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They changed Twitter lately, apparently eliminating “the ratio” so you can’t see how many people responded to point out that the bald eagle is the national bird, on the Great Seal of the United States, that the olive branch is conspicuous by leaving out the arrows also used in other bald eagle heraldry, and that’s the eastern half of the U.S. visible on Earth.

 
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  1. If Neils telling the truth, then why were we told in school that the Apollo 11 Astronauts planted and left behind a US flag on the moon?

  2. Icy Blast says:

    The western half should be visible. The eastern half sucks. And Tyson is a dime-store Carl Sagan. He should wear a tutu.

  3. Anonymous[221] • Disclaimer says:

    The Eagle is Disgruntled.

  4. kihowi says:

    Someone replied with a picture of the space suits with astronaut name and American flag prominently sewed on. Oh and there was something with a flag that they brought with them specifically to ceremonially plant on the moon.

    I suspected for a while that for a physicist he must not be such hot stuff. Can you imagine being at the top and instead of choosing to go for that nobel prize or becoming immortal with some discovery, you become the man on tv who explains science in simple words? Come on. He knew where his strengths lay.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  5. Yeah, that whole “one giant leap for mankind” stuff somehow flew straight past the Science Kang. Good thing he noticed the patch, though.

    Dude should stick to science propaganda, not real propaganda.

    As usual, when the Kangz invent jazz and peanut butter, and also that third thing, I forget what it was (maybe a traffic light or something), it is a Great Black Achievement. But whenever White people invent something nice (like electricity, say, or the entire modern world), then suddenly it Belongs To Everybody — especially Muslims and the Sudanese.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  6. People are actually saying we nevuh went to the moon! And some say the earth is flat! 😱
    Owen Benjamin,who must have a screw loose,insisted that the police chief in “Jaws” ,who uttered that movies signature line ,”You’ve got to get a bigger boat!”,had actually said,”We’ve got to get…”,and that it was changed for some kind of reasons.
    No. Its “you’ve.”
    Could this be that ole rascal,Cass Sunstein,spreading fake conspiracies so as to confuse the goyim?Speaking of Cass why did Mama Cass die so young? What did she know? Was she…mossad? This Ellen Naomi COHEN! She wanted Denny Doherty so bad (honey pot?),but he had his eyes on da prize:Michelle! Phillips er,not the other Michelle…

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    , @guest
  7. Kronos says:

    A bald eagle lost in space without oxygen. With only olive branches for comfort. I’m sure there’s a away to use space void as a metaphorical symbol for black bodies.

  8. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The backstory of Interstellar is starting to sound more plausible all the time, except the reason we’ll tell our children the moon landings were faked is to convince them that America was never great.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @anon
    , @L Woods
    , @Justvisiting
  9. From NASA’s page on the badges of the various Apollo missions:

    https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resources/2293/apollo-mission-patches/

    Apollo 11

    The American eagle, symbolic of the United States, was about to land on the Moon. In its talons, an olive branch indicated the crew “came in peace for all mankind.” The Earth, the place from which the crew came and would return safely in order to fulfill President John F. Kennedy’s challenge to the nation, rested on a field of black, representing the vast unknown of space.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  10. anon[930] • Disclaimer says:
    @WowJustWow

    the reason we’ll tell our children the moon landings were faked is to convince them that America was never great

    That’s about it.

  11. Sorry its me again. I should add that when I was 11 or so my sister bought the single “California Dreamin’”,by,of course those very Mamas and the Papas. I heard the song a million times. My friends, until THIS VERY DAY I thought the words were: “…well I got down on my knees and I began to pray.”
    It is ” I pretend to pray”, as I discovered. Well,hell if its so damn cold in New York City,maybe he shoulda been praying for better weather.
    BTW check out the video of them doing that song on some tv show. Michelle is so high she is singing into a banana. But…such an angel.

    • Replies: @guest
    , @c matt
  12. @MG

    How did Jennifer Lawrence get HER big break? Yes. Exactly.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Gary in Gramercy
  13. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @MG

    he got kicked out of his first PhD program and then got one elsewhere out of pity.

    never got any scope time or did any research. it’s a stretch to call him a scientist, even a poor one.

  14. Did anybody else notice that on the patch, the Eagle is getting ready to drop its olive branch straight down into the crater, sort of flushing it away?

    What the heck does THAT signify?

  15. Kronos says:
    @Father O'Hara

    I didn’t know Harvey Weinstein liked having sex/rape with black dudes.

    “Harvey made me do things man, like a LOT of things. He didn’t love my soul, my heart, he just wanted my black body. He superimposed his desires on that black body. Without any regards to my desires, my needs. He called me his little *sniff* black panther.”

    • Replies: @guest
  16. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=91127

    “Has Tyson done any real science? He seems to be a media celebrity, but when I look in the Smithsonian/NASA ADS, I can find no record of scholarly work in science, except for popular books and social commentary. Is he in fact a practicing astrophysicist?”

    Not since graduate school (he did not successfully progress towards a degree at UT/Austin, and convinced Columbia to give him a second try). Aside from the obligatory papers describing his dissertation, he’s got a paper on how to take dome flats, a bizarre paper speculating about an asteroid hitting Uranus, and courtesy mentions *very* late in the author lists of a few big projects in which it is unclear what, if anything, of substance he contributed. No first author papers of any real significance whatsoever. Nor is there any evidence that he has been awarded any telescope time on significant instruments as PI since grad school, despite the incredibly inflated claims in his published CVs. He cozied up to Bush and pushed Bush’s version of man to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond, and now gets appointed to just about every high level political advisory board. To an actual astronomer, this is almost beyond inconceivable. It’s just bizarre. To answer Delong’s question, no: he is not a practicing astrophysicist. – Don Barry, Ph.D. Dept. of Astronomy, Cornell University

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  17. Sideways says:

    You can still see comment counts. Currently 4.1k to 63k likes.

    • Replies: @caffeine withdrawals
  18. @Icy Blast

    Recently I made a pretty harmless NdeG Tyson joke in “mixed” company (by which I mean everyone was a GoodWhite except for me) and I was schooled quickly that Mr. Tyson is absolutely sacred among such people, and may only be mentioned in reverential tones.

    Frankly I’ve always thought he was a bit of a clown, so I figured he’d be fair game for a gentle gibe or two. Nope.

  19. @Father O'Hara

    It was a Mossad Sandwich that Mama Cass choked on. I just knew it.

    • Replies: @Tex
  20. IHTG says:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C_eDlzuVoAEbSCB?format=jpg&name=small

    • Replies: @Charon
    , @Known Fact
  21. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    “An achievement shared by the humans species”: What does he even mean with this kumbayah statement?

    Anyone’s welcome to feel that they “shared” the “achievement.” But the people who planned, financed, engineered, built, tested, monitored, and manned the project were specific people at specific companies and agencies located in specific locations in the United States. They have names and they received paychecks. In general they raised families and told their kids about what they did at work. The families watched the mission on black and white television, knowing what dad (or rarely mom) contributed to it. (My engineer dad’s company missed out on the Apollo program but was prime contractor on the preceding Surveyor unmanned landers, one of which made a costarring appearance during the Apollo 12 landing.)

    https://www.nasa.gov/content/astronauts-pay-a-visit-to-surveyor-3

    • Replies: @Kronos
  22. Not a human in sight; future generations will conclude the Great Bird God planted a tree on the Moon.

    Oh, and half of America is in darkness, and prominently featured is the slave-trade routes that made America and the Moon landing possible.

    • LOL: JMcG
  23. guest says:

    This is plain dumb. I mean, who doesn’t pause to realize the bald eagle is #2 behind the flag in U.S. National Symbology? It’s a mistake akin to calling him Neil deGrasse Ferguson.

    If Herr Doktor Tyson wishes to expand credit for the Apollo missions beyond America, okay. A tip of the hat to Nazi Germany, everyone!

    • LOL: HammerJack
  24. bomag says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    A kamala harris administration will be able to energize a moon mission purely for the purpose of replacing the faded American flags with LGBT rainbow flags.

  25. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    It turns out NASA has a history of the patch.

    Astronauts designed their own patches (plus a little clean-up from a professional).

    Why no names? To show that it wasn’t an achievement of the three astronauts, but rather “of everyone who had worked toward a lunar landing, and there were thousands.” Horses mouth. That was Michael Collins, who designed the patch. The patch was an achievement not just of the three, but rather of the U.S. aerospace industry and agencies. Ha-ha! Tyson: “We are the world, we are the … HUH?!”

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/the-making-of-the-apollo-11-mission-patch

    The design originally had the olive branch in the raptor’s beak, but a higher-up thought the claws looked too martial, so he put the olive branch in the claws.

    Collins was mildly miffed: “The eagle looked uncomfortable in the new version and I hoped it dropped the olive branch before landing.”

    “Fellow astronaut Jim Lovell suggested the eagle, the national bird of the United States, as the focus of the patch.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  26. guest says:
    @Father O'Hara

    It is “you’re,” though it’s not all that easy to hear.

    Dramatically, I guess You’re versus We makes a difference because it is Quint’s boat, and it would be presumptuous of a landlubbing sheriff to include himself in possession of speculative seacraft. Otherwise, I don’t see any possible significance to altering the line.

    Then again, people do traffic in esoterica.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
  27. @Redneck farmer

    Sagan is somewhat overrated

    Indeed, maybe quite a bit overrated. He pushed some very bad history .

    • Replies: @caffeine withdrawals
  28. guest says:
    @Father O'Hara

    Yeah, pretending to pray always came across to me, because he merely came in to get out of the cold. This is further supported by his guessing the preacher likes the cold because it brings him customers.

  29. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:

    The Nation, not The Onion:

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @PiltdownMan
  30. guest says:
    @Kronos

    Harvey Weinstein ran an awards-grasping movie studio. He doesn’t run Columbia University.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  31. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:

  32. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @Neoconned

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-13/world-population-topping

    Steve, have you seen this?

    It shows that people of European descent are already a tiny minority on the globe, and are destined to become a barely noticeable sliver.

    Also, there is no sign of Africa’s population “topping off” in the forecast years given.

    • Replies: @Charon
    , @Charon
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  33. Kronos says:
    @guest

    It was a joke to a previous reply. The previous commenter stated

    “How did Jennifer Lawrence get HER big break? Yes. Exactly.”

    Jennifer Lawrence = Holleywood = Harvey Weinstein = Joke

    • Replies: @guest
  34. @Anonymous

    Really telling, that “until we compromise 38 to 35 per cent of the population ….” statement.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @c matt
  35. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The design originally had the olive branch in the raptor’s beak, but a higher-up thought the claws looked too martial, so he put the olive branch in the claws.

    Collins was mildly miffed: “The eagle looked uncomfortable in the new version and I hoped it dropped the olive branch before landing.”

    Collins was right. The olive branch should have been carried in the eagle’s beak.

  36. guest says:
    @Kronos

    Yee, I am familiar with humor. Such as the implication that Columbia is full of homos.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  37. Kronos says:
    @Anon

    It’s reverse cultural appropriation.

    Also, somewhere on UNZ there are excellent articles on why”Hidden Figures” was mainly B.S.

  38. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    The Nation’s always been pretty left-wing and anti-American, though. This is like Commentary claiming Israel is good.

  39. SFG says:

    From my non-logged in view of Twitter right now, Tyson’s post has 4.1K comments and 10K retweets. As per Merriam-Webster, a comment:retweet ratio of 2:1 or greater suggests you got ‘ratioed’ (though they’re only citing someone else). KnowYourMeme suggests it’s comments vs. retweets plus likes, but he has 63K likes, so that’s even better for him.

    So, much as I hate to admit it, Tyson has not been ‘ratioed’. The comments are pretty negative (and point out it’s the national bird), but I suspect an even larger number of people just thought ‘nationalism bad’ and retweeted or liked.

    I would quite seriously not be surprised if Twitter had decided to ‘discriminate’ against Steve by hiding his ability to see retweets and likes. He should consider browsing from outside the app.

  40. Kronos says:
    @guest

    I always thought that was Yale, rich ones at that.

    • Replies: @Charon
  41. dearieme says:

    I liked the Russian joke of the time. “Their Germans are better than our Germans.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @prime noticer
  42. Bitfu says:

    Hmm, doesn’t Neil’s ‘logic’ then entail something like the following:

    The Africa to the World Slavery Patch

    Not just black Africans were slaves
    When black Africans were slaves, they were often sold by black African slave sellers
    Not just an American flag

    In that regard, black slavery is not unique among the scourges of human slavery.

    Affirmation that human slavery is not a sin to be borne exclusively by the whites in Appalachia. Slavery is a failing of the human species to be shared by all.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Hamlet's Ghost
  43. @Anonymous

    Yeah, well from a 1969 perspective, it ought to be Disgruntled . . .

    OT:

    Nice white lady elementary school principal in ultra-liberal Ann Arbor, Michigan terminated because “an African-American coveted her position . . .
    Blick’s attorneys allege the Ann Arbor school district and its school board have a history of “harboring, and acting on, racial animus towards Caucasians and non-minority individuals” and have “notoriety” for stepping on the civil rights of Caucasian and non-minority administrators when African American and minority administrators “covet” Caucasian and non-minority administrators’ “legitimately earned” positions.”

    I guarantee this lady is a lefty, only now learning what the future holds for her and her own children, especially her son, if the country continues down this path.

    https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/education/2019/07/22/white-principal-sues-ann-arbor-district-alleges-racial-discrimination/1794375001/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @bomag
    , @George
  44. @Icy Blast

    Tyson is a dime-store Carl Sagan.

    Very good!

  45. So the bald eagle is now the symbol of all mankind? I wonder how the Canadians feel about that!

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @guest
  46. Realist says:
    @guest

    If Herr Doktor Tyson wishes to expand credit for the Apollo missions beyond America, okay. A tip of the hat to Nazi Germany, everyone!

    Exactly.

  47. Gordo says:

    They changed Twitter lately, apparently eliminating “the ratio” so you can’t see how many people responded to point out that the bald eagle is the national bird, on the Great Seal of the United States, that the olive branch is conspicuous by leaving out the arrows also used in other bald eagle heraldry, and that’s the eastern half of the U.S. visible on Earth.

    Nailed it.

  48. El Dato says:
    @Paul Jolliffe

    We need a Greta Thunberg of the Great Replacement.

  49. @Sideways

    I wonder what it’d be if you excluded the I FUCKING LOVE SCIENCE drones

  50. Charon says:
    @SFG

    There’s also the option of ignoring “social media” entirely.

  51. unit472 says:

    Before Tyson became America’s black TV ‘astrophysicist’ he was the director of the Hayden Planetarium. Now a Planetarium is a useful device to show urban populations what the night sky really looks like but they are to cosmology and physics what Disney’s Space Mountain is to the Apollo program. An amusement park ride!

  52. Charon says:
    @Anonymous

    They’ve been predicting that the world population would level out in a few decades for as long as I’ve been alive, and longer. Hasn’t happened yet. Africa and Asia in particular are obscenely crowded and it’s coming our way.

  53. Charon says:
    @Kronos

    It’s the entire Ivy League, and much else.

    Dartmouth was the last holdout.

    But that was many years ago.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  54. peterike says:

    I dunno. The expression on that eagle seems dangerously close to a smirk.

    • Replies: @L Woods
  55. bomag says:
    @Paul Jolliffe

    Nice white lady elementary school principal…

    Education personnel are reliably liberal, but it sounds like things got so blatant that it generated push-back.

    That is some encouragement; but also dreary in that it repeats a pattern: share things with various minorities; they take it over completely.

  56. L Woods says:
    @WowJustWow

    More to convince them that the white man was never great.

  57. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve often hankered after the idea of a ‘National Bald Eagle in Residence’ – a lifetime position – the favored national symbol being installed in an capacious cage/eyery situated on the Whitehouse lawn.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @AnotherDad
  58. L Woods says:
    @peterike

    The irony of the smirk meme is that I see it all the time — on the faces of white women whose sum total of virtue is to have managed to not get too fat. The arrogance and grotesque self-regard dripping out of every soft 6 that can fit into lululemon is palpable.

  59. @Anonymous

    At Rice U., where the Owl is the mascot, we had 3 huge owls in a cage outside Lovett College. One of my friends went to pester the owls after drink was taken, and the vicious raptor ripped his nose open.

  60. @RichardTaylor

    What’d he push? All I can find is anti-nuclearism and pot advocacy.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bubba
  61. When India lands its first Astronsuts on the Moon ….they are going to be Two Chinese Males…

    When China lands two Astronauts on the Moon….they are going to be two Indian-Hindu Males….

    When Israel lands two Astronauts on the Moon….one will be Iranian….the other will be a Syrian…..

    This according to announcements made yesterday by India….China….Israel…..

    • Replies: @Jack D
  62. Jake says:
    @Icy Blast

    If only all of America could be like Hollywood, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle!

  63. @WowJustWow

    The propagandists have told so many lies about the moon landing they can’t keep them all straight.

    The New York Mets baseball team has it right with the moon landing bobblehead doll.

    It is a fairy tale meant to be told to children (can you say neoteny?).

    If you don’t believe in the Easter Bunny you are a wacko right wing hater conspiracy nut!

  64. Jake says:
    @Steve Sailer

    On the topic of owls, my wife is rather certain that novelist/newspaper columnist Michael Peterson did not murder his wife. My wife believes that only a large owl could have left the strange wounds on her head.

    It happened at night, so an owl rather than a hawk. And the neighborhood was filled with very large trees and was known to have owls.

    This was in Durham, NC just before the white Duke lacrosse team raped all the black women in the area and got away with it. So you know that when the DA’s office says the owl theory is bad fiction that there is no chance it could have any validity whatsoever.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  65. @Anonymous

    The author, Haris Durrani, has a South Asian muslim name. He seems what is referred to as a “professional student”, albeit at a high level.

    He has done an applied physics bachelor’s from Columbia University, a master’s in the history of science from Cambridge University, a law degree from Columbia, and is now a first year Ph.D. student at Princeton.

    https://history.princeton.edu/people/haris-durrani

  66. @SFG

    Your comment is the correct assessment. Browsing anonymously, I haven’t seen a change in Twitter’s formula.

  67. The Civil War just wasn’t worth it…Lincoln may very well have deported all the Blacks to Africa….If he did…No Stacey Abrams…No Neil De Grasse Tyson….

    Perhaps WW2 wasn’t worth it either…No Dan Goldin former head of NASA…..

  68. the moon is a proposition celestial body.

  69. @SFG

    It’s merely a function of how Twitter displays. In a thread, you can’t see the number of comments of a tweet that you have selected. But if instead you select another tweet in the thread, the three stats (comments, retweets, and likes) become visible for the original tweet.

  70. Neil deGrasse Tyson is the one pushing blackness in physics: black holes, black matter, black energy. There is a lot of BS in physics to try to make it work. Anybody else recognize it’s malarkey like global warming or the denial of biological racial differences? Group think and group policing has been going on a long time. I personally think plasma physics is an interesting alternative. The electric universe has some interesting theories. Just think of all the money they are wasting to try prove their science fiction true. Gravity is a time fabric? That’s such nonsense.

  71. @john_l

    Check the author of that article.

  72. @HammerJack

    The goodwhites are amusing in a pitiful sort of way.

    My dog that chases cars has more street smarts.

  73. Tex says:
    @HammerJack

    It was a Mossad Sandwich that Mama Cass choked on. I just knew it.

    That shows how devilishly clever MOSSAD is. Who’d suspect they were using a ham sandwich?

  74. Art Deco says:
    @kihowi

    Only an odd minority of physical scientists discover anything that might bring them to public prominence. Carl Sagan was employed at a research university and had a hat full of published research papers, but he wouldn’t have been known to the broad public if he hadn’t been in the science education business as well (which in broadcasting meant appearances in documentaries by CBS Reports, dozens of appearances on the Tonight Show, and his work for PBS).

    Most astronomers work outside of academe and teaching institutions seldom have the critical mass of interested students that would induce them to employ an astronomer on their faculty. The principal options for Tyson 25 years ago would have been a staff position at a public agency or a faculty position at a research university (where he would have published research papers now and again, to be read by very few). He landed a job as a planetarium director and had enough stage presence that he was salable to host documentary programs. You wouldn’t make ‘host of science documentaries’ a career goal as there have been only a handful of people who’ve done that in the last 60 years, all of whom had other irons in the fire.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @J.Ross
  75. @caffeine withdrawals

    He pushed some very bad history .

    What’d he push? All I can find is anti-nuclearism and pot advocacy.

    That weird story of his great-grandfather working as a human ferry boat?

  76. Besides the fact that it has an eagle on it, it’s just a mission patch.

    On wikipedia it shows the first manned mission mission patch (Gemini 5) had just the names of the astronauts and a covered wagon on it, so apparently that was a great leap for gypsy kind.

    Mission patches are neither legally binding nor reality altering. It’s just a patch.

    Apparently the 309th Fighter Squadron in WWII was fighting for cartoon duck kind. The patch doesn’t say they’re American pilots.

  77. Kyle says:

    One thing I noticed watching the cbs live feed of the moon landing was most of the footage of the lunar module landing was just a scale model. Every few minutes the words “cbs simulation” would flash on screen. I was wondering how the hell they got outside shots of the lander as it was descending in orbit and as it was landing, then when I realized they were models I felt stupid. Maybe this is what led to the moon landing conspiracy theories.

  78. Jack D says:

    That poor eagle (an endangered species BTW) would perish in the vacuum of space. Olive trees don’t grow (much) in America. The dead eagle is going to fall into that giant crater.

    The astronauts were great pilots but they were not artists or poets or anything like that – different skill set. Armstrong even botched his one great line, which he had plenty of time to practice. Every time I hear the recording I yell at him – A man, Neil, a man. What he said makes no sense since man and mankind mean the same thing.

    Of course today he would have to say “humankind” and it would be wrong for him to rub it in that a MAN was the one setting foot on the moon, so he’d have to come up with another line.

    For the most part the astronauts were unable to convey the gloriousness and wonder of their missions effectively because their pilot training had taught them to suppress their emotions so that they could continue to coolly analyze any situation. An aircraft can be literally on fire and a test pilot’s voice will not change tone at all. Later on NASA made efforts to compensate by sending up elementary school teachers and such instead of laconic test pilots but that didn’t work out very well. I wonder what the first woman on the moon will say?

  79. snorlax says:

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @guest
  80. …and that’s the eastern half of the U.S. visible on Earth.

    Thus SoCal’s– and Ernie Sailer’s– aerospace industry is obscured, but French Guiana, the future launch site of the EU, is visible. Kneel-in-deGrasse Tyson will be pleased.

    In other Sailer space news, UFO Days are this weekend, and Sailer’s Meats is again a sponsor.

    http://www.countrysidecoop.com/event/elmwood-ufo-days/

  81. Mr. Anon says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Sagan is somewhat overrated.

    True. But Tyson is almost completely overrated.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  82. @Jack D

    Of course today he would have to say “humankind”

    Stop erasing otherkins existence. Trees are people too.

  83. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    African-Americans have moved on from that position (between the decline in black fertility, which is now only slightly higher than white and immigration (ESPECIALLY immigration) blacks can forget about ever being 38% of the population. I’m not sure that position was ever really representative anyway – you can always find some radical to say stupid shit.

    But in Africa, the attitude toward children STILL seems to be “the more the merrier”. This was always their attitude but in the past few made it to adulthood so it all worked out. Now this same attitude is going to get us the World’s Most Important Graph.

  84. Jack D says:
    @snorlax

    The idea that the moon shot was one of the greatest accomplishment of mankind is completely wrong. Two white man raped the moon and then left it smeared with feces. The moon is Tawana Brawley and the astronauts are like those cops who raped her.

    • LOL: slumber_j
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    , @FPD72
  85. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    I guess the fact that Tyson is black had nothing to do with any of this, since you don’t mention it. You are also assuming that he was capable of producing publishable papers, which is a fact not in evidence.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Lurker
  86. @HammerJack

    I’ve noticed that too. Maya Angelou is another one you dare not gently gibe.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  87. Jack D says:
    @dearieme

    The Russians sent their Germans back in ’52 so it was not an even contest. Not because they had any scruples about using Nazis but because they were security obsessed and didn’t trust the Germans. People forget that the main impetus for rocketry was to produce ICBMs. If rockets weren’t weapons they would never have gotten beyond the toy stage.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  88. Mr. Anon says:

    The achievements of Neil deGrasse Tyson (whatever those actually are) are the achievements of the human species, to be shared by all. Every Siberian yak herder, every Saigon pedicab driver, every Kinshasa garbage-hauler can take as much credit for anything that Neil deGrasse Tyson has ever done as can Mr. Tyson himself.

  89. istevefan says:
    @PiltdownMan

    If you do look at the Apollo mission patches on the link you provided, most do include the names of the crew. So Apollo 11 and 13 were somewhat unique in that respect. It appears the Gemini mission patches were similar. Most had the names of the crew, a few did not.

    As others have pointed out, the eagle is a US symbol. Additionally the word ‘Apollo’ is written in the Latin alphabet so that would eliminate a great deal of humanity right there.

  90. Jack D says:
    @Bitfu

    Appalachia was the part of the South where they DIDN’T have slaves. The mountainous terrain did not lend itself to plantation agriculture. West Virginia broke away from the rest of Virginia and stayed with the Union because they opposed slavery.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @FPD72
  91. Jack D says:
    @War for Blair Mountain

    TBH, I don’t get your joke.

    Note that Israel talked about landing Arabs on the moon. They didn’t say anything about bring them back.

    • LOL: bruce county
  92. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    The Russians sent their Germans back in ’52 so it was not an even contest.

    If that is true, then that makes me somewhat more impressed with their effort. Sure they did not get to the moon, but if they did it with homegrown talent, it reflects well on their homegrown talent.

    Though the US would still have achieved our goal, how much longer would we have had to work if not for von Braun and company? Also, I’m sure we had a lot of other European immigrants that contributed mightily.

    I’m not complaining, just pointing out that if we had restricted ourselves to American-born talent, the results might have taken quite a bit longer to realize.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @AnotherDad
  93. JimB says:

    Tyson is an academic mediocrity incapable of discovery or deep scientific analysis but great at popularization and self-promotion. He basically occupies a niche position intended for a Woman Scientist. Like so many women in the hard sciences, he flunked out of his first graduate program due to mathematical ineptitude, in this case at UT, and landed at Columbia, which has had a 2nd tier physics and astronomy program from the 70s up to the present.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  94. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @L Woods

    More to convince them that the white man was never great.

    This.

  95. @john_l

    I’ll take Tyson over Chopra any day.

  96. Jack D says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    I think you should go about this the opposite way – name a black intellectual figure whom it IS OK to jibe and who is not spoken about by goodwhites in tones of hushed reverence as “Dr. ____”. I’m waiting….

  97. @Bitfu

    More than that. Since, according to the politically correct “Out of Africa” theory of human origins, Africans were here first, they were the first to practice slavery. Slavery has been practiced in Africa since time immemorial.

    Blacks created slavery. Whites ended it.

    You’re welcome.

  98. Jack D says:
    @istevefan

    I think that if the US had made a concerted effort right after the war (as the Russians did) to milk the Nazis for everything that they knew about rocketry and then sent them back that the timeline would not have been different. The US had more native talent and more money than the Russians, it just didn’t (until the Russians started making us look bad) have that much interest in space exploration.

    When von Braun got here, he was sort of shocked to find out that Goddard, whom von Braun regarded as a hero, was a prophet without honor in his own country and had never succeeded in getting any significant resources from the US government. Goddard invented both the liquid fueled rocket and the multi-stage rocket in 1914 and had he received adequate support we could have been decades ahead of not only the Russians but the Germans too. Instead he was regarded as a lunatic because he proposed traveling to the moon by rocket – what a ridiculous idea! The NY Times (that great authority on science) editorialized that every high school student knows that thrust is impossible in the vacuum of space so no rocket could ever leave the atmosphere.

  99. Has he always done stuff like this, or is it a response to the recent #MeToo attempt?

  100. JMcG says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The Super Soaker. That’s the third thing.

  101. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    I don’t have a subscription to INSPEC much less Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts. Somehow I doubt you do either. GoogleScholar turns up only popular science literature. He lists a number of papers in academic journals here, where you can also find his dissertation:

    https://www.haydenplanetarium.org/tyson/about/cv.php

    He completed his dissertation at age 33, which is about the median age for that. He had a post-doctoral fellowship for a few years before landing a position at the American Museum of Natural History.

    I guess the fact that Tyson is black had nothing to do with any of this, since you don’t mention it.

    That’s an interest of yours, not an interest of mine. Not many people earn a living hosting science documentaries, and those who do generally have other jobs. Marlin Perkins, John Forsyth, Carl Sagan, Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his narrators &c. Is he better at that job than these other characters? I never thought about it.

  102. snorlax says:
    @Jack D

    The NY Times (that great authority on science) editorialized that every high school student knows that thrust is impossible in the vacuum of space so no rocket could ever leave the atmosphere.

    Which Goddard disproved by rigging a pistol to fire a blank inside a vacuum chamber.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Simply Simon
  103. J1234 says:

    Affirmation that walking on the moon was an achievement of the human species, to be shared by all.

    Except that Armstrong said “…one giant leap for mankind,” which kind of left the women out (in some people’s estimation. )

  104. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    I’m trying to think of a black academic or medical professional who is spoken of in hushed tones by anyone outside a certain professional subculture. I’m drawing a blank.

    There are 1.5 million post-secondary teachers in this country and another six digit population who have the training of post-secondary teachers but work in government and industry. Few of them have any kind of public presence among general audiences.

  105. @Jack D

    thrust is impossible in the vacuum of space

    Right. Good article on that: https://io9.gizmodo.com/how-robert-goddard-almost-killed-space-flight-1491135545

    Goddard’s attitude is mine. Our “elites” are astonishingly stupid and ignorant when tit comes to anything beyond fighting with each other, and even in that the fools tend to fight in a burning barn set alight by overkill. If they don’t like something, don’t bother them with it. They’re not only too stupid to live, they’re too stupid to be save to be around, Hell’s Angels with ties. Think of “pointy hair boss” as a fairly accurate portrait.

    It’s a fairly serious flaw in Western civilization as it is now.

    Counterinsurgency

  106. slumber_j says:
    @Jack D

    Or alternatively, “The moon is a sickle cell / It’ll kill you in time”:

  107. @Father O'Hara

    Jennifer Lawrence is black?? That one drop is certainly well-hidden.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  108. @Jake

    Has “Brad from Raleigh” weighed in on the strigine hypothesis?

  109. @Gary in Gramercy

    Jennifer Lawrence is black?? That one drop is certainly well-hidden.

    I understand nothing of Jennifer’s is well-hidden in The Red Sparrow.

  110. @HammerJack

    You want their heads to explode? Ask them to name one substantive contribution Tyson has made to the science of astrophysics. He was Carl Sagan’s pet feel-good project and white liberals’ smart, hip black friend.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @HammerJack
  111. @Mr. Anon

    But Tyson is almost completely overrated.

    In his favor, we can say he’s never bitten off a rival’s ear, or deceived a small town into letting him build a poultry processing plant on the false promise of jobs for locals.

  112. Never let a deGrasse Tyson try to do the job of a Sagan.


    Space exploration can be brutal.

    Carl Sagan, in front of brutalist Boston City Hall, displays an example of the plaques that exited the solar system on Pioneers 10 and 11. Machines with license plates were already replacing men with flags — and going a whole lot farther.

  113. L Woods says:
    @Jack D

    I wonder what the first woman on the moon will say?

    Something about herself, no doubt.

  114. Dan Hayes says:
    @Jack D

    Jack D:

    Goddard was a certified genius, but was a one-man operation who kept everything to himself being incapable of forming subsidiary cohorts to implement and expand his ideas!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  115. @PiltdownMan

    “The author, Haris Durrani, has a South Asian muslim name.”

    Pashtun/Pathan. There used to be a Durrani Empire.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durrani

    “The literacy rate of the Durrani is the highest among all the Pashtun tribes and they are also considered the most liberal of the Pashtun tribes.”

    Admittedly that’s starting from a pretty illiberal level.

  116. @SFG

    To me, ratio is likes:replies, but no matter how you slice it, NDT hasn’t been ratioed here, as there are only 4100 replies, compared with 62,886 likes. Sorry, Steve.

    • Replies: @Hail
  117. c matt says:
    @Father O'Hara

    I guess their pretend prayer worked because it brought about pretend global warming.

  118. @IHTG

    That must have been during his #metoo incidents

  119. That picture would look threatening to aliens.

    “We did this to Scollay Square, and we can do it to you!”

    • Replies: @snorlax
  120. c matt says:
    @The Alarmist

    I think he meant it. That seems to be the critical minimum of white libs needed to turn the tide.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  121. More like “tastefully understated”. The command module was the “Columbia” after all. The patch characteristics aren’t exactly unique, just unusual. Check out the Apollo 13 patch.

  122. Anon[219] • Disclaimer says:

    The name “Apollo” is also a nationalistic reference, which is clear to anyone with significant knowledge of ancient comparative religion.

    Like the rest of the nationalism on the Apollo patch, noticing that nationalistic reference would require a level of insight, education, and an ability to pay attention that Tyson lacks.

    Credibly prancing around like one knows something generally includes keeping their mouth shut surrounding anything of which they know little to nothing.

    • Replies: @guest
  123. snorlax says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Dunno. The aliens might want to mate with it.

  124. Lurker says:
    @Jack D

    Over here we have a show called The Sky at Night

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_at_Night

    I believe it’s now the longest running TV science show in the world, over 60 years on TV. For the last six years one of the main presenters has been Maggie Aderin-Pocock.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie_Aderin-Pocock

    I’m sure being a black woman played no part in her recruitment for the job.

    Sarcasm aside she seems pretty competent as far as I can judge and is very likeable as a TV presenter.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    , @guest
  125. @Steve Sailer

    While I hope your friend was okay when all was said and done, I say “good for the owl.”

    Facilities for rehabilitation, refuges for the permanently disabled, and zoos for meaningful scientific and educational work (which prioritize their charges over their visitors) have their place, but keeping wild animals for use in movies and circuses, or as mascots, is as unconscionable as bear-baiting and other shameful, savage traditions of the past. Recently most circuses in the civilised parts of the worls have become venues for acrobatics and clowns and such, and finally stopped abusing beasts to entertain humans – a long overdue improvement.

    If a sports team wants to be the “broncos” or the “bulldogs” and have a well cared-for domestic animal participate in a humane half-time show or whatever, fine, but don’t let’s lock up tigers and owls and such for this nonsense. (The “lions” and such can still pay some guy to wear an anthropomorphic costume and do cartwheels if they want to.)

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Anonymous
  126. Jack D says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Goddard was (not unreasonably) concerned about people stealing his inventions. Also not every scientific genius is also a genius of publicity and organization and navigating the political waters (von Braun had the whole package – when being a Nazi was called for, he was a Nazi and when it was time to be a red blooded American he was that too. Tom Lehrer’s joke song that Wernher was learning Chinese would not have been far fetched if he had lived longer) . But really there was nothing wrong with Goddard’s personality that some big fat Army contracts could not have cured.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @snorlax
    , @Kronos
  127. J.Ross says:
    @Art Deco

    Wrong tack. He needn’t be famous but lack of perception in a cosmologist is like a doctor who never washes his hands.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  128. snorlax says:
    @Lurker

    TV presenter is a job well suited to black strengths (enthusiasm, affability, gift of gab). Even if hiring were colorblind, I think many TV presenters would be black.

    Tyson isn’t a genius by any means (neither was Sagan) but he does a good job on TV.

  129. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    There were peculiar circumstances in that particular election: open ballot voting before armed soldiers of occupation.
    https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/West_Virginia_Creation_of#start_entry

  130. The Apollo 11 emblem should show the logos of McDonnell-Douglas, GE, North American, IBM, et al, grotesquely soaked in taxpayers blood, descending on the US Treasury.

  131. @Anonymous

    It shows that people of European descent are already a tiny minority on the globe, and are destined to become a barely noticeable sliver.

    You are exactly right.

    WE are a true minority on a global scale, and becoming more so. (We are the real “people of color” too, with a far greater variety hues, FWIW.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
  132. @Steve Sailer

    Maybe your friend chose to get drunk and pester the owls, not because it was easy but because it was dangerous.

  133. What’s the significance of leaving out the arrows?

  134. El Dato says:
    @snorlax

    You don’t need to disprove it. Nowhere in Newton’s Laws does it say “at 1 atm”.

    Chuckle:

    https://www.popsci.com/military-aviation-amp-space/article/2009-07/new-york-times-nasa-youre-right-rockets-do-work-space/

    Expecting something like that for Forced Diversity, just as rioters with metal-spiked clubs out for a good time reach the NYTTower.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  135. Anonymous[182] • Disclaimer says:

    Houston, we’ve had a legend: Boffin behind NASA Mission Control signs off for final time Chris Kraft set the rules for Mercury, Gemini, Apollo and the Space Shuttle

    Chris Kraft, who created the concept of NASA’s Mission Control, died yesterday aged 95.

  136. @Anonymous

    ‘The Eagle is Disgruntled.’

    The Eagle has Gruntled.

  137. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    People of color are like Ford Model T’s – they’re any color you want so long as it’s brown.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    , @Anonymous
  138. @Redneck farmer

    “Sagan is somewhat overrated.”

    What? I mean, He has millions and millions of…. something.

  139. snorlax says:
    @Jack D

    In America, the New York Times episode convinced Goddard to become a recluse. In Germany, Fritz Lang’s 1929 space travel-themed film Frau im Mond was a huge hit and their military began a well-funded rocketry program shortly after. The top Nazis (esp. Hitler and Goebbels) greatly admired Lang’s films* and that one in particular, and massively increased the already generous funding and resources for the military rocketry program.

    So it was that laymen in the mass media were indirectly responsible for the divergent trajectories of Goddard and Braun. Perhaps for the best, since the Germans blew as much on rockets as we did on the Manhattan Project.

    *Despite Lang’s half-Jewish ancestry and leftist sympathies, they offered to appoint him the head of the German film industry if he agreed to direct propaganda films for them—he instead chose to emigrate to Hollywood—and they remained fans even after this snub.

  140. @Anonymous

    I’ve often hankered after the idea of a ‘National Bald Eagle in Residence’ – a lifetime position – the favored national symbol being installed in an capacious cage/eyery situated on the Whitehouse lawn.

    It should be obvious why we do not want to do that.

  141. George says:
    @Paul Jolliffe

    “Yeah, well from a 1969 perspective, it ought to be Disgruntled . . .”

    Ah the 60s, Vietnam, assassinations, race riots, … But an Italian actor playing an Indian she’d a tear over the garbage everywhere. It was all fun until Nixon was forced by France to devalue the $.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  142. snorlax says:
    @Jack D

    Fauxcahontas, Jorge Ramos, Shaun King, G.K. Butterfield and Hidden Figure Katherine Johnson[1][2][3] beg to differ.

    [1]

    [2] According to Wikipedia, she is a world-leading research mathematician and physicist and computer scientist and “aerospace technologist.” Move over Wernher!

    [3] If Neil Armstrong raped the moon, does that make her an accessory?? #TimesUp

  143. @istevefan

    Though the US would still have achieved our goal, how much longer would we have had to work if not for von Braun and company? Also, I’m sure we had a lot of other European immigrants that contributed mightily.

    I’m not complaining, just pointing out that if we had restricted ourselves to American-born talent, the results might have taken quite a bit longer to realize.

    Not really. I don’t think there’s anything super-duper special about the US (white) population relative to Europe. Probably a bit of selection for “get up and go” but more or less the same people. But we have a *big* white population and generally–or at least we used to have–a more dynamic system.

    The US has never needed any immigration to do great stuff and it’s hard to find anything that US has done where you say “Man, we really needed immigrants to do that.” Fermi comes to mind as a pretty important immigrant in getting the bomb done quickly. Carnegie was a pretty amazing, dynamic guy who certainly had a huge impact. But Americans would have rapidly expanded steel production without him.

    Absent von Braun it would have taken the US a bit longer to ramp up, but it was our native talent and engineering base–and tax base making it possible–that got us to the moon quickly.

    Now with wonderful “diversity” and more immigrants than ever we can’t do shit.

  144. @L Woods

    Yeah, Whitie isn’t smart enough to put men on the Moon.

  145. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Imagine if they planted a Cross?

    • Replies: @Jim bob Lassiter
  146. @snorlax

    Katherine Johnson’s Black? Doesn’t look it. Light-colored eyes, too.

    • Replies: @guest
    , @Autochthon
  147. @Jack D

    The Soviets released their chief German, Helmut Groettrup, in 1953, after he and his team completed the design work which formed the basis for the R-7 ICBM, which was then named Voshkod/Soyuz and used to launch all manned missions. This rocket remains the only man-rated orbital launch vehicle in Russian use today, so it is fair to say they have never mounted a successful program without German assistance, the all-Soviet N-1 and Buran efforts having failed or been abandoned.

  148. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Farrakhan? He’s technically not an “intellectual”, but close enough for our purposes.

    I don’t think black intellectual and other public figures have an ultimate trump card and are completely immune to threats to their status. Anti-Semitism and being anti-Israel seem to be sort of an ultimate red line. If Neil deGrasse Tyson used his pulpit to agitate too strongly for the Palestinians, for example, he would probably suffer some consequences.

  149. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    If Neils telling the truth, then why were we told in school that the Apollo 11 Astronauts planted and left behind a US flag on the moon?

    Neil’s truth might not be your truth, or her truth…

    https://deadline.com/2018/12/neil-degrasse-tyson-sexual-misconduct-accusations-below-metoo-timesup-harassment-1202512371/

    His rebuttal’s seem plausible, except for the personal assistant incident. His points of refutation damn him instead. If he was so close personally to the assistant, why would she quit her job on the spot–a plum job that’s hard to get–then hang him out to dry even later?

    Also, since he was married, late night offers to a young girl for wine and cheese at his abode seems like a non sequitur, to be polite. I’m fairly certain his wife, and everyone else’s wife would agree with me.

  150. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Just Fermi? Not Szilard, Bethe, Bohr, Franck, Kistiakowsky, Rabi, Teller, Ulam, von Neumann, Wigner? Not all the Brits that were seconded to the project? Not all of the NON Founding Stock American scientists (Alvarez, Oppenheimer, Feynman, etc.). You’re delusional. The US just didn’t have a deep enough bench of 1st class physicists. It would be like the NHL without Canadians. Before the War, the world centers of physics were in Europe, not the US. Oppenheimer studied in Cambridge and Goettingen.

    I think that if you remove all these guys, if we had gotten to the Bomb ever, it would have been at least a couple of years more – far too late to save the lives of the 400,000+ GIs who would had died in the invasion of Japan.

  151. Alden says:
    @MG

    Affirmative Action

  152. Not really. I don’t think there’s anything super-duper special about the US (white) population relative to Europe. Probably a bit of selection for “get up and go” but more or less the same people. But we have a *big* white population and generally–or at least we used to have–a more dynamic system.

    The US has never needed any immigration to do great stuff . . . .

    That’s all true of course, but Braun really was special. He’s one of the few who was already, within my lifetime, consciously trying to solve the greatest challenge of the future: the fact that will need to leave this planet to escape the effects of the anticipated changes in the star we orbit.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
    , @guest
  153. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    White people invented electricity? Is Mr. Tyson still sporting his Star Trek sideburns?

  154. @AnotherDad

    Absent von Braun it would have taken the US a bit longer to ramp up, but it was our native talent and engineering base–and tax base making it possible–that got us to the moon quickly.

    That’s just patently false. You have no idea how far behind the nazi’s we were. It would have taken at least a decade longer without the Nazi talent pool. It wasn’t just Von Braun’s big brain we secured. For winning the space race, securing those Nazi’s was like winning lotto. Without them, no moonwalk in the sixties. We’d be looking at the late eighties. Rocket science is no fun when you’re first starting out. Primary development is a shitshow. The Germans did all the heavy lifting. By all accounts.

    “About 100 rockets were shipped to White Sands in New Mexico, but to understand them and develop rockets of their own, the Americans needed von Braun’s team, too. And that meant reaching them before the Russians. ‘These were geniuses 25 years ahead of us,’ gushed Staver.”

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7268437/The-shameful-truth-America-man-moon-help-Nazis-monsters.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
  155. Jack D says:
    @ben tillman

    You’re talking an almost unimaginable time scale. The earth is not going to become uninhabitable due to the changes in the sun for billions of years. Man will have become extinct (like 99% of all the species that ever lived) a dozen times over while still bathed in its sunshine — an asteroid will strike the earth or a global ice age or the poles will flip, or a cosmic ray pulse that will sterilize the planet, or a giant volcano will erupt or a global tidal wave, an unstoppable epidemic, etc. If by some super duper miracle of miracles we’re still around then, humans will regard von Braun’s rockets the way we regard trebuchets – evidence of how primitive our ancestors were, who could only escape the earth’s gravity with such crude primitive means.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Alfa158
    , @ben tillman
  156. @snorlax

    “For every action there is an opposite and equal reaction.” One of Newton’s findings which is seen applied in such a simple act as air being released from a balloon.

  157. Jack D says:
    @Lil' Rocket Man

    This is correct but we didn’t need to keep them around all the way to the moon. We could have done as the Russians did and learned all we could from them and then sent them packing by the early ’50s. Of course it was even easier to just sanitize their dossiers and keep them in place.

  158. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I think that if you remove all these guys, if we had gotten to the Bomb ever, it would have been at least a couple of years more – far too late to save the lives of the 400,000+ GIs who would had died in the invasion of Japan.

    Or we could have just not invaded Japan.

    You are avoiding giving us the number of how many immigrants you would admit the United States per year, and explaining how you would select and recruit them.

  159. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman

    That’s all true of course, but Braun really was special. He’s one of the few who was already, within my lifetime, consciously trying to solve the greatest challenge of the future: the fact that will need to leave this planet to escape the effects of the anticipated changes in the star we orbit.

    We still could have managed fine without him.

  160. Kronos says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    Hey, Ben Franklin wanted the national bird to be a Turkey! Could you imagine political comics featuring a turkey vs a Russian bear? Or NASA (and military) emblems featuring turkeys?

  161. @guest

    My mistake. You’re (heh) obv. right. I just mis-wrote.

  162. @MG

    How did this donkey get a PhD degree?

    I knew Neil at Texas and TA’d with him–on the intro Astronomy course (301), taken by a lot of non-science undergrads as part of their science requirement.

    Neil is a very personable guy–a nice guy, pleasant work collegue, not an pain in the ass or “difficult personality” as some scientists are. He’s no genius–not “smart” by standards of physics grad students and would never have been any sort of great scientist–but he’s not an idiot. He was bounced out of Texas not because he was stupid but because he was enjoying his wine collection, the coeds … being young athletic and handsome and insufficiently devoted to his studies. Not because he’s stupid. (I’ve read he’s a bit bitter about it. I’m sure he feels he could have gotten more support/mentoring. Hey, no one likes failure. But it was a wakeup call and he turned it around at Columbia to his credit.)

    As i’ve said for 20+ when he started to pop up in the media–it’s the perfect meeting of man and job. He’s a reasonably smart guy, but his skill set is showman, not scientist.

    ~~

    What Neil’s stupid tweet reflects is not particularly something about Neil, but the age we live in after 50+ years of Jewish minoritarian ideology.

    Neil knows full well that putting a man on the moon was a highly patriotic American project and was 99 and 44/100%+ done by white guys. (As has 95% of all significant human invention in world history.)

    In a more normally ordered society–America run self-confidently by men from its white gentile majority–Neil wouldn’t be stewing in his ethnic grievances and tweeting such nonsense. He’d have his place doing his science PR or teaching and that would be that. In such a healthy society, people are capable of understanding and accepting their situation, their group’s situation. Being black would not mean being prickly about the reality of other races accomplishments. (I’m perfectly capable of accepting that Ashkenazi Jews are on average smarter–math and esp. verbal, not some much spatial and mechanical–than my people. Or that the Chinese are smarter spatially and more “nose to the grindstone”. Or that my Irish kin haven’t exactly set the world on fire relative to some other Euro ethnicities.) You get on with living your life and accomplish what *you* can accomplish.

    But 50+ of Jewish minoritarianism and the ideology of the day is the dispossession of white gentiles and their nations, and to critique, mock, diminish all the tremendous world historical accomplishments of us boring old white guys.

    When you’re the astro PR guy and it’s the 50th anniversary of one of the greatest accomplishments of mankind–done pretty much entirely by white guys–that leads to a bit of cognitive confusion. And Neil–not being a genius–wasn’t careful or clever enough to carry it off without stumbling.

  163. “They changed Twitter lately”

    Meet the three women (Ashlie Ford, Marina Zhao, and Jesar Shah) who led the first redesign of Twitter.com in seven years.

    Wired Magazine story

  164. guest says:
    @snorlax

    Mr. Armstrong Rapes Hecate, a play in one act.

    That headline, being barely English, is no fun to parse. But I must point out that no one anywhere ever thought the nonexistent tension between the moon in popular imagination and the Life of Armstrong fascinating.

  165. Jack D says:
    @El Dato

    The conventional wisdom of scientists at the time was that the gases from a rocket needed something (air) to push against or there would be no equal and opposite reactionary force. Today we all “know” that’s false, just like we “know” about humans causing global warming but the only way we really know about these things is because our scientific betters tell us so and so most of us just accept what we are told as the scientific truth. The NY Times didn’t write this editorial from their own knowledge – they must have called up some eminent scientific experts who told them what the “experts” believed at the time.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  166. Art Deco says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    Sagan died in 1996. At the time, Tyson was a salaried employee of the American Museum of Natural History that no one had ever heard of. Sagan didn’t work at the American Museum of Natural History and Tyson did not study at Cornell. (Tyson claims to have been a friend of Sagan’s; since there aren’t many astronomers in this country and they both lived and worked in New York, it’s believable they were acquainted; however, they were also 20+ years apart in age and at very different points in their career ca. 1991).

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
  167. Kronos says:
    @George

    Charles de Gaulle send a French warship to New York to pick up their gold in the 1970s.

  168. Art Deco says:
    @J.Ross

    He made a casual remark on Twitter. He didn’t assess the patch after several hours worth of scheduled time with an observatory telescope. I bet he makes mistakes reading his grocery list too.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  169. Kronos says:
    @Charon

    I’m assuming they were all compromised after the 1960s correct?

  170. Art Deco says:
    @MG

    About the same way anyone else does. He took a year or two of graduate school classes and then designed a research project under supervision and wrote a dissertation. This isn’t that difficult.

  171. @dearieme

    “I liked the Russian joke of the time. “Their Germans are better than our Germans.”

    Chris Kraft died today. the guy who invented mission control, and was the flight director for all Mercury and Gemini missions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_C._Kraft_Jr.

    the next guy, Gene Kranz, flight director for all Apollo missions, learned from Kraft

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Kranz

    both of them were german too.

    germans mostly got the US to the moon.

  172. guest says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    They are pleased to upgrade from foliage or moose or beavers or whatever they have going on up there.

  173. @Jack D

    I see Carson and Cosby, and I raise you Clarence Thomas.

    Them – and any others asserting that black people have agency – are, of course, “Uncle Toms,” and not real black people.

    It’s always “No true Scotsman…” in such cases, so it’s no use arguing.

  174. @Jack D

    I think that if you remove all these guys, if we had gotten to the Bomb ever, it would have been at least a couple of years more – far too late to save the lives of the 400,000+ GIs who would had died in the invasion of Japan.

    I think that number is a politically motivated exaggeration. Remember by that time we would have been establishing easy access to airstrips in China, and even Russia. The Japs would have played host to a massive firebombing authored by us, and participated in by every ally with access to a prop plane. Bomber planes would have turned Japan into a righteous moonscape before one American soldier took a step on Jap dirt.

    Never take for granted the profoundly negative effect that 24/7 hour fire bombings would have on a committed fellow’s will to fight on. Even the most fanatical Jap soldier becomes lazy and listless when he see’s his family on fire. It just seems to suck the love of the emperor out of him. Short-circuits the executive function like nobodies business.

    Imagine your mom and dad, wife and kids on fire, running aimlessly, screaming, and wailing until they collapse in the molten tar of the street in front of their home. I’m sure you’ll agree, going forward, that it would have a decided negative effect on your ability to complete tasks.

    • LOL: jim jones
  175. J.Ross says:
    @Art Deco

    He’s not a nobody reporting that xhi enjoyed a Thai cowboy flick. He’s an establishmentarian thought leader with pretense to academic qualifications. His Twitter feed is old media pretending to be new media and his casual observations were smashed by equally casual observations.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  176. @Jack D

    That’s a bad comparison to the Global Climate Disruption(TM) business, Jack. There’s complicated and nowhere-near-working math modeling involved in the study of the Earth’s climate. The principle of Conservation of Momentum is all one needs to understand that the rocket engine will work in a vacuum. No engineer or physicist could have possibly believed otherwise.

    Maybe I misunderstood this comment of yours …

  177. guest says:
    @ben tillman

    Much like the handful of Europeans, many Jews with revenge against Hitler on their minds, who had the recipe for the Bomb in their heads. American money and determination, technical know-how, resources, will to succeed, whatever. All that is nothing without the flashes of genius.

    So happens that leading up to 1945 there were a series of discoveries involving the atom allowing us to unleash its power, if we took the correct steps and had the correct people in place. Many of whom were not American.

  178. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    If by some super duper miracle of miracles we’re still around then, humans will regard von Braun’s rockets the way we regard trebuchets

    Asians value stability over progress, so when they have replaced us, they will find a very comfortable and efficient plateau and stay there.

  179. guest says:
    @Anon

    Apollo may represent some nation, but it does not have any special connection to the American nation, to my knowledge.

    Columbia, on the other hand, quite obviously did.

  180. @Jack D

    Jack, you could use some gentile chill.

    Fermi was a key guy, so i mentioned him.

    No argument that the center of gravity of the pre-war physics world was closer to Europe (specifically German and England). America has generally excelled most in practical invention.

    Feynman, Oppenheimer are, of course, American born. If you’re saying “look at us Jews!”, i’ve already said in previous comments that the bomb is the *one* American project where Jews were critical to American success. (Against the damage done …)

    And yes, without the bomb my dad would have been off the coast shelling Japan possibly blown up. But, of course, if the timeline alters at all before pa’s on top of ma, i’m not here. Everything had to happen just so–the Aryan invasions, the sack of Rome, the transatlantic slave trade, the potato famine, the Civil War, the Great War debacle, Hitler, the Holocaust…. I don’t obsess like some bozo about the bomb. It all had to happen, murders, rapes, slaughter and all, just like it did, for me to be here.

    My point stands. America is a large continental nation with a huge resource base and a very competent can do white population. Direct immigrants have made only modest contributions to American success, that mostly would have been replicable–in some time frame–without them. The heavy lifting has been done by American born whites–their descendants.

    America could have stopped immigration in 1776 and it would still be a large, productive continental nation. And actually much more pleasant and cohesive–with a bright future, unlike our bleak one–for not having the nonsense inflicted upon it by Jewish minoritarianism the last 50 years. Yeah, you wouldn’t be here and neither would i or any of us. So what.

  181. guest says:
    @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    One-drop rule, ya know. She certainly passes the paper bag test.

  182. @Steve Sailer

    We came home from a weekend’s vacation to find an owl, upside down, tangled in the fishing net that covered our chicken pen. How long he had been hanging there, I hadn’t a clue. Apparently he had, not focusing on the intervening mesh, dive bombed the hens and ensnared himself by his taloned feet.

    I didn’t really blame him for wanting a tasty meal, that being, after all, an owl’s nature. But I didn’t want to encourage him either. So I put on a pair of stout leather gloves and approached the owl, talking all the while, explaining to him what it was I was about to do, which was untangle him and let him go.

    In spite of my well-reasoned presentation, he pecked at me aggressively when I reached out to grab him. I persisted and did manage to subdue him and untangled his feet, telling him all the while that he was not to mistake clemency for approval of his behavior but that, rather, would he return, I would shoot him with my shotgun on sight. And I meant it.

    I placed him on top of the fence post where he wobbled unsteadily. We called the animal rescue people and they told us, “No, there’s no need to give him water. Owls get all they need from the blood of their meals.” So that was that.

    An half-hour later he was gone. And he never came back. He understood that I meant what I was saying.

  183. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    You seem to be obsessed with the idea that the minoritarian project is somehow some sort of uniquely Jewish project. Jews are certainly not absent from it but they are far from alone or even dominant in this project. In addition to the minorities themselves, there are lots and lots of goodwhites involved who are in no way, shape or form Jewish. Is Bill De Blasio Jewish? Nancy Pelosi? I blame the Italians.

    • Replies: @peterike
    , @AnotherDad
  184. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    You seem to be obsessed with the idea that the minoritarian project is somehow some sort of uniquely Jewish project.

    It would not exist without them, period. The fact they they’ve Pied Piper’d millions of idiot whites to join in their own destruction doesn’t change things.

    Jews are certainly not absent from it but they are far from alone or even dominant in this project.

    Weaseling. Far from alone? No. Dominant? Entirely.

    Is Bill De Blasio Jewish? Nancy Pelosi? I blame the Italians.

    You guys already used that strategy to deflect from your dominance in organized crime. So shut up.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  185. Space Cleveland.

    “People thank science don’t be like it do, but it do.”

  186. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    I think that if you remove all these guys, if we had gotten to the Bomb ever, it would have been at least a couple of years more – far too late to save the lives of the 400,000+ GIs who would had died in the invasion of Japan.

    Or the criminal United States government could have accepted a conditional surrender and never dropped the bombs at all. Or even better, they could have not pushed Japan into war in the first place.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  187. The problem with Dr. Tyson, indeed with so many professional scientists (and professionals of many sorts), is that at the brass tacks, they work for the government. More often than not, in bureaucracies that the government has no legitimate role funding (substantially!) in the first place.

    From AMNH 2018 Annual Report:

    The Museum continued to receive substantial operating and programmatic support from .. the City of New York, the State of New York, and the federal government

    AMNH is one of those supremely elitist institutions that jealously guards its institutional privileges.

    For instance, its renowned fossil collection must stem from the time when the wealthy prospectors for such artifacts, when they would finish their expeditions, would dynamite the dig zones so in order to prevent other explorers from studying the same sites.

  188. @Jack D

    Yes, Jack i know, i know.

    Jews are responsible for the bomb, modern medicine, the Internet, IT, decent food, refrigeration, the fork …

    But it is black dominance of Hollyweird, the major newspapers and broadcast media, academia, finance, law, political commentary, the ideological and financial control of the Democratic party … that accounts for this minorities good, majorities–flyover country white gentiles especially–bad, sinister, evil ideology that dominates America and increasingly the broader West.

  189. @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    Indeed, along with an oxygen tank so it could be burned.

  190. @AnotherDad

    It has been over fifteen years since I sent Tyson an email remarking that I thought he was doing too much”jiving” during his TV presentations. To my surprise he replied to my email and asked me just what I meant by “jiving.” I must admit I had a hard time replying without giving some hint of racism. I did tell him he looked very much like Cab Calloway, who was a rather handsome black band leader at one time. We had another exchange of emails when I stated there were supernatural forces at work in the universe because of the orderliness of the movements of the stars and planets. As an atheist he wanted none of this, the universe could only be explained from a natural point of view. I ended our email exchange by saying I would pray for him if he did not mind–to which he replied “if you wish.” I kept the emails on my computer until it was destroyed by a house fire one unfortunate day, September 4, 2011.

  191. @PiltdownMan

    The Durrani empire as the anon guy stated. Was pretty big. SOME pathans are highly educated people, and they have high-ranking positions in Pakistan’s militaries.

    This guy seems highly intelligent too. Intelligent than the vast majority of the commenters on this forum. Also, it says he is a JD candidate. Doesnt that mean he’s working towards it? Dunno how JDs work

  192. @MG

    Affirmative action, being black, the black scientist quota, his connections to Carl Sagan.

    Oh he was kicked out of one of his first programs so we can add “Pity” to that list

  193. Alfa158 says:
    @Jack D

    Current estimates are that as the sun gradually warms the Earth will go into runaway greenhouse effect somewhere between 500 million to one billion years from now. Interestingly, because we have water vapor, the Earth will get even hotter than Venus once the oceans have boiled off and might hit four digit temperatures.
    But, that gives me an excuse to retell a Little Johnny joke.
    The teacher is giving a lesson on astronomy and mentions that in several billion years the sun will go nova and destroy the earth.
    From the back of the class Little Johnny loses his composure and starts wailing, “Oh, that’s awful! There must be something we can do to stop it! We’re all doomed, doomed, I tell you!”
    The teacher tries to calm him down; “now, now, Johnny, it’s nothing we have to worry about, after all it won’t happen for billions of years”. Johnny says;”Billions!? Oh, thank God, I thought you said millions!”
    I’m here all week, don’t forget to tip your server.

  194. @AnotherDad

    Some useful immigrants: William Procter (P&G), A.G. Bell, Bob Hope, the German Beer guys, and me.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  195. @AnotherDad

    Oh and I nearly forgot – Trumps’ Scottish mum.

  196. JMcG says:
    @Autochthon

    Amen, I hate zoos with the fire of a thousand suns. And I’m a hunter.

  197. @Art Deco

    I thought this was well known. This article probably overstates the case that Sagan “mentored” him but they were more than just (possible) mere acquaintances as you imply. Tyson has known Sagan since he was 17 years old.

    https://science.howstuffworks.com/dictionary/famous-scientists/10-cool-things-carl-sagan6.htm

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  198. @AnotherDad

    The small island of Ireland produced quite a stable of Thorobreds in the literary field, and the Duke of Wellington, to boot!

  199. Hail says: • Website
    @ScarletNumber

    I would propose a distinction between “absolute ratio’ing” and “relative ratio’ing.”

    Neil DeGrasse Tyson is a major pop-science figure with 13.4 million followers. For a sense of scale, that is twenty times the number of followers as the new British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson (690,000).

    Figures like Tyson with such huge follower-counts are likely largely immune from “absolute ratio’ing,” or at least well cushioned against it.

    As for “relative ratio’ing”:

    Here are a few of Tyson’s other tweets, before and after the Apollo 11 patch, on July 20:

    One praising Neil Armstrong got 190 comments – 849 RTs – 11,800 Likes
    One on the Moon’s orbit around Earth: 325 comments – 2,800 RTs – 16,900 Likes
    A quote from astronaut Edgar Mitchell: 211 comments – 6,300 RTs – 17,100 Likes
    One on the frequency of ‘Blue Moons’: 484 comments – 2,300 RTs – 22,000 Likes
    One on the plaque laid on the Moon: 482 comments – 7,000 RTs – 33,000 Likes

    Same for the Apollo 11 patch tweet: 4,100 comments – 10,500 RTs – 63,000 Likes.

    Retweet-to-Comment Ratios for N.D.Tyson Tweets on July 20, 2019:
    – Armstrong tweet: 447-to-100
    – Moon orbit tweet: 862-to-100
    – Edgar Mitchell tweet: 2,986-to-100
    – Blue Moon tweet: 475-to-100
    – Plaque on Moon tweet: 1,452-to-100
    Apollo 11 patch tweet: 256-to-100

    The lower the first number, the more ratio’ed one is.

    He definitely got “relative ratio’ed” on the Apollo 11 patch tweet.

  200. Bubba says:
    @caffeine withdrawals

    True, he was all about “nuclear winter.” However, Carl Sagan advocated for a satellite to be propelled through space after a “controlled” nuclear explosion so it would travel closer to the speed of light.

  201. @Jack D

    Before the War, the world centers of physics were in Europe, not the US.

    Indeed. As this rather well known photograph from the 1927 Solvay Conference of physicists attests. 17 of the people in the picture were awarded Nobel prizes, and almost all of them were Europeans working in Europe.

    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/solvay-conference-probably-intelligent-picture-ever-taken-1927/

  202. @peterike

    When was the first left-of-center Jew influential in America? I’m having a hard time thinking of any until after the Civil War, whereas much of American liberalism is clearly existent in the 1840s, with most of the usual suspects being WASPs whose Puritan ancestors arrived in Massachusetts in the 1640s.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  203. Hank Yobo says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess that there was more fight in the mascot than the football team. I saw Arkansas once hammer them by almost thirty points. It wasn’t a pretty sight. Woo Pig Suey; Razorbacks!

  204. snorlax says:
    @Steve Sailer

    None other than Karl Marx himself was the European correspondent for the New-York Tribune (the biggest newspaper of its day) between 1852 and 1862.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  205. Hank Yobo says:
    @snorlax

    You could add another “hidden figure,” albeit mini-skirted, to the roll of unrecognized NASA female luminaries: Frances (Poppy) Northcutt.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  206. Art Deco says:
    @Ann K.

    OK, Vox Day says another stupid thing. This is of interest why?

  207. @Malcolm X-Lax

    Thanks for educating me on this.

    I hadn’t even known they were acquainted.

  208. @Jim Don Bob

    It was a clever paraphrase of the “grains of sand” meme IIRC.

    Jesus Christ. Google has scrubbed its image search of every single funny Tyson meme.

    It wasn’t this one


    All that’s left are the smarmy uplifting revelations

  209. Art Deco says:
    @JimB

    You’re beginning to sound like the title character in the last moments of the film Henry Fool.

    I have news for you: there are 1.5 million postsecondary teachers in this country, and a six digit population of others working in government and industry. Most of them have lengthy teaching careers and publish a few papers along the way. He’s worked for the American Museum of Natural History and published a few papers along the way. There are also a mess of people who host news shows and documentaries, including the guy whose done the narration on a about 20 episodes of Nova in recent years. For some reason, Judy Woodruff doesn’t interest you and Prof. Random on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh doesn’t interest you, but this guy does. Did it occur to you to ask yourself why?

    • Replies: @JimB
  210. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike

    Or the criminal United States government could have accepted a conditional surrender and never dropped the bombs at all. Or even better, they could have not pushed Japan into war in the first place.

    Yep.

  211. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ancient Briton

    Some useful immigrants: William Procter (P&G), A.G. Bell, Bob Hope, the German Beer guys, and me.

    How have you helped?

  212. Art Deco says:
    @J.Ross

    He doesn’t have a ‘pretense of academic qualifications’. He has actual academic qualifications. As for being a ‘thought leader’, he’s on television about twice a month in a very fragmented media market. I’m a regular consumer of PBS and cannot remember the last time I saw one of his broadcasts. People who use Twitter sometimes say ill-considered things. This isn’t of that much interest.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  213. Art Deco says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    He had a meeting with Sagan in 1975 when he was spelunking around college campuses. I met this guy

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/harris-j-silverstone-057bab18

    under almost identical circumstances some years later. No, Dr. Silverstone is not a mentor of mine and he wouldn’t have known me from a cord of wood even a couple of years later.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
  214. @AnotherDad

    Agreed entirely save one small quibble. You said Asians are strong in spatial reasoning. My good sir, have you never seen one behind the wheel?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  215. @snorlax

    Hard to say how Jewish Marx was. More Jewish than Emerson and Thoreau, less than Groucho.

    Marx seems to have been Jewish in the same way the Sulzbergers of the NYT are, and the Graham family of the Wash Post. That is, doesn’t matter so much to them anymore, at least not for public consumption. Of course, Bezos is just weird and super-rich. That’s not the same as Jewish, not exactly anyway.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Art Deco
  216. @Hank Yobo

    Poppy Northcutt of NASA had perhaps the shiniest blonde hair of anybody not a professional shampoo model. Her picture was taken a lot back in Apollo days.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  217. Kronos says:
    @HammerJack

    His dad converted to Catholicism, while a city official in a German Protestant Provence.

    But that may more have to do with getting around the “society of orders” religious caste system for Jews.

  218. J.Ross says:
    @Art Deco

    >he isn’t a thought leader because he ain’t on that corner husslin erryday
    He is a celebrity adored by hypnotized normies, who uses his publicity to support establishmentarian positions. I don’t see what the phases of the moon or the number of characters in his average tweet or the price of NdeGT bobbleheads has to do with my characterization.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  219. J.Ross says:
    @HammerJack

    That’s not spatial reasoning, that’s low-trust society. Good driving is societal trust in motion. The extremity of the crashes you see in videos from China depends on the craziness of the maneuvers. The craziness of the maneuvers bears out excellent spatial reasoning. The excellent spatial reasoning is called upon because, in China, every decision made behind the wheel is a lawless atomized ad hoc reaction, something that seems to work right now, but with no wider framework of agreed upon and generally obeyed rules to enable scaling beyond that moment. Know the movie cliche where the frantic paddler avoids rocks but realizes he hears a waterfall?

  220. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Model T’s were originally pretty cars with brass accessories and painted bright colors. It was later on in the run they were all black, because black dried the fastest.

    It was a long run and the T was obsolete engineering wise for most of the run, but they were cheap and easy to work on. Most that survived were extensively modified at some time in thier lives.

    “Ford Nation” was people who learned to drive in middle age and stuck with the T until they died because they didn’t want to learn to drive a “modern” car. It lasted roughly through the end of WWII. Ford dealers were selling T parts to people who used them as transportation, not hobby cars, through then and even somewhat later in more remote places.

    A model T is more akin to a golf cart than an automobile per se by modern standards. 40 mph is really fast in a T, even if it has upgraded brakes, a Ruckstell axle and engine tweaks.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  221. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    In Japan they have owl cafes, so they can’t be terribly dangerous unless provoked or abused, or maybe just some species are. I’ve never handled an owl, but I’ve played with lions , cheetahs and cougars and never got clawed or bit.

  222. JimB says:
    @Art Deco

    Obviously, you are a Tyson fanboy. Another indication of his mediocrity is finishing his doctoral degree at 33. Most cutting edge astronomers trained in the US are from one of seven programs: Harvard, Princeton, University of Chicago, MIT, Cal Tech, Stanford, Berkeley. Average time to PhD completion for these universities: 6 years, not 12. Generally, the sooner you finish the more talented you are unless you have gotten involved in an big instrumentation project, although avoiding instrumentation is also a sign of smarts, IMO.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @JimB
    , @Art Deco
  223. @JimB

    Tyson is pretty good at his job of being Mr. Black Science Guy on TV.

  224. @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    The colour in her eyes is but the glow from that eldritch fire which sustains the decayed form by the lich’s unholy power.

    A similar being enables China’s space programme:

  225. @Steve Sailer

    Except for that time he was dick to his brother….

  226. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I loathe Tyson because his videos are frequently assigned by high school science teachers to my kids, and I end up shouting at the screen because his explanations are so bad and he loves injecting sophomoric philosophical commentary. I wish Dave Chappell would take his place.

  227. @Jack D

    “I wonder what the first woman on the moon will say?”

    “Do you think this spacesuit makes me look fat?”

  228. @Art Deco

    According to Tyson he met Sagan personally several times and corresponded with him throughout his career.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  229. @Steve Sailer

    If the Simpsons ever decided to add another black guy character, Tyson’s their man.

  230. @Malcolm X-Lax

    I spent a day touring Yellowstone national park with a Caltech astronomy professor who’d been a grad student of Carl Sagan at Cornell (?). He worshipped Sagan and implied that everybody who knew him did too.

    I can recall reading a long interview with Sagan in Popular Science in 1976 about the Mars landing coming up around the Bicentennial. It was fascinating.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  231. JimB says:
    @JimB

    Oops. Forgot Cornell.

  232. @Steve Sailer

    Alas, after she past her expiration date, she became a hectoring harridan organising she-woman man-hating claques.

  233. @Steve Sailer

    Sagan was rare in that he was the real deal on both counts: a genius academic master of esoteric knowledge and brilliant insights who was also extraordinarily charismatic – charming, even – and effective at teaching, interviews, and other aspects of explaining complicated things to the general public.

    The only other example I can think of readily is Clive Staples Lewis.

    It’s my understanding both were incredibly humble about their intellect, which probably explains a big part of pulling it off.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  234. @c matt

    The context was birthing more black babies, so I think ‘comprise’ or ‘compose’ was intended, but your point is nevertheless spot on.

  235. FPD72 says:
    @Jack D

    So, you’re saying that the moon landing was a hoax, it never happened? That would be a logical inference from the comparison to Brawley.

  236. @Autochthon

    The only other example I can think of readily is Clive Staples Lewis.

    Feynman was kind of like that, but the Brooklyn schtick was annoying.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  237. @Steve Sailer

    after drink was taken, and the vicious raptor ripped his nose open

    Owls are ‘personable’ enough when sober, but can be mean drunks.

  238. FPD72 says:
    @Jack D

    If West Virginia opposed slavery, why was it still practiced there until the passing of the 13th Amendment? The Emancipation Proclamation had no effect there, since it was not in a state of rebellion.

  239. Art Deco says:
    @HammerJack

    The Ochs-Sulzberger clan and the Meyer clan have inter-married so many times over so many generations that only an obsessive would refer to them as Jewish families. (Such obsessives are common here). The last Meyer scion to run the Washington Post had one Jewish great-grandparent.

  240. Art Deco says:
    @J.Ross

    Again, that’s your fantasy about what other people are thinking. There’s no objective indication he’s anymore adored than was Marlin Perkins. He’s a guy on the tube with a particular academic and professional background. That’s it.

  241. Art Deco says:
    @JimB

    Median time as a registered student in graduate school is 7 years for recipients of research degrees. Median age at which the degree is awarded is 33 years. People who land jobs on university faculties have commonly done other things with their life in their 20s. I knew one who was a travel agent, another who was in Army intelligence, others who taught high school, etc. It’s not clear how long Tyson was a registered graduate student, but it appears to have been between 6 and 9 years. He was 33 years old when his degree was awarded. Why his problems at the University of Texas 35 years ago are of interest to anyone I cannot figure. It’s not like he killed someone.

    Again, I can’t recall the last time I saw Tyson on the tube, and I haven’t much time for his pushing cosmoplitanism or atheism (noting, however, that he’s far less rude about it than is PZ Myers). However, there’s something pathological about the lot of you constructing an electronic slam book about him and doing so multiple times over the last several years. There are several thousand astronomers in the country and quite a clutch of people who appear frequently on public television, so why this guy. As for him being ‘mediocre’, I have news for you, about 85% of us are perfectly unremarkable practitioners of whatever it is we do for a living, and only a few are stars. About 99% of us would be quite pleased if one of our children or one of our siblings or one of our friends qualified for an academic position in a discipline as demanding as astronomy as it’s a rare accomplishment. Evidently Tyson’s accomplishments don’t mean anything because reasons.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  242. @Anonymous

    “That page no longer exists.” – Jack Dorsey

    Hmmmm….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  243. Anonymous[255] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    40 mph is really fast in a T, even if it has upgraded brakes, a Ruckstell axle and engine tweaks.

    IIRC, in “Wild Boys of the Road” the lead character boasts that his Model T can do 40.

  244. Anonymous[153] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    That’s a real shame Autochnon. It was a very interesting image of a newspaper page from another time. Did anyone manage to save a copy?

  245. @Art Deco

    JimB you’re arguing with a guy who attempts to counter your argument that Tyson is a mediocrity with a sentence beginning with “Median time as a registered student in graduate school is 7 years”.

    IOW, “he’s not a mediocrity because the median time of other mediocrities” is blah blah.

    Arguing with AD is like trying to teach your dog to drive a stick shift.

  246. Kronos says:
    @Jack D

    After the Apollo missions, some German scientists went to work for the Zambia Space Program. (Poor souls.)

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @PiltdownMan
  247. Kronos says:
    @Kronos

    My bad, I mean they joined the Zaire Space Program. Another shitty African space program.

    And…I couldn’t help myself.

  248. @Kronos

    From Wikipedia:

    Edward Festus Mukuka Nkoloso was the founder of the Zambia National Academy of Science, Space Research and Philosophy.

    From 1960 until sometime after 1969, this program sought to accomplish the launching of a rocket that would send one girl, 17-year-old Matha Mwambwa, and two cats to the moon. There were also plans for a trip to Mars … Nkoloso stated goals of the program were to establish a Christian ministry to “primitive” Martians, and the hope of Zambia becoming the “controllers of the Seventh Heaven of Interstellar space.”

    However, he reportedly instructed the missionary in the space program not to force Christianity onto the native Martian inhabitants.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  249. Kronos says:
    @PiltdownMan

    It’s so bad cultural leftists feel its necessary to view the Apollo moon landings as a universal human achievement. It’s civilizational pity sex.

  250. @Jack D

    I didn’t say anything about Braun’s rockets. I’m talking about Braun’s foresight. It is a problem that has to be solved, and why wait to solve it?

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