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Harvard Law Professor: Majority of Men Accused of Campus Rape Are Minority
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Haven Monahan

As we all know, the Campus Rape Crisis is due to white fraternity boys like U. of Virginia lifeguard Haven Monahan. Except, despite all the rules mandating counting race and rape on campus, nobody ever releases any figures about the racial makeup of college men accused of rape.

But in passing in a New Yorker article, Harvard Law School criminal law professor Jeannie Suk drops a bombshell: on average, male students accused of sexual assault look less like Haven Monahan than like, say, Heisman Trophy-winner Jameis Winston. From The New Yorker:

Shutting Down Conversations About Rape at Harvard Law
BY JEANNIE SUK

This is a piece on a subject about which I may soon be prevented from publishing, depending on how events unfold. Last month, near the time that CNN broadcast the documentary “The Hunting Ground,” which focuses on four women who say their schools neglected their claims of sexual assault, I joined eighteen other Harvard Law School professors in signing a statement that criticized the film’s “unfair and misleading” portrayal of one case from several years ago. A black female law student accused a black male law student of sexually assaulting her and her white female friend. The accuser, Kamilah Willingham, has graduated from the law school and is featured in the film. The accused, Brandon Winston, who spent four years defending himself against charges of sexual misconduct, on campus and in criminal court, was ultimately cleared of sexual misconduct and has been permitted to reënroll. The group that signed the statement, which includes feminist, black, and leftist faculty, wrote that this was a just outcome. …

But last week the filmmakers did more than understandably disagree with criticism of the film, which has been short-listed for the Academy Award for best documentary. They wrote, in a statement to the Harvard Crimson, that “the very public bias these professors have shown in favor of an assailant contributes to a hostile climate at Harvard Law.” The words “hostile climate” contain a serious claim. At Harvard, sexual harassment is “unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature,” including verbal conduct that is “sufficiently persistent, pervasive, or severe” so as to create a “hostile environment.” If, as the filmmakers suggest, the professors’ statement about the film has created a hostile environment at the school, then, under Title IX, the professors should be investigated and potentially disciplined.

It’s funny how you used to hear all the time about the dangers of any “chilling effect” on freedom of expression, but now you hear all about how allowing freedom of expression creates a “hostile environment” and the phrase “chilling effect” has vanished.

Professor Suk goes on to argue that the current campus atmosphere of Always-Believe-the-(self-proclaimed)-Victim is disproportionately bad for black men:

It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true. And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations. The dynamics of racially disproportionate impact affect minority men in the pattern of campus sexual-misconduct accusations, which schools, conveniently, do not track, despite all the campus-climate surveys. Administrators and faculty who routinely work on sexual-misconduct cases, including my colleague Janet Halley, tell me that most of the complaints they see are against minorities, and that is consistent with what I have seen at Harvard. The “always believe” credo will aggravate and hide this context, aided by campus confidentiality norms that make any racial pattern difficult to study and expose.

That’s not exactly transparent prose, so let me elucidate: what Professor Suk has privately heard from professional campus rape experts and what she has seen at Harvard is that most of those accused of sexual assault don’t look like Haven Monahan, but are instead minorities. And the context of the paragraph suggests that a large fraction of this minority majority of accused student rapists are black.

 
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  1. “American Nazi Party leader says Trump’s plan to ban all Muslims from the U.S. won’t work and casts doubt over whether ‘he even believes what he says’”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3357871/American-Nazi-Party-leader-says-Trump-s-plan-ban-Muslims-U-S-won-t-work-casts-doubt-believes-says.html

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    What is "w***es"? Wusses? Weenies?

    Too raw for refined Daily Mail readers?
    , @AnAnon
    guess the FBI doesn't want to have to do work on that.
    , @tbraton
    I guess the "American Nazi Party leader" thinks we should go immediately to Plan B: gas chambers. Of course, that step would be taken just to delouse the immigrants' clothing.
  2. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Marco Rubio’s brother-in-law Orlando was a front man for one of the infamous cocaine cowboys:

    “REVEALED: Marco Rubio’s brother-in-law was the ‘front man for an international drug-smuggling ring led by leopard-loving “cocaine cowboy” kingpin whose mansion was filled with big cats and a giraffe’”

    ” Orlando Cicilia was arrested in Miami in 1987 when Rubio was just 16
    Was sentenced to 35 years in prison for working under Mario Tabraue
    In 2000 he was freed after serving just 12 years for his part in the racket
    The same year Rubio was re-elected to the House of Representatives
    Cicilia helped ship and bring in marijuana and cocaine over a decade
    Was the ‘front man’, collecting money and arranging deliveries for Tabraue ”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3358281/Marco-Rubio-s-brother-law-man-international-drug-smuggling-ring-led-leopard-loving-cocaine-cowboy-kingpin-mansion-filled-big-cats-giraffe.html

    • Replies: @onetwothree
    Are you just waiting for new posts so you can reply with off topic items? Really obnoxious.
  3. @Anonymous
    Marco Rubio's brother-in-law Orlando was a front man for one of the infamous cocaine cowboys:

    "REVEALED: Marco Rubio's brother-in-law was the 'front man for an international drug-smuggling ring led by leopard-loving "cocaine cowboy" kingpin whose mansion was filled with big cats and a giraffe'"

    " Orlando Cicilia was arrested in Miami in 1987 when Rubio was just 16
    Was sentenced to 35 years in prison for working under Mario Tabraue
    In 2000 he was freed after serving just 12 years for his part in the racket
    The same year Rubio was re-elected to the House of Representatives
    Cicilia helped ship and bring in marijuana and cocaine over a decade
    Was the 'front man', collecting money and arranging deliveries for Tabraue "

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3358281/Marco-Rubio-s-brother-law-man-international-drug-smuggling-ring-led-leopard-loving-cocaine-cowboy-kingpin-mansion-filled-big-cats-giraffe.html

    Are you just waiting for new posts so you can reply with off topic items? Really obnoxious.

    • Agree: Richard S, Thirdeye
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Are you Marco Rubio or one of his PR people?
    , @Yngvar
    The comments must pass by the Whimser, so they are OK by definition.
  4. All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black. There aren’t enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.

    One of my pet theories about the genesis of the mania about rape culture is that this is how white men in frats get the blame for black men raping white women on campus.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Quite the contrary; As they are not required to actually exist , there is no limit to how many can be blamed.
    , @SFG
    Basically, yeah. They keep looking around until they can somehow blame a white guy.
    , @tbraton
    "There aren’t enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time."

    Of course he exists. I have seen him post several messages on Sailer's blogs. It does seem unfair to blame this poster for every single rape that occurs on American college campuses, although I suspect that it does his ego an immense amount of good. We need more names to spread the blame around---white names, not black names like Jameis Winston.
    , @Erik Sieven
    "All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black." isn´t modern feminism mostly about the right to get raped by black guys? Thats what this whole slut walk thing etc. is aiming at. Feminists are angry about white guys who try to prevent that.
  5. “It is as important and logically necessary to … recognize that most rape claims are true.”

    How does she know? How does anyone know? I find it hard to see how anyone does. She surely can’t mean that most claims result in a conviction in a court of law, does she?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Without getting too philosophical about truth, it's probably not wrong to say that more than half of rape claims are true and therefore every rape claim is worthy of investigation with appropriate skepticism by the police, just as is every claim of robbery or any other crime report.

    The problem is when we automatically assume that 100% of them are true because no woman would EVER lie about such a thing. Most people report crimes because they believe they have been victims of a crime and are aware that filing a false report is itself a crime. However, a few do so because of insurance fraud or to seek to cause trouble for someone they dislike or because their boyfriend found out that they were having sex with another man or because they are nuts and want to elicit sympathy from others, etc.

    We have (or are supposed to have) a complex system for sorting the false claims from the true which radical feminists seek to disrupt for this one crime only. If you tell some not 100% coherent story about how your car got damaged and the police ask you skeptical questions about how much you were drinking that night and how many other accidents you have been in recently, they are just doing their job. But if a woman tells some not 100% believable story about how she was raped and the police ask her skeptical questions about how much she was drinking that night and how many other men she has slept with recently, that is victim blaming and totally off limits.
  6. It is a good thing Jeannie Suk is
    1) female
    2) Asian
    3) tenured
    or she would already be a non-person.

    The Overton Window truly is shifting. Trump has show that you can tell the truth.

    • Replies: @anon
    Isn't she saying the opposite?

    She seems to be saying non-white males get accused more often and so because - PC truism - black males get falsely accused more often - that means a lot of these accusations are false and therefore a policy of always believe the victim is a bad idea.


    This is an internal PoCs vs feminist argument.

    , @kaganovitch
    She is also married to Noah Feldman, something of an Icon in progressive circles.
  7. The left cares about rape in the same way they care about slavery. We know slavery was bad 150 + years ago , it still gets more air time in the usa media than the 650,000 people living in slavery in present day Islamic republic of Mauritania.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    As I recall, Brazil banned slavery around 1889, about 20+ years after the end of the Civil War. I also seem to recall reading that Brazil had more slaves than the U.S. Rather curious that you hear nothing about Brazil's slavery in the past.
  8. The demographic thing suggests that the accusations are more likely to be true than some of us have assumed — otherwise it’s unlikely that the numbers would closely track real world sexual assault demographics, rather than the demographics of the men histrionic, sheltered coeds are most likely to hook up with.

    That is, assuming the two differ. But I suspect they do.

  9. Possibilities, neither of which are things that can be said in public:

    1. Black college boys are more confident that she wants the D. Often this may be true, sometimes it’s not. (Applies especially to athletes, super-especially to star athletes)

    2. Drunk Janet gets a case of jungle fever, hungover Janet would never do that to Brad. That Jamal is a rapist.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I'll take Door #2, Monty.
    , @Anonymous
    3. Jamal is boning Janet and Susie. Janet finds out and accuses Jamal to get back at him. This one I know occurs.
    , @dc.sunsets
    Once you have a sick society, is it any wonder that 18 year old girls act like they've matriculated to a whorehouse?

    On a better note, it's helpful indeed that these icky stars of their own interracial porn screenplays self-identify so that the better men among us see them as the lepers they are.
  10. When a black man rapes a white woman, everyone needs to keep it quiet because it violates that man’s civil rights to have to deal with the sheer horror of being accused of rape. The victim doesn’t have any civil rights because she is white.

    Likewise, if we tell white women that black men are targeting them, we’re preaching hate. Supposedly 91% of rape victims are white. Liberals may say “well, minority rape victims are less able to report the crime for fear of revenge” while trying to convince us that most wife-beaters are beer-guzzling white males.

    I think soon we will realize that mainstream American liberalism is all about race, and even the feminists will find themselves at cross-purposes. There will be associations of “women of color”, but they will be more focused on protection for rape victims and battered women’s shelters than on getting Equal Pay or maternity leave legislation through Congress. Just like environmentalism lost the war against aggressive immigration, white feminists will lose the battle against all of the non-white men.

    Personally, if I was running a college, I’d rather have a rape hoax every day than a rape every day.

    • Replies: @SFG
    If I were *running* a college, I'd rather have a rape that can be obfuscated and denied rather than a hoax that attracts a lot of attention.

    If I were a father with a daughter in the college, on the other hand...
    , @Jefferson
    "Supposedly 91% of rape victims are white. Liberals may say “well, minority rape victims are less able to report the crime for fear of revenge”

    Black female rape victims fear revenge by whom? The White male power structure? The vast majority of Black female rape victims are raped by Black men.

    Maybe most Black female rape victims are afraid their Black male rapists will bust a cap in their asses if they snitch them out to the Popos, because the Black men who raped them got gang connections.

  11. @onetwothree
    Are you just waiting for new posts so you can reply with off topic items? Really obnoxious.

    Are you Marco Rubio or one of his PR people?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Hi, I'm one of Rubio's PR people monitoring this blog for quotient of Hispanic-type news, even in HLS stories. Thank you for posting the irrelevant off-topic story on coked-up Cubans of Hialeah, as it marginally brings attention/buzz if not the desired thematic emphasis to our man. We were as surprised as anyone that primary voters apparently don't get their opinions from Michael Gerson, Pete Wehner & the Commentary magazine website blog. We are now experimenting with alternative media strategies as such, like a fantasy-football thing for example, and a contest to win a free iPad Pro.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    ICR: Do you regularly troll here or is this your first time?
    , @5371
    This blog is not a colouring book. Marco Rubio would never read it.
  12. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    It is a good thing Jeannie Suk is
    1) female
    2) Asian
    3) tenured
    or she would already be a non-person.

    The Overton Window truly is shifting. Trump has show that you can tell the truth.

    Isn’t she saying the opposite?

    She seems to be saying non-white males get accused more often and so because – PC truism – black males get falsely accused more often – that means a lot of these accusations are false and therefore a policy of always believe the victim is a bad idea.

    This is an internal PoCs vs feminist argument.

    • Replies: @anon
    I bet, if you asked her, she'd say that, while the reports against black men are mostly true, there are a higher number of actual rapes by white men, but they never get reported because our racist patriarchal system makes women afraid to report rapes by white men. They're just too intimidated by the power white men have over them.
    , @DCBillS
    Agree anon. Did anyone actually read what they are commenting on?
  13. @Discordiax
    Possibilities, neither of which are things that can be said in public:

    1. Black college boys are more confident that she wants the D. Often this may be true, sometimes it's not. (Applies especially to athletes, super-especially to star athletes)

    2. Drunk Janet gets a case of jungle fever, hungover Janet would never do that to Brad. That Jamal is a rapist.

    I’ll take Door #2, Monty.

  14. Scottsboro Boys? To Kill a Mockingbird for that matter.

  15. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    Isn't she saying the opposite?

    She seems to be saying non-white males get accused more often and so because - PC truism - black males get falsely accused more often - that means a lot of these accusations are false and therefore a policy of always believe the victim is a bad idea.


    This is an internal PoCs vs feminist argument.

    I bet, if you asked her, she’d say that, while the reports against black men are mostly true, there are a higher number of actual rapes by white men, but they never get reported because our racist patriarchal system makes women afraid to report rapes by white men. They’re just too intimidated by the power white men have over them.

    • Replies: @Wilbur Hassenfus
    Hand the man a cigar. Protecting black men, guilty or not, is important stuff. Protecting innocent white men is of no interest.
    , @Cryptogenic
    That's one major privilege of progressivism: they get to determine sufficient reason. They frame the problems. They enforce the narrative.

    Of course, two can play at the game of sufficient reason. It's the pleasure of HBD types to trace things all the way back to DNA itself. With leftists the history of everything began with the Middle Passage.
  16. Professor Suk.

    • Replies: @Wyrd
    Tee-hee!
  17. Only an animal forces himself on a woman.

  18. It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.

    Virtually every sentence in this paragraph is terribly written, but the one above in particular is not only badly written but meaningless: I see no “logical necessity” in it.

    • Replies: @anon
    The logical necessity is ideological.

    1) believe all victims of rape
    2) white people are the bad guys
    3) most accused of rape are non-white

    logically impossible

  19. Pretty hilarious the way the left demands that cops stop shooting people… so of course crime skyrockets in black neighborhoods and lots more black people die. The left also demands that we punish gun crime more harshly and pass lots of new anti-gun laws… which of course if enforced will fall heavily on black neighborhoods and send lots more black people to jail. And here we have the left demanding that rape be punished more severely and all accusations be believed… which means lots more innocent black guys getting railroaded by the system. Just insane.

  20. “That’s not exactly transparent prose”

    Her prose suks.

  21. And Harvard has had fun dealing with their rapists, too. Check out “Kevin”, a street hustler from Brooklyn, a black Harvard Law student and a contemporary of Obama. Kevin got to HLS and started the Black Entrepreneurs Association in his 2L year.

    For “security reasons”, Kevin took nude pictures of at least some of the Harvard undergrad “members”. Blackmail photos if they betrayed The Organization (aka “Kevin”) is the best I can figure. I swear, either black chicks are very, very stupid, or they surrendered what little good sense they had and got nekkid for Kevin in hopes of scoring a black male HLS student.

    Eventually, one of the black chicks figured out that she had done something very, very stupid and wanted to get her photos back. But Kevin demanded a “price” for returning the pictures. Only then did she complain.

    My goodness gracious, the contortions those dweeby Jewish HLS professors went through! They had to have an investigation, but how to conduct it? Did the accused have a right to a lawyer? Nope. Did he have an opportunity to confront his accusers? Nope. And what happened to Kevin’s testimony to the HLS profs? Did it remain secret? Nope. The Middlesex County prosecutor got it and took off running when the dumb girl finally wised up and brought charges.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    The Middlesex County prosecutor's office (Cambridge, Massachusetts) is the same office that prosecuted the infamous Fells Acres preschool sex abuse case back in the 80's that wrongfully convicted the members of the Amirault family.
  22. @anon
    Isn't she saying the opposite?

    She seems to be saying non-white males get accused more often and so because - PC truism - black males get falsely accused more often - that means a lot of these accusations are false and therefore a policy of always believe the victim is a bad idea.


    This is an internal PoCs vs feminist argument.

    Agree anon. Did anyone actually read what they are commenting on?

  23. The embarrassing hatestats are easily fixed by lowering the threshold of sexual assault to cover suggestive comments, flirting, ogling, ass-slapping at Lacrosse practice, etc; where the gap will narrow somewhat, particularly in an environment of disparate tolerance because PC.

  24. Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School:

    http://ms-jd.org/blog/article/marriage-means-advancement

    And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School: And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Maybe she heard there as another Farook brother available.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Tell us again, how the marriage of two full-time lawyers or law professors helps our household inequality problem…
    , @Anon
    Me so honorary. Me suk you long time.
    , @tbraton
    Maybe that is how she acquired her great writing skills. But, after reading the piece, maybe that is why he divorced her. I would imagine that, if her cooking skills match her writing skills, he just got tired of eating hash every night.
  25. Sorry. Make that “Society of Black Professional Entrepreneurs”.

  26. @Anonymous
    "American Nazi Party leader says Trump's plan to ban all Muslims from the U.S. won't work and casts doubt over whether 'he even believes what he says'"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3357871/American-Nazi-Party-leader-says-Trump-s-plan-ban-Muslims-U-S-won-t-work-casts-doubt-believes-says.html

    What is “w***es”? Wusses? Weenies?

    Too raw for refined Daily Mail readers?

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Presumably "whores." The polite-society term is now "sex workers."
  27. Do the same professors who teach punctuation puns teach prose like this? Especially interesting is the form “XXX is as [adjective] as YYY”. Here’s an example:
    (1) It is not at all important and logically necessary to recognize that most rape claims are true.
    (2) It is not at all important and logically necessary to acknowledge wrongful accusations of sexual assault.
    The “as” technique is a way to combine these two sentence while removing any assertion of their truth value:
    “It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.”

    • Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Do the same professors who teach punctuation puns teach prose like this? Especially interesting is the form "XXX is as (adjective) as YYY". Here's an example:
    (1) It is not at all important and logically necessary to recognize that most rape claims are true.
    (2) It is not at all important and logically necessary to acknowledge wrongful accusations of sexual assault.
    The "as" technique is a way to combine these two sentence while removing any assertion of their truth value:
    "It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true."
  28. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    Steve, there is something interesting going on as well as a not quite correct claim here:

    http://www.voxeu.org/article/highly-educated-women-no-longer-have-fewer-kids

    Fewer than whom?

    And they are still at sub-replacement rate.

  29. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Do the same professors who teach punctuation puns teach prose like this? Especially interesting is the form "XXX is as [adjective] as YYY". Here's an example:
    (1) It is not at all important and logically necessary to recognize that most rape claims are true.
    (2) It is not at all important and logically necessary to acknowledge wrongful accusations of sexual assault.
    The "as" technique is a way to combine these two sentence while removing any assertion of their truth value:
    "It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true."

    Do the same professors who teach punctuation puns teach prose like this? Especially interesting is the form “XXX is as (adjective) as YYY”. Here’s an example:
    (1) It is not at all important and logically necessary to recognize that most rape claims are true.
    (2) It is not at all important and logically necessary to acknowledge wrongful accusations of sexual assault.
    The “as” technique is a way to combine these two sentence while removing any assertion of their truth value:
    “It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.”

    • Replies: @G Pinfold
    To which you could sincerely reply: I could not fail to disagree with you less.
  30. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    As with a lot of Korean & SE-AZN profs her command of the American professional idiom is terrible: “the filmmakers did more than understandably disagree with the criticism”–what’s she saying, that the flavor of their disagreement was not “understandable” (N.B. she relies on its weasel-word bureaucratic connotations, not literal meaning)? Or that it was a better-than-understandable kind of disagreeing and if so, whence her protest? That’s not classic French prose, no sir

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Right, the "not classic French prose" of Suk had me thinking at first that she was Vietnamese and engaging in some payback.

    Her main stylistic problem is that she qualifies her sentences as she writes them, instead of using subordinate clauses or separate sentences. It's as if she is speaking linearly and has to front load all of her qualifications as she moves along so she won't be shouted down. Two ways to fix that: #1 - Speak more simply. #2 - Start with the neutral sentences and build to the debatable ones.

    "the filmmakers did more than understandably ..... " means that, hey, some people made a film, and they were criticized, and they disagreed -- this is understandable. But they went further and accused anyone who criticized the film of enabling hostile environment, etc. etc. There are a lot simpler ways of expressing this.

    Another problem with her style is her dependence on endless qualification: not just germane qualifications, but sidebar references to all kinds of things that could easily be left out. Try to make one point at a time. A third problem is her reliance on jargon: "mass incarceration"? Brother.
  31. @Reg Cæsar
    What is "w***es"? Wusses? Weenies?

    Too raw for refined Daily Mail readers?

    Presumably “whores.” The polite-society term is now “sex workers.”

  32. @Theognis
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School:

    http://ms-jd.org/blog/article/marriage-means-advancement

    And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School: And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Maybe she heard there as another Farook brother available.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Nah. Not Farouk. Feldman is an Orthodox Jew who married a Korean (Suk) in a ceremony conducted at the Manhattan Harvard Club (!) by a Korean (!!).

    Then he got in a big public fight with his hometown Orthodox community when his Orthodox school cut his woman out of a reunion photo. He snitched on them, turned moser and told some Jewish stories out of school (and in the New York Times!)

    My guess is his wife refused to convert and his family and friends cranked up the heat even further.

    What with the public Jewish catfight and the fact that their kids wouldn't be Jews, he probably just threw in the towel.

    My question is whether he is a wuss and his wife leaned on him to write the NYT article or whether it was his own idea. Whoever's idea the Times article was, he is better off with his own kind (as are we all).
  33. Basically, if a white man is accused of rape, we should believe the victim and punish the supposed perpretator, but if the accusation is throw at a black man, we shouldn’t believe the victim because of racism.

    Who? Whom? As usual.

  34. It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.

    Who’s the Democratic frontrunner again? Oh, yeah…

  35. @SPMoore8
    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.

    Virtually every sentence in this paragraph is terribly written, but the one above in particular is not only badly written but meaningless: I see no "logical necessity" in it.

    The logical necessity is ideological.

    1) believe all victims of rape
    2) white people are the bad guys
    3) most accused of rape are non-white

    logically impossible

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn't work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.
     
    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don't think "insidious" belongs, and adding "elsewhere" is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.


    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.
     
    The "it" could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims "particularly black victims" is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don't think that's true.

    Now then she says she doesn't want to replace the "dismantled historical bias" (another "it") with a "tenet" (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity "must always and unthinkingly be believed.") So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn't mean we should automatically believe them now.


    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that "most rape claims are true", although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she's really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that "most" rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.
     
    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there's a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking "mass incarceration" she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.
  36. @Theognis
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School:

    http://ms-jd.org/blog/article/marriage-means-advancement

    And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Tell us again, how the marriage of two full-time lawyers or law professors helps our household inequality problem…

  37. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Are you Marco Rubio or one of his PR people?

    Hi, I’m one of Rubio’s PR people monitoring this blog for quotient of Hispanic-type news, even in HLS stories. Thank you for posting the irrelevant off-topic story on coked-up Cubans of Hialeah, as it marginally brings attention/buzz if not the desired thematic emphasis to our man. We were as surprised as anyone that primary voters apparently don’t get their opinions from Michael Gerson, Pete Wehner & the Commentary magazine website blog. We are now experimenting with alternative media strategies as such, like a fantasy-football thing for example, and a contest to win a free iPad Pro.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  38. “recognize that most rape claims are true. ”

    Really?

    Any evidence for that?

    • Replies: @ren
    Strictly speaking, if 51% of rape accusations are true, then that is most.

    I think Suk wishes to imply that it is more like 90% but has no facts or basis for her statement, so she just says "most" hoping people will think that means the vast majority rather than simple majority.
  39. Off Topic

    (but a favourite topic of our host)

    How Billionaire Techies Hope To Reshape The Immigration Debate:

    “The immigration-reform advocacy group founded by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg — FWD.us (pronounced “forward U.S.”) — and funded by fellow Silicon Valley entrepreneurs including Microsoft’s Bill Gates and Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer — is rolling out a plan for the 2016 election that will include “substantial” investments in battleground states.”

    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/09/458947223/how-billionaire-techies-hope-to-reshape-the-immigration-debate

  40. @Anonymous
    As with a lot of Korean & SE-AZN profs her command of the American professional idiom is terrible: "the filmmakers did more than understandably disagree with the criticism"--what's she saying, that the flavor of their disagreement was not "understandable" (N.B. she relies on its weasel-word bureaucratic connotations, not literal meaning)? Or that it was a better-than-understandable kind of disagreeing and if so, whence her protest? That's not classic French prose, no sir

    Right, the “not classic French prose” of Suk had me thinking at first that she was Vietnamese and engaging in some payback.

    Her main stylistic problem is that she qualifies her sentences as she writes them, instead of using subordinate clauses or separate sentences. It’s as if she is speaking linearly and has to front load all of her qualifications as she moves along so she won’t be shouted down. Two ways to fix that: #1 – Speak more simply. #2 – Start with the neutral sentences and build to the debatable ones.

    “the filmmakers did more than understandably ….. ” means that, hey, some people made a film, and they were criticized, and they disagreed — this is understandable. But they went further and accused anyone who criticized the film of enabling hostile environment, etc. etc. There are a lot simpler ways of expressing this.

    Another problem with her style is her dependence on endless qualification: not just germane qualifications, but sidebar references to all kinds of things that could easily be left out. Try to make one point at a time. A third problem is her reliance on jargon: “mass incarceration”? Brother.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Sheesh, like the folks around here have never read a paper in an academic journal . . .
    , @Big Bill
    Starting simple and building to debatable is one of the delightful characteristics of Thomas Paine's writing. It is also powerful.

    Its like flying down the freeway, wind in your hair, open road, relaxed, in control, and then gradually, almost imperceptibly getting into a traffic jam. You don't know where it happened, exactly, but you find yourself on the Dan Ryan in start/stop traffic with no way to escape.
  41. @Anonymous
    Are you Marco Rubio or one of his PR people?

    ICR: Do you regularly troll here or is this your first time?

  42. The dynamics of racially disproportionate impact affect minority men in the pattern of campus sexual-misconduct accusations….

    The woman who wrote that is a professor at Harvard Law School. Let that sink in. That might be the worst sentence ever to appear on this blog.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, it takes years of Ivy league education to learn how to write that badly.
  43. @SPMoore8
    Right, the "not classic French prose" of Suk had me thinking at first that she was Vietnamese and engaging in some payback.

    Her main stylistic problem is that she qualifies her sentences as she writes them, instead of using subordinate clauses or separate sentences. It's as if she is speaking linearly and has to front load all of her qualifications as she moves along so she won't be shouted down. Two ways to fix that: #1 - Speak more simply. #2 - Start with the neutral sentences and build to the debatable ones.

    "the filmmakers did more than understandably ..... " means that, hey, some people made a film, and they were criticized, and they disagreed -- this is understandable. But they went further and accused anyone who criticized the film of enabling hostile environment, etc. etc. There are a lot simpler ways of expressing this.

    Another problem with her style is her dependence on endless qualification: not just germane qualifications, but sidebar references to all kinds of things that could easily be left out. Try to make one point at a time. A third problem is her reliance on jargon: "mass incarceration"? Brother.

    Sheesh, like the folks around here have never read a paper in an academic journal . . .

  44. @anon
    The logical necessity is ideological.

    1) believe all victims of rape
    2) white people are the bad guys
    3) most accused of rape are non-white

    logically impossible

    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn’t work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.

    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don’t think “insidious” belongs, and adding “elsewhere” is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.

    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.

    The “it” could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims “particularly black victims” is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don’t think that’s true.

    Now then she says she doesn’t want to replace the “dismantled historical bias” (another “it”) with a “tenet” (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity “must always and unthinkingly be believed.”) So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn’t mean we should automatically believe them now.

    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.

    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that “most rape claims are true”, although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she’s really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that “most” rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.

    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there’s a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking “mass incarceration” she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.

    • Agree: Hail
    • Replies: @anon

    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn’t work.
     
    Yes it does.

    It is ... logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    PC belief 1: all rape claims are true
    PC belief 2: rape accusations against black men are often false

    It's "To Kill a Mockingbird" vs "The Accused."

    The verbal contortions are a product of the mental contortions.
    , @Steve Sailer
    It's not all that obscure for academic writing, but it's bad for The New Yorker, which was the home of Strunk & White lucidity.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I think her writing is more subtle than you're giving it credit for. For example, in the paragraph beginning, "it is as important and logically necessary...", she's not saying it is logically necessary to admit most rape accusations are true, she's saying "if this is necessary (as you, my intended reader, think), the other is necessary as well". It is not logically necessary that all rape accusations are true, but if you are the muddle-headed thinker who thinks so, then, if you examine your reasoning, you must admit the other is "logically necessary" too.

    There's no point in criticizing this article. Steve brought it to our attention not because it is an example of crazy academics, but because somebody noticed by accident.
    , @CJ
    ... I don't think "insidious" belongs ...

    She got it from here:

  45. If I can piece it together, she seems at the end to suggest Title IX be subordinated to “disparate impact” testing– Can someone who knows more about the law than I do explain; like, would a women’s field hockey team get the kibosh for not having enough PoCs, but it wouldn’t deprive a men’s team from playing w/ the right admixture? Would feminist campus rituals only get the blessing if certifiably diverse? Perhaps the results would be less obvious but if Title IX isn’t calibrated differently for each racial subgroup, instead of for white chicks’ concerns, wouldn’t it flunk its own gender-harmonization objectives out of the gate, in every case, if tentative on approved DI racial-harmonization criteria

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    If I can piece it together, she seems at the end to suggest Title IX be subordinated to “disparate impact” testing– Can someone who knows more about the law than I do explain; like, would a women’s field hockey team get the kibosh for not having enough PoCs, but it wouldn’t deprive a men’s team from playing w/ the right admixture?
     
    The text of Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in certain educational contexts. It says nothing about race.
  46. @countenance
    All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black. There aren't enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.

    One of my pet theories about the genesis of the mania about rape culture is that this is how white men in frats get the blame for black men raping white women on campus.

    Quite the contrary; As they are not required to actually exist , there is no limit to how many can be blamed.

  47. @Jim Don Bob
    It is a good thing Jeannie Suk is
    1) female
    2) Asian
    3) tenured
    or she would already be a non-person.

    The Overton Window truly is shifting. Trump has show that you can tell the truth.

    She is also married to Noah Feldman, something of an Icon in progressive circles.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Strike that,I see I am not up to date.
  48. @anon
    I bet, if you asked her, she'd say that, while the reports against black men are mostly true, there are a higher number of actual rapes by white men, but they never get reported because our racist patriarchal system makes women afraid to report rapes by white men. They're just too intimidated by the power white men have over them.

    Hand the man a cigar. Protecting black men, guilty or not, is important stuff. Protecting innocent white men is of no interest.

  49. That’s how academics write, and how they talk.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    There's nothing wrong with her writing. It's sensible, grammatical, logical... If you think it's convoluted, you need to spend more time with 19th- and early-20th-century writers. If you like philosophy, history, or theology, choosing translations from these periods is one way to do it.

    It's unfortunate Steve has to write for numbskulls. At least I have the excuse of usually posting under the influence. Like now, I started reading about FN, then watched a Rick Steves special on Christmas traditions in France and Italy (depressing given current circumstances), and now I've gone through about a 1.5 liters of Cabernet-Merlot. What's your excuse?
    , @SPMoore8
    No. Jacques Barzun didn't write like that. Pinker doesn't write like that. Lots of academicians do not write like that.

    Suk's style is typical of an academic who is insecure (and who therefore needs the approval of others, and therefore needs to make all the PC points in sequence), and who is unsure (a typical feminine academic trait, which manifests in endless qualifications.) There is another kind of academic style that deliberately ornaments and/or obfuscates to conceal a poverty or baldness of thought, and that is somewhat evident here.

    As to Pinker's arguments (and the other arguments) about clarity of style, and why academicians write so poorly, I don't know them because they are paywalled.
    , @ben tillman

    That’s how academics write, and how they talk.
     
    No, it is not. That's how stupid ones, or foreign ones, or dishonest ones write.
  50. @kaganovitch
    She is also married to Noah Feldman, something of an Icon in progressive circles.

    Strike that,I see I am not up to date.

  51. @Anonymous
    "American Nazi Party leader says Trump's plan to ban all Muslims from the U.S. won't work and casts doubt over whether 'he even believes what he says'"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3357871/American-Nazi-Party-leader-says-Trump-s-plan-ban-Muslims-U-S-won-t-work-casts-doubt-believes-says.html

    guess the FBI doesn’t want to have to do work on that.

  52. Nothing makes me smile quite like the white-female-vs.-black-male PC conundrum. One of my favorite articles on it appeared in Salon some 16 years ago:

    Make black the night

    Was planning a march against violence against women an inherently racist undertaking?

  53. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @SPMoore8
    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn't work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.
     
    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don't think "insidious" belongs, and adding "elsewhere" is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.


    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.
     
    The "it" could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims "particularly black victims" is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don't think that's true.

    Now then she says she doesn't want to replace the "dismantled historical bias" (another "it") with a "tenet" (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity "must always and unthinkingly be believed.") So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn't mean we should automatically believe them now.


    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that "most rape claims are true", although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she's really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that "most" rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.
     
    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there's a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking "mass incarceration" she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.

    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn’t work.

    Yes it does.

    It is … logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.

    PC belief 1: all rape claims are true
    PC belief 2: rape accusations against black men are often false

    It’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” vs “The Accused.”

    The verbal contortions are a product of the mental contortions.

  54. @Discordiax
    That's how academics write, and how they talk.

    There’s nothing wrong with her writing. It’s sensible, grammatical, logical… If you think it’s convoluted, you need to spend more time with 19th- and early-20th-century writers. If you like philosophy, history, or theology, choosing translations from these periods is one way to do it.

    It’s unfortunate Steve has to write for numbskulls. At least I have the excuse of usually posting under the influence. Like now, I started reading about FN, then watched a Rick Steves special on Christmas traditions in France and Italy (depressing given current circumstances), and now I’ve gone through about a 1.5 liters of Cabernet-Merlot. What’s your excuse?

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    There’s nothing wrong with her writing.

    Thanks for reminding me that I haven't had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.
    , @ben tillman

    There’s nothing wrong with her writing. It’s sensible, grammatical, logical…
     
    Not in the least. Her thoughts are disorganized at best, and her expression of those thoughts is often incoherent. She misuses words: One can't "aggravate" a "context". The "dynamics of . . . impact affect minority men" -- that is atrocious!
    , @Stan Adams
    Does saying 18949639463946.1 over 37899278927892.2 make you sound smarter than saying one-half?
  55. @Discordiax
    That's how academics write, and how they talk.

    No. Jacques Barzun didn’t write like that. Pinker doesn’t write like that. Lots of academicians do not write like that.

    Suk’s style is typical of an academic who is insecure (and who therefore needs the approval of others, and therefore needs to make all the PC points in sequence), and who is unsure (a typical feminine academic trait, which manifests in endless qualifications.) There is another kind of academic style that deliberately ornaments and/or obfuscates to conceal a poverty or baldness of thought, and that is somewhat evident here.

    As to Pinker’s arguments (and the other arguments) about clarity of style, and why academicians write so poorly, I don’t know them because they are paywalled.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    Pinker's main explanation of why academics write poorly is that they suffer from "the curse of knowledge." They can't imagine what it's like to know much less.

    I'm inclined to disagree: it implies that the better academic writers know less, which I don't think is the case. [Actually it's not quite that straightforward due to potential confounds.]

  56. @countenance
    All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black. There aren't enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.

    One of my pet theories about the genesis of the mania about rape culture is that this is how white men in frats get the blame for black men raping white women on campus.

    Basically, yeah. They keep looking around until they can somehow blame a white guy.

  57. @Chrisnonymous
    There's nothing wrong with her writing. It's sensible, grammatical, logical... If you think it's convoluted, you need to spend more time with 19th- and early-20th-century writers. If you like philosophy, history, or theology, choosing translations from these periods is one way to do it.

    It's unfortunate Steve has to write for numbskulls. At least I have the excuse of usually posting under the influence. Like now, I started reading about FN, then watched a Rick Steves special on Christmas traditions in France and Italy (depressing given current circumstances), and now I've gone through about a 1.5 liters of Cabernet-Merlot. What's your excuse?

    There’s nothing wrong with her writing.

    Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    touché
    , @Anon
    "Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet."

    Looks like you were put in the wrong cell.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1WZ6a6YYJg
    , @tbraton
    "Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up."

    If you need a reminder, you've got a real problem.
  58. @Sleep
    When a black man rapes a white woman, everyone needs to keep it quiet because it violates that man's civil rights to have to deal with the sheer horror of being accused of rape. The victim doesn't have any civil rights because she is white.

    Likewise, if we tell white women that black men are targeting them, we're preaching hate. Supposedly 91% of rape victims are white. Liberals may say "well, minority rape victims are less able to report the crime for fear of revenge" while trying to convince us that most wife-beaters are beer-guzzling white males.

    I think soon we will realize that mainstream American liberalism is all about race, and even the feminists will find themselves at cross-purposes. There will be associations of "women of color", but they will be more focused on protection for rape victims and battered women's shelters than on getting Equal Pay or maternity leave legislation through Congress. Just like environmentalism lost the war against aggressive immigration, white feminists will lose the battle against all of the non-white men.

    Personally, if I was running a college, I'd rather have a rape hoax every day than a rape every day.

    If I were *running* a college, I’d rather have a rape that can be obfuscated and denied rather than a hoax that attracts a lot of attention.

    If I were a father with a daughter in the college, on the other hand…

    • Replies: @tbraton
    "If I were *running* a college, I’d rather have a rape that can be obfuscated and denied rather than a hoax that attracts a lot of attention."

    The last thing you would want to do is run a preschool daycare in Middlesex County. (BTW "Middlesex" was the title of a very entertaining novel a few years back, that had nothing to do with Massachusetts but won the Pulitzer Prize (well deserved).)
  59. @SPMoore8
    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn't work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.
     
    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don't think "insidious" belongs, and adding "elsewhere" is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.


    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.
     
    The "it" could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims "particularly black victims" is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don't think that's true.

    Now then she says she doesn't want to replace the "dismantled historical bias" (another "it") with a "tenet" (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity "must always and unthinkingly be believed.") So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn't mean we should automatically believe them now.


    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that "most rape claims are true", although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she's really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that "most" rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.
     
    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there's a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking "mass incarceration" she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.

    It’s not all that obscure for academic writing, but it’s bad for The New Yorker, which was the home of Strunk & White lucidity.

    • Agree: SPMoore8, Percy Gryce
  60. @SPMoore8
    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn't work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.
     
    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don't think "insidious" belongs, and adding "elsewhere" is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.


    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.
     
    The "it" could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims "particularly black victims" is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don't think that's true.

    Now then she says she doesn't want to replace the "dismantled historical bias" (another "it") with a "tenet" (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity "must always and unthinkingly be believed.") So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn't mean we should automatically believe them now.


    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that "most rape claims are true", although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she's really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that "most" rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.
     
    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there's a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking "mass incarceration" she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.

    I think her writing is more subtle than you’re giving it credit for. For example, in the paragraph beginning, “it is as important and logically necessary…”, she’s not saying it is logically necessary to admit most rape accusations are true, she’s saying “if this is necessary (as you, my intended reader, think), the other is necessary as well”. It is not logically necessary that all rape accusations are true, but if you are the muddle-headed thinker who thinks so, then, if you examine your reasoning, you must admit the other is “logically necessary” too.

    There’s no point in criticizing this article. Steve brought it to our attention not because it is an example of crazy academics, but because somebody noticed by accident.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I got it from a Steven Pinker tweet.

    So the prose style wasn't an insuperable barrier to Pinker understanding it.

    , @SPMoore8
    I disagree, there's no "logical necessity" anywhere in that sentence. It's just a complete non sequitur. That's what drew my attention to it. The rest of my commentary on Suk results from assurances from others that the sentence makes sense. I know what she's trying to say: "We all know that the vast majority of rape claims are true: but if they are not all true, then it must follow that some claims are false." The problem there is that there's no "logical necessity" in accepting the veracity of any rape claim. All such claims should be held in suspense until there is evidence: that is, actually, what she is trying to say.

    I am not going to pretend that her article is as hard to understand as, say, Judith Butler or Julia Kristeva. I am saying it is poorly written, and that the above sentence is particularly bad. That's all.
    , @anon

    but because somebody noticed by accident.
     
    She didn't notice by accident.

    She's pointing out that the consequences of one PC action "always believe the victims" will contradict another "black men are often falsely accused".

    She - like the rest of academia - has known for years. She's only pointing it out now to head off a PC collision.

    Think about that.
  61. It’s nice that after all the publicity for the article, someone besides me is finally noticing the last paragraph. But Sailer is still missing the big point. As I pointed out a few days ago, the Harvard Law professor is saying, “Hey, let’s bring in the blacks to fight the women!” Hilarious.

  62. @SPMoore8
    There’s nothing wrong with her writing.

    Thanks for reminding me that I haven't had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.

    touché

  63. @onetwothree
    Are you just waiting for new posts so you can reply with off topic items? Really obnoxious.

    The comments must pass by the Whimser, so they are OK by definition.

  64. @Chrisnonymous
    I think her writing is more subtle than you're giving it credit for. For example, in the paragraph beginning, "it is as important and logically necessary...", she's not saying it is logically necessary to admit most rape accusations are true, she's saying "if this is necessary (as you, my intended reader, think), the other is necessary as well". It is not logically necessary that all rape accusations are true, but if you are the muddle-headed thinker who thinks so, then, if you examine your reasoning, you must admit the other is "logically necessary" too.

    There's no point in criticizing this article. Steve brought it to our attention not because it is an example of crazy academics, but because somebody noticed by accident.

    I got it from a Steven Pinker tweet.

    So the prose style wasn’t an insuperable barrier to Pinker understanding it.

  65. So pretty soon we’re going to be told that it was wrong to slut-shame Ruby Bates and Victoria Price, and that they rather than the Scottsboro Boys should have been believed.

  66. @Anonymous
    "American Nazi Party leader says Trump's plan to ban all Muslims from the U.S. won't work and casts doubt over whether 'he even believes what he says'"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3357871/American-Nazi-Party-leader-says-Trump-s-plan-ban-Muslims-U-S-won-t-work-casts-doubt-believes-says.html

    I guess the “American Nazi Party leader” thinks we should go immediately to Plan B: gas chambers. Of course, that step would be taken just to delouse the immigrants’ clothing.

  67. @ben tillman

    The dynamics of racially disproportionate impact affect minority men in the pattern of campus sexual-misconduct accusations....
     
    The woman who wrote that is a professor at Harvard Law School. Let that sink in. That might be the worst sentence ever to appear on this blog.

    Yeah, it takes years of Ivy league education to learn how to write that badly.

  68. @SPMoore8
    Right, the "not classic French prose" of Suk had me thinking at first that she was Vietnamese and engaging in some payback.

    Her main stylistic problem is that she qualifies her sentences as she writes them, instead of using subordinate clauses or separate sentences. It's as if she is speaking linearly and has to front load all of her qualifications as she moves along so she won't be shouted down. Two ways to fix that: #1 - Speak more simply. #2 - Start with the neutral sentences and build to the debatable ones.

    "the filmmakers did more than understandably ..... " means that, hey, some people made a film, and they were criticized, and they disagreed -- this is understandable. But they went further and accused anyone who criticized the film of enabling hostile environment, etc. etc. There are a lot simpler ways of expressing this.

    Another problem with her style is her dependence on endless qualification: not just germane qualifications, but sidebar references to all kinds of things that could easily be left out. Try to make one point at a time. A third problem is her reliance on jargon: "mass incarceration"? Brother.

    Starting simple and building to debatable is one of the delightful characteristics of Thomas Paine’s writing. It is also powerful.

    Its like flying down the freeway, wind in your hair, open road, relaxed, in control, and then gradually, almost imperceptibly getting into a traffic jam. You don’t know where it happened, exactly, but you find yourself on the Dan Ryan in start/stop traffic with no way to escape.

  69. @Chrisnonymous
    I think her writing is more subtle than you're giving it credit for. For example, in the paragraph beginning, "it is as important and logically necessary...", she's not saying it is logically necessary to admit most rape accusations are true, she's saying "if this is necessary (as you, my intended reader, think), the other is necessary as well". It is not logically necessary that all rape accusations are true, but if you are the muddle-headed thinker who thinks so, then, if you examine your reasoning, you must admit the other is "logically necessary" too.

    There's no point in criticizing this article. Steve brought it to our attention not because it is an example of crazy academics, but because somebody noticed by accident.

    I disagree, there’s no “logical necessity” anywhere in that sentence. It’s just a complete non sequitur. That’s what drew my attention to it. The rest of my commentary on Suk results from assurances from others that the sentence makes sense. I know what she’s trying to say: “We all know that the vast majority of rape claims are true: but if they are not all true, then it must follow that some claims are false.” The problem there is that there’s no “logical necessity” in accepting the veracity of any rape claim. All such claims should be held in suspense until there is evidence: that is, actually, what she is trying to say.

    I am not going to pretend that her article is as hard to understand as, say, Judith Butler or Julia Kristeva. I am saying it is poorly written, and that the above sentence is particularly bad. That’s all.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    I'll see your Butler and Kristeva and raise you a Roberto Unger. He is my all-time favorite propeller head Crit. The guy is as impenetrable as Cheyenne Mountain.
    , @anon

    I disagree, there’s no “logical necessity” anywhere in that sentence.
     
    Obviously there is *if* you believe two mandatory PC beliefs

    PC belief 1: all rape claims are true
    PC belief 2: rape accusations against black men are often false
  70. @countenance
    All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black. There aren't enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.

    One of my pet theories about the genesis of the mania about rape culture is that this is how white men in frats get the blame for black men raping white women on campus.

    “There aren’t enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.”

    Of course he exists. I have seen him post several messages on Sailer’s blogs. It does seem unfair to blame this poster for every single rape that occurs on American college campuses, although I suspect that it does his ego an immense amount of good. We need more names to spread the blame around—white names, not black names like Jameis Winston.

  71. @SPMoore8
    I disagree, there's no "logical necessity" anywhere in that sentence. It's just a complete non sequitur. That's what drew my attention to it. The rest of my commentary on Suk results from assurances from others that the sentence makes sense. I know what she's trying to say: "We all know that the vast majority of rape claims are true: but if they are not all true, then it must follow that some claims are false." The problem there is that there's no "logical necessity" in accepting the veracity of any rape claim. All such claims should be held in suspense until there is evidence: that is, actually, what she is trying to say.

    I am not going to pretend that her article is as hard to understand as, say, Judith Butler or Julia Kristeva. I am saying it is poorly written, and that the above sentence is particularly bad. That's all.

    I’ll see your Butler and Kristeva and raise you a Roberto Unger. He is my all-time favorite propeller head Crit. The guy is as impenetrable as Cheyenne Mountain.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
  72. @perry
    The left cares about rape in the same way they care about slavery. We know slavery was bad 150 + years ago , it still gets more air time in the usa media than the 650,000 people living in slavery in present day Islamic republic of Mauritania.

    As I recall, Brazil banned slavery around 1889, about 20+ years after the end of the Civil War. I also seem to recall reading that Brazil had more slaves than the U.S. Rather curious that you hear nothing about Brazil’s slavery in the past.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "As I recall, Brazil banned slavery around 1889, about 20+ years after the end of the Civil War. I also seem to recall reading that Brazil had more slaves than the U.S. Rather curious that you hear nothing about Brazil’s slavery in the past."

    You never hear about about slavery in any Latin American country period, because it than destroys the narrative that Hispanics/Latinos can never be racial oppressors.

    The American Left loves Communist Cuba and paints it as an utopia that the U.S should model after, but they always fail to bring up the fact that Cuba used to enslave Black bodies to work in the sugarcane plantations.

  73. @Discordiax
    Possibilities, neither of which are things that can be said in public:

    1. Black college boys are more confident that she wants the D. Often this may be true, sometimes it's not. (Applies especially to athletes, super-especially to star athletes)

    2. Drunk Janet gets a case of jungle fever, hungover Janet would never do that to Brad. That Jamal is a rapist.

    3. Jamal is boning Janet and Susie. Janet finds out and accuses Jamal to get back at him. This one I know occurs.

  74. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    I think her writing is more subtle than you're giving it credit for. For example, in the paragraph beginning, "it is as important and logically necessary...", she's not saying it is logically necessary to admit most rape accusations are true, she's saying "if this is necessary (as you, my intended reader, think), the other is necessary as well". It is not logically necessary that all rape accusations are true, but if you are the muddle-headed thinker who thinks so, then, if you examine your reasoning, you must admit the other is "logically necessary" too.

    There's no point in criticizing this article. Steve brought it to our attention not because it is an example of crazy academics, but because somebody noticed by accident.

    but because somebody noticed by accident.

    She didn’t notice by accident.

    She’s pointing out that the consequences of one PC action “always believe the victims” will contradict another “black men are often falsely accused”.

    She – like the rest of academia – has known for years. She’s only pointing it out now to head off a PC collision.

    Think about that.

  75. @SPMoore8
    I disagree, there's no "logical necessity" anywhere in that sentence. It's just a complete non sequitur. That's what drew my attention to it. The rest of my commentary on Suk results from assurances from others that the sentence makes sense. I know what she's trying to say: "We all know that the vast majority of rape claims are true: but if they are not all true, then it must follow that some claims are false." The problem there is that there's no "logical necessity" in accepting the veracity of any rape claim. All such claims should be held in suspense until there is evidence: that is, actually, what she is trying to say.

    I am not going to pretend that her article is as hard to understand as, say, Judith Butler or Julia Kristeva. I am saying it is poorly written, and that the above sentence is particularly bad. That's all.

    I disagree, there’s no “logical necessity” anywhere in that sentence.

    Obviously there is *if* you believe two mandatory PC beliefs

    PC belief 1: all rape claims are true
    PC belief 2: rape accusations against black men are often false

  76. @SPMoore8
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School: And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Maybe she heard there as another Farook brother available.

    Nah. Not Farouk. Feldman is an Orthodox Jew who married a Korean (Suk) in a ceremony conducted at the Manhattan Harvard Club (!) by a Korean (!!).

    Then he got in a big public fight with his hometown Orthodox community when his Orthodox school cut his woman out of a reunion photo. He snitched on them, turned moser and told some Jewish stories out of school (and in the New York Times!)

    My guess is his wife refused to convert and his family and friends cranked up the heat even further.

    What with the public Jewish catfight and the fact that their kids wouldn’t be Jews, he probably just threw in the towel.

    My question is whether he is a wuss and his wife leaned on him to write the NYT article or whether it was his own idea. Whoever’s idea the Times article was, he is better off with his own kind (as are we all).

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Thanks for some excellent responses. Roberto Ungar definitely deserves the Golden Gordion Knot for incomprehensibility. But Judith Butler definitely gets the silver.
  77. Summary: Don’t accuse black men of rape if you are not black.

    Goodnight.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Summary: Don’t accuse black men of rape if you are not black.

    Goodnight."

    What if an Asian woman gets raped by a Black rapist, will Suk still defend the Black rapist? Is she so pro-Black that in racial conflicts she sides with Blacks even over her own race?

    I thought only White liberals side with Blacks over their own race. Apparently Asians are doing a very good job of assimilating into White Left Wing culture.

  78. @SPMoore8
    Well, thanks for the logical demonstration but it still doesn't work.

    Here:

    Sexual assault is a serious and insidious problem that occurs with intolerable frequency on college campuses and elsewhere.
     
    Ok, an unexamined assumption of rape frequency. I don't think "insidious" belongs, and adding "elsewhere" is a typical qualification that has nothing to do with this argument.


    Fighting it entails, among other things, dismantling the historical bias against victims, particularly black victims—and not simply replacing it with the tenet that an accuser must always and unthinkingly be fully believed.
     
    The "it" could have been clearer, the among other things is possibly gratuitous, and the dismantling the historical bias against victims "particularly black victims" is another unnecessary qualification, unless she wants to say that black women rape victims were usually disbelieved while white women rape victims were believed. And I don't think that's true.

    Now then she says she doesn't want to replace the "dismantled historical bias" (another "it") with a "tenet" (as though a bias and a tenet even function the same way) that stipulates that an accuser must always be believed (again, gratuitious qualifications creating the monstrosity "must always and unthinkingly be believed.") So far, so good: Just as women may have been disbelieved in the past, that doesn't mean we should automatically believe them now.


    It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true.
     
    This is logically false. It is not logically necessary to acknowledge that "most rape claims are true", although, if we say that some rape claims are true, it does follow that some rape claims will be false. But what she's really saying is that it is logically necessary to acknowledge that "most" rape claims are true.

    And if we have learned from the public reckoning with the racial impact of over-criminalization, mass incarceration, and law enforcement bias, we should heed our legacy of bias against black men in rape accusations.
     
    This is the heart of it: She is attempting to say that there's a contrast between the racist attitude that disbelieved the rape claims of women against color, and the racist attitude the believed rape accusations against men of color, and she is trying to use the latter against the former. Which is fine, that argument has been made on this blog many times in the past year. But there was a much better way of doing it. Moreover, by invoking "mass incarceration" she is merely pandering.

    I wonder if they still have editors at The New Yorker to clean up clunky prose like this. I guess not.

    … I don’t think “insidious” belongs …

    She got it from here:

    • Replies: @CJ
    Why do images show in Preview mode but not when "Your comment is awaiting moderation" ?

    http://catalog.lambertvillelibrary.org/texts/English/rohmer/insidious/resources/cover.jpg
  79. @Bill Jones
    "recognize that most rape claims are true. "

    Really?

    Any evidence for that?

    Strictly speaking, if 51% of rape accusations are true, then that is most.

    I think Suk wishes to imply that it is more like 90% but has no facts or basis for her statement, so she just says “most” hoping people will think that means the vast majority rather than simple majority.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    How would we get a good estimate for the fraction of rape accusations that were false? Assuming a date rape case (there is no disagreement that sex happened, just whether it was voluntary), it's hard to imagine you could get a reliable answer from whichever person is lying, so how could we ever know the numbers?
  80. @CJ
    ... I don't think "insidious" belongs ...

    She got it from here:

    Why do images show in Preview mode but not when “Your comment is awaiting moderation” ?

    http://catalog.lambertvillelibrary.org/texts/English/rohmer/insidious/resources/cover.jpg

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Thank you, that's a fine link.
    , @Hail
    I cannot understand the Unz policy regarding images. I have not been able to make one work with img tags.
  81. @CJ
    Why do images show in Preview mode but not when "Your comment is awaiting moderation" ?

    http://catalog.lambertvillelibrary.org/texts/English/rohmer/insidious/resources/cover.jpg

    Thank you, that’s a fine link.

  82. @Big Bill
    Nah. Not Farouk. Feldman is an Orthodox Jew who married a Korean (Suk) in a ceremony conducted at the Manhattan Harvard Club (!) by a Korean (!!).

    Then he got in a big public fight with his hometown Orthodox community when his Orthodox school cut his woman out of a reunion photo. He snitched on them, turned moser and told some Jewish stories out of school (and in the New York Times!)

    My guess is his wife refused to convert and his family and friends cranked up the heat even further.

    What with the public Jewish catfight and the fact that their kids wouldn't be Jews, he probably just threw in the towel.

    My question is whether he is a wuss and his wife leaned on him to write the NYT article or whether it was his own idea. Whoever's idea the Times article was, he is better off with his own kind (as are we all).

    Thanks for some excellent responses. Roberto Ungar definitely deserves the Golden Gordion Knot for incomprehensibility. But Judith Butler definitely gets the silver.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    Funny thing about Unger is that he's quite lucid in his recent book on natural philosophy, co-authored with Lee Smolin.
  83. Negroes are rapists. How is that news? There was an entire social order in the southern U.S. built around controlling negro rape. Am I living in the Twilight Zone?

  84. @Lionel Hutz
    If I can piece it together, she seems at the end to suggest Title IX be subordinated to "disparate impact" testing-- Can someone who knows more about the law than I do explain; like, would a women's field hockey team get the kibosh for not having enough PoCs, but it wouldn't deprive a men's team from playing w/ the right admixture? Would feminist campus rituals only get the blessing if certifiably diverse? Perhaps the results would be less obvious but if Title IX isn't calibrated differently for each racial subgroup, instead of for white chicks' concerns, wouldn't it flunk its own gender-harmonization objectives out of the gate, in every case, if tentative on approved DI racial-harmonization criteria

    If I can piece it together, she seems at the end to suggest Title IX be subordinated to “disparate impact” testing– Can someone who knows more about the law than I do explain; like, would a women’s field hockey team get the kibosh for not having enough PoCs, but it wouldn’t deprive a men’s team from playing w/ the right admixture?

    The text of Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in certain educational contexts. It says nothing about race.

  85. @SPMoore8
    No. Jacques Barzun didn't write like that. Pinker doesn't write like that. Lots of academicians do not write like that.

    Suk's style is typical of an academic who is insecure (and who therefore needs the approval of others, and therefore needs to make all the PC points in sequence), and who is unsure (a typical feminine academic trait, which manifests in endless qualifications.) There is another kind of academic style that deliberately ornaments and/or obfuscates to conceal a poverty or baldness of thought, and that is somewhat evident here.

    As to Pinker's arguments (and the other arguments) about clarity of style, and why academicians write so poorly, I don't know them because they are paywalled.

    Pinker’s main explanation of why academics write poorly is that they suffer from “the curse of knowledge.” They can’t imagine what it’s like to know much less.

    I’m inclined to disagree: it implies that the better academic writers know less, which I don’t think is the case. [Actually it’s not quite that straightforward due to potential confounds.]

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Thanks, and I will follow up on Unger's latest as well. I taught for many years in all kinds of contexts, including when I was in the service. From that I know two things: (a) you have to start at a a common ground that everyone understands, (b) repetition is the mother all learning.

    Sometimes when looking for a common ground you have to reach down pretty far. But you also have to take the enormous amount of knowledge that you have and distill it down to essential points that your typical layperson can understand. That's why articles, books, chapters, Op-Eds have paragraphs, that's why there's an accepted structure of leading into topic, thesis statements, and the like. To say that academic writing sucks because they "cannot imagine not knowing" implies that it is possible to have a vast amount of knowledge but not know how to do any meaningful syntheses with it.

    I can think of a couple of major problems with academese. The first is a question of audience. If you are writing a paper for a professional journal that no one but the people in your specialty will read, then I can imagine writing in such a way that the journal referees would expect or even require. But if you are writing for the lay public you have to write like a normal person.

    But there's the rub. Normal people expect that academicians not only "know a lot of stuff" but also write in a special style. So academicians will all too easily write in what they think is the "proper style" for their social position. Personally I consider that very artificial; some of the authors I mentioned were very clear about how the content of what you write is far more important than any stilted style used to express it. (I could name many others; Schopenhauer's literary essays which were translated by Bailey Saunders are easily available and contain many relevant insights.)
  86. @SPMoore8
    Thanks for some excellent responses. Roberto Ungar definitely deserves the Golden Gordion Knot for incomprehensibility. But Judith Butler definitely gets the silver.

    Funny thing about Unger is that he’s quite lucid in his recent book on natural philosophy, co-authored with Lee Smolin.

  87. @Discordiax
    That's how academics write, and how they talk.

    That’s how academics write, and how they talk.

    No, it is not. That’s how stupid ones, or foreign ones, or dishonest ones write.

  88. @SPMoore8
    There’s nothing wrong with her writing.

    Thanks for reminding me that I haven't had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.

    “Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet.”

    Looks like you were put in the wrong cell.

    • Replies: @Spmoore8
    I love "A Fistful of Yen" but I had to watch it several times before I got the joke about the action taking place on "The Isle of Lucy."
  89. @Theognis
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School:

    http://ms-jd.org/blog/article/marriage-means-advancement

    And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Me so honorary. Me suk you long time.

  90. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Pinker's main explanation of why academics write poorly is that they suffer from "the curse of knowledge." They can't imagine what it's like to know much less.

    I'm inclined to disagree: it implies that the better academic writers know less, which I don't think is the case. [Actually it's not quite that straightforward due to potential confounds.]

    Thanks, and I will follow up on Unger’s latest as well. I taught for many years in all kinds of contexts, including when I was in the service. From that I know two things: (a) you have to start at a a common ground that everyone understands, (b) repetition is the mother all learning.

    Sometimes when looking for a common ground you have to reach down pretty far. But you also have to take the enormous amount of knowledge that you have and distill it down to essential points that your typical layperson can understand. That’s why articles, books, chapters, Op-Eds have paragraphs, that’s why there’s an accepted structure of leading into topic, thesis statements, and the like. To say that academic writing sucks because they “cannot imagine not knowing” implies that it is possible to have a vast amount of knowledge but not know how to do any meaningful syntheses with it.

    I can think of a couple of major problems with academese. The first is a question of audience. If you are writing a paper for a professional journal that no one but the people in your specialty will read, then I can imagine writing in such a way that the journal referees would expect or even require. But if you are writing for the lay public you have to write like a normal person.

    But there’s the rub. Normal people expect that academicians not only “know a lot of stuff” but also write in a special style. So academicians will all too easily write in what they think is the “proper style” for their social position. Personally I consider that very artificial; some of the authors I mentioned were very clear about how the content of what you write is far more important than any stilted style used to express it. (I could name many others; Schopenhauer’s literary essays which were translated by Bailey Saunders are easily available and contain many relevant insights.)

  91. Suk isn’t as terrible a writer as suggested by this piece. Here’s another: http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trouble-teaching-rape-law

    Not nearly as bad. The reason the featured piece is terribly written is that, for the privilege of making her point about not believing every victim (which really is a big issue), she had to concede numerous PC shibboleths, such as most accusations are true.

    This is hardly the first case of believe-the-victim hysteria. In the 80s social workers mounted a national campaign claiming “Children don’t lie.” Child protective agencies assumed every report of child sexual abuse was true. To deny this made you, in their minds and behavior, an accomplice to pedophilia.

    I think most of the hostility to her in Comments is due to misunderstanding her position.

    • Replies: @Spmoore8
    I think it's less hostility than just annoyance at her style. I think you are right that some of her convolutions have to do with how she was couching what she was trying to say. OTOH, Ben Tillman's detailed comments are acute.
    , @Steve Sailer
    "I think most of the hostility to her in Comments is due to misunderstanding her position."

    True, but you shouldn't need Pinker-level reading comprehension skills to read The New Yorker.
  92. @Chrisnonymous
    There's nothing wrong with her writing. It's sensible, grammatical, logical... If you think it's convoluted, you need to spend more time with 19th- and early-20th-century writers. If you like philosophy, history, or theology, choosing translations from these periods is one way to do it.

    It's unfortunate Steve has to write for numbskulls. At least I have the excuse of usually posting under the influence. Like now, I started reading about FN, then watched a Rick Steves special on Christmas traditions in France and Italy (depressing given current circumstances), and now I've gone through about a 1.5 liters of Cabernet-Merlot. What's your excuse?

    There’s nothing wrong with her writing. It’s sensible, grammatical, logical…

    Not in the least. Her thoughts are disorganized at best, and her expression of those thoughts is often incoherent. She misuses words: One can’t “aggravate” a “context”. The “dynamics of . . . impact affect minority men” — that is atrocious!

  93. @Big Bill
    And Harvard has had fun dealing with their rapists, too. Check out "Kevin", a street hustler from Brooklyn, a black Harvard Law student and a contemporary of Obama. Kevin got to HLS and started the Black Entrepreneurs Association in his 2L year.

    For "security reasons", Kevin took nude pictures of at least some of the Harvard undergrad "members". Blackmail photos if they betrayed The Organization (aka "Kevin") is the best I can figure. I swear, either black chicks are very, very stupid, or they surrendered what little good sense they had and got nekkid for Kevin in hopes of scoring a black male HLS student.

    Eventually, one of the black chicks figured out that she had done something very, very stupid and wanted to get her photos back. But Kevin demanded a "price" for returning the pictures. Only then did she complain.

    My goodness gracious, the contortions those dweeby Jewish HLS professors went through! They had to have an investigation, but how to conduct it? Did the accused have a right to a lawyer? Nope. Did he have an opportunity to confront his accusers? Nope. And what happened to Kevin's testimony to the HLS profs? Did it remain secret? Nope. The Middlesex County prosecutor got it and took off running when the dumb girl finally wised up and brought charges.

    The Middlesex County prosecutor’s office (Cambridge, Massachusetts) is the same office that prosecuted the infamous Fells Acres preschool sex abuse case back in the 80’s that wrongfully convicted the members of the Amirault family.

  94. @Anon
    "Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet."

    Looks like you were put in the wrong cell.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1WZ6a6YYJg

    I love “A Fistful of Yen” but I had to watch it several times before I got the joke about the action taking place on “The Isle of Lucy.”

  95. @Theognis
    Interesting to note here, Steve, the reason that she is a tenured professor at Harvard Law School:

    http://ms-jd.org/blog/article/marriage-means-advancement

    And apparently she and Feldman are already divorced too.

    Maybe that is how she acquired her great writing skills. But, after reading the piece, maybe that is why he divorced her. I would imagine that, if her cooking skills match her writing skills, he just got tired of eating hash every night.

  96. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Suk isn't as terrible a writer as suggested by this piece. Here's another: http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trouble-teaching-rape-law

    Not nearly as bad. The reason the featured piece is terribly written is that, for the privilege of making her point about not believing every victim (which really is a big issue), she had to concede numerous PC shibboleths, such as most accusations are true.

    This is hardly the first case of believe-the-victim hysteria. In the 80s social workers mounted a national campaign claiming "Children don't lie." Child protective agencies assumed every report of child sexual abuse was true. To deny this made you, in their minds and behavior, an accomplice to pedophilia.

    I think most of the hostility to her in Comments is due to misunderstanding her position.

    I think it’s less hostility than just annoyance at her style. I think you are right that some of her convolutions have to do with how she was couching what she was trying to say. OTOH, Ben Tillman’s detailed comments are acute.

  97. @SPMoore8
    There’s nothing wrong with her writing.

    Thanks for reminding me that I haven't had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.

    “Thanks for reminding me that I haven’t had a drink yet. It will take me awhile to catch up.”

    If you need a reminder, you’ve got a real problem.

  98. @SFG
    If I were *running* a college, I'd rather have a rape that can be obfuscated and denied rather than a hoax that attracts a lot of attention.

    If I were a father with a daughter in the college, on the other hand...

    “If I were *running* a college, I’d rather have a rape that can be obfuscated and denied rather than a hoax that attracts a lot of attention.”

    The last thing you would want to do is run a preschool daycare in Middlesex County. (BTW “Middlesex” was the title of a very entertaining novel a few years back, that had nothing to do with Massachusetts but won the Pulitzer Prize (well deserved).)

  99. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Suk isn't as terrible a writer as suggested by this piece. Here's another: http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trouble-teaching-rape-law

    Not nearly as bad. The reason the featured piece is terribly written is that, for the privilege of making her point about not believing every victim (which really is a big issue), she had to concede numerous PC shibboleths, such as most accusations are true.

    This is hardly the first case of believe-the-victim hysteria. In the 80s social workers mounted a national campaign claiming "Children don't lie." Child protective agencies assumed every report of child sexual abuse was true. To deny this made you, in their minds and behavior, an accomplice to pedophilia.

    I think most of the hostility to her in Comments is due to misunderstanding her position.

    “I think most of the hostility to her in Comments is due to misunderstanding her position.”

    True, but you shouldn’t need Pinker-level reading comprehension skills to read The New Yorker.

  100. @dearieme
    "It is as important and logically necessary to ... recognize that most rape claims are true."

    How does she know? How does anyone know? I find it hard to see how anyone does. She surely can't mean that most claims result in a conviction in a court of law, does she?

    Without getting too philosophical about truth, it’s probably not wrong to say that more than half of rape claims are true and therefore every rape claim is worthy of investigation with appropriate skepticism by the police, just as is every claim of robbery or any other crime report.

    The problem is when we automatically assume that 100% of them are true because no woman would EVER lie about such a thing. Most people report crimes because they believe they have been victims of a crime and are aware that filing a false report is itself a crime. However, a few do so because of insurance fraud or to seek to cause trouble for someone they dislike or because their boyfriend found out that they were having sex with another man or because they are nuts and want to elicit sympathy from others, etc.

    We have (or are supposed to have) a complex system for sorting the false claims from the true which radical feminists seek to disrupt for this one crime only. If you tell some not 100% coherent story about how your car got damaged and the police ask you skeptical questions about how much you were drinking that night and how many other accidents you have been in recently, they are just doing their job. But if a woman tells some not 100% believable story about how she was raped and the police ask her skeptical questions about how much she was drinking that night and how many other men she has slept with recently, that is victim blaming and totally off limits.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    Most people volunteer to be victimized.

    Frankly, I have next to no sympathy for women who get intoxicated in public. Come to think of it, this applies to men as well.

    The world is not a safe space. Those who insist on behaving as though it is have no one to blame but themselves if a predator finds them while they are behaving like prey.
    , @NOTA
    Yeah, a lot of people seem to miss that fact. The job of the police and judge and jury is to be skeptical of everyone's claims. The job of the defense attorney is to play up those doubts, and for all the complaints about blaming the victim, the defense attorney wouldn't be doing his job if he didn't raise questions about the truthfulness of the alleged victim in a rape case.

    My guess is that most rape accusations that go to the police are probably true (making the accusation is no picnic for the woman who makes it), but that there is usually not enough evidence to make a solid case against the accused rapist.
  101. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Do the same professors who teach punctuation puns teach prose like this? Especially interesting is the form "XXX is as (adjective) as YYY". Here's an example:
    (1) It is not at all important and logically necessary to recognize that most rape claims are true.
    (2) It is not at all important and logically necessary to acknowledge wrongful accusations of sexual assault.
    The "as" technique is a way to combine these two sentence while removing any assertion of their truth value:
    "It is as important and logically necessary to acknowledge the possibility of wrongful accusations of sexual assault as it is to recognize that most rape claims are true."

    To which you could sincerely reply: I could not fail to disagree with you less.

  102. The observation at ms-jd about top Asian female law professors such as Suk being married to male superstar professors, is correct, but is inaccurately interpreted. It’s mainly the gender economics of a male-dominated field, and being a minority may be a further advantage.

    As in some other academic specialties, professors at top-tier law schools are a mostly male group, with many lesbians among the females; and with a high value placed on in-marriage. That means heterosexual females in the group have multiple chances to marry higher performing males, and attractive females can and often do hook superstars.

    Chua and Suk were both very attractive, energetic, and culturally assimilated (no accent, relatively elite background). Suk was a dancer with a stellar academic and legal resume barely a notch below her ex-husband’s. Such women’s value on both the legal job market and the law professor dating market was probably increased by the relative lack of Asian women in the profession, and the even greater scarcity of Asian female competitors on the faculties where they worked. It is a reasonable guess that they basically had their pick from the male top dogs in the field, which when combined with their diversity value does severely advantage them in the tenure race.

    (Unfortunately, in contrast to their flawless resumes, the intellectual output from Suk and her ex-husband has been underwhelming, especially Feldman’s god-awful books of apologia for Islam. They seem to be better at impressing selection committees, less good at doing deep or original thinking. Chua on the other hand has common sense and, unlike her husband, seems averse to intellectual theorizing.)

    • Replies: @iffen
    when combined with their diversity value

    Doesn't this value derive from superficial features? Don't you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?
  103. @Anonymous
    Are you Marco Rubio or one of his PR people?

    This blog is not a colouring book. Marco Rubio would never read it.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    I was just stuck dumb on Sunday when I was at the local Barnes & Noble and discovered a display of the segment of the US publishing industry experiencing exponential growth: "adult" coloring books!

    WTF?!
  104. @countenance
    All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black. There aren't enough non-existent white men like Haven Monahan to blame all the time.

    One of my pet theories about the genesis of the mania about rape culture is that this is how white men in frats get the blame for black men raping white women on campus.

    “All there is here is a massive wreck at the intersectionality of feminism and black.” isn´t modern feminism mostly about the right to get raped by black guys? Thats what this whole slut walk thing etc. is aiming at. Feminists are angry about white guys who try to prevent that.

  105. What she’s saying is logically necessary is that one acknowledge the possibility of false accusations. What she means is that acknowledging that possibility is required, if one is to be rational. She says that this is as important as acknowledging that most rape accusations are true. Whether or not you agree with her, she’s making a clear enough point. It’s true that she could have said it more elegantly.

    • Replies: @anon

    What she means is that acknowledging that possibility is required, if one is to be rational.
     
    She doesn't say anything about rational.

    She says most accused are non-white and therefore "always believe the victim" will lead to a PC train wreck.

    Administrators and faculty who routinely work on sexual-misconduct cases, including my colleague Janet Halley, tell me that most of the complaints they see are against minorities, and that is consistent with what I have seen at Harvard.
     
    So the academic staff at the universities all know the truth is the opposite of what they say in public.

    So who's creating a hostile environment?
  106. @Discordiax
    Possibilities, neither of which are things that can be said in public:

    1. Black college boys are more confident that she wants the D. Often this may be true, sometimes it's not. (Applies especially to athletes, super-especially to star athletes)

    2. Drunk Janet gets a case of jungle fever, hungover Janet would never do that to Brad. That Jamal is a rapist.

    Once you have a sick society, is it any wonder that 18 year old girls act like they’ve matriculated to a whorehouse?

    On a better note, it’s helpful indeed that these icky stars of their own interracial porn screenplays self-identify so that the better men among us see them as the lepers they are.

    • Replies: @anon
    that's just plain anti-white racial hatred

    we'll see more and more of it as Trump triggers the paranoids
    , @NOTA
    This article says that according to surveys, college students now don't actually sleep around more than their parents did in college.
  107. @Jack D
    Without getting too philosophical about truth, it's probably not wrong to say that more than half of rape claims are true and therefore every rape claim is worthy of investigation with appropriate skepticism by the police, just as is every claim of robbery or any other crime report.

    The problem is when we automatically assume that 100% of them are true because no woman would EVER lie about such a thing. Most people report crimes because they believe they have been victims of a crime and are aware that filing a false report is itself a crime. However, a few do so because of insurance fraud or to seek to cause trouble for someone they dislike or because their boyfriend found out that they were having sex with another man or because they are nuts and want to elicit sympathy from others, etc.

    We have (or are supposed to have) a complex system for sorting the false claims from the true which radical feminists seek to disrupt for this one crime only. If you tell some not 100% coherent story about how your car got damaged and the police ask you skeptical questions about how much you were drinking that night and how many other accidents you have been in recently, they are just doing their job. But if a woman tells some not 100% believable story about how she was raped and the police ask her skeptical questions about how much she was drinking that night and how many other men she has slept with recently, that is victim blaming and totally off limits.

    Most people volunteer to be victimized.

    Frankly, I have next to no sympathy for women who get intoxicated in public. Come to think of it, this applies to men as well.

    The world is not a safe space. Those who insist on behaving as though it is have no one to blame but themselves if a predator finds them while they are behaving like prey.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    By the standards of an Afghan tribesman, everyone in the U.S. acts like a victim all the time--wandering around places where we don't know everyone around us, going unarmed, letting women walk around without armed make escort, etc.

    That's what separate countries are for. I think the decent countries should continue to be places where we put people in jail for committing crimes, even against victims who were drunk or careless or stupid.
  108. Cryptogenic [AKA "Gentile Ben"] says:
    @anon
    I bet, if you asked her, she'd say that, while the reports against black men are mostly true, there are a higher number of actual rapes by white men, but they never get reported because our racist patriarchal system makes women afraid to report rapes by white men. They're just too intimidated by the power white men have over them.

    That’s one major privilege of progressivism: they get to determine sufficient reason. They frame the problems. They enforce the narrative.

    Of course, two can play at the game of sufficient reason. It’s the pleasure of HBD types to trace things all the way back to DNA itself. With leftists the history of everything began with the Middle Passage.

  109. @Chrisnonymous
    There's nothing wrong with her writing. It's sensible, grammatical, logical... If you think it's convoluted, you need to spend more time with 19th- and early-20th-century writers. If you like philosophy, history, or theology, choosing translations from these periods is one way to do it.

    It's unfortunate Steve has to write for numbskulls. At least I have the excuse of usually posting under the influence. Like now, I started reading about FN, then watched a Rick Steves special on Christmas traditions in France and Italy (depressing given current circumstances), and now I've gone through about a 1.5 liters of Cabernet-Merlot. What's your excuse?

    Does saying 18949639463946.1 over 37899278927892.2 make you sound smarter than saying one-half?

  110. When narratives collide…

  111. @ren
    Strictly speaking, if 51% of rape accusations are true, then that is most.

    I think Suk wishes to imply that it is more like 90% but has no facts or basis for her statement, so she just says "most" hoping people will think that means the vast majority rather than simple majority.

    How would we get a good estimate for the fraction of rape accusations that were false? Assuming a date rape case (there is no disagreement that sex happened, just whether it was voluntary), it’s hard to imagine you could get a reliable answer from whichever person is lying, so how could we ever know the numbers?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    20%
  112. @dc.sunsets
    Most people volunteer to be victimized.

    Frankly, I have next to no sympathy for women who get intoxicated in public. Come to think of it, this applies to men as well.

    The world is not a safe space. Those who insist on behaving as though it is have no one to blame but themselves if a predator finds them while they are behaving like prey.

    By the standards of an Afghan tribesman, everyone in the U.S. acts like a victim all the time–wandering around places where we don’t know everyone around us, going unarmed, letting women walk around without armed make escort, etc.

    That’s what separate countries are for. I think the decent countries should continue to be places where we put people in jail for committing crimes, even against victims who were drunk or careless or stupid.

  113. @Jack D
    Without getting too philosophical about truth, it's probably not wrong to say that more than half of rape claims are true and therefore every rape claim is worthy of investigation with appropriate skepticism by the police, just as is every claim of robbery or any other crime report.

    The problem is when we automatically assume that 100% of them are true because no woman would EVER lie about such a thing. Most people report crimes because they believe they have been victims of a crime and are aware that filing a false report is itself a crime. However, a few do so because of insurance fraud or to seek to cause trouble for someone they dislike or because their boyfriend found out that they were having sex with another man or because they are nuts and want to elicit sympathy from others, etc.

    We have (or are supposed to have) a complex system for sorting the false claims from the true which radical feminists seek to disrupt for this one crime only. If you tell some not 100% coherent story about how your car got damaged and the police ask you skeptical questions about how much you were drinking that night and how many other accidents you have been in recently, they are just doing their job. But if a woman tells some not 100% believable story about how she was raped and the police ask her skeptical questions about how much she was drinking that night and how many other men she has slept with recently, that is victim blaming and totally off limits.

    Yeah, a lot of people seem to miss that fact. The job of the police and judge and jury is to be skeptical of everyone’s claims. The job of the defense attorney is to play up those doubts, and for all the complaints about blaming the victim, the defense attorney wouldn’t be doing his job if he didn’t raise questions about the truthfulness of the alleged victim in a rape case.

    My guess is that most rape accusations that go to the police are probably true (making the accusation is no picnic for the woman who makes it), but that there is usually not enough evidence to make a solid case against the accused rapist.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye

    My guess is that most rape accusations that go to the police are probably true (making the accusation is no picnic for the woman who makes it), but that there is usually not enough evidence to make a solid case against the accused rapist.
     
    (emphasis added)

    The legal standard of proof is a deterrent to false accusers, particularly if it involves a verifiable falsehood in the police report. But the on-campus adjudication systems do not adhere to the same legal standards of proof and due process. Those systems are just made to be abused by false accusers.

  114. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @AGuy
    What she's saying is logically necessary is that one acknowledge the possibility of false accusations. What she means is that acknowledging that possibility is required, if one is to be rational. She says that this is as important as acknowledging that most rape accusations are true. Whether or not you agree with her, she's making a clear enough point. It's true that she could have said it more elegantly.

    What she means is that acknowledging that possibility is required, if one is to be rational.

    She doesn’t say anything about rational.

    She says most accused are non-white and therefore “always believe the victim” will lead to a PC train wreck.

    Administrators and faculty who routinely work on sexual-misconduct cases, including my colleague Janet Halley, tell me that most of the complaints they see are against minorities, and that is consistent with what I have seen at Harvard.

    So the academic staff at the universities all know the truth is the opposite of what they say in public.

    So who’s creating a hostile environment?

  115. @dc.sunsets
    Once you have a sick society, is it any wonder that 18 year old girls act like they've matriculated to a whorehouse?

    On a better note, it's helpful indeed that these icky stars of their own interracial porn screenplays self-identify so that the better men among us see them as the lepers they are.

    that’s just plain anti-white racial hatred

    we’ll see more and more of it as Trump triggers the paranoids

  116. @dc.sunsets
    Once you have a sick society, is it any wonder that 18 year old girls act like they've matriculated to a whorehouse?

    On a better note, it's helpful indeed that these icky stars of their own interracial porn screenplays self-identify so that the better men among us see them as the lepers they are.

    This article says that according to surveys, college students now don’t actually sleep around more than their parents did in college.

  117. Well, whites are a minority on Harvard campus. So they by all accounts should be a minority in rape. (~47% “white”, but Id wager half those are eskimos)

  118. @NOTA
    How would we get a good estimate for the fraction of rape accusations that were false? Assuming a date rape case (there is no disagreement that sex happened, just whether it was voluntary), it's hard to imagine you could get a reliable answer from whichever person is lying, so how could we ever know the numbers?

    20%

  119. @NOTA
    Yeah, a lot of people seem to miss that fact. The job of the police and judge and jury is to be skeptical of everyone's claims. The job of the defense attorney is to play up those doubts, and for all the complaints about blaming the victim, the defense attorney wouldn't be doing his job if he didn't raise questions about the truthfulness of the alleged victim in a rape case.

    My guess is that most rape accusations that go to the police are probably true (making the accusation is no picnic for the woman who makes it), but that there is usually not enough evidence to make a solid case against the accused rapist.

    My guess is that most rape accusations that go to the police are probably true (making the accusation is no picnic for the woman who makes it), but that there is usually not enough evidence to make a solid case against the accused rapist.

    (emphasis added)

    The legal standard of proof is a deterrent to false accusers, particularly if it involves a verifiable falsehood in the police report. But the on-campus adjudication systems do not adhere to the same legal standards of proof and due process. Those systems are just made to be abused by false accusers.

  120. @Sleep
    When a black man rapes a white woman, everyone needs to keep it quiet because it violates that man's civil rights to have to deal with the sheer horror of being accused of rape. The victim doesn't have any civil rights because she is white.

    Likewise, if we tell white women that black men are targeting them, we're preaching hate. Supposedly 91% of rape victims are white. Liberals may say "well, minority rape victims are less able to report the crime for fear of revenge" while trying to convince us that most wife-beaters are beer-guzzling white males.

    I think soon we will realize that mainstream American liberalism is all about race, and even the feminists will find themselves at cross-purposes. There will be associations of "women of color", but they will be more focused on protection for rape victims and battered women's shelters than on getting Equal Pay or maternity leave legislation through Congress. Just like environmentalism lost the war against aggressive immigration, white feminists will lose the battle against all of the non-white men.

    Personally, if I was running a college, I'd rather have a rape hoax every day than a rape every day.

    “Supposedly 91% of rape victims are white. Liberals may say “well, minority rape victims are less able to report the crime for fear of revenge”

    Black female rape victims fear revenge by whom? The White male power structure? The vast majority of Black female rape victims are raped by Black men.

    Maybe most Black female rape victims are afraid their Black male rapists will bust a cap in their asses if they snitch them out to the Popos, because the Black men who raped them got gang connections.

  121. @Orthodox
    Summary: Don't accuse black men of rape if you are not black.

    Goodnight.

    “Summary: Don’t accuse black men of rape if you are not black.

    Goodnight.”

    What if an Asian woman gets raped by a Black rapist, will Suk still defend the Black rapist? Is she so pro-Black that in racial conflicts she sides with Blacks even over her own race?

    I thought only White liberals side with Blacks over their own race. Apparently Asians are doing a very good job of assimilating into White Left Wing culture.

  122. I have no trouble believing that black men, with their image of hypermasculinity, are sought by white college women looking for an edgy sexual experience. I also have no trouble believing that there is a high incidence of disappointing sexual experience for those same women when their Mandingo turns out to be disrespectful or have other repulsive traits. Lets face it, there’s a big current in black youth culture that regards it as hip to demean women. The prevailing attitude of campus jocks, black and white, is one of social entitlement. The Kobe Bryant case illustrated those dynamics perfectly. The young thing threw herself at the black superstar, they had consensual sex, and his version of pillow talk made her feel demeaned. She accused him of rape when he was just guilty of being an inconsiderate jerk.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "I have no trouble believing that black men, with their image of hypermasculinity, are sought by white college women looking for an edgy sexual experience. I also have no trouble believing that there is a high incidence of disappointing sexual experience for those same women when their Mandingo turns out to be disrespectful or have other repulsive traits. Lets face it, there’s a big current in black youth culture that regards it as hip to demean women. The prevailing attitude of campus jocks, black and white, is one of social entitlement. The Kobe Bryant case illustrated those dynamics perfectly. The young thing threw herself at the black superstar, they had consensual sex, and his version of pillow talk made her feel demeaned. She accused him of rape when he was just guilty of being an inconsiderate jerk."

    Most Black men are not known for chivalry. Hence why most of them are not marriage material. Most Black men on average are only good for short term relationships. But Oriental men and White men on average are better for long term relationships.

    The stereotype is that Black men are good for one night stands, but Black men are not known for being great boyfriends and great husbands.

  123. @tbraton
    As I recall, Brazil banned slavery around 1889, about 20+ years after the end of the Civil War. I also seem to recall reading that Brazil had more slaves than the U.S. Rather curious that you hear nothing about Brazil's slavery in the past.

    “As I recall, Brazil banned slavery around 1889, about 20+ years after the end of the Civil War. I also seem to recall reading that Brazil had more slaves than the U.S. Rather curious that you hear nothing about Brazil’s slavery in the past.”

    You never hear about about slavery in any Latin American country period, because it than destroys the narrative that Hispanics/Latinos can never be racial oppressors.

    The American Left loves Communist Cuba and paints it as an utopia that the U.S should model after, but they always fail to bring up the fact that Cuba used to enslave Black bodies to work in the sugarcane plantations.

    • Agree: tbraton
  124. @CJ
    Why do images show in Preview mode but not when "Your comment is awaiting moderation" ?

    http://catalog.lambertvillelibrary.org/texts/English/rohmer/insidious/resources/cover.jpg

    I cannot understand the Unz policy regarding images. I have not been able to make one work with img tags.

  125. I am sorry but the name Jeannie Suk would be a great name for a porn actress.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "I am sorry but the name Jeannie Suk would be a great name for a porn actress."

    Some East Asian last names can sound quite funny. Did you know that some Chinese people have Jew as their last name?
  126. @Thirdeye
    I have no trouble believing that black men, with their image of hypermasculinity, are sought by white college women looking for an edgy sexual experience. I also have no trouble believing that there is a high incidence of disappointing sexual experience for those same women when their Mandingo turns out to be disrespectful or have other repulsive traits. Lets face it, there's a big current in black youth culture that regards it as hip to demean women. The prevailing attitude of campus jocks, black and white, is one of social entitlement. The Kobe Bryant case illustrated those dynamics perfectly. The young thing threw herself at the black superstar, they had consensual sex, and his version of pillow talk made her feel demeaned. She accused him of rape when he was just guilty of being an inconsiderate jerk.

    “I have no trouble believing that black men, with their image of hypermasculinity, are sought by white college women looking for an edgy sexual experience. I also have no trouble believing that there is a high incidence of disappointing sexual experience for those same women when their Mandingo turns out to be disrespectful or have other repulsive traits. Lets face it, there’s a big current in black youth culture that regards it as hip to demean women. The prevailing attitude of campus jocks, black and white, is one of social entitlement. The Kobe Bryant case illustrated those dynamics perfectly. The young thing threw herself at the black superstar, they had consensual sex, and his version of pillow talk made her feel demeaned. She accused him of rape when he was just guilty of being an inconsiderate jerk.”

    Most Black men are not known for chivalry. Hence why most of them are not marriage material. Most Black men on average are only good for short term relationships. But Oriental men and White men on average are better for long term relationships.

    The stereotype is that Black men are good for one night stands, but Black men are not known for being great boyfriends and great husbands.

  127. @Buffalo Joe
    I am sorry but the name Jeannie Suk would be a great name for a porn actress.

    “I am sorry but the name Jeannie Suk would be a great name for a porn actress.”

    Some East Asian last names can sound quite funny. Did you know that some Chinese people have Jew as their last name?

  128. I thought only White liberals side with Blacks over their own race. Apparently Asians are doing a very good job of assimilating into White Left Wing culture.

    Well, she did marry a Jewish guy. Maybe she assimilated into Jewish Left Wing culture.

  129. @Academic Gossip
    The observation at ms-jd about top Asian female law professors such as Suk being married to male superstar professors, is correct, but is inaccurately interpreted. It's mainly the gender economics of a male-dominated field, and being a minority may be a further advantage.

    As in some other academic specialties, professors at top-tier law schools are a mostly male group, with many lesbians among the females; and with a high value placed on in-marriage. That means heterosexual females in the group have multiple chances to marry higher performing males, and attractive females can and often do hook superstars.

    Chua and Suk were both very attractive, energetic, and culturally assimilated (no accent, relatively elite background). Suk was a dancer with a stellar academic and legal resume barely a notch below her ex-husband's. Such women's value on both the legal job market and the law professor dating market was probably increased by the relative lack of Asian women in the profession, and the even greater scarcity of Asian female competitors on the faculties where they worked. It is a reasonable guess that they basically had their pick from the male top dogs in the field, which when combined with their diversity value does severely advantage them in the tenure race.

    (Unfortunately, in contrast to their flawless resumes, the intellectual output from Suk and her ex-husband has been underwhelming, especially Feldman's god-awful books of apologia for Islam. They seem to be better at impressing selection committees, less good at doing deep or original thinking. Chua on the other hand has common sense and, unlike her husband, seems averse to intellectual theorizing.)

    when combined with their diversity value

    Doesn’t this value derive from superficial features? Don’t you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?

    • Replies: @Academic Gossip
    "Doesn’t [their diversity] value derive from superficial features? Don’t you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?"

    That might apply to conservative black professors, because there are enough other liberal black professors to replace them if they get too far out of line. Asian female law professors are a scarcer commodity, and were significantly scarcer when the hiring and tenure decisions were made. (Suk is heavily PC as far as I can tell.)

  130. @5371
    This blog is not a colouring book. Marco Rubio would never read it.

    I was just stuck dumb on Sunday when I was at the local Barnes & Noble and discovered a display of the segment of the US publishing industry experiencing exponential growth: “adult” coloring books!

    WTF?!

    • Replies: @Discordiax
    IT's a meditation/relaxation thing. You'll usually find them next to yoga DVDs, ariomatherapy candles and that sort of thing.
  131. @Brutusale
    I was just stuck dumb on Sunday when I was at the local Barnes & Noble and discovered a display of the segment of the US publishing industry experiencing exponential growth: "adult" coloring books!

    WTF?!

    IT’s a meditation/relaxation thing. You’ll usually find them next to yoga DVDs, ariomatherapy candles and that sort of thing.

  132. @iffen
    when combined with their diversity value

    Doesn't this value derive from superficial features? Don't you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?

    “Doesn’t [their diversity] value derive from superficial features? Don’t you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?”

    That might apply to conservative black professors, because there are enough other liberal black professors to replace them if they get too far out of line. Asian female law professors are a scarcer commodity, and were significantly scarcer when the hiring and tenure decisions were made. (Suk is heavily PC as far as I can tell.)

    • Replies: @iffen
    So it just comes down to the innate attraction that we have for novelty? Of course I think that attraction to novelty helped us along the way, I just can't fill out the details as to exactly how.
  133. @Academic Gossip
    "Doesn’t [their diversity] value derive from superficial features? Don’t you risk losing your diversity value if you openly express diversity of thought?"

    That might apply to conservative black professors, because there are enough other liberal black professors to replace them if they get too far out of line. Asian female law professors are a scarcer commodity, and were significantly scarcer when the hiring and tenure decisions were made. (Suk is heavily PC as far as I can tell.)

    So it just comes down to the innate attraction that we have for novelty? Of course I think that attraction to novelty helped us along the way, I just can’t fill out the details as to exactly how.

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