other year from 2000 to 2020. In our college alumni group, where two kids is a "large family" and three is unheard of, he was something of a celebrity. His entry in our 25th reunion directory was a faux-interview where he answered unasked questions with answers like, "Two 10 person passenger vans like they have at nursing homes." Very good humored.

    He just passed away from cancer, diagnosed shortly after the youngest one was born.

    Life has a way of making you shake your head.

    Replies: @epebble, @duncsbaby

    No GoFundMe is ever going to paper over that loss. Damn shame for all the kids but especially the young ones. I don’t see too many 40 something guys wanting to date a single mom w/10 kids. Still, life goes on.

  159. @Thea
    @epebble

    You’re correct that people at those incomes would enjoy the same lifestyle during those years.


    But psychologically, motivation matters. How do most millennials feel about the 2008 bailouts that resulted in million dollar bonuses for bankers that wrecked their businesses? Ordinary tax payers paid that bill. How can one not feel the system is corrupt and question the point of honest labor?

    The latest problem income divide has created is that some can and cannot afford private security from the criminals that have recently been unleashed. Supporting BLM as Bezos with armed guards is easy. A normal, hard working family cannot afford that now.

    That is an existential difference. It is not one of superficial comfort as between $100 k and $300 k.

    Replies: @epebble

    cannot afford private security from the criminals

    That is an absolute decrease in quality of life, not because Bezos owns 5 mansions, 4 jets, 3 yachts, 2 islands etc., A citizen in normal society should not need private security. Now, if Bezos doesn’t pay taxes, and that denies good police service, that is a case of poor public policy, but people voted for it.

  160. @Whitey2
    The morons who run this country — and that includes Trump — not only paid people not to work for a year, they foolishly paid most people an extra $600/week not to work.

    Now we're surprised people don't want to get up at 6:00 am to do crap jobs at their pre-Covid pay, or aren't doing those jobs well?

    All of our current problems were plainly foreseeable.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Rob McX, @WorkingClass

    The morons of which you speak don’t know that an extra 600 bucks per week is big money to us proles. For them it’s pocket change. They don’t actually know anything about the real world. We give them too much credit when we say they are evil. Heleocoptor money was supposd to be a joke.

  161. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Drive-by poster

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers....most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @SFG, @BB753, @Paul Mendez

    Well, given that they can hit you with a false accusation in many industries and cause you to lose your job, not to mention that given everyone (male and female) has gotten fatter over the years and the bottom quarter of men would be going after larger women…you can see why a lot of guys would rather stay home and play Call of Warcraft.

  162. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    When Reagan was elected it was like a switch was flipped. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Then 9/11. Then the 2008 Bust. Watershed decade: government will get as powerful as it wants, will spend as much money as it wants, and the rich will not be allowed to become poor.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @SFG

    The woke stuff followed in the early 2010s. Some people think its promotion was an attempt to distract the left after occupy Wall Street; I am not sure, personally, about that.

  163. @Drive-by poster
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.
     
    It's funny you should mention that. I have always wondered about the prevalence of mental illness among those who have sex for money vs. those who do not, but who nonetheless sleep with lots of other people in a casual, no-strings-attached way.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    (It's as though there is a little less left of you after each time you do it.)

    I say this because, as you point out, mental illnesses like anhedonia seem more common today than they once were. Not so long ago, it was only prostitutes who seemed to end up mental wrecks after having loveless sex for years on end.

    Now, having access to the "easy come, easy go" sexual marketplace, it's as though everyone (or seemingly everyone) is off his/her rocker. I should have thought the Sexual Revolution would have put a permanent smile on everyone's face, but the long-term effect appears to have been quite the opposite.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @bomag, @Mark G.

    Good comment.

    Society used to guard against self-destructive behavior: prostitution; porn; drugs; homosexuality; transgenderism.

    Apologists will tell us that these things have always been with us.

    Something about not promoting them seems relevant.

  164. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Drive-by poster

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers....most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @SFG, @BB753, @Paul Mendez

    That’s because he was getting free Viagra.

  165. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    I think COVID may have exposed a lot of people to the fact that their jobs don't really produce much. It's been reported that most employers haven't reported a decline in worker production during the work-at-home era. But there's no way that people are as productive with all of the distractions of home (spouse, children, food, television, etc.) as at the office unless lots of time at the office is wasted on makework and b.s. like chitchatting and making coffee. I've heard plenty of people say things like "I can get my day's work done in like two hours working from home." This is a real world test of "Parkinson's Law" that "work expands to fill the time allotted for its completion." At the office, people fill the extra time with nonsense, but since working from home allows the reward of free time if the work is efficiently and expeditiously completed, lots of people do all of their work in a compressed time frame and reward themselves with the difference. So my surmise is that people would rather spend the six hours of slack time caring for their kids or pursuing an afternoon delight with the old lady rather than dealing with typical office makework, pretending to be busy and other office bull.

    Perhaps with this unexpected spasm of freedom people decided that they actually like their spouses and children and their homes and being together, and that replacing that with hours a day of office nonsense and commuting isn't desirable?

    Replies: @BB753

    It has also dawned on a lot of employers that most white-collar employees are unproductive useless eaters ( to quote that great philanthropist and lover of humanity Bill Gates).
    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @BB753


    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.
     
    During the lockdowns, somewhere in the corners of the internet - somewhere on reddit - I came across a conversation among more working class commenters who were lamenting and gloating over the "essential worker" designation, or the lack thereof.

    At first I thought it was a silly thing to be focusing on, given that my personal opinion of the lockdowns had always been that they were absurd and unnecessary. Then I realized from further comments that for many people, it was the difference between getting paid and not. They were hourly workers and if they couldn't go to work, they didn't get paid. Quite literally, since I'm sure most of them didn't have direct deposit.

    More white-collar workers were not designated as "non-essential" but the paychecks kept showing up and they were really affected. It was just a semi-vacation for most of them.

    Eventually the welfare spigots were opened and those blue collar workers got their own vacation and for many of them it has never ended.

    The lockdowns were much more significant than most upper class people realized.

    Replies: @BB753

  166. @Anonymous
    @Paul Mendez

    Progress always comes from civilizations that have a lot of leisure time. This hard work crap is Puritan nonsense.

    People in slave societies work plenty hard and never progress for thousands of years.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    Progress always comes from civilizations that have a lot of leisure time. This hard work crap is Puritan nonsense

    Guess that explains why sub-Saharan Africa is so advanced, while Japan and Korea are still primitive backwaters.

    Progress comes from productivity. Productivity comes from hard-working civilizations that want to work even harder. Why would a civilization with a lot of leisure time bother to invent the computer, when it had pencil and paper?

  167. @epebble
    @JR Ewing

    So how does a 45-year-old woman with no marketable skills and 10 children, 2- to 20-year-old, support her family now?

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @JR Ewing, @Thea

    I think they will be fine.

    He had two Ivy League degrees and after business school co-founded a startup that was sold to a major hospital company, where he was an executive at the end. They were of substantial means and, while I’m not privy to their finances, he was the type of guy who would have had ample life insurance.

    While I cannot speak to his widow’s dating prospects, I will say that she had also founded a successful startup herself along the way (not sure where she found the time, frankly) which itself was starting to generate income by the time he died.

    I guess this goes back to proving the argument upthread that having large families is a luxury, but at least this large family was able to justify it financially.

  168. @ReadyFreddy
    Nothing Facebook or video game makers do is actually all that important. No great loss if they all suck at work.

    Replies: @MGB

    That’s the primary reason that they suck. They know it’s meaningless shit. No religion, no national purpose, no real pride.

  169. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Drive-by poster

    Yet young people are having much less sex today than anytime in recorded history. Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers....most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    Even boomers today are getting less sex than their parents got when they were elderly. Men like Bob Dole who served in WW II were getting laid more often when they were senior citizens compared to the weaker boomer men today. Bob Dole got laid more when he was 80 than Bill Clinton did at 70.

    One reason Boomers are getting laid less than their parents is due to their lower testosterone levels. Could be the same reason millennial men are getting less sex compared to the boomers. Today 30 year-old millennials have lower testosterone levels than 60 year-old boomers.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @SFG, @BB753, @Paul Mendez

    Millennials get laid less often than our great grandmothers….most millennials haven’t gotten laid in months and 25% of the millennial men are still virgins.

    So, you’re saying jerking off to midget porn doesn’t count?

  170. @Drive-by poster
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Houellebecq of course has always been very perceptive about the extent to which the West’s transition to a sexual free market based explicitly on social status has sucked a lot of the pleasure out of relationships, and turned once enjoyable fairly innocent past times like dating, dancing and flirting into social mine fields. Not surprisingly, anhedonia seems to be far more common than in the past.
     
    It's funny you should mention that. I have always wondered about the prevalence of mental illness among those who have sex for money vs. those who do not, but who nonetheless sleep with lots of other people in a casual, no-strings-attached way.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    (It's as though there is a little less left of you after each time you do it.)

    I say this because, as you point out, mental illnesses like anhedonia seem more common today than they once were. Not so long ago, it was only prostitutes who seemed to end up mental wrecks after having loveless sex for years on end.

    Now, having access to the "easy come, easy go" sexual marketplace, it's as though everyone (or seemingly everyone) is off his/her rocker. I should have thought the Sexual Revolution would have put a permanent smile on everyone's face, but the long-term effect appears to have been quite the opposite.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @bomag, @Mark G.

    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

    I’ve not heard that before but find it plausible. I have seen studies showing people in long-term mutually monogamous relationships live longer. If it improves physical health, then why not mental health too?

    As a libertarian, I’ve always thought exchanging sex for money should be legal. However, I have never had any desire to do that, particularly with large numbers of females, and even feel slightly repelled by the idea of doing that. Like you, I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can’t quite put my finger on why I feel that. I’ve thought about attributing my lack of desire to social conditioning from growing up in a middle-class environment where such activities are seen as deviant behavior. I’ve also thought there may be genetic programming towards monogamy because there would be an evolutionary advantage for men to stay with one female and help raise their children together. Those two things may be part of it, but I feel like something more is involved here.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Mark G.


    I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can’t quite put my finger on why I feel that
     
    You mean the fact that you would be paying for something that other men get for free in abundance?

    Replies: @Mark G.

  171. @Chrisnonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Compare to photos of real Confederate (or Union) soldiers: the bodies are both scrawny and potbellied and the clothes poorly made, ill-fitting and worn slovenly. A sad commentary on our times, and the fact that likely many people cannot see what I am talking about in that photo only makes things worse.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

    It’s even more remarkable considering that the sewing machine was just coming in so that most of the actual Confederate uniforms would have been sewn by hand.

    OTOH, this means that a Confederate uniform would have been tailor made (at least for an officer) so it would have fit properly in a way that an off the rack garment would not. And you wouldn’t have a closet full of clothes – you might literally have only the uniform that you were wearing or perhaps one change of clothes, especially in the field. This uniform represented a large part of your identity and was not some cheap Halloween costume that you put on for “reenactments” and then took off as soon as you got home, where you have a whole closet full of other clothes. (Houses in those days didn’t even have closets – no one had so many clothes that they needed a separate room in which to keep them.)

    In addition, when you see photos of Civil War troops, getting your picture taken was a big deal so they would be careful to look their best for the photo.

    Modern Americans have a different relationship to clothing and to photography. Due to mass production and technology, both have become incredibly inexpensive relative to income. Photographs are practically free. Anything that is plentiful is taken for granted and not given a lot of care and attention.

  172. @Art Deco
    @epebble

    That is extremely rare

    You need to get out more. We have four young women among our proximate relatives with 3+ children by the same husband. All of the children were born after 2003.

    Replies: @epebble, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jack D

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence. Usually it’s the other way around – someone will say “I know someone who has 5 kids” and you will reply ” The average American family in 2021 consisted of 3.13 persons.”

    If you want to be statistical rather than anecdotal, as of 2014, 24% of mothers had 3 children and 14% had 4 or more. This is among women who are mothers at all. Something like 25% will never have any children. So when you put it all together, almost 1 in 3 women will ultimately have 3 or more children, a not insignificant fraction. However, I suspect that they are concentrated in certain groups which largely (but not entirely) do not included college educated white women. The fact that only 14% of mothers have 4 or more children among all groups is especially telling – in earlier generations have 6, 8 or 10 kids was not unusual. It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of – surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2015/05/07/family-size-among-mothers/

    https://ifstudies.org/blog/the-rise-of-childless-america

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of – surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.
     
    My Catholic parish has dozens of families with more than 8 kids, probably 3/4 of the parish has 4+. Almost all the mothers are college-educated and some have graduate degrees (several have doctorates including my wife).

    With respect to both income and education, fertility tends to be a j-curve: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10887-018-9160-8


    Why did rich families increase their fertility? Inequality and marketization of child care
     
    https://assets.weforum.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/151215-education-women-children-fertility-gendergap-VoxEU.jpg

    The following graph has more up-to-date data: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Images/IMF/FANDD/Charts/2022/September/Doepke-Chart2.ashx?w=1182

    Replies: @mc23

    , @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence.

    Since he said 'extremely rare', I didn't think that was necessary. I knew a woman who gave birth to 1o children over nine pregnancies, the first born in 1980 and the last in 1996. That actually is quite rare. A married couple producing three children is not rare.

  173. @BB753
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    It has also dawned on a lot of employers that most white-collar employees are unproductive useless eaters ( to quote that great philanthropist and lover of humanity Bill Gates).
    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.

    During the lockdowns, somewhere in the corners of the internet – somewhere on reddit – I came across a conversation among more working class commenters who were lamenting and gloating over the “essential worker” designation, or the lack thereof.

    At first I thought it was a silly thing to be focusing on, given that my personal opinion of the lockdowns had always been that they were absurd and unnecessary. Then I realized from further comments that for many people, it was the difference between getting paid and not. They were hourly workers and if they couldn’t go to work, they didn’t get paid. Quite literally, since I’m sure most of them didn’t have direct deposit.

    More white-collar workers were not designated as “non-essential” but the paychecks kept showing up and they were really affected. It was just a semi-vacation for most of them.

    Eventually the welfare spigots were opened and those blue collar workers got their own vacation and for many of them it has never ended.

    The lockdowns were much more significant than most upper class people realized.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @JR Ewing

    I agree that lockdowns were an exercise in futility and totalitarism. But they proved that most office work is fluff and that big government is corrupt and inefficient ( if more proof was needed) and that functionaries are dead weight.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  174. Anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    Erin Overbey @erinoverbey
    Let’s talk about racism! Most white people at prestigious magazines don’t ever want to talk about race or diversity at all. Why? It's primarily because they’ve been allowed to exist in a world where their mastheads resemble member registries at Southern country clubs circa 1950..
     
    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    I wasn’t here in the ‘50’s, but asking for a friend: did “Southern country clubs circa 1950” have a lot of Jews, homosexuals, and women?

    Describes Cuckstable CC in South Carolina to a T, it’s Lindsey Graham’s home course..

  175. @JR Ewing
    @BB753


    On the other, essential workers during the lockdowns were those employees who make things run, mostly blue-collar jobs.
     
    During the lockdowns, somewhere in the corners of the internet - somewhere on reddit - I came across a conversation among more working class commenters who were lamenting and gloating over the "essential worker" designation, or the lack thereof.

    At first I thought it was a silly thing to be focusing on, given that my personal opinion of the lockdowns had always been that they were absurd and unnecessary. Then I realized from further comments that for many people, it was the difference between getting paid and not. They were hourly workers and if they couldn't go to work, they didn't get paid. Quite literally, since I'm sure most of them didn't have direct deposit.

    More white-collar workers were not designated as "non-essential" but the paychecks kept showing up and they were really affected. It was just a semi-vacation for most of them.

    Eventually the welfare spigots were opened and those blue collar workers got their own vacation and for many of them it has never ended.

    The lockdowns were much more significant than most upper class people realized.

    Replies: @BB753

    I agree that lockdowns were an exercise in futility and totalitarism. But they proved that most office work is fluff and that big government is corrupt and inefficient ( if more proof was needed) and that functionaries are dead weight.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @BB753


    most office work is fluff
     
    Matches my observation.
  176. @Jack D
    I was wondering when you would write about the Erin Overbey thing, which is hilarious. Aside from her airing her employer's dirty laundry in public (always a good way to get fired), she is also paranoid - - probably going thru menopause hormones. She accused the New Yorker of firing her over errors in her work which she says that David Remnick planted . It's possible but I doubt it - the man has better things to do. It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of Leftists.

    The whole story is here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/inside-the-new-yorkers-flame-war-with-archives-editor-erin-overbey

    I think that Erin thought that since she was kvetching on behalf of Blax she would be immunized - everyone knows that Extremism in Defense of Negroes is No Vice. But it turns out that she's just another white person. 10 to 1 they hire an Asian to replace her to show that she was wrong about their commitment to diversity. A young Asian at a lower salary who will probably work harder. Erin was in charge of the New Yorker archive which is a great job for an E. Asian.

    This was her New Yorker cartoon image:

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59097b762179605b11ad8f0f/master/w_600,c_limit/overbey-erin.png

    and this is the real Erin who has been hitting the pastry shop too often lately, what with all the stress she is under worrying about the lack of diversitay at the New Yorker:

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/07/erin-overbey-facebook-03.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1535

    Replies: @fish, @Dnought, @kaganovitch, @Daniel H, @old hispanic geezer, @AnotherDad, @Hypnotoad666, @William Badwhite, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @recently_based

    The average American woman weighs 171 pounds (and it’s about the same for women in prime dating years 20 – 39 — 168 pounds). 170 pounds. Let that sink in.

    You wanna know what makes men “listless,” there it is.

    Obviously, I’m not totally serious, and it’s also true that 75% of American men are medically defined as either overweight or obese, but Jesus.

  177. @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    There’s not a lot to aspire to most places. I’m mid-forties and I don’t see the point in working a ton more than I need to to pay the bills, etc. I find what I think we’re calling the managerial class more disgusting than anything. They’re mostly just a bunch of manipulators, bullshitters, etc. I want as little contact with them as I can get. Joining it sounds awful. It’s clear that white guys are the last choice in anything so if I kill myself in the hope of advancement I’ll most likely be passed over anyway.

    The modern office is also very much a women’s world. They’re fundamentally oriented differently than men. Female conversations are constant noise, no breaks, hard to participate in. Most of their attention focuses on peripheral things, minutia that doesn’t need to be discussed in detail.

  178. Let’s see how long this sense of lazy entitlement lasts once the recession truly begins to bite and the layoffs start at Meta.

  179. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence. Usually it's the other way around - someone will say "I know someone who has 5 kids" and you will reply " The average American family in 2021 consisted of 3.13 persons."

    If you want to be statistical rather than anecdotal, as of 2014, 24% of mothers had 3 children and 14% had 4 or more. This is among women who are mothers at all. Something like 25% will never have any children. So when you put it all together, almost 1 in 3 women will ultimately have 3 or more children, a not insignificant fraction. However, I suspect that they are concentrated in certain groups which largely (but not entirely) do not included college educated white women. The fact that only 14% of mothers have 4 or more children among all groups is especially telling - in earlier generations have 6, 8 or 10 kids was not unusual. It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of - surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2015/05/07/family-size-among-mothers/

    https://ifstudies.org/blog/the-rise-of-childless-america

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Art Deco

    It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of – surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.

    My Catholic parish has dozens of families with more than 8 kids, probably 3/4 of the parish has 4+. Almost all the mothers are college-educated and some have graduate degrees (several have doctorates including my wife).

    With respect to both income and education, fertility tends to be a j-curve: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10887-018-9160-8

    Why did rich families increase their fertility? Inequality and marketization of child care


    The following graph has more up-to-date data: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Images/IMF/FANDD/Charts/2022/September/Doepke-Chart2.ashx?w=1182

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @mc23
    @Twinkie

    My wife has told me this was a trend, nice to see the data. A hugh improvement for the most educated, unfortunately below replacement for everyone except those with less then 12.

    High energy and intelligence are formidable and admirable even more in a women and no more so then in a mother.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  180. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Corvinus

    Nope; and what is "corporate," do tell.

    Nope, no idea.

    Sure, among some very particular others, but you don't really know how the world works. I doubt, for example, that you've ever formed a business corporation.

    Here's what we know about you:

    Your URL shows you live in a parasitic, dysfunctional polity.

    You're a Continental mutt who harbors a visceral hatred for America's founding stock.

    Your posting volume and content suggests net tax consumption.

    You're a complete misogynist.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    You’re acting like a pavement ape as you did on your shuttered blog anytime someone had the audacity to question you. You are undoubtedly a corporate lawyer, and your wife is a schoolteacher. Both of your Virginia residential snouts are smack dab in the net tax eater trough.

    My URL shows I live in a solid middle class community, and I am a proud Continental Mutt like tens of millions of my fellow white brethren, bigot. As far as being a misogynst, that is decidedly more your territory than mine. But if it makes you feel outwardly better to label others in that fashion, go right ahead.

  181. anonymous[523] • Disclaimer says:

    The pandemic was the best thing that ever happened to me maybe in my life, getting a year off from the office. It was like getting off the hamster wheel for the first time in my life. Then going back for a year hybrid, now no office at all. For a website/app company a physical workspace is completely superfluous today and was for at least a few years before 2020. For the first time in my life I don’t resent the time lost from my own life doing work, because I don’t have to pay to fight through a commute and asshole congested traffic to show up somewhere in the morning to be chained to a location all day where none of us want to be, all for zero utility. The pandemic broke the inertia that was keeping IT workers from sleeping in and doing the work at their pace in the comfort of the home. It turned out covid was way overplayed, and the masking was increasingly obnoxious and the vaccine/big pharma/mandates stuff was eye opening and sucks, but I feel so free and unchained now. And yes, it lets me pretend to be working less. And yes, I don’t work if I don’t have to. There’s more to life for me.

  182. @prosa123
    Most Men of Unz long for an idealized version of 1950's in which people had big families, everyone went to church, men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren't many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
    Reality check: those days are dead and buried, and aren't coming back. Make the best of the here and now.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Cagey Beast, @Random Anonymous, @mc23

  183. @Luddite in Chief
    @Close Reader


    Your impression of the lives of ordinary workers during the Stalin period is badly out of date. Since the archives opened up after the collapse of the USSR, a lot of Soviet history has had to be drastically revised.
     
    Has Robert Conquest's stuff held up do you know?

    Replies: @Patrick McNally

    Not with regards to the more dramatic assertions (artificial famine, tens of millions, et cetera). A useful overview of the archival Gulag data is given here:

    https://sovietinfo.tripod.com/GTY-Penal_System.pdf

    The original article was from The American Historical Review, October 1993. The above link is just a reproduction of the AHR piece.

    Likewise, Mark Tauger has debunked the myth that the famines of 1931-3 were “manmade” rather than being closely linked with natural disasters that were not well understood by Soviet authorities. This piece “Natural Disaster and Human Actions in the Soviet Famine” is just one of many landmark studies by Tauger:

    http://carlbeckpapers.pitt.edu/ojs/index.php/cbp/article/view/89/90

  184. > then in the 1970s things started to go wrong, often for obscure reasons,

    The original drives to industrialize the USSR focused on “heavy industry” instead of consumer goods. This was justified with reference to military needs and such and the argument could seem plausible with Hitler preparing a drive to the east to conquer living space from the subhuman Slavs. But Khrushchev recognized that Soviet industry would have to become useful to ordinary consumers if the government was going to justify itself. Although Khrushchev never really figured out how to address the problem of a bureaucracy which was inept at producing household consumer goods, he gave off a general sincerity which had some charm. Under Brezhnev the reigning bureaucracy just accepted that they were not going to really produce high quality consumer goods. Top party members could order something made in West Germany, but they abandoned the pretense that Soviet industry would one day produce the same goods for Soviet consumers. This quite naturally meant a decline in motivation for Soviet workers, and a rise of alcoholism among the male workers especially.

  185. Will the tech billionaires figure out the connections between Wokeness and slacking off and cut back on Wokeness?

    Does the question need to be asked?

    Another line of inquiry might be if there’s any correlation between a company providing an actual identifiable functional product at a specified time and the level of wokeness.

    A huge and growing percentage of GDP if functionally nothing at all.

  186. @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of – surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.
     
    My Catholic parish has dozens of families with more than 8 kids, probably 3/4 of the parish has 4+. Almost all the mothers are college-educated and some have graduate degrees (several have doctorates including my wife).

    With respect to both income and education, fertility tends to be a j-curve: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10887-018-9160-8


    Why did rich families increase their fertility? Inequality and marketization of child care
     
    https://assets.weforum.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/151215-education-women-children-fertility-gendergap-VoxEU.jpg

    The following graph has more up-to-date data: https://www.imf.org/-/media/Images/IMF/FANDD/Charts/2022/September/Doepke-Chart2.ashx?w=1182

    Replies: @mc23

    My wife has told me this was a trend, nice to see the data. A hugh improvement for the most educated, unfortunately below replacement for everyone except those with less then 12.

    High energy and intelligence are formidable and admirable even more in a women and no more so then in a mother.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @mc23


    My wife has told me this was a trend, nice to see the data. A hugh improvement for the most educated, unfortunately below replacement for everyone except those with less then 12.
     
    One thing to keep in mind is that, within each category, there is likely a great deal of variation. So, for example, while the average fertility of those with more than 16 years of schooling is 1.89, it may very well be that the fertility among the more religious within that cohort is substantially higher while that of the secular within the same cohort is lower. That pattern is probably replicated for each cohort of schooling years.
  187. @epebble
    @JR Ewing

    So how does a 45-year-old woman with no marketable skills and 10 children, 2- to 20-year-old, support her family now?

    Replies: @duncsbaby, @JR Ewing, @Thea

    It’s not that hard. You can’t live in San Francisco or take luxury vacations but 10 children do not cost 10 times as much as 1. Live near extended family and exchange help. Hand-me downs, part-time summer jobs for teens, share rooms. I won’t go into specifics but my situation has some similarities to the one above

    Having a lot of children is easier in some ways, in fact.

  188. @Luddite in Chief
    @JimB


    The problem with any addiction is that it represents destruction of brain tissue in the hippocampus that you can never grow back. Once an addict, always an addict. Addicts can never regain their preaddiction level of productivity. They will be distracted until death by the monkey on their back.
     
    I believe this is the "disease" model of addiction you are describing, is that correct? While I do not doubt that addiction changes the brain (as does any action performed repeatedly over time), I am not sure I subscribe to the theory that says, "once addicted, always addicted."

    I have only just started it, but Marc Lewis has written a book titled, The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. What makes the book interesting is not that Lewis is a neuroscientist (which one might expect), but that he is a former addict himself.

    From what I gather, Lewis views the disease model of addiction as a barrier (rather than a means) to effective treatment. However, I do not know whether his view has found widespread acceptance or if Lewis is considered a maverick (to put it politely).

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most). However, I am not sure I buy into a model that seems to say, in essence, "people are helpless and that is all there is to it."

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin, @JimB

    I can see why the disease model is so popular nowadays, as it serves to largely relieve people of personal responsibility (responsibility being anathema to most).

    The disease model of addiction should be taught to middle school kids instead of the progressive dogma that experimentation with sex and drugs is part of self-exploration necessary for maturation. Getting high ends up being a disastrous impediment to meaningful self-actualization that comes only from constructive goal oriented action pursued in the context of well ordered daily routine.

  189. An example of a large family:

    https://www.the-sun.com/news/4563608/what-octomom-nadya-suleman-doing-now/

    It doesn’t look easy, though she seems to be happy

  190. @Dr. X

    Have We Entered a Brezhnevite Malaise?
     
    With the geriatric, senile Biden in office, I think we're probably into the Chernenko-Andropov malaise by now.

    A general impression I’ve had over the last 28 months is that many people have used covid as an excuse to slack off... Much of wokeness involves denunciations of hard, painstaking work as an outmoded white male thing.
     
    I think this is true, particularly among the late Millennials and Zoomers, but it's not the whole story.

    Wokeness is the culmination of decades of political correctness and anti-white maleness in the workplace. Thirty years ago employers were blatantly looking to hire and promote blacks over whites. As workplaces have become feminized, social skills take priority over actual work. The way to make money is not to actually do any work -- the guys who do that are either paid shit or their jobs have been offshored -- but to socially maneuver your way into a paying position based on who you know or being part of a given clique. Better yet, the way to make money is to get some kind of unionized government employment (and then go on disability) or be involved in some kind of rent-seeking grift where your wages are essentially paid by the government.

    Failing that, there's not much worth doing. I'm an early Gen Xer, too young to retire but too old to deal with and maneuver through all the bullshit. I'm not gainfully employed at the moment, but don't really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled. None of them pay enough to make much of a difference in my life. My $150k house ($70k when I bought it) has long been paid off. My cars are paid off. I have no debt. What's the point of doing some shitty retail or service job for $15 an hour? It's not enough to upgrade to a $500k house or a $70k car. None of the wages that are being paid will keep up with inflation. (Frankly I consider $20-25 and hour to be the effective minimum wage that would stir my interest at this point). All I would do is make somebody else rich and take up the dwindling amount of time I have left. I'll probably be dead in 25 years, I'm not going to spend it working an idiotic job for which I'll have to get a COVID jab and wear a stupid mask and do sexual harassment training and put up with petty bullshit. I've had a couple of jobs like that, and I'm not interested in any more of them.

    I'd rather check out of society as much as possible rather than try to "get ahead," I don't think that's possible any more unless you're a criminal, a grifter, or a real bastard. You certainly can't "get ahead" by working for an hourly wage. Hell, it was way back in 1978 that Merle Haggard sang "The Workin' Man Can't Get Nowhere Today," it's only gotten worse since then.

    I suppose I'll have to get something at the end of the summer, but right now I'd much rather have my time, even if I use it to just screw off.

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer, @Almost Missouri, @Muggles, @ScarletNumber

    I’m not gainfully employed at the moment, but don’t really have any interest in the crappy jobs that are going unfilled.

    Tell me you’re not married without telling me you’re not married

  191. @Reg Cæsar

    As the world entered the “malaise” era of the 1970s (to use Jimmy Carter’s term for his time)
     
    Carter never actually used that word. Nor did George Mallory (let alone Edmund Hillary) say "Because it us there." Both were the words of reporters writing about them.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Nor according to Bill Oakley, Josh Weinstein, and The Simpsons in “Marge In Chains” (421, May 6, 1993)

  192. @JR Ewing
    @JR Ewing

    Just looked it up and I butchered it quite a bit: the player was Darryl Strawberry going to the Dodgers in the prime of his career... but the Tommy Lasorda "it's a weakness" part was correct.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    The irony is that Darryl would eventually clean himself up and had five productive seasons at the end of his career with the Yankees (95-99) where they won three World Series. He and Gooden were both members of the 96 Yankees which ended their longest World Series drought. This bothers Mets fans to no end, especially since they haven’t won since 86.

  193. @Harry Baldwin
    @Luddite in Chief

    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years. She eventually got clean and is no longer possessed by the demon. To say, "Once an addict, always an addict" is a bit misleading. An insightful drug counselor we spoke with distinguished between being a drug addict and being someone who abuses drugs. The former eventually has a complete, irreversible, warping of their personality. The latter can clean themselves up and return to their former selves.

    I would agree that there is such a thing as an addictive personality, which can express itself in ways more or less harmful. That aspect of our daughter's personality now indulges itself with vaping rather than heroin. Not ideal but a marked improvement.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @ScarletNumber

    As a teenager our daughter was addicted to heroin for several years

    How much fellatio did she give to satisfy that habit?

  194. @Mark G.
    @Drive-by poster


    It seems that having sex with large numbers of people whom you do not care about (and possibly vice versa) affects you in some way. I cannot quite put my finger on it (perhaps it is ineffable?), but it acts to demean and diminish you in some way.

     

    I've not heard that before but find it plausible. I have seen studies showing people in long-term mutually monogamous relationships live longer. If it improves physical health, then why not mental health too?

    As a libertarian, I've always thought exchanging sex for money should be legal. However, I have never had any desire to do that, particularly with large numbers of females, and even feel slightly repelled by the idea of doing that. Like you, I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can't quite put my finger on why I feel that. I've thought about attributing my lack of desire to social conditioning from growing up in a middle-class environment where such activities are seen as deviant behavior. I've also thought there may be genetic programming towards monogamy because there would be an evolutionary advantage for men to stay with one female and help raise their children together. Those two things may be part of it, but I feel like something more is involved here.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can’t quite put my finger on why I feel that

    You mean the fact that you would be paying for something that other men get for free in abundance?

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @ScarletNumber


    You mean the fact that you would be paying for something that other men get for free in abundance?
     
    No, that's not it. When I was younger, I was married and had no shortage of sex. I'm 66 now. The older I got the more interest I received from women around the same age as me. Statistically, under the age of 45 more women are married but after 45 more men are married. Men die younger and successful men marry younger women so there is a shortage of same age men for older women. My last girlfriend was in the recent past, and I could get another one without any problem because of that surplus of older unwanted females.

    Most older guys who are in good health and financially well off, like myself, I think actually pay for sex so they can get access to a much younger female, not because women around their own age are unavailable. For some reason, I would rather be with a female at least somewhat close to the same age as me. She might actually care about me and I might care about her, and I would like that.
  195. @prosa123
    Most Men of Unz long for an idealized version of 1950's in which people had big families, everyone went to church, men were unquestioned leaders of the family, blacks were submissive, there weren't many Hispanics or Asians, and gays were deeply closeted.
    Reality check: those days are dead and buried, and aren't coming back. Make the best of the here and now.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Cagey Beast, @Random Anonymous, @mc23

    That pretty much describes the 60’s as well. Social cohesion started to break at that time. Mid 70’s is where things finally fractured

  196. @epebble
    @Art Deco

    U.S. women, on average, stopped having a third child by 1965. It is at or near 2 since 1972. Your experience is unusual, not the norm.

    https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/children-born-per-woman?tab=chart&country=~USA

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Do you understand the difference between ‘not as common’ and ‘extremely rare’ (evidently Anti-Gnostic does not)?

  197. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence. Usually it's the other way around - someone will say "I know someone who has 5 kids" and you will reply " The average American family in 2021 consisted of 3.13 persons."

    If you want to be statistical rather than anecdotal, as of 2014, 24% of mothers had 3 children and 14% had 4 or more. This is among women who are mothers at all. Something like 25% will never have any children. So when you put it all together, almost 1 in 3 women will ultimately have 3 or more children, a not insignificant fraction. However, I suspect that they are concentrated in certain groups which largely (but not entirely) do not included college educated white women. The fact that only 14% of mothers have 4 or more children among all groups is especially telling - in earlier generations have 6, 8 or 10 kids was not unusual. It would be interesting to see who that 14% was made up of - surely a lot of Amish, Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Hispanics, etc. and not very many college educated white females.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2015/05/07/family-size-among-mothers/

    https://ifstudies.org/blog/the-rise-of-childless-america

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Art Deco

    This is strange because you are usually big on statistical evidence.

    Since he said ‘extremely rare’, I didn’t think that was necessary. I knew a woman who gave birth to 1o children over nine pregnancies, the first born in 1980 and the last in 1996. That actually is quite rare. A married couple producing three children is not rare.

  198. @ScarletNumber
    @Mark G.


    I feel like it would demean and diminish me in some way and also like you I can’t quite put my finger on why I feel that
     
    You mean the fact that you would be paying for something that other men get for free in abundance?

    Replies: @Mark G.

    You mean the fact that you would be paying for something that other men get for free in abundance?

    No, that’s not it. When I was younger, I was married and had no shortage of sex. I’m 66 now. The older I got the more interest I received from women around the same age as me. Statistically, under the age of 45 more women are married but after 45 more men are married. Men die younger and successful men marry younger women so there is a shortage of same age men for older women. My last girlfriend was in the recent past, and I could get another one without any problem because of that surplus of older unwanted females.

    Most older guys who are in good health and financially well off, like myself, I think actually pay for sex so they can get access to a much younger female, not because women around their own age are unavailable. For some reason, I would rather be with a female at least somewhat close to the same age as me. She might actually care about me and I might care about her, and I would like that.

  199. @mc23
    @Twinkie

    My wife has told me this was a trend, nice to see the data. A hugh improvement for the most educated, unfortunately below replacement for everyone except those with less then 12.

    High energy and intelligence are formidable and admirable even more in a women and no more so then in a mother.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    My wife has told me this was a trend, nice to see the data. A hugh improvement for the most educated, unfortunately below replacement for everyone except those with less then 12.

    One thing to keep in mind is that, within each category, there is likely a great deal of variation. So, for example, while the average fertility of those with more than 16 years of schooling is 1.89, it may very well be that the fertility among the more religious within that cohort is substantially higher while that of the secular within the same cohort is lower. That pattern is probably replicated for each cohort of schooling years.

  200. @JimDandy
    @epebble

    This is a typically-selfish myopic-American conversation. The Ukraine is so strapped for cash right now their poor brave little leader is out there in his undershirt begging for alms.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @tyrone, @Sam Malone

    lol

  201. @BB753
    @JR Ewing

    I agree that lockdowns were an exercise in futility and totalitarism. But they proved that most office work is fluff and that big government is corrupt and inefficient ( if more proof was needed) and that functionaries are dead weight.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    most office work is fluff

    Matches my observation.

  202. Anon[794] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble
    @Paul Mendez

    The malaise started loooong before the WuFlu.

    My theory is, we lost the oomph at the end of 1990. The era of 1961 - 1990 was all about struggle for survival during Cold War and failure was not an option. Before that, the era of 1931-1960 was a struggle for survival from Great Depression, WW2 and Cold War. The years before that were just a struggle for most everyone since there were not many conveniences - no electricity, no cures for common diseases, no means for efficient travel or communication for most people.

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn't have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything. From the quality of leaders, the citizens, industriousness, ethics, values ...

    The interesting question is, will 2021-2050 be different or a repetition of 1991-2020 with more pixels per inch?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Thea, @Cato, @Paul Mendez, @JimDandy, @Mark G., @Joe862, @Anon

    The 1991-2020 is the first generation in a long time when the nation didn’t have a purpose or urgency and it is showing in everything.

    It’s not so abstract, collective.

    The reason is that people have stopped having children, forming families. Children provide people with a huge incentive to work and build wealth.

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