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From Richard Hanania’s Substack:

Why the Media is Honest and Good
How to critique the press without devolving into nihilism

Richard Hanania
Jan 17

I tend to get annoyed by those around me. Most of my adult life I’ve spent in academic institutions, and this has created a revulsion towards the woke. As my writing has gained attention over the last two years, I’ve made friends with lots of conservatives, and that has made me notice their flaws more and more, including ones that I could more easily overlook back when sexual harassment and diversity trainings were part of my life. Most writers have to worry about “audience capture,” but for me it’s the opposite. When I see what those around me think, I have to struggle not to get consumed by all the ways in which they’re wrong about the world….

In this essay, I’m going to argue that everyone is wrong, and the media is actually good and honest. You should be glad it exists, admire those who work in the industry, and hope for its continued influence and success. Scott Alexander recently said that the media very rarely tells explicit lies, a view he got a lot of pushback for. My position is more extreme than his. It’s that while the American media has serious flaws, it is one of the most honest, decent, and fair institutions designed for producing and spreading truth in human history. Like any institution, the press has to be judged according to realistic benchmarks, not simply criticized because it is imperfect or makes mistakes. And if you judge the mainstream media by historical standards, or compare it to anything that competes with it for influence – the right-wing press, popular influencers, social media, foreign sources of news, etc. – the institutions of American journalism come out looking extremely well.

Let’s take a topic I know some something about: baseball. New York Times sportswriter Tyler Kepner is outstanding at writing about pitching. If he has a bias, I don’t know enough to notice it.

Now, let’s take a topic I don’t know anything about: the fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan. If I saw a headline about renewed fighting over Nagorno-Karabakh and, for once, was interested in learning more, would I turn to the New York Times to read about it? Sure. The NYT employs a lot of smart, careful people to write and edit on all sorts of specialist topics, and watches out for some (but not all) conflicts of interest.

On the other hand, Noam Chomsky argued that the NYT and the like were beholden to the American government’s foreign policy apparatus. And he has something of a point. If you are a reporter covering a foreign war, one thing you’d want to do is to check with your U.S. Deep State contacts who have access to military satellite surveillance to see which side is conquering territory. In return, though, you’d be expected to put some spin on the news in a way desired by Fort Meade.

Personally, I don’t know what bias that would introduce: the Deep State tends to favor Azerbaijan, I think, because Armenia allies with Russia. But Congress tends to favor Armenia, because there are a lot of affluent Armenian-Americans who donate to candidates.

Likewise, my favorite novel is Evelyn Waugh’s Scoop about how hard it is to learn anything about a war when you are a foreign correspondent sent to cover it. In Scoop, the cream of the world’s war correspondents descend upon Addis Ababa, five hundred miles from the front, but the Ethiopian government won’t issue permits to visit the front, so the most famous reporters in the world just sit around the hotel bar to drink, complain, and lie. I can recall in 1980 reading an article about frustrated reporters covering the new Iraq-Iran war from the bar in the Baghdad Hilton with no way of getting to the front. It was amazingly like Scoop, although, now that I think about it, I’m sure the reporter who wrote it had read Scoop and was in on his own joke.

To cover an Armenia-Azerbaijan war even-handedly, you’d probably need one correspondent who’d spent years making friends in the Armenian capital and another who’d done the same in the Azerbaijan capital. Sounds expensive, especially since most of the time neither country generates much interesting news.

When it comes to a more relevant war, such as Russia-Ukraine, the headlines tend to be highly biased, always putting some kind of pro-Ukraine spin on it. If Russia conquered Odessa, the headline would be, “Russia Takes Odessa, Extending Its Supply Lines Dangerously.” In this case, not just the US government but most readers are on the side of Ukraine since Russia started this war of annexation.

There is a major exception when it comes to the “holy trinity” of liberalism, that is topics having to do with race, gender, and sexual orientation, but even here the problem is not lies as much as that the press is blinded by ideology. The facts they give you even on these sensitive topics are usually correct, but it’s simply that the interpretation of these facts is wrong.

Or they don’t give you the facts at all. For example, I apparently invented that you can look up how often the NYT or WP use different tendentious terms over time, which the academics David Rozado and Zach Goldberg have greatly advanced. But, here’s a quick and dirty comparison:

Richard would say that transgenderism isn’t an important issue, but that’s not the New York Times’ opinion, evidently, because it has published 8,386 articles touching on the topic. On the other hand, the sex fetish that motivates many of the most influential M-to-Fs is news not fit to print.

Compared to What?

… People who complain about the media tend to implicitly judge it by the standard of perfection, while either offering no alternative or arguing that people instead listen to sources that are even worse. They find it easy to list its mistakes, including WMDs, Russiagate, and the narratives surrounding various shootings of young black men.

Alternatively, they could be worse than in the past. Several things have made the NYT worse than it used to be: the combination of the Great Awokening from 2013 onward and the By Any Means Necessary push to dump Trump from 2017 onward combined with the marketing department’s growing awareness of what kind of clickbait subscribers like has done bad things to the Times relative to the first decade of the century.

In 2019, the NYT’s executive editor Dean Baquet was recorded apologizing to the staff that their Plan A to take down Trump, RussiaGate, had flopped, but they now had a Plan B: racism 24/7.

… There are probably literally millions of articles published by major news sources each year.

There are two angles on this: I agree with Richard that it’s silly to get too worked up over a handful of really wrong articles in the numerator compared to all the okay articles in the denominator.

On the other hand, as Stalin liked to say, quantity has a quality all its own. Publishing 8,386 articles that include the word “transgender” has done a lot to signal the rest of the media that trans was the Next Big Thing. If the NYT started running articles about how so many of the most famous transgenders are motivated by their sex fetish, other outlets would gain courage to do so too. But they don’t, so a decade into transmania, practically nobody knows about it.

An entire right-wing ecosystem centers around finding the most absurd headlines and stories and using them to build a narrative about how terrible the media is, with journalists the moment they make a mistake being dunked on by grifters who’ve never in any way made their fellow human beings smarter or better informed.

This kind of criticism is cheap and selective, and it ignores how the media gets things right a lot more often than it gets them wrong. In late 2021, I read in the NYT that Russia would invade Ukraine in a few months. Practically every major critic of the media that I saw on Twitter doubted that reporting. When Russia did invade Ukraine, people forgot that the press, and the “deep state” for that matter, had gotten things right.

I didn’t. I pointed out the good job the US Intelligence Community had done in predicting the Russian invasion and admitted I expected Putin to do something more ambiguous, like he did in 2014.

Had the NYT been wrong, we would’ve never stopped talking about the great Ukraine invasion hoax of 2021-2022.

… Instead of comparing the MSM to some idealized standard of reporting, I prefer to judge it relative to other institutions. Conservatives have tried to build alternatives to the NYT and other major papers. This has been a failed experiment….

The problem with taking a nihilistic posture towards the MSM is that there’s nothing to replace it with.

Actually, that there’s no replacement for the MSM sounds like a good justification for pointing out flaws in the MSM.

If someone spends all their time complaining about capitalism without making the case for a realistic alternative, what they’re advocating for is chaos, or more likely, socialism, which is much worse.

Ralph Nader complained about capitalism and got seat belts in cars.

Likewise, simply trying to discredit the media when it’s in many ways the only means we have to acquire accurate information about the world should be understood as advocating for making society dumber.

I argue for getting smarter at how to read the mass media: e.g., the inconvenient facts tend to get buried deep within the article.

… Even the few conservative institutions that people take seriously like The Wall Street Journal have to rely to a large extent on left-wing staff. There is no shortage of right-wing grifters though, and the movement should spend more time reflecting on this fact and less time criticizing others. …

The MSM is at its worst when it comes to issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation because the left has lost its mind on these issues. One should be able to disaggregate various areas of coverage.

But of course, people who like the NYT don’t. They assume that if the NYT is fairly legit on the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict, then they they must be giving us the straight story on the Racial Reckoning.

If the media was as bad on every topic as it is on identity, I would probably join conservatives in suggesting we burn the whole thing to the ground, which is the posture I’m in favor of taking towards much of the academy. The press is committed to a narrative in which disparities are caused by discrimination and whites and men are constantly oppressing women and people of color. Even here, they’re usually not explicitly lying. For example, they’ll lower their standards in order to publish an unconfirmed report about an alleged hate crime against a minority, and often treat what should be at most local stories into matters of national significance. Recently, three black UVA football players were killed, and the Washington Post made it into a story about white racism, not informing the reader that the shooter himself was black until paragraph 8. This article may not technically contain a “lie,” but it is clearly giving a false impression regarding what happened.

That being said, even here, the media is still in many ways more useful than most of its critics. Steve Sailer does a fantastic job of scouring MSM race coverage, but his articles often rely on the NYT for the reporting of basic facts, which he interprets in his own ways.

It’s called “admission against interest.” For example, in 2016 the New York Times looked into every mass shooting (at least four casualties) in 2015 and found that in almost three-fourths of the cases, both the shooters and victims were black. I cite that in Twitter debates a lot because everybody knows the NYT is biased on race, so if they admit it against their interest, it must be true.

On the other hand, I’ve likely quoted that New York Times finding more times over the last seven years than the New York Times has. As far as I can tell, the NYT has written “nearly three-fourths of victims and suspected assailants” only in its original 2016 article and has never again brought up the finding it spent a fair amount of labor to come up with in the last seven years.

Of course, it never overcorrects on identity issues, where I’ve already granted to media haters that they’re insane.

OK, but identity is kind of a big deal.

… The few media critics who are better than the press are rare and deserve your support. The exception here is anything having to do with race, gender, or sexual orientation, where you should understand that establishment journalists are trying their best but can’t be trusted because they’ve lost their minds, or are scared of those that have, and you’d be better off listening to people with cancelable views. Continue to criticize the press for where it falls short, without devolving into nihilistic hate.

… First of all, when people stop trusting mainstream journalists, there’s no guarantee that they start listening to better sources of information instead.

… I think people keep expecting the MSM to go away because they misunderstand the source of its power.

Balaji calls what they do “fiat information,” Yarvin refers to “the Cathedral,” and Sailer talks about “the megaphone.” Each of these phrases misleads us about why the press is so powerful.

Media institutions are influential not simply because they have arbitrary power that could just as easily be bestowed on anyone else. Rather, they produce the kind of content that educated Westerners want to read, in part because, unlike many conservatives, most people who consume serious newspapers, books, and magazines want sources of information that at least make some basic effort to be fair and neutral in their analysis, and that try to cover a wide variety of topics.

Of course, that’s my point about the New York Times’ possession of “the megaphone.” The rest of the media pays careful attention to what the New York Times considers fit to print because it’s a giant and serious institution.

If the New York Times were to use its megaphone announce tomorrow: “Hey, you, all that George Floyd Black Lives Matter stuff seems to have discouraged policing, which, ironically, has wound up getting many thousands of extra blacks murdered and killed in car crashes. Oops, sorry,” most of the rest of the press would sheepishly follow along shortly.

A second opinion, from Paleo Retiree, who worked for decades at a major weekly news magazine. After I wrote about the bronze statue boom of the last third of a century, which I’ve seen with my own eyes all across the country but can’t recall ever reading about in the national press as a subject worthy of art criticism, he responded:

BTW, there’s a surprisingly big world out there of gifted people — architects, painters, composers, poets, etc — creating delightful, solid and beautiful stuff in trad kinds of ways. I’ve met a bunch of them. The reason your average American culturefan isn’t aware of this activity is that the press doesn’t cover it, so you aren’t being told about it. You won’t know about it if you don’t stumble into it yourself.

You can trust me on this, btw: back in the ‘90s I pitched a lot of story ideas about the various New Traditionalisms to a lot of different editors, and 99.9% of the time my ideas were shot down. I had to have had the worst batting average of any arts reporter ever, lol.

You’d think editors of arts sections and arts publications would find such people and developments interesting, and would want to explore them and tell readers and viewers about them. But no: in fact what I found was that the editors and producers (and the people behind them) who run the discussion about the arts in our country aren’t interested in mere reporting, let alone in giving their readers and viewers a fair picture of what’s really going on culturally in the world. They’re interested in dictating terms and promoting agendas. A few scales fell from my eyes. It’s almost like the entire news business generally!

 
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  1. Art Deco says:

    Mr. Hanania ought to look at the social research done by Stanley Rothman on the properties of the staff of the major media, among other things. He might even ask himself how the media got to be the way it is.

    Note, seconding Paleo Retiree is Rod Dreher, who was on the editorial staff of the Dallas Morning News from 2002 to 2009. Dreher would look at the market research on who actually bought the paper and send around circulars suggesting the paper cover stories of more interest to their modal reader (older suburban whites). He said the response from assignment editors was zero. They didn’t give a rip what their readers were interested in, they covered what they were interested in covering.

  2. OK, so this character Hanania says the the Lyin’ Press is good and irreplaceable because:

    a) They give you basic true facts, though they may be buried at the bottom because … this is a way to lie to the readers that don’t read the whole thing.

    b) They predicted the Ukraine War and they get everything right except that they have lost their way on the race issue … except that they control which stories get lots of articles and which get buried, which is also a type of lying.

    No. There’s one field in which I know a particularly lot about, and I would not let this reporter ask me questions about an event I was personally involved in, unless he would let me edit it with him on the phone afterwards. He let me, I did, and we corrected about 10 important points. This was a local guy, so he had a little bit of integrity still left in him.

    The one time I was quoted on local TV news, long ago, they cut off the 2nd half of the one sentence they played, which changed the meaning 180 degrees. You can learn a lot from a dummy liar.

    Hanania is just another lyin’ sack of shit.

  3. On Peak Stupidity I may get around to writing that book review of M. Stanton Evans’ Blacklisted by History about Joe McCarthy.

    That story goes from nearly 90 years ago up through about 70 years ago, and the national press was the same bunch of Lying jackals as they are now, at least when they wanted to be. They wanted to let the Communists get a good start on their March through the American Institutions, and they sure weren’t going to let some concerned patriotic upstart Senator out of Wisconsin get in their way!

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
  4. Thoughts says:

    Hanania is at best an idiot, at worst a terrible liar.

  5. Coemgen says:

    When it comes to a more relevant war, such as Russia-Ukraine, … most readers are on the side of Ukraine since Russia started this war of annexation.

    I’m going to go out on a limb and posit that these “most readers” believe that race – and national borders – are merely “social constructs” and, that those same readers are quite happy to appease certain groups of people no matter how much misery those groups of people inflict on others.

    Certainly, the concept of annexation is a social construct.

    If no blood was shed over the “annexation,” what would be the result? Russian language being placed above Ukrainian on road signs? Recoloring of maps containing both Russia and Ukraine? Biden’s string pullers get mad that their real-life Risk game is not going as well as they want?

    My neighbor’s cat has annexed my yard.

    Should I lobby my other neighbor to give me a bigger meaner cat to rid my yard of the interloper?

    Aside: How do we view non-U.S. countries that have U.S. military bases? Have they been annexed by the U.S.?

  6. Dream says:

    In American media entertainment:

    • Replies: @Barnard
  7. Dream says:

    Blacks are very angry in the comments and quote tweets.

  8. pyrrhus says:

    “Russia launched this war of annexation”–clueless propaganda..As many articles by non-NYT apparatchiks point out, US intelligence and military knew that Kiev was crossing the red line with membership in NATO and talk about getting nukes…The murderous attacks on Russians in the DonBas were additional motivation…

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
    • Troll: Guest007, Peter Akuleyev
  9. Anon[195] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve met Richard Hanania in passing. Nice enough guy – but he may not be aware that he’s a bit weird and autistic.

    This “Why the Media is Honest and Good” is either one of three things:

    1) A clickbait contrarian bid to get hyper-attention (eg Everyone says X, I say -X!!!)

    2) An attempt to curry favor with the Lefty powers that be (eg similar to David Brooks’ schtick)

    3) Remarkably dumb but good faith argument, demonstrating that for all his autism — he’s just not that smart after all.

    For Dick’s sake, I’d prefer 1) or 2) over 3) — but 3) is most likely.

    It is worth noticing that his argument is really another fusillade in the “War Against Noticing” — not likely to go over well with faithful Sailer readers. And of course, this would be also be a good time to remind folks about Crichton’s observation of the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect, and what it means for MSM consumption.

    Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray [Gell-Mann]’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.

    • Agree: ArthurinCali, Liger
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
  10. quewin says:

    Those cataract surgeries paid dividends here.

  11. AndrewR says:
    @Thoughts

    Yeah. We’re talking about a guy who bragged about defiantly going maskless to the pharmacy to eagerly get the COVID vax.

    His entire large ego depends on these “enlightened centrist” takes like “mask bad, vax good” and “mainstream media is a good thing despite almost always being wrong about major topics”

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
  12. megabar says:

    > Like any institution, the press has to be judged according to realistic benchmarks

    Ironically, RH is doing exactly what the press does: he’s using accurate facts and anecdotes to create a narrative that is inaccurate, because he ignores the main issue.

    You can tell if a story is honest by whether it credibly addresses the main issue:

    – BLM: Do black men commit more crime and resist arrest more frequently?
    – Race/sex/class issues: Are mental traits partially innate and vary by race/sex/class?
    – Prison reform: Are criminals more innately violent?
    – Gay rights: Is being queer a mental disorder?
    – Abortion: Is abortion the taking of a life?
    – Ukraine: How much of the Russian attack was based on legitimate concerns re: Western expansion?

    And, for this article: “Does the press lead the populace to an accurate understanding of the world?”

    No.

  13. “since Russia started this war of annexation”

    2014 – Nuland coup in Ukraine. Donbass and Luhansk declare independence, backed by the Ukrainian Armed Forces in those areas who join the rebels, what you could call a civil war begins.

    Russia moves to annex Crimea, which was a gift from Krushchev to Ukraine in 1954, and more importantly was their Black Sea Fleet base.

    https://www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/why-did-russia-give-away-crimea-sixty-years-ago

    Crimea was part of Russia from 1783, when the Tsarist Empire annexed it a decade after defeating Ottoman forces in the Battle of Kozludzha, until 1954, when the Soviet government transferred Crimea from the Russian Soviet Federation of Socialist Republics (RSFSR) to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (UkrSSR).

    2015-21 – Ukraine retakes some of the two rebel oblasts in fierce fighting which kills more than ten thousand civilians. While some Russians join the rebels and Russia helps arm them, they put hope in the Minsk Accords, which promise autonomy to Donbass and Luhansk but instead are used to buy time for Ukrainian training and rearming.

    2022 – Russia realises (IMHO reluctantly, Donbass people had been screaming for Russian intervention for years) that they’d been taken for mugs and invade to protect the majority ethnic Russian population, their own people.

    (A precedent had been set around 1989 when US/NATO supported Serbian rebels in Kosovo and bombed Serbia until they gave in. But unlike the Donbass, the electricity supply was pretty much the first thing to be targeted, and unlike the Donbass the rebels weren’t “our people” but instead the most unsympathetic bunch of organ thieves you could imagine.)

    All US papers, plus sadly Steve – “Russia’s unprovoked invasion“.

  14. dearieme says:
    @Art Deco

    A natural consequence of having a local monopoly?

  15. So, apparently Scott Alexander is not that intelligent after all.

    Good to know, good to know.

    • Replies: @grinning
    , @Corpse Tooth
  16. Thea says:

    Recently they reported that middle age deaths of despair are related to decline in Christianity:
    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/deaths-of-despair-may-be-driven-by-loss-of-religion-new-research-paper-argues-11673876749

    The article states religion in general but really the repeal of blue laws only applied to Christian church services.

    Such information should be front and center and have real policy implications along with encouraging healthy marriages and self restraint in sexuality. The journalists could elevate this to Floyd levels of attention and actually help people and improve lives.

    Wether they tell the truth occasionally is irrelevant if they only use it to destroy the people.

  17. SFG says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I actually don’t think it’s that. The guy just had a daughter (I presume his wife did, though he never talks about her, which makes sense given how much he likes to fight verbally) and he is probably worried about putting her through college now.

  18. “… which the academics Dave Rozema and Zach Goldberg have greatly advanced”.

    Steve, do you mean David Rozado, rather than Dave Rozema?

  19. Steve Sailer always dutifully knocks Russia. Maybe he knows what his donors want to hear? He got to keep his Chase account while real dissidents lost theirs.

    This is the guy who lectured white people on why they shouldn’t be on their own side.

    • Thanks: Pierre de Craon
  20. Rob says:

    This is off-topic, but would anyone like to make a prediction about what the Supreme Court will decide about affirmative action?

  21. The media will always lie about the following topics

    Black crime/iq
    Jewish power/influence
    Oligarchy control of western Europe and USA
    Women/abortion issue
    Immigration destroying western countries

    Mainstream media is totally beholden to the Jewish financial Oligarchy.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  22. Ian Smith says:

    I will say this: believing everything you read on the NYT will make you less retarded than believing everything you see on Infowars or Q-tard twitter. Overall I agree with the general thrust of Hanania’s article.

    • Replies: @Gilbert Ratchet
    , @Dmon
  23. Steve your fisking of Hanania’s essay is spot on and much, much better than Hanania’s essay.

    The core of it is he just doesn’t seem to “get” what he writes …

    There is a major exception when it comes to the “holy trinity” of liberalism, that is topics having to do with race, gender, and sexual orientation, but even here the problem is not lies as much as that the press is blinded by ideology. The facts they give you even on these sensitive topics are usually correct, but it’s simply that the interpretation of these facts is wrong.

    First off it isn’t a “trinity” it is more the old Jewish one-God–minoritarianism. (The tranny nonsense is a clear example of that. It would have had zero purchase without the pre-existing ideological structure where minorities are ipso facto “good” and majorities enforcing their norms ipso facto “oppressive” and “bad”.)

    And most importantly, this isn’t some little cubby hole minoritarianism (his “race, gender, sexual orientation”) is what all of our politics is about.

    It is the story involving crime, education, affirmative action, jobs, housing, public spending, taxation, lawfare, political polarization … and of course the big kahuna pressurizing and laying waste everything–immigration.

    It is what our politics is pretty much entirely about. Normal middle and working class Americans who just want to raise their families and live their lives in decent neighborhoods according to their traditional normie American values.

    And a vast parasitic verbalist overclass which uses these minoritarian “oppression” narratives of the world to justify its existence and massive abuse of state power in order to loot … and has been making American life shitty and shitty for normies every year.

    If Hanania really thinks “race, gender and sexual orientation” is some little–“ok ignore them on that stuff”–cubbyhole, but otherwise all is well, then he really is–for whatever intelligence he possesses, utterly clueless.

  24. Anonymous[256] • Disclaimer says:

    Low effort trolling from Banana. He’s criticizing the pro-ignorant by playing down to their level. Steve’s response here is so much richer in nuance, context, logical thinking, quantitative thinking. But it’s not framed as “x is good/bad, actually” bait, so I doubt it will do as well on Twitter

  25. Brutusale says:

    Again, journalism was degraded by the whole Watergate era, and subsequent journalists evolved from ink-stained wretches reporting the facts to pampered, upper-class J-school school pukes whose opinions ARE their facts. The wall between reporting and editorializing is long gone.

    Journalism jobs, like being a pro sports executive, are now filled by the monied classes. The unpaid/low-paid internships take care of that. Editors, too, are gone or coopted; there are no adults in charge anymore.

    Speaking of sources, Steve, here are some documents (diplomatic cables) for your reading pleasure. I’m sure you’ll begin ignoring them immediately!

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/dozens-wikileaks-cables-show-us-knew-nato-expansion-was-russias-bright-red-line

    • Agree: Barnard
    • Replies: @bomag
    , @Thirdtwin
    , @AnotherDad
  26. Thirdtwin says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You have to wonder who got to him. He sounds like he’s been intensively convinced.

  27. Anon[102] • Disclaimer says:

    Some of our online friends have a more parsimonious & elegant explanation than Hanania about the media’s areas of accuracy or inaccuracy:

    The Media is owned and run by Jews.

    Topics and narratives that the Jews care about are tightly controlled & will be full of whatever bias, lies, half-truths, omissions, and wishcasting is required to support the Jewish agenda.

    Topics and narratives that the Jews do NOT care about are allowed to be reported on without interference because why not. Furthermore, the presence of honest accurate information in The Media helps preserve its legitimacy.

    If people are increasingly distrustful of The Media it could be because the list of topics and narratives that Jews care about keeps growing longer and longer.

    They’ve always been very concerned about how the goyim think about Race, Crime, Immigration, Gays and Israel.

    But now they also seem to be very interested in how we feel about the weather, the Ukraine, cutting genitals off, eating bugs, racist robots, seasonal flus and gas stoves. So the space for accurate and bias-free reporting keeps getting smaller and smaller.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  28. I actually do think Russia could be freaked out by our Transgender Generals at the Pentagon. They simply don’t have anything to compete.

    I would like to put forward RuPaul as a symbol for our Pentagon. She/he makes a great Uncle Samantha, to represent the new queer general officers.

    Many posters/donors to this blog would love to shake booties with an Uncle Samantha tranny. Then they could twist their own nipples and goon to stats about BBC (Big Black Champions).

    Now, let’s get back to some anagrams and discussing what BBC had the best running record back in 1989 ….

    • Replies: @Thoughts
  29. SafeNow says:

    I confess that I felt a worm of reliability skepticism as soon as I heard the name “Hanania.” I have a tendency to judge people by their name (and what they look like). My name-assessment test for reliability is to imagine dialogue in a play or film that goes like this:

    Male character: “Well, I’ve broken my leg, and now I can’t bring-in my crops. I will ask__________. _____________ will bring in my crops.”

    Now fill-in “Hanania.” You see? It doesn’t work. (Same with Goldstein. Same with LeMichael. On the other hand, try, simply, Tom. “Tom will bring-in my crops” works.)

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Stealth
  30. bomag says:
    @Thoughts

    I’ll stick up for him a small amount and say he’s a compromised individual.

    Kind of telling that the Press, who have barrels of ink, have come to the point where the likes of Hanania are compelled to defend the politically crippled institution.

  31. bomag says:
    @Brutusale

    I suspected the institution was in trouble when it became popular, post Watergate, for young people; pageant contestants, e.g.; to announce they are going into journalism “to change the world”.

  32. Thirdtwin says:
    @Brutusale

    “…pampered, upper-class J-school school pukes whose opinions ARE their facts…”

    …and nepot stenographers who report corporate or government press releases as facts. There about two dozen actual investigative journalists in the world, and they toil mostly in obscurity or exile.

  33. “the murder of George Floyd …”

  34. I don’t know what all Hanania’s musings add up to. Basically:

    — Most people think the MSM is mostly right because they mostly get their opinions from the MSM.

    — Most people are too ignorant and apathetic to know or care whether the media is right anyway.

    — The media is better than they would be if they were worse than they are.

    Are these deep thoughts?

    • Agree: Almost Missouri, Dnought
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  35. bomag says:
    @AnotherDad

    Spot on.

    I’ve been reading a few economists on substack. Their rosy support of immigration comes across as childlike innocence. They act like immigrants are superheros that will show up and save us from a variety of economic problems.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Smooth Brain
  36. The Twitter files and now Steven Crowder’s contract from Daily Wire are eye-openers.

    Once you know how things work you can’t unsee it.

    • Agree: DCThrowback
  37. @Thoughts

    Yeah, there’s no other way to explain this:

    I like the idea of understanding people’s true motivations not just by what they say, but what they seem to have the strongest emotional reaction to. No matter what liberals tells you, opposing various forms of “bigotry” is the center of their moral universe. For conservatives, the equivalent is clearly hatred of the left. Tim Miller, a Bulwark writer who became disillusioned with the party during the Trump era, wrote in his book Why We Did It that there’s a lot of cynicism in Republican politics, but to the extent that many operatives have one genuine belief, it’s wanting to spite and harm liberals.

    As far as I can tell, this supposedly pervasive phenomenon cannot be observed anywhere. It’s a complete fabrication, one of the Left’s dumbest talking points.

  38. @Rob

    would anyone like to make a prediction about what the Supreme Court will decide about affirmative action?

    They will say that: “The best way to stop discrimination based on race, is to stop discriminating based on race.”

    Now that they actually overruled Roe v. Wade, it’s clear the conservative majority doesn’t care about preserving sacred cows with mealey-mouthed moderation.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  39. @SFG

    What do you propose as the mechanism by which that fact scrambles his brain?

    • Replies: @SFG
  40. Mike Tre says:

    “On the other hand, Noam Chomsky argued that the NYT and the like were beholden to the American government’s foreign policy apparatus. And he has something of a point. ”

    Ya think? Two of the highest ranking operatives with the OSS’s Psychological Operations Division during WWII were a guy named CD Jackson (publisher of Fortune Magazine and Directer of Time-Life) and a guy named William Paley (basically the guy who founded CBS). Jackson was one of Eisenhower’s closest advisers and also one of his speech writers.

    CD Jackson is the guy seen waiving around the fake human pelvis ash tray at the Buchenwald labor camp in what might be the first Holocaust propaganda film created. It was directed by… Samuel.. I mean, Billy, Wilder of Some Like it Hot fame.

    Oh and that nobody I mentioned earlier, CD Jackson, he just happens to be the guy that bought the Zapruder film directly from old Abe in order to “protect the integrity of the film”.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  41. Of course, it never overcorrects on identity issues, where I’ve already granted to media haters that they’re insane.

    … The few media critics who are better than the press are rare and deserve your support. The exception here is anything having to do with race, gender, or sexual orientation, where you should understand that establishment journalists are trying their best but can’t be trusted because they’ve lost their minds, or are scared of those that have, and you’d be better off listening to people with cancelable views.

    One can–and should–learn from people one disagrees and even people who are wrong.

    For example, someone might spout off about something they really don’t know much about, but be quite informative about stuff they are knowledgeable upon. You make note–wheat/chaff. Or someone might have a political orientation I disagree with but be good at explicating their thinking, and you learn from it.

    But “insane” and “lost their minds” are not markers for “worth listening to”. Rather when someone is claiming authority in some area, but spewing absolute nonsense, that’s a marker for “dumbass”, “fraud”, “liar”. It is discrediting for everything else they say because they are simply too stupid and/or dishonest.

  42. I’d just be repeating Douglas Valentine at length, so instead I’ll recommend his books.

    Also there are of course alternatives to the MSM, like magazines and newsletters and news aggregators. Back in the old days you’d read Slashdot headlines and then click on the interesting ones and go read something on Computer World or something. But hey, let’s pretend “former” intelligence operatives copy/pasting press releases from the favored side of a conflict is boring, incremental progress and not civilization-ending malicious stupidity.

  43. @AnotherDad

    We’re in the middle of an attempt to genocide a race of a billion people. Race is by far the most important thing to be right or wrong on, both from the perspective of the perpetrator group and from the perspective of the victim group, which is why the media he defends are always (deliberately) wrong on race. Anyone who doesn’t see the primacy of this existential issue isn’t perceptive or isn’t smart. Anyone who lies about the issue isn’t good.

    • Agree: bomag
  44. Sounds like Hanania is angling for a long-term writing job at the NYTimes or Wall Street Journal, or perhaps a gig at CNN or FoxNews.

    • Agree: Dnought
  45. @SFG

    AEN:

    Hanania is just another lyin’ sack of shit.

    SFG:

    I actually don’t think it’s that. The guy just had a daughter … and he is probably worried about putting her through college now.

    SFG, those two are not mutually exclusive. One might recognize that a morally compromised person would have motive to publicly lie for personal advantage. AEN’s assessment stands. Hanania is a liar. His weird physiognomy is fair warning to anyone on the fence about his character.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  46. Polynices says:

    Hanania seemed interesting and heterodox when he first appeared in the last year or two but recently it’s become clear that he’s just a liberal who doesn’t like trannies. If it weren’t for the culture war stuff he is irritated by he’d be indistinguishable from a generic right-liberal. He is very much an example of someone who “doesn’t know what time it is”. He accepts the left’s framing of every issue aside from gay and trans stuff and it seems he only really objects to that stuff based on personal disgust not any deeper philosophical reason.

    Very, very much not worth anyone’s time to pay attention to.

    • Replies: @John Pepple
  47. ic1000 says:

    The #7 or #8 spot on yesterday’s NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt was a police-blotter man-bites-dog story about the arrest of some New Mexico crank who weaseled his way onto the Democratic ticket for a City Council spot, lost big, claimed “I Wuz Robbed,” then engaged in a reckless scheme to hire gig-economy knuckleheads. To spray some bullets at a few current and former residences of his erstwhile opponents. The reporter interviewed local Establishment Democrats who were appalled that this nutcase somehow got himself on their ballot, and soberly assured viewers that Steps Have Already Been Taken to prevent this from happening, ever again. A psychological evaluation of the alleged perpetrator is scheduled.

    Sorry. That happened in some alternate world.

    In this one, the arrest of the New Mexican Republican crank was the lead story. An Establishment Democrat was indeed interviewed; she and the reporter implied that the crazy guy was simply another Trumpist, and the Gun Violence he brought to the community was the unfortunate and typical outcome of their False Claims of election fraud. No Republicans appeared on camera, presumably because they were too ashamed of themselves to show their faces.

    Per Scott Alexander, Lester’s team didn’t tell a single lie (at least, that I could detect). I had to admire the artistry, no matter how agenda-driven.

  48. Great piece and a really important topic.
    Sorry to pick up on just one small point, but I think it is interesting.

    I didn’t. I pointed out the good job the US Intelligence Community had done in predicting the Russian invasion and admitted I expected Putin to do something more ambiguous, like he did in 2014.

    Did US Intelligence Community predict a Russian invasion? Or did they predict a Kiev attack on Donbas where the expected Russian reaction would be spun as a Russia invasion of Ukraine?

    Certainly all the experts at the time were expecting a Ukraine attack on Donbas, even if they could not say so. And pretty much every US backed war starts with a false flag, not just the Gulf of Tonkin.

    Evidence to support this:
    Zelensky loudly announced he would take back Donbas in 2021.
    Huge dug in defensive and offensive positions outside Donbas region build over 2015-2021
    A tripling of army size with Nato training over 2015-2021
    Poroshenko, Merkel & Hollande have all stated that Minsk 1&2 were used to buy time ahead of a military attack to regain lost territory.
    The “defence of Ukraine from Russia” is even today mostly promoted as Ukraine fighting to regain its territory.
    In 2021 Ukraine moved its forces into position outside Donbas, and everyone interpreted (but dare not say) that Russian movements were in response to apparent Ukrainian aggression. The consensus was that Russian reactions were enough to deter Zelensky from its plans.
    Despite the “warnings by US intelligence” come February 2022 Ukraines forces were nowhere near the border where Russian forces were lined up – they were massed in front of the Donbas. Apparently Kiev did not expect a Russian invasion either.

    What then happened was the Great Distraction where 50k Russians took huge amounts of territory including crucial parts west of Kiev that had little or no protection. They faced (as we quickly learnt, civilians alone!!!!). Large numbers of Ukrainian troops were withdrawn form in front of Donbas and they chased them away (to great western cheers, though in fact the Russians ran with little losses). What really happened? Russia got enough artillery in place on the edge of Donbas that it was able to take apart that massively dug in protected Ukrainian force that threatened the rebel territories.
    Meanwhile the southern Oblasts were taken by Russia too.
    There are few certainties in war, but we can be certain of one thing – Kiev was not planning for a Russian invasion.

    The SMO was a clever Russia Pre-empting of the planned Kiev attack on Donbas.
    But the core event of 2022 was all about a Ukraine attempt to regain lost territory that went farcically wrong for Kiev and Nato/US.
    Don’t expect NYT to write that.

  49. This is more evidence of desperation on the part of the regime media losing their legitimacy. As more people start to recognize the multiple deceptions, these types of mediasplaining articles will crop up.

    How many examples are needed before one sees that the media is not trustworthy, nor truthful?

    1. The Duke Lacrosse
    2. Covington Hoax
    3. Mostly Peaceful Protests
    4. Hands up Don’t Shoot Micheal Brown
    5. Jussie Smollett ‘MAGA Country’ (in 10 degree Urban Chicago?)

    ….The list is practically endless of deceptions from the legacy media, yet they still have the hubris to bristle at the mere indication that they are less than holy.

  50. Ron Unz says:

    Well, I have mixed feelings about this analysis. It’s certainly true that the MSM is totally incompetent and dishonest about very many important things, but it’s also true that the conservative counter-MSM he criticizes is also totally incompetent and dishonest, perhaps even much more so.

    But I think that one reason he’s able to exonerate the MSM from massive flaws is that he carefully avoids any of the really “touchy” issues where the MSM has totally fallen down on the job, sometimes for generations.

    For example, last month Tucker Carlson had a great segment in which he pointed out the obvious fact that JFK had been killed in a conspiracy involving the CIA and the MSM had covered it up for more than two generations.

    In broadcast and on Youtube, his segment reached many millions of viewers, and RFK Jr. praised it as the most courageous newscast in 60 years, getting over 33,000 Retweets:

    https://www.unz.com/runz/collapsing-conspiracy-cover-ups/

    Now assuming it’s actually true that the President of the United States was killed in a conspiracy involving the CIA and the MSM covered it up for 60 years, that really seems like a pretty big MSM “glitch.” For example, since I relied upon the MSM, I’d lived most of my life never suspecting anything until about 10 years ago. And it would obviously make a sensible person start to look into all sorts of other things, which is why I began writing my long American Pravda series:

    https://www.unz.com/page/american-pravda-series/

    But if Hanania is very careful to avoid acknowledging any of those mega-glitches because those would get him labeled a “conspiracy theorist” or a “Putin lackey” most of what’s left is criticizing the MSM for its Woke politics, which is certainly bad but hardly as serious as cheer-leading us into a nuclear war with Russia over Ukraine.

  51. The exception here is anything having to do with race, gender, or sexual orientation, where you should understand that establishment journalists are trying their best but can’t be trusted because they’ve lost their minds, or are scared of those that have, and you’d be better off listening to people with cancelable views. Continue to criticize the press for where it falls short, without devolving into nihilistic hate.

    Hanania concedes that the media is pumping out noble lies on race gender and sexual orientation but assumes it’s okay on other issues, like foreign affairs. Shouldn’t we assume the opposite?

    Journalists spin narratives and lie by omission not because the CIA gives them envelopes of cash or holds their children hostage but because they see these projects as their projects too. Over the last decade, they did hit pieces on Marine Le Pen, Putin and Orban not because they had to but because they wanted to. The BBC, NYT and WaPo correspondents see them as political enemies too.

    Hanania:

    The problem with taking a nihilistic posture towards the MSM is that there’s nothing to replace it with.

    Malcolm Gladwell made a similar argument in his closing remarks at a recent Munk debate*. What Hanania is saying essentially is that we have to get out our intellectual tweezers to pick the peppercorns out of the mouse droppings because there’s nowhere else to reliably get information. What Gladwell says is even worse: that we have to trust liberal institutions like the mainstream media because the alternative is too terrible to contemplate.

    *:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vkgROIINEs

    • Agree: Poirot
  52. For example, in 2016 the New York Times looked into every mass shooting (at least four casualties) in 2015 and found that in almost three-fourths of the cases, both the shooters and victims were black.

    One might therefore argue that corporate white America has done an excellent job of indoctrinating the descendants of slavery into a culture of guns, murder, and violence via TV and movies.

    Wasn’t Bonnie and Clyde one of the most popular movies of its time? Did it trigger a discussion about the American culture of casual and itinerant violence fueled by guns and automobiles?

    I was just thinking about this recently due to all the changes that have taken place subsequent to the death of her majesty Queen Elizabeth II, who had ruled for 70 years.

    At the time of her Ascension to the throne, which closely coincided with my own birth, television and popular culture and media as we know it today barely existed. In Britain at the time the BBC was the only broadcaster, with its mission statement to educate and entertain and news readers War evening dress. At the time of closing broadcasting at night the national anthem was played.

    Could the development of popular media have taken a different course?

  53. ic1000 says:

    Not really OT, for those following the war in Central Europe who are inclined to listen to interviews, here is Noah Carl hosting Anatoly Karlin on his podcast. Karlin has sensible, realistic, pro-Russian perspectives that are missing from the mainstream discourse. (FWIW, my own views do not accord with Karlin’s.)

    Who’s winning the war in Ukraine? Jan. 9, 2023.

    A few months back, Carl exchanged views with pro-Ukraine pundit Konstantin Kisin, also worth a listen.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  54. I can recall in 1980 reading an article about frustrated reporters covering the new Iraq-Iran war from the bar in the Baghdad Hilton with no way of getting to the front.

    You can’t get to the front … but the front can get to you:

  55. Old Prude says:

    except that they control which stories get lots of articles and which get buried, which is also a type of lying

    This. This. This. Selection is the first bias.

    How many articles about Ukraine and Afghanistan – countries half way around the world, with absolutely no impact on the lives of 99.9 percent of Americans?

    Now, how many about the very large country right up against our southern border?

    How many about the ongoing murder of whites by blacks every month.

    Who killed George Floyd? Now, who killed Canon Hinnant? Why do we know Floyd and Chauvin, but not Canon and what’s-his-name?

    So, also This: Hanania is just another lyin’ sack of shit.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @duncsbaby
  56. Dmon says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes.
    Shorter Hanania: “I pretended to be an edgy dissident and GloboHomo made me an offer that I took. Now I have this good grift going, so you guys out there stop effing it up for me. I’m the controlled opposition, not you”.

    He’s the White millenial Al Sharpton.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @Pete P
  57. i stopped reading this guy a while ago, because he has devolved into nonsense takes.

    however, if you’re new to the concept of very smart people talking themselves into nonsense, then reading Hanania for a while is a good exercise in seeing how the sausage is made.

    while clearly a centrist, watching Hanania work his way thru ideas and concepts to arrive at an incorrect induction is revealing to how leftists go thru this process.

  58. Personally, I don’t know what bias that would introduce:

    And that’s why you are wrong on anything of note.

    Here’s a clue: The fuckers lie.

  59. theMann says:

    Laughably false and ridiculous to boot. Two examples from my own experience:
    1. A relative’s husband is a noted Physicist, who spent years pointing out obvious basic errors to the local news outlets, who never corrected and never learned to check first.
    2. My own ( first) degree was in Economics, the amount of basic errors the Media gets on that subject approach 100%.

    Anybody with an area of expertise will tell you the same thing about the Media: wrong, sloppily incompetent, and they never meaningfully correct.
    Then add in their dishonest and thoroughly malevolent agenda.

    The “News” is garbage, period.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  60. “…most people who consume serious newspapers, books, and magazines want sources of information that at least make some basic effort to be fair and neutral in their analysis…”

    That’s an Overton Window situation. Most people on the Left consider something “fair” if it finds a middle ground between deranged progressivism and uniparty centrism. 60+ years of leftward drift and establishment influence in journalism has consistently moved the position of “fair” in one direction.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  61. @Hypnotoad666

    It seems like only three days ago I posted this.
    Summary: Most people know the Medias opinion of themselves is bullshit.

    • Thanks: Post-Postmodernist
  62. Anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hanania‘s main shtick is to just be disagreeable and state slightly controversial views. It’s in order to cleverly stand out among the punditry. If you read his thesis here he basically says nothing.

    He states the obvious about how the media correctly gives basic facts about things like shootings or murder etc. Big deal.

    But he hedges and admits the Sailers of the world are 100% correct that the media obfuscates or
    omits certain details surrounding the important cultural issues central to questions of our time.

    We all knew this. Basically a Zero-Sum argument he got you to waste your time reading.

    • Agree: Forbes
  63. @Ron Unz

    “Well, I have mixed feelings about this analysis.”

    one of his main problems is that Richard Hanania is not that old, and hasn’t lived long enough to understand certain stuff. i see this recurring in his output. the first time he tackles certain issues is the first time he’s ever thought about them, and there’s no context other than a 30 year old guy reading wikipedia about stuff he didn’t experience.

    to him, certain things have always been the way they are today. he wasn’t around for the time periods before that when lots of things were different. he takes whatever is happening in 2023 and says well, that’s a lot better than 1023. well sure, but it’s also complete garbage compared to 1963 or 1983, which is the relevant, in living memory metric.

    he’s the younger version of Steven Pinker, trying to tell me that everything is better than it’s ever been (haven’t heard Pinker going on about that one in a while however).

    • Replies: @Forbes
  64. Gordo says:

    Hanania has changed recently, and not for the better.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  65. “There is no such a thing in America as an independent press, unless it is out in country towns. You are all slaves. You know it, and I know it. There is not one of you who dares to express an honest opinion. If you expressed it, you would know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid $150 for keeping honest opinions out of the paper I am connected with…The man who would be so foolish as to write honest opinions would be out on the street hunting for another job. The business of a New York journalist is to distort the truth, to lie outright, to pervert, to villify, to fawn at the feet of Mammon…You know this, and I know it; and what foolery to be toasting an “Independent Press”! We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes. We are jumping-jacks. They pull the string and we dance. Our time, our talents, our lives, our possibilities, are all the property of other men. We are intellectual prostitutes.”

    Attributed to John Swinton on April 12, 1883, at the Twilight Club, New York City.

  66. Tom F. says:

    Am loving me some Hanania!

    He’s a fantastic troll, in the mold of Beattie, and Santos. And, sometimes, Sailer. Hanania notices.
    “God forgive me, but I do love it so!” – George S. Patton, amended.

    P.S. – for those keeping score at home, Hanania is not a Joo.

  67. @Ron Unz

    … but it’s also true that the conservative counter-MSM he criticizes is also totally incompetent and dishonest, perhaps even much more so.

    Nah, it’s quite a different crowd. The Conservative non-Lyin’-Press is full of all sorts of freelancers, like iSteve, others on your site, and on substack, etc. There are those who fall for and promote any crazy story, but then there are those that would be the best of the best of the Media, were they not writing way too much WrongThink (aka, truth).

    The former types may not be good at stats, math, or science, and may write completely out of their leagues, but then that’s the same for almost ALL of the Lyin’ Press. (They are most especially innumerate as all hell.) The freelance Conservatives are not purposeful liars though. This substack guy does nothing but defend alternate ways of lying of the Lyin’ Press.

    However, we have a free market in alt-Journalism – as in Conservative and Libertarian, seeing as almost none of the mainstream is either. We can pick and choose those who we see as competent. Meanwhile, the MSM is pounding in the lies to the rest of the population day and night.

  68. The exception here is anything having to do with race, gender, or sexual orientation, where you should understand that establishment journalists are trying their best but can’t be trusted because they’ve lost their minds,

    Those “exceptions” cover an awful lot of ground. This would be like saying “XYZ Corp made an excellent globe, except the oceans are all in the wrong place”.

    I’d add that if someone has “lost their minds” they shouldn’t be establishment journalists.

    I follow Hanania’s substack. He’s worth skimming because he isn’t dishonest (as far as I can tell) and he seems to be slowly grasping that a LOT of what he believed is turning out to be not so.

    BUT…he has a lot of the tics that reformed/reforming leftists have – e.g. it is really important to him that he believe liberals are more educated and smarter than conservatives. That means: people that believe socialism in a multi-cultural society can work; that men can become women and vice versa; that diversity is a strength; and that blacks are victims of white oppression. That’s who is “smart” and “educated”.

    He is young and doesn’t have the life experience to be wise. He reminds me of a smarter Sean Hannity (just because I said RH isn’t as smart as he wants to believe, that doesn’t mean he’s as dumb as Hannity): when he learns something he seems to think that because it is new to him, its new to everyone.

    Rather, they produce the kind of content that educated indoctrinated Westerners want to read, in part because, unlike many conservatives, most people who consume serious newspapers, books, and magazines want sources of information that at least make some basic effort to be fair and neutral in their analysis, and that try to cover a wide variety of topics.

    Lol, no.

  69. I tend to get annoyed by those around me. Most of my adult life I’ve spent in academic institutions, and this has created a revulsion towards the woke. As my writing has gained attention over the last two years, I’ve made friends with lots of conservatives, and that has made me notice their flaws more and more, including ones that I could more easily overlook back when sexual harassment and diversity trainings were part of my life. Most writers have to worry about “audience capture,” but for me it’s the opposite. When I see what those around me think, I have to struggle not to get consumed by all the ways in which they’re wrong about the world….

    Sounds like Hanania needs to spend more time among journalists, rather than among those who critique journalists.

    Or he could just read Ron Unz’s American Pravda series.

    Or the Twitter Files. (Hey, the Twitter Files story about how journalists, the media, and the deep state colluded to lie, censor, and deceive, is being reported by journalists in the media, so it must honest and good, right Richard? Aargh, so confusing!)

    The macro-takeaway from the Twitter Files I have seen isn’t any particular story or incident. It’s that a huge portion of the time of a huge portion of Twitter’s staff—up to and including its top executives—was taken up with the matter of how to lie, censor, and deceive without it being too obvious that they were lying, censoring, and deceiving. Given that Musk fired most of the staff for this and now Twitter runs better, it must have been literally the main product at Twitter.

    Media institutions are influential not simply because they have arbitrary power that could just as easily be bestowed on anyone else.

    So why does the Media-Government-Industrial Complex spend so much time and effort silencing the anyone elses? Adjust your priors, Richard!

    Richard Hanania occasionally makes good points, but most occasionally makes merely provocative points. Being relatively young and a bit of an outsider, this is natural: he wants to create a name for himself, so being pro- [in favor of] -voc- [voice] is a way to do that.

    Here, though, he is merely provocative.

    ———

    For anyone whose browser doesn’t use Chrome’s newfangled text-bookmarking protocol, here is the actual link for SlateStarCodex’s “pushback” article:

    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/highlights-from-the-comments-on-the-061

    (Google Chrome is probably the the most widespread surveillance and spyware program in history, so you shouldn’t use it unless you want to be surveilled, but their text-bookmarking protocol is a clever and useful addition to software libraries, so one might hope it will catch on more widely, even though Ron Unz’s similar protocol for this site does same thing more concisely. Google has oligopoly power that Ron doesn’t.)

  70. @William Badwhite

    “most people who consume serious newspapers, books, and magazines want”

    Heh. Somebody said “serious newspapers.” Blurgle.

  71. BUT…he has a lot of the tics that reformed/reforming leftists have – e.g. it is really important to him that he believe liberals are more educated and smarter than conservatives.

    Of course, as Jacques Ellul’s Propaganda explains, the “educated” are the most susceptible to propaganda.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  72. @ben tillman

    […] there’s a lot of cynicism in Republican politics, but to the extent that many operatives have one genuine belief, it’s wanting to spite and harm liberals.

    As far as I can tell, this supposedly pervasive phenomenon cannot be observed anywhere. It’s a complete fabrication, one of the Left’s dumbest talking points.

    The fact that the one genuine belief of Republican operatives is that they’re not personally getting enough money for their … exertions shouldn’t get in the way of the fact that some variation of “wanting to spite and harm liberals” ought to be number one or thereabouts.

    The New Left wants them and the people they ostensibly set up proper representation for dead, GULAGed or otherwise crushed, and it should be obvious to all by now this is a fight with no quarter. Instead they and the GOPe in general have allowed the election system on which their income depends get corrupted to the point we doubt there will ever be another vaguely honest election in our future

    Then again, a 1980 type everything is going to hell landslide still might be possible, but winning that would not come from their efforts.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  73. @Almost Missouri

    . . . he wants to create a name for himself, so being pro- [in favor of] -voc- [voice] is a way to do that.

    Here “pro” means “forward”, which makes your point stronger.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  74. Like any institution, the press has to be judged according to realistic benchmarks, not simply criticized because it is imperfect or makes mistakes.

    Hanania is treating crimes as mistakes, which they are not.
    A store manager who does a competent job most of the time but makes mistakes can be retained.
    A manager who does a competent job most of the time but occasionally embezzles has to be fired.
    Would you keep buying stocks from Bernie Madoff AFTER you caught him lying to you?
    The main stream media deliberately lie by omitting crucial facts, and they deliberately lie by presenting facts they know to be false at the time they present them. They lie on the most important stories, especially war. They lie in unison, to create propaganda campaigns.
    They should be judged according to realistic benchmarks of basic integrity and on that basis they should be mistrusted and dismissed as a reliable news source.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast, Dmon
    • Thanks: Yancey Ward
  75. Barnard says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Dissident right writers like Jared Taylor and Peter Brimelow are only doing interviews with newspapers through email for good reasons. Selective editing of quotes to misrepresent someone has been a common practice in the newspaper industry since its inception. Hanania strikes me as a “I can’t believe I have to put up with you people” kind of academic.

  76. The biggest problem I see isn’t that the press lies — they do, and always have.

    It’s that now so many of them tell the same lie, in unison. Tucker Carlson has a field day with that.

    Back in the before time sure, the press lied then too. But they usually competed by contradicting each other. If the Daily News was for intervention, the Tribune would promptly take up isolationism. Then you could either stick with the side you preferred, or consider both sets of arguments — your choice.

    No more. Now it’s duckspeak. Take transsexuals. Who could possibly oppose rights for transsexuals? This population didn’t even exist ten years ago — but who points that out?

    The Ukraine. Expelling illegals immediately. Stamping out black crime. Etc, etc. We’re confronted with an all but uniform wall of propaganda for one set of views. Even those who apparently differ are basically following along — just dragging their feet.

  77. @Ron Unz

    Agree with all of the foregoing, but there may be a slight infelicity in the final sentence:

    what’s left is criticizing the MSM for its Woke politics, which is certainly bad but hardly as serious as cheer-leading us into a nuclear war with Russia over Ukraine.

    Inasmuch as a major reason that the Establish Media tells us that we are supposed to hate and oppose Russia—perhaps using nuclear weapons—is that they are not woke enough, Woke politics may indeed be quite literally cheer-leading us into a nuclear war.

    Of course, if one won’t oppose wokeness for being wrong, false, and wicked, one may still oppose it for gratuitous nuclear war.

    ———

    (Incidentally, lest anyone conclude I am an “Unz-lackey” for shilling the American Pravda series in a comment shortly after this comment of Ron’s, I point out I wrote it before Ron’s comment posted.)

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  78. AndrewR says:
    @SFG

    So what? I would beg on the street before I wrote one word defending the corporate media.

  79. @Almost Missouri

    (Google Chrome is probably the the most widespread surveillance and spyware program in history, so you shouldn’t use it unless you want to be surveilled, but their text-bookmarking protocol is a clever and useful addition to software libraries, so one might hope it will catch on more widely, even though Ron Unz’s similar protocol for this site does same thing more concisely. Google has oligopoly power that Ron doesn’t.)

    The Brave browser uses the open-source Chromium engine, so that might be the best alternative.

  80. Anyway, while I see the point about getting fed up with the Left, then realizing the Right is flawed as well, I think there’s a difference.

    The Left has come to simply seek to undermine every paradigm and shared assumption that makes civilized life possible. We should promptly mutilate unhappy children. Blacks should be permitted to loot and kill at will. The borders should be open — and apparently stay open until this country has decayed to the point where the average Bangladeshi no longer has a reason to come here. The more perverse and degenerate a sexual act is, the more we should celebrate it.

    The general idea is pretty obvious. On the other hand, the right has looney ideas as well — but at least most of them want a decent world, one where people are prosperous, and happy, and if you really want a fight, try the biker bar. It’s nice around here: the kids are lively but basically well-behaved, you know your neighbors and give them a hand if they need it, I wouldn’t leave the weedwhacker out on the front lawn overnight, but no one’s going to break into your house or rape your daughter.

    So given a choice…

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @John Milton's Ghost
  81. @That Would Be Telling

    The fact that the one genuine belief of Republican operatives is that they’re not personally getting enough money for their … exertions shouldn’t get in the way of the fact that some variation of “wanting to spite and harm liberals” ought to be number one or thereabouts.

    To me it translates into a general belief that preserving our people — survival — is number one. Harming liberals is merely incidental to the primary goal. I just don’t see any evidence of people “wanting to spite and harm liberals” as an end in itself, which is what Hanania claims he sees.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
  82. Edwhy says:

    Jenner said it in the fewest words. ‘Another” was superfluous.

  83. This morning I’m watching CNBC out of the corner of my eye and the news anchor announces the pending resignation of New Zealand’s Prime Minister, who is citing “burn out” as her reason. The anchor then goes on to describer her as “progressive icon” who did a splendid job handling the Covid crisis. Never mind the PM’s party is tanking in the polls but that played no part in her decision.

    I no longer even believe the weather reports coming from the media. They lie for their corporate masters on every issue and do not factually report the news.

  84. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ron Unz

    Now assuming it’s actually true that the President of the United States was killed in a conspiracy involving the CIA and the MSM covered it up for 60 years, that really seems like a pretty big MSM “glitch.”

    Yeah, that does seem like perfect instance to use the line, “Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play?”

    • Agree: ben tillman
  85. @Hypnotoad666

    would anyone like to make a prediction about what the Supreme Court will decide about affirmative action?

    They will say that: “The best way to stop discrimination based on race, is to stop discriminating based on race.”

    I tend to agree.

    Now that they actually overruled Roe v. Wade, it’s clear the conservative majority doesn’t care about preserving sacred cows with mealey-mouthed moderation.

    Indeed. And now that the Supreme Court adjudication has gone gloves-off, we should anticipate that the institutional Left will see to it that there never be another Constitutionalist appointment to SCOTUS again. Whatever we get from this this Court right now will be Peak Conservatism. Après eux, le Déluge.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  86. Tex says:

    Hanania cites Matthew Yglesias as an authority. I don’t think that would favorably impress anyone around here. That he cites him as asserting the Hillary Clinton e-mail stuff was over-reported doesn’t bolster H’s argument.

    We got a lot about Clinton’s e-mails, to be sure. Much of it was focused on mishandling info. Well, sometimes you goof, right?

    Not much followed the trail of why she had her own e-mail server. I think it was so she’d have a secure channel to discuss bribes funneled through the Clinton Foundation or other means in exchange for her decisions/influence as secretary of state.

    But what do I know. I’m not a member of the MSM.

  87. NEVER heard a pro-gun story on public radio EVER.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  88. Stealth says:
    @SafeNow

    Seriously. Who cares what Richard Punania thinks? Or is it Inania? I’m sure we can do something with that.

  89. @Almost Missouri

    “Google Chrome is probably the the most widespread surveillance and spyware program in history, so you shouldn’t use it unless you want to be surveilled”

    Brave is a decent browser with a TOR option (admittedly I mostly use that option to visit sports stream sites, but it’s generally good for getting past censorship) and good privacy options. Their CEO, Brendan Eich, is one of the good guys, doxxed by the tax people in an outrage against privacy when he was at Firefox.

  90. Anonymous[205] • Disclaimer says:

    O.T.

    A senior worker in the Swedish intelligence services has just been sentenced to life imprisonment for the crime of handing highly classified information to Russian authorities – in exchange for hard cash.
    This Swede’s name is Peyman Kia, who really is in fact an Iranian who happens to live in Sweden.

    Formerly, it was a rule of British secret services – I don’t know if it still is in these woke times – never to employ anyone who could not demonstrate that they were of British blood, due to the possibility of disloyalty to their nation. Which is a rather sensible position to take.

  91. Dumbo says:

    I don’t know and don’t care who is this ridiculous guy, but I have the following expressions for him:

    “100% safe and effective”
    “transgender women”
    “pregnant men”.

    The idea that the media is “honest” is stupid. Its whole framework is based on lies.

    No, Steve, the NYT is not right about anything, not even about Nagorno-Kabarakh. Maybe only sports coverage is more or less factual. Sure, it’s not 100% lies either, you can always pick up a few nuggets of facts here and there, but ALWAYS with a grain of salt.

    The problem of Steve is that he reads too much the NYT, I realize that now. That is why he’s like that.

  92. Arclight says:

    No one expects perfection from the media, the problem is that they clearly start from a conclusion and work backwards far too often. And Hanania acting like the only real problem – ‘the holy trinity’ – is not a big one is absurd when being force fed like a French goose on these agendas has massive implications for politics, the workplace, and the culture that affect nearly every American.

    In fact, I am struggling to come up with a major issue in the last 20 years where the media got it right from the outset – our foreign policy misadventures, Covid, Russia, transmania, race and crime, etc., etc. It’s a deliberate lack of curiosity about perspectives or facts that run contrary to their bias, and it’s had awful consequences for our society. Whenever they walk something back, it’s after the damage has already been done.

  93. SFG says:
    @ben tillman

    He needs to make money for college and figures there’s more money on the left.

    So, boom, conversion. He has to do a couple of these to show him moving left so it looks realistic. In a year he’ll be covering gender issues for the NYT.

  94. @ben tillman

    To me it translates into a general belief that preserving our people — survival — is number one. Harming liberals is merely incidental to the primary goal. I just don’t see any evidence of people “wanting to spite and harm liberals” as an end in itself, which is what Hanania claims he sees.

    Agree, but liberalism is based on slander of normal people and destruction of our way of life. I do incidentally feel hatred toward people who are trying to kill me.

  95. @ben tillman

    many operatives have one genuine belief, it’s wanting to spite and harm liberals.

    It’s a complete fabrication, one of the Left’s dumbest talking points.

    Not to defend the Left, but I think I know why it appears this way to them, because I do what they think they describe.

    Over time I have learned that liberals are so comprehensively wrong that I have developed a shortcut that if liberals suddenly favor something, there is probably something wrong/mistaken/malign about it, even if I do not yet perceive it myself. I can understand that from the liberals’ point of view, it may appear I simply spite them, when the reality is that I hold a reliably wrong source in higher skepticism.

    BTW, this shortcut heuristic has approximately a 100% accuracy rate.

    • Agree: Dmon
    • Thanks: ben tillman
  96. PeterIke says:

    I pointed out the good job the US Intelligence Community had done in predicting the Russian invasion

    It’s easy to predict something you’ve spent years actively provoking.

  97. @Thoughts

    Hanania has generally fallen in with the right on most of his views and in some cases is even further right, such as with civil rights. But he still sees himself as an intellectual and dislikes the anti-intellectual streak of the right, so he pushes out occasional articles like this to “trigger cons” and position himself as a more enlightened centrist who isn’t tribal and super rational.

    Sailer’s responses to Hanania are good because Sailer knows who Hanania is and isn’t assuming some agenda beyond that like a lot of the commenters here seem to be doing. I think Hanania wrote this to be deliberately provocative to his mostly right leaning base, and judging by its engagement I’d say it worked.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin, Cato
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  98. Great piece, and many thanks to Steve for including my comment as part of it.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  99. PeterIke says:
    @Rob

    This is off-topic, but would anyone like to make a prediction about what the Supreme Court will decide about affirmative action?

    My prediction is: it doesn’t matter. The legal niceties around the issue are meaningless. Universities and big business will always and forever find simple, “legal” ways around it, because there is absolutely no way to stop them. You just change the selection criteria to something else, and that something else just happens to favor non-whites and females at every turn. The education system is already preparing for this as more and more colleges drop the SAT as a measurement criteria.

    The system is filled top to bottom with true believers. And true believers are very, very good at gaming the system however they like.

  100. @ben tillman

    The evidence is overwhelming that a lot of political activity is driven by a desire to spite and harm the other side. This is especially true now and especially true about US politics. Liberals engage in this as much or more than conservatives, so Hanania is being selectively blind here but so is any conservative who says Hanania’s accusation is groundless.

  101. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    His weird physiognomy is fair warning to anyone on the fence about his character.

    Weird, horror-movie-villain-looking Hanania must’ve read my comment: Here’s a tweet from 30 minutes ago where he self-servingly imagines a mystery-meat Ellis Island fatso has ‘good physiognomy’. The presenter is a greasy human slug:


    [MORE]


  102. Hanania is mildly amusing (looking), almost always wrong; and is more or less a revolving door of bad hair days. He’s a little naive kid who gives dumb opinions on Russia and correct opinions on civil rights. He needs more experience, and wisdom before he tries to be Scott Alexander for the umpteenth time. Instead of a successful co-opt of Alexander’s recent post about the media hardly ever lying, he made the entirely ridiculous point, that the media is fantastic! lol – like dude, chex yoself foo! His faculties are not where they need to be, nor is his self awareness. He should narrow his range of inquiry to save himself from further embarrassments.

    I know this seems harsh, and I admit it is a cheap personal attack lacking in substance, but everybody with a brain already knows this. And he quite rightly in my opinion turns up the heat in the kitchen from time to time. It needs to be turned up. It should be turned up. However, people can know nothing else about Hanania except that he teamed up with Caplan. That by itself is death by self-immolation for anybody that has beat up on internet tough guys for the last thirty years. So let’s at least try to be entertaining when addressing the girl in the warzone – Hanania.

    Realer dan real. Truer dan true.

  103. Jack D says:

    This is damning with faint praise. Our media is better than what they have in Communist China! It could be even worse than what we have now!

  104. Mike Tre says:
    @SFG

    Who am I going to believe, this guy:

    or my own lyin’ eyes.

    • LOL: James Forrestal
  105. anon556 says:

    “If the media was as bad on every topic as it is on identity, I would probably join conservatives in suggesting we burn the whole thing to the ground, which is the posture I’m in favor of taking towards much of the academy.”

    Interesting how he falls into this trap. You see it all the time. People don’t generalize effectively from experience. As Robert Conquest said, “Everybody’s a conservative in what they know best.” Or Michael Crichton’s take: You know something about the story you’re reading about and the journalist gets it hilariously wrong, often even reversing cause and effect. “Wet streets cause rain.” Then you turn the page and read the next story completely forgetting how bad the last story was.

    I spent 18 years in the Army, two in Iraq. You don’t want to know how bad it is.

    Wife’s an academic, and, yeah, Hanania is right about burning most it to the ground.

    Richard Lindzen, climatologist at MIT, said the entire field needs to be shut down until the last grad student has retired.

    Long term, I think, as Glenn Reynolds likes to point out, Trump’s most important role was to expose the corruption of most American institutions. The question is, what will we do about? Can anything effective even be done?

    No one in politics seems like they understand this. De Santis, Youngkin, or Kemp seem fine by conventional standards, but I don’t see any of them tackling the corruption.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  106. Art Deco says:
    @bomag

    (1) Academicians are other-directed.

    (2) They only care about the welfare of their social and professional circle.

  107. Art Deco says:
    @Mike Tre

    Two of the highest ranking operatives with the OSS’s Psychological Operations Division during WWII

    William Paley was running a commercial company.

    • Replies: @Corpse Tooth
  108. Jack D says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He looks a little bit like the guy who was arrested for killing those students in Iowa.

    But serious, you really can’t put much stock in physiognomy.

    Here’s a man who looks like a harmless middle aged civil servant or maybe your insurance agent – nothing threatening about his physiognomy:

    In real life, the guys to watch out for are not the ones who look like movie villains but the ones who don’t.

  109. AKAHorace says:

    A few comments about this topic:

    First of all, when people stop trusting mainstream journalists, there’s no guarantee that they start listening to better sources of information instead.

    The alternatives to mainstream journalism range from sources as crazy as Miles Mathis, to those as sober and reliable as Slate/Astral Star Codex.

    (Brietbart is about half way between these two extremes. It is interesting as it seems like the mirror image of the mainstream media, rarely if ever lying, but pushing it’s own agenda by picking which stories to amplify and which to ignore.)

    As the mainstream media becomes more unreliable political debate may become heated as people will no longer agree on the basics of any issue.

    A lot of the criticism of the New York Times misses the point. Do NYT readers really need to know who is winning in the Armenian Azerbaijani war ? As diversity statements become a requirement for people’s careers perhaps a more intelligent reader would want to know what their position should be.

    Given current trends, Steve Sailer’s interpretations of the New York Times articles may come to resemble those of László Ladány (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A1szl%C3%B3_Lad%C3%A1ny).

  110. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    […]mystery-meat Ellis Island fatso has ‘good physiognomy’. The presenter is a greasy human slug

    A beautiful use of language! His long underwear under a jacket also made me think of Italians getting off steamships.

  111. @Paleo Retiree

    Your Gold Box is in the mail. Watch for it. 😉

  112. grinning says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    No, Scott Alexander is a smart guy. One can be smart and wrong, happens all the time. If your calculus leads you to assume that dumb follows from wrong, you’re in for a rude awakening someday.

    And I have no love lost for Mr. Alexander.

    • Disagree: The Wild Geese Howard
  113. @AnotherDad

    parasitic verbalists, my man, let’s get that in some f**king MEMEs STAT

  114. @Ian Smith

    Gee… can I have a third choice?

  115. @Anon

    A credit to Sailer’s excellent commentariat it only took 9 comments before this excellent heuristic by Crichton was noted.

    I also feel like Hanania’s case is similar to the argument that “humans and apes share 99% of dna!” or some such blather. The devil, as always, is in the details, or in the case, the ~1% of articles on race or war or immigration or crime that are picked up and signaled to the rest of the downstream megaphone owners that “we are choosing to focus on *this* as our narrative”.

  116. I confess I didn’t know who this Richard Hanania guy is–though I’d heard the name here on iSteve–so I looked him up.

    Now can someone tell me why my news feed doesn’t have the prison break in Idaho?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Pixo
  117. @Brutusale

    Again, journalism was degraded by the whole Watergate era, and subsequent journalists evolved from ink-stained wretches reporting the facts to pampered, upper-class J-school school pukes whose opinions ARE their facts. The wall between reporting and editorializing is long gone.

    Good work Brutusale.

    I’d throw in another factor–the influx of women.

    For the media to be useful–precisely in the way Hanania claims it is–journalism basically has to be an empirical exercise. “This is what is going on.” That’s is actually quite important and useful.

    But minoritarian leftism is not remotely empirical, it’s an entirely anti-empirical exercise. And post-Watergate we had the rush into journalism of people with the desire not to ferret out what they heck is actually going on (a demo that skews male and old and cynical), but true-believers anxious to insure we think proper, appropriate thoughts. A demo that skews female, younger, dumber and utterly narrative compliant.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  118. LP5 says:
    @Art Deco

    Art Deco writes about newspaper assignment editors:

    They didn’t give a rip what their readers were interested in, they covered what they were interested in covering.

    It may be instructive to look at what is happening in the non-newspaper media world. Columnists, pundits, writers and others may be enticed with large pay packets. In return, they agree to push ads and get penalized when those targets aren’t met. They also limit or modify the range of their opinions. That is one way to accept the new party line or take the ticket. Another way is to join a panel on some evening cable show and spout as directed.

    Unz readers may have noticed material changes in the tone, content and leanings of media people they once saw, read or followed on the telly, radio, in print or online. Many can say What happened to So-and-So, the columns are so different now?, and notice trends. There are many causes, ranging from industry concentration to political agendas fueled by dark money to advertisers wanting more targeted results.

    That environment is not conducive to transparency, objectivity or truth.

    • Replies: @Anon
  119. @Jack D

    Eichmann did look a bit odd (though not necessarily “threatening”—see both younger and older photos), but of course that doesn’t automatically predict actions an odd-looking person will take. OTOH, one may reasonably assume that an odd/ugly/scary-looking person, if aware of that fact, might have a somewhat darker/angrier/cynical view of life than an average-looking or attractive person, ceteris paribus.

    But serious, you really can’t put much stock in physiognomy.

    In real life, the guys to watch out for are not the ones who look like movie villains [e.a] but the ones who don’t.

    I specifically wrote “horror-movie-villain” which is usually a creepy-looking person or scary monster. You likely look rather odd yourself, judging by your Dick-Wolf-style misdirection on this specific subject.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  120. Anonymous[322] • Disclaimer says:

    Media is plural of medium.

    It should be ‘media are’

    • Agree: ben tillman
  121. Mary McCarthy on Lillian Hellman.

    Every word she writes is a lie, including and and the.

    Today’s media in a nutshell.

  122. Dmon says:
    @Ian Smith

    At least you understand that comparisons between the NYT and Infowars are appropriate because the two have comparable journalistic stature and reliability.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  123. @Jack D

    Ts, ts …… He was just doing his duty ….

  124. @Pop Warner

    I think this is a pretty fair assessment of the man and his writing, but I also think he is wrong here and increasingly in other areas he comments on that are outside of his core topics of the Academy and identity.

    • Agree: Pop Warner
  125. besides the outright narrative pushing on insane shitlib topics, on the most important news stories of my life–9/11-War on Terror-Iraq War, the economic crash, Trump supposedly being a Russian Agent, Russia-Ukraine–the NYT has been worse than useless; it has been viciously, violently wrong and actively propagandizing against the truth.

    burn this CIA garbage pile to the ground.

    people can learn about birdwatching or cooking or people with shitty taste in literature and music on their own time.

    btw, the nyt never breaks any sports news. never. so that’s not even a the tiny bit of recovered news respect that sports might entail.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  126. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    a mystery-meat Ellis Island fatso

    Or the ‘Canadian’ equivalent. I didn’t notice the “Tim’s” mugs at time of posting.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    , @Pixo
  127. Hanania is an elitist who has found a niche criticizing both his fellow elites as well as the proletariat. I think his driving motivation is to claim the authority to criticize the elite while avoiding being grouped in with the “no-nothings” who drive the elite criticizing industry (ie cable News viewers & Talk radio listeners). So Hanania always saves venom to put down the uncouth Right and Left.

  128. I haven’t read all of the comments yet, but as I’m sure has been pointed out numerous times: This guy is giving these people way too much credit.

    The canon of ethics for lawyers (stop laughing) prohibits lawyers from making “false or misleading statements.”

    These scribblers mislead almost 100% of the time in furtherance of the woke/far left agenda. Whether it’s the “experts say” stratagem, the insertion of “false” in front of “claims”, regardless of whether there’s been any investigation of the claims in question, or the deliberate misleading of unperceptive people (most people) with stuff like “The spike in violence in the wake of the pandemic” as if correlation is causation.

  129. Forbes says:
    @prime noticer

    I’m not even certain he’s a younger version of Pinker. I’ve read several of Pinker’s door stops, and I don’t think Hanania has the temperament to stick with a subject long enough to compile a Pinker-like thesis and explanation.

    The premise that the MSM is honest and good is LOL! funny. It just tells you how truncated is the knowledge and experience of today’s credentialed class. I followed Hanania’s substack for a while and was under impressed.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  130. Barnard says:
    @Dream

    Is this really happening now, or is it just what black women TV writers wish was happening? I don’t know what show this is from, but I would be curious to know if a non white woman wrote this episode.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  131. Art Deco says:
    @AnotherDad

    Dorothy Kilgallen was not empirical?

  132. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Wonderful opinion piece in the New York Times about blondes, written by a black women projecting her own hair insecurities on white women in amusing fashion, based on TikTok videos:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/19/opinion/the-enduring-invisible-power-of-blond.html

    … a multiyear project I have been working on about “blonde” as a racial signifier. We use “blonde” (and if to a lesser extent “brunette”) to signal that someone is white without using a racialized term like “white.” It may also be more — a signifier of a type of white person. When the daughter with visibly brown roots insists that having blond hair as a child makes her a natural blonde, she is saying something I have heard countless people say. I have always been puzzled by it.

    What could be so important about a genetic trait that someone would use it to describe herself long after the trait’s phenotypic expression — light hair — no longer exists? It makes literal sense only if by blonde she is referring to something more than hair. Being a natural blonde must confer honor, esteem and power to those who can legitimately claim it. Guess how we define social status? It is as a role or identity that confers honor, esteem and power to those who legitimately hold it.

    We also use “blonde” not just to construct meaning about whiteness but also to describe how it is achieved and maintained. Sometimes our usage is also about gender and class and the status behaviors people develop to be legible as members of the dominant group. I’d bet that if you envisioned a blonde at any point while reading this, the woman you pictured looks more like Reese Witherspoon than Beyoncé. The tricky thing about status is that the specter of race is always close at hand.

    I may need to convince you that unpacking what blonde means as a social status is worth your consideration. I am up for the task. It helps that I’m bringing a gang. I will be talking with writers, anthropologists, economists and readers about what blonde means. They can help us understand the class distinctions people make about people who achieve blonde from $10 at-home kits versus those who pay $1,500 for it. They can also help us make sense of why so many women in conservative media are also blondes.

  133. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    Hanania has been rebranding himself as “not one of them” lately.

    By the way, he’s been doing streaming television drama recaps and discussions with Rob Henderson and others. Steve and Hanania doing movie discussions would be interesting!

  134. Art Deco says:

    What’s baffling about this is that we’ve learned in recent months of a successful effort to suppress consequential stories which could only have been successful with the connivance of the Sulzbergers and others. And then there’s the media’s assiduous refusal to probe for Biden’s medical and psychiatric records and their willingness to be props in the pantomime public addresses and news conferences. Did Hanania not notice any of this?

  135. keypusher says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He writes stuff like that all the time. It’s weird how anonymous kibitzers on fringe websites imagine public figures are reading and responding to them.

  136. Anon[228] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Politically correct discourse maintains that there are absolutely no medically important genetic differences between blacks and whites and thus studying that and using that assumption clinically is racist. However … there may be differences in health outcomes based on racist practices like redlining!

    A Hotter Planet Takes Another Toll on Human Health: A new hypothesis about heat waves, redlining, and kidney stones.

    https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/a-hotter-planet-takes-another-toll-on-human-health

    For reasons that remain unclear, kidney stones have traditionally been more common among white people, but, in recent years, doctors have noted huge increases among Black Americans and a significant rise in Latino communities. The authors of the new article looked to the past for a possible explanation—particularly to the nineteen-thirties, when a federal agency, the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, graded all of America’s neighborhoods and deemed some of them “hazardous” for investment, essentially because they were home to large minority communities. This grading system (from A for “best” and B for “still desirable” to C for “declining” and D for “hazardous”) underlay what came to be known as redlining. The grading system led to “chronic disinvestment” in the lower-rated neighborhoods, resulting, over time, in less of everything from parks and green spaces to street trees and air-conditioning in homes.

    Now the results can be measured with a thermometer: in Portland, Oregon, the authors report, neighborhoods that were graded A in the nineteen-thirties now “average 8 degrees Fahrenheit lower than the city’s mean temperature, while D-graded neighborhoods average 4.8 Fahrenheit degrees warmer.” Actually, you don’t need a thermometer—that’s a thirteen-degree gap that anyone can feel just by walking across town. No one has carefully studied the incidence of kidney stones among these different neighborhoods, but the authors, in their hypothesis, point to research now under way. Similar work on asthma, another heat-related disease, has shown emergency-room visits are 2.4 times higher in redlined tracts.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  137. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    LOL, you beat me to it. I was about to post the exact same photo. I read the first paragraph and I knew this guy looked weird and I would have to pull up a photo.

    There should be a German word for the ability to know what someone looks like based on reading just one paragraph of their writing. It is amazing. I am a literary physiognomy clairavoyant.

  138. And in other news you didn’t see from the corporate media whores.

    New York City officials have agreed to remove 441,083 ineligible voters from its voter rolls after a legal watchdog found the liberal-led government refused to clean up its list of voters as required by federal law.
    Judicial Watch, a non-profit public interest law firm, filed the lawsuit after an investigation found that in six years, out of 5.5 million voters, only 22 names had been removed for moving away, dying or otherwise becoming ineligible to vote.

    https://americanliberty.news/commentary/new-york-city-removes-441083-ineligible-voters-after-lawsuit/dferguson/2023/01/?utm_medium=email

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Jim Don Bob
  139. Jack D says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Maybe I’m stupid but I’m not following you. You’re saying that if someone looks like a HORROR movie villain and not just an ordinary movie villain, THAT means that he must be a bad dude? You’re still totally wrong.

    When I was in law school, one of my professors was a guy who had been in a horrific car crash decades earlier and had most of his face burned off . He looked a lot like the Phantom of the Opera as portrayed by Lon Chaney. He literally looked like a monster from a horror movie. Probably of everyone that I have ever seen in real life, he looked the MOST like a character from a horror movie. As it turns out, this man was a sweet, kind and gentle man, the most mild mannered person you could imagine. His personality had nothing to do with his physiognomy.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  140. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You did not notice their brutal accents?

  141. @Colin Wright

    I fully agree…
    and the right as you’ve described it is old and getting older. Gen Zers are the depressed version of millennials, neither of whom have worked an honest job in their lives and who reflexively think traditional values have something to do with Nazis. I suspect we will see a genocide of older whites in the next thirty years, if the left is not patient enough to let their education camps and natural aging finish the job for them more gradually.

  142. When it comes to a more relevant war, such as Russia-Ukraine, the headlines tend to be highly biased, always putting some kind of pro-Ukraine spin on it.

    There’s a good podcast which has just come out with Dominic Cummings which discusses various deep state stuff: https://www.manifold1.com/episodes/dominic-cummings-vote-leave-brexit-covid-and-no-10-with-boris-28

    In it, he points out that the probable reason MSM journalists (and the establishment) are so pro-Ukraine and anti-Russia is because they believed the whole Russia hoax (“Putin got Trump elected by buying ads on Facebook” or something). They can’t believe he would win an election. After all, none of their friends voted for Trump. So now they want to destroy Russia based on that delusion, because in doing so, they can “get back” at Trump. Thousands have to die so they can get back at Trump.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  143. @Jack D

    He looks a little bit like the guy who was arrested for killing those students in Iowa.

    You mean Idaho. Way to show your Northeastern bias. That being said, the comparison is apt.

    In real life, the guys to watch out for are not the ones who look like movie villains but the ones who don’t.

    I think this is a Hollywood trope. In my experience, weird looking people are often weird acting. Obviously, there are exceptions, but it is a good rule of thumb on the street.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  144. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Now can someone tell me why my news feed doesn’t have the prison break in Idaho?

    Because it’s an insignificant story that is only of local interest? Why do you need a “feed’ – can’t you look for it yourself?

    PS they caught the guys.

    • Replies: @Corpse Tooth
  145. @The Wild Geese Howard

    How do you get a job as an intellectual? Do you have to join the league of ordinary gentlemen? If I join will I still be able to have coitus with black women?

  146. @Jack D

    “PS they caught the guys.”

    “PS they caught the goys.” — a snippet from the transcription of the infamous leaked classified Zoom call between DHS Sec. Alejandro Mayorkas and his ‘Triad’.

  147. G. Poulin says:
    @AndrewR

    That’s just it. The less important the topic, the more likely the media will get it right. Even the old Pravda was reliable when it came to weather reports, sports scores, and other matters of little import. But when it came to things that people really needed to know, they just lied their asses off and were rewarded for it. That’s where we are in America today.

  148. @Art Deco

    “William Paley was running a commercial company.”

    Ever hear of moonlighting? If you were offered a position as an empire builder of an empire that would eventually be absorbed by globohomo wouldn’t you cut your hours at the photography studio?

  149. Pete P says:
    @Dmon

    Pretty much. He might be a true believing libertarian fool but his sudden change in writing over the last 6 months has all the hallmarks of a ticket taker.

  150. prosa123 says:

    Personally, I don’t know what bias that would introduce: the Deep State tends to favor Azerbaijan, I think, because Armenia allies with Russia. But Congress tends to favor Armenia, because there are a lot of affluent Armenian-Americans who donate to candidates.

    Another big factor is that Armenia is Christian and Azerbaijan Muslim, albeit mostly of a rather laid-back, moderate version.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  151. Anonymous[954] • Disclaimer says:

    I knew of one NYT reporter, even had a book on the NYT bestseller list, who had a pretty good scam going.

    A not very attractive man, approaching middle-age used to hold weekend seminars for young aspiring journalists. He used that as his way to meet attractive women, with him holding all the cards from the get-go, since these were young folks, desperate for a journalist gig, many interested in securing his favor, due to his power and great connections. That’s a great hand to be holding if you’re a not-very-attractive man, and he knew it.

    So, he would “date” some of the women in his classes, whether they were married or not, and did quite well for himself, as far as I was aware. He even got some good of his girlfriends their first published stories in the NYT! So I guess he had some journalistic integrity, as far as fairly administrating his “pay for play” game on his more attractive, younger, and sometimes married desperate students. That’s likely why nobody has come forward regarding his scam.

    He was never confronted, much less reprimanded, and boy was he one arrogant fellow, probably because he never got his wings clipped.

    Going by my inadvertent “inside look” at the NYT, the place is a fucking perverse cesspool of interpersonal wretchedness that celebrates… itself.

    I guess that’s one version of Hell. And it’s not where I prefer to get my news.

    Btw, has anyone else here ever heard of these weekend journalist “seminars” run by any of the sad sack ineffectual men at the NYT? Any good stories?

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  152. @Jack D

    Maybe I’m stupid

    Hmm. That would be the ‘innocent’ excuse…

    You’re saying that if someone looks like a HORROR movie villain and not just an ordinary movie villain, THAT means that he must be a bad dude?

    Re-read what I wrote. I’m saying that that if someone naturally looks like a horror-movie villain, they may have a warped/cynical view of life. E.g., Hanania is being a dishonest imp, likely with trollish intent.

    When I was in law school, one of my professors was a guy who had been in a horrific car crash decades earlier and had most of his face burned off.

    As it turns out, this man was a sweet, kind and gentle man, the most mild mannered person you could imagine. His personality had nothing to do with his physiognomy.

    For a liar, sorry, lawyer, you constantly have a tough time with basic vocabulary. In this case you are ‘confusing’ inherited physiognomy with incidental disfigurement. Poor physiognomy can cause psychological dissonance for both the congenitally ugly and the beholder(s) of such, because one’s worth (or one’s tribe’s worth) is instinctually (if not always explicitly) judged in a physically heterogeneous society.

    For example, (Ashkenazi) Jews generally (not always) look odd/alien/sinister compared to European stock, particularly compared to Anglo/Nord/Teuton stock. Many Whites (and others) historically have considered Jews somewhat suspicious in general, in part due to pattern recognition of divergent group interests (e.g., Jews in America stereotypically wanting to flood America with “wretched refuse”, or counter-signaling the Second Amendment). Recognizing existing correlating patterns of both behavior and physical appearance is HBD 101, scaled from the individual on up.

    You’re still totally wrong.

    I can see why the concept makes you nervous.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  153. In my opinion, it is evident that some kind of orchestrated hysteria is under way re. transgenderistas (media etc.).

    Of course, it is a threat to mentally sane people if they end up threatened & blacklisted in this witch-hunt. Here I completely agree; I’m on the side of common sense & against all commissary-type muzzles.

    But, what I find hard is to commiserate with “victims” of brain-washing. Hell, these people have free will. If they want to ruin their lives- it’s their choice. Good riddance! Darwin award for them. If these idiots want to mutilate themselves- it’s their life & I don’t give a hoot.

    What is at stake is freedom of expression, similar to what happened in failed Communist states. And that’s what matters, not to be forced to change a common sense behavior because of the whims of a bunch of decadent lunatics playing the role of thought police.

    Just, more than that- no. If modern “feminists” want to whore themselves & later regret; if wannabe TGs are strong believers in their right to mutilate themselves- I’m also OK with that.

    You play, you pay.

    • Replies: @Thea
  154. Sailer is right, Hanania is wrong.

    Hanania is pleasingly creative and original at times. Yet, he worships Bryan Caplan, I think because Hanania is stuck in an aspergery adolescent libertarianism. I’ve never met an academic more deeply confused than Caplan.

    People tell me Yglesias is clever, but anyone who believes in open borders is clueless about humans, their biology, their history, their behavior in groups, as countries, how economies and societies work.

    Hanania is doing a Kinsley. Neolib Kinsley in the 90s would write something to shock the New Dealers, getting a lot of attention for each heresy he committed.

  155. Jack D says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It does make me nervous that primitive tribalists like you still exist and are allowed to have guns.

  156. J.Ross says:

    Guaranteed replies. No case to make after the murderous lockdown, and the way to make it is definutely not trying to argue that MSNBC is more trustworthy than AFP.
    ———
    OT — Rumor: Wall Street and megacorps are laying people off, but they’re just the ones with fake jobs (DIE, HR, Diversity Officers, “people skills”).

  157. @Jack D

    primitive tribalists

    The irony, I love it.

    • Agree: HammerJack, Colin Wright
  158. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    Screencapped, for the next time you claim to be an American.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  159. They find it easy to list its mistakes, including WMDs, Russiagate, and the narratives surrounding various shootings of young black men.

    Not meaning to sound hysterical or – heavens – like Hanania’s shiftless grifters, always carping, never uplifting humanity, but these mistakes seriously have damaged this country’s chances at a peaceful, prosperous future.

  160. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I assumed Hanania was Armenian based on his name, physiognomy, and general brusque obnoxiousness. But he’s actually Palestinian Christian, which fits with his physiognomy and obnoxiousness which is common among Levantines and Arabs more generally.

    Incidentally, for all his apparent aggressive contrarianism and obnoxiousness, he has very conventional open borders liberal and libertarian free market views and works for Koch brothers outlets. He’ll be non-PC about blacks and other non-whites but he also seems to be contemptuous of normal white Americans with conventional conservative instincts who aren’t into open borders libertarianism like he is.

    He’s similar to Nicholas Nassim Taleb, another obnoxious Levantine who has fairly conventional views.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @adreadline
  161. Art Deco says:
    @New Dealer

    Neolib Kinsley in the 90s would write something to shock the New Dealers, getting a lot of attention for each heresy he committed.

    Kinsley was notable ca. 1984 as a critic of a menu of items which were then fashionable in the Democratic Party (e.g. ‘industrial policy’, domestic content laws, trade restrictions) but didn’t stir passions among the bourgeois types with which he associated. His assessment of the court system is much more critical than liberals tend to be and he doesn’t sentimentalize criminals, but otherwise I cannot recall him being truly off the reservation. It’s true he’s quirky and inner directed to a degree.

  162. @TelfoedJohn

    That, and Russia waging a war of annexation.

  163. @Steve Sailer

    how do you feel about america deciding who gets to have a country in the balkans and bombing people who disagree?

    just “lines on a map” that time, huh? self-determination needs NATO bombs and all that?

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  164. @prosa123

    Yes the Anglo-American empires seem to go out of their way to screw over the Christians of the Balkans, Levant, Iraq, Iran and anywhere else they can get their hands on.

  165. Art Deco says:
    @Bill Jones

    It was actually routine practice when I was involved in local politics Upstate. You don’t cast a ballot for four years, your name falls off the voter roll. They send you a courtesy postcard coincident with that.

  166. Let’s see, they lie relentlessly on:
    Race
    Crime
    Constitutional law
    Sex
    Welfare
    Education
    Political parties
    Genetics
    Immigration
    For example, the Times and the Post went a third of a century without acknowledging the Warren Court’s role in the crime explosion that left an extra quarter million dead Americans.
    But they are decent on covering Lower Slobovia.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  167. Art Deco says:
    @Anonymous

    Arabs have a reputation for being very particular about manners except for a tendency to get too close to people in conversation and to jostle them in public places.

  168. @Henry Canaday

    “But they are decent on covering Lower Slobovia”.

    It’s that we feel far too comfortable taking their word on Lower Slobovia.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  169. @Barnard

    Speaking of, the Regime Media in the form of one of its principal organs (Washington Post) has ramped up its war against VDare for the crime of repeatedly questioning Open Borders Theology. “Castle of Hate” they’re calling it, and they’re co-ordinating with the SPLC of course. Read some of the comments at the link, and tell me about the virtue of the virtue signalers…

    https://vdare.com/articles/hate-castle-wapo-s-silverman-stirs-up-leftist-troll-storm-violent-fantasies-over-vdare-com-s-hq

    “Never send to know for whom the bell tolls…”

    • Replies: @Renard
  170. @Jack D

    It does make me nervous that primitive tribalists like you still exist and are allowed to have guns.

    Says the forum’s most vicious tribalist. Good one!

  171. @Anonymous

    He’s similar to Nicholas Nassim Taleb, another obnoxious Levantine who has fairly conventional views.

    Not in physiognomy. Taleb looks like he’d be at home being a cab driver or a pimp, gold chains dangling from his neck. Hanania? Not really. Both do seem to be very obnoxious in their virtual interactions with others through the bird app.

  172. @New Dealer

    People tell me Yglesias is clever, but anyone who believes in open borders is clueless about humans, their biology, their history, their behavior in groups, as countries, how economies and societies work.

    Or maybe just evil, outside of ethnocentric interests and questionable for their own interests ways of pursuing them?

    Jews in the US have Officially been pushing the blank slate fallacy for at least a century so there goes “clueless about humans, their biology.” The last straw that created some number of anti-Semites in the US like Kevin MacDonald and myself is their leading role in what’s now called “open borders.” There’s also the dangerous revenge angle which we think is partly driving that, many other policies against white Americans, and the posture towards Russia long before the start of the “special military operation.”

  173. @whereismyhandle

    Beating the hell out of a faraway country for fun and profit is considered admirable but annexing ethnically similar territories from a neighbouring country is chillingly Hitlerian.

  174. Mike Tre says:
    @Jack D

    And it makes me glad that dishonest tribalists like you get nervous knowing people like me have guns.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • LOL: BB753
  175. @Cagey Beast

    “But they are decent on covering Lower Slobovia”.

    It’s that we feel far too comfortable taking their word on Lower Slobovia.

    As is pointed out in the standard Gell-Man Amnesia Effect thesis exposition.

    Once upon a time they had a claim to such coverage. But to quote Ben Rhodes, the lead in selling Obama’s Iran deal in the US:

    “All these newspapers used to have foreign bureaus,” he said. “Now they don’t. They call us to explain to them what’s happening in Moscow and Cairo. Most of the outlets are reporting on world events from Washington. The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing.”

    The exceptions to the young Maoists are dying off or getting purged, and as the preceding prose to the quote implies, these MSM enterprises simply don’t have the money to do that level or type of foreign reporting anymore.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  176. Pixo says:
    @AnotherDad

    He’s a nerdy energetic guy whose parents are Arab Christians from the West Bank. At some point he decided to be a public intellectual rather than a lawyer.

    He’s trying to do what Steve used to do and Charles Murray and Ann Coulter still do: be as honest about race and sex issues as possible while still maintaining the ability to publish in mainstream outlets. It isn’t easy, but I think it is worthwhile.

    He’s not enthralled by International Jewry, he’s mildly anti-Israel but tends to ignore the issue lately.

    Relatedly, the relationship between the various non-Jew/non-Arab Muslim groups in greater Israel is an interesting topic.

    My quick summary:
    Samaritans are borderline Jews now and pro-Israel

    Druze and Alawites have a long history of fighting off Muslims.

    Alawites used to be quasi-Christian, but when their man Assad Sr because dictator of Syria they followed his lead and became more quasi-Muslim.

    Israeli Druze have some complaints but are basically content with Jewish leadership.

    Muslim Beduins in Israel had a long bad relationship with nearby regular Muslims and Israeli largesse bribed them over time onto Team Jew. More recently their nomadism has become annoying as Israel develops its desert areas and tried to force them onto what looks like squalid American Indian reservations.

    Arab Christians in Israel proper with Israeli citizenship have gradually and grudgingly accepted Jewish dominance and have an even lower opinion of Arab Muslims. The youngest of them are sometimes assimilated into Israel’s large conservative-and-secular subculture and volunteer for the IDF. A lot of the half-Jewish/half-Christian secular conservatives who migrated from the USSR fall into this same grouping.

    Arab Christians in the West Bank and East Jerusalem (Hanania’s parents) were anti-Israel for left-wing nationalist reasons in the 50s to 80s but radical Islam’s growth and the increasing oppression of other middle east Christians by Muslims has made them apathetic and mostly focused on emigration.

  177. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    If that’s what real (“generic”) Americans are like then I don’t want to be American. But they’re not. People like him are some sort of fossil or the last of a dying breed. I hope. Real Americans are like George Washington, not like Father Coughlin.

  178. @TelfoedJohn

    You can time the Left’s turn on Putin and Russia to the day Pussy Riot got arrested.

  179. @That Would Be Telling

    Even worse than the foreign policy journalists who are unfamiliar with foreign countries are the ones who are far too familiar with them. They’re the ones who emigrated or who were raised by emigrees and who use our resources to get back at their enemies in the old country.

  180. Jack D says:
    @clifford brown

    He’s not weird. He doesn’t look like Robert Redford or some nordic type but his looks are perfectly normal for a Palestinian Arab. Maybe he’s not the most handsome guy on earth but that tells you absolutely nothing about his character or wisdom. Conversely, people are programmed to trust handsome guys like Gavin Newsom and this trust is totally misplaced.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  181. @Old Prude

    My impression is that, until Carlos Slim came along, the New York Times wanted to cover Mexico more than readers wanted to read about Mexico.

  182. @Barnard

    I agree, Barnard. That’s probably the best way to try to hold them to at least not lying about your answers.

    I got pretty busy, but I see that HammerJack beat me to the more detailed story of VDare, Peter Brimelow, and his latest media vendetta. I read Mr. Brimelow’s whole email interview with Miss Silverman from the Washington Post. As well as he handled it, the agenda was going to be carried through though.

    Thanks, HammerJack.

  183. @Polynices

    … a generic right-liberal

    I guess I am a right-liberal, but I didn’t know there were any others. Who are you thinking of?

  184. So other than that unpleasantness of your husband being shot, what did you think of the play, Mrs. Lincoln? He mentions three things that the media gets wrong, but they aren’t just confined to a sandbox, the collateral issues that touch on those are then biased as well, being biased about race affects coverage of crime for example.

  185. @Jack D

    He’s not weird.

    his looks are perfectly normal for a Palestinian Arab

    but that tells you absolutely nothing about his character or wisdom

    LOL ! Looks like I struck a nerve. You must be creepy as hell. Count Orlok? Late-stage Gregor Samsa? I shudder to think what’s lurking on the Main Line.

    • Troll: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @Jack D
  186. @Almost Missouri

    The macro-takeaway from the Twitter Files I have seen isn’t any particular story or incident. It’s that a huge portion of the time of a huge portion of Twitter’s staff—up to and including its top executives—was taken up with the matter of how to lie, censor, and deceive without it being too obvious that they were lying, censoring, and deceiving. Given that Musk fired most of the staff for this and now Twitter runs better, it must have been literally the main product at Twitter.

    Excellent point, AM. I remember years ago reading somewhere that Twitter had many many thousands of employees. Given that it’s basically just a posting platform, I wondered what the hell everybody was doing all the time. Well, now we all know. And we know that’s what going on at all of the platforms.

    • Agree: Unladen Swallow
  187. Ian M. says:

    Let’s stipulate that the news media actually is “honest, decent, and fair”, i.e., the facts it reports are accurate, journalists do not intentionally report things they know to be false, etc: this would not address the fundamental problem with the mass media. The news media by its very nature must distort the truth, even if all the facts it reports are accurate.

    There are two basic reasons for this. The first is the media’s focus on disconnected, ephemeral, current events: rare and aberrant occurrences generate news, rather than normal, everyday things. For example, what will make the news: a story about a father sexually abusing his own children, or a story about a father working extra hours to support his family? The former obviously. And a steady diet of such stories disconnected from a normative framework (which the news cannot itself provide – except tacitly – since such a normative framework is the product of a type of knowledge that is alien to the sort of factual information the media deals with) will naturally distort our perspective on reality.

    [MORE]

    The second reason is the ideal of neutrality (let’s stipulate that the media actually strives for neutrality). But media ‘neutrality’ just is liberalism: the idea that we can be neutral among competing visions of the good. (This is why mainstream conservative complaints of media ‘bias’ are superficial.) This is why the mass modern media is intrinsically liberal. It’s not an accidental feature, it’s essential to what it is to be the media.

    For example, for the media to take a ‘neutral’ stance on ‘transgenderism’, where it allows the best representatives of both sides equal time to present their cases is already to have adopted a secular utilitarian approach to the question. One cannot address moral questions from a ‘neutral’ point of view. The liberal conceit is that each person can step outside of the various viewpoints and judge them ‘equally’ from a neutral viewpoint. But there is no ‘view from nowhere’: to judge something, one has to adopt a viewpoint, i.e., one needs to judge it according to some criteria. By assuming that all viewpoints are ‘equal’ and can be evaluated without adopting any of the viewpoints being considered, one has already adopted the liberal viewpoint, and he will implicitly evaluate the issue according to liberal criteria. Thus, the normative framework being tacitly assumed by the news media and that provides the context for the stories it reports on will be a liberal one.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  188. Ian M. says:

    People who complain about the media tend to implicitly judge it by the standard of perfection, while either offering no alternative or arguing that people instead listen to sources that are even worse. …

    The problem with taking a nihilistic posture towards the MSM is that there’s nothing to replace it with. …

    Does this Hanania chap not realize that for most of world history, the MSM did not exist? Why does there need to be an alternative? Society got along fine – and indeed, better – before the age of mass media. None of what the MSM provides is necessary. Indeed, it is actively harmful because of how it distorts our view of the world (see my previous comment).

    A profit-driven media in a capitalist society has no intrinsic connection to the common good, and so it has no incentive to promote it. This, combined with its autonomy as an entity divorced from natural institutions like the state or the family, or from supernatural institutions like the Church, means there are no internal principles or external forces to constrain it: it has power but no attendant responsibilities. (Lack of responsibility corrupts; absolute lack of responsibility corrupts absolutely). It can attack the state, the Church, the family with impunity. Meanwhile, because of the First Amendment and cries of censorship, the state is not permitted to punish the media for undermining the common good.

    In a democracy, power accrues to whomever can shape public opinion. This is the media par excellence. Is it really prudent to allow an institution that has no accountability have so much power?

    Likewise, simply trying to discredit the media when it’s in many ways the only means we have to acquire accurate information about the world should be understood as advocating for making society dumber.

    Isn’t it obvious that the MSM makes us dumber? What purpose does 99% of the “information about the world” we get from the MSM serve? None. If the MSM did not exist, people would get their ‘news’ from institutions that have a connection to the common good: people would depend more on their church, on their local community, their local government, etc. Since such information would be aimed at facilitating the common good, such information would serve a definite and coherent purpose rather than being a jumble of disconnected facts about current events for the sake of current events. I suppose people might be less ‘informed’ about what was going on in Bhutan or about a random black man who died in police custody halfway across the country, but… who cares?

    One of the key maxims of a genuine reactionary ought to be: the goal of conservatives ought not to be to take over the media, but to destroy the media.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  189. The alt-media is providing the best analysis of Ukraine. Let’s see CNN match this:

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  190. @Thoughts

    Hanania is at best an idiot, at worst a terrible liar.

    And awfully close to onania.

  191. anon[184] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    All four young men in that picture were – and those still alive still are – low IQ servants of the state, barely even rising to the level of court jesters, despite their great success at selling mostly trashy ‘anti-authority’ “albums” to their fellow servants.

    “won’t be fooled again”, indeed.

    Clowns.

  192. @Cagey Beast

    They’re just as good on domestic affairs:

    • Replies: @whereismyhandle
  193. @PeterIke

    Agree…I made almost the identical point in the comments t an earlier article. You can be confident this is true because, in theory, what universities are doing right now in selection is already illegal.

  194. @Cagey Beast

    the latest episiode was funny with its obligatory steve bits.

    Anna: “I wasn’t going to talk about Steve Sailer this time BUT….” [proceeds to discuss sailer piece]

    this, of course, was after Dasha had started the episode by saying she was recording from her closet, like Steve Sailer.

    so the red scare “dont talk about steve” challenge remains unmet

  195. Dnought says:
    @TelfoedJohn

    You’re correct and actually several have come right out and said that…”this is revenge for the 2016 election.”

    Back in February 2022: Biden admin’s Ukraine campaign, ex-DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson says, “is payback for 2016.”

    Several others as well.

    • Agree: TelfoedJohn
    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  196. @PeterIke

    Great comment; couldn’t agree more.

    Many people thought SATs/ACTs and GREs were immovable cornerstones of university admissions, and that it would be functionally impossible for universities to do away with them, because how else would they ever get through all those applications each year?

    And yet that’s exactly what’s happening.

    American university faculties/administrations act in such stupid ways these days that it’s easy to forget they comprise large numbers of people who are intelligent and talented, albeit grossly misdirected and deluded. When those people decide they’re going to get something done that will make them feel better and help save the world, they can still muster a lot of dark energy.

  197. @Steve Sailer

    There are dozens of conflicts in the 21st century. Is the US getting involved in the Uyghur-Chinese fight? The Papua-Indonesia fight? Is it just a coincidence that the US is involved in war against Russia? No. Hostility to Russia suddenly went up after the Russia hoax.

  198. Anonymous[393] • Disclaimer says:

    I remember reading the reminiscences of a journalist who worked for one of the big newspapers in the 1980s. While he was assigned to South Africa, covering the violence there, he wrote an article explaining the Zulu vs. Xhosa rivalry in the country, and how this affected politics there.

    The story was spiked by his editor. When he queried the reason why, he was told in complete honesty that the newspaper’s policy on South Africa was to present a simple narrative of good blacks vs. bad whites, and that stories about black tribalism would just confuse the readers.

  199. @Barnard

    It’s from the pilot episode of the NBC series New Amsterdam. It aired on Tuesday, September 25, 2018. (That was around the time of the Brett Kavanaugh hearings.)

    The episode was written by series creator David Schulner.

    Schulner looks a little like Kyle MacLachlan (picture after MORE tag):

    OT: Steve, any thoughts about Julian Sands? Last night I noticed that Google was quoting Wikipedia as saying he *was* an English actor – and I immediately checked to see if the searchers had found his body, and they hadn’t – but this morning the verb form has changed back to present tense.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Jack D
  200. @whereismyhandle

    Agree. On reflection, contra Hanania and Alexander, everything the Establishment Media produce is either a lie or setting up a lie.

    The NY Times is the undisputed doyenne of Establishment Media, and the NYT home page right now says:

    68 Days of Silence: Why the White House Stayed Mum on Classified Documents
    Advisers to President Biden calculated that the Justice Department would view possession of the documents as little more than a good-faith mistake.

    Lie: pretend they weren’t actively doing what they were accusing Trump of
    Set up future lie: We had good reasons, pleb!

    After Roe, Republicans Wrestle With What It Means to Be ‘Pro-Life’
    Some Republican strategists worry that such a position could repel swing voters

    Lie: pretend no one is getting killed
    Set up future lie: create rhetorical cover for Republicans to betray voters

    Should You Quit Your Job?
    Jacinda Ardern is stepping down from her role because she no longer has “enough in the tank” to do it. If you relate to this, here’s what to consider.

    Lie: pretend Jacinda’s resignation has nothing to do with cratering popularity
    Set up future lie: Anything is a lifestyle choice when we say it is, pleb!

    Could air power your flight someday?
    Airlines are betting on it.

    Lie: Airplanes can power themselves from … air!
    Set up future lie: You don’t need fossil fuel, pleb!

    MODERN LOVE
    I’ll Get by With a Little Help From My Herd

    Lie: Our thrown-together multiethnic polycule is just as valid as your laboriously built nuclear family, pleb!
    Set up future lie: Single motherhood good! Patriarchy bad!

    Opinion
    JONATHAN ALTER
    Oh Biden, What Have You Done

    Lie: Biden actually controls anything
    Set up future lie: [insert deepstate overreach here] Oh that goofy Biden!

    David Brooks
    DAVID BROOKS

    Lie: everything
    Set up future lie: everything

    The purpose of the entire editorial hierarchy of the New York Times is to ensure readers never form an accurate understanding.

    • Agree: Muggles, Wade Hampton
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Jack D
  201. Gabe Ruth says:

    Mr. H should read Propaganda, by Jacques Ellul. Very French, not that there’s anything wrong with that.

    People would not stop learning things if the MSM was completely destroyed, let alone if the dominant players were trimmed back a bit. Worst case, the cost in time and effort of learning things would increase, but I don’t believe that’s a bad thing. Maybe people would take more interest in things around them that directly affect them, and that they have some ability to direct, rather than the current super important global issues.

  202. BB753 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Since the CIA-directed coup in 2014, NATO had been training and building up a huge Ukrainian army to attack not only the Donetsk and Lugansk republics ( whatever happened to the right to self-determination, you know, Kosovo and all that?), but to attack Russia itself.
    Over half of that Ukrainian fighting force has been crushed by the combined forces of the Donetsk and Lugansk militias, the Wagner ( mercenary) group and regular Russian troops. And Russians haven’t even started in earnest.
    Don’t delude yourself, in January, Ukraine had the second largest army in Europe, a well-trained and equipped fighting force which was a menace to Russia.

    • Agree: acementhead
    • Replies: @Jack D
  203. Jack D says:
    @Rob

    Stick a fork in it, it’s done. At oral arguments the remaining 3 liberals were steaming mad because they know that they have already lost. Usually the justices behave with elaborate (mostly even genuine) collegiality toward each other but this time it was hard to hid their malice.

    That being said, as others have said, the colleges are going to find ways to do what they want anyway “without explicitly taking race into account”. It’s all going to be wink, wink, nod, nod. After all, admissions are “holistic”. They no longer look at SATs, so Asians no longer have a big advantage. Maybe there will be extra bonuses for “coming from a low income area” or “coming from a single parent home” – things that are proxies for being black and being Notasian without saying the words. Etc. Don’t look for things to change much at all.

    But it will be a good talking point for Leftist politicians. The Republicans took away your AA.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  204. There is a major exception when it comes to the “holy trinity” of liberalism, that is topics having to do with race, gender, and sexual orientation, but even here the problem is not lies as much as that the press is blinded by ideology.

    Well, the press wedge these topics into every story, so…

  205. Jack D says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Lie: Airplanes can power themselves from … air!
    Set up future lie: You don’t need fossil fuel, pleb!

    I doubt it’s every going to happen any time soon but it’s not impossible. You can make hydrocarbon fuels (like what jet engines burn) by combining carbon from CO2 in the air with hydrogen from water electrolysis. The key is that you need energy (electricity) to make this happen. It’s not like fossil fuel where the energy source is the sunshine from millions of years ago.

    If you were running your electrical generators on oil then it makes no sense – you would burn more fuel to make your artificial fuel than the amount of fuel that you produce. However, if the electricity comes from “alternative” sources then it makes some sort of sense. You can’t fly an airplane with solar energy or wind power but you could use the solar energy to make the artificial fuel and fly on that. They are also working on battery powered planes but in the short run we are going to need jets and the jets need fuel.

    Regardless of the global warming stuff, the amount of petroleum on the planet is fixed and the petroleum should be conserved for future ages to be used as chemical feedstocks. We were going to have to switch to something else eventually anyway so might as well get working on it. Someday our descendants were going to curse us for having burned up all the incredibly valuable petrochemicals like we curse our ancestors for having used what today would be incredibly valuable old growth timber as firewood.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  206. Our business is to get an audience. Whatever else it is, our newspaper must be excessively interesting, not to the good, wise men and pure in spirit, but to the great mass of sordid, squalid humanity. Humanity is vulgar, so we must be vulgar. It is coarse, so we must not be refined. It is passionate; therefore the blood that flows through our newspapers must be warm. -W. Scripps, founder of the Scripps-Howard newspaper conglomerate.

    Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knowledge with the lies of the day. I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens, who, reading newspapers, live & die in the belief, that they have known something of what has been passing in the world in their time… – Thomas Jefferson, 1807, letter to John Norvell.

  207. Hanania fell on my radar about a year ago thru the MAGA grifter network. My thought then was who is this guy? And why he even was rising to prominence? His wordy posts and youthful appearence soon struck me that he was a mere self promoting blogger trying to latch onto an audience. Hence I answered the who. Still can’t figure out the why he got promoted in the first place. There is nothing original about his ideas, but the MAGA Inc still found him useful for some reason. Perhaps Stephen Crowders’ recent revelations are the explanation for Hanania’s rise?

  208. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    Anyone who would be motivated by that particular talking point already votes Democratic.

    A sensible thing to do would be to limit federal financing of higher education to veterans’ benefits, ROTC, and some scholarships for niche clientele. Students seeking to attend private institutions could repair to private bank loans which were not completely immune to discharge in bankruptcy; the banks would have to do some serious underwriting.

    Public higher education could be financed by voucher redemptions. Students admitted to a public college would have a contingent claim on a tuition voucher and a room-and-board voucher. They’d exercise the claim by paying a recipient’s fee to the state treasury. They take the vouchers and hand them over to the institution in question, which clears their obligation to said institution (which would be debarred from charging fees for aught but metered services). The institution then submits the vouchers to a dedicated state fund, which provides the institution with cash to the tune of the face value of the voucher. The dedicated state funds would be financed by a special state income tax for which the base and the rates would be fixed by constitutional provision. In lieu of having discretionary appropriations from the state treasury, you’d have a constitutional commitment to devote a particular share of the state’s personal income flow to public higher education, no more no less. The number of matriculants to the system each year would consist of the available revenue (less a buffer) divided by a redemption value determined by a state board in consultation with the institutions in question. The recipient’s fee paid to the state treasury could be on a sliding scale, an inverse function of the number of years during the aspirant student’s natural life that the applicant, his mother, his father, &c have filed the special income tax return in question. The fee could be financed by family resources, grants from third-party foundations, grants from dedicated funds of the institution itself, discretionary grants from the institution, or bank loans.

    In any case, were Republican state legislators not otiose, they might establish a central admissions office for the whole state system the operations of which would be subject to audits by the state comptroller and state police at irregular intervals. They’d also prescribe an admissions formula consisting of a vector equation of which board scores, achievement test scores, and high school GPA were the arguments. The applicant fills out a demographic sheet and provides proof of the foregoing data points, along with a pre-printed list of the state’s institutions on which he’s ranked his preferences. The probability of being admitted to your first choice would be correlated with the composite score you received from your performance on standardized tests and high school GPA. Students would be sorted among the state’s institution according to their absorptive capacity, with most attending middling schools of interest to them for reasons of taste, convenience, or available programs.

    As for research projects, these can be done by federal agencies in house or contracted out; you could pick the brains of university-based researchers with temporary fellowships which include an indemnity to the home institution for loss of services. The same might apply to state governments per se. Research conducted at colleges and universities themselves could be financed with private donations and institutional endowment income. The endowments of public institutions could be enhanced by special bond issues put on the ballot for public approval via petition campaigns, rather than regular appropriations from the legislature.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Almost Missouri
  209. Jack D says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    And you look like Paul Newman, right? Well maybe not Paul Newman because he had Jew blood. Like Robert Redford except more handsome? Amirite?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  210. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Your idea makes a lot of sense, so it has absolutely no chance of every being passed. Too many vested interests to change the current system.

    It reminds me a little bit of Malcolm Gladwell’s description of how he picked which college to attend in Canada. It was all very low stakes and not the kind of thing where people would have been willing to pay large bribes to get their kid in:

    I applied to college one evening, after dinner, in the fall of my senior year in high school. College applicants in Ontario, in those days, were given a single sheet of paper which listed all the universities in the province. It was my job to rank them in order of preference. Then I had to mail the sheet of paper to a central college-admissions office. The whole process probably took ten minutes.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2005/10/10/getting-in

  211. Renard says:
    @HammerJack

    What a delight for Silverman and her editors at the Post. They get to combine their war on white people with their war on Christmas.

    Not that there was ever much light between the two, mind you.

    As a long-time contributor, I just hope that VDare is protecting their subscriber rolls. However that may be naïve of me. It’s a high-value target and has probably already been compromised many times over.

  212. These people spent 2 years intentionally trying to provoke a race riot by trying to turn everything into a racial issue until they were given the gift of Floyd. This was in response to Trump recieving more black votes than any republican which threatened the political power of the DNC. This is pure evil, so no they aren’t good not good at all. They would cover up any atrocity, sink to any level, destroy anything if it threatens the democrats. They are sick and disgusting.

  213. @William Badwhite

    I agree that he’s young. From watching his video interviews, he strikes me as someone who gets a lot of validation by being able able to hobnob with people like Pinker. This makes it very hard not to accept that the world views of those people may be very wrong even when they are correct in their narrow fields of expertise. The fact that so much of academia polled as believing the Soviet Union would win the Cold War because of their superior economy ought to make everyone pause of the opinions of the educated elites –but status, you know.

  214. @Ian M.

    Two excellent comments, back-to-back.

    Does this Hanania chap not realize that for most of world history, the MSM did not exist?

    As myself and lots of others pointed out, Hanania is young and doesn’t really know very much. People that shouldn’t be able to opine for a living. Learn something, THEN opine.

    • Replies: @Ian M.
  215. @Dnought

    Back in February 2022: Biden admin’s Ukraine campaign, ex-DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson says, “is payback for 2016.”

    Left unsaid is that, even if Russia DID interfere with the 2016 election, that still doesn’t mean you run your foreign policy with “payback” as the goal.

    The fact an AA dimwit like “Jeh” came right out and admitted they put party over country doesn’t surprise me. The fact nobody said “holy crap, you’re putting Dem party revenge fantasies over the national interest??” should surprise me, but doesn’t.

    #ClownWorld

    • Agree: Almost Missouri, Dnought
  216. @Jack D

    Like Robert Redford except more handsome? Amirite?

  217. Muggles says:

    what I found was that the editors and producers (and the people behind them) who run the discussion about the arts in our country aren’t interested in mere reporting, let alone in giving their readers and viewers a fair picture of what’s really going on culturally in the world. They’re interested in dictating terms and promoting agendas. A few scales fell from my eyes. It’s almost like the entire news business generally!

    What I term Soviet America.

    When the actual USSR collapsed, pseudo intellectuals and now mostly ideologically homeless Marxists began to discuss new ways of imposing their world views on innocent citizens.

    Using ideological “Balkanization” as their analysis, stuffed into education institutions and career pathways, they divided society into new sectors to be pitted against one another. Race, sex, sexual deviance, newly discovered pots of “historical guilt”, etc. Green religion and End of the Worldism.

    News reporting became Narrative Bringing. The coming of the Internet emptied former advertising supported news reporting and led to the now centralized form of oligarch owned “media content” generators of the MSM all shouting in the echo chamber. Big Tech was cowed or bullied into censorship (see Matt Taibbi/Twitter/FBI).

    So reporting reality as it exists is out. Describing Clown World is in.

    Thanks to Unz and various rogue media outlets fitfully financed by individual Deplorable Donors, we have rely on places like Unz and iSteve commentary.

    The Truth does seep out.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  218. @Art Deco

    That all sounds clever but complicated. Nevertheless, I’m bookmarking it in case I’m appointed state ed czar (lol never happening).

  219. @anon556

    I spent 18 years in the Army, two in Iraq. You don’t want to know how bad it is.

    Sure we do. Tell us some stories.

  220. @Art Deco

    Curtis Yarvin has had disagreements with people about which way influence flows–from academia to media or vice versa. Paleo Retiree’s example is an interesting test case. Would media be interested in the traditional art movement if art historians and museums got more interested in it, or do art historians and museums follow journalism’s coverage of popular galleries and sales?

    I agree with Richard that it’s silly to get too worked up over a handful of really wrong articles in the numerator compared to all the okay articles in the denominator.

    If we grant for a moment that there really are only a handful of mistakes limited to touchy political topics, this is still not an endorsement of the MSM because articles about baseball and the weather really don’t matter. For a functional democracy, the only articles that really matter are the touchy political topics where the NYT lies and has extreme bias. The fact that baseball game winners are reported accurately is about as relevant to anything important about the place of media in society as the fact that the NYT masthead accurately reflects who editors are. Moreover, the baseball articles are not neutral but pernicious inasmuch as they create the impression that the institution is neutral and accurate more broadly–a kind of habituation to belief and trust, which Hanania seems to have fallen prey to.

    However, I don’t want to grant Hanania and Sailer that point. I think that, in fact, it’s possible that the world portrayed to us by the MSM is not as it actually is but that we are only able to detect its mistakes within in the narrow range of articles that Hanania and Sailer recognize as being wrong. Let’s start with the field of psychology. How many articles in the MSM cover things or assume in their coverage of things points that are generally regarded as “factual” but should be called into question by the replication crisis. Another example is low-fat, plant-based nutritional science. This is far from settled but if not for alt media coverage over the last 30 years, that wouldn’t be known today. Not just that it would be fringe, but actually the alt media coverage has encouraged the production of science and deconstruction of bad consensus in the scientific and medical community such that if the MSM were our only news source, the science could actually be different today. Here’s a topic where lots of science reporting would undoubtedly get good marks by Hanania and Sailer but may be almost entirely wrong: the cholesterol hypothesis of heart disease. There is a little known dissident group of cardiologists who don’t believe the standard narrative of heart disease. Their “leader” is Malcolm Kendrick, whose own theory of heart disease (see The Clot Thickens) predicts that Viagra should decrease heart disease deaths–low and behold, research is now showing that Viagra users have less heart disease. If the cholesterol theory of heart disease is wrong, it would mean that large swaths of science and medicine articles that appear to be reliable are in fact not, despite the fact that contradictory hypotheses and research has existed. You can see my point–the assumption that the MSM is largely accurate is almost impossible to validate and is mostly just confirmation bias.

    Likewise, simply trying to discredit the media when it’s in many ways the only means we have to acquire accurate information about the world should be understood as advocating for making society dumber.

    … Even the few conservative institutions that people take seriously like The Wall Street Journal have to rely to a large extent on left-wing staff.

    The formal argument Hanania is making here is “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good” but the content is somewhat different, more along the lines of “we haven’t got any choice”. I disagree. In the areas that count most, bad journalism can be worse than ignorance. The COVID-19 pandemic is a case in point. To go back to the baseball example, imagine if the NYT reported that the Yankees won a game that actually lost and Hanania’s response was shrug, well, they get most of the games right, so don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good, or how else you gonna get baseball news. You can see the problem immediately–he is advocating that you accept as fact all baseball scores while knowing that some percentage are wrong. But which ones? What is the value of reading the baseball news coverage unless it is, actually, accurate all the time?

  221. @bomag

    Or being true to their profession

    economists see the world as economic numbers and humans as interchangeable lego blocks, just numbers and statistics.

    So an illiterate goat herder from Afghanistan or a Boko Haram supporter from Nigeria are exactly the same as a rocket scientist from Texas, or an AI programmer from India…. as long as they are consoomers.

    The harsh realities of the human world are lost in them…

  222. Anon[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @LP5

    “That environment is not conducive to transparency, objectivity or truth.”

    It never has been, and anybody pretending otherwise is naive.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  223. @Muggles

    Except for when your narrative describes the effects of not so much the Internet as the World Wide Web when that became a big thing, all the “new ways of imposing their world views on innocent citizens” were already in play long before the Evil Empire fell.

    Some think there was a hinge point when the Sandinistas Officially lost power in a 1990 election (of course didn’t give up real power). With no more foreign causes worth supporting, they had no choice but to turn inwards to the extent they weren’t already imposing their will on the US etc.

    Big Tech was cowed or bullied into censorship (see Matt Taibbi/Twitter/FBI).

    Enough of them are communists to begin with, but none want to end up in Federal prison like Joseph Nacchio, a mid-late ’00s object lesson on what happens if corporate leadership says no to the Deep State.

    • Thanks: Nicholas Stix
  224. Getaclue says:
    @Art Deco

    The Mainslime Media is a complete and total biased joke and anyone not a moron knows this now – of course Hanania KNOWS this thoroughly also yet he pimps this utter bs so he can keep his hand in, like RINOS do as to agreeing to and pushing Lefty Agendas, and not be attacked by his buds and maybe even sometime rejoin them in that profitable arena?….

    Sailer knows it’s even worse than he describes also no doubt, he isn’t stupid – literally the Mainslime Media very recently worked to overthrow a duly elected President in concert with the FBI et al and they endlessly pimp Hate YT lies like that 1619 bs etc. that affect people’s lives and even get people killed….

    The best thing that can happen to Mainslime Media outlets is that they fail and go bankrupt but many are propped up by Soros, Jobs et al bc they are just propaganda outlets for the Satanic NWO Globalist Agenda and the War On The Peons being actively waged (but not discussed by the Mainslime) to depopulate them and then enslave the remaining ones in “Smart Cities” as monitored Serfs under a ChiCom type Social Credit System — there’s an actual war on but basically only the 1% Billionaire WEF Creeps and their lackeys (including the Mainslime Media they totally own) are fighting it, often in the dirtiest manner possible – the targeted Peons are, for the most part, utterly and willfully clueless…Do get that Booster Richard H. your with them so you know well — fu

    • Agree: Dnought
  225. @anon

    Well as they say, there is no arguing about taste, and so if you simply do not like The Who, I won’t quarrel with you: go thy ways, thou hast tamed a curs’d shrow.

    But simply to fire back at some of your assertions:

    — In the circles I travel in (generally north of IQ 130, I’m a 150 m’self), the song “My Wife”, the one I quoted, is considered a masterpiece of complicated and controlled irony;

    — Among experienced musicians, John Entwistle is considered one of the great masters of the bass guitar, and some of his songs have entered the standard repertoire;

    — Keith Moon, while self-admittedly a yob, was a very great drummer, just ask any serious drummer;

    — Pete Townshend wrote the rock opera “Tommy” and the semi-opera “Quadrophenia”; if you’ve written a song smarter than “5:15” or “Amazing Journey” I’d certainly like to hear it;

    — you can’t even get your quotes right — it is, “Won’t GET fooled again” a much more astute political observation than I’ve heard out of you lately;

    — I wrote my (successful) Harvard essay about “Tommy,” not about your sneering;

    — HARVARD INTERVIEWER: If you could have dinner with any person from history, who would it be?

    MYSELF: John Entwistle and Dorothy Day.

    INTERVIEWER: Okay that does it, you’re in.

    All things considered, I think I’d rather have a few pints with The Who than with you.

  226. Do you people have to say ‘legit” all the time. Legit legit legit. Where on earth did that come from? I understand the 12 year olds picking up on the latest imitation-30s-gangster slang. But old men like this one? Cut it with the legit already. Sheesh.

  227. “The MSM is pretty good except for the issues that cause riots, murders, and mayhem” is not a good argument in its favor

  228. @Ian M.

    “The second reason is the ideal of neutrality (let’s stipulate that the media actually strives for neutrality). But media ‘neutrality’ just is liberalism: the idea that we can be neutral among competing visions of the good.”

    Media neutrality is a complete fantasy. The msm aren’t neutral between racist, black cut-throats and hard-working, law-abiding, tax-paying Whites; they’re loyal to the racist, black cut-throats. The msm aren’t neutral between racist, brown, illegal alien cut-throats and hard-working, law-abiding, tax-paying Whites; they’re loyal to the racist, brown, illegal cut-throats. They aren’t neutral between homosexuals and normal people; they’re loyal to the homos. Ditto as for between sexual psychopaths and normal people.

    They aren’t even neutral as between the different groups of terrorists and psychopaths; the stack always ranks certain groups above others.

    Your presuppositions are all wrong, thus leading to utterly false conclusions.

    As for your description of “liberalism,” it sounds like something you might have picked up from a lying philosophy professor today, or a very naive one, generations ago.

    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Ian M.
  229. A thread on this conversation here:

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    , @AnonH
  230. @Cagey Beast

    He has a point about the “anti-Semites”. There’s absolutely no peer review or quality control when it comes to this. For every time a commenter makes a good point about Jews or Jewishness we get at least ten stupid or lazy claims. It’s like intellectual duct tape: it’s so misused and overused by morons that it makes even the proper use of it look bad.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  231. Jack D says:
    @BB753

    whatever happened to the right to self-determination,

    Ask the people of Chechnya and Syria, the ones who are not dead.

    If the war was about Donetsk and Lugansk, what were Russian troops doing in Kyiv and Kharkiv and Kherson? Did they make a wrong turn?

    And Russians haven’t even started in earnest.

    Really, 100,000+ casualties is not “earnest”? How many Russian boys will have to die for Putin’s ego before it is “earnest”?

    https://nypost.com/2023/01/20/russia-has-significantly-more-than-100000-casualties-in-ukraine-milley/

    I would say they made a very earnest effort. It wasn’t entirely successful but it was quite earnest.

    • Replies: @BB753
  232. Thea says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Just, more than that- no. If modern “feminists” want to whore themselves & later regret; if wannabe TGs are strong believers in their right to mutilate themselves- I’m also OK with that.

    If we want a flourishing and beautiful society we need to be our brothers’ keepers. We need men of courage to teach the next generation. Wouldn’t you rather a world filled with demure and feminine European women then these wrecks?

  233. Corvinus says:
    @Ron Unz

    “Well, I have mixed feelings about this analysis. It’s certainly true that the MSM is totally incompetent and dishonest about very many important things, but it’s also true that the conservative counter-MSM he criticizes is also totally incompetent and dishonest, perhaps even much more so”

    Except it’s true ONLY from YOUR perspective. Clearly you are engaging in propagenda.

    From a reader from your fine opinion webzine—“What you write is obviously not always factually false. You (a) emphasize any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) cover up and avoid the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) report some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.”

    So, what is that narrative? Jews, globalists, and their liberal mystery meat allies are evil. And as that same reader stated “And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it’s an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies, as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the narrative”—e.g., race realism, rampant election fraud, anti-whiteism.

    The lesson here is you, ad well as the Tiabbi’s and Greenwald’s of the world, are attempting to force people to live in a pseudo reality of your own creation, one where everything normies have investigated for themselves contradicts you, does not matter. We are virtue signaled to death to accept what you and your brethren tells us is truth rather than our own eyes.

    But, let us give partial to credit to Mr. Sailer, who in his usual cagey way addressed the fallacy that the media lies all or even most the time and thus cannot be trusted. That is intellectually sterility at its finest. Certainly media outlets have a bias. But people have to prove or disprove the contents from different sources.

    Thankfully, we have your words to fall back upon—I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying?—

  234. @theMann

    Agree.

    “The problem with taking a nihilistic posture towards the MSM is that there’s nothing to replace it with.”

    How about a good education? You know, a proper grounding in chemistry, physics and biology. Math through Calculus including statistics. History of Human Ideas from the Greeks to the present. Study of Chinese and Indian cultural traditions. History of Western Civ from Greeks on down. American history. Macroeconomics. Some study in formal Christian theology and modern psychology, ethology. Now, go to the library and check out some books covering current economics and politics.

    Armed with the above, a reader doesn’t need a modestly-educated reporter to interpret a newsworthy item for them any more than a person who could read the Bible in the vernacular needed a Latin-speaking clergy to interpret the Word of God.

    From this perspective, disbelief in the MSM is not a “nihilistic posture”.

    “nothing to replace it with”…..for those whose intellectual life revolves around the media, this would appear to be true. An inadvertent confession, an own goal.

  235. coop62 says:

    Its not the stories the NYT prints, its the ones they don’t. The legacy media has far more influence based on the stories they don’t cover vs. bias in the stories they do.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Thanks: Coemgen
  236. Cato says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    First time on Unz I’ve seen ad hominems directed at personal appearance (“physiognomy”). Moderators should have blocked these.

    • LOL: Coemgen
  237. @Ron Unz

    I honestly cannot believe that serious people are still talking about “news” outlets like the NYT, WaPo, et al as if they represent honest purveyors of information. They aren’t. I assume that anything they publish represents to one degree or another a distortion of the truth or a complete fabrication.

    Following is an interview with Lee Smith about the role of the press in the Russiagate affair.

    Lee Smith: “…Here’s something that boggles me still that there are still people after what we have seen and after I’ve documented in the book what the press has become what the WaPo what the prestige brands of American journalism have become and nonetheless there are Republicans only blocks from here who are more than happy to treat whether it’s the WaPo, NYT, CNN, MSNBC as though these are regular news networks still. Even after three years of seeing them operate exactly like media operatives…”

    Steve Bannon: “You believe they are the opposition party media. Right?

    Lee Smith: “It’s not a media, it’s a platform for intelligence operations. It’s not media at all. This is like the Arab press.”

    “It’s not a media, it’s a platform for intelligence operations.”

    • Replies: @Ron Unz
  238. Jack D says:
    @Stan Adams

    As a matter of courtesy to the family you shouldn’t declare someone dead until you know for sure, but his chances at this point are very slim. Miracles have happened but that’s what he would need at this point – a miracle.

    Mt. Baldy is only 45 miles from LA so it gets a lot of visitors. They’ve had 14 emergency calls in the last month. 45 mi. is very close to a big sea level city for a 10,000 ft mountain. You could be sunning on the beach at Malibu but meanwhile it goes down to 20F on Mt. Baldy at night and there can be snow and ice. One slip and you could plunge 500 ft.

    In NY you have to drive 275 miles to get to the tallest mountain and it’s only 5,00o ft.

  239. My father worked for the General Electric Atomic Power Energy Division for much of his career, responsible for the training of operators and startup of reactors. He was mostly apolitical and a mostly undoubting consumer of news media.

    That changed in 1979 with the Three Mile Island accident and attendant reporting by the broadcast networks. Although TMI was a pressurized water reactor and so a Westinghouse design, Dad was familiar with the system and the accident since he was working in the industry at the time and pretty well connected.

    He was appalled at the lies both overt and by omission told in the TMI reporting, mostly to make the whole affair seem more sensational that it actually was. From then on, he was a skeptic about the news media.

    Falsus in unum, falsus in omnibus.

  240. Ron Unz says:
    @Wade Hampton

    I honestly cannot believe that serious people are still talking about “news” outlets like the NYT, WaPo, et al as if they represent honest purveyors of information. They aren’t. I assume that anything they publish represents to one degree or another a distortion of the truth or a complete fabrication.

    Following is an interview with Lee Smith about the role of the press in the Russiagate affair.

    Ha, ha—by citing Lee Smith, you’ve inadvertently bolstered Hanania’s own case.

    Smith is a notoriously fanatic Jewish Neocon, well known from the Iraq War era, and then fervently eager for America to attack Iran on Israel’s behalf. He routinely denounces everyone who disagrees as a vile “anti-Semite.”

    I certainly emphasized that our MSM is dishonest and worthless, but someone like Smith is far more dishonest and worthless, pretty close to being an outright traitor who should be dangling from the end of a rope.

    https://militarist-monitor.org/profile/lee-smith/

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  241. Ian M. says:
    @William Badwhite

    Thank you. (I haven’t commented enough to use the ‘Thanks’ button).

  242. Hanania makes distinctions that collapse under the slightest scrutiny, e.g., “conservatives” vs. the “media,” and people who have lost their minds over race and sex within the msm, and people who haven’t.

    The national msm typically refused to report on the racist atrocity I dubbed the Knoxville Horror, except for the ap’s Duncan Mansfield, who implied that only White supremacists considered it a hate crime. fox news devoted a few seconds to it.

    The left and the right both jumped on the Trayvon Martin Hoax bandwagon.

    The left gave full-throated support to ending Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell in the military; the right meekly surrendered.

    I have no idea who the “conservatives” are that Hanania is talking about.

    Hanania says the left lost its mind over race and sex, but those are the same people whom he defends throughout this endless “thing.” (I read thousands of words—or were those pages?—from him, with no end in sight, before quitting.) And you can’t distinguish race (which includes immigration) and sex from everything else, because the msm are only interested in race and sex.

    Hanania distinguishes between academia and the msm, but this won’t hold, either. newsroom politics are identical to antiversity politics, and that’s no accident.

    https://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com/2019/12/the-real-world-of-affirmative-action.html

    Almost all msm operatives went to j-schools, which only function to cull people with any honesty or decency. twenty years ago, there were certain culling classes which were required of all students. The prof would be a black supremacist, e.g., Tracy Owens Patton, who would rant and rave about “racial profiling,” in order to lure a “privileged, White male” into arguing with her, say with DOJ/BCS stats. Then she would have him expelled from school, and defame him as a Nazi, lying and saying that campus and local city police had warned her about White supremacists on campus and in town, the student in question, and offer her bodyguards, all of which she’d made up. But the school (if not the campus or city cops) would back her up.

    By now, each j-school class probably has such political loyalty oath functions.

    https://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com/2013/06/tracey-owens-patton-remembering-racist.html

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  243. — you can’t even get your quotes right — it is, “Won’t GET fooled again”

    “It is”, well not really. It is “Can’t get fooled again.”

    Seventeen second listen

    When we super duper, HiQ people are correcting hoi poloi we need to be relentlessly right.

    P.S. I do like your comments, otherwise I wouldn’t honour you with my audits.

  244. Ian M. says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    Hi Nicholas Stix,

    Of course the media is not neutral. That’s why I put inverted commas around the word.

    But the ideal of ‘neutrality’ (which is impossible) – which many mainstream conservatives advocate for – leads to the obviously non-neutral leftist media we see today. Liberalism is ‘neutral’ with respect to Rawlsian ‘reasonable’ viewpoints, but what do you know, it turns out that the only viewpoint that’s reasonable is liberalism itself.

    I grant that over the last decade, the liberalism’s self-conception as a political philosophy of neutrality has receded and been eclipsed by the oppressor-oppressed paradigm.

    As for your description of “liberalism,” it sounds like something you might have picked up from a lying philosophy professor today, or a very naive one, generations ago.

    There have been several influences on my understanding of liberalism, but probably the most important one for me has been James Kalb .

  245. @Cato

    First time on Unz I’ve seen ad hominems directed at personal appearance (“physiognomy”). Moderators should have blocked these.

    What, exactly, is your objection? 🧐

  246. AnonH says:
    @Cagey Beast

    “You have your argument, but you also have bad fans, therefore you lose” Hanania is a complete hack, 5 years from now we’ll discover he’s another Weinstein Bros-tier grifter to subvert the race realism corner

  247. BB753 says:
    @Jack D

    “Ask the people of Chechnya and Syria, the ones who are not dead.”

    You mean the crazy Mujahideen in Chechnya and the US – backed ISIS Al-Qaeda in Syria? Lovely people! Why doesn’t Israel take them him as refugees?

    “If the war was about Donetsk and Lugansk, what were Russian troops doing in Kyiv and Kharkiv and Kherson? Did they make a wrong turn?”

    Pressuring Ukrainian authorities and the West to negotiate, which they refused. They’d rather see the entire country destroyed and half of the Ukrainian population dead or exiled than give in. BTW, Kharkov and Kherson are as Russian as Volgograd.

    ” Really, 100,000+ casualties is not “earnest”? How many Russian boys will have to die for Putin’s ego before it is “earnest”?”

    The NY Post is not a reliable source of information. That figure reflects more accurately the numbers of Ukrainian soldiers confirmed dead by independent observers, plus a further 30,000 to 50,000 MIA, some of whom are rotting unrecovered cadavers lying in the fields in the Bakhmut area. But you just keep cheering on the massacre! Let’s you and him fight! Anything to preserve the petrodollar and the Fed keeping up their fiat money scam.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  248. @Anonymous

    A not very attractive man, approaching middle-age … would “date” some of the women in his classes, whether they were married or not, and did quite well for himself, as far as I was aware. He even got some good of his girlfriends their first published stories in the NYT!

    He’s The New York Times‘ very own Harvey Weinstein!

    Something tells me this won’t be among “all the news that’s fit to print”.

  249. @Cagey Beast

    He has a point about the “anti-Semites”. There’s absolutely no peer review or quality control when it comes to this.

    Meh, he’s just sore that he got thoroughly deloused in the comments, so he’s throwing a tantrum and using the MSM’s poopiehead-type words: “anti-¡S!emite, anti-vax”. (He still thinks “anti-vax” is an insult, lol.)

    He’s been loused up so long he doesn’t recognize the gift of health and freedom when it’s bitten him in the ass.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  250. @Almost Missouri

    Yeah you guys are doing a fantastic job naming the Jew. Only whiners and suckers think otherwise.

  251. @Cato

    “First time on Unz I’ve seen ad hominems directed at personal appearance (“physiognomy”).”

    You must not read comments about female op-ed writers.

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
    • LOL: Pixo, Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  252. @Steve Sailer

    Right.

    Sailer’s First Law of Female Journalism, past iSteve Male of the Year worthies, Gavin “California Psycho” Newsom, antifa mugshots, etc. etc.


    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  253. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    That first Tweet pic is a phantasmic Comic-Con horror movie reunion:

    A hybrid Alien Mister Ed refugee from the set of Apocalypto is embraced by decrepit old preacher Kane from Poltergeist II while American Joker Psycho brings up the rear.

  254. lavoisier says: • Website
    @Chrisnonymous

    Agree. Very well thought out and expressed.

    The media does not generally get the important matters right and have an overt bias and ignorance that is destructive to truth.

  255. @Chrisnonymous

    ‘Would media be interested in the traditional art movement if art historians and museums got more interested in it, or do art historians and museums follow journalism’s coverage of popular galleries and sales?’

    There are interlinked commercial and prestige networks at the top of society.

    If powerful people are suppressing traditional art through print media outlets then trad art will not be picked up by big galleries or (promoted) art historians.

    Anyone can go independent if they wish, but they cannot get an arm of the Establishment publicity machine to adopt and promote them. Same with publishing novels or anything of consequence really.

    The Art Renewal Center – https://www.artrenewal.org

  256. “This kind of criticism is cheap and selective, and it ignores how the media gets things right a lot more often than it gets them wrong. ”

    Wow! What a standard. How far we have come from the journalism practiced by the Water gate reporting. Double-sourced with people who would go ON RECORD. Everything today is what used to be called innuendo, a slight against the character of someone, on the basis of an impression, without any kind of fact. Facts today are treat as inconvenient: they get in the way of a good story and can be minimized or even suppressed in order to make a point

  257. Corvinus says:
    @Ron Unz

    “I assume that anything they publish represents to one degree or another a distortion of the truth or a complete fabrication.”

    See, this is madness, Mr. Unz. Certainly Wade is entitled to his own opinion. But have you have ever thought the long term implications of such thinking?

    Mr. Sailer—Having been criticized a lot over the decades, my view is that criticism is good for people. I try hard not to fall for low IQ critiques. In contrast, the current view that various groups are sacred cows above criticism but beneath agency is bad for them.

    So, can you provide specific instances where you made adjustments to your narratives and ideology due to critiques of your reasoning and conclusions, or addressed on a regular basis that the Wade’s of the world should recalibrate their line of thinking?

    Introspection is a good thing.

    Consider that YOU made this statement in s moment of clarity—“Lots of the commenters here are delusional in all sorts of different ways?” Does this apply to you as well?

    Furthermore, while free speech remains a potent force in our country. It’s just that there are always consequence for what one says.

    Sure, the Johnny Walker’s and the clifford brown’s of the world have the liberty to falsely claim that “a secret society runs the country from the shadows” and “Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell (like her father before her) were intelligence assets for Israel, organized crime and likely certain elements of US intelligence”. The problem is that this “opinion” becomes “truth”, which spreads like a cancer, thus metastasizing discourse. It’s a race to the bottom of the brain stem.

    Case in point—Hilary Clinton on Twitter linked to a Los Angeles Times article about what happened to Pelosi’s husband, and then Elon Musk countered with *a post from a fake-news site* that soon was taken down. Then he wrote there was a “tiny possibility” what he linked to had been was wrong as a hedge against spreading disinformation.

    Too many people are getting sucked into this vortex. But then again, you facilitate it and receive financial consideration along the way, so in the end why would you want to take partial ownership.

    That’s why you need to heed this message
    from John Robb—We are being mentally rewired by the technologies of social networking. It’s an involuntary process. That mental rewiring is forcing a reorganization of society. Those changes are dangerous during the early phases (think: printing press/30-years war)…We might need to shut down Twitter to increase our potential of surviving the first half of this century. Network decision making, in its current raw form, is simply too dangerous.

    • Replies: @Pixo
    , @BB753
  258. @Nicholas Stix

    Then she would have him expelled from school….

    According to both your blog postings (which are the only things that can be found by Bing and Google with these two people’s names; 2003 might as well not exist for the modern web, but see Professor Watchlist for 2021 crimes against humanity), the white victim was “expelled” or “removed” from this one class. Back in 2003 through 2019 you made no claim he was expelled from the school.

    Not that it matters that much, this is almost certainly a career ending thing, but as usual the willingness to tolerate female and negro misbehavior, and use people like this Owens to harangue and terrorize their betters is a strong solvent for what’s left of our civilization.

    STEVE SAILER ALERT!!!

    While searching for more recent mentions of her name, I found this 2006 National Women’s Studies Association Journal article “Hey Girl, Am I More than My Hair?: African American Women and Their Struggles with Beauty, Body Image, and Hair“. Here’s the abstract:

    Using Afrocentric theory and standpoint theory, this article examines the effect of the White standard of beauty upon African American women. By shedding light on the salience of the effects of beauty, body image, and hair, this article questions societal definitions of beauty. Adherence to the Euro American beauty standard has had, and continues to have, devastating effects upon African American women. In addition, this standard pits African American women against the dominant cultural standard of beauty. A call to challenge the hegemonic White standard of beauty through Black beauty liberation is offered.

    But wait, there’s more! She gets a bit part in this Canadian government propaganda article “Tangled Roots: Decoding the history of Black Hair.”

    • Replies: @Poirot
  259. Jack D says:
    @BB753

    Just what I thought. All the self determination talk is instantly forgotten the instant the shoe is on the other foot. People in Syria and Chechnya can’t have self determination because they would pick crazy mujahadeen, while the people of Luhansk and Donetsk have wisely chosen the crook – puppets who run their country on behalf of Putin. Even the crook puppet Kadyrov in Chechnya is wise and no longer a terrorist now that he has switched sides (as Muslim warlords are wont to do).

    Pressuring to negotiate – you mean like blowing up the electrical system. This is exactly how the Mafia “pressures you to negotiate” your protection payment. Your store was fire bombed? – that’s just a negotiating tactic.

    The Post is not reliable? They were quoting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley. Is he also not reliable? Is there anyone who is reliable other than Peskov? I think that Peskov IS reliable in a certain way – you can’t believe that anything has happened until Peskov denies it.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Yancey Ward
    , @BB753
  260. gregor says:

    Here’s the thing: I don’t think people actually hate the media because of lack of accuracy per se. That’s just how it’s often expressed because that’s an effective way to attack a hated institution. The real reason people hate the media is simply because they perceive (correctly) that the media hates them and is not on their side. Other observations about lies of omission and skewed selection of topics can be thought of as an extension of this underlying problem.

    Propaganda has a very negative connotation now but historically it is a more neutral concept and it’s actually less effective if it’s based primarily on deception. You could have propaganda that would be broadly very appealing to many Americans and that would be in their interests. You could have pro-family instead of pro-gay propaganda, or pro-white instead of anti-white, for example. People will actually like it if it’s for them rather than against them.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  261. Rjk says:

    Steve, you desperately need an editor. Your last three posts have some seriously garbled sentences.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  262. @Art Deco

    Note, seconding Paleo Retiree is Rod Dreher, who was on the editorial staff of the Dallas Morning News from 2002 to 2009. Dreher would look at the market research on who actually bought the paper and send around circulars suggesting the paper cover stories of more interest to their modal reader (older suburban whites). He said the response from assignment editors was zero. They didn’t give a rip what their readers were interested in, they covered what they were interested in covering.

    [MORE]

    Dreher is not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed. He makes a couple of implicit assumptions that are rather… problematic, as the progs would say:

    1. The editors make coverage/ narrative decisions based on their own interests/ preferences
    2. The readers are the most important customers for the paper

    Obviously, the publishers/ owners take some interest in which narratives are promoted by their outlets. And sometimes the “right” narrative in a broader context is more important to those oligarchs than making money in a particular instance — especially in a time when ownership of narrative promotion agencies in the US is concentrated to an unprecedented degree in the hands of a few oligopolists:
    https://wfswhittier.net/3037/sci-tech/the-media-oligopoly-how-a-handful-of-companies-control-nearly-all-of-the-media-in-the-u-s/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_cross-ownership_in_the_United_States

    But even beyond that, newspapers in the modern era have always brought in more money from advertisers (their real customers) than from readers (their ostensible “customers”). And advertiser money comes in bigger chunks. Analogy: Which has a bigger impact/ more influence: thousands of small shareholders/ customers complaining to a corporation about its policies… or Larry Fink calling the CEO and saying “If you don’t crack down harder on the White goyim, BlackRock will sell its stake* in your company — which, by the way, amounts to 9% of your shares”?

    These are hardly novel observations about the nature of the narrative promotion industry. Upton Sinclair covered it well in The Brass Check (1919). Still worth reading today.

    Some might argue “But many so-called ‘journalists’ are true believers in the narratives they promote!”
    Noam Chomsky is a notorious Bolshevik jew (and his basic shtick is a modified limited hangout, of course), but he makes an excellent point here:

    You can shape a narrative by deciding which facts (or “facts”) to include/ emphasize, and which to ignore/ downplay — but also by only hiring people who already believe in the overall narrative you wish to promote. And if any of them should happen to develop even slightly heretical beliefs on an important narrative later on? They’re gone. For example, here’s a small sample of some of the narrative promoters who were fired for showing insufficient enthusiasm for officially-mandated dogma in the early days of the George Floyd overdose/ BLM/ antifa riots narrative:
    https://thefederalist.com/2020/06/11/if-you-dont-support-black-lives-matter-youre-fired/

    *Yes, I know. Strictly speaking, BlackRock doesn’t “own” those shares. But they control them, and that’s what matters.

  263. @Jack D

    primitive tribalists

    Demonstrating yet again that reflexive projection is a characteristic feature of toxic semitism.

  264. Pixo says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    He’s a apparatus a purely Portuguese-Canadian sports talk guy. RH didn’t say he had good physiognomy at all.

    The implication of what RH said is he looks like a prole fat guy whose physiognomy would imply he’s conservative with prole conservative views on gays.

    I agree RH looks a bit creepy. He’s got Arab features but very light skin and blue eye, the look is weird for Americans though if you lived in areas with a lot of Arab Christians you’d get used to it. (Green eyed mulattos have a similar creepy look).

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  265. @YetAnotherAnon

    You’re trying to reason with people whose viewpoints are based on emotion and years of preconditioning. A noble effort, but also a complete waste of time.

    • Replies: @Post-Postmodernist
  266. @Jack D

    Being a spokesman for the US government, Milley isn’t inherently reliable. I would be no more willing to believe what he says about the war in Ukraine than I would be to believe Putin or Zelensky.

    One should always try to verify the facts someone states are facts, and if not able to do so, discount heavily based on what might be the political self-interest of the speaker.

    What is astonishing to me is the belief that skepticism is a crippling stance to take. Human beings lie all the time, for an amazing number of motivations. Sometimes you can catch them in the lying, but mostly you won’t, but you can limit the damage by not relying on them telling the truth so much.

    • Agree: acementhead
    • Replies: @Jack D
  267. I tend to like Hanania – he often writes some heterodox and interesting things, even if I don’t ultimately agree with his reasoning or conclusions.

    But he couldn’t be more wrong here. I have to wonder whether Hanania is motivated – consciously or not – by a feeling that he flies too close to the sun sometimes as in the case of his interaction with Amy Wax, and therefore he needs to pay some gold to the Dane here. Perhaps a test of Media credibility for Hanania would be “how accurate would the media be if one of my provocations went viral and I became Emmanuel Goldstein for a news cycle or two.” You can bet they’d get a lot of basic facts about Hanania very, very wrong even before the media represented what he had said that was the cause for controversy. You can guarantee that the incorrect facts won’t be flattering.

    “The media is honest about a lot of things with little political valence, but if something is important to the ruling class and has political implications you can’t trust the media” isn’t the zinger he thinks it is. Extreme members of both parties vote in the same manner for most things – AOC and Lauren Boebert probably vote the same way on 60-70% of bills or more. But that’s because 60-70% of bills are about naming post offices or something else with no ideological/partisan/economic impact one way or the other. This doesn’t mean that they agree or are bipartisan, it just means that there are a lot of things that aren’t important enough to expend partisan energy on.

    [MORE]

    Even in the example of Ukraine and Russia, the media (in concert with the security state and NGO puppets) has cast Russia as anti-gay for years. When Russia invaded Ukraine, the frame became a proxy for the prior years long mirage of Trump as Russian agent and Russia having “hacked our Democracy.” This was augmented by portrayals of Zelenskyyy as plucky Freedom Fighter who dutifully made overtures to pro-gay movement in the Ukraine (likely either instinctually or at the advice of the U.S. Security State). This was a case of the media being part of the apparatus to make a fight between slightly different kinds of Slavs over the particular outlines of the border between former Romanov and Habsburg possessions a proxy for American left-right politics. Objectively the dispute in Eastern Europe is about the perceived geopolitical interests of Russia and a NATO proxy, but laundered through the media narratives it actually becomes a matter of “race, gender and sexual orientation” and pro-Democracy (anti-Trump) versus anti-Democracy (pro-Trump). There is virtually no attempts at a “deep dive” into the history of Russia and the Ukraine, how parts of Eastern Ukraine became parts of Eastern Ukraine, the linguistic/cultural/ethnic divides within Ukraine, warnings from Statesmen and Russians about the provocative effects of NATO’s Eastern expansion for decades, the so-called Maidan revolution, etc. You can disagree that these things should make people favor Ukraine less and Russia more, but you can’t disagree that they’re relevant to understanding the conflict and Russia’s perception of its vital interests (whether you agree with them or not).

    Speaking of which – a lot of what the media does is not investigate or report when it should. There was a nation-rending dispute about 2016 as a “hacked election” and the installation of a “Russian puppet” in the White House – to the point that there was a clandestine security state operation to remove the President, and then an overt “Special Counsel” process to do the same. The whole thing just sort of ended one day without proof that the President was a decades-long Russian intelligence asset, but the media expressed absolutely no curiosity about that. The biggest story in the U.S. for years just dried up one day and they had no interest in finding out what happened and holding the people who were responsible to account. They just went on to the next confected outrage to injure Trump – interestingly, a call between Trump and elements of the Ukrainian government leaked by a Ukrainian-born Army intelligence officer who had previously been offered a high ranking position in the Ukrainian government (again, no curiosity about this strange collection of facts at all).

    You could go on and on but I think the credits of the Times and similar organizations are perhaps the parts of its operations which aren’t politically important enough to be forced through the lens of American politics – maybe some assignment desk in Ouagadougou staffed by veteran newsmen can report accurately about Burkina Faso’s increased sorghum exports but no one really cares about that.

  268. BB753 says:
    @Jack D

    “People in Syria and Chechnya can’t have self determination because they would pick crazy mujahadeen”

    The majority of the Syrian population is fine with the Assad regime. Both ISIS and Al-Qaeda are state department/ CIA puppets, armed, trained and funded to take down a regime which does not agree with Washington, London and Israel. Syrians should be thankful for the Russian intervention.

    “Pressuring to negotiate – you mean like blowing up the electrical system.”

    The heavy bombings to take down the electrical grid started only after Ukraine exited the negotiating table. Because the Zelensky/ Hunter Biden Ukrainian puppet regime was told not to negotiate by Boris Johnson and the collective West.

    “They were quoting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley. Is he also not reliable?”

    No, he’s a liar. What can you expect from the Pentagon?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  269. Pixo says:
    @Corvinus

    Wow, a persuasive and quality non-trolling Corvinus-post. It’s a good look on you.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  270. Art Deco says:
    @BB753

    The last time the Syrian public expressed an opinion about anything was around about 1961.

    • LOL: BB753
  271. Art Deco says:
    @James Forrestal

    You mean their advertisers wanted them to ignore the preferences of their suburban readers in favor of the Big Gay Weekend?

    He’s not the sharpest tool in the shed. He did actually work there and know the people making the decisions.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  272. BB753 says:
    @Corvinus

    ““Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell (like her father before her) were intelligence assets for Israel, organized crime and likely certain elements of US intelligence”. ”

    Those are facts, not opinions.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  273. Jack D says:
    @Yancey Ward

    I agree that you should be skeptical about everyone and everything. The old newspaperman’s mantra was, “if your mother says she loves you, check it out”. However, Russian and Arabs lie a lot more than Americans. It’s a major cultural difference and one reason why America is so much richer than Russia. All that lying is a drag on the economy. When an American tells you something, it’s probably 80/20 that it’s true, and when a Russian says something, the odds are reversed.

  274. @Pixo

    RH didn’t say he had good physiognomy at all.

    The implication of what RH said is he looks like a prole fat guy whose physiognomy would imply he’s conservative with prole conservative views on gays.

    Tweet reply counterpoints to Hanania’s misdirection on the use of “physiognomy” in assessing the presenter’s character:

    He’s disgusting now and would have been slightly less disgusting a generation ago. It’s a point for physiognomy

    Nah – looks weak – blubbers as expected – score 1 for physiognomy.

    You and this misshapen T50 are actually both great examples of poor physiognomy explaining bad politics.

    Not sure this is really a strike against physiognomy (not that I put a ton of stock in it to begin with). In both scenarios the guy is a retarded conformist, the zeitgeist he’s conforming to has just changed. [e.a.]

    That last bolded line is the crux of it. If physiognomy is a clue to character, Hanania’s supposed paradox fails.

    • Replies: @Pixo
  275. Pixo says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Each of those tweeted points are wrong. He’s below average for TV but very average looking overall. Most men that look like him have right of median views on homosexuality, though that median has shifted left rapidly the past couple decades.

    The reason RH is wrong is that individual exceptions are meaningless and it’s dumb trolling to tweet “hey look an exception!”. Nobody maintains that physiognomy has 100% accuracy for predicting political views.

    I do have a fairly high opinion of RH and like his focus on how low IQ scammers are a blight on on the right, but his attentionwhoring and trolling are his worst traits and this is an example.

  276. P.T. says:

    Actually, the United States started the Ukraine-Russia war with the neocons plan to put NATO troops on the Ukraine-Russia border to menace Russia. The Russians found that unacceptable.
    lll

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  277. @Jack D

    Perhaps, before spewing forth reams of incoherent, histrionic nonsense, you might wish to take a brief moment to look up the definition of the word “power?”

    You’re welcome.

  278. Corvinus says:
    @BB753

    Citations required on your part.

    • Replies: @BB753
  279. Corvinus says:
    @Pixo

    It’s always been a good look on me, ma’am.

  280. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:
    @gregor

    The media invariably promotes causes that annoy ordinary Americans. Maybe this is incidental but you suspect in fact that it’s the whole point. This would explain why, as soon as ordinary people became comfortable with homosexuality, they began pushing gay marriage, and as soon as that became accepted, transsexualism and pederasty.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  281. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rjk

    A lot of posters here could do with a proof reader.

    Unfortunately it’s a stereotype that people on “our side” are uneducated hicks, so typos and plain bad English are embarrassing to see in otherwise good posts.

  282. @Anonymous

    True. The worst thing about the modern West is its faith in and addiction for permanent revolution.

    • Agree: Poirot
  283. BB753 says:
    @Corvinus

    Work and honesty required on your part.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  284. Art Deco says:
    @P.T.

    You’ve uttered three falsehoods in two sentences.

    • Replies: @P.T.
  285. Corvinus says:
    @BB753

    Those are two books who each offer a theory based on their interpretation of events. I have watched Webb being interviewed about her book. Some interesting things to be sure, but her conclusions on false premises and conjecture.

    Work and honesty required on your part.

    • Replies: @BB753
  286. BB753 says:
    @Corvinus

    Well, I need to congratulate you on your dishonest hasbara work ethic. Ryan Dawson’s books on Epstein are better but they’re not readily available. The guy’s been persecuted by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Patreon, PayPal, etc. For a reason.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  287. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    This is like arguing that a person that feeds you 99% of good food but mixes in 1% of a poison is a nice, well-meaning individual. Hanania’s mindless contrarianism gets him attention he craves but is not winning him any respect from smart people.

  288. P.T. says:
    @Art Deco

    And you could not refute one of them. lol

  289. @Art Deco

    He [Dreher] did actually work there and know the people making the decisions.

    He knew the people and knew what decisions they made. It does not automatically follow that he knew (or cares to disclose) their motivations.

    You mean their advertisers wanted them to ignore the preferences of their suburban readers in favor of the Big Gay Weekend?

    I mean that both the oligarchs who own narrative promotion agencies and their advertisers (customers) take some interest in the content (and instrumental purpose) of the narratives that appear in those outlets. Of course, when it comes to online “news” sources in the current year, it’s more like advertiser (singular) — Alphabet/ Google:

    https://www.fastcompany.com/90787357/should-congress-save-newspapers-from-google

    Just another facet of systemic tribalism:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Page#Early_life
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Brin#Early_life_and_education

  290. Corvinus says:
    @BB753

    And I need to give you credit for continuing to press the default button for anyone whom you disagree with must be Jewish or a Jewish acolyte. Not something for you to be proud of.

    • Replies: @BB753
  291. BB753 says:
    @Corvinus

    Hasbara has become a common term for all online mercenary desk warriors, not just Jews or Israelis.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  292. I don’t understand why Steve automatically thinks the reason NYT foreign policy correspondents views are transactional. It never occurs to him that maybe they actually hold the same views (i.e. pro-war) as their sources. For every David Halberstam there are 50 Judy Millers in the news business. But Steve’s foreign policy thoughts have never been that sharp. You can kick the right winger out of the National Review but you can never really remove the National Review from the right winger

  293. Corvinus says:
    @BB753

    No, “hasbara” a meaningless term meant to deflect your intellectual sterility.

    • LOL: BB753
  294. @Veteran Aryan

    You’re trying to reason with people whose viewpoints are based on emotion and years of preconditioning.

    As opposed to whom? Who is immune to the influences that you allude-to? Are we not all heavily biased by our upbringing; our peers; our interests (personal; familial; professional); our emotions; and numerous other factors that are endemic to the human condition?

  295. @James Forrestal

    Noam Chomsky is a notorious Bolshevik jew

    Bolshevik? Chomsky self-describes as a Libertarian or Anarcho– Socialist.

    As for Chomsky’s Jewishness, it is hardly a secret that he explicitly rejects Judaism and identifies as atheist. (As did the Bolsheviks, incidentally, to say the very least.)

    One might, perhaps, also mention here the little fact that there was nothing inherently or even particularly Jewish about Bolshevism. The movement always included plenty of non-Jews (including no less a central figure than Lenin himself), and never enjoyed the support of anywhere near a majority of Jews.

    Your comment would appear not only plainly inaccurate but also quite gratuitous.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @James Forrestal
  296. duncsbaby says:
    @Old Prude

    Who killed George Floyd?

    No-one. It was suicide by drug overdose.

  297. duncsbaby says:
    @Gordo

    I stopped following Hanania on twitter about 6 months ago. I forget why but he tweeted something so horrendously incorrect that I started to suspect the guy was a fraud. I follow left wingers who are idiots too but I know what to expect from them. I’m glad to see Hanania referencing Sailer in his substack but I wouldn’t trust him as far as I could throw him.

    • Replies: @Pete P
  298. Art Deco says:
    @Post-Postmodernist

    Chomsky self-describes as a Libertarian or Anarcho– Socialist.

    The actual Chomsky is someone who amuses himself taking perverse and malicious stances on public affairs.

  299. Melpomene says: • Website

    Once an eagle, stricken with a dart,
    Said, when he saw the fashion of the shaft,
    “With our own feathers, not by others’ hands,
    Are we now smitten”

  300. @James Forrestal

    A qualifier concerning the concluding statement of my previous reply to you, Your comment would appear not only plainly inaccurate but also quite gratuitous. This was not directed at your post as a whole, which I found germane, but specifically to the statement of yours that I had quoted. (And the mindset that it, along with numerous other comments of yours, exhibit.)

  301. @Post-Postmodernist

    As for Chomsky’s Jewishness, it is hardly a secret that…

    He is halachically a Member of the Tribe. Do you hate People of Semitism so much that you believe the mere mention of their ethnicity is an insult? Strange.

    Bolshevik? Chomsky “self-describes” as a “Libertarian” or “Anarcho– Socialist.”

    That’s nice. You know, I can’t help but notice that many people on this site will spew incoherent, vitriolic rants about imaginary conspiracies involving supposed “card-carrying members of the National Socialist German Workers Party” at the drop of a hat — yet they manage to get all hysterical about what they consider to be “imprecise” use of common terms like “Neo-Bolshevik.” Let’s take a brief look at symbology:

    Headquarters of the Bolsheviks in Germany, 1932:

    https://img.haarets.co.il/bs/0000017f-f6c9-d5bd-a17f-f6fba1510000/a3/57/96e884ff218e96a0eebdcb4747ad/1018316866.jpg?precrop=794,459,x6,y24&height=488&width=840

    Note the Bolshevik flag [from https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/2016-12-29/ty-article/1895-a-jew-who-would-thanklessly-head-germanys-communist-party-is-born/0000017f-f6c9-d5bd-a17f-f6fbaa020000 ]

    Compare to a current year “anarchist” flag:

    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.0ScxiP-pO_huyxLnP340SwHaEK%26pid%3DApi&f=1&ipt=8aa6acb31dd1a11719f4ece2ff56d373f4edb13e747c8633dad771c063c7af3a&ipo=images

    Huh.

  302. OldFart says:

    “Media carries with it a credibility that is totally undeserved. You have all experienced this, in what I call the Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia effect. (I refer to it by this name because I once discussed it with Murray Gell-Mann, and by dropping a famous name I imply greater importance to myself, and to the effect, than it would otherwise have.)

    Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.

    That is the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect. I’d point out it does not operate in other arenas of life. In ordinary life, if somebody consistently exaggerates or lies to you, you soon discount everything they say. In court, there is the legal doctrine of falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus, which means untruthful in one part, untruthful in all. But when it comes to the media, we believe against evidence that it is probably worth our time to read other parts of the paper. When, in fact, it almost certainly isn’t. The only possible explanation for our behavior is amnesia.” – Michael Crichton

  303. Pete P says:
    @duncsbaby

    RH was brought into the University of Austin grift about 6 months ago. I suspect he is posting and arguing under approved lines from his paymasters.

    It was always weird how he appeared out of nowhere a few years ago and made it to TV. Such is usually the product of a hidden hand.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  304. towero says:

    Hanania defines himself by constantly being in opposition, and has now moved to attack the “right”. He is in the midst of taking a massive L on vaccines so he is lashing out at what he perceives as right-wing shibboleths.

    It’s hard to read his stuff atm, as it is filled with a bias he probably isn’t even aware of (you could even say its… unconscious, lol). And therefor lacks the bracing clarity of somebody reaching some sort of truth.

    But by defining himself in perpetual opposition to the left or the right he’s missing the point. It’s just establishment vs decentralization now.

  305. @James Forrestal

    This is a bit of a misunderstanding, perhaps. Antifa with the now iconic to us symbol/flag was originally the Weimar German Communist Party’s last paramilitary organization after their previous was banned. (Also interesting is that at the end, per Moscow that party was more focused on opposing the Socialists I think it was than the Nazi party.)

    It is very interesting although not surprising it was taken back up after WWII in Europe and probably later the US, but of course “fascism” became and always will be one of the great enemies.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  306. @Pete P

    It was always weird how he appeared out of nowhere a few years ago and made it to TV. Such is usually the product of a hidden hand.

    Good point. Let’s take a look:

    According to public documents, Hanania founded the “Center for the Study of Partisanship and Ideology” [a California Domestic Corporation] on January 28, 2020. [Not going to link because the address on file appears to be a private residence]

    Until 2022, it only had one principal on record (Hanania) — now it has 3. Legalzoom.Com, Inc is listed as the Registered Agent on file for this company. Not exactly looking like a huge operation so far. Yet on June 1, 2021, Hanania wrote:

    Since I announced the founding of CSPI in November [2020], our work has been regularly featured in the press. Articles by or about our fellows have appeared in almost every one of the most important American publications across the political spectrum, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Quillette, The New York Post, Reason, and National Review. Our work has also appeared in publications abroad, including two articles that Philippe Lemoine has written on the COVID-19 crisis for Le Figaro.

    So… he opens a do-it-yourself corp using Legalzoom and (presumably) his home address, and a few months later, just about every major narrative promotion agency in the country is promoting him and his corporate “fellows?”

    Yeah I think “out of nowhere” seems like an apt description. Where did the money and influence come from?

    Also note that according to guidestar.org:

    The Center for the Study of Partisanship and Ideology (CSPI) was formed in 2020 to help support research into underexplored ideas in political psychology and the social sciences. With the rise of populism, increasing polarization, and identity-based movements across the world, there has rarely been a better time to study these topics.

    So Hanania, a Research Fellow at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University, is concerned about the rise of populism from the standpoint of political psychology? Sounds pretty “right wing” to me…

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  307. @James Forrestal

    He is halachically a Member of the Tribe.

    Irrelevant.[1]

    Do you hate People of Semitism so much that you believe the mere mention of their ethnicity is an insult?

    Context.

    [MORE]

    (You are clearly intelligent enough that the only plausible alternative to your being disingenuous would be that of being blinded to what would be obvious if not for your overwhelming bias.)

    “Neo-Bolshevik.” Let’s take a brief look at symbology:

    Compare to a current year “anarchist” flag:

    My challenge, clearly articulated, was not to the term “Neo-Bolshevik” but to your description of Noam Chomsky as a “notorious Bolshevik jew”. “Bolshevik”, I maintain, is inaccurate. “Jew” is technically accurate but, in the context-in-question, irrelevant.

    As for the flags shown in the images you linked-to, whatever connection to or continuity with Bolshevism that they might have would only be relevant if Chomsky identified with a party that used such symbolism. Anarcho-Socialist is a pretty broad term, and does not signify identification with any particular entity that either uses the title Anarchist or could reasonably be characterized as such.

    [1] While it is true that Judaism regards one born to a Jewish mother as immutably Jewish, this in so far as the individual’s obligations under the religion; a non-believer (such as Chomsky), however, for most intents and purposes, is excluded from communal religious life. (While a sincere, valid convert is fully included.) Moreover, a Jewish atheist is (again, in the eyes of Judaism*) held in lower regard than a non-Jewish theist. These are all examples that rebut the simplistic, ignorant charges of mere crude tribalism that are so often reflexively leveled at Judaism by the “usual suspects”.

    *As distinct from any number of ersatz substitutes masquerading as Judaism.

  308. Art Deco says:
    @James Forrestal

    Chomsky is no friend to Jews qua Jews, or, indeed, to anyone who isn’t an acolyte or a collaborator on his various projects.

  309. Anonymous[335] • Disclaimer says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    Yes, according to Marxist-Leninist theory, Fascism was just a type a feudalism and so was no threat to Communism. The “bourgeois” parties, particularly the Social Democrats, were seen as the main enemy, not the Nazis. (Communists and Nazis sometimes even worked together to defeat Social Democrats at elections.)

    Of course, after Barbarossa the Communists amended their theories. Fascism was now “the armed wing of the Bourgeoisie”, a deadly threat, and treated accordingly.

    However it’s good to remind modern “Antifa” that their revered Weimar predecessors were at one time de facto allies of the Nazis.

  310. @James Forrestal

    Good work. Now, the question is, Who’s his rabbi? Someone at Columbia?

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
  311. @Nicholas Stix

    Good work. Now, the question is, Who’s his rabbi?

    More like, “Who’s his macher?”

    And the answer is… beats me. Just pointing out that his sudden appearance as a heavily-promoted public figure seems (like many media narratives) unlikely to be a spontaneous, “viral” phenomenon.

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