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Haaretz: "All Is Quiet at the Eye of the Storm."
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Another slow day at the Israeli border

Although Europeans are assured by their rulers that nothing can be done to stop the Camp of the Saints from inundating them, various countries very near Syria, such as the Persian Gulf Arab petrostates and Israel, find that ensuring self-rule over their demographic destinies is merely a matter of taking prudent precautions, such as building walls. From Haaretz today, an extremely calm analysis, as befits Israel’s strong border security situation, which is built not on geographic isolation, but on a proper understanding of the relationship between citizens and their state.

As Arab Migrants Swamp Europe, Israel Also Needs to Take Stock
Analysis | Israel is not impervious to the repercussions of the Middle Eastern refugee wave.

Amos Harel Sep 03, 2015 9:40 PM

The picture of the tiny corpse of the 3-year-old Kurdish child that washed up on the beach in the hands of a Turkish policeman; the scenes of the thousands of refugees crowding into the Budapest train station requesting in vain permission to transit into Germany; the truck abandoned by the roadside in Austria and inside it the corpses of scores of people who had fled the horrors of the civil war in Syria – all these tell the same story: In the waning days of this summer the Middle East has come for a visit to Europe. And together with the refugees and survivors of the many crises and conflicts in Africa that barely get a small percentage of the international attention paid to the wars in the Arab world, it has no intention of going anywhere else.

It appears there is no longer any point in spreading apocalyptic scenarios along the lines of the plot of Michel Houellebecq’s novel “Submission,” but it is already clear that things are never again going to be what they used to be. After nearly five years of atrocities, the huge upheaval in the Arab countries is no longer closed in a box, its external repercussions limited. Just as the slaughter that is happening daily in Syria and Iraq radiates onto the neighboring countries, among them Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, which are inundated with waves of refugees, so hundreds and thousands more are fleeing to Europe, the promised continent. …

Within this huge uproar, most of the time Israel is continuing to maintain a kind of security bubble. The number of live-fire incidents along the borders has indeed increased somewhat, but it seems that the Israeli citizen hardly feels the repercussions of the upheaval all around him. All is quiet at the eye of the storm. …

The waves of refugees in the region, and alongside them the increased activity of the jihadist organizations along Israel’s borders, are expected to encourage Netanyahu to retrieve from the mothballs the old plan to surround the country with high fences and intelligence and surveillance systems. Possibly some of the tax collection surplus will be directed toward this aim.

The construction of the fence along the Egyptian border, which was completed more than two years ago, reflected an accurate strategic analysis on the prime minister’s part. In the future he will want to accelerate construction of a fence along the Jordanian border. At this stage, the security establishment is preparing to build a fence only in the southernmost section of the border, along 30 kilometers from Eilat northwards, which will protect the new airport going up at Timna.

Though the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan appears stable today, the concern for its future in the face of Islamic State pressures and the refugees necessitate broad attention by decision-makers in Israel. On the terror front, Israel is concerned about the movement of tens of thousands of Syrian refugees southward to work on farms on the Jordanian side of the Jordan Valley, for fear they will be infiltrated by terror activists.

Moreover, in recent weeks a new regional concern has cropped up: It turns out that three million citizens have fled from Yemen on the backdrop of the war that is raging there, and they are now moving northwards, to Saudi Arabia and thence perhaps also to Jordan. Possibly this trend will be depicted as another reason compelling accelerated closure of the Jordanian border in the near future.

It’s almost as if a strong, self-confident government can do what is in its voters’ best interests.

 
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  1. There’s an even greater irony given who owns (as opposed to ‘publishes’-see also NYT) Haaretz:

    http://www.dumont.de/medien-services.html

    Maybe Germany can build another wall.

  2. Since Jews have spent the last half century reminding Americans (and more recently Canadians) of the ‘Voyage of the Damned’ (MS St Louis) one can only imagine the terrible guilt generations of Israelis are going to feel about denying refuge to similarly unfortunate Syrians.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Matra

    Indeed that point is made and made and made again in Tel Aviv in the Human Rights advocates quarters. Also the legal profession, and Jewish Judges, cite it in demanding that Bibi tear down that wall and allow Africans free movement in Israel.

    "Nation of Immigrants?" Check. "Human Rights for Refugees?" Check. "UN Refugee 1951 Agreement?" Check.

    So why are the voices, including most of the Israeli court system, lawyers, press, and opposition party being ignored?

    Simple: Bibi and the rest of the Israeli members of the Knesset would be removed by a non-Jewish majority in months if they opened the borders. For Merkel it will take decades she figures and by that time she'll be dead. Meanwhile she makes coalition partners the Greens happy.

    The better question is why is the Smart Set opinion in Israel so like that of say, Germany and the UK?

    Replies: @bossel

  3. It is hardly remarkable that a people, a nation, would want to live. Singapore does not let Asian boat people or even non-Chinese Malaysians into Singapore. Botswana built an electric fence on their border with Zimbabwe. The Romans did not build a wall across Scotland to keep the Picts in. This article is not even worthy of note. What is worthy of note is the EU wanting to kill itself.

  4. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.facebook.com/thenational/videos/10153095047672686/

    Here, Germans are bitching that UK is a slacker when it comes to taking in refugees.

    Well, Germans…

    You need to know that UK was one of the few nations with moral surplus at the end of WWII. They don’t have to ‘atone’ as much as Germany does. Indeed, would Germans be acting this generous if not for ‘atonement complex’ from WWII and Holocaust?

    Btw, if Germans really wanna be morally tough about this, why don’t they say to Americans and Israel, “you guys pushed the foreign policy that led to this mess. why don’t you guys take in most of the refugees.”

    To be fair, when it comes to recent crisis in the Middle East, UK and France are far more to blame than Germany is. So, why is Germany paying the highest price? I guess Moral Envy still drives the Germans.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon

    You certainly guess a lot.

  5. It is hardly remarkable that a people, a nation, would want to live. Singapore does not let Asian boat people or even non-Chinese Malaysians into Singapore. Botswana built an electric fence on their border with Zimbabwe. The Romans did not build a wall across Britain to keep the Picts inside the Empire. This article is not even worthy of note. What is worthy of note is the EU wanting to kill itself.

  6. That Syrians don’t think to move to Golan Heights(which is actually a part of Syria) and instead make a long treacherous trek to Europe indicates that people go to where the going is good.

  7. Steve,

    Did you see that World War Z movie with Brad Pitt?

    Israel was calm in the eye of the storm behind its fences… until suddenly it wasn’t!!

    Not suggesting that their fences will fail, just was thinking about those zombies swarming all over and the migrants swarming the borders…

    Maybe Greece will be ignored by the migrants as the sick man of Europe?

  8. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The belligerents and their supporters in the Syrian Civil War are listed here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_armed_groups_in_the_Syrian_Civil_War

    Baathist Syria is supported by Hezbollah, Palestinian nationalists, Iran, Russia, North Korea, Iraq, Belarus, Egypt, Venezuela, Angola, and China.

    The Syrian opposition is supported by Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, the US, France, Libya, UAE, Jordan, UK, Canada, and Germany.

    It seems that the Gulf States, Turkey, Jordan, the US, France, UK, Canada, and Germany should bear responsibility for these refugees.

  9. terror activists

    That’s a new one. It really is just an additional notch on the soros scale

  10. Here, Germans are bitching that UK is a slacker when it comes to taking in refugees.

    Germans have had a problem with the sovereignty of other European nations since, oh, I don’t know, maybe 1914.

    Btw, if Germans really wanna be morally tough about this, why don’t they say to Americans and Israel, “you guys pushed the foreign policy that led to this mess. why don’t you guys take in most of the refugees.”

    Though the foreign policies of those countries (and Britain and France) are indefensible they weren’t the ones propping up an Alawite minority regime all these decades. The rebellion that led to the 1982 Hama massacre of members of the disaffected Sunni majority had little to do with the foreign policies of Western states. Ethnic/religious minority regimes face internal resistance sooner or later and leave themselves more vulnerable to foreign meddling.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Matra

    Internal conflict and resistance are not unique to minority regimes. They're simply facts of political life.

    , @Anonymous
    @Matra

    "Germans have had a problem with the sovereignty of other European nations since, oh, I don’t know, maybe 1914."

    You could say that about any great power and certainly with far more justification about the US and Britain.

  11. a proper understanding of the relationship between citizens and their state

    Steve,

    Check out

    kakistocracyblog.wordpress.com

    for another writer who is interested in this theme.

  12. @Matra
    Here, Germans are bitching that UK is a slacker when it comes to taking in refugees.

    Germans have had a problem with the sovereignty of other European nations since, oh, I don't know, maybe 1914.

    Btw, if Germans really wanna be morally tough about this, why don’t they say to Americans and Israel, “you guys pushed the foreign policy that led to this mess. why don’t you guys take in most of the refugees.”

    Though the foreign policies of those countries (and Britain and France) are indefensible they weren't the ones propping up an Alawite minority regime all these decades. The rebellion that led to the 1982 Hama massacre of members of the disaffected Sunni majority had little to do with the foreign policies of Western states. Ethnic/religious minority regimes face internal resistance sooner or later and leave themselves more vulnerable to foreign meddling.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Internal conflict and resistance are not unique to minority regimes. They’re simply facts of political life.

  13. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    It appears there is no longer any point in spreading apocalyptic scenarios along the lines of the plot of Michel Houellebecq’s novel “Submission,” but it is already clear that things are never again going to be what they used to be. After nearly five years of atrocities, the huge upheaval in the Arab countries is no longer closed in a box, its external repercussions limited. Just as the slaughter that is happening daily in Syria and Iraq radiates onto the neighboring countries, among them Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, which are inundated with waves of refugees, so hundreds and thousands more are fleeing to Europe, the promised continent. …

    According to Wikipedia, the Arab Spring started 5 years ago in December 2010, and in June 2012 the U.N. declared Syria to be in a state of civil war, which I guess resulted from the Arab Spring. I haven’t followed any of this closely at all, but wasn’t the Arab Spring initially thought to be a good thing?

  14. @Matra
    Since Jews have spent the last half century reminding Americans (and more recently Canadians) of the 'Voyage of the Damned' (MS St Louis) one can only imagine the terrible guilt generations of Israelis are going to feel about denying refuge to similarly unfortunate Syrians.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    Indeed that point is made and made and made again in Tel Aviv in the Human Rights advocates quarters. Also the legal profession, and Jewish Judges, cite it in demanding that Bibi tear down that wall and allow Africans free movement in Israel.

    “Nation of Immigrants?” Check. “Human Rights for Refugees?” Check. “UN Refugee 1951 Agreement?” Check.

    So why are the voices, including most of the Israeli court system, lawyers, press, and opposition party being ignored?

    Simple: Bibi and the rest of the Israeli members of the Knesset would be removed by a non-Jewish majority in months if they opened the borders. For Merkel it will take decades she figures and by that time she’ll be dead. Meanwhile she makes coalition partners the Greens happy.

    The better question is why is the Smart Set opinion in Israel so like that of say, Germany and the UK?

    • Replies: @bossel
    @Whiskey


    Meanwhile she makes coalition partners the Greens happy.
     
    Wow! You show your infinite wisdom regarding Germany.
  15. You can delete this comment. I just wanted to mention that in the book The Camp of the Saints, and in the Bible, the term refers to the people being invaded, not the invaders. Google gog magog camp saints for more info.

  16. Although Europeans are assured by their rulers that nothing can be done to stop the Camp of the Saints from inundating them

    I wonder where you get that stuff from. Either you suffer from some kind of tunnel view or you’re really becoming some anti-immigrant agitator. I get the impression, that most politicians in Europe actually talk about ways to limit immigration, if not stopping it. More so in Eastern Europe than in the West, but even in France or Germany they are talking about how to stop the wave. Virtually no one is saying “Oh, we can’t do anything, anyway. Just let them all in.” (although in case of the Syrian refugees, Germany seems to have opened its arms a bit wide)

    @ Anon:

    Indeed, would Germans be acting this generous if not for ‘atonement complex’ from WWII and Holocaust?

    Germans are brainwashed from an early age how guilty they are. So, it’s no wonder that they feel some kind of moral obligation to help refugees. If not for this brainwashing they would react similarly to Poles, I suppose.

    Anyway, in the case of Germany, immigration is not yet that much of a problem. Actually, it even might be helpful in the long run. It all depends on how many (& who) of the refugees will stay & how well those can be integrated. If it can be done like with most of the Turks in the past, it shouldn’t be that much of a problem.
    France didn’t do so well in the past (although the problems are probably exaggerated). The UK seems to have some kind of Pakistani problem. Sweden, oh well …
    So, it depends on the country we’re talking about. Even in the EU there are a number of varying approaches & problems. Saying Europe this or Europe that is mostly just empty babble.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @bossel

    Yeah, right.

    That's why at just this very moment Angela Merkel is welcoming these 'refugees' with open arms, and denouncing Germans who question her.

    Replies: @LondonBob

  17. @Whiskey
    @Matra

    Indeed that point is made and made and made again in Tel Aviv in the Human Rights advocates quarters. Also the legal profession, and Jewish Judges, cite it in demanding that Bibi tear down that wall and allow Africans free movement in Israel.

    "Nation of Immigrants?" Check. "Human Rights for Refugees?" Check. "UN Refugee 1951 Agreement?" Check.

    So why are the voices, including most of the Israeli court system, lawyers, press, and opposition party being ignored?

    Simple: Bibi and the rest of the Israeli members of the Knesset would be removed by a non-Jewish majority in months if they opened the borders. For Merkel it will take decades she figures and by that time she'll be dead. Meanwhile she makes coalition partners the Greens happy.

    The better question is why is the Smart Set opinion in Israel so like that of say, Germany and the UK?

    Replies: @bossel

    Meanwhile she makes coalition partners the Greens happy.

    Wow! You show your infinite wisdom regarding Germany.

  18. @bossel

    Although Europeans are assured by their rulers that nothing can be done to stop the Camp of the Saints from inundating them
     
    I wonder where you get that stuff from. Either you suffer from some kind of tunnel view or you're really becoming some anti-immigrant agitator. I get the impression, that most politicians in Europe actually talk about ways to limit immigration, if not stopping it. More so in Eastern Europe than in the West, but even in France or Germany they are talking about how to stop the wave. Virtually no one is saying "Oh, we can't do anything, anyway. Just let them all in." (although in case of the Syrian refugees, Germany seems to have opened its arms a bit wide)


    @ Anon:

    Indeed, would Germans be acting this generous if not for ‘atonement complex’ from WWII and Holocaust?
     
    Germans are brainwashed from an early age how guilty they are. So, it's no wonder that they feel some kind of moral obligation to help refugees. If not for this brainwashing they would react similarly to Poles, I suppose.

    Anyway, in the case of Germany, immigration is not yet that much of a problem. Actually, it even might be helpful in the long run. It all depends on how many (& who) of the refugees will stay & how well those can be integrated. If it can be done like with most of the Turks in the past, it shouldn't be that much of a problem.
    France didn't do so well in the past (although the problems are probably exaggerated). The UK seems to have some kind of Pakistani problem. Sweden, oh well ...
    So, it depends on the country we're talking about. Even in the EU there are a number of varying approaches & problems. Saying Europe this or Europe that is mostly just empty babble.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yeah, right.

    That’s why at just this very moment Angela Merkel is welcoming these ‘refugees’ with open arms, and denouncing Germans who question her.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Anonymous

    From my British perspectives the politicians seem to be putting up more resistance, the media, apart from some right wing commentators in the print press/internet, are leading the charge for us to let them all in. The TV news are having a particularly deleterious effect. Orban and other Eastern Europeans have been good and Cameron has surprised me but the majority of the European establishment are as pathetic as ever.

  19. @Anonymous
    @bossel

    Yeah, right.

    That's why at just this very moment Angela Merkel is welcoming these 'refugees' with open arms, and denouncing Germans who question her.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    From my British perspectives the politicians seem to be putting up more resistance, the media, apart from some right wing commentators in the print press/internet, are leading the charge for us to let them all in. The TV news are having a particularly deleterious effect. Orban and other Eastern Europeans have been good and Cameron has surprised me but the majority of the European establishment are as pathetic as ever.

  20. Yesterday, @skipolemistis posted a link to an article in the Daily Mail, which contained a picture of a horde of Syrian refugees disembarking from a Greek ferry in Athens. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3220341/We-t-cope-tide-Europe-s-despairing-leaders-bring-border-controls-free-movement-zone-brink-collapse.html
    Upon seeing what looked like a small invading army, I labeled the situation as “insanity.” What are the Greeks thinking when they see such pictures? Why are they providing free ferry service from one of their islands to Athens? Is this payback to Germany and all their other EU “partners” for the shoddy way they treated Greece recently? I do find it interesting that all the EU countries are playing a form of “beggar thy neighbor” policies reminiscent of what they did back in the 30’s when they all raised their tariffs to keep out foreign goods. Now the idea is to speed transport of the invading refugees to other EU countries.

    BTW I noticed that the common theme in yesterday’s news cycle (NPR’s ATC, Fox News, NBC, which I saw and heard, and I am sure others which I did not see or hear) was to highlight the “iconic” picture of the little Syrian boy washing up on the beach in Turkey. (In fact, there was an article in yesterday’s NY Times about how the Turks were so disturbed by that picture and are very upset that Europe won’t open its borders and readily accept more refugees.) It appears to be designed as part of a deliberate propaganda campaign by the forces favoring mass immigration to counter the clearly disturbing pictures of the invading hordes, such as the one in the Daily Mail I cited above. In fact, there was a segment on NPR’s ATC yesterday involving an interview with a woman professor who immediately cited as a similar example of an “iconic photo” the famous picture from the Vietnam War of the naked teenage Vietnamese girl running down the street with her back aflame from napalm dropped from U.S. planes. How ironic. First, that Vietnam picture was provided free from government control. (The Pentagon learned from its sorry experience in the Vietnam War to place restrictions on the media when reporting from future wars.) Secondly, the “iconic” Vietnam photo had the effect of changing public opinion about the war in a negative way and speeding the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Vietnam. This latest “iconic photo” has the opposite intention: hoping to cause a change in public opinion so that the public accepts the invading horde of fleeing refugees.

    P.S.–In my response to @skipolemistis yesterday, I erroneously referred to Angela Merkel as “Andrea Merkel.” In my defense, I got the first two letters right (one-third of the six letters), so I think I should get at least a “B’ on that message. I think those crack debaters from Towson U. might agree with my reasoning.

  21. …reflected an accurate strategic analysis on Netanyahu’s part.

    Not something you’d except to see written in Haaretz. The Israelis are getting worried.

  22. @Anon
    https://www.facebook.com/thenational/videos/10153095047672686/

    Here, Germans are bitching that UK is a slacker when it comes to taking in refugees.

    Well, Germans...

    You need to know that UK was one of the few nations with moral surplus at the end of WWII. They don't have to 'atone' as much as Germany does. Indeed, would Germans be acting this generous if not for 'atonement complex' from WWII and Holocaust?

    Btw, if Germans really wanna be morally tough about this, why don't they say to Americans and Israel, "you guys pushed the foreign policy that led to this mess. why don't you guys take in most of the refugees."

    To be fair, when it comes to recent crisis in the Middle East, UK and France are far more to blame than Germany is. So, why is Germany paying the highest price? I guess Moral Envy still drives the Germans.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    You certainly guess a lot.

  23. @Matra
    Here, Germans are bitching that UK is a slacker when it comes to taking in refugees.

    Germans have had a problem with the sovereignty of other European nations since, oh, I don't know, maybe 1914.

    Btw, if Germans really wanna be morally tough about this, why don’t they say to Americans and Israel, “you guys pushed the foreign policy that led to this mess. why don’t you guys take in most of the refugees.”

    Though the foreign policies of those countries (and Britain and France) are indefensible they weren't the ones propping up an Alawite minority regime all these decades. The rebellion that led to the 1982 Hama massacre of members of the disaffected Sunni majority had little to do with the foreign policies of Western states. Ethnic/religious minority regimes face internal resistance sooner or later and leave themselves more vulnerable to foreign meddling.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    “Germans have had a problem with the sovereignty of other European nations since, oh, I don’t know, maybe 1914.”

    You could say that about any great power and certainly with far more justification about the US and Britain.

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