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Whether or not Newsweek still exists is an iffy proposition. I’ve heard it suggested that these days it’s basically 3 people in Williamsburg trying to come up with clickbait headlines, such as:

How Medellín, Colombia, Became the World’s Smartest City
BY DAVID H. FREEDMAN ON 11/18/19 AT 12:00 PM EST

The reason Medellin is the World’s Smartest City is because it installed ski-lift type gondola transport for slum dwellers who live up high.

I’ve been following this idea for awhile, wondering if gondola lifts would be any use in Los Angeles. But poor people don’t crowded on top of hills here, right people live fairly spaciously up high. So the throughput isn’t enough to make it sensible.

However, there could be tourist applications. Some insiders are kicking around the idea a downtown Union Station to Dodger Stadium ski lift.

Another natural would be to charge tourists $25 to ride up to the Hollywood Sign. In this age of selfies, the Hollywood Sign is high on tourists’ checklists, but the whole experience at present is dull and disappointing.

 
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  1. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Six Flags in St. Louis had a gondola ride across the park. It was by Von Roll, of Bern, Switzerland, and was powered by a natural gas burning VW engine, which fascinated me as a kid. Over the decades they had a couple of fatality incidents.

    Von Roll Seilbahnen AG

    Von Roll Seilbahnen AG was the aerial tramway and cableway division that was sold to Austrian manufacturer Doppelmayr in 1996.
    Products
    Perhaps Von Roll’s best-known product was the type 101 sky ride or simply “VR101” that operated in many amusement parks. A total of over 100 were installed; as of 2008 only ten remained operational. On December 30, 1954, Felseneggbahn was opened. It was built by Von Roll in seven months for one million Swiss francs. It still runs, and on March 31, 2010, it carried its 10 millionth passenger.[7] The Disneyland Skyway was Von Roll’s first aerial ropeway in the United States. It opened on June 23, 1956, and closed on November 9, 1994. The first Von Roll VR101 was built in Flims, in 1944, and replaced in 1986.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  2. Anon[286] • Disclaimer says:

    A ride up to the top of the Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades Spillway in Sylmar would be fun. There could be a Meet Mr. Lincoln-style show starring an audio-anamatronic William Mulholland.

    I suppose Newsweek has yet to retract its Satoshi Nakamoto story? The writer seems to be doing okay:

    In 2016, [Leah] McGrath Goodman placed as a finalist for the National Magazine Award for her coverage of America’s widening wealth gap as part of a package of stories for Newsweek magazine. In 2017, a second Newsweek cover story she wrote about the 9-11 attacks leading Ground Zero to become a deadly cancer cluster was also nominated for a National Magazine Award.

    She’s a total Valley Girl:

    OT

    Google Talks in 2014 hosted a talk by an archeologist who claimed that homo sapiens is millions of years old, and this is being covered up by mainstream scientists.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @donut
  3. [hat tip to The New English Review for covering this many years ago]

    Time For A La La Land Funiculi Funiculà?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funicul%C3%AC,_Funicul%C3%A0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eq7T7HpluUM

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    , @Brutusale
  4. Basically, you could just make a ski lift tour of LA, passing Venice Beach, soaring above Rodeo Drive, looking over the hedges in Bel Air, etc. This would be very popular as the worst thing about LA is dealing with the people. As Steve used to say, being poor in America means not being able to move away from other poor people. Well, when you’re a tourist you can’t escape. Los Angelinos really ruined my long-awaited visited to the Chinese theater and stars of fame. Also, it took me four hours to exit the city onto the highway to Nevada. Next time, I just want to ski-lift-ride over the crowds and then take an Elon Musk tube to Las Vegas.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    , @International Jew
  5. El Dato says:

    You get assaulted from the air!

    That would probably bring in a lot of visitors.

    • Replies: @Genrick Yagoda
  6. El Dato says:
    @Anon

    Google Talks in 2014 hosted a talk by an archeologist who claimed that homo sapiens is millions of years old, and this is being covered up by mainstream scie

    Fred Flintstone and his dinopet are real! The only question is, why is homo sapiens so stupid that he didn’t conquer the galaxy in a million years? (Or maybe that’s what’s claimed, I didn’t watch. Maybe a fan of Larry Niven’s “Protector” , who at least had a good explanation for the weirdness of ageing)

    It’s as if the more the science is settled by perfected tools and puzzle fitting, the more outlandish and fantastic the theories.

    covered up

    It’s a mental affliction called paranoia.

    In reality, archeologists, anthropologists and geneticists would be falling over themselves to open up this new goldmine for research.

  7. Altai [AKA "Altai_4"] says:

    Raises a point. As wealthy Western countries turn into highly unequal and ethnically stratified societies, (IE Latin America. Indeed the current situation in Peru is basically a race war as much as it is also a class war, like with Northern Ireland, the terms ‘Poor’ and ‘Elite’ are correct but only tell half the story, like ‘Protestant’ and ‘Catholic’) the desire for the elite to segregate themselves grows.

    We’re all familiar with the traditional means of doing this, but what could novel technologies do? There is much for the new America in it’s outward looking cosmopolitanism to learn from third world elites.

    Lesson 1: Copenhagen: BAD!
    Lesson 2: Dubai: GOOD! (The slaves even know their place and don’t revolt!)

    • Replies: @Lot
  8. From Wikipedia, part of a page from Newsweek, March 1976.

    A minute spent on reading the text reminds us how far the craft of objective news journalism has fallen.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Justvisiting
  9. More like:

    How Medellín, Colombia, Thinks It Is the World’s Smartest City, Usually Around 4:00 AM in The Morning, Also, The Most Paranoid City In The World. What’s Your Favorite Smiths’ Album?

    Definitely, sounds like a Williamsburg brain trust at work.

    • LOL: TWS
  10. Sean R says:

    A good story about Newsweek.

    https://www.cjr.org/special_report/newsweek.php
    Dropshipping journalism
    No one working at Newsweek can tell me why it still exists

    The Conclusion:
    “Newsweek has the name and the professional website it has built in years past, but it’s increasingly repurposing the work of others—whether the Washington Post, the outrage fiends at Fox News, or a dozen people on Twitter—and packaging it as its own. Plenty of news sites aggregate, and in many ways the story of Newsweek is the story of the industry. But whereas other aggregators—Mashable, BuzzFeed, Upworthy; the list goes on—built their sites around this kind of internet-first strategy, Newsweek is selling off its own legacy while hoping that readers won’t notice. Reporters and editors there tell me they’re willing to do good work; the question is whether Newsweek is willing, or even able, to find a business model that allows them to do it.”

  11. Thomm says:

    Doesn’t LA already have its own ‘Funiculi Funicula’, that has started up, been halted, started up again, and halted again a few times?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_Flight

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Jack D
  12. Thomm says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Even better, just see a drone video that edits out all the non-essentials :

  13. Even before the LA mayor endorsed it, I have thought that a high tech gondola from Universal City Walk to the Hollywood Sign would be a major tourist attraction with a minimal amount of infrastructure investment around the sign. The high-tech glass globe gondola design would be an attraction in and of itself. A restaurant, small museum, maybe a wedding chapel… one can dream.

    https://www.lamag.com/culturefiles/los-angeles-gondola-aerial-tram-universal-studios-hollywood-sign/

    During a serious earthquake or brush fire, the gondolas would double as a Universal Studios Disaster Attraction.

  14. Lot says:
    @Thomm

    Bunker Hill a charmless claustrophobic cluster of glass office towers. Bad spot for a tourist attraction.

    The rest of downtown LA is nicer, excepting Skid Row. Which actually is worth checking out (daylight hours only) if you’re wondering what a zombie apocalypse looks like. Daily Mail is on the story:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3824528/Skid-Row-revealed-striking-photographs.html

  15. Lot says:
    @Altai

    “ Lesson 1: Copenhagen: BAD!
    Lesson 2: Dubai: GOOD! ”

    The Oiler Arabs are wiser than the EU cheap labor loving elites. They use docile S and SE Asian coolies, and send em right back if they cause the slightest trouble.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  16. @Lot

    The rest of downtown LA is nicer, excepting Skid Row. Which actually is worth checking out (daylight hours only) if you’re wondering what a zombie apocalypse looks like. Daily Mail is on the story:

    The first and last time I saw someone smoke crack was on LA Skid Row. It certainly made an impression. Skid Row at night is not bad if you are in a car with locked doors and driving quickly through. The LAPD squad cars are on constant patrol and do not mess around in that vicinity.

    I have been threatened with violence a few times down there including with some racially charged language, but no issues if you keep on walking, avoid eye contact and can carry yourself.

    On the positive side, I was picking up Christmas cards in a Walgreens adjacent to Skid Row on a Friday afternoon right before Christmas when an eccentrically dressed homeless black man approached me with a large, ear tagged Algebra Test Prep book. He was likely slightly disturbed, but was exceptionally polite and soft spoken and he asked me if I could explain an algebra problem to him. I do not know why he chose me out of the crowd in Walgreens other than maybe because I had a pen in my hand for the Christmas cards.

    I am a softy for eccentrics so I spent about twenty minutes walking him through some of the word problem exercises demonstrating how to solve for “x”. He was really appreciative and in the end I think he understood the concepts. We parted ways with a handshake that became a hug and wishing one another a “Merry Christmas”.

    A bizarre Skid Row Christmas memory that still sticks with me.

  17. Not all the poor live on the hillsides in Medellin. A friend’s son teaches there, and takes a gondola each day down to the school in a poor area. There are a lot of Brits out there doing English teaching.

    He says it’s a pretty safe place apart from the occasional outbreak of gang violence, generally directed at other gang members. One day only half the kids turned up to school, owing to several shootings in the area, and next day the school was shut for the rest of the week.

    “Pretty safe” is relative – 626 homicides last year in a city of 2.5m. He didn’t have much sympathy with young Americans who take three girls back from a disco without wondering what their attraction might be – and then wake up two days later with a maxed-out credit card and no passport. That sort of thing happens a fair bit. But the worst aspect of life there is apparently the very bland food.

    https://colombiareports.com/medellins-scopolamine-threat/

  18. @Chrisnonymous

    Kinda like the ski lift that takes you over the lion area, at the Oakland, California, zoo.

  19. Puremania says:

    And, just to bring everything full circle, the severed head found near the Hollywood sign was that of Hervey Medellin. Duude.

  20. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:

    Coalition of the fringe vs Coalition of the cringe.

  21. @Lot

    The rest of downtown LA is nicer, excepting Skid Row.

  22. Ano says:

    If it’s California, isn’t it more likely what would be built is a high-speed ski-lift to nowhere?

    • Agree: Ian Smith, bomag
  23. Ano says:

    Hi, is it true the California Dems are proposing to build a gondola cable car line?

    I’m told it will a) span the border wall; b) be free for non-Americans; and c) goes in one direction only.

    I also hear the contract is to be awarded to a Republican party-connected construction firm.

    • LOL: Ray Huffman
    • Replies: @James J. O'Meara
  24. Sean says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Hardly objective, but then a lot of people hated the Hearst name and were willing to visit that on his grandaughter.

    William and Emily Harris are vermin, he beat and raped Patty. Emily murdered a bystander Myrna Opsahl, who was at a bank making a deposit when she robbed it . Hearst was potentially a witness against Harris for a capital offense., Emily Harris gave a magazine interview from jail alleging that Hearst’s keeping a trinket given to her by student radical William Wolfe who had first raped her followed by black ex con DeFrieze was an indication that she had been in a romantic relationship with him. Hearst said she had kept the stone carving because she thought it was a pre-Colombian artifact of archeological significance. The prosecutor James L. Browning Jr. used Harris’ interpretation of the item, and some jurors later said they regarded the carving, which Browning waved in front of them, as powerful evidence that Hearst was lying. In a closing prosecution statement that hardly acknowledged that Hearst had been kidnapped and held captive, prosecutor Browning suggested that Hearst had taken part in the bank robbery without coercion. Browning also suggested to the jury that as the female SLA members were feminists, they would not have allowed Hearst to be raped. The prison took no special security measures for Hearst’s safety until she found a dead rat on her bunk the day William and Emily Harris were arraigned for her abduction. The Harrises (the only survivors of the original SLA unit that kidnapped Patty), were convicted on a simple kidnapping charge as opposed to the more serious kidnapping for ransom or kidnapping with bodily injury), and were released after serving a total of eight years each.

  25. bjdubbs says:

    In DC there’s been talk of a gondola from the Rosslyn metro station to Georgetown. Probably not a bad idea.

    http://www.georgetownrosslyngondola.com/

    • Replies: @Phil
    , @EdwardM
  26. slumber_j says:
    @reactionry

    There’s the whole Angels Flight funicular situation in Downtown LA, which I only became aware of because of Scotsman Robin Robertson’s Noir-ish book-length poem The Long Take.

    Originally not far from its current location, the whole thing was torn up in the 1960s and then reconstituted (sort of) in the 1990s. I have no idea whether people actually use it or not.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  27. Traveller says:

    I work in Colombia. While I do agree with your impression of Newsweek, in this case the article is dead on. (Despite clickbait headline)

    Medellin is awesome. And the article is fairly accurate. Actually Colombia in general has done much better than the rest of South America with fewer natural resources. One of the the places where US involvement and support worked.

    Also the women are hot as F!

  28. Traveller says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I actually like the food. Its very meat and potatoes. But, Colombians aren’t into spice or exotic dishes.

    Peru is renown for food, but I find it terrible. Lose weight every time I go there.

    Crime would be even better in Colombia if they didn’t have millions of Venezuelans.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  29. Anonymous[378] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Does anyone know if Buffet is shorting or leaving Coke after the latest Spite Ad?

  30. B36 says:

    What I want is a ski lift that takes you to the monorail.

    • LOL: Cortes
  31. No skyway tour of LA would be complete without a landing and a walk through of Frederick’s of Hollywood. Unfortunately a time machine would also be required to realize that dream.

  32. Brutusale says:
    @reactionry

    Nah, it’s Hollywood, Jake. Go with the Hollywood version, with the funny Jew playing an Italian.

  33. OT. an honest, civil conversation in Sweden:

  34. @El Dato

    QUOTE In reality, archeologists, anthropologists and geneticists would be falling over themselves to open up this new goldmine for research. END QUOTE

    I am sorry, that is not true, and Michael Cremo is not the only one. There was a famous case in Mexico where Virginia Steen-MacIntyre and a team of qualified scientists dated a site back to 250,00o years ago. Since this did not fit with the convention claims, she was de-personed.

    There are plenty other people and other sites, including the nonsense peddled about the Pyramids which are tens of thousands of years older than what is claimed.

    And Michael Cremo is worth watching.

  35. I trust Mr. Sailer will indulge this tangential post.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  36. Dr. X says:

    OT:

    Chick-fil-gay caves in to LGBTQ demands, abandons donations to Christian organizations

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2019/11/18/chick-fil-a-will-stop-donating-to-salvation-army-christian-athletes-following-lgbt-pressure/

    You can’t even eat a fried chicken sandwich any more without the thought of buggery being rammed home…

  37. Anon[426] • Disclaimer says:

    In the context of the long-term affects of dumbing down and affirmative-actioning STEM education and medical research Steve mentioned that discoveries take a long time before they achieve practical use, such as the 30-years it’s taken from the discovery of the cystic fibrosis gene till current clinical trials.

    Here’s another one from Japan:

    Nobel laureate Yamanaka: Don’t cut funds for iPS cell stock project
    http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201911190045.html

    For Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka, whose 2006 creation of the first induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell opened abundant possibilities in regenerative medicine, recent clinical trial success in transplantation using iPS cells is good news.

    But the closer the practical application of iPS cells in medical fields nears, the more Yamanaka sees the possibility that funding for research and development of iPS cells will dry up….

    Thirteen years have passed since the discovery of iPS cells, and the research-and-development process has reached a transitional period from basic research to commercialization.

    This is when support for “bridgebuilding from academia to companies that handle iPS cells’ application to medical treatment in earnest” is much needed, Yamanaka said.

    But government officials seem ready to pull funding for the project, while cost-conscious companies have different visions from researchers.

    “An open panel of experts at the (science) ministry appraised the iPS cell stock project and decided to continue funding. Yet, some people have called for a halt for spending government money on the project,” Yamanaka said at the news conference.

    He said the decision regarding future funding should be made through a “highly transparent discussion.”

    Yamanaka is a very well known and recognized science celebrity in Japan and is widely respected by the public. I don’t think Nobel laureates are quite the rock stars in the U.S. that they are in Japan. This is one of many examples of Yamanaka using his fame for good.

  38. Paul Rise says:

    An eccentric multimillionaire – billionaire? – in Austin who calls himself Lord British I believe was proposing this as a way to address Austin Texas unsolvable traffic issues (unsolvable because the city council refuses to build or improve roads for all the cars that everyone drives).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @J.Ross
  39. Phil says:
    @bjdubbs

    Georgetown is one of those places that make a lot more sense after you read Steve for a while.

    Its very nice, but really a pain in the ass to get to, there’s no metro stop, its mostly street parking

    After a while, you wonder if that’s not sort of by design,

    that maybe its a feature not a bug, that its difficult for people who rely on public transportation to get there

  40. @Clifford Brown

    And every Christmas to this day you pour out egg nog for your eccentric soul brother and a tear streams down one cheek as you lament Skid Row and what might have been….

  41. Mike1 says:

    “But poor people don’t crowded on top of hills here, right people live fairly spaciously up high.”

    Sentence needs an edit.

    • Replies: @Alden
  42. Mike1 says:

    Somehow they forgot to mention the police with AR 15’s stationed every couple of hundred yards on the gondola/escalator parts of the city. This is the actual technology that has improved lives in those areas.
    Medellin does have an excellent elevated transit system which the city’s scum is not allowed to mess with. The contrast with LA subway or BART is very stark. The third world and the first world have essentially swapped places in terms of cleanliness and public order.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  43. @YetAnotherAnon

    626 homicides out of 2.5 million?

    That is a slightly lower rate than NYC at the peak of the crack epidemic. There are parts of Chicago today that are more dangerous.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  44. EdwardM says:
    @bjdubbs

    Their literature touts “a lower subsidy per ride than any other transit offered in the region.” And this results in a “feasible” rating.

    http://www.georgetownrosslyngondola.com/join-the-coalition/

    I guess that’s how things work in the U.S. Certainly a good deal for tourists; a fun ride subsidized by corporate sponsors, I mean, DC taxpayers, I mean, federal taxpayers.

  45. I’ve been following this idea for awhile, wondering if gondola lifts would be any use in Los Angeles. But poor people don’t crowded on top of hills here, right people live fairly spaciously up high. So the throughput isn’t enough to make it sensible.

    Rio in reverse?

    Maybe what LA needs is gondolas from the economic troughs to the peaks:

    Somewhat related is the issue of density. Manhattan’s densest square kilometer looks like it would be pretty nice to live in, certainly preferable to spread-out Compton or Liberty City.

    From this perspective, it’s obvious both how extraordinary New York’s patterns are and also how varied the city is within itself. The #1 most dense cell, containing more than 42,000 people in Manhattan, is twice as dense as the #53 densest cell, with 21,000 people in Queens. Yet even that cell is still denser than the densest parts of Los Angeles or Chicago.

    https://www.citylab.com/perspective/2019/07/urban-density-map-city-population-data-geography/591760/

    (By the way, how many often-mispronounced words can you squeeze into a sentence? “Safely concealed in the quayside gondola in Qatar, I fumbled for her clitoris… “)

    • Replies: @prosa123
  46. Jack D says:
    @Thomm

    I thought of that too, but that’s a funicular or incline railway, which is quite different than an aerial tramway such as the one in Medellin. Aerial tramways (aka ropeways, gondola lifts, etc.) are not exactly new technology – they were used in mining as early as the 19th century, the key technological breakthru being wire rope since hemp rope could not span long distances nor carry heavy loads. You also needed a steam engine to drive the system. There were examples as early as the 1830s but, as with many Industrial Age things, they really got going post Civil War. Funiculars also got going right around the same time (although there are examples that are much older) and were popular in many hilly cities.

    Accidents are not unheard of for either form of transportation since gravity always wants to do its thing. Therefore careful engineering and maintenance are required but are not always present, especially as the systems age and are run on a shoestring (Angel’s Flight still uses its original 1901 cars). The same thing is true in airplanes but people don’t pay 25 cents for an airplane ride so there is more money available.

    Buses and other motor vehicles (unlike ordinary railroads) are able to ascend fairly steep slopes and it’s usually possible to build some some sort of winding road to lessen the grade further (at the cost of greater distance traveled) or an inclined tunnel so both are largely obsolete as urban transit and are found mostly in ski resorts nowadays. The reason you have them in Medellin is probably that it would be impractical to build a road thru the densely packed hillside slums, nor would it be safe to traverse such a road, so instead you fly right over the slum. Perhaps someday we will have similar glories in LA.

  47. @Anonymous

    …they had a couple of fatality incidents

    St Louis is known for “fatality incidents”.

  48. BenKenobi says:
    @El Dato

    he didn’t conquer the galaxy

    Well, we kinda got started on that. But now we have the cruel yoke of diversity around our necks, rendering us earthbound.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    , @adreadline
  49. nebulafox says:
    @Clifford Brown

    That’s heart-warming, man.

    I really hope that homeless guy you described is doing OK. Between the genuine interest in improving his mind and his impeccable personality, he seems like the kind of guy who’d do OK for himself if given a bit of help to smooth out the eccentricities and a chance to achieve a stable life.

  50. @Jack D

    Funiculars also got going right around the same time (although there are examples that are much older) and were popular in many hilly cities.

    In the New World, too.

  51. @Paleo Liberal

    “As home of the now defunct Medellín Cartel, the city was once known as the most violent city in the world. However, its homicide rate has decreased by 95% and extreme poverty by 66%, thanks in part to a string of innovative mayors who laid out plans to integrate the poorest and most violent hillside neighborhoods into the city center in the valley below. Medellín is now considered safer than the US cities of Baltimore, St. Louis, Detroit and New Orleans.”

    Wiki’s top 50 cities for homicide. You can see why Brazil elected a law-and-order type, with 14 of the cities, Mexico is top with 15, including 5 of the top 6. USA has 5, Colombia 2 – neither of them Medellin.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_by_murder_rate

  52. @PiltdownMan

    Newsweek was carrying water for the CIA as part of Project Mockingbird.

    Here is the story (on the SLA) they did not want to cover:

  53. Thomm says:
    @Jack D

    I would have to assume that people in the slums (whichever city) will just shoot the passing overhead cars.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  54. nebulafox says:
    @Sean

    “Browning also suggested to the jury that as the female SLA members were feminists, they would not have allowed Hearst to be raped.”

    Did this guy ever observe how women tend to treat other women they don’t like?

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Kronos
    , @Alden
  55. Just the word “Newsweek” gives me flashbacks to the 1980’s and I didn’t even take too much that ought to give me flashbacks.

    The reason Medellin is the World’s Smartest City is because it installed ski-lift type gondola transport for slum dwellers who live up high.

    I assume this is snark on Newsweek‘s those 3 kids in Williamsburg’s take on it. Rabid innumeracy – that’s what I would expect from anyone claiming to be an old-fashioned journalist.

    You need a big mechanical apparatus on both ends, with that big 500-1000 hp motor on one end, and a set-up to disengage and re-engage the cars from the cable on both ends, to allow people to safely get on and off. Even just the supports/pulleys, and cable itself has got to cost 10 times more than just a road with switchbacks and a bus to drive on it.

    How many people can the best of these things take up and down per hour? I’d just estimate 8 people per car, loading/unloading every 30 seconds (at best!), so that’s ~ 1,000/hr. Buses could go at at, say 1/3 that speed (accounting for the much longer distance with switchbacks). It might take longer, but that many people can go on 30 ratty bus rides in an hour. That’s way cheaper in fixed costs, but maybe not in recurring costs.

    Gondola cars (and the whole set-up) are for skiers, tourists, and the rich. BTW, in most place in the US, the poor live at the bottom, and the rich live at the top. Take Berzerkely, Oakland, LA and Seattle (in Seattle, some poor people live on the SIDES of the hills, but that’s only because there basically is no flatland.)

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Replies: @Jack D
  56. @nebulafox

    Did this guy ever observe how women tend to treat other women they don’t like?

    Irrelevant. His job is to win the case, not to find the truth.

    • Agree: Bubba
    • Replies: @Sean
  57. prosa123 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    (By the way, how many often-mispronounced words can you squeeze into a sentence? “Safely concealed in the quayside gondola in Qatar, I fumbled for her clitoris… “)

    Clitoris is an interesting word in another respect. While it’s a clean(ish) word in its entirety, drop the last four letters and the remaining portion is an obscene word.

  58. One of Mission Impossible’s coolest episodes was filmed at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway — the mob is holding a summit meeting on the mountaintop, and the IM crew pulls all kinds of mischief inside the tram car to sabotage the conference

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  59. @YetAnotherAnon

    Andean food is very bad in general, relative to the rest of Latin America. Not their fault, I suppose: mountaineers typically lack the flavors available to lowlanders.

    • Replies: @Jpp
  60. Muggles says:

    The Gulf Coast metropolitan area near where I live has a very high water table and thick clay soil which is unstable for large heavy loads. Large skyscrapers all rest on several stories of deep underground concrete foundations.

    While the local bus/rail system would love to build a subway system also (more billions for them to squander!) that isn’t feasible for those reasons.

    The Medellin gondola system would be ideal for mass transit there. All above ground and not much disruption of existing roads/rail lines since it would pass overhead. The large towers could be built on/over existing freeways and larger roadways, where traffic already goes. Since it is flat you would have to build transfer stations and ending terminals down to surface level, but that’s not a problem.

    Drawbacks are only weather related. Hurricanes and high winds, tropical storms. Even those are manageable. The transit cars used in Switzerland up to ski areas are quite large and hold close to 50 people each. They have excellent reliability and the Swiss pretty much developed this decades ago.

    Of course, no serious consideration has been given to doing this. These systems don’t need elevations to work as mass transit systems. Would work in nearly every location. They would even be great tourist rides especially at night with the city lights. I guess such an obvious idea lacks enough bribery potential to get municipal officials interested.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  61. Anonymous[896] • Disclaimer says:

    Stone Mountain, Georgia has the Summit Skyride cable car that takes you up to the top of the mountain. It is a lot of fun- beautiful views of surrounding woods, the attendants usually are very entertaining and informative. And of course, the huge carving of Jefferson-Davis, Lee, and Jackson is very impressive. Go see it while it is still there.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  62. Dennis Dale says: • Website

    Portland has an “aerial tram” cable-lift connecting a hospital on a hill with its school down by the river. Probably quite practical in eliminating street traffic while at the same time providing a very Disney-kitsch aspect to the area.

  63. Kronos says:
    @Sean

    The SLA were a pretty weird group, even by lefty radical standards. I loved the perceived pretentiousness between the various leftist terrorist organizations in Burrough’s “ Days of Rage: America’s Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence.”

    The SDS/Weatherman members were the perceived cream of the crop and lefty ideal. If I recall correctly, the SLA practiced the first (and maybe only) form of affirmative action for a terrorist organization. They specifically wanted a black man as there leader. After an exhaustive search they found this weird black dude named Donald DeFreeze willing to lead them. They felt that a black leader would place them on par of moral standing to the Weathermen

    From Wikipedia

    In 1967, the police stopped DeFreeze for running a red light on his bicycle. The police said that when he was searched, they found a homemade bomb in his pocket, and in the basket of the bicycle, another bomb and a pistol. DeFreeze said he had found them and was trying to sell them because of his family’s needs. He was given three years of probation.[4]

    Not a very bright guy…

    I’m a bit more sympathetic to Hearst. One of my family members was kidnapped in San Francisco during the 1960s. There was a ransom and it was paid. Thankfully, great aunt (blank) remained physically and mentally fine. (I think it was for a week.) But stuff like that happened quite a bit during the 1960s.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Jack Henson
  64. Alden says:
    @Sean

    And after release the Harris’ went to work for the law firm of their defense attorney. I remember many laudatory articles in the local Hearst newspapers about how wonderful the Harris’ were.

    It was the kidnapping of Patty Hearst that made me realize how much good Whites hate other Whites. Before her kidnapping I thought it was just me as an individual White that liberals hated.

    During the entire saga the liberal Whites of California expressed their hatred of Patty and her family and adoration and admiration of her kidnappers. It was a real eye opener.

    They won. The anti White liberals won and now rule the country.

  65. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos

    The Weathermen were predominantly Jewish. They felt no such need for a front man to give them moral legitimacy, very much like today.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  66. Forget Newsweek! I wanna know if Steve is still in Taki’s?They changed the look and arrangement and it’s hard to tell who’s who and where their stuff is on the site anymore. Your pic is still there, are your scribblings, Steve? Anxious readers need to know! Ha!

    • Agree: Dtbb
    • Replies: @adreadline
    , @Steve Sailer
  67. @Sean

    Hoax to sell Hearst newspapers as part of ongoing Intelligence projects run on Americans by the Usual Suspects.

    http://mileswmathis.com/hearst.pdf

    • Replies: @Alden
  68. @Paul Rise

    unsolvable because the city council refuses to build or improve roads for all the cars that everyone drives

    Well, why don’t the drivers take up a collection and build these roads themselves? Why does every solution have to be a socialist one?

    Look at what happened with communist roads in Communist China:

    Normal countries ship coal on private railways.

  69. @Known Fact

    Clint Eastwood and Richard Burton had Mission Impossible beat by about 45 years or so, in Where Eagles Dare.

    (Don’t worry that it’s in French. I doesn’t make much of a difference in this scene.)

  70. Best scenario would be sky gondolas from Universal, up to the Hollywood sign, then on to Griffith Park Observatory.

    However, I live in the Hollywood Hills. And it’s chocked full of boomer queebs who inherited their dead parents decrepit house, industry nut cases, and SJW trustifarians earnestly sitting around for their big break–and middle-aged cat ladies. Lots and lots of unwed cat ladies.

    They ride herd on the Hollywood Hills-based Facebook pages, that are chock full of daily outrages. I recall right after Trump was elected, they were wildly live texting their endeavor of stopping to all traffic on the 101 freeway. When I texted to suggest they quit running around on the freeway, they demanded the Facebook monitor kick me out of the group. these people are collectively insane, and their parents, dead or alive, as well as the entertainment industry, financially support their perverse world view.

    Essentially, normal people who work honestly for a living… aren’t here.

    With the NIMBYism amongst liberals, being traditionally fierce, “skyways to tomorrow” are out of the question. They despise tourists.

    In summary, Hollywood Hillbillies are quite fucked up in the head, and it ain’t gonna be changing.

  71. J.Ross says:
    @Paul Rise

    Lord British is the name of Richard Branson’s self-insert benevolent dictator in the Ultima series of 90s PC role-playing games (when he falls through a not-wardrobe into the Ultima fantasy world, the first thing he tells people is that he’s British, and they don’t know what he means, and assume it’s his name).
    So in a sense it’s already thoroughly taken by one billionaire who (as far as I know) doesn’t live in Texas. Can a billionaire take another billionaire’s pet name, and, if he does, is that toadying or a power move? Wouldn’t Zuck be miffed if somebody admired Augustus more than him?

  72. Kronos says:
    @Anon

    Fair enough, but it seems that a lack of “racial diversity” always nagged in the back of their minds. When the weathermen tried to rejoin SDS, I believe Dorn had to perform a public self-criticism for white supremacy. (No joke.)

    But this was a true crisis in the minds of the SLA. They couldn’t be a REAL revolutionary force without black leadership. That by having a member of that most oppressed minority, they became legitimate.

    (Personally, I find that kinda retarded but it was a very small crazy group. Also, the future burnout between true blacks and Jewish whites didn’t happen yet. Eventually, they did search far and wide for Barack Obamas and Eric Holders.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
  73. @Phil

    “that maybe its a feature not a bug, that its difficult for people who rely on public transportation to get there”

    You figured it out.

    The Getty Villa near LA. If you don’t arrive by car, you’ll need to show a bus ticket to get in. No local foot (or bike) traffic allowed on the premises.

  74. @Reg Cæsar

    “Well, why don’t the drivers take up a collection and build these roads themselves? Why does every solution have to be a socialist one?”

    Since the tax dollars have already been seized, Paul’s complaint is valid.

    It’s not like you to attack a symptom rather than the disease.

  75. Jack D says:
    @Thomm

    Although criminals will sometimes shoot at random targets for fun, mostly they either shoot at their gang rivals or else rob people. You don’t really gain much by shooting at the gondola passing overhead. Also see Mike’s comment about the # of cops who are assigned to guard the system.

  76. songbird says:

    Good choice for Hollywood chase scenes?

  77. @slumber_j

    You beat me to it. One of Michael Connelly’s novels had that name as its title, IIRC.

    https://www.angelsflight.org/

  78. @Kronos

    SLA, Weathermen, Yippies, all fake groups. Run by Intelligence, using children of the elites.
    Same thing now with Anti-Fa, the fake anti fascists, who never strike at the actual fascist government-corporate power structure, such as the Federal Reserve or the Pentagon.

  79. Kronos says:
    @nebulafox

    I wonder if Bill Clinton knew about that?…

  80. Jack D says:
    @Muggles

    These systems are OK for moving relatively small volumes of people from Point A to Point B but they don’t really substitute for a metro (aka subway) system.

    The biggest bang for the buck is dedicated bus lanes but there’s not enough money for corruption in those and they are not “sexy” so they get no support. Also, in the US outside of NYC, buses have a reputation as something that only poor brown people ride. Perhaps as buses switch from diesel to electric they will get a little more support.

  81. @Sean

    Just spent a half hour reading about Wendy Yoshimura. Charming how SF’s Japanese community rallied around this radical terrorist to give her support. Today she teaches water color painting in her studio in what is I’m sure one of the more fashionable neighborhoods in Oakland. Wouldn’t be surprised if she someday is honored by her own Google Doodle

  82. J.Ross says:

    Texan police rescue eight year old white girl from middle aged black man who kidnapped her off the street in Fort Worth.

  83. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Gondola car systems also need to be maintained to a much higher (and more expensive) standard than buses. If your bus or road maintenance is subpar, you get stuck at the side of the road. Everyone gets out and you send another bus. If your aerial tram maintenance is poor, people are trapped for hours high above the street or plummet to their death.

    • Replies: @Alden
  84. @Jack D

    I am OK riding on cable cars that don’t have so many U.S. Marine jets flying underneath them on low-altitude training missions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalese_cable_car_disaster_%281998%29

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    , @Jim Christian
  85. Yngvar says:

    I’ve been following this idea for awhile, wondering if gondola lifts would be any use in Los Angeles. But poor people don’t crowded on top of hills

    I have to interrupt there…

    For the lack of examples.
    Caracas, Venezuela: straight to the top.
    Everywhere, Switzerland, to the free nature top
    Norway, violently everywhere, black-out carriages demanded.

    Oh, you mean… oh..

    O.T

    My late father had a subscription to Time Magazine. After the 9/11 commemorative issue, I went back to the issue before. Did it mention anything about the looming threat? No. It had short notice about how Bin-Laden was suspected of testing chemical weapons.

    I was skeptical. BUT… Now we have all seen the videos of the effing ‘testing’ those effing al-Qaida did to that poor dog; EFF them!

  86. prosa123 says:

    The Roosevelt Island tram is allegedly the only form of mass transit in NYC that turns a profit at the farebox. I say “allegedly” because it is difficult to figure out the costs and revenue allocations.

    • Replies: @James J. O'Meara
  87. Alden says:
    @Mike1

    The arial trams would make it a lot easier for the help to get to the mansions in the hills. There could be transfer points all over town with skyway transfer points.

  88. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    So hire White and Hispanic mechanics instead of the black retards who take care of surface buses. The mass tort bar will ensure safety standards are kept up.

  89. @BenKenobi

    he didn’t conquer the galaxy
    Well, we kinda got started on that. But now we have the cruel yoke of diversity around our necks, rendering us earthbound.

    Heh,

  90. Muggles says:

    Aerial tramways/gondola cars can hold as many riders as most regular sized buses. Like any mass transit system more capacity can be added with more cars.

    Subways are hugely expensive to build in densely populated areas. In the city I am referencing a subway would cost a billion dollars/mile according to some estimates. The high water table and unstable subsoil are unlike Manhattan, London, Paris and many other cities with subways.

    Likewise though rail lines are being built, they too are very expensive and disrupt cross street traffic in dense urban settings. Right of ways are also extremely costly and forced buyouts unpopular.

    Safety concerns exist with trains, buses and subways. Overhead gondolas have an excellent safety record overall and emergency exit systems can be deployed in rare cases when that is required.

    True, buses are much cheaper and flexible, but currently these are being used already with dedicated lanes (in freeways) and they tend to be at full capacity. Suburban commuters already use them but more transit is needed.

    Such gondola systems are already used to some extent in S. America and there is no reason why they can’t be used in the US when alternatives aren’t feasible. Novelty and politics seems to be the main barrier. Overhead space above freeways and major roadways are the major unused transit venues and the technology is proven for this alternative. At a fraction of the cost of other alternatives.

  91. Alden says:
    @nebulafox

    In 1974 when Patty Hearst was was kidnapped To Kill A Mockingbird and Soul on Ice were still the Bible of jews liberals and feminazis. They applauded every rape of a White woman by a black man.

    It wasn’t till the feminazis realized there were billions in grant money from the wealthy foundations and federal government that they turned against rape.

    Blacks still resent the betrayal of the White Jewish feminazis

  92. @Jack D

    In my commuting days I took the commuter bus into work. It went from whitopia to the black city and back during the appropriate rush hours.

    The commuting buses had almost all white passengers. The whites were well dressed and many worked on their laptops during the commute.

    The city buses had almost all black and hispanic passengers–never saw a laptop on those buses.

    As you entered the city on the several lane wide main roads the “white” bus and the “black” bus would be driving side by side–it was a bit surreal since the signs on the bus referred to “bringing the community together”.

    It kinda reminded me of the “Peace is our business” sign showing during the military siege scene in Dr. Strangelove.

    Here in New England we do serious segregation–and hypocrisy is an art form.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    , @Kronos
  93. Redmen says:

    Steve,

    I think you may have hit paydirt. My wife and I are planning a trip to Cali next year and we told our 7 year-old daughter. She immediately asked if we could go into the Hollywood sign.

    Maybe it’s a girl thing, since I never even thought about that. But she was adamant about that being her goal.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  94. @Redmen

    The Hollywood Sign is difficult to get close to and there’s nothing much to do if you hike all the way up the mountain to it. But it is, in my experience, an Extremely Big Deal to tourists.

  95. Pattern recognition is homophobic–Steve, please tell me you’re going to give this one a good fisking:
    https://www.wired.com/story/how-earnest-research-into-gay-genetics-went-wrong/

  96. Paul Rise says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, the first problem is the Austin City Council would never permit that construction project. But if you told them Red China had private roads, maybe.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  97. Jpp says:
    @Clive Beaconsfield

    I can’t vouch for Andean food one way or the other, but vis a vis your contention regarding mountainous cultures, I do find Himalayan food to be quite decent. The momo dumpling and thukpa noodle staples are of a welcome and noticeably different variety than analogous items in the cuisines of India or China. And the fennel, cumin, mustard, etc which spice these dishes lends them a nice liveliness.

  98. J.Ross says:

    Vindman’s testimony today has completely exonerated Trump, not only from the Ukraine nothingburger, but from all the failures of this administration. Everything Ann Coulter ever complained about can be explained by a Local Vindman. Why was our Ukraine policy confused? Why did DHS drop the ball on crime that exists and instead loudly prioritize “white supremacists”? Why are there constant leaks? Why do many Trump policies seem to go backwards? Because, throughout the government, an unelected seditious Deep State bureaucrat is “resisting,” telling subordinates and foreign diplomats as Vindman openly admits he did “Yeah, never you mind about that president guy, I dictate US policy in this area, so just do what I say, even if it’s perfectly opposite what he just directed in writing.”

  99. @Jim Christian

    He is and so are his columns. Sailer occasionally doesn’t write on wednesdays. By the way, Theodore Dalrymple still writes for them, even though his picture and name aren’t featured with the other columnists’ at the bottom.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  100. @Lot

    Bunker Hill USED TO BE a pretty nifty neighborhood before the glass towers. See Robert Aldrich’s Kiss Me Deadly.

  101. @Dennis Dale

    Any progress on Mayor Ted Wheeler following the rule of law? No? Imagine that.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  102. @Ano

    See Tito Perdue, The Gizmo (2019)

  103. @BenKenobi

    Diversity: the Great Filter?

  104. @Jim Christian

    I took a week off from Taki’s to try to make a tiny dent in my giant pile of paperwork that needs doing.

    My movie review of “Ford v Ferrari” should be up on Wednesday at Takimag.com.

    How do you like the new format?

    Is the default typeface big enough?

  105. @prosa123

    I rode it once for a lark, but feared it for exactly what did happen: one night it ground to a halt mid-river (highest point). There were TV news films of Hasidic looking gentlemen being rescued.

    There’s a subway now that they had to build like 10 miles below the surface, which I also refuse to ride. The R. Island folks opposed it for years, since it would let “those people” from Queens and Spanish Harlem invade their little island. Which, by the way, looks like that Prisoner location if it had been designed by Mussolini.

  106. @PiltdownMan

    Tangents to one of the greatest WW2 and action movies of all time are never OT my friend!

  107. @Phil

    Definitely a feature. Georgetown residents lobbied hard against any nearby Metro station when the system was being planned.

    In the 70’s, Georgetown was the epicenter for the DC area’s nightlife. Not any more. I’m sure the residents must miss all the fist fights and puking going on feet from their bedroom windows at 2:00am, and regret not having a Metro station.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
  108. @Steve Sailer

    How do you like the new format? Is the default typeface big enough?

    I would never denigrate Taki’s other than in as gentle a way as I just did without your asking. I assume you want to know, heh. Here goes: I HATE their new format. Lot of folks I turned on to Takis over the years that I talk to hate it too. They’re going to lose a lot of traffic, it was so simple before, not at all anymore and they don’t put dates on the headers of the articles. It obviously has been worked over by a woman’s touch, I guess Taki’s daughter influenced things. Is Theo Dalyrimple(sp) still there? He isn’t on the list of authors, but he has a piece dated the 16th that I barely caught, stumbled on, really. I like that guy. You can’t tell what’s new, it isn’t instantly at-hand the way it was before. It’s impossible to see what’s new without searching all over the home page. Me, I’m going to keep reading because it’s a very important site, but I haven’t subscribed, so I have no say.

    I can’t be the only one. Hell, I’d subscribe to get the old format back, heh. Thanks, Steve.

  109. @adreadline

    And how do YOU like the new format? I get lost in it, they quit putting a date on the headers and everything is scattered. It was the best news site this side of Unz, but they had to girlie-it up. I’d never say anything about it except Steve asked in another post. I bet if they focus-grouped the new format (I’m sure they didn’t) 9 outta 10 people familiar with the old format would hate the new. It was like a comfy old shoe, at ag glance you knew when new content came in. But now it’s a scattershot collection and hard to keep track of their greats. Dalrymple is a case in point, he had a column I missed dated the 16th, found it only by accident looking for Steve, who was off this past week. Ah well, it’s Taki. I can find Steve here and The High Life is easy to find. I’ll settle for those, if you all you ever read was Sailerman and Taki’s High Life every week, you’re better informed than 99% of the so-called free world.

    I’ll take it.

  110. @Jack D

    The biggest bang for the buck is dedicated bus lanes but there’s not enough money for corruption in those and they are not “sexy” so they get no support.

    Not just corruption, but jobs, fees, and consulting contracts. The Imperial Capital built a $13 billion dollar subway system to Dulles Airport and they are raising the driver tolls on the Dulles Access road to pay for it.

    Also, in the US outside of NYC, buses have a reputation as something that only poor brown people ride.

    It’s the Brown Bus around here outside of rush hour. Nobody’s got enough money for a car but they all got a big ass smart phone.

  111. Corvinus says:

    “Whether or not Newsweek still exists is an iffy proposition. I’ve heard it suggested that these days it’s basically 3 people in Williamsburg trying to come up with clickbait headlines…The reason Medellin is the World’s Smartest City is because it installed ski-lift type gondola transport for slum dwellers who live up high.”

    I’ve NOTICED that whenever there is an article that contains rock solid content, and thus thwarts Mr. Sailer’s alleged superb pattern recognition skills, he resorts to Sarah Jeong pot shot tactics.

  112. Bubba says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s great to read that you are still there and I agree with Jim Christian that the new format is bit of a letdown and initially confusing.

    For example, the links to the most recent articles posted by Taki columnists are located in the bottom half of the home page while old, stale columns are posted in the top half. Not the best design in my opinion.

  113. @El Dato

    It took me multiple re-readings to appreciate Larry Niven as a humorist when, in Protector, he has one of the characters ask something to the effect of “Doesn’t the fossil record track the development of Homo sapiens over millions of years as a perfectly conventional Earthly species?” (thus negating the novel’s central conceit) and then just has whichever character who responds offer a glib, one-sentence dismissal.

    I could happily re-read his Known Space books for the rest of my life. So fun.

  114. @Paul Mendez

    In the 70’s, Georgetown was the epicenter for the DC area’s nightlife. Not any more. I’m sure the residents must miss all the fist fights and puking going on feet from their bedroom windows at 2:00am, and regret not having a Metro station.

    I grew up there in the nineties. We liked to hang out at the Black Cat on Fourteeth Street or in Adams Morgan. Georgetown was full of expensive stores.

  115. anon[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    He still isn’t paying attention. Maybe scream louder?

  116. @Jack D

    Also, in the US outside of NYC, buses have a reputation as something that only poor brown people ride.

    People refer to Atlanta’s MARTA system as “Moving Africans Rapidly Through Atlanta”.

    Apparently it’s a common enough appellation that a Google bot took it to be the actual meaning of the acronym, with predictable and hilarious results.

    https://sso.cmgdigital.com/static/server.html?origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ajc.com%2Fnews%2Flocal%2Fgoogle-search-answered-what-does-marta-stand-for-with-racist-joke%2FA584nhs04yYaiN85xf40NO%2F

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  117. @Justvisiting

    “Peace is our Profession.” [1:24]

  118. Bubba says:

    I took the Medellin tram a few years ago and asked my Colombian colleague/guide/translator/security guard why the shantytowns below all kept their clothes on the tin corrugated roofs. He replied with something like, “secadora de pobre hombre.” Then I understood why my hotel laundry was never returned in the evening after a cloudy day.

  119. @Jack D

    Supposedly, when the Goodyear Blimp flies over Texas, they examine the airship for bullet holes.

  120. @Inquiring Mind

    Truly a testament to the aeronautical engineers who designed the A-6 Intruder; reminds me of the B-52 bomber that had it’s bomb bay doors torn off by trees for flying too low. Or the F-15 fighter that landed with ONE wing after an accident with an A-4.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  121. @El Dato

    That last line is ridiculous. There are plenty of questions about pre-Columbian European societies in America that get hand waved away by anthropologists as urban legends/crank science, Out of Africa is still held up as a valid theory despite having to backdate things by another 10,000 years each time a megalithic site is dug up in Eastern Europe, and otherwise anything differing from Consensus is ignored.

    Anthropology doesn’t even like to talk about how Africa was basically a Bantu Buffet / Zombie Apocalypse for millenia, and instead spends its time inventing convoluted theories regarding the existence of utopian matriarchal societies and hyping Great Zimbabwe. Don’t you remember “Black Egyptians”?

    I’ll take mainstream anthropology seriously when it can tell me who the fuck the Sea People were versus guessing every people except what we would call “Atlanteans”.

    • LOL: Herbert West
  122. Kronos says:
    @Justvisiting

    It kinda reminded me of the “Peace is our business” sign showing during the military siege scene in Dr. Strangelove.

    It’s actually “Peace is our Profession.”

  123. In the 70’s, Georgetown was the epicenter for the DC area’s nightlife. Not any more. I’m sure the residents must miss all the fist fights and puking going on feet from their bedroom windows at 2:00am, and regret not having a Metro station.

    Georgetown was always overrated. DC is a shithole. Was since the mid-60s. Throw in MLK’s assassination and the riots and it got even worse. Worse still when the crack wars started, Hell, even the Mayor was arrested for crack. As for the Metro situation, I was told quite awhile back by several people who had some influence in DC’s real estate markets in Georgetown and Foxhall Road that those folks didn’t want criminal Blacks out of Southeast and Northeast DC to have quick access into and egress out of Georgetown from across town. Later, it was deemed with all the malls being built in the Md. suburbs, a north/south Metro Line out of Bethesda wasn’t necessary, so they never built it and so Georgetown is Metro-Less. DC became less and less important to the region after Tyson’s Corner, White Flint and Landover Malls and decent restaurants and shopping started going up in Virginia and Maryland, but even THAT is going into the crapper with all the illegals and of course the decline of Prince Georges County with the Blacks settling in from DC. Even way back in the 70s when things were being planned out the good folk of the DC upper-crust knew damned good and well the results of too-easy access by the have-nots to the haves. And they were right.

  124. Bubba says:
    @Clifford Brown

    You were very lucky to have escaped uninjured or possibly murdered. The “homeless” algebra guy was setting you up (which was obviously very effective) and his thug accomplice who was supposed to rob you went AWOL.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  125. @Joe Stalin

    It wasn’t a fighter, it was a Marine Corp Queer A6 electronic warfare jet. Marine Corp fixed-wing pilots suck. They need to be de-commissioned as aviation units, the Navy screwed that up badly.

  126. @Inquiring Mind

    I am OK riding on cable cars that don’t have so many U.S. Marine jets flying underneath them on low-altitude training missions.

    Concur. Marine Corp jets cause death and destruction far out of proportion to their numbers. One of em killed a bunch of guys aboard Nimitz in 81, the cable car thing in Italy, but there are many more. Something about the culture of the Marines is lacking in that they take a Naval Aviator and turn him into a retard.

  127. @Kronos

    Whenever people defend the integrity of the judiciary I do enjoy bringing up how all these Left wing terrorists keep getting free passes while anyone vaguely right wing gets ATF/FBI raids shooting your dog, wife, and kids.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  128. Bubba says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Chris Christie’s “Bridgegate” was nothing compared to this and yet it ended up in court with guilty convictions.

    Normal countries ship coal on private railways.

    Yes, but we’re not a normal county any longer.

    https://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/2019/11/18/bay-area-city-might-ban/

  129. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Crows are a pest species. I used to cack them, and grackles too, when I was a kid.

  130. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Corvinus

    Sara Jeong would’ve said “three white men in Texas” but other than that your analogy is, well, still shit.

  131. @Daniel Williams

    People refer to Atlanta’s MARTA system as “Moving Africans Rapidly Through Atlanta”.

    William Least Heat Moon heard that forty years ago, and mentioned it in his book Blue Highways. It was probably old even then.

    MARTA was part of the trio of heavy rail systems of the 1970s, the other two being BART and Washington’s Metro. Most other cities splurged on stadia instead. They either already had a transit system, or didn’t want one.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Highways

  132. @Phil

    After a while, you wonder if that’s not sort of by design,

    This is deadpan, right? Of course it’s by fucking design. We have the same thing here in the PHX area, where the only bus line that goes into Gilbert goes to the community college there and that’s the only place it goes. Even the bus lines that run along the edge of Gilbert on one of the roads which form its boundaries don’t have any stops that let out on the Gilbert side of the road. That’s how anal they are about it. They’re conservatives there, though, so at least they’re not dirty hypocrites like the people in GT who pretend to care about feral negroes while carefully sequestering themselves from same. Instead, they’re just snobs.

  133. anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    In reality, archeologists, anthropologists and geneticists would be falling over themselves to open up this new goldmine for research.

    Is that what happened with Kennewick Man?

  134. LondonBob says:

    I took a ski lift up to the Great Wall of China and a dry toboggan run back down.

  135. @Clifford Brown

    I am a softy for eccentrics so I spent about twenty minutes walking him through some of the word problem exercises demonstrating how to solve for “x”.

    That’s a striking story and certainly makes you wonder about the poor guy. Unfortunately, in my experience, when a black man approaches me and starts a friendly conversation, he eventually gets around to asking me for money. Because now we have a relationship, you know.

  136. Sean says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It was not Browning’s job to bring the law into disrepute. John Wayne in one of his last public statements pointed to the events of Jonestown and scoffed at the idea that Hearst had not been brainwashed. Browning said the evidence suggested she was not raped and he must have known when he said it that he was contrary to common sense that a kidnap victim could consent to sex. The judge let the fact that Patty had been fucking since she was 15 be mentioned to the jury. The judge was senile, he said publicly before the trial that he was not scared of the Hearsts and he had met Patty as a child when he was a guest at the Hearst estate, which was untrue, and he fell asleep during defence testimony.

    I can imagine how Browning would characterise any sexual activity he might have with killer kidnappers after being kept in a cupboard shitting himself in the dark for days and threatened with death. Yes she was in law guilty of something but she was also raped.

    Patty was the only one charged with the famous bank robbery, even though it was clear from the surveillance footage that the SLA members were pointing guns at her during the robbery, meaning the gun she had was almost certainly not loaded.

  137. Kronos says:
    @Jack Henson

    Oh they kept receiving these misdemeanor charges that were even further reduced.

    • Replies: @Jack Henson
  138. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Are the other two Charles Erwin Wilsons prone to irrelevant, random comments?

  139. anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    Hong Kong, I hear has had miles of public and open-air escalators/walkalators for pedestrians in hilly neighborhoods, like, forever

  140. @Kronos

    Bernadette Dohrn just happened to keep on ending up in front of the same extremely leftist judge who just kept on determining the police didn’t do what they said they did and dismissing the charges for process reasons.

    • Replies: @Alden
  141. Polynikes says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Look forward to the review. I really enjoyed that movie.

  142. @Bubba

    Of course, he took my wallet. Did I forget to mention that?

    Joking. I am pretty street savvy and generally politely reject the homeless. That said, if your mugging strategy is to approach a complete stranger in a crowded Walgreens (with an armed in-store guard) and say “Excuse me sir, can you show me how to solve this polynomial equation word problem?”

    Hell, you’ve more than earned my money. I respect the game.

    Most homeless and mentally ill people are not violent criminals. Always be careful, but you can sometimes help people out.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Bubba
  143. @Jack D

    You don’t really gain much by shooting at the gondola passing overhead.

    True, unless you’re a psycho.

    A pilot I know was asked to call the tower after landing at LAX in a DC10 (this was maybe 30 years ago). He did so and they asked him to come in and speak with them. It took him about an hour, but when he got there LAPD was present and asked if he’d noticed anything unusual on final approach. He said no and asked why. They said they’d arrested a guy who was standing on the roof of a building, shooting at passing airplanes with a rifle.

  144. Alden says:
    @SaneClownPosse

    Moderator, I thought links to Mad Miles Mathis were banned. Every thing that happens is a result of a CIA plot according to Mad Miles.

  145. @Paul Rise

    Well, the first problem is the Austin City Council would never permit that construction project. But if you told them Red China had private roads, maybe.

    Someone had to elect that city council. Austin, Tex. was once twice the size of Austin, Minn. Now it’s forty times. (And the smaller Austin gave us Spam and the Gear Daddies. What’s the bigger one have?)

    This is Austin’s real problem:

    The eleventh-largest city in the land? Not even in the top 100 in WWII:

    https://www.biggestuscities.com/1940

    A million people? Bigger than Boston, Denver, Washington, than every state capital but Phoenix?

    Why?

    It’s not the lack of roads, it’s the excess of people.

  146. Alden says:
    @Clifford Brown

    I agree. Since they are homeless and usually don’t have cars, they tend avoid crime where they live. Because people and local police get to recognize them. So if a police report is made about black man short thin nasty braids hangs out in the 7 11 parking lot sleeps on the bus bench in front at night. He knows he’ll be caught. Also they make a living begging and don’t want to irritate donors.

  147. Alden says:
    @Jack Henson

    Exactly, something to do with a wiretap on someone else’s phone.

  148. @Traveller

    “Crime would be even better in Colombia if they didn’t have millions of Venezuelans.”

    Dunno about the locals, but the expats feel pretty sorry for the Venezuelans, who sell high-denomination and near-worthless Venezuelan notes on public transport – as souvenirs.

  149. donut says:
    @Anon

    I’m not going to watch the whole thing again but I did see that Michael Cremo video a while back . As I recall he is up front about his New Age beliefs but his point was that there are some glaring anomalies in the archeological records that mainstream archeology being unable to explain dismisses and ignores and careers are ruined over , much like climate change . His point was that a serious effort should be made to address these anomalies .
    Here is another guy with some some thoughts along the same lines .

    Crackpots to a man ? You be the judge .

  150. Bubba says:
    @Clifford Brown

    My apologies, I read too fast through your post and thought he approached you immediately outside on Skid Row and not inside the store as you had stated. Mea culpa.

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