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Harry Potter and the Recessive Wizardry Gene
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As I wrote in Taki’s Magazine in 2009 in a review of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince:

… Human races mean nothing in Rowling’s world. The student body of Hogwarts is strenuously multiracial, yet strikingly monocultural. In these tributes to two centuries of English children’s fiction, whatever their ancestry, they’e all very British.

Instead, the hereditary differences between wizards and Muggles are central to the books. All fans identify with the wizard minority rather than with the Muggle majority.

A 2005 letter in Nature entitled “Harry Potter and the Recessive Allele“ explains the Mendelian genetics of wizardry. According to the family trees in Rowling’s books, wizardry is apparently embodied in a recessive gene. Like blue eyes, possessing the power of magic requires inheriting a copy from both parents.

This is the Punnett Square, named after one of the four founders of the Cambridge Eugenics Society in 1910, along with Horace Darwin, Richard A. Fisher, and John Maynard Keynes.

Harry’s father was a pureblood wizard, while his mother was a witch born to Muggle parents who evidently each carried one recessive copy of the wizardry gene. Occasionally, witches such as Harry’s pal Hermione Granger are born to Muggle parents who each have wizard ancestors. …

Yet, because Muggles are so boring, the main impetus of the plot comes not from conflicts between Muggles and wizards, but from the war over race relations waged among wizards. On one side are our tolerant heroes. On the other are the evil Nazi purebloods — such as Voldemort and blond Draco Malfoy, Harry’s archrival from Slytherin House — who denigrate wizards of mixed-ancestry as “mudbloods.”

Although Rowling, who once worked for Amnesty International, makes her books ostentatiously anti-racist, there’s something fundamentally bogus about her facade of conventional modern politics. Wizardry turns out to feature a politically incorrect dependence upon nature rather than nurture. Blood will tell. As Chris Suellentrop scoffed in Slate at Rowling’s eugenic worldview: “Hogwarts is nothing more than a magical Mensa meeting.”

By the way, Slytherin House was founded by Salazar Slytherin, a “monkey-like” racist. António de Oliveira Salazar was dictator of Portugal from 1932-1968. Perhaps not at all coincidentally, Rowling’s short, unhappy first marriage was to a Portuguese man.

 
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  1. Go Trannies. They are messing things up from the inside.

    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Anonymous

    Will J.K. Rowling stand by her principles or, more, likely will she surrender to the PC crowd? IOW, how soon until Hagrid becomes a "woman"?

    , @bigdicknick
    @Anonymous

    Trannies are sort of like the blacks of gender.
    The left courts them, but they kind of become bad optics if you give randomly selected members of the group screen time.

  2. Seriously, fuck Harry Potter and anyone who writes/comments about it. 🙂

    • Agree: Ian Smith
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon

    The real question is, would Wizard Epstein provide services to grown-up Harry?

    , @Jake
    @Anon

    Are you aware that you cursed yourself?

    , @SFG
    @Anon

    It's a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction. The gimmick of releasing a new book every year so Harry grows up with the reader is quite clever.

    That it's become an annoying example of liberal infantilism is another story. Even Tolkien complained about 'my deplorable cultus'. I like to say us gen-X science fiction nerds had the sense to be embarassed about it, but the past is a foreign country, after all.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux

  3. The importance of purity of blood to so many key characters seemed contrived. It would have made more sense if there were an additional recessive muggle/squib gene that could cause descendants of muggle-born wizards to be squibs. Keeping a family’s bloodlines pure would be insurance against the social disaster of giving birth to a squib.

  4. I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I’d forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Silva
    @Dumbo

    You (I presume) genetically have all the capabilities required to wipe your own ass. Was it moot for your parents to teach you how to?

    , @Jake
    @Dumbo

    Yes, but that would mean that the super Elite 'good public schools' of England would be moot. And they are the heart of Elite WASP culture, therefore the heart of Anglo-Zionist Empire.

    , @Wilkey
    @Dumbo


    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.
     
    Why do people say such nonsense? It may require native intelligence to become a (good) doctor, lawyer, or engineer, but there’s still lots of shit you have to learn in order to actually become one.

    There were plenty of very smart people around a thousand years ago, but none of them knew how to build a computer or calculate a derivative. Humans first had to develop that knowledge, and then others had to learn it. Learning often requires a teacher and teachers often work at schools.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo


    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline.
     
    Yes, I have watched part of a Potter movie and read part of a book, but it never seemed to me to make any sense, or even to be entertaining.

    At least James Bond villains seem to have had some kind of plausible motivation, like the desire to control the solar system, but the bad wizards seem to just be born bad without any real definition of what is bad.

    Rowling may have been slightly influenced by the incredibly popular British author Enid Blyton, whose Famous Five series deals with four boarding-school children and a dog who spend their school vacations camping in the countryside and running down criminal gangs. One of the girls is a preoperative transexual,

    The twist is that the children have been given the magical powers that all children wish they could have.

    Maybe I have not read enough to really get the point, but I think JK Rowling has been cackling all the way to the bank, and not in a nice way.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Ian Smith
    @Dumbo

    I watched most of the movies and they all had the same plot; two new adult characters show up at the wizard school. The one you think will be bad turns out to be good and vice versa.

    I’ve never read Dianna Wynn-Jones but I remember John Dolan making the case that Rowling stole a lot of her shtick from her.

    Harry Potter and the Dr. Who reboot are the favored escapism of nerdy SJWs. Barf.

    , @James J. O'Meara
    @Dumbo

    "If [intelligence] is genetic then the whole point of schools is moot."

    What?

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Rapparee
    @Dumbo

    Reading the books as an adult, Rowling's plots and characterization were always on the brink of falling apart. To her credit, she usually saw the rocks downstream and changed course at the very last second, answering my objections when I was about the toss the book against the wall in frustration. If nothing else, her perfectly Dickensian character names are a lot of fun. Rowling's real cultural achievement was resurrecting the long-dormant but once-popular School Story genre by combining it with fantasy elements.

    She never addresses her biggest problem, though, which is that her villains have no motivation- if magical ability is the only difference between wizards and muggles, and it is a purely recessive trait with no apparent regression to the mean, why would the purebloods be bothered by intermarriage with muggle-born wizards? In reality, human groups who object to miscegenation have some sort of identifiable reason, justified or not- a difference of cult or creed, a genetic & racial gulf, castes of hereditary profession, etc. If I put my writer brain to work I could invent a dozen for Harry Potter, but Rowling never bothered with one. In her lazy P.C. outlook, purity of bloodline is a completely irrational obsession, needing no explanation besides "evil people are prejudiced".

    Men since the dawn of history have taken moral instruction from the heroic epics of their culture. The Iliad and Aeneid are not just adventure stories, but vehicles for transmitting the Greeks' and Romans' respective religious and philosophical wisdom and their national self-conceptions. The problem with modern adventure epics of the Anglosphere like Star Wars and Harry Potter is in their creators' jejunely shallow worldviews, which then get transmitted to impressionable young fans- as Shelley wrote, "Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world". Lord of the Rings comes closer to the ancient model (and is tellingly more popular with young rightists), because J.R.R. Tolkien had far more life experience and inherited wisdom than later modern mythologists like Rowling and Lucas.

  5. This really matters.

    It is reminiscent of the time in the 1970s when Scientific American published an extensive math exercise about whether or not it was better to run inside to get out of the rain, or to walk slowly. You know, when would the least number of raindrops hit you? We middle school geniuses read it.

    This is that kind of important intellectual exercise.

    • Disagree: Flip
    • Replies: @Flip
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Sorry hit disagree by mistake

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Actually, walk vs. run was an important intellectual debate prior to WW1.
    The correct answer of attack in an armored vehicle wasn't figured out until after the war was almost finished.

    , @kihowi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Almost an autism test, that question. It's not important the exact volume of liquid you get on you, what's important is that you want to be in the rain for as short a time as possible.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Must learn walk between raindrops, Daniel-san. Look sky. Or maybe Totes will devise a wormhole virtual-umbrella app for your iStupid which will circumvent weather, asteroids, rape, repo men, g-men, spouses, neighbors, cancer, microaggressions, etc.

    Seriously, it will be nice when the West experiences a mass renaissance, where adults once again are not taken with childish pursuits.

  6. @Buzz Mohawk
    This really matters.

    It is reminiscent of the time in the 1970s when Scientific American published an extensive math exercise about whether or not it was better to run inside to get out of the rain, or to walk slowly. You know, when would the least number of raindrops hit you? We middle school geniuses read it.

    This is that kind of important intellectual exercise.

    Replies: @Flip, @Redneck farmer, @kihowi, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Sorry hit disagree by mistake

  7. @Buzz Mohawk
    This really matters.

    It is reminiscent of the time in the 1970s when Scientific American published an extensive math exercise about whether or not it was better to run inside to get out of the rain, or to walk slowly. You know, when would the least number of raindrops hit you? We middle school geniuses read it.

    This is that kind of important intellectual exercise.

    Replies: @Flip, @Redneck farmer, @kihowi, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Actually, walk vs. run was an important intellectual debate prior to WW1.
    The correct answer of attack in an armored vehicle wasn’t figured out until after the war was almost finished.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  8. @Anon
    Seriously, fuck Harry Potter and anyone who writes/comments about it. :)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jake, @SFG

    The real question is, would Wizard Epstein provide services to grown-up Harry?

  9. OT: New trends in User Interface design

    Those modern “Star Trek TNG / iPhone” interfaces for industrial control still need work:

    https://www.rt.com/usa/476537-mccain-collision-controls-report/

    https://features.propublica.org/navy-uss-mccain-crash/navy-installed-touch-screen-steering-ten-sailors-paid-with-their-lives/

    I don’t know what’s up but the ProPublica report is too clever by half with web wizardry – it’s barely comprehensible how to read it, probably illustrating the point.

  10. Again ironic that Portugal has been very mixed-race since four hundred years, far more than Rowling’s UK. The Salazar legacy regime fell to the socialists in a 1974 peaceful Carnation revolution. Her Portuguese husband worked in tv – a very left-wing institution and is unlikely to have secretly supported Salazar by 1990. The pair bonded over mutual passion for Jane Austen. She must’ve been his fair English rose like the books!

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Ray P



    Portugal has been very mixed-race since four hundred years

     

    Yay, slavery!
  11. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    You (I presume) genetically have all the capabilities required to wipe your own ass. Was it moot for your parents to teach you how to?

  12. This wizard or muggle status that is hereditary through genetics is merely another fictional take on promoting a tenet that has always been central to WASP culture: the precious few Elites who must rule, especially in secret (say, Deep State).

    Back in the last century, a bunch of us grad students across 3 or 4 disciplines were encouraged to attend a symposium by 3 Brit academics on tour in the American provinces (one of whom was of seemingly pure Indian sub-continent heritage). Their focus was the coming end of racism from globalism And they asserted that the Brit Empire had begun and nurture that process, which was to create the best possible world of fairness ever!

    Their proof that the Brit Empire served goals opposite those of racists was that the Brit Empire always acted to locate and nurture local elites, including preparing them to study at Elite English schools. The original WASP Empire acted in such a way, the white one, who was the only one self-identified as conservative, said that it set standards of anti-racism by acknowledging that the vast majority of whites could never be Elite in any meaningful sense, while every other race had Elites.

    As with the white natives of the British Isles, there were Elites scattered among all the blacks, browns, and yellows, and a main purpose of the Brit WASP Elites was to find and nurture and elevate those non-white Elites.

    That means, of course, that the vast majority of whites native to the British Isles are assumed to be white trash. And white trash causes trouble for all the Elites.

    Wizards and Muggles.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Jake


    Their proof that the Brit Empire served goals opposite those of racists was that the Brit Empire always acted to locate and nurture local elites, including preparing them to study at Elite English schools.
     
    Those elites also posed the biggest threat to British occupation. Better to bring them info fold than have them starting trouble. The Soviet Union made it a habit to cultivate the best and brightest of a country so to avoid them creating insurgencies and playing the Soviet Union against the United States.
  13. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    Yes, but that would mean that the super Elite ‘good public schools’ of England would be moot. And they are the heart of Elite WASP culture, therefore the heart of Anglo-Zionist Empire.

  14. @Anon
    Seriously, fuck Harry Potter and anyone who writes/comments about it. :)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jake, @SFG

    Are you aware that you cursed yourself?

    • Agree: Jane Plain
  15. I wonder if wizards in the HP world could use magic to transition?

    Instead of old Voldy using the killing curse (a hundred times unsuccessfully) on Harry, he could have just turned himself into a broad, accused Harry of transphobia, and proceeded to take over the world.

  16. @Anon
    Seriously, fuck Harry Potter and anyone who writes/comments about it. :)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jake, @SFG

    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction. The gimmick of releasing a new book every year so Harry grows up with the reader is quite clever.

    That it’s become an annoying example of liberal infantilism is another story. Even Tolkien complained about ‘my deplorable cultus’. I like to say us gen-X science fiction nerds had the sense to be embarassed about it, but the past is a foreign country, after all.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    The world-building is terrible, and as for being "well-written".....


    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

     


    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.
     

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.
     

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

     


    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Kronos

    , @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    Try comparing Rowling to genuine masters like Kipling (Rewards and Fairies, Puck of Pook's Hill, The Jungle Book , The Second Jungle Book ) Twain (Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn), Lewis Carroll (the Alice books), Madeleine L'Engle (A Wrinkle in Time) and Ursula K. Le Guin (A Wizard of Earthsea).

    Replies: @Anonymous

  17. @Buzz Mohawk
    This really matters.

    It is reminiscent of the time in the 1970s when Scientific American published an extensive math exercise about whether or not it was better to run inside to get out of the rain, or to walk slowly. You know, when would the least number of raindrops hit you? We middle school geniuses read it.

    This is that kind of important intellectual exercise.

    Replies: @Flip, @Redneck farmer, @kihowi, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Almost an autism test, that question. It’s not important the exact volume of liquid you get on you, what’s important is that you want to be in the rain for as short a time as possible.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @kihowi


    what’s important is that you want to be in the rain for as short a time as possible
     
    Surely what's important - the reason you don't want to be 'in the rain' - is that generally being wet is worse than being dry.

    Personally I don't give a fuck because I'm not made of soluble Aspirin, but women and effeminate men might not like getting their shoulder-pads wet or some shit.

    If the situation is configured so that crossing some distance at running speed makes you wetter than doing the same distance at walking speed (because at higher speed you intercept more raindrops than you would if you walked), walking is worse.

    So you're in the rain for a shorter time, but you made the rain artificially worse in the sense that there were more raindrops per unit area (of you) per unit time.

    I'm pretty sure "Mythbusters" did a small-N trial of this and found that there was fuck-all difference (unlike their small-N trial of hot-air hand-dryers vs paper towels, which seems to have coinciuded with Peak Hand-Dryer).

    I walk even if it's sheeting down, because it makes a nice contrast.

  18. Ronald A. Fisher, not Richard

  19. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Why do people say such nonsense? It may require native intelligence to become a (good) doctor, lawyer, or engineer, but there’s still lots of shit you have to learn in order to actually become one.

    There were plenty of very smart people around a thousand years ago, but none of them knew how to build a computer or calculate a derivative. Humans first had to develop that knowledge, and then others had to learn it. Learning often requires a teacher and teachers often work at schools.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Wilkey

    Yeah, that's true, but wizardry is just fiction, so it could be whatever the author decided it to be.

    I liked Bewitched better, with the beautiful Elizabeth Montgomery, and a memorable Agnes Moorehead.

  20. The entire premise is false. Any young males with the powers attributed to these wizards would, in short order, impregnate all available muggle females and eliminate the muggle genes entirely. How many generations it would take is open to speculation.

    This actually happened. The Neanderthals are all gone now, but traces live on in modern European man.

    Any mutation favoring one person over another in the reproductive sweepstakes, will result in race replacement over time.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @HallParvey

    Neanderthal ancestry in Europeans is 25-30% lower than it is in East Asians and Australian Aboriginals. The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.

    Admixture from Denisovans also appears to have been largely male-mediated...


    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258056301_Did_the_Denisovans_Cross_Wallace's_Line


    flow from the Denisovans is suggested by genomic evidence to have been largely male-mediated, giving some clues about the bature of the interactions
     

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Anonymous

  21. O/T…

    PragerU recently released the Youtube video, If You Hate Israel, You’re No Friend of the Jews, which goes over standard Blood & Soil arguments justifying the existence of Israel, then makes standard Zionist arguments that Israel is similar to any other country, like Italy, so it’s anti-Semitic to single it out.

    But PragerU made one mistake…they forgot to turn off the comments. A sampling:

    “Remember when Italian run NGO’s were facillitating the invasion of Europe and the US by third world migrants? Yeah, me neither”

    “You’re an Anti-Semite. Please donate.”

    “Haven’t seen this much red-pilling since Epstein didn’t kill himself and Gillette declared war on biological males.”

    “Did you know that Taylor Swift has a dirty secret? Google “Dancing Israelis”.”

    “To find out who rules over you, buy Mel Gibson a drink” – Old Polish Proverb

    • Replies: @BB753
    @anonymous guest

    I couldn't find Taylor Swift 's versión! Anyhow, here's a cover of the "Dancing Israelis" :
    https://youtu.be/lrzMwGcchmE

  22. Harry Potter just like Star Wars is dead culture. Nobody gives a shite. A product of the “gay 2000s”… despised by all.

    And good riddance!

  23. i hope to see JK back in a bennies line in Londonistan. JP Watson

    https://summit.news/2019/12/20/jk-rowling-is-cancelled/

  24. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline.

    Yes, I have watched part of a Potter movie and read part of a book, but it never seemed to me to make any sense, or even to be entertaining.

    At least James Bond villains seem to have had some kind of plausible motivation, like the desire to control the solar system, but the bad wizards seem to just be born bad without any real definition of what is bad.

    Rowling may have been slightly influenced by the incredibly popular British author Enid Blyton, whose Famous Five series deals with four boarding-school children and a dog who spend their school vacations camping in the countryside and running down criminal gangs. One of the girls is a preoperative transexual,

    The twist is that the children have been given the magical powers that all children wish they could have.

    Maybe I have not read enough to really get the point, but I think JK Rowling has been cackling all the way to the bank, and not in a nice way.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Jonathan Mason

    Maybe I have not read enough to really get the point, but I think JK Rowling has been cackling all the way to the bank, and not in a nice way.

    She was a bit left-wing for my tastes, but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don't see a problem there.

    I mean, it synthesizes the British school story with the modern high fantasy novel, so it is kind of something new. It's better written than Fifty Shades of Grey.

  25. @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo


    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline.
     
    Yes, I have watched part of a Potter movie and read part of a book, but it never seemed to me to make any sense, or even to be entertaining.

    At least James Bond villains seem to have had some kind of plausible motivation, like the desire to control the solar system, but the bad wizards seem to just be born bad without any real definition of what is bad.

    Rowling may have been slightly influenced by the incredibly popular British author Enid Blyton, whose Famous Five series deals with four boarding-school children and a dog who spend their school vacations camping in the countryside and running down criminal gangs. One of the girls is a preoperative transexual,

    The twist is that the children have been given the magical powers that all children wish they could have.

    Maybe I have not read enough to really get the point, but I think JK Rowling has been cackling all the way to the bank, and not in a nice way.

    Replies: @SFG

    Maybe I have not read enough to really get the point, but I think JK Rowling has been cackling all the way to the bank, and not in a nice way.

    She was a bit left-wing for my tastes, but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.

    I mean, it synthesizes the British school story with the modern high fantasy novel, so it is kind of something new. It’s better written than Fifty Shades of Grey.

  26. Harry Potter ‘s fiction is too complex for kids and too low I. Q. for grown-ups. I never got it. Plus, I find its occultic deep meaning unhealthy.

  27. Glad to read this, Mr. Sailer. I read two of the Potter books, mostly standing up in airport bookstores. I was displeased by the vicious description of the foster parents of Harry (basically fat, stupid proles) and also by the fact that Harry’s greatness was inborn. This second aspect made the series repellent to me, as it seemed to be wish-fulfillment squared: the audience was basically invited to adopt a “we’re better than you” attitude from the start, absent any doubt or real challenge.

    • Replies: @anon
    @tono bungay

    Harry’s greatness was inborn. This second aspect made the series repellent to me, as it seemed to be wish-fulfillment squared: the audience was basically invited to adopt a “we’re better than you” attitude from the start, absent any doubt or real challenge.

    They are "secret kings". Just like Rey in the latest $tar War$, they just "are" and do not have to actually do anything to be special. Now, is anyone surprised the SJW's luv them so Hairy Potter?


    Hairy Potter fan told Rowling doesn't believe men in dresses are women.

    https://media.giphy.com/media/o6SQRR0Etm90Y/giphy.gif

  28. Is there a concise comparison of the racism elements in Harry Potter versus Lord of the Rings? This might be a good measure of progress (so-called) and stasis. I’m guessing it’s stasis all the way but I am prejudiced.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Morton's toes

    It is clearcut decline.

    Orcs aren't a different race, they're twisted elves. But there aren't any orcish characters, unlike Rowling. Neither story is about race in any case.

    "Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus?

    Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?

    What if God, willing to shew his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction:

    And that he might make known the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory,

    Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles?"

  29. @Wilkey
    @Dumbo


    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.
     
    Why do people say such nonsense? It may require native intelligence to become a (good) doctor, lawyer, or engineer, but there’s still lots of shit you have to learn in order to actually become one.

    There were plenty of very smart people around a thousand years ago, but none of them knew how to build a computer or calculate a derivative. Humans first had to develop that knowledge, and then others had to learn it. Learning often requires a teacher and teachers often work at schools.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    Yeah, that’s true, but wizardry is just fiction, so it could be whatever the author decided it to be.

    I liked Bewitched better, with the beautiful Elizabeth Montgomery, and a memorable Agnes Moorehead.

  30. Don’t know any youngsters
    who read these books read
    anything other than adventure.
    Kids love wizards, magic, nonsense.

    Merlin still popular.

    As are End Times, Rapture, Darby,
    Scofield, Red Heifer, Israel.

    Maybe, when they get to college
    they will have assignments that
    will mess up their minds.

    5ds

  31. There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Thea


    There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.
     
    Where can one learn what these handful of story arcs are?

    Replies: @Lurker, @Futurethirdworlder

  32. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    I watched most of the movies and they all had the same plot; two new adult characters show up at the wizard school. The one you think will be bad turns out to be good and vice versa.

    I’ve never read Dianna Wynn-Jones but I remember John Dolan making the case that Rowling stole a lot of her shtick from her.

    Harry Potter and the Dr. Who reboot are the favored escapism of nerdy SJWs. Barf.

    • Agree: jim jones
  33. ….but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.

    I think it is all marketing hype and probably millions of people who bought the books or had the books bought for them did not actually read the books, although I do understand that initially, at least, they were very popular with young readers.

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    However she seems to be on a level with the books of Enid Blyton (not very well known in the US) who has sold 600 million books and been translated into 90 languages, but never considered to be a good writer on the level of, say E. Nesbit or C.S. Lewis or Tolkien.

    Nesbit’s books are delicious, because they can be read at two levels, both for the children who are having the story read to them, and the sly humor directed at the adult reader. In Five Children and It, for example, the children have access to magic powers, but when their wishes are granted they always go wrong in subtle ways.

    I wonder if Rowling’s books will hold up as classics a hundred years from now. I suspect not.

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The same reason as why Downton Abbey and Outlander are more popular in the US than in England or Scotland. But Harry Potter was a huge deal in Britain.

    Replies: @Stick, @Thea

    , @Desiderius
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US
     
    Because we remain more than half British - in bone, soul, law, custom, and culture. It takes more than a mere five or ten generations to make a man.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Wilkey
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Lurker

    , @Gabe Ruth
    @Jonathan Mason

    Can't remember where I read it, some alt-right type claims it's basically a demonstration of the power of marketing to children. Scholastic, the publishing company, bought the rights early, and they have privileged access through school distributed catalogs.

  34. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    “If [intelligence] is genetic then the whole point of schools is moot.”

    What?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @James J. O'Meara

    Keep in mind the traditional purpose of education (pre-1954) was to rank student IQ ability, not create the illusion of value added cognitive ability. It’s not like every baby is born at zero IQ and each grade adds ten points over time. (The Coleman Report and all empirical evidence discredits that notion.)

    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons. Not that in enlightens any juvenile delinquents but in terms of a cheaper storage facility. The mass closing of mental institutions in the 1970s-1980s was a massive disaster. Not that they could cure low IQ/mental illness but provided some safety and personal order. The unleashed level of crime, homelessness and drug-abuse was horrific. In LA, the high IQ rich kids might be alright during a “school abolition” but having black underclass kids running about would create a hellscape.

    https://youtu.be/NgrM4_JMi9w

    The true foundations of contemporary education is to:

    1) Form an absolute minimum of education knowledge if possible (they gotta learn how to read somewhere.)

    2) Child Daycare (Feminists complain about access to cheap and quality daycare, but by god they got it already. They just don’t provide services on weekends.)

    3) Provide employment opportunities for adults (it’s a big one.)

    But yeah, education is the hot secretary that can’t type or work a damn. Yet, she miraculously keeps her job while developing curious rug burns on her knees.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  35. @SFG
    @Anon

    It's a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction. The gimmick of releasing a new book every year so Harry grows up with the reader is quite clever.

    That it's become an annoying example of liberal infantilism is another story. Even Tolkien complained about 'my deplorable cultus'. I like to say us gen-X science fiction nerds had the sense to be embarassed about it, but the past is a foreign country, after all.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux

    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.

    The world-building is terrible, and as for being “well-written”…..

    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @syonredux

    It's sophomoric, which is better than average for female writers, since they mature so much earlier than men, typically around twelve or thirteen. It's some small grace that Rowling's world is the product of a sixteen-year-old mind, rather than a twelve.

    I'd say the incessant Manichaeism is the twelve, the predictable flips between goodies and baddies the sixteen.

    , @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    She refuses to believe Harry Potter can be Harry Pooter.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @SFG
    @syonredux

    I mean, they're well-written for pop fiction.

    If you're going to compare them to Kipling and Twain, well, that's another story.

    , @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

  36. @SFG
    @Anon

    It's a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction. The gimmick of releasing a new book every year so Harry grows up with the reader is quite clever.

    That it's become an annoying example of liberal infantilism is another story. Even Tolkien complained about 'my deplorable cultus'. I like to say us gen-X science fiction nerds had the sense to be embarassed about it, but the past is a foreign country, after all.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux

    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.

    Try comparing Rowling to genuine masters like Kipling (Rewards and Fairies, Puck of Pook’s Hill, The Jungle Book , The Second Jungle Book ) Twain (Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn), Lewis Carroll (the Alice books), Madeleine L’Engle (A Wrinkle in Time) and Ursula K. Le Guin (A Wizard of Earthsea).

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Success of HARRY POTTER and DOWNTON ABBEY, especially among progs, suggest something odd.

    Progs push decadence and degeneracy but love these stories set in rather staid, respectable, and controlled environments. They talk of 'progress' but look back nostalgically to a simpler time. Though I don't know the time and setting of HARRY POTTER, it seems rather old-fashioned. A boarding school with masters and the like. Even the homo stuff in POTTER is kept under lid. While someone might be 'gay', they don't have massive 'pride' parades with half-naked freaks.

    It's as if the progs want it both ways. They want more decadence as 'progress' but also long for 'dignity' and 'manners'. HARRY POTTER seems to offer something for everyone. It has some 'woke' stuff but is also about hierarchy and discipline.

    It also made witchcraft into something safe and 'bourgeois'. Instead of battling the witches, the heroes are witchlings or witchkins, but they use dark magic for good.

    Haven't read it and don't want to and just watched 15 min of one movie before turning it off. But it's not hard to understand the appeal. Just like the Beatles made rock safe for adults, HARRY POTTER made 'dark' and 'edgy' stuff gentle and kind for kibblers and their parents.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

  37. @Jonathan Mason

    ....but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.
     
    I think it is all marketing hype and probably millions of people who bought the books or had the books bought for them did not actually read the books, although I do understand that initially, at least, they were very popular with young readers.

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    However she seems to be on a level with the books of Enid Blyton (not very well known in the US) who has sold 600 million books and been translated into 90 languages, but never considered to be a good writer on the level of, say E. Nesbit or C.S. Lewis or Tolkien.

    Nesbit's books are delicious, because they can be read at two levels, both for the children who are having the story read to them, and the sly humor directed at the adult reader. In Five Children and It, for example, the children have access to magic powers, but when their wishes are granted they always go wrong in subtle ways.

    I wonder if Rowling's books will hold up as classics a hundred years from now. I suspect not.

    Replies: @Altai, @Desiderius, @Wilkey, @Gabe Ruth

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    The same reason as why Downton Abbey and Outlander are more popular in the US than in England or Scotland. But Harry Potter was a huge deal in Britain.

    • Replies: @Stick
    @Altai

    The reason Harry caught on in the states is because he was cast as John Lennon’s Mini Me.

    , @Thea
    @Altai

    It’s also a great mystery that Def Leppard’s Pyromania never caught on in their native land while filling every stadium here.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  38. @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    The world-building is terrible, and as for being "well-written".....


    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

     


    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.
     

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.
     

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

     


    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Kronos

    It’s sophomoric, which is better than average for female writers, since they mature so much earlier than men, typically around twelve or thirteen. It’s some small grace that Rowling’s world is the product of a sixteen-year-old mind, rather than a twelve.

    I’d say the incessant Manichaeism is the twelve, the predictable flips between goodies and baddies the sixteen.

  39. Hermione’s family tree is confusing.

    London cast 1. (I think Ron needs a paternity test here.)

    London cast 2. (I think Ron realises he is a stepdad here and his expression/touching is not okay)

    San Fransisco cast. (I don’t think this Ron is bothered about not being the father here…)

    New York cast. (Again, why is the daughter never mixed race?)

    Melbourne cast. (A testament to how few black people there are in Australia that they couldn’t go as dark as they apparently want)

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Altai

    Who are these people supposed to be?

    Replies: @Altai

    , @Lurker
    @Altai

    San Francisco cast: If that's not gay face I d0nt know what is.

    New York cast: Sure this is not a Munsters stage play?

    , @sb
    @Altai

    Well ,speaking as a Melbournian , there are Africans in Melbourne ( best known of course for their eccessive crime activity ) but you would need a very large population of same in order to find any capable of half decent acting


    Speaking of Harry Potter the appeal of English boarding school tales has long been a feature of British (and Commonwealth ) children's literature .I read many myself when young .I didn't think this was true of American child literature but my knowledge of this is scant (I did read some Hardy Boys but my favourite American kids books were the Adventure books by Willard Price )

  40. @Jonathan Mason

    ....but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.
     
    I think it is all marketing hype and probably millions of people who bought the books or had the books bought for them did not actually read the books, although I do understand that initially, at least, they were very popular with young readers.

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    However she seems to be on a level with the books of Enid Blyton (not very well known in the US) who has sold 600 million books and been translated into 90 languages, but never considered to be a good writer on the level of, say E. Nesbit or C.S. Lewis or Tolkien.

    Nesbit's books are delicious, because they can be read at two levels, both for the children who are having the story read to them, and the sly humor directed at the adult reader. In Five Children and It, for example, the children have access to magic powers, but when their wishes are granted they always go wrong in subtle ways.

    I wonder if Rowling's books will hold up as classics a hundred years from now. I suspect not.

    Replies: @Altai, @Desiderius, @Wilkey, @Gabe Ruth

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US

    Because we remain more than half British – in bone, soul, law, custom, and culture. It takes more than a mere five or ten generations to make a man.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Desiderius

    We're more British than the British, or more accurately, we more represent the yeoman farmer strain of Englishness that made the English, and hence British , governance what it was, than remains on the dentally challenged lilly pad itself. It's the same strain that made the Roman farmer-soldier-statesman of the Republic noble and which was subsumed utterly when Rome went from republic to empire.

    We are degenerate, of course, but less so than what remains in Britain itself.

  41. There’s been a real decline in the quality of kid’s popular fiction in my lifetime. Compare this stupid Potter wizards-and-magic crap with a serious mythos like Star Wars. There’s no comparison.

  42. I remember sitting in first class on a domestic flight in the early 2000s, and several of the businessmen seated around me were reading Harry Potter. They must have been trying to figure out what all the fuss was about.

    They inspired me to pick up the first book, but I could not endure it.

    If it were published today, it would not get nearly as much attention because it’s not sufficiently political. I couldn’t believe the titles I saw featured in the “young adult” section at a suburban bookstore last week.

  43. @Thea
    There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.

    Where can one learn what these handful of story arcs are?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Anonymous

    This may help:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hero_with_a_Thousand_Faces

    , @Futurethirdworlder
    @Anonymous

    Kurt vonnegut explains
    https://youtu.be/GOGru_4z1Vc

  44. @Morton's toes
    Is there a concise comparison of the racism elements in Harry Potter versus Lord of the Rings? This might be a good measure of progress (so-called) and stasis. I'm guessing it's stasis all the way but I am prejudiced.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    It is clearcut decline.

    Orcs aren’t a different race, they’re twisted elves. But there aren’t any orcish characters, unlike Rowling. Neither story is about race in any case.

    “Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus?

    Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?

    What if God, willing to shew his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction:

    And that he might make known the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory,

    Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles?”

  45. @Anonymous
    @Thea


    There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.
     
    Where can one learn what these handful of story arcs are?

    Replies: @Lurker, @Futurethirdworlder

  46. @anonymous guest
    O/T...

    PragerU recently released the Youtube video, If You Hate Israel, You're No Friend of the Jews, which goes over standard Blood & Soil arguments justifying the existence of Israel, then makes standard Zionist arguments that Israel is similar to any other country, like Italy, so it's anti-Semitic to single it out.

    But PragerU made one mistake...they forgot to turn off the comments. A sampling:

    - “Remember when Italian run NGO's were facillitating the invasion of Europe and the US by third world migrants? Yeah, me neither”

    - “You’re an Anti-Semite. Please donate.”

    - "Haven't seen this much red-pilling since Epstein didn't kill himself and Gillette declared war on biological males."

    - “Did you know that Taylor Swift has a dirty secret? Google “Dancing Israelis”.”

    - "To find out who rules over you, buy Mel Gibson a drink" - Old Polish Proverb

    Replies: @BB753

    I couldn’t find Taylor Swift ‘s versión! Anyhow, here’s a cover of the “Dancing Israelis” :

  47. The Democrat Push for Civil War: VA AG says he will not “recognize” sanctuary counties and will aggressively prosecute every single citizen and law enforcement officer who allows themselves a failure of revolutionary consciousness.
    How does this not end in killing? How is this not the same thing as going to a Muslim country and demanding that everybody renounce Islam?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginia-ag-herring-second-amendment-sanctuary-proclamations-have-no-force/2019/12/20/5f7adcb2-234b-11ea-a153-dce4b94e4249_story.html

  48. @Altai
    Hermione's family tree is confusing.

    London cast 1. (I think Ron needs a paternity test here.)
    http://www.the-leaky-cauldron.org/wp-content/uploads/assets/HP_20558_Weasley_Granger_FL.jpg

    London cast 2. (I think Ron realises he is a stepdad here and his expression/touching is not okay)
    https://www.whatsonstage.com/s/wos-photos-production/114911.jpg

    San Fransisco cast. (I don't think this Ron is bothered about not being the father here...)
    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/potter-1010-03.jpg?w=620

    New York cast. (Again, why is the daughter never mixed race?)
    https://ewedit.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/04.-hpcc_grangerweasleyfamily_photo-by-matthew-murphy.jpg?w=2000&h=2000

    Melbourne cast. (A testament to how few black people there are in Australia that they couldn't go as dark as they apparently want)
    https://media.timeout.com/images/105286179/630/472/image.jpg

    Replies: @TWS, @Lurker, @sb

    Who are these people supposed to be?

    • Replies: @Altai
    @TWS

    They've made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  49. @Altai
    Hermione's family tree is confusing.

    London cast 1. (I think Ron needs a paternity test here.)
    http://www.the-leaky-cauldron.org/wp-content/uploads/assets/HP_20558_Weasley_Granger_FL.jpg

    London cast 2. (I think Ron realises he is a stepdad here and his expression/touching is not okay)
    https://www.whatsonstage.com/s/wos-photos-production/114911.jpg

    San Fransisco cast. (I don't think this Ron is bothered about not being the father here...)
    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/potter-1010-03.jpg?w=620

    New York cast. (Again, why is the daughter never mixed race?)
    https://ewedit.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/04.-hpcc_grangerweasleyfamily_photo-by-matthew-murphy.jpg?w=2000&h=2000

    Melbourne cast. (A testament to how few black people there are in Australia that they couldn't go as dark as they apparently want)
    https://media.timeout.com/images/105286179/630/472/image.jpg

    Replies: @TWS, @Lurker, @sb

    San Francisco cast: If that’s not gay face I d0nt know what is.

    New York cast: Sure this is not a Munsters stage play?

  50. @Anonymous
    Go Trannies. They are messing things up from the inside.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @bigdicknick

    Will J.K. Rowling stand by her principles or, more, likely will she surrender to the PC crowd? IOW, how soon until Hagrid becomes a “woman”?

  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    This really matters.

    It is reminiscent of the time in the 1970s when Scientific American published an extensive math exercise about whether or not it was better to run inside to get out of the rain, or to walk slowly. You know, when would the least number of raindrops hit you? We middle school geniuses read it.

    This is that kind of important intellectual exercise.

    Replies: @Flip, @Redneck farmer, @kihowi, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Must learn walk between raindrops, Daniel-san. Look sky. Or maybe Totes will devise a wormhole virtual-umbrella app for your iStupid which will circumvent weather, asteroids, rape, repo men, g-men, spouses, neighbors, cancer, microaggressions, etc.

    Seriously, it will be nice when the West experiences a mass renaissance, where adults once again are not taken with childish pursuits.

  52. @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    The world-building is terrible, and as for being "well-written".....


    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

     


    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.
     

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.
     

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

     


    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Kronos

    She refuses to believe Harry Potter can be Harry Pooter.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Anonymous

    Harry Poofter?

  53. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    Try comparing Rowling to genuine masters like Kipling (Rewards and Fairies, Puck of Pook's Hill, The Jungle Book , The Second Jungle Book ) Twain (Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn), Lewis Carroll (the Alice books), Madeleine L'Engle (A Wrinkle in Time) and Ursula K. Le Guin (A Wizard of Earthsea).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Success of HARRY POTTER and DOWNTON ABBEY, especially among progs, suggest something odd.

    Progs push decadence and degeneracy but love these stories set in rather staid, respectable, and controlled environments. They talk of ‘progress’ but look back nostalgically to a simpler time. Though I don’t know the time and setting of HARRY POTTER, it seems rather old-fashioned. A boarding school with masters and the like. Even the homo stuff in POTTER is kept under lid. While someone might be ‘gay’, they don’t have massive ‘pride’ parades with half-naked freaks.

    It’s as if the progs want it both ways. They want more decadence as ‘progress’ but also long for ‘dignity’ and ‘manners’. HARRY POTTER seems to offer something for everyone. It has some ‘woke’ stuff but is also about hierarchy and discipline.

    It also made witchcraft into something safe and ‘bourgeois’. Instead of battling the witches, the heroes are witchlings or witchkins, but they use dark magic for good.

    Haven’t read it and don’t want to and just watched 15 min of one movie before turning it off. But it’s not hard to understand the appeal. Just like the Beatles made rock safe for adults, HARRY POTTER made ‘dark’ and ‘edgy’ stuff gentle and kind for kibblers and their parents.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Anonymous

    Progs like British stuff because of the class system.

  54. @James J. O'Meara
    @Dumbo

    "If [intelligence] is genetic then the whole point of schools is moot."

    What?

    Replies: @Kronos

    Keep in mind the traditional purpose of education (pre-1954) was to rank student IQ ability, not create the illusion of value added cognitive ability. It’s not like every baby is born at zero IQ and each grade adds ten points over time. (The Coleman Report and all empirical evidence discredits that notion.)

    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons. Not that in enlightens any juvenile delinquents but in terms of a cheaper storage facility. The mass closing of mental institutions in the 1970s-1980s was a massive disaster. Not that they could cure low IQ/mental illness but provided some safety and personal order. The unleashed level of crime, homelessness and drug-abuse was horrific. In LA, the high IQ rich kids might be alright during a “school abolition” but having black underclass kids running about would create a hellscape.

    The true foundations of contemporary education is to:

    1) Form an absolute minimum of education knowledge if possible (they gotta learn how to read somewhere.)

    2) Child Daycare (Feminists complain about access to cheap and quality daycare, but by god they got it already. They just don’t provide services on weekends.)

    3) Provide employment opportunities for adults (it’s a big one.)

    But yeah, education is the hot secretary that can’t type or work a damn. Yet, she miraculously keeps her job while developing curious rug burns on her knees.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Kronos


    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons.
     
    Education provides the raw material on which an intelligent mind can act. An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas. True that it’s silly to think that you can turn a Ford Focus into a Ferrari just by adding more gas, but neither the Ford nor the Ferrari are going to get anywhere without some gas.

    Even the greatest minds need some type of education, formal or otherwise. Newton, Einstein, and Euler made huge additions to our body of knowledge, but they only did so by learning what we already knew and then extending that knowledge even further. None of them started from zero.

    Arguing against the need for an education system is like arguing against the need for governments, borders, or private property. Show me the society that thrives without one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos

  55. Don’t you mean Ronald Fisher not Richard?

  56. @Ray P
    Again ironic that Portugal has been very mixed-race since four hundred years, far more than Rowling's UK. The Salazar legacy regime fell to the socialists in a 1974 peaceful Carnation revolution. Her Portuguese husband worked in tv - a very left-wing institution and is unlikely to have secretly supported Salazar by 1990. The pair bonded over mutual passion for Jane Austen. She must've been his fair English rose like the books!

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    Portugal has been very mixed-race since four hundred years

    Yay, slavery!

  57. Can “the end of serial killing” survive the drowning of American society, that is, the legal privileging of extreme high risk antisocial minorities?
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/27/us/transgender-women-deaths.html
    A masked serial killer who exclusively targets trannies has already claimed eighteen victims.

  58. Despite featuring a boy wizard protagonist, the Harry Potter fanbase seems to consist mainly of girls and women. The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    The funniest thing about 50 Shades is it's a ripoff of the big female-targeting erotic product of some decades begfore, Nine And A Half Weeks, down to the name of the male character ("Gray").

    Replies: @miss marple

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:
     
    I doubt if men are reading better stuff. Indeed, many don't read at all and just play video games.

    A culture without inhibitions has freed men and women from cultural aspirations. They are fully content with what their reptilian brains(usually male) or amphibian brains(usually female) like.

    But if millennial boys and girls have one thing in common, it seems they've been Pixarized in speech. They talk like characters in CGI animation. All gushy-wushy.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=my+favorite+books&page=&utm_source=opensearch

    Replies: @Desiderius

  59. anon[816] • Disclaimer says:
    @tono bungay
    Glad to read this, Mr. Sailer. I read two of the Potter books, mostly standing up in airport bookstores. I was displeased by the vicious description of the foster parents of Harry (basically fat, stupid proles) and also by the fact that Harry's greatness was inborn. This second aspect made the series repellent to me, as it seemed to be wish-fulfillment squared: the audience was basically invited to adopt a "we're better than you" attitude from the start, absent any doubt or real challenge.

    Replies: @anon

    Harry’s greatness was inborn. This second aspect made the series repellent to me, as it seemed to be wish-fulfillment squared: the audience was basically invited to adopt a “we’re better than you” attitude from the start, absent any doubt or real challenge.

    They are “secret kings”. Just like Rey in the latest $tar War$, they just “are” and do not have to actually do anything to be special. Now, is anyone surprised the SJW’s luv them so Hairy Potter?

    Hairy Potter fan told Rowling doesn’t believe men in dresses are women.

  60. @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    The world-building is terrible, and as for being "well-written".....


    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

     


    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.
     

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.
     

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

     


    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Kronos

    I mean, they’re well-written for pop fiction.

    If you’re going to compare them to Kipling and Twain, well, that’s another story.

    • Agree: Kronos
  61. Not quite the topic, but- Bloom was right:
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB963270836801555352

    Can 35 Million Book Buyers Be Wrong? Yes.

    • Replies: @Stick
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon, Bloom thought Phillip Roth was Nobel material. Clearly Bloom can be wrong even though I agree with his opinion on this.

    , @Stick
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Bardon, Bloom thought Phillip Roth was Nobel material. Clearly Bloom can be wrong even though I agree with his opinion on this.

  62. the Cambridge Eugenics Society in 1910, along with Horace Darwin, Richard A. Fisher, and John Maynard Keynes.

    In the long run, we are all recessive?

  63. The irony of Voldemort’s obsession with blood purity was of course that he himself was a half blood. I guess the real world analogy would be the most militant black activists being the lighter-skinned ones.

  64. @Altai
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The same reason as why Downton Abbey and Outlander are more popular in the US than in England or Scotland. But Harry Potter was a huge deal in Britain.

    Replies: @Stick, @Thea

    The reason Harry caught on in the states is because he was cast as John Lennon’s Mini Me.

  65. @Bardon Kaldian
    Not quite the topic, but- Bloom was right:
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB963270836801555352

    Can 35 Million Book Buyers Be Wrong? Yes.

    Replies: @Stick, @Stick

    Bardon, Bloom thought Phillip Roth was Nobel material. Clearly Bloom can be wrong even though I agree with his opinion on this.

    • Agree: Pheasant
  66. @Bardon Kaldian
    Not quite the topic, but- Bloom was right:
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB963270836801555352

    Can 35 Million Book Buyers Be Wrong? Yes.

    Replies: @Stick, @Stick

    Bardon, Bloom thought Phillip Roth was Nobel material. Clearly Bloom can be wrong even though I agree with his opinion on this.

  67. @Anonymous
    Go Trannies. They are messing things up from the inside.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @bigdicknick

    Trannies are sort of like the blacks of gender.
    The left courts them, but they kind of become bad optics if you give randomly selected members of the group screen time.

  68. @Jonathan Mason

    ....but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.
     
    I think it is all marketing hype and probably millions of people who bought the books or had the books bought for them did not actually read the books, although I do understand that initially, at least, they were very popular with young readers.

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    However she seems to be on a level with the books of Enid Blyton (not very well known in the US) who has sold 600 million books and been translated into 90 languages, but never considered to be a good writer on the level of, say E. Nesbit or C.S. Lewis or Tolkien.

    Nesbit's books are delicious, because they can be read at two levels, both for the children who are having the story read to them, and the sly humor directed at the adult reader. In Five Children and It, for example, the children have access to magic powers, but when their wishes are granted they always go wrong in subtle ways.

    I wonder if Rowling's books will hold up as classics a hundred years from now. I suspect not.

    Replies: @Altai, @Desiderius, @Wilkey, @Gabe Ruth

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Wilkey

    https://youtu.be/SXYuPMsThYs

    , @Lurker
    @Wilkey


    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?
     
    By then the US will look like Mexico, 'America' and 'Britain' will no longer exist.
  69. @TWS
    @Altai

    Who are these people supposed to be?

    Replies: @Altai

    They’ve made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Altai


    They’ve made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.
     
    So the Westermarck Effect isn't present in wizards?


    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/WestermarckEffect

    Replies: @Lurker

  70. @Jake
    This wizard or muggle status that is hereditary through genetics is merely another fictional take on promoting a tenet that has always been central to WASP culture: the precious few Elites who must rule, especially in secret (say, Deep State).

    Back in the last century, a bunch of us grad students across 3 or 4 disciplines were encouraged to attend a symposium by 3 Brit academics on tour in the American provinces (one of whom was of seemingly pure Indian sub-continent heritage). Their focus was the coming end of racism from globalism And they asserted that the Brit Empire had begun and nurture that process, which was to create the best possible world of fairness ever!

    Their proof that the Brit Empire served goals opposite those of racists was that the Brit Empire always acted to locate and nurture local elites, including preparing them to study at Elite English schools. The original WASP Empire acted in such a way, the white one, who was the only one self-identified as conservative, said that it set standards of anti-racism by acknowledging that the vast majority of whites could never be Elite in any meaningful sense, while every other race had Elites.

    As with the white natives of the British Isles, there were Elites scattered among all the blacks, browns, and yellows, and a main purpose of the Brit WASP Elites was to find and nurture and elevate those non-white Elites.

    That means, of course, that the vast majority of whites native to the British Isles are assumed to be white trash. And white trash causes trouble for all the Elites.

    Wizards and Muggles.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Their proof that the Brit Empire served goals opposite those of racists was that the Brit Empire always acted to locate and nurture local elites, including preparing them to study at Elite English schools.

    Those elites also posed the biggest threat to British occupation. Better to bring them info fold than have them starting trouble. The Soviet Union made it a habit to cultivate the best and brightest of a country so to avoid them creating insurgencies and playing the Soviet Union against the United States.

  71. @Anonymous
    @Thea


    There are only a few stories and we just keep retelling the same plot in updated settings. Movies as well all follow one of a handful of story arcs.
     
    Where can one learn what these handful of story arcs are?

    Replies: @Lurker, @Futurethirdworlder

    Kurt vonnegut explains

  72. @Kronos
    @James J. O'Meara

    Keep in mind the traditional purpose of education (pre-1954) was to rank student IQ ability, not create the illusion of value added cognitive ability. It’s not like every baby is born at zero IQ and each grade adds ten points over time. (The Coleman Report and all empirical evidence discredits that notion.)

    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons. Not that in enlightens any juvenile delinquents but in terms of a cheaper storage facility. The mass closing of mental institutions in the 1970s-1980s was a massive disaster. Not that they could cure low IQ/mental illness but provided some safety and personal order. The unleashed level of crime, homelessness and drug-abuse was horrific. In LA, the high IQ rich kids might be alright during a “school abolition” but having black underclass kids running about would create a hellscape.

    https://youtu.be/NgrM4_JMi9w

    The true foundations of contemporary education is to:

    1) Form an absolute minimum of education knowledge if possible (they gotta learn how to read somewhere.)

    2) Child Daycare (Feminists complain about access to cheap and quality daycare, but by god they got it already. They just don’t provide services on weekends.)

    3) Provide employment opportunities for adults (it’s a big one.)

    But yeah, education is the hot secretary that can’t type or work a damn. Yet, she miraculously keeps her job while developing curious rug burns on her knees.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons.

    Education provides the raw material on which an intelligent mind can act. An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas. True that it’s silly to think that you can turn a Ford Focus into a Ferrari just by adding more gas, but neither the Ford nor the Ferrari are going to get anywhere without some gas.

    Even the greatest minds need some type of education, formal or otherwise. Newton, Einstein, and Euler made huge additions to our body of knowledge, but they only did so by learning what we already knew and then extending that knowledge even further. None of them started from zero.

    Arguing against the need for an education system is like arguing against the need for governments, borders, or private property. Show me the society that thrives without one.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas.
     
    No, with plenty of gas, but no steering wheel. And sketchy brakes. It's dangerous.

    A vehicle with an empty tank is benign.

    , @Kronos
    @Wilkey

    Perhaps my language was a bit sloppy. I should’ve made a careful distinction between education and school system. Education regardless if self-taught, by a parent, or a teacher can be beneficial. Instruction can provide rapid progress in procuring the desired knowedge/skill set. That stuff is mainly self evident. I’d hate to contemplate how many times humanity reinvented the wheel because that knowledge couldn’t be retained and gradually improved. (Rock wheels suck, wheels with air and rubber are much better.) the creation of the printing press was likely the most important technological advancement of all time. Because it made idea dissemination and education that much easier.

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6aFsXzUCQz4/VjQn5Vx1hBI/AAAAAAAAAKw/_LQN3omLXv8/s1600/ArchaeoDiscoveries24.jpg

    The brunt of my criticism is at the contemporary US school system(s) and indirectly at the US Supreme Court (I’m looking at you Earl Warren.) Mainly in regards to sacrificing high IQ students for empirically pointless “War on Poverty” operations. (Not to mention that the false “cognitive equality” facade helped justify the offshoring of million of jobs. Apparently you really cant retool 105 IQ steel workers into 180+ IQ hedge fund managers. At least not yet.)

    These problems are historical in nature and based on policy makers and organizations that operated on very bad premises. (That IQ was overwhelmingly environmental, not genetic.) That elephant turd has clogged up the communal toilet of civil discourse for nearly 70 years. While the US kicked ass on this year’s PISA score results (once racially disaggregated shhhh...) the shadow political maneuvering is financially/socially painful. Such as corrupting the IQ predictive ability of the SAT/ACT and making quality K-12 and college expensive as hell.

    So don’t worry, I won’t go on any book burning spree. (Unless it’s a book store solely dedicated to selling the works of Michel Foucault.)

    http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120528043235/mlpfanart/images/a/a2/Kill-it-with-fire-random-29296574-256-192.gif

  73. @Anonymous
    Despite featuring a boy wizard protagonist, the Harry Potter fanbase seems to consist mainly of girls and women. The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:

    https://twitter.com/TheLincoln/status/1208043191875915777

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anonymous

    The funniest thing about 50 Shades is it’s a ripoff of the big female-targeting erotic product of some decades begfore, Nine And A Half Weeks, down to the name of the male character (“Gray”).

    • Replies: @miss marple
    @J.Ross

    Kim Basenger says 50 Shades isn't any sillier except that stair scene, can't top that.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  74. @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    She refuses to believe Harry Potter can be Harry Pooter.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Harry Poofter?

  75. @Wilkey
    @Kronos


    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons.
     
    Education provides the raw material on which an intelligent mind can act. An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas. True that it’s silly to think that you can turn a Ford Focus into a Ferrari just by adding more gas, but neither the Ford nor the Ferrari are going to get anywhere without some gas.

    Even the greatest minds need some type of education, formal or otherwise. Newton, Einstein, and Euler made huge additions to our body of knowledge, but they only did so by learning what we already knew and then extending that knowledge even further. None of them started from zero.

    Arguing against the need for an education system is like arguing against the need for governments, borders, or private property. Show me the society that thrives without one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos

    An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas.

    No, with plenty of gas, but no steering wheel. And sketchy brakes. It’s dangerous.

    A vehicle with an empty tank is benign.

  76. @syonredux
    @SFG


    It’s a reasonably good example of world-building and a well-written series of young adult fiction.
     
    The world-building is terrible, and as for being "well-written".....


    Harold Bloom on JK Rowling:

    One can reasonably doubt that “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is going to prove a classic of children’s literature, but Rowling, whatever the aesthetic weaknesses of her work, is at least a millennial index to our popular culture. So huge an audience gives her importance akin to rock stars, movie idols, TV anchors, and successful politicians. Her prose style, heavy on cliche, makes no demands upon her readers. In an arbitrarily chosen single page–page 4–of the first Harry Potter book, I count seven cliches, all of the “stretch his legs” variety.

     


    How to read “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”? Why, very quickly, to begin with, perhaps also to make an end. Why read it? Presumably, if you cannot be persuaded to read anything better, Rowling will have to do. Is there any redeeming education use to Rowling? Is there any to Stephen King? Why read, if what you read will not enrich mind or spirit or personality? For all I know, the actual wizards and witches of Britain, or America, may provide an alternative culture for more people than is commonly realized.
     

    Perhaps Rowling appeals to millions of reader non-readers because they sense her wistful sincerity, and want to join her world, imaginary or not. She feeds a vast hunger for unreality; can that be bad? At least her fans are momentarily emancipated from their screens, and so may not forget wholly the sensation of turning the pages of a book, any book.
     

    And yet I feel a discomfort with the Harry Potter mania, and I hope that my discontent is not merely a highbrow snobbery, or a nostalgia for a more literate fantasy to beguile (shall we say) intelligent children of all ages. Can more than 35 million book buyers, and their offspring, be wrong? yes, they have been, and will continue to be for as long as they persevere with Potter.

     


    A vast concourse of inadequate works, for adults and for children, crams the dustbins of the ages. At a time when public judgment is no better and no worse than what is proclaimed by the ideological cheerleaders who have so destroyed humanistic study, anything goes. The cultural critics will, soon enough, introduce Harry Potter into their college curriculum, and The New York Times will go on celebrating another confirmation of the dumbing-down it leads and exemplifies.
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Anonymous, @SFG, @Kronos

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Kronos


    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.
     
    Books for kids that are better than Harry Potter: Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Alice in Wonderland, A Wrinkle in Time, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There , A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, The House with a Clock in Its Walls, Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Johnny Tremain, Puck of Pook's Hill, Have Space Suit—Will Travel, Rewards and Fairies, Citizen of the Galaxy, .......

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Kronos

    Meh, Reggie Jackson tried to do it 30 years ago.

    , @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    Subarus are not worth a shit. They are now the FCA of Japan. Stick with Honda or Toyota for reliable.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Yngvar
    @Kronos


    In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes.
     
    It is not extrajudicial, it is common law. The Labour party have tried to get rid of that since it was founded, but not with very much success. I am guessing the Brits like their class system. It is all so orderly.
    , @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    Subarus are troublesome. Stick to Hondas and Toyotas.

  77. @Altai
    @TWS

    They've made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They’ve made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.

    So the Westermarck Effect isn’t present in wizards?

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/WestermarckEffect

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Reg Cæsar

    Re: Westermarck Effect - Being at the same boarding school is perhaps not quite the same as "people who live in close domestic proximity during the first few years of their lives". I don't think they sleep in the same dormitory or share every single class. Also they go home for holidays and more significantly don't arrive at Hogwarts until around the age of eleven by which time the Effect has long stopped operating.

  78. @Anonymous
    @syonredux

    Success of HARRY POTTER and DOWNTON ABBEY, especially among progs, suggest something odd.

    Progs push decadence and degeneracy but love these stories set in rather staid, respectable, and controlled environments. They talk of 'progress' but look back nostalgically to a simpler time. Though I don't know the time and setting of HARRY POTTER, it seems rather old-fashioned. A boarding school with masters and the like. Even the homo stuff in POTTER is kept under lid. While someone might be 'gay', they don't have massive 'pride' parades with half-naked freaks.

    It's as if the progs want it both ways. They want more decadence as 'progress' but also long for 'dignity' and 'manners'. HARRY POTTER seems to offer something for everyone. It has some 'woke' stuff but is also about hierarchy and discipline.

    It also made witchcraft into something safe and 'bourgeois'. Instead of battling the witches, the heroes are witchlings or witchkins, but they use dark magic for good.

    Haven't read it and don't want to and just watched 15 min of one movie before turning it off. But it's not hard to understand the appeal. Just like the Beatles made rock safe for adults, HARRY POTTER made 'dark' and 'edgy' stuff gentle and kind for kibblers and their parents.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Progs like British stuff because of the class system.

  79. @HallParvey
    The entire premise is false. Any young males with the powers attributed to these wizards would, in short order, impregnate all available muggle females and eliminate the muggle genes entirely. How many generations it would take is open to speculation.

    This actually happened. The Neanderthals are all gone now, but traces live on in modern European man.

    Any mutation favoring one person over another in the reproductive sweepstakes, will result in race replacement over time.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    Neanderthal ancestry in Europeans is 25-30% lower than it is in East Asians and Australian Aboriginals. The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.

    Admixture from Denisovans also appears to have been largely male-mediated…

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258056301_Did_the_Denisovans_Cross_Wallace’s_Line

    flow from the Denisovans is suggested by genomic evidence to have been largely male-mediated, giving some clues about the bature of the interactions

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @JohnPlywood

    Modern human ancestry in Neanderthals was female-mediated...

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jul/18/did-human-women-contribute-to-neanderthal-genomes-over-200000-years-ago

    , @Anonymous
    @JohnPlywood


    The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.
     
    We're all descended from cave sharks and BNC sluts!
    Ain't it awful?
  80. @JohnPlywood
    @HallParvey

    Neanderthal ancestry in Europeans is 25-30% lower than it is in East Asians and Australian Aboriginals. The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.

    Admixture from Denisovans also appears to have been largely male-mediated...


    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258056301_Did_the_Denisovans_Cross_Wallace's_Line


    flow from the Denisovans is suggested by genomic evidence to have been largely male-mediated, giving some clues about the bature of the interactions
     

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Anonymous

  81. @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Books for kids that are better than Harry Potter: Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Alice in Wonderland, A Wrinkle in Time, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There , A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, The House with a Clock in Its Walls, Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Johnny Tremain, Puck of Pook’s Hill, Have Space Suit—Will Travel, Rewards and Fairies, Citizen of the Galaxy, …….

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @syonredux

    Good luck finding even 1/2 of those in a Scholastic yearly book sale.

    http://www.crisismagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Scholastic-Book-Fair.jpg

    Vox Day is doing some cool stuff. He’s bringing back a collection of kids stories (Collier Junior Classics) from back in the day.

    https://voxday.blogspot.com/2019/06/the-literature-we-have-lost.html

  82. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US
     
    Because we remain more than half British - in bone, soul, law, custom, and culture. It takes more than a mere five or ten generations to make a man.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    We’re more British than the British, or more accurately, we more represent the yeoman farmer strain of Englishness that made the English, and hence British , governance what it was, than remains on the dentally challenged lilly pad itself. It’s the same strain that made the Roman farmer-soldier-statesman of the Republic noble and which was subsumed utterly when Rome went from republic to empire.

    We are degenerate, of course, but less so than what remains in Britain itself.

  83. @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    The funniest thing about 50 Shades is it's a ripoff of the big female-targeting erotic product of some decades begfore, Nine And A Half Weeks, down to the name of the male character ("Gray").

    Replies: @miss marple

    Kim Basenger says 50 Shades isn’t any sillier except that stair scene, can’t top that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @miss marple

    Basinger has an interesting background:



    In 1979, Basinger met makeup artist Ron Snyder-Britton (born Ronald Snyder) on the film Hard Country, and they married on October 12, 1980. In the same year, Basinger developed agoraphobia following an episode where she had a panic attack in a grocery store, and was housebound for two months.[10] Snyder quit his job during the marriage and changed his surname to Britton after Basinger had requested he choose "something with a B" so she could keep the same initials when using her married name.[14] They separated in November 1988, when she left him for Batman producer Jon Peters,[49] and were divorced a few days before Christmas 1989.[50] In the interim, Basinger also dated Prince.[51] Britton later wrote a memoir titled Longer Than Forever, published in 1998, about their time together, in which he claimed Basinger suffered a miscarriage in 1981 and had an affair with Richard Gere while filming No Mercy (1986).[14]

    Basinger met her second husband, Alec Baldwin, in 1990 when they played lovers in The Marrying Man, and they married on August 19, 1993. They starred together again in the 1994 remake The Getaway, and played themselves in a 1998 episode of The Simpsons, in which Basinger corrected Homer Simpson on the pronunciation of her last name and polished her Oscar statuette. Basinger and Baldwin have a daughter, Ireland Eliesse Baldwin (born October 23, 1995). They separated on December 5, 2000,[52] and divorced on February 3, 2002. In his 2008 book, A Promise to Ourselves: A Journey Through Fatherhood and Divorce, Baldwin wrote about the contentious custody battle with Basinger over their daughter.
     
    Ron Snyder was the son of Allan "Whitey" Snyder, makeup man of choice and longtime confidant of Marilyn Monroe. Hardcore MM fans all know the story of the money clip and Snyder making her corpse up at the funeral home. Basinger was no Monroe, of course, but nobody else is either, and in her heyday she was fairly impressive as a screen sex bomb in her own right.

    Replies: @miss marple

  84. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Despite featuring a boy wizard protagonist, the Harry Potter fanbase seems to consist mainly of girls and women. The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:

    https://twitter.com/TheLincoln/status/1208043191875915777

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Anonymous

    The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:

    I doubt if men are reading better stuff. Indeed, many don’t read at all and just play video games.

    A culture without inhibitions has freed men and women from cultural aspirations. They are fully content with what their reptilian brains(usually male) or amphibian brains(usually female) like.

    But if millennial boys and girls have one thing in common, it seems they’ve been Pixarized in speech. They talk like characters in CGI animation. All gushy-wushy.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=my+favorite+books&page=&utm_source=opensearch

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anonymous


    many don’t read at all and just play video games.
     
    Vidja serves as literature for millions. There is a great deal of reading involved, some higher than you might think.
  85. @Altai
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The same reason as why Downton Abbey and Outlander are more popular in the US than in England or Scotland. But Harry Potter was a huge deal in Britain.

    Replies: @Stick, @Thea

    It’s also a great mystery that Def Leppard’s Pyromania never caught on in their native land while filling every stadium here.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Thea

    We don't think Rich Hall is funny, but they do for some reason.

    Replies: @Lurker

  86. @Jonathan Mason

    ....but she wrote the book, millions of people liked it enough to pay for it, so she gets rich. I don’t see a problem there.
     
    I think it is all marketing hype and probably millions of people who bought the books or had the books bought for them did not actually read the books, although I do understand that initially, at least, they were very popular with young readers.

    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.

    However she seems to be on a level with the books of Enid Blyton (not very well known in the US) who has sold 600 million books and been translated into 90 languages, but never considered to be a good writer on the level of, say E. Nesbit or C.S. Lewis or Tolkien.

    Nesbit's books are delicious, because they can be read at two levels, both for the children who are having the story read to them, and the sly humor directed at the adult reader. In Five Children and It, for example, the children have access to magic powers, but when their wishes are granted they always go wrong in subtle ways.

    I wonder if Rowling's books will hold up as classics a hundred years from now. I suspect not.

    Replies: @Altai, @Desiderius, @Wilkey, @Gabe Ruth

    Can’t remember where I read it, some alt-right type claims it’s basically a demonstration of the power of marketing to children. Scholastic, the publishing company, bought the rights early, and they have privileged access through school distributed catalogs.

  87. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @miss marple
    @J.Ross

    Kim Basenger says 50 Shades isn't any sillier except that stair scene, can't top that.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Basinger has an interesting background:

    In 1979, Basinger met makeup artist Ron Snyder-Britton (born Ronald Snyder) on the film Hard Country, and they married on October 12, 1980. In the same year, Basinger developed agoraphobia following an episode where she had a panic attack in a grocery store, and was housebound for two months.[10] Snyder quit his job during the marriage and changed his surname to Britton after Basinger had requested he choose “something with a B” so she could keep the same initials when using her married name.[14] They separated in November 1988, when she left him for Batman producer Jon Peters,[49] and were divorced a few days before Christmas 1989.[50] In the interim, Basinger also dated Prince.[51] Britton later wrote a memoir titled Longer Than Forever, published in 1998, about their time together, in which he claimed Basinger suffered a miscarriage in 1981 and had an affair with Richard Gere while filming No Mercy (1986).[14]

    Basinger met her second husband, Alec Baldwin, in 1990 when they played lovers in The Marrying Man, and they married on August 19, 1993. They starred together again in the 1994 remake The Getaway, and played themselves in a 1998 episode of The Simpsons, in which Basinger corrected Homer Simpson on the pronunciation of her last name and polished her Oscar statuette. Basinger and Baldwin have a daughter, Ireland Eliesse Baldwin (born October 23, 1995). They separated on December 5, 2000,[52] and divorced on February 3, 2002. In his 2008 book, A Promise to Ourselves: A Journey Through Fatherhood and Divorce, Baldwin wrote about the contentious custody battle with Basinger over their daughter.

    Ron Snyder was the son of Allan “Whitey” Snyder, makeup man of choice and longtime confidant of Marilyn Monroe. Hardcore MM fans all know the story of the money clip and Snyder making her corpse up at the funeral home. Basinger was no Monroe, of course, but nobody else is either, and in her heyday she was fairly impressive as a screen sex bomb in her own right.

    • Replies: @miss marple
    @Anonymous

    I'd say Basinger's life has been a bit more interesting than her acting.

  88. @Wilkey
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Lurker

  89. @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

    Meh, Reggie Jackson tried to do it 30 years ago.

  90. @Thea
    @Altai

    It’s also a great mystery that Def Leppard’s Pyromania never caught on in their native land while filling every stadium here.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    We don’t think Rich Hall is funny, but they do for some reason.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @ScarletNumber

    I don't find him funny either. He certainly appeals to TPTB who get say who is on TV - which is anyone who says the right things about Trump, Brexit, Farage, the Daily Mail etc

  91. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    The market demand for terrible literature seems to be largely driven by women:
     
    I doubt if men are reading better stuff. Indeed, many don't read at all and just play video games.

    A culture without inhibitions has freed men and women from cultural aspirations. They are fully content with what their reptilian brains(usually male) or amphibian brains(usually female) like.

    But if millennial boys and girls have one thing in common, it seems they've been Pixarized in speech. They talk like characters in CGI animation. All gushy-wushy.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=my+favorite+books&page=&utm_source=opensearch

    Replies: @Desiderius

    many don’t read at all and just play video games.

    Vidja serves as literature for millions. There is a great deal of reading involved, some higher than you might think.

  92. @Altai
    Hermione's family tree is confusing.

    London cast 1. (I think Ron needs a paternity test here.)
    http://www.the-leaky-cauldron.org/wp-content/uploads/assets/HP_20558_Weasley_Granger_FL.jpg

    London cast 2. (I think Ron realises he is a stepdad here and his expression/touching is not okay)
    https://www.whatsonstage.com/s/wos-photos-production/114911.jpg

    San Fransisco cast. (I don't think this Ron is bothered about not being the father here...)
    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/potter-1010-03.jpg?w=620

    New York cast. (Again, why is the daughter never mixed race?)
    https://ewedit.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/04.-hpcc_grangerweasleyfamily_photo-by-matthew-murphy.jpg?w=2000&h=2000

    Melbourne cast. (A testament to how few black people there are in Australia that they couldn't go as dark as they apparently want)
    https://media.timeout.com/images/105286179/630/472/image.jpg

    Replies: @TWS, @Lurker, @sb

    Well ,speaking as a Melbournian , there are Africans in Melbourne ( best known of course for their eccessive crime activity ) but you would need a very large population of same in order to find any capable of half decent acting

    Speaking of Harry Potter the appeal of English boarding school tales has long been a feature of British (and Commonwealth ) children’s literature .I read many myself when young .I didn’t think this was true of American child literature but my knowledge of this is scant (I did read some Hardy Boys but my favourite American kids books were the Adventure books by Willard Price )

  93. “I do not wish this. Every drop of magical blood spilled is a terrible waste.”

    -Voldemort

  94. @Wilkey
    @Kronos


    EducationRealist made a superb point a few years back that education is just cheaper than prisons.
     
    Education provides the raw material on which an intelligent mind can act. An intelligent mind without some sort of education, formal or otherwise, is like a Ferrari without gas. True that it’s silly to think that you can turn a Ford Focus into a Ferrari just by adding more gas, but neither the Ford nor the Ferrari are going to get anywhere without some gas.

    Even the greatest minds need some type of education, formal or otherwise. Newton, Einstein, and Euler made huge additions to our body of knowledge, but they only did so by learning what we already knew and then extending that knowledge even further. None of them started from zero.

    Arguing against the need for an education system is like arguing against the need for governments, borders, or private property. Show me the society that thrives without one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos

    Perhaps my language was a bit sloppy. I should’ve made a careful distinction between education and school system. Education regardless if self-taught, by a parent, or a teacher can be beneficial. Instruction can provide rapid progress in procuring the desired knowedge/skill set. That stuff is mainly self evident. I’d hate to contemplate how many times humanity reinvented the wheel because that knowledge couldn’t be retained and gradually improved. (Rock wheels suck, wheels with air and rubber are much better.) the creation of the printing press was likely the most important technological advancement of all time. Because it made idea dissemination and education that much easier.

    The brunt of my criticism is at the contemporary US school system(s) and indirectly at the US Supreme Court (I’m looking at you Earl Warren.) Mainly in regards to sacrificing high IQ students for empirically pointless “War on Poverty” operations. (Not to mention that the false “cognitive equality” facade helped justify the offshoring of million of jobs. Apparently you really cant retool 105 IQ steel workers into 180+ IQ hedge fund managers. At least not yet.)

    These problems are historical in nature and based on policy makers and organizations that operated on very bad premises. (That IQ was overwhelmingly environmental, not genetic.) That elephant turd has clogged up the communal toilet of civil discourse for nearly 70 years. While the US kicked ass on this year’s PISA score results (once racially disaggregated shhhh…) the shadow political maneuvering is financially/socially painful. Such as corrupting the IQ predictive ability of the SAT/ACT and making quality K-12 and college expensive as hell.

    So don’t worry, I won’t go on any book burning spree. (Unless it’s a book store solely dedicated to selling the works of Michel Foucault.)

  95. @Dumbo
    I never read any of the books, but the movies left a muddled impression on me. The plots seemed pretty confusing with a multitude of characters and no coherent storyline. I'd forget the movies just after watching them. The only one of the films that seemed to have an actual plot and some drama was that one about the wizard olympics. The rest was just a parade of supernatural characters based on several different elements of myth and folklore with a politically correct and multicultural veneer.

    Also if wizardly is genetic then the whole point of the books (school for wizards) is moot.

    Replies: @Silva, @Jake, @Wilkey, @Jonathan Mason, @Ian Smith, @James J. O'Meara, @Rapparee

    Reading the books as an adult, Rowling’s plots and characterization were always on the brink of falling apart. To her credit, she usually saw the rocks downstream and changed course at the very last second, answering my objections when I was about the toss the book against the wall in frustration. If nothing else, her perfectly Dickensian character names are a lot of fun. Rowling’s real cultural achievement was resurrecting the long-dormant but once-popular School Story genre by combining it with fantasy elements.

    She never addresses her biggest problem, though, which is that her villains have no motivation- if magical ability is the only difference between wizards and muggles, and it is a purely recessive trait with no apparent regression to the mean, why would the purebloods be bothered by intermarriage with muggle-born wizards? In reality, human groups who object to miscegenation have some sort of identifiable reason, justified or not- a difference of cult or creed, a genetic & racial gulf, castes of hereditary profession, etc. If I put my writer brain to work I could invent a dozen for Harry Potter, but Rowling never bothered with one. In her lazy P.C. outlook, purity of bloodline is a completely irrational obsession, needing no explanation besides “evil people are prejudiced“.

    Men since the dawn of history have taken moral instruction from the heroic epics of their culture. The Iliad and Aeneid are not just adventure stories, but vehicles for transmitting the Greeks’ and Romans’ respective religious and philosophical wisdom and their national self-conceptions. The problem with modern adventure epics of the Anglosphere like Star Wars and Harry Potter is in their creators’ jejunely shallow worldviews, which then get transmitted to impressionable young fans- as Shelley wrote, “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world“. Lord of the Rings comes closer to the ancient model (and is tellingly more popular with young rightists), because J.R.R. Tolkien had far more life experience and inherited wisdom than later modern mythologists like Rowling and Lucas.

  96. @syonredux
    @Kronos


    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.
     
    Books for kids that are better than Harry Potter: Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Alice in Wonderland, A Wrinkle in Time, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There , A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, The House with a Clock in Its Walls, Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Johnny Tremain, Puck of Pook's Hill, Have Space Suit—Will Travel, Rewards and Fairies, Citizen of the Galaxy, .......

    Replies: @Kronos

    Good luck finding even 1/2 of those in a Scholastic yearly book sale.

    Vox Day is doing some cool stuff. He’s bringing back a collection of kids stories (Collier Junior Classics) from back in the day.

    https://voxday.blogspot.com/2019/06/the-literature-we-have-lost.html

  97. @JohnPlywood
    @HallParvey

    Neanderthal ancestry in Europeans is 25-30% lower than it is in East Asians and Australian Aboriginals. The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.

    Admixture from Denisovans also appears to have been largely male-mediated...


    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258056301_Did_the_Denisovans_Cross_Wallace's_Line


    flow from the Denisovans is suggested by genomic evidence to have been largely male-mediated, giving some clues about the bature of the interactions
     

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Anonymous

    The admixture was entirely from Neanderthal males to modern human females.

    We’re all descended from cave sharks and BNC sluts!
    Ain’t it awful?

  98. @Anonymous
    @miss marple

    Basinger has an interesting background:



    In 1979, Basinger met makeup artist Ron Snyder-Britton (born Ronald Snyder) on the film Hard Country, and they married on October 12, 1980. In the same year, Basinger developed agoraphobia following an episode where she had a panic attack in a grocery store, and was housebound for two months.[10] Snyder quit his job during the marriage and changed his surname to Britton after Basinger had requested he choose "something with a B" so she could keep the same initials when using her married name.[14] They separated in November 1988, when she left him for Batman producer Jon Peters,[49] and were divorced a few days before Christmas 1989.[50] In the interim, Basinger also dated Prince.[51] Britton later wrote a memoir titled Longer Than Forever, published in 1998, about their time together, in which he claimed Basinger suffered a miscarriage in 1981 and had an affair with Richard Gere while filming No Mercy (1986).[14]

    Basinger met her second husband, Alec Baldwin, in 1990 when they played lovers in The Marrying Man, and they married on August 19, 1993. They starred together again in the 1994 remake The Getaway, and played themselves in a 1998 episode of The Simpsons, in which Basinger corrected Homer Simpson on the pronunciation of her last name and polished her Oscar statuette. Basinger and Baldwin have a daughter, Ireland Eliesse Baldwin (born October 23, 1995). They separated on December 5, 2000,[52] and divorced on February 3, 2002. In his 2008 book, A Promise to Ourselves: A Journey Through Fatherhood and Divorce, Baldwin wrote about the contentious custody battle with Basinger over their daughter.
     
    Ron Snyder was the son of Allan "Whitey" Snyder, makeup man of choice and longtime confidant of Marilyn Monroe. Hardcore MM fans all know the story of the money clip and Snyder making her corpse up at the funeral home. Basinger was no Monroe, of course, but nobody else is either, and in her heyday she was fairly impressive as a screen sex bomb in her own right.

    Replies: @miss marple

    I’d say Basinger’s life has been a bit more interesting than her acting.

  99. @kihowi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Almost an autism test, that question. It's not important the exact volume of liquid you get on you, what's important is that you want to be in the rain for as short a time as possible.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    what’s important is that you want to be in the rain for as short a time as possible

    Surely what’s important – the reason you don’t want to be ‘in the rain’ – is that generally being wet is worse than being dry.

    Personally I don’t give a fuck because I’m not made of soluble Aspirin, but women and effeminate men might not like getting their shoulder-pads wet or some shit.

    If the situation is configured so that crossing some distance at running speed makes you wetter than doing the same distance at walking speed (because at higher speed you intercept more raindrops than you would if you walked), walking is worse.

    So you’re in the rain for a shorter time, but you made the rain artificially worse in the sense that there were more raindrops per unit area (of you) per unit time.

    I’m pretty sure “Mythbusters” did a small-N trial of this and found that there was fuck-all difference (unlike their small-N trial of hot-air hand-dryers vs paper towels, which seems to have coinciuded with Peak Hand-Dryer).

    I walk even if it’s sheeting down, because it makes a nice contrast.

  100. @Wilkey
    @Jonathan Mason


    The really fascinating question is why they caught on so immediately in the US, rather than in Britain, seeing that the characters and locations are solidly British.
     
    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Lurker

    The love for all things British runs deep in many Americans and, in fact, in much of the world. Will that still be the case when Britain looks more like Pakistan than like Britain?

    By then the US will look like Mexico, ‘America’ and ‘Britain’ will no longer exist.

  101. @Reg Cæsar
    @Altai


    They’ve made a Harry Potter stage play. These people are supposed to be adult Ron, Hermione and their daughter.
     
    So the Westermarck Effect isn't present in wizards?


    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/WestermarckEffect

    Replies: @Lurker

    Re: Westermarck Effect – Being at the same boarding school is perhaps not quite the same as “people who live in close domestic proximity during the first few years of their lives”. I don’t think they sleep in the same dormitory or share every single class. Also they go home for holidays and more significantly don’t arrive at Hogwarts until around the age of eleven by which time the Effect has long stopped operating.

  102. @ScarletNumber
    @Thea

    We don't think Rich Hall is funny, but they do for some reason.

    Replies: @Lurker

    I don’t find him funny either. He certainly appeals to TPTB who get say who is on TV – which is anyone who says the right things about Trump, Brexit, Farage, the Daily Mail etc

  103. @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

    Subarus are not worth a shit. They are now the FCA of Japan. Stick with Honda or Toyota for reliable.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Anonymous

    Subaru manufactures good cars but perhaps not great cars. Toyota (#1) and Honda (#2) are the best car brands in the world. But they’ve have lots of time to steadily improve the Subaru Outback and it handles great in snow (which is an issue where I live.)


    http://www.dashboard-light.com/vehicles/Subaru_Outback.html

    https://youtu.be/H5XVqbEgSIE

    Replies: @Anonymous

  104. @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

    In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes.

    It is not extrajudicial, it is common law. The Labour party have tried to get rid of that since it was founded, but not with very much success. I am guessing the Brits like their class system. It is all so orderly.

  105. @Kronos
    @syonredux

    The Harry Potter series are great for young readers. I started reading then in third grade. It was one of the first book series I ever read. Keep in mind, those books had to compete against TV, video games, and other fun non-literary activities. If your a parent, your thrilled if your kid reads anything. To get kids (even high IQ ones) to read “Infinite Jest” and “Gravity’s Rainbow” is just over the top.

    Rowling seemed to project her contempt for the British aristocracy via House Slytherin and the Malfoys. In the US, it’s weird to consider some citizens having extrajudicial rights of Barons and Dukes. (Though we give them to historical hereditary losers/victims such as Blacks and Women.)

    Some of that aristocratic hatred can be quite self evident. My favorite video of it is James May reviewing the Subaru Legacy Outback. (Unfortunately this video is in Russian.) Essentially, they’re inbred and require a car that’ll last for years until their hunting dogs chew up all the leather. (Subaru Outbacks are good cars if your still looking Steve.)

    https://youtu.be/1-mB-6iDyLg

    He also shoots the Queen in another season/episode soon after debating her on the need for an aristocracy in the 21st Century.

    https://youtu.be/yNTKjnCm7mk

    So comparing US class tension is different compared to the UK.

    Replies: @syonredux, @ScarletNumber, @Anonymous, @Yngvar, @Anonymous

    Subarus are troublesome. Stick to Hondas and Toyotas.

  106. @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    Subarus are not worth a shit. They are now the FCA of Japan. Stick with Honda or Toyota for reliable.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Subaru manufactures good cars but perhaps not great cars. Toyota (#1) and Honda (#2) are the best car brands in the world. But they’ve have lots of time to steadily improve the Subaru Outback and it handles great in snow (which is an issue where I live.)

    http://www.dashboard-light.com/vehicles/Subaru_Outback.html

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    Subaru's 4WD system works really well and in certain areas like Colorado or Maine where the weather conditions make it advantageous enough, putting up with Subaru's hinky head gaskets and other issues can be worthwhile, but for most people not.

    The Subaru flat 4 was reliable in its old pushrod guise but modern ones are troublesome and except for people who work on them all the time, mechanics find them baffling and don't want to fool with them. Head gaskets have been an issue for a long time. Patient DIYers like them but if you are paying flat rate labor keeping them on the road is expensive, and the company is douchebaggy. They know they have problems and correct them at a slothlike pace.

    Outside areas where Subarus are really popular-where snow conditions make their 4WD worth the premium-there are no good Subaru independent shops and you wind up going back to the stealership and the stealerships will drill, ream, tap, chamfer and deburr you royally every chane they get because they have you where they want you. Everywhere, Hondas and Toyotas now are like Chevys in the sixties-everyone knows them, parts are common, etc.

    Having said that when the Subaru works, it does work well. Handling is good in dry and relative to other cars, the crummier road conditions, the better they do.

  107. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos
    @Anonymous

    Subaru manufactures good cars but perhaps not great cars. Toyota (#1) and Honda (#2) are the best car brands in the world. But they’ve have lots of time to steadily improve the Subaru Outback and it handles great in snow (which is an issue where I live.)


    http://www.dashboard-light.com/vehicles/Subaru_Outback.html

    https://youtu.be/H5XVqbEgSIE

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Subaru’s 4WD system works really well and in certain areas like Colorado or Maine where the weather conditions make it advantageous enough, putting up with Subaru’s hinky head gaskets and other issues can be worthwhile, but for most people not.

    The Subaru flat 4 was reliable in its old pushrod guise but modern ones are troublesome and except for people who work on them all the time, mechanics find them baffling and don’t want to fool with them. Head gaskets have been an issue for a long time. Patient DIYers like them but if you are paying flat rate labor keeping them on the road is expensive, and the company is douchebaggy. They know they have problems and correct them at a slothlike pace.

    Outside areas where Subarus are really popular-where snow conditions make their 4WD worth the premium-there are no good Subaru independent shops and you wind up going back to the stealership and the stealerships will drill, ream, tap, chamfer and deburr you royally every chane they get because they have you where they want you. Everywhere, Hondas and Toyotas now are like Chevys in the sixties-everyone knows them, parts are common, etc.

    Having said that when the Subaru works, it does work well. Handling is good in dry and relative to other cars, the crummier road conditions, the better they do.

  108. Elizer Yudkowski of Less Wrong fame wrote an extremely good Harry Potter fanfic where Harry is a skeptical and optimistic youth drawn (platonically!) to Draco Malloy, hates Quidditch, realizes the rules are retarded, and is basically what Yudkoski imagines he’d do with Wizard powers. It’s called Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality, and used to be available free at hpmor.com. As far as I know HPatMoR has not inspired and transsexuals, so it has that going for it. SFG, you would probably like it.

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