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One of the more famous stories in American business history is how middle-aged traveling milkshake machine salesman Ray Kroc went to visit his best customers, the McDonalds brothers of San Bernardino, and ended up going into business with them and taking the McDonald’s brand nationwide, discarding the brothers along the way. Whether Kroc is this tale’s hero or villain (for crushing the McDonald brothers, one of whom was a logistical genius) has been debated ever since.

In 1950, it typically took about a half hour between the time you walked into a diner and the time the waitress put your hamburger in front of you. The McDonald Brothers figured out in their San Bernardino restaurant how to cut that by at least an order of magnitude. But Ray Kroc wound up with most of the money from their innovation.

The first half hour of the 2016 movie The Founder with Michael Keaton as Kroc, directed by John Lee Hancock (The Rookie, The Blind Side), offers a vivid retelling of this legendary event.

I only now discovered a song, “Boom, Like That” by Mark Knopfler (founder of Dire Straits, e.g., “Sultans of Swing”) that condenses the McDonald’s history to 5′:40″. I assumed it was written for the soundtrack of the 2016 movie, but it turns out that Knopfler released it in 2004:

I’m going to San Bernardino ring-a-ding-ding
Milkshake mixers that’s my thing, now
These guys bought a heap of my stuff
And I gotta see a good thing sure enough, now

Or my name’s not Kroc, that’s Kroc with a ‘k’
Like ‘crocodile,’ but not spelled that way, yeah
It’s dog eat dog rat eat rat
Kroc-style boom, like that

The folks line up all down the street
And I’m seeing this girl devour her meat, now
And then I get it, wham as clear as day
My pulse begins to hammer and I hear a voice say
These boys have got this down
Oughtta be a one of these in every town
These boys have got the touch
It’s clean as a whistle and it don’t cost much
Wham, bam you don’t wait long
Shake, fries patty, you’re gone
And how about that friendly name?
Heck, every little thing oughtta stay the same …

You gentlemen ought to expand
You’re going to need a helping hand, now

A reference to Rod Stewart’s “Maggie Mae,” another rock song with surprisingly detailed realistic lyrics.

Sometimes you gotta be an s.o.b.
You want to make a dream reality

It’s pretty unexpected to see a rock song that functions as a competent business biography that could almost be a Harvard Business School case study. But Knopfler is a guy who made a huge amount of money in the 1980s because A) he’s really talented, B) he made some tough Kroc-like executive decisions, like firing his brother from Dire Straits while recording their Making Movies album.

 
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  1. Back in my young muso days I shared managers with Mr. Knopfler, the whole lot of them were sharp….really sharp, pity I was talentless!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Thud

    That's cool. Thanks for sharing. Don't be shy.

    , @Curle
    @Thud

    “pity I was talentless!”

    Talent is overrated.









    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LfNq0kboAII

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  2. Industrial Disease– by Dire Straits– also functions quite nicely as a competent economics case-study.

  3. “Boom, Like That” is probably my dad’s favorite song for some reason. I think he sees it as anti-corporate, with the same tone as “Money for Nothing” only slightly more serious. Plus he just worships Knopfler in general, which with my dad I always assume is politically motivated.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @passive-aggressivist

    He thinks Money for Nothing was an anti-corporate song? It was a paean to the genius of corporate gods who made otherwise schlock mass marketable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. I watched The Princess Bride (1987) last week and noticed Knopfler wrote much of the music for it.

  5. Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can’t laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count ’em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs…”Come on, Walk of Life already…”

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @onetwothree

    Wha? Like a lot of bands, Dire Straits had a lot of pretty good songs that didn't chart. The Top 40 or nothing mentality is Not A Good Thing.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @Anon
    @onetwothree

    I never cared for Dire Straits, but I appreciated the work Knopfler did on the Miracle album by Willy Deville. It's Knopfler's best guitar work and Deville's best set of songs and singing.

    , @Autochthon
    @onetwothree

    I find them to be one of those outfits who are undeniably technical virtuosos (Knopfler anyway) but whose songwriting, with a few exceptions, is not engaging.

    Sort of the opposite of, say, Johnny Cash.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @onetwothree

    de gustibus non disputandum est, culus

    , @reactionry
    @onetwothree

    Look Ma, No Hans Landa!
    (disappears from list of war criminals)

    Col Hans Landa didn't quite get The Knack(sack/dirt nap/knapsack?) of singing "My Shosanna"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQ_ymsaXilk

    https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=nQdNXKfZKMS7jwTMtb6wAg&q=the+knack+my+sharona&btnK=Google+Search&oq=the+knack+my+sharona&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0l10.964.5925..6843...0.0..0.90.1272.20....2..0....1..gws-wiz.....0..0i131.6r-0-SnfoPo

    Also see (again) Au revoir , Éric Rohmer (and Nathan Philips) in Bury My Heart at Claire's Wounded Knee

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PB_ewNo31Cw

    (won't bother going with Oh, Sharona with banjo on my knee)

    See also in VN's Lolita, Humbert's first love, Annabel Lee and her "opalescent knee"

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @onetwothree


    hey count ’em: *Three* hits.

     

    Four:
    Sultans of Swing
    Skateaway
    Walk of Life
    Money for Nothing

    Replies: @M. Hartley

  6. The song is new to me too, but Knopfler has condensed history before (e.g., Brothers in Arms, Telegraph Road).

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    , @Con Moto
    @Dave Pinsen

    He also did Sailing to Philadelphia (about the mason-dixon line)

  7. The only songwriter I know of to write a heartfelt Celtic-sounding ballad about the French invasion of Russia.

  8. net worth 95 million ..he can afford to noodle around on aimless folkie tunes these days. Knopfler peaked with Dire Straits where he hired and fired with abandon. Not just his brother.
    The Founder looks like a movie I would see in a theater.

  9. I am somewhat of a Dire Straits fan, but have never heard Boom, Like That till just now. Thanks. I will say though, that as good as the lyrics may be in any song, it’s the melody and the sound that make the song. I already like the melody and sound of this one (still listening), and if I never made out all the lyrics*, it wouldn’t make much difference, unfortunately, for a good lyric-writer.

    Now, I just finished listening to another great Knofler tune and watched the preview to The Founder. I don’t say this often, but I want to go see this movie. I wish someone who’s seen an advanced screening could warn me if there are many little anti-white/PC jabs in it. It’s 2019, and I though that was required. What’s it gonna be, a black fry cook getting made fun of by the white boys because he wan’t eat food from his own place of employment and always eats his Mama’s fried chicken instead? (It’ll be something, I’m sure.)

    .

    * which is pretty much the case right now, as I type and listen.

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I watched it on Netflix about a year ago. My teenage kids turned me onto this movie. They've watched it more than once. I can't recall any crazy PC BS and I'm always alert for that kind of crap.

    It is a movie that will stay with you.

    SoCal circa 1950's was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @M. Hartley

    , @Autochthon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's a great movie true to the historical diegesis and with no GloboHomo that O ever noticed (and my radar for that stuff is pretty keen).

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I liked The Founder, and I don't recall any of that crap, not even the usually obligatory sneering at 50s America.

  10. @Dave Pinsen
    The song is new to me too, but Knopfler has condensed history before (e.g., Brothers in Arms, Telegraph Road).

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Con Moto

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn’t beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don’t even get me started on that.)

    Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules …”

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Sabaton is pretty good.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @WHAT
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Stewart is beyond comparison in history-infused lyrics, agreed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Ganderson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed- I’ll see your invasion of Russia song, and raise you one more:
    https://youtu.be/jM0zvTL7Adc

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @reactionry
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Re "Roads To Moscow"
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_to_Russia

    If I didn't have bad taste, I'd have none at all and all that and loved the Ramones (all of the original members are dead* now) back in the daze and would have taken more Super 8 Sound footage (with a Sears(!) rebranded camera) than actually filmed on account of being told to stop by security people at First Avenue in Minneapolis. Until a few months ago, no word of a lie, one of my daughters and her family lived right across the street from Bishop Cretin High School. While the students surely became aware of the Ramones decades ago, this was certainly *not* the school song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ymeuOz0hZU

    From their "Commando"**

    "They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    First rule is 'the laws of Germany'
    Second rule is 'be nice to mommy'
    Third rule is 'don't talk to Commies'
    Fourth rule is 'eat kosher salamis'
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do…"

    * "dead" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73NdmMYZsnM

    ** Commando -The term "Kommando" might have first come into language with the Anglo-CowBoer War, but it seems that the meaning of going without underwear was fixed (like Brit bayonets in the Iraq War) during the Vietnam War. Over the past few years the Democrat Party has gone full Sonderkommando, if not full Mengele.

    Replies: @ganderson

    , @dr kill
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who did the guitar work in 'On The Border'?

  11. Knopfler’s biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. “That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Tom Scarlett

    To his current-year credit I suppose, Mark has not only never retracted/changed that verse to my knowledge, but has once or twice defended it on grounds of artist's prerogative: quoting someone for Sprechstimme authenticity is not an endorsement, etc. A concept which sails over the head of the modern "journalist," who is really nothing more than an overgrown hall monitor

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Tom Scarlett


    Knopfler’s biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. “That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire.”
     
    For a while there, they were bleeping the word "faggot" when that song played. Then they took to just excising the whole stanza from the song.
    , @reactionry
    @Tom Scarlett

    [Scarlett beat me to it, (classic misquote?) but frankly dear, I don't give a damn]

    The "Bare Ruined Choirs" Of Workers' Dire Straits?

    Putting aside the previously posted deja Derbyshire all over again, Amazon Prime Obsession, here's that little non-dance number for a preternatural premonition of Amazon warehouse workers:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAD6Obi7Cag

    See also Boom Like That - Mike drop, boom microphones?

  12. Anonymous [AKA "Siouxland Guy"] says:

    Knopfler is a heavy reader, and I’m guessing he read a biography of Kroc to write that song. For his “Sailing to Philadelphia,” about Mason and Dixon, he read Thomas Pynchon’s “Mason&Dixon,” which is not something that ordinary people or even musicians do.

  13. Steve, would love to get your take on this for a future post.

    https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/starbucks-bathroom-birth-highlights-challenges-of-welcoming-all#gs.NMbM0eau

    1. Sounds like RaceInc moved in quickly and successfully to strip mine Starbucks of some cash to investigate and report all this mayhem going on in their stores. Holder, doubtful more than 40 percent sub-Saharan, penning the synopsis is a nice touch. It’s a great industry to be in, I s’pose.

    2. If Starbucks sees the future as serving non-customers, why not every business in every location everywhere all the time?

    • Replies: @TheBoom
    @Iberiano


    One in out of every five Starbucks customers probably has a mental illness of some kind,
     
    If that doesn't make you want to go to Starbucks and hang out, I don't know what will. Far more exciting than their piped in music
    , @William Badwhite
    @Iberiano


    Many of the tough issues facing Starbucks stores are also front and center for public libraries, said Amy VanScoy, who teaches library science at the University of Buffalo.
     
    Uh oh, they used Art Deco's real name
  14. Is it just me or does the burger joint McDonalds associated with thus movie and this song make them both unattractive? I suppose its supposed to have the opposite effect. The association of the fast food is intended to attract people to these entertainments. But for me it does the opposite. It repulses me.

    I never eat at McDonalds. I can;t understand why anyone would. Jack-in-the-Box or Wendy’s make some sense but McDonalds food is just junk.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Pat Boyle

    I like BigMacs.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Mr. Anon, @Flip, @reactionry

    , @Stan Adams
    @Pat Boyle

    The Bacon Smokehouse burger is not bad.

    https://assets3.thrillist.com/v1/image/2771338/size/tmg-article_default_mobile.jpg

    The guava-and-cheese pies are decent.

  15. Great call Steve. The first 30 minutes of that movie is a masterpiece and homage to old America.

  16. @Dave Pinsen
    The song is new to me too, but Knopfler has condensed history before (e.g., Brothers in Arms, Telegraph Road).

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Con Moto

    He also did Sailing to Philadelphia (about the mason-dixon line)

  17. Anonymous [AKA "Hope Smith"] says:

    Shutdown has ended.

    No wall. Lol

    Trump will lose in 2020.
    Reply only if you have any arguments.
    Putting Troll won’t do anything.

    Period.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Troll: Clyde, Chrisnonymous, Alfa158
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anonymous

    The joke's on you: it's your country too.

    , @Alfa158
    @Anonymous

    Sorry I can’t disagree with what you wrote, but daring people to put up a troll tag was just too good to resist. Ya shoulda known better.

    , @J1234
    @Anonymous

    No, it's a setup...by Trump. It means the hammer is about to fall. Declaring an emergency is something he's willing and wanting to do, but it isn't something he wants to enter into lightly.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Anonymous

    Who with any clarity of vision could disagree? Trump Pelosi on and got his tail end handed to him on a platter. He’s through.

  18. Anon[210] • Disclaimer says:

    I eat at McDonald’s once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    The trick is to order a plain hamburger, a small fries, and a Coke. And in Japan you can get a small shake that actually is small. Once you get used to a plain hamburger, no cheese, no Big Mac, you can start to get a feel for the simple charm of 1950s McDonald’s.

    If you do an images search for “Karuizawa McDonald’s” you can find a slightly remodeled Golden Arches franchise. The funny thing is that Karuizawa is a resort area that zoned out chain stores, but this location is so old that it was grandfathered in.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon

    Same. I never ate McDonalds in the US but go sometimes in Japan. Agree that the plain burger, small fries, small shake is a decent experience, but the Grand Bacon Cheese is hard to pass up. Wendy's/First Kitchen is better, though, and they have a no-bun low-carb burger.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @TelfoedJohn
    @Anon


    I eat at McDonald’s once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.
     
    A leftie friend once raved to me about the McDonalds he ate at in New Zealand. He had trouble articulating why they were so good there, but I suspect it was because NZ then had 50s US levels of whiteness.
    , @Kyle
    @Anon

    I’m a construction worker in America. That’s what I have for lunch every day, Cheeseburger, small fries, large coke. Three bucks.

    , @MBlanc46
    @Anon

    Those 15 cent burgers seemed fantastic when I was twelve.

    Replies: @Clyde

  19. The guy in the Black shirt and glasses playing guitar in Knopfler’s Boom, Like That video is Richard Bennett, an American born in Illinois who later moved to LA.

    I remember him from a live video of Knopfler’s Hill Farmer’s Blues where he started out the song with a simple bit on the mandolin. I think it’s the mandolin, might be wrong.

    As usually happens, Knopfler and the guy on bass guitar steal away the thunder from the honest and plucky mandolin player. What it is, folks!

  20. How many movies have been named after famous pop songs?

    Answer: A lot.

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    How many movies have been named after famous pop songs?

    Answer: A lot.
     
    If you do it, make sure you don't f*** with O.G.'s like Steely Dan:
    http://www.lettersofnote.com/2009/12/you-me-and-cousin-dupree.html
  21. In Wisconsin we have Culver’s. Much better.

    • Disagree: Kyle
    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Paleo Liberal

    I could go for a buttered burger and some curds right now.

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Paleo Liberal

    Any thinking civilized person knows Blimpy Burgers are the best.

    https://www.blimpyburger.com

    For those unfortunates who can’t visit Crazy Jim, there’s always In-n-Out.

    Replies: @Thomm

  22. Knopfler is probably the most under-rated guitarist of all times.

    Also check out “Don’t Crash the Ambulance” from the same 2004 album:

    It’s an allusion of Bush Sr advising the Jr on not being reckless.

  23. @Pat Boyle
    Is it just me or does the burger joint McDonalds associated with thus movie and this song make them both unattractive? I suppose its supposed to have the opposite effect. The association of the fast food is intended to attract people to these entertainments. But for me it does the opposite. It repulses me.

    I never eat at McDonalds. I can;t understand why anyone would. Jack-in-the-Box or Wendy's make some sense but McDonalds food is just junk.

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Stan Adams

    I like BigMacs.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @MarkinLA

    Here’s a guy that REALLY likes Big Macs:

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/wisconsin-man-eats-30-000th-big-mac-hamburger-article-1.3975373

    Replies: @E. Rekshun

    , @Mr. Anon
    @MarkinLA


    I like BigMacs.
     
    You forgot to add "And I cannot lie."
    , @Flip
    @MarkinLA

    Filet-O-Fish for me

    , @reactionry
    @MarkinLA

    "LOL!" says Steve Jobs from the grave.

    cc The LOLita-ish "animated" "beard" for MarkinLA - SmirkinMerkinLA

    (See VN's "animated merkin" (Hat tip to Hugh Fitzgerald for the "LOL" line))

  24. Anon[774] • Disclaimer says:

    Re: McDonalds

    They are doing just fine. Many of the food items are rather good. Fries always have been. Coffee has gotten to the “good” level. Had a chicken biscuit the other day. Nicely cooked, adequately spiced. The biscuit was perfect. They are generally able to keep their standard.

    They know their market.

    You can dislike them all you want, but I think they are doing fine…in their target market.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Anon

    That's never enough. Must have neverending growth! That's where MBA geniuses think McCafe concepts and upscale appearances are what the world really wants from McDonalds. Nope, it has always been fries, Happy Meals, and bad burgers.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  25. I just read up on the brother, David. He seems like a nice guy, but a loser in the context of a band: He wanted a utopian band democracy. Ha-ha-ha!

  26. When Ray Kroc puts the legal screws on the McDonald brothers (in the movie), it’s interesting that the brothers never seem to consider (in the movie) if it would be worth it to try to locate their own reinforcements in the law firms and investment houses of neighboring L.A.

  27. @Paleo Liberal
    In Wisconsin we have Culver’s. Much better.

    Replies: @Anon87, @Stan d Mute

    I could go for a buttered burger and some curds right now.

  28. The excellent podcast Business Wars is featuring the McDonald’s-Burger King rivalry right now.

    The history of McDonald’s is pretty well-known, but Burger King’s background is pretty interesting, too. And the podcast series also covers Burger Chef and Wendy’s.

    https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wondery/business-wars

  29. I would be interested to learn what McDonald’s recipes we’re back in the early days. I’d like to think the food was higher quality back then.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @AndrewR

    I think that would be true for most chain restaurants. It is hard to believe they can make any money today selling $5 footlong subs, dollar menu hamburgers and fries, etc., using decent food just based off what it would cost to buy the food at a grocery store and make it at home. The biggest markup has always been on the fountain soft drinks, but they have to make something off the main food items on the menu too.

    , @dvorak
    @AndrewR


    I would be interested to learn what McDonald’s recipes we’re back in the early days. I’d like to think the food was higher quality back then.
     
    Go to the counter at an In-N-Out and order a hamburger and a shake, (no secret menu, no 'Animal Style'), if you want a classic McD experience.
    , @Flip
    @AndrewR

    The fries tasted better when they fried them in beef tallow. If you believe the paleo guys, they were healthier too.

  30. @Paleo Liberal
    In Wisconsin we have Culver’s. Much better.

    Replies: @Anon87, @Stan d Mute

    Any thinking civilized person knows Blimpy Burgers are the best.

    https://www.blimpyburger.com

    For those unfortunates who can’t visit Crazy Jim, there’s always In-n-Out.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Stan d Mute

    In-n-Out's burgers are good but the fries are unacceptable.

    Five Guys is surprisingly expensive, even if the fries portion is generous.

    I may be in the minority, but I am starting to like Habit.

    McDonald's never makes the top of anyone's list for burger quality. Ironically, their coffee is good, and one-third the price of Starbucks (not to mention that Starbucks is a lunatic SJW operation).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corn

  31. OT, but possibly of interest – is Chris Korda, son of Graham Greene’s mate and editor Michael Korda, founder of the extremely unpleasant Church Of Euthanasia, musician and software developer, another late-onset trans chap?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Korda

    He was born in 1962 and was still being described as “he” by the NYT in 1996, when he was a big Unabomber For President type. Wiki says “she” is trans, and a 2014 piece describes a “cross-gendered” human.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I just read about this ostensible "church" – why haven't its members and supporters all killed themselves already? Hypocrites.

  32. It’s easy to explain how the song could anticipate the movie. Kroc’s autobiography came out in 1977.

  33. Love Knopfler. In addition to being a driven, wonderful musician-creator he gives tons of evidence of being a bright, verbal guy. I read somewhere that before committing to music he’d worked as a journalist, which isn’t always a bad thing, let alone bad training. How many pop musicians write songs about history?

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @Paleo Retiree


    How many pop musicians write songs about history?
     
    When asked why their songs were so satirical and funny, Steely Dan explained that most of their peers lack a sense of humor.
    , @Excal
    @Paleo Retiree

    Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) has a degree in history, and has indulged on occasion: "Don Juan" is a fine example, and there's also "Zazou". Perhaps more vignettes than history lessons, but both good and interesting still.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Autochthon

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Paleo Retiree


    How many pop musicians write songs about history?
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FECOMdLIcBo
  34. @AndrewR
    I would be interested to learn what McDonald's recipes we're back in the early days. I'd like to think the food was higher quality back then.

    Replies: @Barnard, @dvorak, @Flip

    I think that would be true for most chain restaurants. It is hard to believe they can make any money today selling $5 footlong subs, dollar menu hamburgers and fries, etc., using decent food just based off what it would cost to buy the food at a grocery store and make it at home. The biggest markup has always been on the fountain soft drinks, but they have to make something off the main food items on the menu too.

  35. Semi-OT:

    Norwegian billionaires back campaign for an almost all plant-based diet while flying around the world on a private jet:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-01-21/do-i-say-not-i-do-vegetarian-environmental-activist-criticized-traveling-private

    Pretty sure Leftist hypocrisy is as close as we can get to a perpetual motion machine in this timeline.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    They want us peons to live on lentils and rice. FYI morons, meat is plant based because those animals eat nothing but plants.

    I love both lentils and rice. But they’re very fattening. Meat fish and eggs keep you thin. 1,000 calories a day of rice noodles bread etc is more fattening than 2,000 calories a day of meat fish and eggs

  36. @MarkinLA
    @Pat Boyle

    I like BigMacs.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Mr. Anon, @Flip, @reactionry

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 - 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @reactionry, @Pericles

  37. money for nothing, chicks for free. there’s your real business case. hard to beat that business model.

  38. The best fast-food burger in this country is In-N-Out. Unfortunately only in the American South West and the Pacific Coast.

    The last time I was in San Diego I suggested In-N-Out, and the stupid Israeli in our group vetoed the suggestion: “I don’t think my stomach could take a hamburger.”

    Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, who was generally extremely critical of fast-food, said complimentary things about In-N-Out.

    I sometimes consider flying to the Left Coast just to get an In-N-Out burger.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @DaveC

    In-n-Out, like Chik-Fil-A, illustrate the pattern of smaller owners (who happen to be Christian) competing with the megafranchises, despite having higher prices, through sheer quality; also in this group are the mid-Western Rocket and Culver's. There is almost certainly a thing like this nearer to you.

  39. @Stan d Mute
    @Paleo Liberal

    Any thinking civilized person knows Blimpy Burgers are the best.

    https://www.blimpyburger.com

    For those unfortunates who can’t visit Crazy Jim, there’s always In-n-Out.

    Replies: @Thomm

    In-n-Out’s burgers are good but the fries are unacceptable.

    Five Guys is surprisingly expensive, even if the fries portion is generous.

    I may be in the minority, but I am starting to like Habit.

    McDonald’s never makes the top of anyone’s list for burger quality. Ironically, their coffee is good, and one-third the price of Starbucks (not to mention that Starbucks is a lunatic SJW operation).

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Thomm

    I assume Five Guys is expensive for a logical reason but their preparation leaves something to be desired. Unless you like inhaling grease.

    The Habit is decent though their hamburgers aren't anything special. Best tasting FF burger I ever had was at a N. Cal. establishment that was actually part of a local taco/burrito chain-- go figure...

    , @Corn
    @Thomm

    I’m glad I’m not the only one to notice In-N-Out’s fries. What’s the deal there? Is it the variety of potato they use or the cooking oil?

    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.

    Replies: @Thomm

  40. @Anon
    Re: McDonalds

    They are doing just fine. Many of the food items are rather good. Fries always have been. Coffee has gotten to the "good" level. Had a chicken biscuit the other day. Nicely cooked, adequately spiced. The biscuit was perfect. They are generally able to keep their standard.

    They know their market.

    You can dislike them all you want, but I think they are doing fine...in their target market.

    Replies: @Anon87

    That’s never enough. Must have neverending growth! That’s where MBA geniuses think McCafe concepts and upscale appearances are what the world really wants from McDonalds. Nope, it has always been fries, Happy Meals, and bad burgers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon87

    According to my dad, my twin sister and I (early 80s gen) didn't even like burgers/fries when prepared at home or ordered at other restaurants-- but as soon as the new movie/cartoon tie-in toys were advertised each month, we'd immediately clamor for Chez Ronald

    Replies: @Anon87

  41. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    Wha? Like a lot of bands, Dire Straits had a lot of pretty good songs that didn’t chart. The Top 40 or nothing mentality is Not A Good Thing.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Redneck farmer

    Some of their best songs were too long to get much air play, e.g., Tunnel of Love (8:07). They’re even longer live.

  42. @AndrewR
    I would be interested to learn what McDonald's recipes we're back in the early days. I'd like to think the food was higher quality back then.

    Replies: @Barnard, @dvorak, @Flip

    I would be interested to learn what McDonald’s recipes we’re back in the early days. I’d like to think the food was higher quality back then.

    Go to the counter at an In-N-Out and order a hamburger and a shake, (no secret menu, no ‘Animal Style’), if you want a classic McD experience.

  43. @Paleo Retiree
    Love Knopfler. In addition to being a driven, wonderful musician-creator he gives tons of evidence of being a bright, verbal guy. I read somewhere that before committing to music he'd worked as a journalist, which isn't always a bad thing, let alone bad training. How many pop musicians write songs about history?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NYhTwLCT-Q

    Replies: @dvorak, @Excal, @Reg Cæsar

    How many pop musicians write songs about history?

    When asked why their songs were so satirical and funny, Steely Dan explained that most of their peers lack a sense of humor.

  44. In Eric Schlosser’s 1998 best selling book Fast Food Nation, he devotes an entire chapter to the founding of McDonalds, the brothers, and Ray Kroc’s role in the chain. It’s fairly clear that while Kroc had some amazing talents, (as well as coincidentally sharing a WW1 barrack with legendary studio producer Walt Disney), Kroc is not the hero. Granted, one could say that the reason that Carl’s Jr Founder Carl Karcher comes across personally as a genuinely nice person in Fast Food Nation was because he granted Schlosser an interview whereas Kroc did the undecent thing by dying about fifteen years before the book was released, the general facts remain clear that Kroc was the villian of the story. One could also add that the McDonald bros shouldn’t have sold out, but, business is business.

    And business can be very, very, cold.

    But overall Fast Food Nation is fair to McDonalds and all the relevant major players involved.

  45. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    Sabaton is pretty good.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Redneck farmer

    Then the Winged Hussars arrived......

  46. @Pat Boyle
    Is it just me or does the burger joint McDonalds associated with thus movie and this song make them both unattractive? I suppose its supposed to have the opposite effect. The association of the fast food is intended to attract people to these entertainments. But for me it does the opposite. It repulses me.

    I never eat at McDonalds. I can;t understand why anyone would. Jack-in-the-Box or Wendy's make some sense but McDonalds food is just junk.

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Stan Adams

    The Bacon Smokehouse burger is not bad.

    The guava-and-cheese pies are decent.

  47. @MikeatMikedotMike
    How many movies have been named after famous pop songs?

    Answer: A lot.

    Replies: @dvorak

    How many movies have been named after famous pop songs?

    Answer: A lot.

    If you do it, make sure you don’t f*** with O.G.’s like Steely Dan:
    http://www.lettersofnote.com/2009/12/you-me-and-cousin-dupree.html

  48. Anon[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tom Scarlett
    Knopfler's biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. "That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire."

    Replies: @Anon, @Mr. Anon, @reactionry

    To his current-year credit I suppose, Mark has not only never retracted/changed that verse to my knowledge, but has once or twice defended it on grounds of artist’s prerogative: quoting someone for Sprechstimme authenticity is not an endorsement, etc. A concept which sails over the head of the modern “journalist,” who is really nothing more than an overgrown hall monitor

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon


    Mark has not only never retracted/changed that verse to my knowledge, but has once or twice defended it on grounds of artist’s prerogative
     
    Well, he did. The live performances of this song use "little queenie", starting almost immediately after the album's release. E.g., Live Aid 1985
  49. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomm
    @Stan d Mute

    In-n-Out's burgers are good but the fries are unacceptable.

    Five Guys is surprisingly expensive, even if the fries portion is generous.

    I may be in the minority, but I am starting to like Habit.

    McDonald's never makes the top of anyone's list for burger quality. Ironically, their coffee is good, and one-third the price of Starbucks (not to mention that Starbucks is a lunatic SJW operation).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corn

    I assume Five Guys is expensive for a logical reason but their preparation leaves something to be desired. Unless you like inhaling grease.

    The Habit is decent though their hamburgers aren’t anything special. Best tasting FF burger I ever had was at a N. Cal. establishment that was actually part of a local taco/burrito chain– go figure…

  50. I haven’t eaten at McDonalds in over 30 years.

    Rolling Stone Magazine lists Mark Knopfler as no. 44 on the 2016 list of Top 100 all-time greatest guitarists.

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls066632618/

    I especially like these two live versions of Sultans of Swing:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENJlmnqxZUQ&feature=youtu.be

    • Replies: @dr kill
    @E. Rekshun

    Well. Thanks for that, we all know Rolling Stone has never been wrong about anything.

  51. @Anon87
    @Anon

    That's never enough. Must have neverending growth! That's where MBA geniuses think McCafe concepts and upscale appearances are what the world really wants from McDonalds. Nope, it has always been fries, Happy Meals, and bad burgers.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    According to my dad, my twin sister and I (early 80s gen) didn’t even like burgers/fries when prepared at home or ordered at other restaurants– but as soon as the new movie/cartoon tie-in toys were advertised each month, we’d immediately clamor for Chez Ronald

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Anonymous

    There certainly is something to them having all the best tie-ins, but I think their fries have kept people coming back for more.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  52. I’m pretty sure that the song inspired the movie. There’s a scene toward the end where Kroc speaks with the original owners and part of his dialogue effectively quotes from the song.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Eric F

    Thanks. But Knopfler lifted some of his lyrics from Kroc's autobiography, so ...

    But I'd hardly be surprised if John Lee Hancock heard Knopfler's song and said, wow, if he can tell this story in 6 minutes, I can probably do it in 2 hours.

  53. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @MarkinLA

    Here’s a guy that REALLY likes Big Macs:

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/wisconsin-man-eats-30-000th-big-mac-hamburger-article-1.3975373

    Replies: @E. Rekshun

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 – 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @E. Rekshun


    Over the 25-year period, 1990 – 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.
     
    ... and you're still able to sit up straight and comment? Wow, I am a true believer in HBD now. Thank you, iStevers.
    , @reactionry
    @E. Rekshun

    Wasn't the weight-loss woke spokesperson for Subway the guy who wrote "White Castle Identity" and "Paved & Eating With Good Intentions," Jared

    Taylor?

    , @Pericles
    @E. Rekshun

    And that's merely 6500 of them.

  54. @Tom Scarlett
    Knopfler's biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. "That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire."

    Replies: @Anon, @Mr. Anon, @reactionry

    Knopfler’s biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. “That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire.”

    For a while there, they were bleeping the word “faggot” when that song played. Then they took to just excising the whole stanza from the song.

  55. “The Founder,” summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it’s pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating “Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it’s so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!”

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn’t come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my “The Founder” as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald’s, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like “Kroc.”)

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Wilkey

    * Oh and for the record I actually really liked the movie. I watched it twice. I think it may still be on Netflix if anyone here hasn't watched it yet.

    It left me actually admiring Kroc, although of course I think those tactics work better for a hamburger store than they're working out for our country.

    , @Stan Adams
    @Wilkey

    How about a reboot of Soylent Green in which an enterprising fast-food vendor comes up with an ingenious solution to the overpopulation problem?

    Has anyone ever made a movie based on A Modest Proposal?

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    , @Anon
    @Wilkey

    The entire 1:55 movie is up on YouTube, and the upload date is a year ago.

    If you have moral problems with this, please wait a week before reporting it, so I can find time to watch it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Pericles
    @Wilkey

    Venture capitalists love expounding that the idea (McDonalds brothers) is nothing, execution (Kroc) is everything. Coincidentally, or is that correlationally, they also tend to belong to a certain ethnic group.

    , @Kyle
    @Wilkey

    McDonald seems like a Scottish surname to me, not Irish.

  56. I’ve noticed a lot of fast food places are selling meals for as low as $5. Bojangles, for example has had $5 lunches for at least ten years. Any food that cheap is probably food you don’t want to eat. Then of course there is Taco Bell, whose food is only notionally mexican in that their offerings all end in vowels. For that matter, there food is only notionally food:

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bell-warns-employees-against-directly-exposing-ski-1819576531

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mr. Anon

    The girl I was eating with long ago at a Taco Johns was telling me that the meat tasted nasty or something. I'd already wolfed down my food in about a minute and a half. If it weren't so unhealthy I still would, as there is nothing tastier than that fat, salt, and sugar combo.

    Anyway, she said "you look like you don't believe me. Do you think I am just being bitchy?". Well, I just nodded, haha. She let me taste hers, and I did admit that it was kind of bad. Mine was already down the hatch though.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Mr. Anon

    Taco Bell's California Crunch wraps are good. < $3

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Corn
    @Mr. Anon

    I prefer Taco John’s to Taco Bell.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Mr. Anon

    The first two links are the same.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  57. @MarkinLA
    @Pat Boyle

    I like BigMacs.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Mr. Anon, @Flip, @reactionry

    I like BigMacs.

    You forgot to add “And I cannot lie.”

  58. @MarkinLA
    @Pat Boyle

    I like BigMacs.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Mr. Anon, @Flip, @reactionry

    Filet-O-Fish for me

  59. @AndrewR
    I would be interested to learn what McDonald's recipes we're back in the early days. I'd like to think the food was higher quality back then.

    Replies: @Barnard, @dvorak, @Flip

    The fries tasted better when they fried them in beef tallow. If you believe the paleo guys, they were healthier too.

    • Agree: EH
  60. @Wilkey
    "The Founder," summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it's pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating "Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it's so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!"

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn't come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my "The Founder" as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald's, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like "Kroc.")

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Stan Adams, @Anon, @Pericles, @Kyle

    * Oh and for the record I actually really liked the movie. I watched it twice. I think it may still be on Netflix if anyone here hasn’t watched it yet.

    It left me actually admiring Kroc, although of course I think those tactics work better for a hamburger store than they’re working out for our country.

  61. @Achmed E. Newman
    I am somewhat of a Dire Straits fan, but have never heard Boom, Like That till just now. Thanks. I will say though, that as good as the lyrics may be in any song, it's the melody and the sound that make the song. I already like the melody and sound of this one (still listening), and if I never made out all the lyrics*, it wouldn't make much difference, unfortunately, for a good lyric-writer.

    Now, I just finished listening to another great Knofler tune and watched the preview to The Founder. I don't say this often, but I want to go see this movie. I wish someone who's seen an advanced screening could warn me if there are many little anti-white/PC jabs in it. It's 2019, and I though that was required. What's it gonna be, a black fry cook getting made fun of by the white boys because he wan't eat food from his own place of employment and always eats his Mama's fried chicken instead? (It'll be something, I'm sure.)

    .

    * which is pretty much the case right now, as I type and listen.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is..., @Autochthon, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I watched it on Netflix about a year ago. My teenage kids turned me onto this movie. They’ve watched it more than once. I can’t recall any crazy PC BS and I’m always alert for that kind of crap.

    It is a movie that will stay with you.

    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @The preferred nomenclature is...

    OK, thanks for the report. I thought it was brand new, as in coming to the theaters.


    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.
     
    Hey, you're not the only one I've heard this from. BTW, I just posted a couple of Eagles songs from their On the Border album - it's great music and the imagery makes me reckon that even through the mid 1970's that would have been a hell of a place to spend one's life.
    , @M. Hartley
    @The preferred nomenclature is...


    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.
     
    I would agree with that, and stretch the halcyon days right up to the mid 1960s when everything started falling apart all at once.

    The Italian Renaissance was also noteworthy, but SoCal had indoor plumbing.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @E. Rekshun

  62. I can’t think of any song about a successful business. Richard Cory is kind of about a businessman.

    There are many more songs about people in dire poverty.

    Some good ones from different genres:

    Gentle on my Mind

    Like a Rolling Stone

    Fast Car

    • Replies: @M. Hartley
    @Lot


    There are many more songs about people in dire poverty.
     
    You know, this was a sterling opportunity to tie in with the thread topic...
  63. @Wilkey
    "The Founder," summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it's pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating "Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it's so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!"

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn't come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my "The Founder" as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald's, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like "Kroc.")

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Stan Adams, @Anon, @Pericles, @Kyle

    How about a reboot of Soylent Green in which an enterprising fast-food vendor comes up with an ingenious solution to the overpopulation problem?

    Has anyone ever made a movie based on A Modest Proposal?

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Stan Adams

    Pete Doherty (best known for the Libertines) had a secondary group called "Babyshambles."

  64. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    I never cared for Dire Straits, but I appreciated the work Knopfler did on the Miracle album by Willy Deville. It’s Knopfler’s best guitar work and Deville’s best set of songs and singing.

  65. Oh so Jim Steinman wasn’t pretentiously howling about the Federal Reserve?

  66. @Thud
    Back in my young muso days I shared managers with Mr. Knopfler, the whole lot of them were sharp....really sharp, pity I was talentless!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Curle

    That’s cool. Thanks for sharing. Don’t be shy.

  67. @Anonymous
    Shutdown has ended.

    No wall. Lol

    Trump will lose in 2020.
    Reply only if you have any arguments.
    Putting Troll won't do anything.

    Period.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Alfa158, @J1234, @MBlanc46

    The joke’s on you: it’s your country too.

  68. @Anon
    I eat at McDonald's once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    The trick is to order a plain hamburger, a small fries, and a Coke. And in Japan you can get a small shake that actually is small. Once you get used to a plain hamburger, no cheese, no Big Mac, you can start to get a feel for the simple charm of 1950s McDonald's.

    If you do an images search for "Karuizawa McDonald's" you can find a slightly remodeled Golden Arches franchise. The funny thing is that Karuizawa is a resort area that zoned out chain stores, but this location is so old that it was grandfathered in.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TelfoedJohn, @Kyle, @MBlanc46

    Same. I never ate McDonalds in the US but go sometimes in Japan. Agree that the plain burger, small fries, small shake is a decent experience, but the Grand Bacon Cheese is hard to pass up. Wendy’s/First Kitchen is better, though, and they have a no-bun low-carb burger.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Chrisnonymous

    My favorite large chain burger is the zeppin burger at Lotteria, an outlet that otherwise has nothing to interest me.

    http://hamburger.jp/photo/special723_41.jpg

    I had to get this about three times to make my mind up about it. It's such a radical experience that unless you have recalibrated your brain you can't judge it. What it is, is:

    -- A small burger, though not slider small

    -- An expensive burger

    -- Always made fresh for you

    -- Extremely simple: a shiny bun, a small, somewhat irregular beef patty heavily salted and peppered, and two small slices of different cheeses

    -- The meat is extremely fatty and thus the burger is extremely greasy

    It turns out that fat and salt makes stuff really, really good. Who knew?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  69. @Anonymous
    Shutdown has ended.

    No wall. Lol

    Trump will lose in 2020.
    Reply only if you have any arguments.
    Putting Troll won't do anything.

    Period.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Alfa158, @J1234, @MBlanc46

    Sorry I can’t disagree with what you wrote, but daring people to put up a troll tag was just too good to resist. Ya shoulda known better.

  70. One word on McDonald’s. Pink_slime.

    In Peter Levenda’s Sinister Forces he claims that John Brown scammed Colonel Sanders out of the control of the Kentucky Fried Chicken business. I would enjoy Levenda’s ouvre much more if I had some confidence in his truthiness.

  71. See the big picture! Maybe some of you missed this classic rap-style video when it came out in 2010:

    “If you’re living high on that cheap credit hog
    Don’t look for cure from the hair of the dog
    Real savings come first if you want to invest
    The market coordinates time with interest

    Your focus on spending is pushing on thread
    In the long run, my friend, it’s your theory that’s dead
    So sorry there, buddy, if that sounds like invective
    Prepared to get schooled in my Austrian perspective!”

  72. I have heard an anecdote years ago that when Kroc was struggling, he couldn’t make the payroll on his secretary every week so he would give her shares that week in lieu of pay. Supposedly she ended up a multi-millionaire as a result, but I find it hard to believe that Kroc wouldn’t have found a way to screw her out of the money by diluting her stock or some other Zuckerbergian ploy. People like him don’t care how much money they have made, they’ll bitterly resent the fact that someone beat them out of a tiny piece of it, even if innocently.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Alfa158

    wwebd said ----- Similarly, some very religious people who have lots of time to pray generally only pray for the people they like!

    I on the other hand pray every day for people who have mocked me in real life or even on the internet, go figure !

    Mess with my kids though or mess with people I love and I will pray for God to smite you.

    I only say this to offer some indirect insight into the twisted souls of people who cheat their employees. Technically, I have had a few employees, but they were all craftier than me, so I could not have cheated them if I wanted to.

  73. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    I find them to be one of those outfits who are undeniably technical virtuosos (Knopfler anyway) but whose songwriting, with a few exceptions, is not engaging.

    Sort of the opposite of, say, Johnny Cash.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Autochthon

    For some reason guitar virtuosos can't seem to write good tunes, and good songwriters tend not to be virtuosos. The only person I can think of who can do both is J Mascis.

  74. @Achmed E. Newman
    I am somewhat of a Dire Straits fan, but have never heard Boom, Like That till just now. Thanks. I will say though, that as good as the lyrics may be in any song, it's the melody and the sound that make the song. I already like the melody and sound of this one (still listening), and if I never made out all the lyrics*, it wouldn't make much difference, unfortunately, for a good lyric-writer.

    Now, I just finished listening to another great Knofler tune and watched the preview to The Founder. I don't say this often, but I want to go see this movie. I wish someone who's seen an advanced screening could warn me if there are many little anti-white/PC jabs in it. It's 2019, and I though that was required. What's it gonna be, a black fry cook getting made fun of by the white boys because he wan't eat food from his own place of employment and always eats his Mama's fried chicken instead? (It'll be something, I'm sure.)

    .

    * which is pretty much the case right now, as I type and listen.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is..., @Autochthon, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    It’s a great movie true to the historical diegesis and with no GloboHomo that O ever noticed (and my radar for that stuff is pretty keen).

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Autochthon

    Thanks. Auto.

  75. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaucho_(album)#Recording_sessions

    Fagen and Becker hired Mark Knopfler to play the guitar solo on “Time Out of Mind” after hearing him play on Dire Straits’ hit single “Sultans of Swing”. Several hours of Knopfler’s playing were recorded at the session, but his contributions as heard on the record are limited to a matter of seconds.

    Time Out Of Mind

  76. @Anon
    I eat at McDonald's once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    The trick is to order a plain hamburger, a small fries, and a Coke. And in Japan you can get a small shake that actually is small. Once you get used to a plain hamburger, no cheese, no Big Mac, you can start to get a feel for the simple charm of 1950s McDonald's.

    If you do an images search for "Karuizawa McDonald's" you can find a slightly remodeled Golden Arches franchise. The funny thing is that Karuizawa is a resort area that zoned out chain stores, but this location is so old that it was grandfathered in.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TelfoedJohn, @Kyle, @MBlanc46

    I eat at McDonald’s once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    A leftie friend once raved to me about the McDonalds he ate at in New Zealand. He had trouble articulating why they were so good there, but I suspect it was because NZ then had 50s US levels of whiteness.

  77. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT, but possibly of interest - is Chris Korda, son of Graham Greene's mate and editor Michael Korda, founder of the extremely unpleasant Church Of Euthanasia, musician and software developer, another late-onset trans chap?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Korda

    He was born in 1962 and was still being described as "he" by the NYT in 1996, when he was a big Unabomber For President type. Wiki says "she" is trans, and a 2014 piece describes a "cross-gendered" human.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    I just read about this ostensible “church” – why haven’t its members and supporters all killed themselves already? Hypocrites.

  78. As they get older, Mark Knopfler and Mike Judge are starting to look more alike.

  79. @Eric F
    I'm pretty sure that the song inspired the movie. There's a scene toward the end where Kroc speaks with the original owners and part of his dialogue effectively quotes from the song.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks. But Knopfler lifted some of his lyrics from Kroc’s autobiography, so …

    But I’d hardly be surprised if John Lee Hancock heard Knopfler’s song and said, wow, if he can tell this story in 6 minutes, I can probably do it in 2 hours.

  80. No movie about McDonalds would be complete w/o documenting the behavior of some of the clientele (and employees for that matter).

    For example, among hundreds of others:

    • Replies: @jim jones
    @E. Rekshun

    I have never eaten in a McDonalds because they cater to the underclass, if I am hungry in London I just go into a pub and buy a sandwich.

    , @Pericles
    @E. Rekshun

    The first video certainly had its moments. Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too. Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues. And at the beginning, did some random black guy steal the red bag while the upstanding citizens were arguing? Quick situational thinking.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy, @Reg Cæsar

    , @William Badwhite
    @E. Rekshun

    They need to add "how to properly film an altercation" as a required course in ghetto schools. The technical quality of these worldstar-type wigouts is usually quite poor.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @E. Rekshun

    You can have it your way at Burger King. Not at McDonald's.

  81. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    Stewart is beyond comparison in history-infused lyrics, agreed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

  82. @Iberiano
    Steve, would love to get your take on this for a future post.

    https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/starbucks-bathroom-birth-highlights-challenges-of-welcoming-all#gs.NMbM0eau

    1. Sounds like RaceInc moved in quickly and successfully to strip mine Starbucks of some cash to investigate and report all this mayhem going on in their stores. Holder, doubtful more than 40 percent sub-Saharan, penning the synopsis is a nice touch. It's a great industry to be in, I s'pose.

    2. If Starbucks sees the future as serving non-customers, why not every business in every location everywhere all the time?

    Replies: @TheBoom, @William Badwhite

    One in out of every five Starbucks customers probably has a mental illness of some kind,

    If that doesn’t make you want to go to Starbucks and hang out, I don’t know what will. Far more exciting than their piped in music

  83. OT:

    OT

    Yanis Varoufakis (not a fan of Trump and inclined to characterize Bannon as a Fascist) calls out the “Russian collusion to influence the U.S. election” meme for the absurd joke that it is:
    (relevant quote from 34:30-36:00)

    He even gets a big laugh about it from the Oxford kids.

  84. Someone in Seattle is Standing his Ground. Notice the phrasing of the headlines (“situation,” like a shooting).
    Anon compiled:
    Many posters have already gone up and headlines are starting to roll in:
    https://www.wbko.com/content/news/South-Warren-High-School-situation-under-investigation-504753451.html
    https://www.bgdailynews.com/news/swhs-investigating-stand-your-ground-posters-at-school/article_8a1a7c82-0c6c-5eec-b4c2-66d92d995327.html
    https://cloverchronicle.com/2019/01/24/operation-stand-your-ground-underway-after-dc-confrontation-between-covington-catholic-student-nicholas-sandmann-and-native-american-activist-nathan-phillips/
    The poster design has also been retweeted happily by James Woods and angrily by the NYT:

  85. @DaveC
    The best fast-food burger in this country is In-N-Out. Unfortunately only in the American South West and the Pacific Coast.

    The last time I was in San Diego I suggested In-N-Out, and the stupid Israeli in our group vetoed the suggestion: "I don't think my stomach could take a hamburger."

    Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, who was generally extremely critical of fast-food, said complimentary things about In-N-Out.

    I sometimes consider flying to the Left Coast just to get an In-N-Out burger.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    In-n-Out, like Chik-Fil-A, illustrate the pattern of smaller owners (who happen to be Christian) competing with the megafranchises, despite having higher prices, through sheer quality; also in this group are the mid-Western Rocket and Culver’s. There is almost certainly a thing like this nearer to you.

  86. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon

    Same. I never ate McDonalds in the US but go sometimes in Japan. Agree that the plain burger, small fries, small shake is a decent experience, but the Grand Bacon Cheese is hard to pass up. Wendy's/First Kitchen is better, though, and they have a no-bun low-carb burger.

    Replies: @Anon

    My favorite large chain burger is the zeppin burger at Lotteria, an outlet that otherwise has nothing to interest me.

    I had to get this about three times to make my mind up about it. It’s such a radical experience that unless you have recalibrated your brain you can’t judge it. What it is, is:

    — A small burger, though not slider small

    — An expensive burger

    — Always made fresh for you

    — Extremely simple: a shiny bun, a small, somewhat irregular beef patty heavily salted and peppered, and two small slices of different cheeses

    — The meat is extremely fatty and thus the burger is extremely greasy

    It turns out that fat and salt makes stuff really, really good. Who knew?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon

    Now, I will go try that burger just because you recommended it. I have only been to Lotteria once quite a long time ago. My impression was that it was a McDonalds rip-off which simply charged higher prices and made some "Japanese" substitutions like melon-flavored soda that actually detract from the burger experience. The fatty meat will not an issue, but I maybe the overseasoning. I can't understand why a people whose native cuisine relies on letting the flavors of ingredients shine through overseasons their beef (see hamburg).

    Say, I heard Unz ears Burger King every day. I wonder if he would like Lotteria.

    Unz, why do you eat at Burger King instead of Wendy's, Five Guys, or one of those other places?

  87. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    de gustibus non disputandum est, culus

  88. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    Look Ma, No Hans Landa!
    (disappears from list of war criminals)

    Col Hans Landa didn’t quite get The Knack(sack/dirt nap/knapsack?) of singing “My Shosanna”

    https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=nQdNXKfZKMS7jwTMtb6wAg&q=the+knack+my+sharona&btnK=Google+Search&oq=the+knack+my+sharona&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0l10.964.5925..6843…0.0..0.90.1272.20….2..0….1..gws-wiz…..0..0i131.6r-0-SnfoPo

    Also see (again) Au revoir , Éric Rohmer (and Nathan Philips) in Bury My Heart at Claire’s Wounded Knee

    (won’t bother going with Oh, Sharona with banjo on my knee)

    See also in VN’s Lolita, Humbert’s first love, Annabel Lee and her “opalescent knee”

  89. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:

    I really love it when someone figures out a way to write a good song that isn’t lyrically about boy-girl stuff (or Jesus). You wouldn’t think that a rock version of Ray Kros’s autobiography would be that interesting, but Knopfler’s lyrics are fun and clever. Excerpts:

    I’m going to San Bernardino, ring-a-ding-ding
    Milkshake mixers, that’s my thing now

    Folks line up all down the street
    Now I am seeing this girl devour her meat now

    These boys have got this down
    Ought to be one of these in every town
    These boys have got the touch
    It’s clean as a whistle and it don’t cost much

    Competition, sent ’em south
    If they’re gonna drown put a hose in their mouth
    Do not pass “Go”, go straight to hell
    I smell that meat hook smell

    If nothing else, the ability to write lyrics like these allows a man of Knopfler’s, uh, vintage, to produce good work as he ages without the embarassing fact that the songs being about a teenager, as with, say, Paul McCartney. Nick Lowe has tried aging his lyrics without as much success: Doesn’t he have a prostate song or something like that?

    On the other hand, a song like this is unlikely to chart.

    Complete lyrics here:
    https://genius.com/Mark-knopfler-boom-like-that-lyrics

  90. Well, one band nailed (Matron! The smelling salts!) the real impact of German womanhood…

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @Cortes

    Bewitched "Enchanted" Good Will Hunting For Broomhilda?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mv19j1irTWg

  91. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I watched it on Netflix about a year ago. My teenage kids turned me onto this movie. They've watched it more than once. I can't recall any crazy PC BS and I'm always alert for that kind of crap.

    It is a movie that will stay with you.

    SoCal circa 1950's was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @M. Hartley

    OK, thanks for the report. I thought it was brand new, as in coming to the theaters.

    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    Hey, you’re not the only one I’ve heard this from. BTW, I just posted a couple of Eagles songs from their On the Border album – it’s great music and the imagery makes me reckon that even through the mid 1970’s that would have been a hell of a place to spend one’s life.

  92. @Autochthon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's a great movie true to the historical diegesis and with no GloboHomo that O ever noticed (and my radar for that stuff is pretty keen).

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks. Auto.

  93. That is interesting that Ray Kroc was 52 went he started. Usually guys by that age are burned out.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @istevefan


    That is interesting that Ray Kroc was 52 went he started. Usually guys by that age are burned out.
     
    How old was Rodney Dangerfield when he broke out?
  94. @Mr. Anon
    I've noticed a lot of fast food places are selling meals for as low as $5. Bojangles, for example has had $5 lunches for at least ten years. Any food that cheap is probably food you don't want to eat. Then of course there is Taco Bell, whose food is only notionally mexican in that their offerings all end in vowels. For that matter, there food is only notionally food:

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bell-warns-employees-against-directly-exposing-ski-1819576531

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob, @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    The girl I was eating with long ago at a Taco Johns was telling me that the meat tasted nasty or something. I’d already wolfed down my food in about a minute and a half. If it weren’t so unhealthy I still would, as there is nothing tastier than that fat, salt, and sugar combo.

    Anyway, she said “you look like you don’t believe me. Do you think I am just being bitchy?”. Well, I just nodded, haha. She let me taste hers, and I did admit that it was kind of bad. Mine was already down the hatch though.

  95. @E. Rekshun
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 - 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @reactionry, @Pericles

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 – 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    … and you’re still able to sit up straight and comment? Wow, I am a true believer in HBD now. Thank you, iStevers.

  96. @Cortes
    Well, one band nailed (Matron! The smelling salts!) the real impact of German womanhood...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=E3fX2_bxEkg

    Replies: @reactionry

    Bewitched “Enchanted” Good Will Hunting For Broomhilda?

  97. @WHAT
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Stewart is beyond comparison in history-infused lyrics, agreed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate’s lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn’t a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another “Mandolin Wind.”

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Steve Sailer

    Rod’s greatest hit?

    We Are Wailing! (You probably had to be there)...

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2229721/Rod-Stewart-breaks-tears-beloved-team-Celtic-prove-victorious-Barcelona.html

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    I agree totally on the "rockstaritis", as you call it. It seemed like every artist or band would put out 2 or 3 great albums, but then change the sound all up. "We are tired of all that and wanted to go in a different direction." "Hey, I paid $8.50 for this concert, and I didn't want you to go in some different direction, dammit!" Michael McDonald's single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers is my worst experience with this (though a slightly different cause - he was a good musician, I'll admit, but too jazzy, when the band had been straight-up rock.)

    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN'T FIT!

    Here is exhibit A:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm39YkGrHp8

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    The all-time worst history lyrics song is "The Wreak of the Edmund Fitzgerald." The song is a long sing-songy set of verses without any chorus or breaks, and the lyrics are simply a recital of facts from a timeline, with no particular insight.

    Replies: @Anon, @Old Prude

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Steve Sailer

    I have thought for some 40+ years now that Rod Stewart and his music blows dead dogs.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart...

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis
     
    Of course, you mean Rod, not Al. (You do, don't you?)

    Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate’s lyrics),
     
    It seems natural that a singer would specialize in words, especially one who doesn't hold an instrument. It gives him two ways to shoot off his mouth.

    But some singers are better with the tune, and ask someone else to put words in their mouths. Elton John and Carole King do this. Mel Torme wrote only the tune to his "Christmas Song".

    Fred Astaire composed and sang "I'm Building Up to an Awful Let-Down", but got Johnny Mercer to do the words. Carlos Lyra writes lovely melodies, then gets Brazil's top poets to tell him what to say. Nice work if you can get it.
    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    I lived near the Sony studios in the early 1980s, and was apparently in the right demographic, since I was often approached by people giving out tickets to screenings of in-progress movies: 80 percent finished stuff you'd watch and answer a questionnaire about.

    At one point I went to a screening for a mystery-meat movie I later learned was "To Live and Die in L.A." I and a friend lined up behind what seemed like a gay couple. One of them apparently had some connection with Rod Stewart's psychologist or psychiatrist, who in turn was apparently not really into client confidentiality. The two were so involved in their gossip that their whispers could be plainly heard.

    If this guy could be believed, Stewart had an extreme inferiority complex about an aspect of his body.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  98. @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

  99. @MarkinLA
    @Pat Boyle

    I like BigMacs.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Mr. Anon, @Flip, @reactionry

    “LOL!” says Steve Jobs from the grave.

    cc The LOLita-ish “animated” “beard” for MarkinLA – SmirkinMerkinLA

    (See VN’s “animated merkin” (Hat tip to Hugh Fitzgerald for the “LOL” line))

  100. Knopfler is like Steve Miller, so good on guitar that any tune sounds great.

    I recall seeing my first MacDonalds at McCoy AFB, now Orlando International. It had two real arches and the cheeseburger was to die for. Didn’t have another cheeseburger that good until many years later at a Wendys near the Big Chicken.

    A fraternity brother was so golden haired and fair he made a few extra bucks smiling on one of their ads.

    So, one day, this Mensa-in-law (married to an M) shows up at our annual Halloween party, oh wait, it was at their house, and exclaims, “We finally got all dairy products out of the milkshakes. They’re made with seawwed.” Sort of explains how lactose intolerance is not an issue with their current customer base.

  101. @istevefan
    That is interesting that Ray Kroc was 52 went he started. Usually guys by that age are burned out.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    That is interesting that Ray Kroc was 52 went he started. Usually guys by that age are burned out.

    How old was Rodney Dangerfield when he broke out?

  102. @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    I agree totally on the “rockstaritis”, as you call it. It seemed like every artist or band would put out 2 or 3 great albums, but then change the sound all up. “We are tired of all that and wanted to go in a different direction.” “Hey, I paid $8.50 for this concert, and I didn’t want you to go in some different direction, dammit!” Michael McDonald’s single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers is my worst experience with this (though a slightly different cause – he was a good musician, I’ll admit, but too jazzy, when the band had been straight-up rock.)

    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

    Here is exhibit A:

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Michael McDonald’s single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers..
     
    Agree completely.
    The Doobies used to do stuff like this before MM's p***y music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh4nNdNJ_U8

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

     

    It's a lot more efficient to start with the tune, then add the lyrics to fit. Words are more flexible than music. There are almost limitless ways to say the same thing, but fiddle with the notes, and pretty soon you've got a different tune. Other than the Mass, and "art songs", you don't see much words-first composition.

    There are exceptions. Richard Rodgers added music to words Oscar Hammerstein set to opera tunes in his head. And it worked. But then, he said he could pee a melody, and was right. And he wrote the music first with Lorenz Hart, and it was more impressive.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Old Prude, @Achmed E. Newman

  103. @Paleo Retiree
    Love Knopfler. In addition to being a driven, wonderful musician-creator he gives tons of evidence of being a bright, verbal guy. I read somewhere that before committing to music he'd worked as a journalist, which isn't always a bad thing, let alone bad training. How many pop musicians write songs about history?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NYhTwLCT-Q

    Replies: @dvorak, @Excal, @Reg Cæsar

    Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) has a degree in history, and has indulged on occasion: “Don Juan” is a fine example, and there’s also “Zazou”. Perhaps more vignettes than history lessons, but both good and interesting still.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Excal

    At last an excuse to post this!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7w0eqUBp3c

    , @Autochthon
    @Excal

    Tennant is a lyrical genius. "King of Rome," about the tragic, short life of Napoleon's son, is sublime.

    Songs about historical events seem to be most prevalent in folky and progressive circles, which are in many ways diametrically opposed modes, but with the common trait of not really giving a shit much about conventional, commercial success.

    Rush's "Manhattan Project" and "Heresy," Marillion's "Out of This World" (about Donald Campbell and Bluebird) and "Ocean Cloud" (about Don Allum's rowing across the Atlantic Ocean alone), Iron Maiden's "Alexander the Great" and "Aces High," Dream Theater's "Sacrificed Sons" (about the horrors of 11 September 2001) and "In the Name of God" (about the Davidians and the seige upon them)...I guess that, like the news, it's the tragic stuff that gets attention; even "Heresy" (about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the demise of communism in Europe, a positive thing, mostly laments the preceding suffering – but, hey, we have Scorpions' "Winds of Change" to uplift us (a better song anyhow). Or we had it, anyway: I'll always remember when all that happened, in high school, there was so much hope and potential...but then, instead, we got GloboHomo and permanent poverty via overpopulation. Talk about "We were promised jet-packs...."

    One of the best combining the historic and the personal is "Driving the Last Spike."

    https://youtu.be/rG9-7WmeSdc

  104. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:

    A clip from a documentary where Knopfler explains the background behind the song:

    “There are these figures, and I found on this record there are teen figures, and a lot of it is about a time in the ’60s when there was quote a lot of innocence about it. There are figures in the background like Colonel Parker and Kroc, and I have a couple of songs about people who saw themselves as visionaries.”

    I’d like to see him do a Steve Jobs song.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Knopfler is just sticking to his basic "Sultans of Swing" sound from 1978 in his 2004 Ray Kroc song, but, you know, it's a good sound. Nobody else is doing much stylistic innovating either, so why not have a middle aged guy who has seen more of success and its price than most write songs about similar middle aged guys?

    Replies: @Anon

  105. @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    The all-time worst history lyrics song is “The Wreak of the Edmund Fitzgerald.” The song is a long sing-songy set of verses without any chorus or breaks, and the lyrics are simply a recital of facts from a timeline, with no particular insight.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon

    Hey, I like the "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," and what's more, used to know all the lyrics by heart. As traditional folksongs go, it's one of the better ones. Most folksongs are a lot worse.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Old Prude
    @Anon

    Don't dump on Lightfoot and the Wreck. While the music is repetative, it is haunting. And lyrics like "In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed/in the Maritime Sailors Catheral" or "Lake Michigan steams/like a young man's dreams" or "All that remains/are the faces and the names/of the wives and the sons and the daughters" are poetically evocative. Strumming it on a guitar is like entering a dream.

    Dave Barry made fun of the lyrics "As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most" and got a laugh from the NPR crowd on Prarie Home Companion. I never understood why he thought that was so funny, or the lyric particularly egregious. I've heard entire songs based on things a lot more eye-rolling: Chris Stapleton's "Parachute" for example. Jeezuz he might as well have written a song called "Spatula"..... I'll save you from the fire, babe/I'll take away the heat/I'll be your...Spatuala!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  106. @Mr. Anon
    I've noticed a lot of fast food places are selling meals for as low as $5. Bojangles, for example has had $5 lunches for at least ten years. Any food that cheap is probably food you don't want to eat. Then of course there is Taco Bell, whose food is only notionally mexican in that their offerings all end in vowels. For that matter, there food is only notionally food:

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bell-warns-employees-against-directly-exposing-ski-1819576531

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob, @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    Taco Bell’s California Crunch wraps are good. < $3

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Jim Don Bob


    Taco Bell’s California Crunch wraps are good. < $3
     
    Which more than makes up for the fact that Taco Bell is not, technically, food.
  107. My guess is that the greatest poet of the USA XX Century will be agreed to have been Frank Zappa. Along around 2250 or thereby the verdict will come in.

    His best work?

    Bobby Brown.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
    @Cortes

    Everyone insists on playing that song to me over the years. I wonder why?

  108. @Anon
    A clip from a documentary where Knopfler explains the background behind the song:

    https://youtu.be/Lla3e5Nn8pk?t=1405

    "There are these figures, and I found on this record there are teen figures, and a lot of it is about a time in the '60s when there was quote a lot of innocence about it. There are figures in the background like Colonel Parker and Kroc, and I have a couple of songs about people who saw themselves as visionaries."

    I'd like to see him do a Steve Jobs song.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Knopfler is just sticking to his basic “Sultans of Swing” sound from 1978 in his 2004 Ray Kroc song, but, you know, it’s a good sound. Nobody else is doing much stylistic innovating either, so why not have a middle aged guy who has seen more of success and its price than most write songs about similar middle aged guys?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Knopfler is just sticking to his basic “Sultans of Swing” sound from 1978 in his 2004 Ray Kroc song, but, you know, it’s a good sound.
     
    Sounds good to me.

    Generally artists think they have to break new ground, but if something sounds good, why not make more songs like it? I guess they are not "authentic" in some sense, but I'm fine with that. I'm a sucker for simulacra like "That Thing You Do":

    https://youtu.be/fzllVlzzeuo

    I wouldn't mind another several dozen Chopin preludes and nocturnes. The best classical-style music these days is written for movie soundtracks, not for orchestras.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6HRQkXvw2I4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAv52sYkYh0

    And sometimes the influence goes the other way, as with these great orchestral "covers" of Ennio Morricone spaghetti Western soundtracks by the Danish National Symphony Orchestra under Hawaiian-bred conductor Sarah Hicks:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enuOArEfqGo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4niv522mbtM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efdswXXjnBA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DT1NJwEi6nw
  109. @Tom Scarlett
    Knopfler's biggest hit was sung in the voice of a workingman who was envious of how rich rock stars are. "That little faggot with the earring and the makeup [Prince?] . . . that little faggot is a millionaire."

    Replies: @Anon, @Mr. Anon, @reactionry

    [Scarlett beat me to it, (classic misquote?) but frankly dear, I don’t give a damn]

    The “Bare Ruined Choirs” Of Workers’ Dire Straits?

    Putting aside the previously posted deja Derbyshire all over again, Amazon Prime Obsession, here’s that little non-dance number for a preternatural premonition of Amazon warehouse workers:

    See also Boom Like That – Mike drop, boom microphones?

  110. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    I agree totally on the "rockstaritis", as you call it. It seemed like every artist or band would put out 2 or 3 great albums, but then change the sound all up. "We are tired of all that and wanted to go in a different direction." "Hey, I paid $8.50 for this concert, and I didn't want you to go in some different direction, dammit!" Michael McDonald's single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers is my worst experience with this (though a slightly different cause - he was a good musician, I'll admit, but too jazzy, when the band had been straight-up rock.)

    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN'T FIT!

    Here is exhibit A:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm39YkGrHp8

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    Michael McDonald’s single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers..

    Agree completely.
    The Doobies used to do stuff like this before MM’s p***y music:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Don Bob

    Yeah, I like that one and almost everything from The Captain and Me, Stampede, and What were once vices are now Habits.

    I will give Michael McDonald credit for Takin' it to the Streets. It's jazzy, sort-of, but still one of my favorites:

    It does not beat Neal's Fandango, though:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsvqK4A3X48

    "Goin' back, I'm too tired to roam,
    Loma Preita* my mountain home,
    on the hills above Santa Cruz,
    the place where I spent my youth."


    Besides having normal episodes of lyricosis, they sing this so fast that it was years (and time spent in California) before I got the chorus down. What a home to be from, 1970's coastal California!

    .

    * Well before the quake.

  111. @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    I have thought for some 40+ years now that Rod Stewart and his music blows dead dogs.

  112. like firing his brother from Dire Straits

    Are two-brother bands all that great an idea?

    Tommy Dorsey broke up with Jimmy on stage. Ray and Dave Davies would get into fights– fisticuffs, I think– which got the Kinks banned from America at the height of their success. (More the work of the musicians’ union than the State Department.) Once Tim Bachman left BTO to be a sound engineer, taking care of an easier business, Randy and Rob were at odds. Rob wrote his songs with CF Turner, and Randy was estranged from his creation for years.

    Bigger collections of brothers, notably the Wilsons, the Gibbs, the Jacksons, the Osmonds, and the Cowsills, had their difficulties, but sibling rivalry didn’t seem to be a factor.

    The McCartney, Jagger, and Taylor brothers were smart enough to keep their acts separate.

    But the best strategy was that of the Fiegers. Doug led the Knack, while Geoff defended Dr Jack Kevorkian, an amateur jazz musician who recorded a tribute to his counsel.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Dave Davies Death of a Clown

    https://youtu.be/CK-Po-IGY8k

    God help us. Why are the English so dark? And their descendants? Need to invite AOC to the party to brighten things up.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There really weren't that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don't be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor ... and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon87, @Autochthon, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Mael brothers of the band Sparks have been going for over 50 years, and still releasing songs and albums at a rapid pace in their 70s. Sparks, as a local band formed by UCLA graduates, was sort of a secret password among more literate UCLA students in the 1970s (the lyrics are consistently clever, and their fan base is the UK, so they were not hugely known stateside).

    I think these guys survive by not really having any more contact with each other than is absolutely required. And since one of them is the vocalist and frontman, and one writes all the songs and lyrics, the division of responsibilities is clear. However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don't want to tour because they don't need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.

    Replies: @M. Hartley, @Reg Cæsar

    , @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    Beach Boys - three brothers and a cousin.

    Any Soul group - cuz they're all 'brothers'

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  113. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    Achmed- I’ll see your invasion of Russia song, and raise you one more:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ganderson

    I'd never heard this one, Ganderson, from this subset of the genre of Hist-Rock, called Russian-Invasion-Rock ;-}! Once I read the lyrics, I had to learn more of this war wages by Sweden's Charles XII on Russia and the Poles (initially) and Germans of Saxony (the Saxons, hey, I've heard of them!)

    Here's page 1 of a 5-page website on the Great Northern War.

    OK, I call. I do think that Peter White's Spanish guitar in Roads to Moscow make it take this hand.

    Replies: @ganderson

  114. @Excal
    @Paleo Retiree

    Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) has a degree in history, and has indulged on occasion: "Don Juan" is a fine example, and there's also "Zazou". Perhaps more vignettes than history lessons, but both good and interesting still.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Autochthon

    At last an excuse to post this!

  115. @Paleo Retiree
    Love Knopfler. In addition to being a driven, wonderful musician-creator he gives tons of evidence of being a bright, verbal guy. I read somewhere that before committing to music he'd worked as a journalist, which isn't always a bad thing, let alone bad training. How many pop musicians write songs about history?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NYhTwLCT-Q

    Replies: @dvorak, @Excal, @Reg Cæsar

    How many pop musicians write songs about history?

  116. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    I agree totally on the "rockstaritis", as you call it. It seemed like every artist or band would put out 2 or 3 great albums, but then change the sound all up. "We are tired of all that and wanted to go in a different direction." "Hey, I paid $8.50 for this concert, and I didn't want you to go in some different direction, dammit!" Michael McDonald's single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers is my worst experience with this (though a slightly different cause - he was a good musician, I'll admit, but too jazzy, when the band had been straight-up rock.)

    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN'T FIT!

    Here is exhibit A:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm39YkGrHp8

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar

    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

    It’s a lot more efficient to start with the tune, then add the lyrics to fit. Words are more flexible than music. There are almost limitless ways to say the same thing, but fiddle with the notes, and pretty soon you’ve got a different tune. Other than the Mass, and “art songs”, you don’t see much words-first composition.

    There are exceptions. Richard Rodgers added music to words Oscar Hammerstein set to opera tunes in his head. And it worked. But then, he said he could pee a melody, and was right. And he wrote the music first with Lorenz Hart, and it was more impressive.

    • Replies: @Paleo Retiree
    @Reg Cæsar

    Another exception, at least if my memory can be trusted: Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. Pretty sure I read somewhere Tilbrook saying that Difford almost always wrote the lyrics first and that Tilbrook then put the music to them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Old Prude
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think some guy writes lyrics and mails them to Elton John, and he puts them to music. That's a pretty incredible way to come up with "Goodbye Yellow-brick Road" or "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me"

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, Reg, it could be done either way, but I'll take your word for it about most writing the tune first. My point was, Miss Mitchell would write poems, basically, with not any kind of meter to fit with the tunes she had (some of the time, anyway). Did you listen to California above? It's a good song, nonetheless.

    This one is one she did write right, with brilliant lyrics, and I like her raw version better than Judy Collins' polished up version:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcrEqIpi6sg

  117. anonymous[348] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158
    I have heard an anecdote years ago that when Kroc was struggling, he couldn’t make the payroll on his secretary every week so he would give her shares that week in lieu of pay. Supposedly she ended up a multi-millionaire as a result, but I find it hard to believe that Kroc wouldn’t have found a way to screw her out of the money by diluting her stock or some other Zuckerbergian ploy. People like him don’t care how much money they have made, they’ll bitterly resent the fact that someone beat them out of a tiny piece of it, even if innocently.

    Replies: @anonymous

    wwebd said —– Similarly, some very religious people who have lots of time to pray generally only pray for the people they like!

    I on the other hand pray every day for people who have mocked me in real life or even on the internet, go figure !

    Mess with my kids though or mess with people I love and I will pray for God to smite you.

    I only say this to offer some indirect insight into the twisted souls of people who cheat their employees. Technically, I have had a few employees, but they were all craftier than me, so I could not have cheated them if I wanted to.

  118. @Thomm
    @Stan d Mute

    In-n-Out's burgers are good but the fries are unacceptable.

    Five Guys is surprisingly expensive, even if the fries portion is generous.

    I may be in the minority, but I am starting to like Habit.

    McDonald's never makes the top of anyone's list for burger quality. Ironically, their coffee is good, and one-third the price of Starbucks (not to mention that Starbucks is a lunatic SJW operation).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corn

    I’m glad I’m not the only one to notice In-N-Out’s fries. What’s the deal there? Is it the variety of potato they use or the cooking oil?

    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Corn


    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.
     
    In-N-Out needs to merge with Five Guys. In-N-Out does the burgers (not that Five Guys has a bad burger but the price is at least 50% higher). Five Guys does the fries.

    That is the winning combo.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  119. @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart…

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis

    Of course, you mean Rod, not Al. (You do, don’t you?)

    Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate’s lyrics),

    It seems natural that a singer would specialize in words, especially one who doesn’t hold an instrument. It gives him two ways to shoot off his mouth.

    But some singers are better with the tune, and ask someone else to put words in their mouths. Elton John and Carole King do this. Mel Torme wrote only the tune to his “Christmas Song”.

    Fred Astaire composed and sang “I’m Building Up to an Awful Let-Down”, but got Johnny Mercer to do the words. Carlos Lyra writes lovely melodies, then gets Brazil’s top poets to tell him what to say. Nice work if you can get it.

  120. @Mr. Anon
    I've noticed a lot of fast food places are selling meals for as low as $5. Bojangles, for example has had $5 lunches for at least ten years. Any food that cheap is probably food you don't want to eat. Then of course there is Taco Bell, whose food is only notionally mexican in that their offerings all end in vowels. For that matter, there food is only notionally food:

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bell-warns-employees-against-directly-exposing-ski-1819576531

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob, @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    I prefer Taco John’s to Taco Bell.

  121. I had a better diner experience somewhere in mid-Florida, memory failure, but a couple of times I’ve had superb US meals in W Palm Beach:

    https://m.facebook.com/HowleysDiner

    The Palm Beach “equivalents” were, hmm, overpriced weak sauce.

    Howleys also were happy to give me a couple of excellent posters for free.

  122. @Reg Cæsar

    like firing his brother from Dire Straits
     
    Are two-brother bands all that great an idea?

    Tommy Dorsey broke up with Jimmy on stage. Ray and Dave Davies would get into fights-- fisticuffs, I think-- which got the Kinks banned from America at the height of their success. (More the work of the musicians' union than the State Department.) Once Tim Bachman left BTO to be a sound engineer, taking care of an easier business, Randy and Rob were at odds. Rob wrote his songs with CF Turner, and Randy was estranged from his creation for years.

    Bigger collections of brothers, notably the Wilsons, the Gibbs, the Jacksons, the Osmonds, and the Cowsills, had their difficulties, but sibling rivalry didn't seem to be a factor.

    The McCartney, Jagger, and Taylor brothers were smart enough to keep their acts separate.

    But the best strategy was that of the Fiegers. Doug led the Knack, while Geoff defended Dr Jack Kevorkian, an amateur jazz musician who recorded a tribute to his counsel.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXJlE6h8_-Q

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @James Speaks

    Dave Davies Death of a Clown

    God help us. Why are the English so dark? And their descendants? Need to invite AOC to the party to brighten things up.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Neil Templeton

    Dave Davies saw where England is headed:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuGFlP5Duuw

    Replies: @E. Rekshun, @dr kill

  123. @Reg Cæsar

    like firing his brother from Dire Straits
     
    Are two-brother bands all that great an idea?

    Tommy Dorsey broke up with Jimmy on stage. Ray and Dave Davies would get into fights-- fisticuffs, I think-- which got the Kinks banned from America at the height of their success. (More the work of the musicians' union than the State Department.) Once Tim Bachman left BTO to be a sound engineer, taking care of an easier business, Randy and Rob were at odds. Rob wrote his songs with CF Turner, and Randy was estranged from his creation for years.

    Bigger collections of brothers, notably the Wilsons, the Gibbs, the Jacksons, the Osmonds, and the Cowsills, had their difficulties, but sibling rivalry didn't seem to be a factor.

    The McCartney, Jagger, and Taylor brothers were smart enough to keep their acts separate.

    But the best strategy was that of the Fiegers. Doug led the Knack, while Geoff defended Dr Jack Kevorkian, an amateur jazz musician who recorded a tribute to his counsel.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXJlE6h8_-Q

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @James Speaks

    There really weren’t that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don’t be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor … and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Steve Sailer

    The Robinson brothers from the Black Crowes don't speak, and the Gallaghers from Oasis can't spend 5 minutes together without a fistfight.

    AC/DC's Young brothers were a good team, and very successful. Malcolm wasn't as talented as Angus, but was a real band leader.

    , @Anon87
    @Steve Sailer

    Smothers Brothers?

    , @Autochthon
    @Steve Sailer

    The Van Halens have stuck together, but it's pretty clearly a relationship in which Ed calls the shots and Alex goes along.

    Justin and Jeremy Furstenfeld have a similarly amicable and successful working relationship; though Justin is clearly the genius behind Blue October, he is far less egomaniacal and volatile than Eddie Van Halen.

    https://youtu.be/RC0tIrHjTIM

    The Bee Gees had ups and downs but mostly stayed together for an incredibly long time. The Porcaros also come to mind, as do the Marx Brothers. As with most things, the negative examples are more memorable and gain more attention.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer

    One advantage the Coens have is that the two of them are so different. My brother and I almost never got into arguments, even though we're just a year apart, because we had almost no interests in common.

    Ma and Pa Coen were hardcore academics. Ethan said that although he majored in philosophy, and Joel in filmmaking, their parents thought Ethan was being the practical one.

  124. @E. Rekshun
    No movie about McDonalds would be complete w/o documenting the behavior of some of the clientele (and employees for that matter).


    For example, among hundreds of others:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrXFxQj1Sc4

    https://youtu.be/vsH6L4EAe7o

    Replies: @jim jones, @Pericles, @William Badwhite, @Reg Cæsar

    I have never eaten in a McDonalds because they cater to the underclass, if I am hungry in London I just go into a pub and buy a sandwich.

  125. @E. Rekshun
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 - 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @reactionry, @Pericles

    Wasn’t the weight-loss woke spokesperson for Subway the guy who wrote “White Castle Identity” and “Paved & Eating With Good Intentions,” Jared

    Taylor?

  126. @Cortes
    My guess is that the greatest poet of the USA XX Century will be agreed to have been Frank Zappa. Along around 2250 or thereby the verdict will come in.

    His best work?

    Bobby Brown.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUq_T_Bhau8

    Replies: @Dtbb

    Everyone insists on playing that song to me over the years. I wonder why?

  127. @Autochthon
    @onetwothree

    I find them to be one of those outfits who are undeniably technical virtuosos (Knopfler anyway) but whose songwriting, with a few exceptions, is not engaging.

    Sort of the opposite of, say, Johnny Cash.

    Replies: @Anon

    For some reason guitar virtuosos can’t seem to write good tunes, and good songwriters tend not to be virtuosos. The only person I can think of who can do both is J Mascis.

  128. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    Re “Roads To Moscow”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_to_Russia

    If I didn’t have bad taste, I’d have none at all and all that and loved the Ramones (all of the original members are dead* now) back in the daze and would have taken more Super 8 Sound footage (with a Sears(!) rebranded camera) than actually filmed on account of being told to stop by security people at First Avenue in Minneapolis. Until a few months ago, no word of a lie, one of my daughters and her family lived right across the street from Bishop Cretin High School. While the students surely became aware of the Ramones decades ago, this was certainly *not* the school song:

    From their “Commando”**

    “They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    First rule is ‘the laws of Germany’
    Second rule is ‘be nice to mommy’
    Third rule is ‘don’t talk to Commies’
    Fourth rule is ‘eat kosher salamis’
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do…”

    * “dead”

    ** Commando -The term “Kommando” might have first come into language with the Anglo-CowBoer War, but it seems that the meaning of going without underwear was fixed (like Brit bayonets in the Iraq War) during the Vietnam War. Over the past few years the Democrat Party has gone full Sonderkommando, if not full Mengele.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @reactionry

    Cretin Class of ‘72 here, too early for the Ramones, not to mention that when I was there one could not “go for a whirl with my Cretin girl” as the school did not go coed until ‘87. I could imagine us yelling “ one, two three four, cretins gonna hop some more...”

    And, while it’s now Cretin- Derham
    Hall, back in the 70s it was just Cretin. It was never Bishop Cretin.

    Replies: @reactionry

  129. @Mr. Anon
    I've noticed a lot of fast food places are selling meals for as low as $5. Bojangles, for example has had $5 lunches for at least ten years. Any food that cheap is probably food you don't want to eat. Then of course there is Taco Bell, whose food is only notionally mexican in that their offerings all end in vowels. For that matter, there food is only notionally food:

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bells-five-ingredients-combined-in-totally-new-way-1819564909

    https://www.theonion.com/taco-bell-warns-employees-against-directly-exposing-ski-1819576531

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob, @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    The first two links are the same.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @ScarletNumber

    The deuce you say! And, so you are right.

  130. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    The all-time worst history lyrics song is "The Wreak of the Edmund Fitzgerald." The song is a long sing-songy set of verses without any chorus or breaks, and the lyrics are simply a recital of facts from a timeline, with no particular insight.

    Replies: @Anon, @Old Prude

    Hey, I like the “Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” and what’s more, used to know all the lyrics by heart. As traditional folksongs go, it’s one of the better ones. Most folksongs are a lot worse.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The Wisdom Bridge Theater Company in Chicago made a powerful play out of the wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald.

  131. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I watched it on Netflix about a year ago. My teenage kids turned me onto this movie. They've watched it more than once. I can't recall any crazy PC BS and I'm always alert for that kind of crap.

    It is a movie that will stay with you.

    SoCal circa 1950's was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @M. Hartley

    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.

    I would agree with that, and stretch the halcyon days right up to the mid 1960s when everything started falling apart all at once.

    The Italian Renaissance was also noteworthy, but SoCal had indoor plumbing.

    • Agree: Endgame Napoleon
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @M. Hartley

    Affordable housing, beautiful women, surf music and radio, Highway One, and very trim automobiles stuffed with big V-8s.

    , @E. Rekshun
    @M. Hartley

    Well after the golden days, but when I was experiencing my own California Dreamin' in the late '80s and again in the late '90s, I turned down a few very decent job offers to relocate from the east coast to southern California. I sometimes wonder what could have been.

  132. @Anon
    @Anon

    Hey, I like the "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," and what's more, used to know all the lyrics by heart. As traditional folksongs go, it's one of the better ones. Most folksongs are a lot worse.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Wisdom Bridge Theater Company in Chicago made a powerful play out of the wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald.

  133. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

     

    It's a lot more efficient to start with the tune, then add the lyrics to fit. Words are more flexible than music. There are almost limitless ways to say the same thing, but fiddle with the notes, and pretty soon you've got a different tune. Other than the Mass, and "art songs", you don't see much words-first composition.

    There are exceptions. Richard Rodgers added music to words Oscar Hammerstein set to opera tunes in his head. And it worked. But then, he said he could pee a melody, and was right. And he wrote the music first with Lorenz Hart, and it was more impressive.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Old Prude, @Achmed E. Newman

    Another exception, at least if my memory can be trusted: Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. Pretty sure I read somewhere Tilbrook saying that Difford almost always wrote the lyrics first and that Tilbrook then put the music to them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Paleo Retiree


    Another exception, at least if my memory can be trusted: Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. Pretty sure I read somewhere Tilbrook saying that Difford almost always wrote the lyrics first and that Tilbrook then put the music to them.
     
    I'd thought of Squeeze, too, as an example of the singer singing someone else's words. I'm not surprised that the words came first. Their Achilles heel was stress-scansion errors, the sign of an amateur. Rhyme is fake, unless you're Jesse Jackson, but scansion is how we speak normally.

    One case I forgot to mention is Neil Sedaka. Especially dumb since the passing of Daryl Dragon recently. His lyrics were written by Howard Greenfield. Who died from "AIDS-related" something-or-other in 1986. That kind of belies the claims of "Love Will Keep Us Together".
  134. @Corn
    @Thomm

    I’m glad I’m not the only one to notice In-N-Out’s fries. What’s the deal there? Is it the variety of potato they use or the cooking oil?

    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.

    Replies: @Thomm

    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.

    In-N-Out needs to merge with Five Guys. In-N-Out does the burgers (not that Five Guys has a bad burger but the price is at least 50% higher). Five Guys does the fries.

    That is the winning combo.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Thomm

    In-N-Out b urge rs! Anyone still got the sticker - it was a, ahem, stroke of genius!

    Still, Thomm, I'd still stick with the place that has the forced-hot-air hand dryers in the bathroom, so you can get some comfortable rest on those occasional chilly southern California nights. (Sorry, piling on, per MikeAtMike, but I'm still laughing at that one!)

    Oh, and Five Guys french fries smell too greasy even for me.

  135. @Lot
    I can't think of any song about a successful business. Richard Cory is kind of about a businessman.

    There are many more songs about people in dire poverty.

    Some good ones from different genres:

    Gentle on my Mind

    Like a Rolling Stone

    Fast Car

    Replies: @M. Hartley

    There are many more songs about people in dire poverty.

    You know, this was a sterling opportunity to tie in with the thread topic…

  136. @Achmed E. Newman
    I am somewhat of a Dire Straits fan, but have never heard Boom, Like That till just now. Thanks. I will say though, that as good as the lyrics may be in any song, it's the melody and the sound that make the song. I already like the melody and sound of this one (still listening), and if I never made out all the lyrics*, it wouldn't make much difference, unfortunately, for a good lyric-writer.

    Now, I just finished listening to another great Knofler tune and watched the preview to The Founder. I don't say this often, but I want to go see this movie. I wish someone who's seen an advanced screening could warn me if there are many little anti-white/PC jabs in it. It's 2019, and I though that was required. What's it gonna be, a black fry cook getting made fun of by the white boys because he wan't eat food from his own place of employment and always eats his Mama's fried chicken instead? (It'll be something, I'm sure.)

    .

    * which is pretty much the case right now, as I type and listen.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is..., @Autochthon, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I liked The Founder, and I don’t recall any of that crap, not even the usually obligatory sneering at 50s America.

  137. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There really weren't that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don't be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor ... and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon87, @Autochthon, @Reg Cæsar

    The Robinson brothers from the Black Crowes don’t speak, and the Gallaghers from Oasis can’t spend 5 minutes together without a fistfight.

    AC/DC’s Young brothers were a good team, and very successful. Malcolm wasn’t as talented as Angus, but was a real band leader.

  138. @Neil Templeton
    @Reg Cæsar

    Dave Davies Death of a Clown

    https://youtu.be/CK-Po-IGY8k

    God help us. Why are the English so dark? And their descendants? Need to invite AOC to the party to brighten things up.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Dave Davies saw where England is headed:

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I greatly enjoyed seeing the Kinks play at the University of NH in 1984.

    , @dr kill
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The Kinks were the original noticers.

  139. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Knopfler is just sticking to his basic "Sultans of Swing" sound from 1978 in his 2004 Ray Kroc song, but, you know, it's a good sound. Nobody else is doing much stylistic innovating either, so why not have a middle aged guy who has seen more of success and its price than most write songs about similar middle aged guys?

    Replies: @Anon

    Knopfler is just sticking to his basic “Sultans of Swing” sound from 1978 in his 2004 Ray Kroc song, but, you know, it’s a good sound.

    Sounds good to me.

    Generally artists think they have to break new ground, but if something sounds good, why not make more songs like it? I guess they are not “authentic” in some sense, but I’m fine with that. I’m a sucker for simulacra like “That Thing You Do”:

    I wouldn’t mind another several dozen Chopin preludes and nocturnes. The best classical-style music these days is written for movie soundtracks, not for orchestras.

    And sometimes the influence goes the other way, as with these great orchestral “covers” of Ennio Morricone spaghetti Western soundtracks by the Danish National Symphony Orchestra under Hawaiian-bred conductor Sarah Hicks:

  140. @Wilkey
    "The Founder," summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it's pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating "Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it's so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!"

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn't come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my "The Founder" as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald's, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like "Kroc.")

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Stan Adams, @Anon, @Pericles, @Kyle

    The entire 1:55 movie is up on YouTube, and the upload date is a year ago.

    If you have moral problems with this, please wait a week before reporting it, so I can find time to watch it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    #MeTooDammit
    #Don'tScrewItUpForUs

  141. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    like firing his brother from Dire Straits
     
    Are two-brother bands all that great an idea?

    Tommy Dorsey broke up with Jimmy on stage. Ray and Dave Davies would get into fights-- fisticuffs, I think-- which got the Kinks banned from America at the height of their success. (More the work of the musicians' union than the State Department.) Once Tim Bachman left BTO to be a sound engineer, taking care of an easier business, Randy and Rob were at odds. Rob wrote his songs with CF Turner, and Randy was estranged from his creation for years.

    Bigger collections of brothers, notably the Wilsons, the Gibbs, the Jacksons, the Osmonds, and the Cowsills, had their difficulties, but sibling rivalry didn't seem to be a factor.

    The McCartney, Jagger, and Taylor brothers were smart enough to keep their acts separate.

    But the best strategy was that of the Fiegers. Doug led the Knack, while Geoff defended Dr Jack Kevorkian, an amateur jazz musician who recorded a tribute to his counsel.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXJlE6h8_-Q

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @James Speaks

    The Mael brothers of the band Sparks have been going for over 50 years, and still releasing songs and albums at a rapid pace in their 70s. Sparks, as a local band formed by UCLA graduates, was sort of a secret password among more literate UCLA students in the 1970s (the lyrics are consistently clever, and their fan base is the UK, so they were not hugely known stateside).

    I think these guys survive by not really having any more contact with each other than is absolutely required. And since one of them is the vocalist and frontman, and one writes all the songs and lyrics, the division of responsibilities is clear. However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.

    • Replies: @M. Hartley
    @Anon

    Interesting. I guess this is why I always thought Sparks were British.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.
     
    One of the songwriting Byrds kept his mouth shut about his extra royalty stream. Smart move. Invest it, don't flash it around.

    Alan Price pissed off his fellow Animals by taking the arranger's credit on "House of the Rising Sun". (Composer royalties go to the arranger on public domain works, or did then, anyway.)

    The rest thought they should have been spread around the band, but they weren't as savvy as Price, I guess. Not that it would have mattered that much in the "one-for-you-nineteen-for-me" Sixties.

    This incident may have been what inspired Chas Chandler to switch careers from less-than-impressive bassist to shrewd manager of acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    Replies: @Anon, @Clyde, @Clyde

  142. Isn’t he the one who wrote about the Fake Fourth Estater with “the gleam in her eye?” It was prophetic if so, because at this point in history, the so-called “media” is a 24/7 gossip fest, with newscasters no longer even bothering to conceal their salivating over train wrecks, as they avoid the serious issues of the era and the voters’ will.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Endgame Napoleon

    That was Don Henley (Dirty Laundry). Good lyrics in that one too:


    We got the bubble-headed bleach-blonde who comes on at five
    She can tell you about the plane crash with a gleam in her eye
    It's interesting when people die, give us dirty laundry
     

    Replies: @Autochthon

  143. @onetwothree
    Dire Straights is one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can't laugh at them like The Knack because, hey count 'em: *Three* hits. But everything else was just completely blah. Their concerts must be uneasy affairs..."Come on, Walk of Life already..."

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Anon, @Autochthon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @reactionry, @Rosamond Vincy

    hey count ’em: *Three* hits.

    Four:
    Sultans of Swing
    Skateaway
    Walk of Life
    Money for Nothing

    • Replies: @M. Hartley
    @Rosamond Vincy

    I never heard of takeaway (auto correct never heard of it either).

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  144. @M. Hartley
    @The preferred nomenclature is...


    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.
     
    I would agree with that, and stretch the halcyon days right up to the mid 1960s when everything started falling apart all at once.

    The Italian Renaissance was also noteworthy, but SoCal had indoor plumbing.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @E. Rekshun

    Affordable housing, beautiful women, surf music and radio, Highway One, and very trim automobiles stuffed with big V-8s.

  145. @ScarletNumber
    @Mr. Anon

    The first two links are the same.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The deuce you say! And, so you are right.

  146. @Jim Don Bob
    @Mr. Anon

    Taco Bell's California Crunch wraps are good. < $3

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Taco Bell’s California Crunch wraps are good. < $3

    Which more than makes up for the fact that Taco Bell is not, technically, food.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  147. @passive-aggressivist
    "Boom, Like That" is probably my dad's favorite song for some reason. I think he sees it as anti-corporate, with the same tone as "Money for Nothing" only slightly more serious. Plus he just worships Knopfler in general, which with my dad I always assume is politically motivated.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    He thinks Money for Nothing was an anti-corporate song? It was a paean to the genius of corporate gods who made otherwise schlock mass marketable.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Alarmist


    He thinks Money for Nothing was an anti-corporate song? It was a paean to the genius of corporate gods who made otherwise schlock mass marketable.
     
    I like it at times, depending on the mood, but it is rather arrogant. I mean, it's one thing for a working stiff to make fun of rich rock stars, which is the subject of the song. It's quite another for a rich rock star to make fun of working stiffs, which is the actuality of the song.
  148. Were there really so many black burger flippers and franchise owners at the beginning of Kroc’s efforts? I’m watching it on YouTube now.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anon

    In the southeastern states there were scads of black folks working in kitchens. I cannot speak as knowledgably about the rest of the nation.

    I don't remember an inordinate amount of Negroe franchisees, but I watched the film three years ago; maybe I did overlook some GloboHomo propaganda after all. You gotta be sharp; they're clever!

  149. Mark Knopfler is Jewish so he knows the score. Rather reactionary he named his band – using different letters – They Are Straights.

  150. @Excal
    @Paleo Retiree

    Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) has a degree in history, and has indulged on occasion: "Don Juan" is a fine example, and there's also "Zazou". Perhaps more vignettes than history lessons, but both good and interesting still.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Autochthon

    Tennant is a lyrical genius. “King of Rome,” about the tragic, short life of Napoleon’s son, is sublime.

    Songs about historical events seem to be most prevalent in folky and progressive circles, which are in many ways diametrically opposed modes, but with the common trait of not really giving a shit much about conventional, commercial success.

    Rush’s “Manhattan Project” and “Heresy,” Marillion’s “Out of This World” (about Donald Campbell and Bluebird) and “Ocean Cloud” (about Don Allum’s rowing across the Atlantic Ocean alone), Iron Maiden’s “Alexander the Great” and “Aces High,” Dream Theater’s “Sacrificed Sons” (about the horrors of 11 September 2001) and “In the Name of God” (about the Davidians and the seige upon them)…I guess that, like the news, it’s the tragic stuff that gets attention; even “Heresy” (about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the demise of communism in Europe, a positive thing, mostly laments the preceding suffering – but, hey, we have Scorpions’ “Winds of Change” to uplift us (a better song anyhow). Or we had it, anyway: I’ll always remember when all that happened, in high school, there was so much hope and potential…but then, instead, we got GloboHomo and permanent poverty via overpopulation. Talk about “We were promised jet-packs….”

    One of the best combining the historic and the personal is “Driving the Last Spike.”

  151. @Anon
    Were there really so many black burger flippers and franchise owners at the beginning of Kroc's efforts? I'm watching it on YouTube now.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    In the southeastern states there were scads of black folks working in kitchens. I cannot speak as knowledgably about the rest of the nation.

    I don’t remember an inordinate amount of Negroe franchisees, but I watched the film three years ago; maybe I did overlook some GloboHomo propaganda after all. You gotta be sharp; they’re clever!

  152. Anon[114] • Disclaimer says:

    Finished the movie.

    A couple of annoying things:

    — They play up the sentimental American patriotism stuff, but it has a little aroma of belittlement, as you would expect from a Hollywood screenwriter

    — It plays up the angle that Kroc made the deal in order to get an “American” name, “McDonald’s,” (like he couldn’t just have started his own restaurant and named it anything) saying that “Kroc” didn’t have the right sound. Although there is some historicality to this from Kroc’s book, the movie almost makes it sounds like “Czechs were not considered whites, so I didn’t have the white privilege needed to attract business.”

    The middle of the movie was a big mess with staged scenes to forcibly stuff information down our throats and advance the time frame, a lot of talky explaining sessions. Not the best screenplay or direction, in my opinion. The Actors were O.K. I’d like to know the facts behind it more.

    It took all of five minutes on the internet to discover that the efficiency automation aspect was used by many other outfits, including White Castle from the 1930s.

    And yeah, the lyrics for “Boom, Like That” are kind of a pastiche of Krocisms strung together; but still, strung together quite effectively.

  153. @Redneck farmer
    @onetwothree

    Wha? Like a lot of bands, Dire Straits had a lot of pretty good songs that didn't chart. The Top 40 or nothing mentality is Not A Good Thing.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Some of their best songs were too long to get much air play, e.g., Tunnel of Love (8:07). They’re even longer live.

  154. @Endgame Napoleon
    Isn’t he the one who wrote about the Fake Fourth Estater with “the gleam in her eye?” It was prophetic if so, because at this point in history, the so-called “media” is a 24/7 gossip fest, with newscasters no longer even bothering to conceal their salivating over train wrecks, as they avoid the serious issues of the era and the voters’ will.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That was Don Henley (Dirty Laundry). Good lyrics in that one too:

    We got the bubble-headed bleach-blonde who comes on at five
    She can tell you about the plane crash with a gleam in her eye
    It’s interesting when people die, give us dirty laundry

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Dave Pinsen

    "Dirty Laundry" is biting and spot-on. It's interesting for at least a couple of reasons: Axl Rose contributed backing vocals, and some speculate it was at least partly inspired by the unwanted attention Henley gets for the imbroglio many years ago when paramedics were called to his house to find a couple of underaged – fifteen and sixteen, I think – girls naked at his house. At least one was drugged out of her gourd. I believe one or both of the girls were charged with prostitution and Henley got some kind of slap on the wrist (the seventies were a different era).

    Ah, here we are, from the Palm Beach New Times:


    On November 21, 1980, a 911 call from Henley's home led the L.A. Fire Department to find a naked 16-year-old prostitute who had OD'ed on cocaine. Henley later entered a plea of no contest to the misdemeanor charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and received two years' probation. He denied knowing how old she was, insisted he never had sexual contact with her, and all but blamed his roadies for her ingestion of drugs.
     
    I have had enough contact and knowldge of the crazy, dark sides of the music industry – especially during tours – to say I don't automatically disbelieve Henley's story. I knew of one roadie who was hidden and smuggled out of a town after the father of a girl who'd deceived him about her age sent police to raid the venue, trucks, and buses as they were doing the load out. The guy made a harrowing escape and, as far as I know, was never railroaded, but I bet he became a Hell of a lot more chary of any woman not obviously over thirty – he had genuinely and convincingly been misled about the girl's age. However, just as many, if not more, stories go the other way, with depraved musicians and roadies exploiting girls they know, or reasonably should know, are too young, too drugged, or otherwise not ethically available.

    Maybe soon with #metoo madness everyone will wear bodycams and subcutaneous microchips indicating age will be scanned to avoid such hijinks.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Clyde

  155. Knopfler’s lyrics to Romeo and Juliet are pretty good too:

    A lovestruck Romeo sings the streets a serenade
    Laying everybody low with a love song that he made
    Finds a street light, steps out of the shade
    Says something like, “You and me babe, how about it?”

    Juliet says, “Hey it’s Romeo, you nearly gave me a heart attack”
    He’s underneath the window, she’s singing, “Hey la, my boyfriend’s back
    You shouldn’t come around here, singing up at people like that”
    Anyway, what you gonna do about it?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    How about Industrial Disease, Dave? Those lyrics are great. However, I like this one line from Solid Rock on your same album Making Movies:

    "When you point your finger cause your plans fell through,
    you got three more fingers pointed at you, yeah!"


    Plus, as I wrote, if you've got a good tune and sound, that's all that matters anyway:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @ganderson

  156. @M. Hartley
    @The preferred nomenclature is...


    SoCal circa 1950’s was as close as the human race has come to heaven on earth.
     
    I would agree with that, and stretch the halcyon days right up to the mid 1960s when everything started falling apart all at once.

    The Italian Renaissance was also noteworthy, but SoCal had indoor plumbing.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @E. Rekshun

    Well after the golden days, but when I was experiencing my own California Dreamin’ in the late ’80s and again in the late ’90s, I turned down a few very decent job offers to relocate from the east coast to southern California. I sometimes wonder what could have been.

  157. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Neil Templeton

    Dave Davies saw where England is headed:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuGFlP5Duuw

    Replies: @E. Rekshun, @dr kill

    I greatly enjoyed seeing the Kinks play at the University of NH in 1984.

  158. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Semi-OT:

    Norwegian billionaires back campaign for an almost all plant-based diet while flying around the world on a private jet:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-01-21/do-i-say-not-i-do-vegetarian-environmental-activist-criticized-traveling-private

    Pretty sure Leftist hypocrisy is as close as we can get to a perpetual motion machine in this timeline.

    Replies: @Alden

    They want us peons to live on lentils and rice. FYI morons, meat is plant based because those animals eat nothing but plants.

    I love both lentils and rice. But they’re very fattening. Meat fish and eggs keep you thin. 1,000 calories a day of rice noodles bread etc is more fattening than 2,000 calories a day of meat fish and eggs

  159. @E. Rekshun
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Over the 25-year period, 1990 - 2015, I ate five Subway subs each and every week.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @reactionry, @Pericles

    And that’s merely 6500 of them.

  160. @Wilkey
    "The Founder," summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it's pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating "Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it's so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!"

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn't come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my "The Founder" as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald's, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like "Kroc.")

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Stan Adams, @Anon, @Pericles, @Kyle

    Venture capitalists love expounding that the idea (McDonalds brothers) is nothing, execution (Kroc) is everything. Coincidentally, or is that correlationally, they also tend to belong to a certain ethnic group.

  161. @E. Rekshun
    No movie about McDonalds would be complete w/o documenting the behavior of some of the clientele (and employees for that matter).


    For example, among hundreds of others:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrXFxQj1Sc4

    https://youtu.be/vsH6L4EAe7o

    Replies: @jim jones, @Pericles, @William Badwhite, @Reg Cæsar

    The first video certainly had its moments. Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too. Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues. And at the beginning, did some random black guy steal the red bag while the upstanding citizens were arguing? Quick situational thinking.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Pericles


    Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too.
     
    He's my new hero.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Pericles


    Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues.
     
    That's not a job for a lady.

    I imagine just about all us deplorables here side with the blacks in the second altercation. But who knows, maybe the Duck or the Crow will find a way to defend the white jerk just to spite us.

    I'm surprised the fellow doesn't have obvious tattoos. He's only 40. Isn't that de rigueur for white trash today?

    Replies: @Pericles

  162. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    The all-time worst history lyrics song is "The Wreak of the Edmund Fitzgerald." The song is a long sing-songy set of verses without any chorus or breaks, and the lyrics are simply a recital of facts from a timeline, with no particular insight.

    Replies: @Anon, @Old Prude

    Don’t dump on Lightfoot and the Wreck. While the music is repetative, it is haunting. And lyrics like “In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed/in the Maritime Sailors Catheral” or “Lake Michigan steams/like a young man’s dreams” or “All that remains/are the faces and the names/of the wives and the sons and the daughters” are poetically evocative. Strumming it on a guitar is like entering a dream.

    Dave Barry made fun of the lyrics “As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most” and got a laugh from the NPR crowd on Prarie Home Companion. I never understood why he thought that was so funny, or the lyric particularly egregious. I’ve heard entire songs based on things a lot more eye-rolling: Chris Stapleton’s “Parachute” for example. Jeezuz he might as well have written a song called “Spatula”….. I’ll save you from the fire, babe/I’ll take away the heat/I’ll be your…Spatuala!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Old Prude

    “As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most” -- Dave Barry was probably jealous. It's a proto-Dave Barry line.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  163. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yes, Telegraph Road is THE BEST of Dire Straits. The lyrics can be easily made out, as Knofler sings them when the music is not so loud behind him, but then gets into one of the best guitar solos of all time. (No, it doesn't beat Blue Sky, Jessica, or Scarlet Begonias and a coupla dozen more Jerry solos, so don't even get me started on that.)

    "Then came the churches, then came the schools, then came the lawyers, then came the rules ..."

    If you really want history rock, though, there is only one go-to guy, and that is Mr. Al Stewart:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ZG6tRGMYk

    Gentlemen, I rest my case.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @WHAT, @Ganderson, @reactionry, @dr kill

    Who did the guitar work in ‘On The Border’?

  164. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Mael brothers of the band Sparks have been going for over 50 years, and still releasing songs and albums at a rapid pace in their 70s. Sparks, as a local band formed by UCLA graduates, was sort of a secret password among more literate UCLA students in the 1970s (the lyrics are consistently clever, and their fan base is the UK, so they were not hugely known stateside).

    I think these guys survive by not really having any more contact with each other than is absolutely required. And since one of them is the vocalist and frontman, and one writes all the songs and lyrics, the division of responsibilities is clear. However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don't want to tour because they don't need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.

    Replies: @M. Hartley, @Reg Cæsar

    Interesting. I guess this is why I always thought Sparks were British.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @M. Hartley

    Sparks are a couple of L.A. brothers, but they've never been big in L.A. They used to take their friends to Farmer's Market in West Hollywood where they'd sign autographs for European tourists, thus proving to their pals they were big in Europe.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  165. @Rosamond Vincy
    @onetwothree


    hey count ’em: *Three* hits.

     

    Four:
    Sultans of Swing
    Skateaway
    Walk of Life
    Money for Nothing

    Replies: @M. Hartley

    I never heard of takeaway (auto correct never heard of it either).

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @M. Hartley

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQBKUPwG_Gk



    Charted 37 in UK, 58 in US, but got a lot of local play when I lived in Philly.

  166. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

     

    It's a lot more efficient to start with the tune, then add the lyrics to fit. Words are more flexible than music. There are almost limitless ways to say the same thing, but fiddle with the notes, and pretty soon you've got a different tune. Other than the Mass, and "art songs", you don't see much words-first composition.

    There are exceptions. Richard Rodgers added music to words Oscar Hammerstein set to opera tunes in his head. And it worked. But then, he said he could pee a melody, and was right. And he wrote the music first with Lorenz Hart, and it was more impressive.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Old Prude, @Achmed E. Newman

    I think some guy writes lyrics and mails them to Elton John, and he puts them to music. That’s a pretty incredible way to come up with “Goodbye Yellow-brick Road” or “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me”

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Old Prude

    I wouldn't call Bernie Taupin "some guy." He's one of the most talented and prolific lyricists in the world. Most famous for his collaborations with Elton John, he also write these pieces:

    https://youtu.be/41P8UxneDJE

    https://youtu.be/K1b8AhIsSYQ

    Incidentally, a third mode hasn't been mentioned, perhaps because it's less common, but that is simultaneous composition of lyrics and music. Neil Peart woild go off to a room and write lyrics while Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee made music in the studio. They'd send the tapes and lyrics back and forth and discuss what was and wasn't working, as they paired a lyric with music, refining things as they moved ahead. I imagine a lot of pieces written by a single person composing both lyrics and music function the same way, only with all the refining and reconciliation going on in the one person's head (notes, conputer, etc.). I expect people especially adroit at clever lyrics scanned just so to fit ewually clever melodies and rythyms – people like Nik Kershaw – work this way.

    I thought this confession from Aimee Mann was pretty candid about how prosaic and mundane the process can be:


    If I really feel stuck or just can’t seem to make anything happen during my usual fifteen-minute routine, I’ll do this thing that I call iTunes roulette. I will open a dictionary at random and pick a word and then I will enter that word into the iTunes search. The first song that comes up, no matter what it is, will give me my tempo and my style. Usually if you search a word in iTunes it will also suggest an audiobook, so if you click on that you can usually see or hear a sentence. Within that first sentence, whatever it is, you have to use something—either a phrase or a few words. Then I write down a bunch of different chords on pieces of paper and throw them up in the air. Whatever lands face up, those are my chords. You’ve got a tempo and a style, you’ve got some words, you’ve got some chords—good luck! Of course as soon as you play the chords it’s usually like, “Ok, fuck it, I’m throwing this chord away and I’m gonna add this chord instead” or whatever. You can do whatever you want because it’s a made up game and the rules are all arbitrary, but it really does get you started and sometimes that’s all you need.
     
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @Old Prude

    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  167. @E. Rekshun
    I haven't eaten at McDonalds in over 30 years.

    Rolling Stone Magazine lists Mark Knopfler as no. 44 on the 2016 list of Top 100 all-time greatest guitarists.

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls066632618/


    I especially like these two live versions of Sultans of Swing:

    https://youtu.be/cJwJ11-pmxg?list=RDcJwJ11-pmxg&t=2


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENJlmnqxZUQ&feature=youtu.be

    Replies: @dr kill

    Well. Thanks for that, we all know Rolling Stone has never been wrong about anything.

  168. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Neil Templeton

    Dave Davies saw where England is headed:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuGFlP5Duuw

    Replies: @E. Rekshun, @dr kill

    The Kinks were the original noticers.

  169. Anon[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @WHAT

    Al Stewart is the history lyrics guy, but Rod Stewart was a pretty good lyricist in his prime at telling a story in a song with a lot of colorful realistic detail: e.g., You Wear It Well.

    In general, the quality of lyric writing was pretty poor during the late 1960s-early 1970s peak of electric guitar rock. Some of this was the demand for authenticity that the frontman of a touring rock band was supposed to be singing his own (or a bandmate's lyrics), which is a pretty unlikely combination of talents: be an introspective poet and an extraverted cock of the walk rock star.

    Van Morrison did one album, Astral Weeks, where the lyric sheet was pretty close to publishable lyric poetry, but he also wasn't a great rock star performer.

    Rod Stewart was releasing albums at a rapid rate at his peak, but only putting 3 original songs on each one, so he seemed to work harder on the lyrics than his superstar peers.

    Of course, Stewart was also notorious for succumbing to rockstaritis, so his peak of quality was pretty short, just a few years in the early 1970s. I can remember my cousin from San Francisco coming to visit in the late 1970s and wanting to go see celebrities, so I told him to go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and, sure enough, he saw Rod Stewart and was quite satisfied with his visit.

    But Rod being a fixture on Rodeo Drive is probably not a good way for him to write another "Mandolin Wind."

    Replies: @Cortes, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Jim Don Bob, @Reg Cæsar, @Anon

    I lived near the Sony studios in the early 1980s, and was apparently in the right demographic, since I was often approached by people giving out tickets to screenings of in-progress movies: 80 percent finished stuff you’d watch and answer a questionnaire about.

    At one point I went to a screening for a mystery-meat movie I later learned was “To Live and Die in L.A.” I and a friend lined up behind what seemed like a gay couple. One of them apparently had some connection with Rod Stewart’s psychologist or psychiatrist, who in turn was apparently not really into client confidentiality. The two were so involved in their gossip that their whispers could be plainly heard.

    If this guy could be believed, Stewart had an extreme inferiority complex about an aspect of his body.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Anon


    Stewart had an extreme inferiority complex about an aspect of his body.
     
    The mole?
  170. @Anon
    @Chrisnonymous

    My favorite large chain burger is the zeppin burger at Lotteria, an outlet that otherwise has nothing to interest me.

    http://hamburger.jp/photo/special723_41.jpg

    I had to get this about three times to make my mind up about it. It's such a radical experience that unless you have recalibrated your brain you can't judge it. What it is, is:

    -- A small burger, though not slider small

    -- An expensive burger

    -- Always made fresh for you

    -- Extremely simple: a shiny bun, a small, somewhat irregular beef patty heavily salted and peppered, and two small slices of different cheeses

    -- The meat is extremely fatty and thus the burger is extremely greasy

    It turns out that fat and salt makes stuff really, really good. Who knew?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Now, I will go try that burger just because you recommended it. I have only been to Lotteria once quite a long time ago. My impression was that it was a McDonalds rip-off which simply charged higher prices and made some “Japanese” substitutions like melon-flavored soda that actually detract from the burger experience. The fatty meat will not an issue, but I maybe the overseasoning. I can’t understand why a people whose native cuisine relies on letting the flavors of ingredients shine through overseasons their beef (see hamburg).

    Say, I heard Unz ears Burger King every day. I wonder if he would like Lotteria.

    Unz, why do you eat at Burger King instead of Wendy’s, Five Guys, or one of those other places?

  171. @reactionry
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Re "Roads To Moscow"
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_to_Russia

    If I didn't have bad taste, I'd have none at all and all that and loved the Ramones (all of the original members are dead* now) back in the daze and would have taken more Super 8 Sound footage (with a Sears(!) rebranded camera) than actually filmed on account of being told to stop by security people at First Avenue in Minneapolis. Until a few months ago, no word of a lie, one of my daughters and her family lived right across the street from Bishop Cretin High School. While the students surely became aware of the Ramones decades ago, this was certainly *not* the school song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ymeuOz0hZU

    From their "Commando"**

    "They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    First rule is 'the laws of Germany'
    Second rule is 'be nice to mommy'
    Third rule is 'don't talk to Commies'
    Fourth rule is 'eat kosher salamis'
    They do their best, they do what they can
    They get them ready for Vietnam
    From old Hanoi to East Berlin
    Commando, involved again
    They do…"

    * "dead" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73NdmMYZsnM

    ** Commando -The term "Kommando" might have first come into language with the Anglo-CowBoer War, but it seems that the meaning of going without underwear was fixed (like Brit bayonets in the Iraq War) during the Vietnam War. Over the past few years the Democrat Party has gone full Sonderkommando, if not full Mengele.

    Replies: @ganderson

    Cretin Class of ‘72 here, too early for the Ramones, not to mention that when I was there one could not “go for a whirl with my Cretin girl” as the school did not go coed until ‘87. I could imagine us yelling “ one, two three four, cretins gonna hop some more…”

    And, while it’s now Cretin- Derham
    Hall, back in the 70s it was just Cretin. It was never Bishop Cretin.

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @ganderson

    Arrrgghhh! I should just stick to "Boxing the Bishop." You are (of course) correct, sir.
    I wish that I wasn't such an old pinhead.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT_2K4ddG7g

    I hope that you "accept" my apology as in the following during which freaks seem to want to make a very white woman their "bitch."
    Take a gander, son, at this, though it might freak you out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9C4uTEEOJlM

    Replies: @ganderson

  172. @Ganderson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed- I’ll see your invasion of Russia song, and raise you one more:
    https://youtu.be/jM0zvTL7Adc

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I’d never heard this one, Ganderson, from this subset of the genre of Hist-Rock, called Russian-Invasion-Rock ;-}! Once I read the lyrics, I had to learn more of this war wages by Sweden’s Charles XII on Russia and the Poles (initially) and Germans of Saxony (the Saxons, hey, I’ve heard of them!)

    Here’s page 1 of a 5-page website on the Great Northern War.

    OK, I call. I do think that Peter White’s Spanish guitar in Roads to Moscow make it take this hand.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Like ‘em both. Al still puts on a pretty good show-his voice is going, but he’s charming in person if a tad faggy . There is an Esias Tegner poem about Karl XII that can be sung to the tune of “The Coldest Winter”: (Lagertha can translate)

    Kung Karl, den unge hjälte,
    Han stod i rök och damm.
    Han drog sitt svärd från bälte
    Och bröt i striden fram.
    ”Hur svenska stålet biter,
    Kom, låt oss pröva på!
    Ur vägen, moskoviter!
    Friskt mod, I gossar blå!”

    Don’t know if it was intentional or not, but Al’s a pretty smart guy, so...

    Robert Massie’s “Peter the Great” has a good section on The Great Northern War, and the rivalry between Charles XII and Peter.

  173. @Jim Don Bob
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Michael McDonald’s single-handed RUINING of The Doobie Brothers..
     
    Agree completely.
    The Doobies used to do stuff like this before MM's p***y music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh4nNdNJ_U8

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, I like that one and almost everything from The Captain and Me, Stampede, and What were once vices are now Habits.

    I will give Michael McDonald credit for Takin’ it to the Streets. It’s jazzy, sort-of, but still one of my favorites:

    It does not beat Neal’s Fandango, though:

    “Goin’ back, I’m too tired to roam,
    Loma Preita* my mountain home,
    on the hills above Santa Cruz,
    the place where I spent my youth.”

    Besides having normal episodes of lyricosis, they sing this so fast that it was years (and time spent in California) before I got the chorus down. What a home to be from, 1970’s coastal California!

    .

    * Well before the quake.

  174. @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Oh, on great lyrics: Joni Mitchell wrote good lyrics, IMO, especially for females, but her problem is that she would just try to wedge them into the tune she must have already written, when they DIDN’T FIT!

     

    It's a lot more efficient to start with the tune, then add the lyrics to fit. Words are more flexible than music. There are almost limitless ways to say the same thing, but fiddle with the notes, and pretty soon you've got a different tune. Other than the Mass, and "art songs", you don't see much words-first composition.

    There are exceptions. Richard Rodgers added music to words Oscar Hammerstein set to opera tunes in his head. And it worked. But then, he said he could pee a melody, and was right. And he wrote the music first with Lorenz Hart, and it was more impressive.

    Replies: @Paleo Retiree, @Old Prude, @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, Reg, it could be done either way, but I’ll take your word for it about most writing the tune first. My point was, Miss Mitchell would write poems, basically, with not any kind of meter to fit with the tunes she had (some of the time, anyway). Did you listen to California above? It’s a good song, nonetheless.

    This one is one she did write right, with brilliant lyrics, and I like her raw version better than Judy Collins’ polished up version:

  175. @Dave Pinsen
    Knopfler’s lyrics to Romeo and Juliet are pretty good too:

    A lovestruck Romeo sings the streets a serenade
    Laying everybody low with a love song that he made
    Finds a street light, steps out of the shade
    Says something like, "You and me babe, how about it?"

    Juliet says, "Hey it's Romeo, you nearly gave me a heart attack"
    He's underneath the window, she's singing, "Hey la, my boyfriend's back
    You shouldn't come around here, singing up at people like that"
    Anyway, what you gonna do about it?
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    How about Industrial Disease, Dave? Those lyrics are great. However, I like this one line from Solid Rock on your same album Making Movies:

    “When you point your finger cause your plans fell through,
    you got three more fingers pointed at you, yeah!”

    Plus, as I wrote, if you’ve got a good tune and sound, that’s all that matters anyway:

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Doctor Parkinson declared 'I'm not surprised to see you here
    You've got smokers cough from smoking brewer's droop from drinking beer
    I don't know how you came to get the Bette Davis knees
    But worst of all young man you've got Industrial Disease'
    He wrote me a prescription he said 'you are depressed
    But I'm glad you came to see me to get this off your chest
    Come back and see me later - next patient please
    Send in another victim of Industrial Disease'

  176. @Anon
    @Tom Scarlett

    To his current-year credit I suppose, Mark has not only never retracted/changed that verse to my knowledge, but has once or twice defended it on grounds of artist's prerogative: quoting someone for Sprechstimme authenticity is not an endorsement, etc. A concept which sails over the head of the modern "journalist," who is really nothing more than an overgrown hall monitor

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Mark has not only never retracted/changed that verse to my knowledge, but has once or twice defended it on grounds of artist’s prerogative

    Well, he did. The live performances of this song use “little queenie”, starting almost immediately after the album’s release. E.g., Live Aid 1985

  177. @Iberiano
    Steve, would love to get your take on this for a future post.

    https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/starbucks-bathroom-birth-highlights-challenges-of-welcoming-all#gs.NMbM0eau

    1. Sounds like RaceInc moved in quickly and successfully to strip mine Starbucks of some cash to investigate and report all this mayhem going on in their stores. Holder, doubtful more than 40 percent sub-Saharan, penning the synopsis is a nice touch. It's a great industry to be in, I s'pose.

    2. If Starbucks sees the future as serving non-customers, why not every business in every location everywhere all the time?

    Replies: @TheBoom, @William Badwhite

    Many of the tough issues facing Starbucks stores are also front and center for public libraries, said Amy VanScoy, who teaches library science at the University of Buffalo.

    Uh oh, they used Art Deco’s real name

  178. @Reg Cæsar

    like firing his brother from Dire Straits
     
    Are two-brother bands all that great an idea?

    Tommy Dorsey broke up with Jimmy on stage. Ray and Dave Davies would get into fights-- fisticuffs, I think-- which got the Kinks banned from America at the height of their success. (More the work of the musicians' union than the State Department.) Once Tim Bachman left BTO to be a sound engineer, taking care of an easier business, Randy and Rob were at odds. Rob wrote his songs with CF Turner, and Randy was estranged from his creation for years.

    Bigger collections of brothers, notably the Wilsons, the Gibbs, the Jacksons, the Osmonds, and the Cowsills, had their difficulties, but sibling rivalry didn't seem to be a factor.

    The McCartney, Jagger, and Taylor brothers were smart enough to keep their acts separate.

    But the best strategy was that of the Fiegers. Doug led the Knack, while Geoff defended Dr Jack Kevorkian, an amateur jazz musician who recorded a tribute to his counsel.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXJlE6h8_-Q

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @James Speaks

    Beach Boys – three brothers and a cousin.

    Any Soul group – cuz they’re all ‘brothers’

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @James Speaks


    Beach Boys – three brothers and a cousin.
     
    Those were the Wilsons I referred to. And, like I said, the two-brother rule doesn't apply.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  179. @Anon
    I eat at McDonald's once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    The trick is to order a plain hamburger, a small fries, and a Coke. And in Japan you can get a small shake that actually is small. Once you get used to a plain hamburger, no cheese, no Big Mac, you can start to get a feel for the simple charm of 1950s McDonald's.

    If you do an images search for "Karuizawa McDonald's" you can find a slightly remodeled Golden Arches franchise. The funny thing is that Karuizawa is a resort area that zoned out chain stores, but this location is so old that it was grandfathered in.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TelfoedJohn, @Kyle, @MBlanc46

    I’m a construction worker in America. That’s what I have for lunch every day, Cheeseburger, small fries, large coke. Three bucks.

  180. @Wilkey
    "The Founder," summarized:

    Hard charging guy (Catholic, not Jewish) with ethnic surname steals business out from under traditional WASP guys (well ok, Irish guys) who are happy being happy and doing well with their one store.

    It was written by Robert (((Siegel))) and however much you want to believe that Siegel tried to present Kroc as the bad guy, it's pretty damn clear that he loved him.

    You can sorta see a sequel being made 50 years from now, but with Chuck Schumer as the ethnic guy and with all of us dying-out WASPs as the McDonald brothers WASPs and Schumer wildly gesticulating "Here! Take this nice little country ya got here, cram it full of another 2 billion people, no need to worry about fake ice cream powder or the quality of the other immi-gredients, and PRESTO! it's so much better now well not really, but it made me fantastically wealth and screw you I gotta signed contract see ya later ya goy schmucks!"

    Serves as a great metaphor for the way America has been stolen out from under us. Too bad the movie didn't come out 54 years ago.

    (And if you think my "The Founder" as metaphor for the theft of America is a little far-flung, Siegel basically has Kroc say so at the end of the movie. He has Kroc saying that he needed a nice Anglo-Irish name, like McDonald's, on the front of the store, not a ridiculous ethnic one like "Kroc.")

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Stan Adams, @Anon, @Pericles, @Kyle

    McDonald seems like a Scottish surname to me, not Irish.

  181. @E. Rekshun
    No movie about McDonalds would be complete w/o documenting the behavior of some of the clientele (and employees for that matter).


    For example, among hundreds of others:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrXFxQj1Sc4

    https://youtu.be/vsH6L4EAe7o

    Replies: @jim jones, @Pericles, @William Badwhite, @Reg Cæsar

    They need to add “how to properly film an altercation” as a required course in ghetto schools. The technical quality of these worldstar-type wigouts is usually quite poor.

  182. @Anonymous
    @Anon87

    According to my dad, my twin sister and I (early 80s gen) didn't even like burgers/fries when prepared at home or ordered at other restaurants-- but as soon as the new movie/cartoon tie-in toys were advertised each month, we'd immediately clamor for Chez Ronald

    Replies: @Anon87

    There certainly is something to them having all the best tie-ins, but I think their fries have kept people coming back for more.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anon87

    It's the infusion of chemical and beef by-products that keep you coming back for more.

    (Seriously, it is; millions are spent paying chemists – so called "food scientists" – to refine this stuff.)

  183. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There really weren't that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don't be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor ... and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon87, @Autochthon, @Reg Cæsar

    Smothers Brothers?

  184. @Anonymous
    Shutdown has ended.

    No wall. Lol

    Trump will lose in 2020.
    Reply only if you have any arguments.
    Putting Troll won't do anything.

    Period.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Alfa158, @J1234, @MBlanc46

    No, it’s a setup…by Trump. It means the hammer is about to fall. Declaring an emergency is something he’s willing and wanting to do, but it isn’t something he wants to enter into lightly.

  185. Iron Maiden is the undisputed king of history and literature based tunes. The Piece of Mind album is mostly history and lit. They even quoted Idi Amin and backmasked it to mess with the Tipper Gore types.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  186. What a great song. Really the same spirit as the movie (which was also great.) I’m guessing the movie copped the vibe to a large degree.

    Of course, there was the standard Hollywood hypocrisy in the movie – Kroc was vilified to a huge audience for treating his first wife in a way that seems to be s.o.p. for Hollywood executives and stars.

  187. @Anon
    @Wilkey

    The entire 1:55 movie is up on YouTube, and the upload date is a year ago.

    If you have moral problems with this, please wait a week before reporting it, so I can find time to watch it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    #MeTooDammit
    #Don’tScrewItUpForUs

  188. @Thomm
    @Corn


    I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are the worst.
     
    In-N-Out needs to merge with Five Guys. In-N-Out does the burgers (not that Five Guys has a bad burger but the price is at least 50% higher). Five Guys does the fries.

    That is the winning combo.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    In-N-Out b urge rs! Anyone still got the sticker – it was a, ahem, stroke of genius!

    Still, Thomm, I’d still stick with the place that has the forced-hot-air hand dryers in the bathroom, so you can get some comfortable rest on those occasional chilly southern California nights. (Sorry, piling on, per MikeAtMike, but I’m still laughing at that one!)

    Oh, and Five Guys french fries smell too greasy even for me.

  189. @Dave Pinsen
    @Endgame Napoleon

    That was Don Henley (Dirty Laundry). Good lyrics in that one too:


    We got the bubble-headed bleach-blonde who comes on at five
    She can tell you about the plane crash with a gleam in her eye
    It's interesting when people die, give us dirty laundry
     

    Replies: @Autochthon

    “Dirty Laundry” is biting and spot-on. It’s interesting for at least a couple of reasons: Axl Rose contributed backing vocals, and some speculate it was at least partly inspired by the unwanted attention Henley gets for the imbroglio many years ago when paramedics were called to his house to find a couple of underaged – fifteen and sixteen, I think – girls naked at his house. At least one was drugged out of her gourd. I believe one or both of the girls were charged with prostitution and Henley got some kind of slap on the wrist (the seventies were a different era).

    Ah, here we are, from the Palm Beach New Times:

    On November 21, 1980, a 911 call from Henley’s home led the L.A. Fire Department to find a naked 16-year-old prostitute who had OD’ed on cocaine. Henley later entered a plea of no contest to the misdemeanor charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and received two years’ probation. He denied knowing how old she was, insisted he never had sexual contact with her, and all but blamed his roadies for her ingestion of drugs.

    I have had enough contact and knowldge of the crazy, dark sides of the music industry – especially during tours – to say I don’t automatically disbelieve Henley’s story. I knew of one roadie who was hidden and smuggled out of a town after the father of a girl who’d deceived him about her age sent police to raid the venue, trucks, and buses as they were doing the load out. The guy made a harrowing escape and, as far as I know, was never railroaded, but I bet he became a Hell of a lot more chary of any woman not obviously over thirty – he had genuinely and convincingly been misled about the girl’s age. However, just as many, if not more, stories go the other way, with depraved musicians and roadies exploiting girls they know, or reasonably should know, are too young, too drugged, or otherwise not ethically available.

    Maybe soon with #metoo madness everyone will wear bodycams and subcutaneous microchips indicating age will be scanned to avoid such hijinks.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Autochthon

    Dirty Laundry was 1982, don't think Axl Rose was in LA yet. Axl backed Henley on "I Will Not Go Quietly"

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @Clyde
    @Autochthon

    https://tiffanyfitzhenry.com/2018/09/22/david-geffen-don-henley-the-clintons-cocaine-rape-when-truth-brings-down-the-house/

    Above taken word for word, is the original "blind" Don Henley entry from the Crazy Days and Nights blog which may not carry this item anymore. It got tons of response there and may have been taken down due to lawyers threats

  190. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There really weren't that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don't be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor ... and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon87, @Autochthon, @Reg Cæsar

    The Van Halens have stuck together, but it’s pretty clearly a relationship in which Ed calls the shots and Alex goes along.

    Justin and Jeremy Furstenfeld have a similarly amicable and successful working relationship; though Justin is clearly the genius behind Blue October, he is far less egomaniacal and volatile than Eddie Van Halen.

    The Bee Gees had ups and downs but mostly stayed together for an incredibly long time. The Porcaros also come to mind, as do the Marx Brothers. As with most things, the negative examples are more memorable and gain more attention.

  191. @Thud
    Back in my young muso days I shared managers with Mr. Knopfler, the whole lot of them were sharp....really sharp, pity I was talentless!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Curle

    “pity I was talentless!”

    Talent is overrated.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Curle

    Hey, they do more with two chords than Simply Red did.

  192. Anonymous [AKA "craig h"] says: • Website
    @Redneck farmer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Sabaton is pretty good.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Then the Winged Hussars arrived……

  193. @Anon87
    @Anonymous

    There certainly is something to them having all the best tie-ins, but I think their fries have kept people coming back for more.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    It’s the infusion of chemical and beef by-products that keep you coming back for more.

    (Seriously, it is; millions are spent paying chemists – so called “food scientists” – to refine this stuff.)

  194. @Anonymous
    Shutdown has ended.

    No wall. Lol

    Trump will lose in 2020.
    Reply only if you have any arguments.
    Putting Troll won't do anything.

    Period.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Alfa158, @J1234, @MBlanc46

    Who with any clarity of vision could disagree? Trump Pelosi on and got his tail end handed to him on a platter. He’s through.

  195. @Anon
    I eat at McDonald's once or twice a month and like it. I live in Japan, so the cleanliness and human capital employee pool is probably closer to the 1950s U.S. level than at current U.S outlets.

    The trick is to order a plain hamburger, a small fries, and a Coke. And in Japan you can get a small shake that actually is small. Once you get used to a plain hamburger, no cheese, no Big Mac, you can start to get a feel for the simple charm of 1950s McDonald's.

    If you do an images search for "Karuizawa McDonald's" you can find a slightly remodeled Golden Arches franchise. The funny thing is that Karuizawa is a resort area that zoned out chain stores, but this location is so old that it was grandfathered in.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @TelfoedJohn, @Kyle, @MBlanc46

    Those 15 cent burgers seemed fantastic when I was twelve.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @MBlanc46


    Those 15 cent burgers seemed fantastic when I was twelve.
     
    Same here. My assignment. Saturday scraping and caulking underside of my father's wood hulled motor boat. 1949 Chris Craft powered by a slant six engine. Same as the automobile engine but pumped seawater as coolant. My reward - 15 cents McDonald hamburgers plus fries at the end of the day.
  196. Late to the party, but so weird to read Dire Straits described as “one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can’t laugh at them like The Knack…” Jeez, Dire Straits has sold 100-million albums, which ranks them among the 50 top-selling acts of all time, along with other notable dec-platinum artists such as Dylan, Chicago, Simon & Garfunkel, Prince, Santana, Neil Diamond and Eric Clapton. Knopfler’s the one laughing, and it’s all the way to the bank…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Andrew Gilbert

    Dire Straits/Mark Knopfler seems like a band that got by on making good music. E.g., they didn't fit into any stylistic trends of the late 1970s when they emerged, or of the mid 1980s when they made a fortune.

  197. @Andrew Gilbert
    Late to the party, but so weird to read Dire Straits described as "one of those odd two- or three-hit wonder bands. You can’t laugh at them like The Knack..." Jeez, Dire Straits has sold 100-million albums, which ranks them among the 50 top-selling acts of all time, along with other notable dec-platinum artists such as Dylan, Chicago, Simon & Garfunkel, Prince, Santana, Neil Diamond and Eric Clapton. Knopfler's the one laughing, and it's all the way to the bank...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Dire Straits/Mark Knopfler seems like a band that got by on making good music. E.g., they didn’t fit into any stylistic trends of the late 1970s when they emerged, or of the mid 1980s when they made a fortune.

  198. @M. Hartley
    @Anon

    Interesting. I guess this is why I always thought Sparks were British.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Sparks are a couple of L.A. brothers, but they’ve never been big in L.A. They used to take their friends to Farmer’s Market in West Hollywood where they’d sign autographs for European tourists, thus proving to their pals they were big in Europe.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer

    Ron Mael changed the "Roland" on his keyboard to "Ronald". He said Russell sang tenor because Ron composed with his right hand. Using the left hand would have led to lower notes.

    This video, arguably the weirdest ever, by anybody, was rather prescient in 2003:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-ONRt9ER6Y

  199. @Old Prude
    @Anon

    Don't dump on Lightfoot and the Wreck. While the music is repetative, it is haunting. And lyrics like "In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed/in the Maritime Sailors Catheral" or "Lake Michigan steams/like a young man's dreams" or "All that remains/are the faces and the names/of the wives and the sons and the daughters" are poetically evocative. Strumming it on a guitar is like entering a dream.

    Dave Barry made fun of the lyrics "As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most" and got a laugh from the NPR crowd on Prarie Home Companion. I never understood why he thought that was so funny, or the lyric particularly egregious. I've heard entire songs based on things a lot more eye-rolling: Chris Stapleton's "Parachute" for example. Jeezuz he might as well have written a song called "Spatula"..... I'll save you from the fire, babe/I'll take away the heat/I'll be your...Spatuala!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most” — Dave Barry was probably jealous. It’s a proto-Dave Barry line.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Steve Sailer

    The line makes sense if you know the story behind it. The ship had made the trip for years safely, partly because it was heavy enough to withstand most of the waves. The wave that finally capsized it was estimated to be around 30 feet.

    BTW, he got the melody from an old Irish folk song.

  200. @ganderson
    @reactionry

    Cretin Class of ‘72 here, too early for the Ramones, not to mention that when I was there one could not “go for a whirl with my Cretin girl” as the school did not go coed until ‘87. I could imagine us yelling “ one, two three four, cretins gonna hop some more...”

    And, while it’s now Cretin- Derham
    Hall, back in the 70s it was just Cretin. It was never Bishop Cretin.

    Replies: @reactionry

    Arrrgghhh! I should just stick to “Boxing the Bishop.” You are (of course) correct, sir.
    I wish that I wasn’t such an old pinhead.

    I hope that you “accept” my apology as in the following during which freaks seem to want to make a very white woman their “bitch.”
    Take a gander, son, at this, though it might freak you out:

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @reactionry

    Apology accepted, provide you go outside and sing the Cretin Rouser at an annoyingly high volume . Oh, and apologize to Joe Mauer, Paul Molitor, Ryan McDonagh, the Paradise brothers, Steve Walsh, Chris Weinke, Tim Tschida... Oh, and Brother Basil!

  201. @Paleo Retiree
    @Reg Cæsar

    Another exception, at least if my memory can be trusted: Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. Pretty sure I read somewhere Tilbrook saying that Difford almost always wrote the lyrics first and that Tilbrook then put the music to them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Another exception, at least if my memory can be trusted: Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. Pretty sure I read somewhere Tilbrook saying that Difford almost always wrote the lyrics first and that Tilbrook then put the music to them.

    I’d thought of Squeeze, too, as an example of the singer singing someone else’s words. I’m not surprised that the words came first. Their Achilles heel was stress-scansion errors, the sign of an amateur. Rhyme is fake, unless you’re Jesse Jackson, but scansion is how we speak normally.

    One case I forgot to mention is Neil Sedaka. Especially dumb since the passing of Daryl Dragon recently. His lyrics were written by Howard Greenfield. Who died from “AIDS-related” something-or-other in 1986. That kind of belies the claims of “Love Will Keep Us Together”.

  202. @Steve Sailer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There really weren't that many long-term brother acts in Anglosphere pop culture before the Coen Brothers. It was pretty common for brother acts to get into really awful feuds: e.g., the Everly Brothers.

    The Coens perhaps have a policy of never talking about sibling rivalry and it never seems to come up.

    The Coens avoiding sibling rivalry problems (that we know of) are an example of how to have high Emotional IQ:
    start with high regular IQs, don't be all that emotional, and have a good sense of humor ... and you might be able to reason your way through emotional problems, such as sibling rivalry, that beset most people.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon87, @Autochthon, @Reg Cæsar

    One advantage the Coens have is that the two of them are so different. My brother and I almost never got into arguments, even though we’re just a year apart, because we had almost no interests in common.

    Ma and Pa Coen were hardcore academics. Ethan said that although he majored in philosophy, and Joel in filmmaking, their parents thought Ethan was being the practical one.

  203. @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    Beach Boys - three brothers and a cousin.

    Any Soul group - cuz they're all 'brothers'

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Beach Boys – three brothers and a cousin.

    Those were the Wilsons I referred to. And, like I said, the two-brother rule doesn’t apply.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lots of Wilsons working as siblings out there, but none more stunning than Wendy. The father of her four(!) white children won bigly.

    https://youtu.be/Zi9w_aaF34U

    https://youtu.be/woNAiH5GqBc

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  204. @Steve Sailer
    @M. Hartley

    Sparks are a couple of L.A. brothers, but they've never been big in L.A. They used to take their friends to Farmer's Market in West Hollywood where they'd sign autographs for European tourists, thus proving to their pals they were big in Europe.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ron Mael changed the “Roland” on his keyboard to “Ronald”. He said Russell sang tenor because Ron composed with his right hand. Using the left hand would have led to lower notes.

    This video, arguably the weirdest ever, by anybody, was rather prescient in 2003:

  205. @The Alarmist
    @passive-aggressivist

    He thinks Money for Nothing was an anti-corporate song? It was a paean to the genius of corporate gods who made otherwise schlock mass marketable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    He thinks Money for Nothing was an anti-corporate song? It was a paean to the genius of corporate gods who made otherwise schlock mass marketable.

    I like it at times, depending on the mood, but it is rather arrogant. I mean, it’s one thing for a working stiff to make fun of rich rock stars, which is the subject of the song. It’s quite another for a rich rock star to make fun of working stiffs, which is the actuality of the song.

  206. @Autochthon
    @Dave Pinsen

    "Dirty Laundry" is biting and spot-on. It's interesting for at least a couple of reasons: Axl Rose contributed backing vocals, and some speculate it was at least partly inspired by the unwanted attention Henley gets for the imbroglio many years ago when paramedics were called to his house to find a couple of underaged – fifteen and sixteen, I think – girls naked at his house. At least one was drugged out of her gourd. I believe one or both of the girls were charged with prostitution and Henley got some kind of slap on the wrist (the seventies were a different era).

    Ah, here we are, from the Palm Beach New Times:


    On November 21, 1980, a 911 call from Henley's home led the L.A. Fire Department to find a naked 16-year-old prostitute who had OD'ed on cocaine. Henley later entered a plea of no contest to the misdemeanor charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and received two years' probation. He denied knowing how old she was, insisted he never had sexual contact with her, and all but blamed his roadies for her ingestion of drugs.
     
    I have had enough contact and knowldge of the crazy, dark sides of the music industry – especially during tours – to say I don't automatically disbelieve Henley's story. I knew of one roadie who was hidden and smuggled out of a town after the father of a girl who'd deceived him about her age sent police to raid the venue, trucks, and buses as they were doing the load out. The guy made a harrowing escape and, as far as I know, was never railroaded, but I bet he became a Hell of a lot more chary of any woman not obviously over thirty – he had genuinely and convincingly been misled about the girl's age. However, just as many, if not more, stories go the other way, with depraved musicians and roadies exploiting girls they know, or reasonably should know, are too young, too drugged, or otherwise not ethically available.

    Maybe soon with #metoo madness everyone will wear bodycams and subcutaneous microchips indicating age will be scanned to avoid such hijinks.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Clyde

    Dirty Laundry was 1982, don’t think Axl Rose was in LA yet. Axl backed Henley on “I Will Not Go Quietly”

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Ron Mexico

    Quite right; I stand corrected.

  207. Another history lyrics song, straight from Hollywood Babylon, just came to me.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Prevost

  208. @Old Prude
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think some guy writes lyrics and mails them to Elton John, and he puts them to music. That's a pretty incredible way to come up with "Goodbye Yellow-brick Road" or "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me"

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

    I wouldn’t call Bernie Taupin “some guy.” He’s one of the most talented and prolific lyricists in the world. Most famous for his collaborations with Elton John, he also write these pieces:

    Incidentally, a third mode hasn’t been mentioned, perhaps because it’s less common, but that is simultaneous composition of lyrics and music. Neil Peart woild go off to a room and write lyrics while Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee made music in the studio. They’d send the tapes and lyrics back and forth and discuss what was and wasn’t working, as they paired a lyric with music, refining things as they moved ahead. I imagine a lot of pieces written by a single person composing both lyrics and music function the same way, only with all the refining and reconciliation going on in the one person’s head (notes, conputer, etc.). I expect people especially adroit at clever lyrics scanned just so to fit ewually clever melodies and rythyms – people like Nik Kershaw – work this way.

    I thought this confession from Aimee Mann was pretty candid about how prosaic and mundane the process can be:

    If I really feel stuck or just can’t seem to make anything happen during my usual fifteen-minute routine, I’ll do this thing that I call iTunes roulette. I will open a dictionary at random and pick a word and then I will enter that word into the iTunes search. The first song that comes up, no matter what it is, will give me my tempo and my style. Usually if you search a word in iTunes it will also suggest an audiobook, so if you click on that you can usually see or hear a sentence. Within that first sentence, whatever it is, you have to use something—either a phrase or a few words. Then I write down a bunch of different chords on pieces of paper and throw them up in the air. Whatever lands face up, those are my chords. You’ve got a tempo and a style, you’ve got some words, you’ve got some chords—good luck! Of course as soon as you play the chords it’s usually like, “Ok, fuck it, I’m throwing this chord away and I’m gonna add this chord instead” or whatever. You can do whatever you want because it’s a made up game and the rules are all arbitrary, but it really does get you started and sometimes that’s all you need.

  209. @Reg Cæsar
    @James Speaks


    Beach Boys – three brothers and a cousin.
     
    Those were the Wilsons I referred to. And, like I said, the two-brother rule doesn't apply.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Lots of Wilsons working as siblings out there, but none more stunning than Wendy. The father of her four(!) white children won bigly.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Autochthon


    Lots of Wilsons working as siblings out there...
     
    How did I forget Ann and Nancy of Heart? I always thought it amusing that "Nancy" originated as a diminutive of "Ann", so their parents pretty much gave the girls the same name, whether they knew it or not.

    In Bill Kauffman's semi-autobiographical novel, the policy wonk protagonist hooks up with a working-class girl who's a bigtime Heart fan. It's like they were Kauffman's symbol, ironic or honest, of down-home authenticity.

    Heart was, of course, the distaff version of the corporate stadium-rock juggernaut of the day. Once they (and Tom Petty, the Eagles, Caspar Springsteen's descendant, etc) crossed the California border-- and made their declarations to the agricultural officer there-- they lost, as far as I'm concerned, any claims to grass-roots status. Prince, and for a while Ani DiFranco, were the real thing.

    And Miss DiFranco crossed the Louisiana border. Where they don't care what you carry with you.
  210. @M. Hartley
    @Rosamond Vincy

    I never heard of takeaway (auto correct never heard of it either).

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    Charted 37 in UK, 58 in US, but got a lot of local play when I lived in Philly.

  211. @Steve Sailer
    @Old Prude

    “As the big freighters go/She was bigger than most” -- Dave Barry was probably jealous. It's a proto-Dave Barry line.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    The line makes sense if you know the story behind it. The ship had made the trip for years safely, partly because it was heavy enough to withstand most of the waves. The wave that finally capsized it was estimated to be around 30 feet.

    BTW, he got the melody from an old Irish folk song.

  212. @Curle
    @Thud

    “pity I was talentless!”

    Talent is overrated.









    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LfNq0kboAII

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    Hey, they do more with two chords than Simply Red did.

  213. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    I lived near the Sony studios in the early 1980s, and was apparently in the right demographic, since I was often approached by people giving out tickets to screenings of in-progress movies: 80 percent finished stuff you'd watch and answer a questionnaire about.

    At one point I went to a screening for a mystery-meat movie I later learned was "To Live and Die in L.A." I and a friend lined up behind what seemed like a gay couple. One of them apparently had some connection with Rod Stewart's psychologist or psychiatrist, who in turn was apparently not really into client confidentiality. The two were so involved in their gossip that their whispers could be plainly heard.

    If this guy could be believed, Stewart had an extreme inferiority complex about an aspect of his body.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    Stewart had an extreme inferiority complex about an aspect of his body.

    The mole?

  214. @Old Prude
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think some guy writes lyrics and mails them to Elton John, and he puts them to music. That's a pretty incredible way to come up with "Goodbye Yellow-brick Road" or "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me"

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Rosamond Vincy

    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rosamond Vincy


    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.
     
    It's almost like Taupin, who's straight, is the queer lyricist Sir Elton wishes he were. Similarly, the Avenue Q team consisted of a virile-looking Jewish Californian and a rather fey Hispanic. But the latter is straight, married, with at least a daughter, while the former is a member of LA's (one of many?) gay men's chorus.

    If you're looking for entertaining reading on Sir Elton and his contemporaries, check out Linda Lewis's autobiography, which might be hard to find in America. She was a big British pop star of the '70s and '80s, of Jamaican parentage, who never caught on over here. (Except with critics.)

    At the beginning of her career, she lived (and sometimes slept) in a communal house with Marc Bolan, Gilbert O'Sullivan, Cat Stevens, and a few other future notables. Elton didn't live there, but she knew him quite well, and even offered to bear his child. Via Coke bottle, if necessary.

    Replies: @ganderson

  215. @Pericles
    @E. Rekshun

    The first video certainly had its moments. Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too. Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues. And at the beginning, did some random black guy steal the red bag while the upstanding citizens were arguing? Quick situational thinking.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy, @Reg Cæsar

    Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too.

    He’s my new hero.

  216. @Stan Adams
    @Wilkey

    How about a reboot of Soylent Green in which an enterprising fast-food vendor comes up with an ingenious solution to the overpopulation problem?

    Has anyone ever made a movie based on A Modest Proposal?

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    Pete Doherty (best known for the Libertines) had a secondary group called “Babyshambles.”

  217. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ganderson

    I'd never heard this one, Ganderson, from this subset of the genre of Hist-Rock, called Russian-Invasion-Rock ;-}! Once I read the lyrics, I had to learn more of this war wages by Sweden's Charles XII on Russia and the Poles (initially) and Germans of Saxony (the Saxons, hey, I've heard of them!)

    Here's page 1 of a 5-page website on the Great Northern War.

    OK, I call. I do think that Peter White's Spanish guitar in Roads to Moscow make it take this hand.

    Replies: @ganderson

    Like ‘em both. Al still puts on a pretty good show-his voice is going, but he’s charming in person if a tad faggy . There is an Esias Tegner poem about Karl XII that can be sung to the tune of “The Coldest Winter”: (Lagertha can translate)

    Kung Karl, den unge hjälte,
    Han stod i rök och damm.
    Han drog sitt svärd från bälte
    Och bröt i striden fram.
    ”Hur svenska stålet biter,
    Kom, låt oss pröva på!
    Ur vägen, moskoviter!
    Friskt mod, I gossar blå!”

    Don’t know if it was intentional or not, but Al’s a pretty smart guy, so…

    Robert Massie’s “Peter the Great” has a good section on The Great Northern War, and the rivalry between Charles XII and Peter.

  218. @Ron Mexico
    @Autochthon

    Dirty Laundry was 1982, don't think Axl Rose was in LA yet. Axl backed Henley on "I Will Not Go Quietly"

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Quite right; I stand corrected.

  219. @Autochthon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lots of Wilsons working as siblings out there, but none more stunning than Wendy. The father of her four(!) white children won bigly.

    https://youtu.be/Zi9w_aaF34U

    https://youtu.be/woNAiH5GqBc

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Lots of Wilsons working as siblings out there…

    How did I forget Ann and Nancy of Heart? I always thought it amusing that “Nancy” originated as a diminutive of “Ann”, so their parents pretty much gave the girls the same name, whether they knew it or not.

    In Bill Kauffman’s semi-autobiographical novel, the policy wonk protagonist hooks up with a working-class girl who’s a bigtime Heart fan. It’s like they were Kauffman’s symbol, ironic or honest, of down-home authenticity.

    Heart was, of course, the distaff version of the corporate stadium-rock juggernaut of the day. Once they (and Tom Petty, the Eagles, Caspar Springsteen’s descendant, etc) crossed the California border– and made their declarations to the agricultural officer there– they lost, as far as I’m concerned, any claims to grass-roots status. Prince, and for a while Ani DiFranco, were the real thing.

    And Miss DiFranco crossed the Louisiana border. Where they don’t care what you carry with you.

  220. @Rosamond Vincy
    @Old Prude

    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.

    It’s almost like Taupin, who’s straight, is the queer lyricist Sir Elton wishes he were. Similarly, the Avenue Q team consisted of a virile-looking Jewish Californian and a rather fey Hispanic. But the latter is straight, married, with at least a daughter, while the former is a member of LA’s (one of many?) gay men’s chorus.

    If you’re looking for entertaining reading on Sir Elton and his contemporaries, check out Linda Lewis’s autobiography, which might be hard to find in America. She was a big British pop star of the ’70s and ’80s, of Jamaican parentage, who never caught on over here. (Except with critics.)

    At the beginning of her career, she lived (and sometimes slept) in a communal house with Marc Bolan, Gilbert O’Sullivan, Cat Stevens, and a few other future notables. Elton didn’t live there, but she knew him quite well, and even offered to bear his child. Via Coke bottle, if necessary.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    I guess she wasn’t alone again...naturally.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  221. @E. Rekshun
    No movie about McDonalds would be complete w/o documenting the behavior of some of the clientele (and employees for that matter).


    For example, among hundreds of others:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrXFxQj1Sc4

    https://youtu.be/vsH6L4EAe7o

    Replies: @jim jones, @Pericles, @William Badwhite, @Reg Cæsar

    You can have it your way at Burger King. Not at McDonald’s.

  222. @Pericles
    @E. Rekshun

    The first video certainly had its moments. Black employee certainly knows what to do when the customers jump the counter, and with some relish too. Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues. And at the beginning, did some random black guy steal the red bag while the upstanding citizens were arguing? Quick situational thinking.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy, @Reg Cæsar

    Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues.

    That’s not a job for a lady.

    I imagine just about all us deplorables here side with the blacks in the second altercation. But who knows, maybe the Duck or the Crow will find a way to defend the white jerk just to spite us.

    I’m surprised the fellow doesn’t have obvious tattoos. He’s only 40. Isn’t that de rigueur for white trash today?

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Reg Cæsar


    That’s not a job for a lady.

     

    "I don't care who started it ... uh, never mind."

    I’m surprised the fellow doesn’t have obvious tattoos. He’s only 40. Isn’t that de rigueur for white trash today?

     

    Never try to pull your counterpart across the counter if you're too weak to finish it. That was a pretty small black girl too.
  223. @reactionry
    @ganderson

    Arrrgghhh! I should just stick to "Boxing the Bishop." You are (of course) correct, sir.
    I wish that I wasn't such an old pinhead.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT_2K4ddG7g

    I hope that you "accept" my apology as in the following during which freaks seem to want to make a very white woman their "bitch."
    Take a gander, son, at this, though it might freak you out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9C4uTEEOJlM

    Replies: @ganderson

    Apology accepted, provide you go outside and sing the Cretin Rouser at an annoyingly high volume . Oh, and apologize to Joe Mauer, Paul Molitor, Ryan McDonagh, the Paradise brothers, Steve Walsh, Chris Weinke, Tim Tschida… Oh, and Brother Basil!

  224. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Dave Pinsen

    How about Industrial Disease, Dave? Those lyrics are great. However, I like this one line from Solid Rock on your same album Making Movies:

    "When you point your finger cause your plans fell through,
    you got three more fingers pointed at you, yeah!"


    Plus, as I wrote, if you've got a good tune and sound, that's all that matters anyway:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @ganderson

    Doctor Parkinson declared ‘I’m not surprised to see you here
    You’ve got smokers cough from smoking brewer’s droop from drinking beer
    I don’t know how you came to get the Bette Davis knees
    But worst of all young man you’ve got Industrial Disease’
    He wrote me a prescription he said ‘you are depressed
    But I’m glad you came to see me to get this off your chest
    Come back and see me later – next patient please
    Send in another victim of Industrial Disease’

  225. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rosamond Vincy


    Bernie Taupin. Sir Elton acknowledged recently how well their long-distance collaboration had worked.
     
    It's almost like Taupin, who's straight, is the queer lyricist Sir Elton wishes he were. Similarly, the Avenue Q team consisted of a virile-looking Jewish Californian and a rather fey Hispanic. But the latter is straight, married, with at least a daughter, while the former is a member of LA's (one of many?) gay men's chorus.

    If you're looking for entertaining reading on Sir Elton and his contemporaries, check out Linda Lewis's autobiography, which might be hard to find in America. She was a big British pop star of the '70s and '80s, of Jamaican parentage, who never caught on over here. (Except with critics.)

    At the beginning of her career, she lived (and sometimes slept) in a communal house with Marc Bolan, Gilbert O'Sullivan, Cat Stevens, and a few other future notables. Elton didn't live there, but she knew him quite well, and even offered to bear his child. Via Coke bottle, if necessary.

    Replies: @ganderson

    I guess she wasn’t alone again…naturally.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ganderson



    At the beginning of her career, she lived (and sometimes slept) in a communal house with Marc Bolan, Gilbert O’Sullivan, Cat Stevens
     
    I guess she wasn’t alone again…naturally.
     
    She was willing to ride a white swan, and go on the road to find out.
  226. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Mael brothers of the band Sparks have been going for over 50 years, and still releasing songs and albums at a rapid pace in their 70s. Sparks, as a local band formed by UCLA graduates, was sort of a secret password among more literate UCLA students in the 1970s (the lyrics are consistently clever, and their fan base is the UK, so they were not hugely known stateside).

    I think these guys survive by not really having any more contact with each other than is absolutely required. And since one of them is the vocalist and frontman, and one writes all the songs and lyrics, the division of responsibilities is clear. However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don't want to tour because they don't need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.

    Replies: @M. Hartley, @Reg Cæsar

    However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.

    One of the songwriting Byrds kept his mouth shut about his extra royalty stream. Smart move. Invest it, don’t flash it around.

    Alan Price pissed off his fellow Animals by taking the arranger’s credit on “House of the Rising Sun”. (Composer royalties go to the arranger on public domain works, or did then, anyway.)

    The rest thought they should have been spread around the band, but they weren’t as savvy as Price, I guess. Not that it would have mattered that much in the “one-for-you-nineteen-for-me” Sixties.

    This incident may have been what inspired Chas Chandler to switch careers from less-than-impressive bassist to shrewd manager of acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Mike Love sued Brian Wilson for songwriting credit on a lot of songs. Most of his claims were ridiculous, instances where he added a word during recording or the like, but a few were legitimate cases where Père Wilson had ripped him off. A Beach Boys fan with time on his hands attended most of the court hearings and wrote them up online somewhere, fascinating reading. I got the feeling that Brian Wilson was rich enough and just gave in without much of a fight, but some of his co-writers were really pissed off.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Clyde
    @Reg Cæsar

    In my book the largest royalty rip offs were Robbie Robertson stealing from Levon and the others.
    Jagger-Richards not crediting Mick Taylor.
    Whiter Shade of Pale.... Mathew Fisher finally got his royalty cut about 9 years ago so is now set for life. It took a decision in the British Courts to remedy.


    Procul Harum organist Matthew Fisher wins share of A ...
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/5941449/...
    Jul 30, 2009 · Organist Matthew Fisher has won a share of the royalties of the Procol Harum song A Whiter Shade of Pale, 42 years after the record became one of the biggest hits in pop history.
     
    , @Clyde
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah Alan Price ripped 'em off and was set for life. But he's not talking. Really, listen to House of the Rising Sun, and it is just an amazingly clean, clear, ringing production to come from some working class Newcastle boys in 1963 when they were 22-23 or so.


    The song was recorded in just one take on May 18, 1964,[17] and it starts with a now-famous electric guitar A minor chord arpeggio by Hilton Valentine.[1][3] According to Valentine, he simply took Dylan's chord sequence and played it as an arpeggio.[18] The performance takes off with Burdon's lead vocal, which has been variously described as "howling,"[2] "soulful,"[19] and as "...deep and gravelly as the north-east English coal town of Newcastle that spawned him."[1] Finally, Alan Price's pulsating organ part (played on a Vox Continental) completes the sound. Burdon later said, "We were looking for a song that would grab people's attention."[20]
     
  227. Some lyrics from Dire Straits 1982 song “Industrial Disease”

    There’s a protest singer singing a protest song – he says
    ‘they want to have a war to keep us on our knees
    They want to have a war to keep their factories
    They want to have a war to stop us buying Japanese
    They want to have a war to stop Industrial Disease
    They’re pointing out the enemy to keep you deaf and blind
    They want to sap your energy incarcerate your mind
    They give you Rule Brittania, gassy beer, page three

    Seems there still relevant today.

  228. New York Times obituary of Richard McDonald:

    https://www.nytimes.com/1998/07/16/business/richard-mcdonald-89-fast-food-revolutionary.html

    It mentions and quotes from a 1993 book by David Halberstam, The Fifties. That might be a good supplement to Kroc’s 1977 Grinding it Out, which wrote the McDonald brothers out of the company’s history.

  229. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.
     
    One of the songwriting Byrds kept his mouth shut about his extra royalty stream. Smart move. Invest it, don't flash it around.

    Alan Price pissed off his fellow Animals by taking the arranger's credit on "House of the Rising Sun". (Composer royalties go to the arranger on public domain works, or did then, anyway.)

    The rest thought they should have been spread around the band, but they weren't as savvy as Price, I guess. Not that it would have mattered that much in the "one-for-you-nineteen-for-me" Sixties.

    This incident may have been what inspired Chas Chandler to switch careers from less-than-impressive bassist to shrewd manager of acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    Replies: @Anon, @Clyde, @Clyde

    Mike Love sued Brian Wilson for songwriting credit on a lot of songs. Most of his claims were ridiculous, instances where he added a word during recording or the like, but a few were legitimate cases where Père Wilson had ripped him off. A Beach Boys fan with time on his hands attended most of the court hearings and wrote them up online somewhere, fascinating reading. I got the feeling that Brian Wilson was rich enough and just gave in without much of a fight, but some of his co-writers were really pissed off.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    Mike Love sued Brian Wilson for songwriting credit on a lot of songs.
     
    Wilson "ripped himself off" in "Little Saint Nick", but that's legal. John Fogerty was sued for plagiarizing himself, though. Really.

    He insulted his former label boss Saul Zaentz in "Zanz Can't Dance" and other songs. Rather than press on with suing Fogerty for libel, which might bring up Zaentz's own behavior in court, he used his ownership of CCR songs to argue that "The Old Man Down the Road" and other Fogerty second-winders infringed his intellectual property rights.

  230. @Reg Cæsar
    @Pericles


    Blonde semi-SWPL hesitantly moving to break things up, then tippy-toeing away as the beatdown continues.
     
    That's not a job for a lady.

    I imagine just about all us deplorables here side with the blacks in the second altercation. But who knows, maybe the Duck or the Crow will find a way to defend the white jerk just to spite us.

    I'm surprised the fellow doesn't have obvious tattoos. He's only 40. Isn't that de rigueur for white trash today?

    Replies: @Pericles

    That’s not a job for a lady.

    “I don’t care who started it … uh, never mind.”

    I’m surprised the fellow doesn’t have obvious tattoos. He’s only 40. Isn’t that de rigueur for white trash today?

    Never try to pull your counterpart across the counter if you’re too weak to finish it. That was a pretty small black girl too.

  231. @ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    I guess she wasn’t alone again...naturally.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    At the beginning of her career, she lived (and sometimes slept) in a communal house with Marc Bolan, Gilbert O’Sullivan, Cat Stevens

    I guess she wasn’t alone again…naturally.

    She was willing to ride a white swan, and go on the road to find out.

  232. @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Mike Love sued Brian Wilson for songwriting credit on a lot of songs. Most of his claims were ridiculous, instances where he added a word during recording or the like, but a few were legitimate cases where Père Wilson had ripped him off. A Beach Boys fan with time on his hands attended most of the court hearings and wrote them up online somewhere, fascinating reading. I got the feeling that Brian Wilson was rich enough and just gave in without much of a fight, but some of his co-writers were really pissed off.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Mike Love sued Brian Wilson for songwriting credit on a lot of songs.

    Wilson “ripped himself off” in “Little Saint Nick”, but that’s legal. John Fogerty was sued for plagiarizing himself, though. Really.

    He insulted his former label boss Saul Zaentz in “Zanz Can’t Dance” and other songs. Rather than press on with suing Fogerty for libel, which might bring up Zaentz’s own behavior in court, he used his ownership of CCR songs to argue that “The Old Man Down the Road” and other Fogerty second-winders infringed his intellectual property rights.

  233. @Autochthon
    @Dave Pinsen

    "Dirty Laundry" is biting and spot-on. It's interesting for at least a couple of reasons: Axl Rose contributed backing vocals, and some speculate it was at least partly inspired by the unwanted attention Henley gets for the imbroglio many years ago when paramedics were called to his house to find a couple of underaged – fifteen and sixteen, I think – girls naked at his house. At least one was drugged out of her gourd. I believe one or both of the girls were charged with prostitution and Henley got some kind of slap on the wrist (the seventies were a different era).

    Ah, here we are, from the Palm Beach New Times:


    On November 21, 1980, a 911 call from Henley's home led the L.A. Fire Department to find a naked 16-year-old prostitute who had OD'ed on cocaine. Henley later entered a plea of no contest to the misdemeanor charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and received two years' probation. He denied knowing how old she was, insisted he never had sexual contact with her, and all but blamed his roadies for her ingestion of drugs.
     
    I have had enough contact and knowldge of the crazy, dark sides of the music industry – especially during tours – to say I don't automatically disbelieve Henley's story. I knew of one roadie who was hidden and smuggled out of a town after the father of a girl who'd deceived him about her age sent police to raid the venue, trucks, and buses as they were doing the load out. The guy made a harrowing escape and, as far as I know, was never railroaded, but I bet he became a Hell of a lot more chary of any woman not obviously over thirty – he had genuinely and convincingly been misled about the girl's age. However, just as many, if not more, stories go the other way, with depraved musicians and roadies exploiting girls they know, or reasonably should know, are too young, too drugged, or otherwise not ethically available.

    Maybe soon with #metoo madness everyone will wear bodycams and subcutaneous microchips indicating age will be scanned to avoid such hijinks.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Clyde

    https://tiffanyfitzhenry.com/2018/09/22/david-geffen-don-henley-the-clintons-cocaine-rape-when-truth-brings-down-the-house/

    Above taken word for word, is the original “blind” Don Henley entry from the Crazy Days and Nights blog which may not carry this item anymore. It got tons of response there and may have been taken down due to lawyers threats

  234. @MBlanc46
    @Anon

    Those 15 cent burgers seemed fantastic when I was twelve.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Those 15 cent burgers seemed fantastic when I was twelve.

    Same here. My assignment. Saturday scraping and caulking underside of my father’s wood hulled motor boat. 1949 Chris Craft powered by a slant six engine. Same as the automobile engine but pumped seawater as coolant. My reward – 15 cents McDonald hamburgers plus fries at the end of the day.

  235. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.
     
    One of the songwriting Byrds kept his mouth shut about his extra royalty stream. Smart move. Invest it, don't flash it around.

    Alan Price pissed off his fellow Animals by taking the arranger's credit on "House of the Rising Sun". (Composer royalties go to the arranger on public domain works, or did then, anyway.)

    The rest thought they should have been spread around the band, but they weren't as savvy as Price, I guess. Not that it would have mattered that much in the "one-for-you-nineteen-for-me" Sixties.

    This incident may have been what inspired Chas Chandler to switch careers from less-than-impressive bassist to shrewd manager of acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    Replies: @Anon, @Clyde, @Clyde

    In my book the largest royalty rip offs were Robbie Robertson stealing from Levon and the others.
    Jagger-Richards not crediting Mick Taylor.
    Whiter Shade of Pale…. Mathew Fisher finally got his royalty cut about 9 years ago so is now set for life. It took a decision in the British Courts to remedy.

    Procul Harum organist Matthew Fisher wins share of A …
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/5941449/&#8230;
    Jul 30, 2009 · Organist Matthew Fisher has won a share of the royalties of the Procol Harum song A Whiter Shade of Pale, 42 years after the record became one of the biggest hits in pop history.

  236. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    However, I wonder about the money split, since bands often get into trouble when the songwriter(s) get disproportionately rich off of performance and mechanical royalties, and sometimes don’t want to tour because they don’t need the money, but the non-songwriter(s) do need the tour and merch sales for income.
     
    One of the songwriting Byrds kept his mouth shut about his extra royalty stream. Smart move. Invest it, don't flash it around.

    Alan Price pissed off his fellow Animals by taking the arranger's credit on "House of the Rising Sun". (Composer royalties go to the arranger on public domain works, or did then, anyway.)

    The rest thought they should have been spread around the band, but they weren't as savvy as Price, I guess. Not that it would have mattered that much in the "one-for-you-nineteen-for-me" Sixties.

    This incident may have been what inspired Chas Chandler to switch careers from less-than-impressive bassist to shrewd manager of acts such as the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    Replies: @Anon, @Clyde, @Clyde

    Yeah Alan Price ripped ’em off and was set for life. But he’s not talking. Really, listen to House of the Rising Sun, and it is just an amazingly clean, clear, ringing production to come from some working class Newcastle boys in 1963 when they were 22-23 or so.

    The song was recorded in just one take on May 18, 1964,[17] and it starts with a now-famous electric guitar A minor chord arpeggio by Hilton Valentine.[1][3] According to Valentine, he simply took Dylan’s chord sequence and played it as an arpeggio.[18] The performance takes off with Burdon’s lead vocal, which has been variously described as “howling,”[2] “soulful,”[19] and as “…deep and gravelly as the north-east English coal town of Newcastle that spawned him.”[1] Finally, Alan Price’s pulsating organ part (played on a Vox Continental) completes the sound. Burdon later said, “We were looking for a song that would grab people’s attention.”[20]

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