The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Hate Hoaxer Michael Ron David Kadar Sentenced in Israel
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

The New York Times runs a sizable article on the sentencing of the Israeli-American Jewish man who launched a thousand op-eds about how Trump was causing rising anti-Semitism by phoning in all those bomb threats to Jewish institutions in the U.S.. And yet, incredibly, the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish.

American-Israeli Teenager Is Sentenced to 10 Years for Bomb Hoaxes

The 19-year-old has remained publicly unidentified because some of the crimes were committed while he was still a minor.

That makes perfect sense. It’s like banning any newspaper mention of serial killer Ted Bundy’s name because, say, he had also tortured animals when he was a minor.

Outside of the New York Times, the criminal’s name is Michael Ron David Kadar. It’s not a secret. You can look his name and ethnicity up on Wikipedia.

This is kind of like how Haven Monahan’s name has only appeared once in the history of the New York Times and Jackie Coakley’s last name never. It’s a way of memory-holing embarrassing events by keeping them vague. If nobody has a handle to remember them by, they can’t be part of The Narrative. It’s rather like how there is no journalistic shorthand name for Merkel’s Mistake letting in the Million Marching Muslim Men in 2015.

The Wikipedia article, on the other hand, is pretty good:

2017 Jewish Community Center bomb threats

In early 2017, a wave of more than 2,000 bomb threats were made against Jewish Community Centers in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Norway and Denmark.[1] Two arrests were made in connection with the threats and Michael Ron David Kadar, a dual American-Israeli citizen, has been convicted.[2][3] He was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment.

Theories
Media speculation made by the ADL in January 2017 promoted the view that the threats were the responsibility of “right wing Christians in the United States”.[4] The same month, Jerry Silverman of the Jewish Federations of North America said the threats were part of a “coordinated effort” to intimidate American Jews.[5] In February, during an interview on CNN, U.S. Congressman Jerrold Nadler said that some supporters of Donald Trump were responsible for the threats.[6]

In an op-ed for the Baltimore Sun, deputy editor Tricia Bishop said the threats represent a growing attitude of racial intolerance in the United States, but probably no specific group or person was responsible for the threats. She implored readers to “stand up … before it’s your children they come for”.[7]

Suspects
In March 2017, two persons were arrested on separate charges of making a number of the bomb threats:

American journalist
Juan M. Thompson, a former journalist for The Intercept, was charged with responsibility for at least eight of the incidents.[8] According to media reports, Thompson had called in the threats in an attempt to frame a woman whom he had previously dated.[9] …

They should also mention that Thompson was left of center and black, but that at least is a good start.

Israeli-American man

A 19-year-old Jewish Israeli-American named as Michael Ron David Kadar, was arrested in March 2017 in Ashkelon, Israel and charged with responsibility for “dozens” of the threats.

 
Hide 71 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. He’s not Jewish, Steve, he’s Misunderstood.

    • LOL: Bubba
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Not misunderstood. This aspie is a victim of the Holocaust.

    Asperger's Children: The Origins of Autism in Nazi Vienna

    , @Flip
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    He’s not Jewish, Steve, he’s Misunderstood.

     

    From the King of Cultural Appropriation:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHjKzr6tLz0

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  2. And yet, incredibly, the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish.

    Both of the previous articles in the NYT, March 23 and 24 2017, prominently mention that he’s Jewish, so I doubt there is some conspiracy afoot here.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @kaganovitch

    But Steve, the article does say :

    "The hoax calls appear to have started in the spring of 2015, when he would have been about 16. Between April 2015 and March 2017, prosecutors said, he called about 2,000 institutions, claiming that bombs had been planted or threatening an imminent shooting attack, prompting evacuations and bringing out the police and emergency services."

    2,000 calls!

    This creep is responsible for the entire phenonemon!

    All of it!

    And the NYT admitted it!

    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe "dozens" of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!

    (BTW, his mother was good for the de rigeur "my boy didn't do anything" quote.)

    Replies: @anon, @Trevor H.

  3. I’m certainly glad that the NYT ran a large article and that the Israeli court was tough on him. I’m no fan of the NYT, but credit where credit is due. As far as his name is concerned, no one will remember it anyway. And since the headline describes him as American-Israeli, what else would he be but Jewish? A Palestinian would never be so described.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
  4. Out of curiosity, what % of Unz.com have ethnically id’d themselves on this website?

    For example I’ve always assumed that Paul Craig Roberts is a White Amerian Christian, but I don’t recall this site explicitly identifying himself as such.

    Here is his Wikipedia bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Craig_Roberts

    No mention of him being a White Christian. Hmmm

    Of course you can pretty much make assumptions especially when its obvious (eg American-Israeli as the NYT article says)

    • Troll: MikeatMikedotMike
    • Replies: @gabriel alberton
    @anony-mouse

    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it's not obvious. Given that he reportedly made bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, he wouldn't be expected to be Jewish. Yet he is.

    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @slumber_j

  5. Soon after the perpetrator was caught in Israel (I wonder how much pressure FBI had to exert for this to happen) we were told by media to never mind that he was Jewish and Israeli. His actions were ant-Semitic, the fear of Jews in synagogues and community centers was real so we should concentrate on rising anti-Semitism.

  6. Apparently Kadar suffers from autism. Perhaps that’s why the NYT didn’t name him.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @JLK

    No way. People on the spectrum have trouble reading social cues. This guy knew enough to cover his tracks for a long time.

  7. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Kadar’s crime was not anti-Jewish or ‘antisemitic’.

    He was trying to defame white people by making Jews seem like victims.

    His ilk need to apologize to white people.

    And the fact that he was able to do it on such a huge scale means that Israel tolerates and even encourages that kind of thing.

    But media will spin it was ‘self-loathing Jew attacking Jews’.

    No, he is a Jewish supremacist who tried to defame white(and maybe Muslims).

    He is Anti-whitite.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    @Anon

    He was drawing attention the vicious racism rampant in America

    To me hi is a hero

    Replies: @epochehusserl

    , @anon
    @Anon


    He was trying to defame white people by making Jews seem like victims.

    His ilk need to apologize to white people
     
    hear hear
  8. He’s described as American-Israeli and that makes it quite obvious he’s Jewish (since Americans of Israeli Arab extraction or Palestinian extraction would never be described as American Israelis but rather as Arab Americans or Palestinian Americans)

  9. Another example of Bobby Fischer syndrome.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dave Pinsen

    Bobby Fischer had nothing on Dan Burros.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Burros


    https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1343343604l/5996668.jpg

    Replies: @PV van der Byl, @Anonymous

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @Dave Pinsen

    Did anyone else think of that scene in Blazing Saddles where Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder try to infiltrate the Klan?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nB1E0oAAc-w

  10. Haven Monahan began Raping girls when he was in high School with Bret Kavanaugh , thus they cannot be named because they were juveniles when they started sexually assaulting girls.

  11. @Anon
    Kadar's crime was not anti-Jewish or 'antisemitic'.

    He was trying to defame white people by making Jews seem like victims.

    His ilk need to apologize to white people.

    And the fact that he was able to do it on such a huge scale means that Israel tolerates and even encourages that kind of thing.

    But media will spin it was 'self-loathing Jew attacking Jews'.

    No, he is a Jewish supremacist who tried to defame white(and maybe Muslims).

    He is Anti-whitite.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck, @anon

    He was drawing attention the vicious racism rampant in America

    To me hi is a hero

    • Replies: @epochehusserl
    @Tiny Duck

    you keep misspelling your last name

  12. …incredibly, the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish…

    By “incredibly,” I take it you meant “predictably,” or “obviously?”

    • Replies: @Jimmy R.
    @vinteuil

    Pretty much. You can delete "And yet, incredibly" and just leave "the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish."

    Omission is a principal method by which the MSM lies. So much easier to "explain". I mean, we simply don't have room to include everything. Nothing to see here.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

  13. @MikeatMikedotMike
    He's not Jewish, Steve, he's Misunderstood.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Flip, @Reg Cæsar

    Not misunderstood. This aspie is a victim of the Holocaust.

    Asperger’s Children: The Origins of Autism in Nazi Vienna

  14. On balance, Wikipedia is a force for the red pill. I say this from experience. There is some egregious bias on some of the articles, but regardless there’s usually MORE than enough there for the inquisitive reader.

    Below are some of the worst articles I’ve seen in terms of bias.

    Ron talked about this Barnes guy in one of his articles. The guy wrote a ton of material, essentially none of it on the Holocaust, yet the article reduces his influence almost entirely to Holocaust denial, sourced almost entirely from Deborah Lipstadt’s work.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Elmer_Barnes

    Then there are many that use very loaded and dismissive language.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Bolshevism

    “Jewish Bolshevism, also Judeo–Bolshevism, is an anti-communist and antisemitic canard…”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_genocide_conspiracy_theory

    “The white genocide conspiracy theory is a neo-Nazi, alt-right, white nationalist/supremacist conspiracy theory…”

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @gregor

    Wikipedia is hopeless as a resource for anything contentious. Too many interest groups.

    , @European-American
    @gregor

    Wikipedia is an incredibly useful resource that can be used to counterbalance biased news reporting. Of course it’s very imperfect. But on the whole less truth-challenged than most of the media.

    I ♥
    WIKI

  15. @vinteuil
    ...incredibly, the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish...

    By "incredibly," I take it you meant "predictably," or "obviously?"

    Replies: @Jimmy R.

    Pretty much. You can delete “And yet, incredibly” and just leave “the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish.”

    Omission is a principal method by which the MSM lies. So much easier to “explain”. I mean, we simply don’t have room to include everything. Nothing to see here.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @Jimmy R.

    Perhaps it is me but what reader wouldn't understand "Israeli-American" (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    If a black guy had been making hoax calls to black civil rights groups threatening them and they reported it as "Nigerian-American" in the headline would you think they were trying to obscure the facts?

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @European-American, @International Jew

  16. Media speculation made by the ADL in January 2017 promoted the view that the threats were the responsibility of “right wing Christians in the United States.”

    Worth repeating, since you can count the days until it disappears from Wikipedia.

  17. “Michael Ron David”?

    That brings two things to mind. Cold fusion– anyone ever mixed these?

  18. Were the stats on anti-Semitic events adjusted for these false flag threats?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Goatweed

    Of course not. Also, the ADL will add to its list every anti-Semitic crime imagined for Law & Order: Hate Crimes. They're hate crimes too.

  19. @JLK
    Apparently Kadar suffers from autism. Perhaps that's why the NYT didn't name him.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    No way. People on the spectrum have trouble reading social cues. This guy knew enough to cover his tracks for a long time.

  20. @Dave Pinsen
    Another example of Bobby Fischer syndrome.

    https://twitter.com/bosnerdley/status/1065689412745482247?s=21

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rosamond Vincy

    Bobby Fischer had nothing on Dan Burros.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Burros

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    @Reg Cæsar

    Truth is, indeed, stranger than fiction.

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Note the choice of the phrase "American-Jewish" rather than "Jewish American."

  21. @Dave Pinsen
    Another example of Bobby Fischer syndrome.

    https://twitter.com/bosnerdley/status/1065689412745482247?s=21

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rosamond Vincy

    Did anyone else think of that scene in Blazing Saddles where Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder try to infiltrate the Klan?

  22. > for Merkel’s Mistake letting in the Million Marching Muslim Men in 2015.

    1.8 Million and counting according to the stats office, cf https://wp.me/sapuj6-2, I can translate that if needed.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut

    How would you translate


    "nicht berücksichtigt worden, weil sich nicht eindeutig bestimmen ließ"
     
    ?

    Thanks.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Anonymous

    , @theo the kraut
    @theo the kraut

    https://www.focus.de/politik/deutschland/bundesregierung-veroeffentlicht-zahlen-die-fakten-zur-fluechtlingskrise-so-viele-menschen-kamen-seit-2013-nach-deutschland_id_9965943.html


    translate.google.com:

    According to this, more than 1.8 million people have applied for asylum in Germany since 2013. Two-thirds of them in 2015 and 2016, ie in the time of large refugee flows. Almost a third of the people said they came from Syria. According to the German government, eleven percent come from Afghanistan, almost ten percent from Iraq.
    1.3 million asylum seekers in Germany

    At the moment there are still around 1.3 million of these people in Germany. [theo: yeah, right...] Around 570,000 are recognized as refugees. Almost 210,000 enjoy subsidiary protection because war is raging in their homeland. Around 300,000 asylum procedures are still ongoing.

  23. @Goatweed
    Were the stats on anti-Semitic events adjusted for these false flag threats?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Of course not. Also, the ADL will add to its list every anti-Semitic crime imagined for Law & Order: Hate Crimes. They’re hate crimes too.

  24. @gregor
    On balance, Wikipedia is a force for the red pill. I say this from experience. There is some egregious bias on some of the articles, but regardless there’s usually MORE than enough there for the inquisitive reader.

    Below are some of the worst articles I’ve seen in terms of bias.

    Ron talked about this Barnes guy in one of his articles. The guy wrote a ton of material, essentially none of it on the Holocaust, yet the article reduces his influence almost entirely to Holocaust denial, sourced almost entirely from Deborah Lipstadt’s work.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Elmer_Barnes

    Then there are many that use very loaded and dismissive language.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Bolshevism

    “Jewish Bolshevism, also Judeo–Bolshevism, is an anti-communist and antisemitic canard...”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_genocide_conspiracy_theory

    “The white genocide conspiracy theory is a neo-Nazi, alt-right, white nationalist/supremacist conspiracy theory...”

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @European-American

    Wikipedia is hopeless as a resource for anything contentious. Too many interest groups.

  25. @anony-mouse
    Out of curiosity, what % of Unz.com have ethnically id'd themselves on this website?

    For example I've always assumed that Paul Craig Roberts is a White Amerian Christian, but I don't recall this site explicitly identifying himself as such.

    Here is his Wikipedia bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Craig_Roberts

    No mention of him being a White Christian. Hmmm

    Of course you can pretty much make assumptions especially when its obvious (eg American-Israeli as the NYT article says)

    Replies: @gabriel alberton

    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it’s not obvious. Given that he reportedly made bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, he wouldn’t be expected to be Jewish. Yet he is.

    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @gabriel alberton


    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it’s not obvious.
     
    Good point. Arab Israelis and other Palestinians have reasons to resent Israel and Jews. The first inference would be that this was done by an Arab Israeli not a Jewish Israeli.
    , @slumber_j
    @gabriel alberton


    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.
     
    If accuracy were a major concern of the ADL, they'd rename themselves the Defamation League.
  26. You’re NOTICING again!

  27. @Jimmy R.
    @vinteuil

    Pretty much. You can delete "And yet, incredibly" and just leave "the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish."

    Omission is a principal method by which the MSM lies. So much easier to "explain". I mean, we simply don't have room to include everything. Nothing to see here.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

    Perhaps it is me but what reader wouldn’t understand “Israeli-American” (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    If a black guy had been making hoax calls to black civil rights groups threatening them and they reported it as “Nigerian-American” in the headline would you think they were trying to obscure the facts?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @Tyrion 2

    Or rather, to put it another way, if an Anglo-Saxon Kenyan with American citizenship won the Fields Medal and it was reported merely as a Kenyan-American, they'd obviously be trying to sell a falsehood.

    , @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    > Perhaps it is me

    Yes you are being disingenuous. It’s burying the lede and being suspiciously indirect.

    Of course, it’s common practice when protected minorities are the perpetrators, so it’s a bad habit that’s easy to fall into.

    Here’s a far more straightforward headline and story:

    Jewish man sentenced to 10 years in jail for making antisemitic bomb threats
    https://news.sky.com/story/jewish-man-sentenced-to-10-years-in-jail-for-making-antisemitic-bomb-threats-11560326

    Sky News is not as sophisticated a news source as the New York Times, of course, whose alternate motto should read:

    “All the News
    That’s Fake to Print”

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Jason Calley

    , @International Jew
    @Tyrion 2


    what reader wouldn’t understand “Israeli-American” (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?
     
    A reader who wanted to post something on his blog today, couldn't think of anything genuinely interesting, but knew he could count on many of his readers to join him in his disingenuousness.

    As it happens, there is one small interesting aspect to this story (though one Sailer missed). It's that though the media indeed refers to non-Jewish citizens of Israel as "Palestinian", it studiously refers to non-French citizens of France as "Frenchmen" -- as in "Frenchman crushes 100 people celebrating Bastille Day".

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

  28. @Tyrion 2
    @Jimmy R.

    Perhaps it is me but what reader wouldn't understand "Israeli-American" (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    If a black guy had been making hoax calls to black civil rights groups threatening them and they reported it as "Nigerian-American" in the headline would you think they were trying to obscure the facts?

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @European-American, @International Jew

    Or rather, to put it another way, if an Anglo-Saxon Kenyan with American citizenship won the Fields Medal and it was reported merely as a Kenyan-American, they’d obviously be trying to sell a falsehood.

  29. @gregor
    On balance, Wikipedia is a force for the red pill. I say this from experience. There is some egregious bias on some of the articles, but regardless there’s usually MORE than enough there for the inquisitive reader.

    Below are some of the worst articles I’ve seen in terms of bias.

    Ron talked about this Barnes guy in one of his articles. The guy wrote a ton of material, essentially none of it on the Holocaust, yet the article reduces his influence almost entirely to Holocaust denial, sourced almost entirely from Deborah Lipstadt’s work.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Elmer_Barnes

    Then there are many that use very loaded and dismissive language.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Bolshevism

    “Jewish Bolshevism, also Judeo–Bolshevism, is an anti-communist and antisemitic canard...”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_genocide_conspiracy_theory

    “The white genocide conspiracy theory is a neo-Nazi, alt-right, white nationalist/supremacist conspiracy theory...”

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @European-American

    Wikipedia is an incredibly useful resource that can be used to counterbalance biased news reporting. Of course it’s very imperfect. But on the whole less truth-challenged than most of the media.

    I ♥
    WIKI

  30. @Tyrion 2
    @Jimmy R.

    Perhaps it is me but what reader wouldn't understand "Israeli-American" (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    If a black guy had been making hoax calls to black civil rights groups threatening them and they reported it as "Nigerian-American" in the headline would you think they were trying to obscure the facts?

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @European-American, @International Jew

    > Perhaps it is me

    Yes you are being disingenuous. It’s burying the lede and being suspiciously indirect.

    Of course, it’s common practice when protected minorities are the perpetrators, so it’s a bad habit that’s easy to fall into.

    Here’s a far more straightforward headline and story:

    Jewish man sentenced to 10 years in jail for making antisemitic bomb threats
    https://news.sky.com/story/jewish-man-sentenced-to-10-years-in-jail-for-making-antisemitic-bomb-threats-11560326

    Sky News is not as sophisticated a news source as the New York Times, of course, whose alternate motto should read:

    “All the News
    That’s Fake to Print”

    • Agree: Buck Ransom
    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @European-American

    So if they described someone who was Nigerian-American without saying that they were black, they'd be obfuscating that they were black. Are you insane?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    , @Jason Calley
    @European-American

    Hey Tyrion! I think your analogy of a Nigerian-American does not match the particulars of the story, and here is why. In this case, the facts of religious and cultural affiliation are crucial to the story and just leaving them to the readers assumptions fails to give the religious issue the clarity it deserves. Even if one assumes (correctly as it happens) that the guy is Jewish, there is also the matter of his purpose in his crimes. If the NYT really wanted clarity, their article's first line would say "A Jewish man has been convicted for making false flag anti-semitic bomb threats, acts which were wrongly blamed on whites."

  31. @theo the kraut
    > for Merkel’s Mistake letting in the Million Marching Muslim Men in 2015.

    1.8 Million and counting according to the stats office, cf https://wp.me/sapuj6-2, I can translate that if needed.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @theo the kraut

    How would you translate

    “nicht berücksichtigt worden, weil sich nicht eindeutig bestimmen ließ”

    ?

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @theo the kraut
    @Almost Missouri

    ... couldn't be determined properly, so they weren't included.

    cf https://www.unz.com/isteve/hate-hoaxer-michael-ron-david-kadar-sentenced-in-israel/#comment-2637145 also.

    , @Anonymous
    @Almost Missouri

    " ... were not taken into account as these could not be unambiguously determined. "

  32. @Anon
    Kadar's crime was not anti-Jewish or 'antisemitic'.

    He was trying to defame white people by making Jews seem like victims.

    His ilk need to apologize to white people.

    And the fact that he was able to do it on such a huge scale means that Israel tolerates and even encourages that kind of thing.

    But media will spin it was 'self-loathing Jew attacking Jews'.

    No, he is a Jewish supremacist who tried to defame white(and maybe Muslims).

    He is Anti-whitite.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck, @anon

    He was trying to defame white people by making Jews seem like victims.

    His ilk need to apologize to white people

    hear hear

  33. The Israeli court WAS NOT tough on him.

    Compare the punishment received by Juan Thompson in an American court:

    Thompson PLED GUILTY (thus saving the State the time and expense of taking him all the way thru a trial) to 2 criminal charges and was sentenced to 5 years in prison.

    Kadar on the other hand:

    Forced the Israeli court to try him all the way to a FINDING OF GUILTY on HUNDREDS of charges and received 10 years in prison.

    Per wikipedia:

    “In June 2018, he was convicted on HUNDREDS (emphasis added) of counts including charges of extortion, publishing false information that caused panic, computer offenses, and money laundering.”

    Moreover, the Israeli court made no serious attempt to seize the money he amasssed in his criminal enterprise. Thus Kadar profited from his crimes and the ill-gotten money (in the form of Bitcoin, now estimated to be worth $800k) will be available to him and his parents.

    Watch for more leniency, and an early release, as this matter fades from public memory.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @TheCraw

    Ten years is a helluva lot of time in prison. Even the five years handed to the black guy by an American court seems excessive to me. You don't get five years if you bust someone's jaw and knock out all his teeth. These bomb threats didn't physically hurt anyone. I doubt they even scared anyone, much. People know 99.9% of bomb threats are fake.

    I'm as annoyed as a lot of you, that the once-useful but now thoroughly corrupt ADL was able to make political hay out of these threats. But that still doesn't merit 5, or 10, years in prison.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Trevor H.

    , @Anonymous
    @TheCraw

    QUOTE: Thus Kadar profited from his crimes and the ill-gotten money (in the form of Bitcoin, now estimated to be worth $800k) will be available to him and his parents.

    So he was paid $400 ON AVERAGE for each of his 2,000 hoax calls.

    WHO PAID HIM?

    Obviously, the little weasel himself knows who his customers were.

    WHAT ELSE did he do for paying customers? How did he connect with customers?

    Perhaps a year or two in the pokey will loosen his tongue.

  34. @MikeatMikedotMike
    He's not Jewish, Steve, he's Misunderstood.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Flip, @Reg Cæsar

    He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.

  35. @kaganovitch
    And yet, incredibly, the NYT never mentions the convict’s name nor that he is Jewish.

    Both of the previous articles in the NYT, March 23 and 24 2017, prominently mention that he's Jewish, so I doubt there is some conspiracy afoot here.

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    But Steve, the article does say :

    “The hoax calls appear to have started in the spring of 2015, when he would have been about 16. Between April 2015 and March 2017, prosecutors said, he called about 2,000 institutions, claiming that bombs had been planted or threatening an imminent shooting attack, prompting evacuations and bringing out the police and emergency services.

    2,000 calls!

    This creep is responsible for the entire phenonemon!

    All of it!

    And the NYT admitted it!

    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe “dozens” of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!

    (BTW, his mother was good for the de rigeur “my boy didn’t do anything” quote.)

    • Replies: @anon
    @Paul Jolliffe


    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe “dozens” of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!
     
    try to edit wikipedia

    good luck
    , @Trevor H.
    @Paul Jolliffe

    Thanks for emphasizing the point about the number of offenses. Seriously, I hadn't really considered the implications. Not to mention that the actual number is doubtless even more than what he was charged with. It's also sobering to consider that this guy is just one who got caught.

  36. @Tiny Duck
    @Anon

    He was drawing attention the vicious racism rampant in America

    To me hi is a hero

    Replies: @epochehusserl

    you keep misspelling your last name

  37. @theo the kraut
    > for Merkel’s Mistake letting in the Million Marching Muslim Men in 2015.

    1.8 Million and counting according to the stats office, cf https://wp.me/sapuj6-2, I can translate that if needed.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @theo the kraut

    https://www.focus.de/politik/deutschland/bundesregierung-veroeffentlicht-zahlen-die-fakten-zur-fluechtlingskrise-so-viele-menschen-kamen-seit-2013-nach-deutschland_id_9965943.html

    translate.google.com:

    According to this, more than 1.8 million people have applied for asylum in Germany since 2013. Two-thirds of them in 2015 and 2016, ie in the time of large refugee flows. Almost a third of the people said they came from Syria. According to the German government, eleven percent come from Afghanistan, almost ten percent from Iraq.
    1.3 million asylum seekers in Germany

    At the moment there are still around 1.3 million of these people in Germany. [theo: yeah, right…] Around 570,000 are recognized as refugees. Almost 210,000 enjoy subsidiary protection because war is raging in their homeland. Around 300,000 asylum procedures are still ongoing.

  38. @MikeatMikedotMike
    He's not Jewish, Steve, he's Misunderstood.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Flip, @Reg Cæsar

    He’s not Jewish, Steve, he’s Misunderstood.

    From the King of Cultural Appropriation:

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/fd8d0438-0e32-4352-830c-ac825b1371d2

  39. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut

    How would you translate


    "nicht berücksichtigt worden, weil sich nicht eindeutig bestimmen ließ"
     
    ?

    Thanks.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Anonymous

    … couldn’t be determined properly, so they weren’t included.

    cf https://www.unz.com/isteve/hate-hoaxer-michael-ron-david-kadar-sentenced-in-israel/#comment-2637145 also.

  40. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dave Pinsen

    Bobby Fischer had nothing on Dan Burros.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Burros


    https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1343343604l/5996668.jpg

    Replies: @PV van der Byl, @Anonymous

    Truth is, indeed, stranger than fiction.

  41. @Reg Cæsar
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    He’s not Jewish, Steve, he’s Misunderstood.

     

    From the King of Cultural Appropriation:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHjKzr6tLz0

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  42. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dave Pinsen

    Bobby Fischer had nothing on Dan Burros.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Burros


    https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1343343604l/5996668.jpg

    Replies: @PV van der Byl, @Anonymous

    Note the choice of the phrase “American-Jewish” rather than “Jewish American.”

  43. @Paul Jolliffe
    @kaganovitch

    But Steve, the article does say :

    "The hoax calls appear to have started in the spring of 2015, when he would have been about 16. Between April 2015 and March 2017, prosecutors said, he called about 2,000 institutions, claiming that bombs had been planted or threatening an imminent shooting attack, prompting evacuations and bringing out the police and emergency services."

    2,000 calls!

    This creep is responsible for the entire phenonemon!

    All of it!

    And the NYT admitted it!

    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe "dozens" of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!

    (BTW, his mother was good for the de rigeur "my boy didn't do anything" quote.)

    Replies: @anon, @Trevor H.

    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe “dozens” of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!

    try to edit wikipedia

    good luck

  44. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @gabriel alberton
    @anony-mouse

    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it's not obvious. Given that he reportedly made bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, he wouldn't be expected to be Jewish. Yet he is.

    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @slumber_j

    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it’s not obvious.

    Good point. Arab Israelis and other Palestinians have reasons to resent Israel and Jews. The first inference would be that this was done by an Arab Israeli not a Jewish Israeli.

  45. @Tyrion 2
    @Jimmy R.

    Perhaps it is me but what reader wouldn't understand "Israeli-American" (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    If a black guy had been making hoax calls to black civil rights groups threatening them and they reported it as "Nigerian-American" in the headline would you think they were trying to obscure the facts?

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @European-American, @International Jew

    what reader wouldn’t understand “Israeli-American” (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?

    A reader who wanted to post something on his blog today, couldn’t think of anything genuinely interesting, but knew he could count on many of his readers to join him in his disingenuousness.

    As it happens, there is one small interesting aspect to this story (though one Sailer missed). It’s that though the media indeed refers to non-Jewish citizens of Israel as “Palestinian”, it studiously refers to non-French citizens of France as “Frenchmen” — as in “Frenchman crushes 100 people celebrating Bastille Day”.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @International Jew

    Absolutely.

    , @Anonymous
    @International Jew


    Uh, half of Israel’s population is Gentile. And these attacks were anti-Semitic. So, yeah, concealing the Jewish identity here is a lie by omission.
     
  46. @TheCraw
    The Israeli court WAS NOT tough on him.

    Compare the punishment received by Juan Thompson in an American court:

    Thompson PLED GUILTY (thus saving the State the time and expense of taking him all the way thru a trial) to 2 criminal charges and was sentenced to 5 years in prison.

    Kadar on the other hand:

    Forced the Israeli court to try him all the way to a FINDING OF GUILTY on HUNDREDS of charges and received 10 years in prison.


    Per wikipedia:

    "In June 2018, he was convicted on HUNDREDS (emphasis added) of counts including charges of extortion, publishing false information that caused panic, computer offenses, and money laundering."


    Moreover, the Israeli court made no serious attempt to seize the money he amasssed in his criminal enterprise. Thus Kadar profited from his crimes and the ill-gotten money (in the form of Bitcoin, now estimated to be worth $800k) will be available to him and his parents.


    Watch for more leniency, and an early release, as this matter fades from public memory.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous

    Ten years is a helluva lot of time in prison. Even the five years handed to the black guy by an American court seems excessive to me. You don’t get five years if you bust someone’s jaw and knock out all his teeth. These bomb threats didn’t physically hurt anyone. I doubt they even scared anyone, much. People know 99.9% of bomb threats are fake.

    I’m as annoyed as a lot of you, that the once-useful but now thoroughly corrupt ADL was able to make political hay out of these threats. But that still doesn’t merit 5, or 10, years in prison.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @International Jew

    The little weasel was *paid* $800,000 to terrorize people in the U.S. and elsewhere.

    These are not two or three ill-considered acts by a spergie teenager with bats in the belfry and delusions of grandeur.

    As noted above, WHO PAID FOR THIS?

    , @Trevor H.
    @International Jew


    These bomb threats didn’t physically hurt anyone.
     
    Best of all, the real victims are goyishe white people, who are defamed 24/7/365 by the MSM.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  47. @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    > Perhaps it is me

    Yes you are being disingenuous. It’s burying the lede and being suspiciously indirect.

    Of course, it’s common practice when protected minorities are the perpetrators, so it’s a bad habit that’s easy to fall into.

    Here’s a far more straightforward headline and story:

    Jewish man sentenced to 10 years in jail for making antisemitic bomb threats
    https://news.sky.com/story/jewish-man-sentenced-to-10-years-in-jail-for-making-antisemitic-bomb-threats-11560326

    Sky News is not as sophisticated a news source as the New York Times, of course, whose alternate motto should read:

    “All the News
    That’s Fake to Print”

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Jason Calley

    So if they described someone who was Nigerian-American without saying that they were black, they’d be obfuscating that they were black. Are you insane?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Tyrion 2

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as "anti-Semitic," so it's hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Tyrion 2

    Uh, half of Israel's population is Gentile. And these attacks were anti-Semitic. So, yeah, concealing the Jewish identity here is a lie by omission.

  48. @International Jew
    @Tyrion 2


    what reader wouldn’t understand “Israeli-American” (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?
     
    A reader who wanted to post something on his blog today, couldn't think of anything genuinely interesting, but knew he could count on many of his readers to join him in his disingenuousness.

    As it happens, there is one small interesting aspect to this story (though one Sailer missed). It's that though the media indeed refers to non-Jewish citizens of Israel as "Palestinian", it studiously refers to non-French citizens of France as "Frenchmen" -- as in "Frenchman crushes 100 people celebrating Bastille Day".

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    Absolutely.

  49. @gabriel alberton
    @anony-mouse

    Quite a few non-Jews live in Israel, some of whom have reason to resent Israel and Jews, so no, it's not obvious. Given that he reportedly made bomb threats against Jewish Community Centers, he wouldn't be expected to be Jewish. Yet he is.

    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @slumber_j

    If someone made assumptions, and incorrect ones at that, it was the Anti-Defamation League, according to the source of the Wikipedia article.

    If accuracy were a major concern of the ADL, they’d rename themselves the Defamation League.

  50. @Tyrion 2
    @European-American

    So if they described someone who was Nigerian-American without saying that they were black, they'd be obfuscating that they were black. Are you insane?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as “anti-Semitic,” so it’s hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Goal One is to force them to quit using "Semite" as a synonym for "Jew".

    Most Semites are very certainly not Jews. Mizrahi and Sephardi Jews are Semites, Ashkenazim probably really not.

    Many, many times more Semites are Muslims than Jews, but I'm not even certain most Muslims are Semites. But most Semites are Muslims. There are several other religions Semites may belong to as well, I'm sure.

    , @Tyrion 2
    @Steve Sailer

    "Hoax" should have been written in the headline. There should also be an opinion piece on the crazy number of hate hoaxes. It is sad that our newspapers serve to shroud reality as much as reveal it, but I'm not going to be persuaded that many of the NYT's readers are doofus enough to read "Israeli" (without an hyphen "Arab" after it) and not know "Jew". And I'd be even more shocked if their writers thought that way.

    Replies: @European-American

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as “anti-Semitic,” so it’s hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

     

    Actually, the most plausible inference is that an Arab Israeli or a Palestinian (who also are Semites) was the perpetrator.
  51. @Almost Missouri
    @theo the kraut

    How would you translate


    "nicht berücksichtigt worden, weil sich nicht eindeutig bestimmen ließ"
     
    ?

    Thanks.

    Replies: @theo the kraut, @Anonymous

    ” … were not taken into account as these could not be unambiguously determined. ”

  52. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Tyrion 2

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as "anti-Semitic," so it's hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    Goal One is to force them to quit using “Semite” as a synonym for “Jew”.

    Most Semites are very certainly not Jews. Mizrahi and Sephardi Jews are Semites, Ashkenazim probably really not.

    Many, many times more Semites are Muslims than Jews, but I’m not even certain most Muslims are Semites. But most Semites are Muslims. There are several other religions Semites may belong to as well, I’m sure.

  53. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheCraw
    The Israeli court WAS NOT tough on him.

    Compare the punishment received by Juan Thompson in an American court:

    Thompson PLED GUILTY (thus saving the State the time and expense of taking him all the way thru a trial) to 2 criminal charges and was sentenced to 5 years in prison.

    Kadar on the other hand:

    Forced the Israeli court to try him all the way to a FINDING OF GUILTY on HUNDREDS of charges and received 10 years in prison.


    Per wikipedia:

    "In June 2018, he was convicted on HUNDREDS (emphasis added) of counts including charges of extortion, publishing false information that caused panic, computer offenses, and money laundering."


    Moreover, the Israeli court made no serious attempt to seize the money he amasssed in his criminal enterprise. Thus Kadar profited from his crimes and the ill-gotten money (in the form of Bitcoin, now estimated to be worth $800k) will be available to him and his parents.


    Watch for more leniency, and an early release, as this matter fades from public memory.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous

    QUOTE: Thus Kadar profited from his crimes and the ill-gotten money (in the form of Bitcoin, now estimated to be worth $800k) will be available to him and his parents.

    So he was paid $400 ON AVERAGE for each of his 2,000 hoax calls.

    WHO PAID HIM?

    Obviously, the little weasel himself knows who his customers were.

    WHAT ELSE did he do for paying customers? How did he connect with customers?

    Perhaps a year or two in the pokey will loosen his tongue.

  54. @International Jew
    @TheCraw

    Ten years is a helluva lot of time in prison. Even the five years handed to the black guy by an American court seems excessive to me. You don't get five years if you bust someone's jaw and knock out all his teeth. These bomb threats didn't physically hurt anyone. I doubt they even scared anyone, much. People know 99.9% of bomb threats are fake.

    I'm as annoyed as a lot of you, that the once-useful but now thoroughly corrupt ADL was able to make political hay out of these threats. But that still doesn't merit 5, or 10, years in prison.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Trevor H.

    The little weasel was *paid* $800,000 to terrorize people in the U.S. and elsewhere.

    These are not two or three ill-considered acts by a spergie teenager with bats in the belfry and delusions of grandeur.

    As noted above, WHO PAID FOR THIS?

  55. @Steve Sailer
    @Tyrion 2

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as "anti-Semitic," so it's hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    “Hoax” should have been written in the headline. There should also be an opinion piece on the crazy number of hate hoaxes. It is sad that our newspapers serve to shroud reality as much as reveal it, but I’m not going to be persuaded that many of the NYT’s readers are doofus enough to read “Israeli” (without an hyphen “Arab” after it) and not know “Jew”. And I’d be even more shocked if their writers thought that way.

    • Replies: @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?

    Usually news stories spell things out a bit for clarity, at the risk of being pedantic. It’s true, NYT readers are all high IQ men and women of the world with an acute knowledge of all facets and reporting conventions of Israeli or Saudi society, but still... they might stoop to enjoy a good ironic gotcha.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

  56. @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    > Perhaps it is me

    Yes you are being disingenuous. It’s burying the lede and being suspiciously indirect.

    Of course, it’s common practice when protected minorities are the perpetrators, so it’s a bad habit that’s easy to fall into.

    Here’s a far more straightforward headline and story:

    Jewish man sentenced to 10 years in jail for making antisemitic bomb threats
    https://news.sky.com/story/jewish-man-sentenced-to-10-years-in-jail-for-making-antisemitic-bomb-threats-11560326

    Sky News is not as sophisticated a news source as the New York Times, of course, whose alternate motto should read:

    “All the News
    That’s Fake to Print”

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Jason Calley

    Hey Tyrion! I think your analogy of a Nigerian-American does not match the particulars of the story, and here is why. In this case, the facts of religious and cultural affiliation are crucial to the story and just leaving them to the readers assumptions fails to give the religious issue the clarity it deserves. Even if one assumes (correctly as it happens) that the guy is Jewish, there is also the matter of his purpose in his crimes. If the NYT really wanted clarity, their article’s first line would say “A Jewish man has been convicted for making false flag anti-semitic bomb threats, acts which were wrongly blamed on whites.”

  57. The Pittsburgh shooting makes all of this irrelevant. Jews really are under violent siege by Nazis.

  58. Recall that our FBI traced the threats back to Israel and brought it to the attention of the Israeli government.

    Israel has better cyber security capabilities than we do. Hell, our government contracts with their companies for their technology.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2017/07/18/6-reasons-israel-became-a-cybersecurity-powerhouse-leading-the-82-billion-industry/

    The Israeli authorites already know.

    The fix was in the moment Israel asserted jurisdiction over the case despite the fact that Kadar is a U.S. citizen and his victims were U.S. entities.

  59. @Tyrion 2
    @Steve Sailer

    "Hoax" should have been written in the headline. There should also be an opinion piece on the crazy number of hate hoaxes. It is sad that our newspapers serve to shroud reality as much as reveal it, but I'm not going to be persuaded that many of the NYT's readers are doofus enough to read "Israeli" (without an hyphen "Arab" after it) and not know "Jew". And I'd be even more shocked if their writers thought that way.

    Replies: @European-American

    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?

    Usually news stories spell things out a bit for clarity, at the risk of being pedantic. It’s true, NYT readers are all high IQ men and women of the world with an acute knowledge of all facets and reporting conventions of Israeli or Saudi society, but still… they might stoop to enjoy a good ironic gotcha.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @European-American

    If they said he was Saudi I'd know he was Muslim, as would everyone.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @European-American


    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?
     
    The better analogy is this. Suppose there are a series of bombings of synagogues in Israel by, it turns out, an Arab-Israeli, 18 years of age. The New York Times describes the man as an "Israeli teenager."
  60. @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?

    Usually news stories spell things out a bit for clarity, at the risk of being pedantic. It’s true, NYT readers are all high IQ men and women of the world with an acute knowledge of all facets and reporting conventions of Israeli or Saudi society, but still... they might stoop to enjoy a good ironic gotcha.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    If they said he was Saudi I’d know he was Muslim, as would everyone.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Tyrion 2

    But Jews are only 50 percent of the population of Israel.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

  61. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Tyrion 2

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as "anti-Semitic," so it's hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    Before the perp was caught, these incidents were described over and over in the press as “anti-Semitic,” so it’s hardly surprising that many readers who remember that coverage might interpret this article as referring to somebody who is not a Semite, since it goes out of its way not to clear up that confusion.

    Actually, the most plausible inference is that an Arab Israeli or a Palestinian (who also are Semites) was the perpetrator.

  62. @Tyrion 2
    @European-American

    So if they described someone who was Nigerian-American without saying that they were black, they'd be obfuscating that they were black. Are you insane?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Uh, half of Israel’s population is Gentile. And these attacks were anti-Semitic. So, yeah, concealing the Jewish identity here is a lie by omission.

  63. @International Jew
    @Tyrion 2


    what reader wouldn’t understand “Israeli-American” (from the headline) to mean that the bloke is Jewish?
     
    A reader who wanted to post something on his blog today, couldn't think of anything genuinely interesting, but knew he could count on many of his readers to join him in his disingenuousness.

    As it happens, there is one small interesting aspect to this story (though one Sailer missed). It's that though the media indeed refers to non-Jewish citizens of Israel as "Palestinian", it studiously refers to non-French citizens of France as "Frenchmen" -- as in "Frenchman crushes 100 people celebrating Bastille Day".

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    Uh, half of Israel’s population is Gentile. And these attacks were anti-Semitic. So, yeah, concealing the Jewish identity here is a lie by omission.

  64. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @European-American
    @Tyrion 2

    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?

    Usually news stories spell things out a bit for clarity, at the risk of being pedantic. It’s true, NYT readers are all high IQ men and women of the world with an acute knowledge of all facets and reporting conventions of Israeli or Saudi society, but still... they might stoop to enjoy a good ironic gotcha.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2, @Anonymous

    Imagine there was a series of attacks on mosques. They finally catch the guy, and it turns out his name is Mohamed al-Shariah from Saudi Arabia.

    Imagine a report on this that at no point spells out that the culprit is Muslim, just giving us his name and that he’s a Saudi. Or even hiding his name, because the poor dear happened to be underage at some point. Wouldn’t there be something missing in such a story?

    The better analogy is this. Suppose there are a series of bombings of synagogues in Israel by, it turns out, an Arab-Israeli, 18 years of age. The New York Times describes the man as an “Israeli teenager.”

  65. @Tyrion 2
    @European-American

    If they said he was Saudi I'd know he was Muslim, as would everyone.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    But Jews are only 50 percent of the population of Israel.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @Anonymous

    70% and the rest would have "Arab" or "Palestinian" in their description if they weren't Jewish.

    E.g Palestinian members of the Israeli parliament have been forcibly removed from the chamber after staging a protest at the start of US Vice President Mike Pence's speech.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/01/arab-mps-ejected-protesting-pence-knesset-speech-180122160854881.html

    Replies: @Anonymous

  66. @Anonymous
    @Tyrion 2

    But Jews are only 50 percent of the population of Israel.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

    70% and the rest would have “Arab” or “Palestinian” in their description if they weren’t Jewish.

    E.g Palestinian members of the Israeli parliament have been forcibly removed from the chamber after staging a protest at the start of US Vice President Mike Pence’s speech.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/01/arab-mps-ejected-protesting-pence-knesset-speech-180122160854881.html

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Tyrion 2


    70% and the rest would have “Arab” or “Palestinian” in their description if they weren’t Jewish.
     
    You seem to have omitted to populations of Judea and Samaria.

    On journalistic practice, it would better serve your purpose to show the New York Times's usage on the topic. Or to tell us whether Al Jazeera specified whether Kadar is Jewish.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

  67. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tyrion 2
    @Anonymous

    70% and the rest would have "Arab" or "Palestinian" in their description if they weren't Jewish.

    E.g Palestinian members of the Israeli parliament have been forcibly removed from the chamber after staging a protest at the start of US Vice President Mike Pence's speech.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/01/arab-mps-ejected-protesting-pence-knesset-speech-180122160854881.html

    Replies: @Anonymous

    70% and the rest would have “Arab” or “Palestinian” in their description if they weren’t Jewish.

    You seem to have omitted to populations of Judea and Samaria.

    On journalistic practice, it would better serve your purpose to show the New York Times’s usage on the topic. Or to tell us whether Al Jazeera specified whether Kadar is Jewish.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    @Anonymous


    You seem to have omitted to populations of Judea and Samaria
     
    Yes and Gaza. They are self-administered and have been for decades. It isn't controversial to exclude their populations from Israel's. It'd be highly controversial the other way around. Especially with Hamas and Fatah...

    On journalistic practice, it would better serve your purpose to show the New York Times’s usage on the topic. Or to tell us whether Al Jazeera specified whether Kadar is Jewish.
     
    Then somebody would find a way to claim that the NYT doing so would also be part of a grand conspiracy or whatever...

    Anyway, showing that is facile as obviously they do this and you, and anyone else looks ignorant for asking for evidence. Have you never read anything they write on the subject?

    Ahmed Tibi, an Israeli Arab lawmaker

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/18/world/middleeast/israel-passes-national-home-law.amp.html&ved=2ahUKEwi-uZmjrvHeAhUJXMAKHay7BFYQFjADegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw14mXco8L51UtFvpQh0hPFl&ampcf=1
  68. @Anonymous
    @Tyrion 2


    70% and the rest would have “Arab” or “Palestinian” in their description if they weren’t Jewish.
     
    You seem to have omitted to populations of Judea and Samaria.

    On journalistic practice, it would better serve your purpose to show the New York Times's usage on the topic. Or to tell us whether Al Jazeera specified whether Kadar is Jewish.

    Replies: @Tyrion 2

    You seem to have omitted to populations of Judea and Samaria

    Yes and Gaza. They are self-administered and have been for decades. It isn’t controversial to exclude their populations from Israel’s. It’d be highly controversial the other way around. Especially with Hamas and Fatah…

    On journalistic practice, it would better serve your purpose to show the New York Times’s usage on the topic. Or to tell us whether Al Jazeera specified whether Kadar is Jewish.

    Then somebody would find a way to claim that the NYT doing so would also be part of a grand conspiracy or whatever…

    Anyway, showing that is facile as obviously they do this and you, and anyone else looks ignorant for asking for evidence. Have you never read anything they write on the subject?

    Ahmed Tibi, an Israeli Arab lawmaker

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/18/world/middleeast/israel-passes-national-home-law.amp.html&ved=2ahUKEwi-uZmjrvHeAhUJXMAKHay7BFYQFjADegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw14mXco8L51UtFvpQh0hPFl&ampcf=1

  69. @International Jew
    @TheCraw

    Ten years is a helluva lot of time in prison. Even the five years handed to the black guy by an American court seems excessive to me. You don't get five years if you bust someone's jaw and knock out all his teeth. These bomb threats didn't physically hurt anyone. I doubt they even scared anyone, much. People know 99.9% of bomb threats are fake.

    I'm as annoyed as a lot of you, that the once-useful but now thoroughly corrupt ADL was able to make political hay out of these threats. But that still doesn't merit 5, or 10, years in prison.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Trevor H.

    These bomb threats didn’t physically hurt anyone.

    Best of all, the real victims are goyishe white people, who are defamed 24/7/365 by the MSM.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Trevor H.

    Great point.

  70. @Paul Jolliffe
    @kaganovitch

    But Steve, the article does say :

    "The hoax calls appear to have started in the spring of 2015, when he would have been about 16. Between April 2015 and March 2017, prosecutors said, he called about 2,000 institutions, claiming that bombs had been planted or threatening an imminent shooting attack, prompting evacuations and bringing out the police and emergency services."

    2,000 calls!

    This creep is responsible for the entire phenonemon!

    All of it!

    And the NYT admitted it!

    Wikipedia used weasel words to describe "dozens" of calls.
    Bullshit.

    The Israeli prosecutors themselves said between 2015 and 2017 he called 2,000 institutions with bomb threats!

    (BTW, his mother was good for the de rigeur "my boy didn't do anything" quote.)

    Replies: @anon, @Trevor H.

    Thanks for emphasizing the point about the number of offenses. Seriously, I hadn’t really considered the implications. Not to mention that the actual number is doubtless even more than what he was charged with. It’s also sobering to consider that this guy is just one who got caught.

  71. @Trevor H.
    @International Jew


    These bomb threats didn’t physically hurt anyone.
     
    Best of all, the real victims are goyishe white people, who are defamed 24/7/365 by the MSM.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Great point.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS