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From The Atlantic:

The Great Immigration-Data Debate

Does the flow of new arrivals depress the wages of blue-collar American workers? It depends on how you measure.

DAVID FRUM JAN 19, 2016 POLITICS

… One of the most influential such modeling exercises was a paper published by the University of California’s David Card in 1990. Card studied the economy of Miami after an influx of 125,000 Cuban migrants between April and October 1980, the “Mariel boat lift.” Under American law, Cuban migrants become almost immediately eligible to work in the U.S. The result: In bare weeks, the greater Miami workforce jumped by 8 percent—and the stock of workers without a high-school diploma spiked a startling 20 percent. Yet—according to David Card—even this large and sudden supply shock had no negative effect on the wage trend for low-skilled workers. (Wages did decline, he finds, but no more for those workers he regarded as competing with Marielitos than for those he regards as not competing.)

This finding, if true, carried enormous implications. The United States in the 1990s would experience a vast surge of very low-skilled migration, legal and illegal, from Mexico and Central America. Simple economic logic predicted that competition from these migrants should depress the wages of native-born Americans. Card reassured policymakers that simple logic was wrong: They could welcome the newcomers at no cost to the settled population. Here at last was the free lunch that Milton Friedman had so obstinately insisted could not exist.

How was it possible that immigration could stand as the sole exception to the usual laws of supply and demand?

Okay, but as I’ve been pointing out since 2006, Card made the assumption that the only thing different about Miami’s economy in 1980-1984 from his control group of American cities with similar economic growth to Miami in the late 1970s was the Mariel boat lift. But ceteris wasn’t paribus because Miami, unlike the rest of America in 1980-84, was suddenly being flooded with suitcases full of $100 bills in exchange for cocaine from Colombia. All else was definitely not equal. The Mariel boat lift happened to coincide very closely in time and place with the cocaine boom of 1980.

I repetitiously argue that economists should be familiar with this famous episode in economic history from lurid pop culture artifacts, such as the current Netflix TV show Narcos, the 1983 movie Scarface, and the 1984 television drama Miami Vice. (Oliver Stone’s screenplay for Scarface even prophesied that Cuban criminals arriving in the Mariel boat lift would take over the Miami cocaine trade, although in retrospect that doesn’t seem to have happened to the extent imagined in the movie.)

The death of the former member of the Eagles, Glenn Frey, at age 67, should be another reminder to economists. One of Frey’s solo hits was his 1984 song “Smuggler’s Blues,” a densely plotted saga about the Florida cocaine trade which was turned into this elaborate MTV video. I believe it also served as the inspiration for a Miami Vice episode guest-starring Frey.

 
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  1. One disturbing bit in Frum’s article was Noah Smith attempting to unperson George Borjas. Meanwhile, the Chancellor of Germany has asked Facebook to censure comments critical of mass immigration, and despite that, Politico claims that Trump supporters are the ones with authoritarian tendencies.

    Glenn Frey was great in Miami Vice, btw.

  2. Marco Rubio is not one who can, right now at least, claim ignorance of Cuban immigrant cocaine money. Working for his major cocaine trafficker brother-in-law was literally his first job! But he does claim to have not noticed anything unusual until the day bro in law was arrested.

    About the drug ring where Orlando Cicilia was the #2 man:

    What began as a marijuana-import operation in the late 1970s had blossomed into the far more lucrative business of distributing kilos of cocaine smuggled into South Florida from Colombia. During operation from 1976 to 1986, the ring moved half-a-million pounds of marijuana and 200 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $75 million.

    “It was a very large operation,” said Delbert Woodburn, a Miami-Dade narcotics detective who investigated Tabraue in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Planes from Colombia were coming into the Bahamas and the Keys, landing at small airports, dropping drugs into the Everglades.”

    Once Cicilia joined, he became the “front man,” insulating Tabraue by handing over drugs to buyers and coordinating shipments around the country, according to interviews, DEA field reports and grand jury testimony obtained by The Washington Post.

    As the business flourished, Cicilia took on the appearance of the quintessential Miami underworld hotshot, donning sunglasses and wearing his paisley suit sleeves rolled up.

    $75 million in the 80’s is like $200 million now. But Marco, who I am sure never even saw Scarface or Miami Vice, had NO CLUE that a family member he saw everyday was involved with drugs.

    “Mario was the kingpin, and Orlando was his second in command,” said Michael Fisten, a homicide detective who worked on the case and is writing a book about it. “He always had large amounts of cash on him.”

    No clue whatsoever, there are many ways that a recent Cuban immigrant in 80’s Miami could “always have large amounts of cash on him.”

    The couple also agreed to pay Rubio $10 a week for each of their seven Samoyed dogs he washed. He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.

    That same house where Rubio earned his football-ticket money would soon be under surveillance by federal agents. ….

    Detectives had noticed a man behind the wheel of a Chevy Blazer that was appearing frequently among the stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars that flowed to and from the kingpin’s pet store.

    No way young Marco could even have suspected, in 80’s Miami, that a “stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars” coming from a Cuban immigrant who wore his “paisley suit sleeves rolled up” could ever be involved with anything illegal.

    • Replies: @5371
    @Lot

    To be fair, "preternaturally alert, perceptive, and suspicious" is not an impression that Rubio ever gives of himself.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Lot

    "He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote."

    That's wasn't as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio's brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I'm not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he's ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that's the ethnic background -- Miami Vice -- he's from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn't Colombia, but still ... Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I'm sure he didn't get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I'm sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That's probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton.

    I'm sure Trump has dealt with a lot of "private sanitation" guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that's the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Stan D Mute, @Name Withheld, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Lot

    That was fascinating. I don't doubt you for a second, but when I bring this up later IRL, people will ask me to site my source. Where did you find that text about Orlando Cicilia and Marco Rubio?

    Slightly OT; Isn't it about time for paisley to make a come back?

    Replies: @Lot

    , @Anonymous
    @Lot

    I have no use for Rubester but your comment is pretty dishonest on several points (almost as if you're trying to smear the candidate -- very rare on the Internet, I realize). Little brother Rube worked for his sister and her husband the gangster at their house, literally as a pool boy, not quite the unsavory street-crime job you imply. Also Cicilia was not the 2nd highest authority in the crew; read some more about it and you'll learn he was clearly more of a local money launderer than a shot-caller. Is Rube not sufficiently embarrassed by the affiliation? Maybe, but he was 16 when the crook went away. The main hook for scandal since has been Rube getting the ex-con a realtor license. This development doesn't exactly shatter anyone's notion of the integrity of Florida's real estate industry (or civil service)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  3. I remember this song :

    I was in Subic Bay , Olongapo City , RP . Pretending that these cheap sentiments were a sublime excuse for my sordid lust , my “Subic Bay marriage” . Jesus ! Who needs God’s judgement ? Don’t our own memories torment us enough ? Rend and tear at our wretched souls ? “We men are wretched things.” So said the blind bard . Can one noble deed redeem our debased and polluted souls ? “humanity they knew to be corrupt…from the day of Adam’s creation” . To exist as a self aware being is to regret existing at all . But I still like this song .

    • Replies: @donut
    @donut

    In case our our own memories don't torment us enough life has this or something equally uplifting in store for us :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWz75MYteX0

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

  4. @donut
    I remember this song :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP4xXjW97ko

    I was in Subic Bay , Olongapo City , RP . Pretending that these cheap sentiments were a sublime excuse for my sordid lust , my "Subic Bay marriage" . Jesus ! Who needs God's judgement ? Don't our own memories torment us enough ? Rend and tear at our wretched souls ? “We men are wretched things.” So said the blind bard . Can one noble deed redeem our debased and polluted souls ? "humanity they knew to be corrupt...from the day of Adam's creation" . To exist as a self aware being is to regret existing at all . But I still like this song .

    Replies: @donut

    In case our our own memories don’t torment us enough life has this or something equally uplifting in store for us :

    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @donut

    I got goosebumps. It's like the first time I heard "Surfin' Bird" or "I Wanna Be Sedated".

  5. It’s a bit like asking why Colombia was the only major Latin American country not to default in the early 80s.

    http://www.icps.cat/archivos/WorkingPapers/WP_I_70.pdf?noga=1

  6. @Lot
    Marco Rubio is not one who can, right now at least, claim ignorance of Cuban immigrant cocaine money. Working for his major cocaine trafficker brother-in-law was literally his first job! But he does claim to have not noticed anything unusual until the day bro in law was arrested.


    About the drug ring where Orlando Cicilia was the #2 man:


    What began as a marijuana-import operation in the late 1970s had blossomed into the far more lucrative business of distributing kilos of cocaine smuggled into South Florida from Colombia. During operation from 1976 to 1986, the ring moved half-a-million pounds of marijuana and 200 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $75 million.

    “It was a very large operation,” said Delbert Woodburn, a Miami-Dade narcotics detective who investigated Tabraue in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Planes from Colombia were coming into the Bahamas and the Keys, landing at small airports, dropping drugs into the Everglades.”

    Once Cicilia joined, he became the “front man,” insulating Tabraue by handing over drugs to buyers and coordinating shipments around the country, according to interviews, DEA field reports and grand jury testimony obtained by The Washington Post.

    As the business flourished, Cicilia took on the appearance of the quintessential Miami underworld hotshot, donning sunglasses and wearing his paisley suit sleeves rolled up.
     

    $75 million in the 80's is like $200 million now. But Marco, who I am sure never even saw Scarface or Miami Vice, had NO CLUE that a family member he saw everyday was involved with drugs.

    “Mario was the kingpin, and Orlando was his second in command,” said Michael Fisten, a homicide detective who worked on the case and is writing a book about it. “He always had large amounts of cash on him.”
     
    No clue whatsoever, there are many ways that a recent Cuban immigrant in 80's Miami could "always have large amounts of cash on him."

    The couple also agreed to pay Rubio $10 a week for each of their seven Samoyed dogs he washed. He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.

    That same house where Rubio earned his football-ticket money would soon be under surveillance by federal agents. ....

    Detectives had noticed a man behind the wheel of a Chevy Blazer that was appearing frequently among the stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars that flowed to and from the kingpin’s pet store.
     

    No way young Marco could even have suspected, in 80's Miami, that a "stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars" coming from a Cuban immigrant who wore his "paisley suit sleeves rolled up" could ever be involved with anything illegal.

    Replies: @5371, @Steve Sailer, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    To be fair, “preternaturally alert, perceptive, and suspicious” is not an impression that Rubio ever gives of himself.

    • Replies: @anon
    @5371


    To be fair, “preternaturally alert, perceptive, and suspicious” is not an impression that Rubio ever gives of himself.
     
    To be realistic, Rubio's documented associations over the course a decade-plus political career (never mind his upbringing) put Illinois/Jersey/DC style corruption culture to shame.

    It's puro Latin America...http://observer.com/2016/01/poor-little-rich-boy/

  7. @Lot
    Marco Rubio is not one who can, right now at least, claim ignorance of Cuban immigrant cocaine money. Working for his major cocaine trafficker brother-in-law was literally his first job! But he does claim to have not noticed anything unusual until the day bro in law was arrested.


    About the drug ring where Orlando Cicilia was the #2 man:


    What began as a marijuana-import operation in the late 1970s had blossomed into the far more lucrative business of distributing kilos of cocaine smuggled into South Florida from Colombia. During operation from 1976 to 1986, the ring moved half-a-million pounds of marijuana and 200 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $75 million.

    “It was a very large operation,” said Delbert Woodburn, a Miami-Dade narcotics detective who investigated Tabraue in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Planes from Colombia were coming into the Bahamas and the Keys, landing at small airports, dropping drugs into the Everglades.”

    Once Cicilia joined, he became the “front man,” insulating Tabraue by handing over drugs to buyers and coordinating shipments around the country, according to interviews, DEA field reports and grand jury testimony obtained by The Washington Post.

    As the business flourished, Cicilia took on the appearance of the quintessential Miami underworld hotshot, donning sunglasses and wearing his paisley suit sleeves rolled up.
     

    $75 million in the 80's is like $200 million now. But Marco, who I am sure never even saw Scarface or Miami Vice, had NO CLUE that a family member he saw everyday was involved with drugs.

    “Mario was the kingpin, and Orlando was his second in command,” said Michael Fisten, a homicide detective who worked on the case and is writing a book about it. “He always had large amounts of cash on him.”
     
    No clue whatsoever, there are many ways that a recent Cuban immigrant in 80's Miami could "always have large amounts of cash on him."

    The couple also agreed to pay Rubio $10 a week for each of their seven Samoyed dogs he washed. He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.

    That same house where Rubio earned his football-ticket money would soon be under surveillance by federal agents. ....

    Detectives had noticed a man behind the wheel of a Chevy Blazer that was appearing frequently among the stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars that flowed to and from the kingpin’s pet store.
     

    No way young Marco could even have suspected, in 80's Miami, that a "stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars" coming from a Cuban immigrant who wore his "paisley suit sleeves rolled up" could ever be involved with anything illegal.

    Replies: @5371, @Steve Sailer, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    “He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.”

    That’s wasn’t as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio’s brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I’m not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he’s ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that’s the ethnic background — Miami Vice — he’s from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn’t Colombia, but still … Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I’m sure he didn’t get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I’m sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That’s probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting “Cocaine” by Eric Clapton.

    I’m sure Trump has dealt with a lot of “private sanitation” guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that’s the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Steve Sailer

    The Donald Trump presidential campaign is basically about whether we want to elect cocaine president.

    (IMHO, yeah, would be a big improvement)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Stan D Mute
    @Steve Sailer


    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn’t Colombia, but still … Jeb must have had a clue what was going on.
     
    As a Spanish fluent banker in Miami circa 1980, there is zero probability that ¡Jeb! didn't know about the flood of drug cash buoying the S Fla market. First was the freighters of marijuana coming into Everglades City. Later, with routes well established, more profitable cocaine began flooding in. Routes shifted with the massive bust of Everglades City, instead of freighters dropping cargo onto small fishing boats that would sneak into the glades south of Naples, bales of coke were dropped offshore east of Miami and brought in on Don Arenow's go-fast offshore speedboats into Haulover Inlet. There were also direct flights into Central Fla and even up into the gulf coast La, MS, and AL/AR (these often done by "former" US intelligence and military types)

    There are of course the definitive films Cocaine Cowboys and Cocaine Cowboys: Reloaded by Billy Corben. No films, but still some good info online about the Everglades City crews.

    Remember that it was 1979 when the Dadeland Massacre happened. This was peak news coverage and incited Reagan's "War on Drugs." Again, impossible to not know what was going on here. Equally impossible to not notice that the real kingpins got off with 4-10 year sentences at Club Fed and zero moneymen took a fall (possibly excepting Noriega). Meanwhile penny ante street dealers routinely got life sentences under State drug statutes and without the legal defense team (and negotiating power of ratting out other smugglers) the smuggler/importers had.
    , @Name Withheld
    @Steve Sailer

    A great ad for Trump would show him negotiating with a mob boss at a table with all sorts of mobsters around with guns. The end of the ad would have him winning the negotiation saying "That's the way I did it in New York with the tough guys".

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Venezuela wasn’t Colombia...
     
    Other than preferring baseball to soccer, how is Venezuela not Colombia?

    Actually, Colombia has had a better century so far than has Venezuela. Kind of like how Uganda is one of the more stable places in Africa today.
  8. Leftist conservative [AKA "bernays derivative"] says:

    these “scientific” studies are bought and paid for by the establishment….academia will provide you with any result you want. If you got the money, honey, they got the time.

    the Establishment is force-feeding American economic growth via mass immigration. We are the goose being fattened up with grain forced down our throat. We are livestock. The big corporations and the government and Hollywood, i.e., the Establishment, they are our ranchers, our owners. We are being fattened up with economic growth. Immigration means more cheap labor, despite what the bogus studies say. Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Immigration means more profits for our owners.

    Stay fat, dumb and happy, my fellow livestock.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Leftist conservative


    Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.
     
    Nope - they know it drives down wages - that's why they do it and that's why they have to pay people to lie.

    What they don't understand is as immigration drives down wages and increases housing costs the proportion of income spent on basic necessities: housing, food, transport, energy etc goes up and spending on everything else goes down.

    So wages are lower but so are revenues as their poorer workers are now buying smaller amounts of cheaper stuff so the broader economy slowly sinks.

    , @MarkinLA
    @Leftist conservative

    Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Yes, as long as they have their EBT cards to pay for it because their lousy pay won't.

  9. @5371
    @Lot

    To be fair, "preternaturally alert, perceptive, and suspicious" is not an impression that Rubio ever gives of himself.

    Replies: @anon

    To be fair, “preternaturally alert, perceptive, and suspicious” is not an impression that Rubio ever gives of himself.

    To be realistic, Rubio’s documented associations over the course a decade-plus political career (never mind his upbringing) put Illinois/Jersey/DC style corruption culture to shame.

    It’s puro Latin America…http://observer.com/2016/01/poor-little-rich-boy/

  10. @Steve Sailer
    @Lot

    "He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote."

    That's wasn't as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio's brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I'm not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he's ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that's the ethnic background -- Miami Vice -- he's from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn't Colombia, but still ... Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I'm sure he didn't get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I'm sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That's probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton.

    I'm sure Trump has dealt with a lot of "private sanitation" guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that's the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Stan D Mute, @Name Withheld, @Reg Cæsar

    The Donald Trump presidential campaign is basically about whether we want to elect cocaine president.

    (IMHO, yeah, would be a big improvement)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @snorlax


    The Donald Trump presidential campaign is basically about whether we want to elect cocaine president.

    (IMHO, yeah, would be a big improvement)
     
    Over the Panama Red in there now, yes.

    Too bad cocaine doesn't look like America!
  11. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The Mariel boat lift Cubans can’t really be considered in the same category as other immigrants for anybody’s economic study. The ones I met were unemployable people for the most part. Criminals, crazies, illiterates, homosexual prostitutes, institutionalized types, they weren’t Cuba’s best. Years later many were still behind prison bars where they later rioted. Others did things like murder their sponsors, commit armed robberies and many found their way into employment in the drug trade. Really not a valid group to use for immigrant-employment effect studies.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @anonymous

    "Really not a valid group to use for immigrant-employment effect studies."

    Undoubtedly, you are one of those whites whose IQ is substandard.

    Miami was naturally the centerpiece behind the influx of cocaine from Central and South America in the 1970’s regardless if there was a Mariel boat lift. George Jung, a white dude, hooked up with the Medellin Cartel and monopolized the drug trade beginning in the late 1970's and early 1980's. His distribution center inevitably would have associates who newly arrived from points South.

    Dade County crime statistics in the 1970’s had steadily increased in large part due to the efforts of Colombian cartels to gain a southern base for their operations, long before the Mariel refugees arrived. In 1980, there were 515 homicides in this county, with criminologist William Wilbanks concluded that Mariel refugees were responsible for only a quarter of the increase.

    Now, while the Miami Times in December 1980 ran a story regarding how homicide was up 103 percent, robbery was up 124 percent, and assault was up 109 percent, people assumed it was the boat people, without taking into account the wave of mayhem as a result of the McDuffie Riots—four white Miami cops had been found not guilty in the death Arthur McDuffie, a darkie.

    Out of the 125,000 from the first wave, it is estimated 2,000 to 2,500 had engaged in criminal activity, with another 500 who were mentally ill. Interesting to note that one way to get permission to leave Cuba during the boatlift was to sign what the Castro Regime described as a carta de escoria (literally, scum-letter) confessing to sexual crimes. Thousands of Cubans signed them, only to find themselves scooped up from shark-infested waters by American immigration officials.

    When federal immigration officials reviewed refugee records before securing their release, about 1,306 refugees who had committed crimes that warranted stays in minimum-security prisons, and 350 felons sent to maximum-security prisons, in America. That represents about 1.4 percent of the 120,000 refugees the panels screened, compared with the 6 percent of Americans who had committed a felony in 1980, according to FBI crime statistics from the time period.

    “The Mariel boat lift happened to coincide very closely in time and place with the cocaine boom of 1980.”

    Yes, it did. But correlation does not mean causation. I am summarizing one part of a study conducted by Ethan Lewis (2004) ”Working Paper No. 04-3 How Did The Miami Labor Market Absorb The Mariel Immigrants”. The author claims that large cities in the 1980’s, Miami included, as it endured changes in worker mix, were largely absorbed by within-industry changes in skill intensity** without a substantial depression in relative wages. Computer use had decreased rapidly among workers in markets where there was a relatively short supply of college-educated graduates. Thus, urban areas of the type witnessed an increase in the hiring of low-skilled workers to handle these responsibilities normally reserved for these specialized workers. In other words, workers in Miami were less likely be involved in skill-based technologies compared to other workers due to a lack of supply. Stated another way—Johnny company owner in Miami notices there is a lack of skilled workers who could make his business computer savvy and more efficient in their tasks. He decides to hire several unskilled workers, in this case immigrants, rather than a couple of trained workers, to perform those tasks, since those workers were relatively scarce in the area.

    Now, something directly from Ethan Lewis’ study—“Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years, compared to these cities. Statistically significant changes include the 6 percent decline in the employment rates of blacks and non-Cuban Hispanics relative to the comparison cities, but it is worth noting that the fall in employment rates is less than this for the subgroup most likely to be most competitive with the Mariel immigrants, high school dropouts. Changes to the structure of wages in Miami and these other cities are also statistically similar. The apparent 20 percent decline in wages for non-Cuban Hispanics is either spurious – it is not statistically significant – or not causally related to the Mariel boatlift, as it concentrated among more educated Hispanics. Thus the boat lift appears in these data to have had little lasting impact on the labor market outcomes of less skilled workers in Miami.

    Replies: @anonymous

  12. I don’t know if he’s changed his position since, but 10 years ago, even a card-carrying liberal like Paul Krugman had to admit that mass immigration lowers wages, especially at the lower end of the food chain: http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2006/03/27/notes-on-immigration/?_r=0

  13. Its obvious that having a bunch of low skilled immigrants move to your city is a big benefit to native born American people. You can tell because of all the Americans who move to a city that receives a big immigrant influx. Take California. Look at all the Americans who have moved to California since the big illegal influx of the 1990s. Then, subtract all that have left. That alone will show you what a great benefit immigration is to citizens.

  14. @Lot
    Marco Rubio is not one who can, right now at least, claim ignorance of Cuban immigrant cocaine money. Working for his major cocaine trafficker brother-in-law was literally his first job! But he does claim to have not noticed anything unusual until the day bro in law was arrested.


    About the drug ring where Orlando Cicilia was the #2 man:


    What began as a marijuana-import operation in the late 1970s had blossomed into the far more lucrative business of distributing kilos of cocaine smuggled into South Florida from Colombia. During operation from 1976 to 1986, the ring moved half-a-million pounds of marijuana and 200 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $75 million.

    “It was a very large operation,” said Delbert Woodburn, a Miami-Dade narcotics detective who investigated Tabraue in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Planes from Colombia were coming into the Bahamas and the Keys, landing at small airports, dropping drugs into the Everglades.”

    Once Cicilia joined, he became the “front man,” insulating Tabraue by handing over drugs to buyers and coordinating shipments around the country, according to interviews, DEA field reports and grand jury testimony obtained by The Washington Post.

    As the business flourished, Cicilia took on the appearance of the quintessential Miami underworld hotshot, donning sunglasses and wearing his paisley suit sleeves rolled up.
     

    $75 million in the 80's is like $200 million now. But Marco, who I am sure never even saw Scarface or Miami Vice, had NO CLUE that a family member he saw everyday was involved with drugs.

    “Mario was the kingpin, and Orlando was his second in command,” said Michael Fisten, a homicide detective who worked on the case and is writing a book about it. “He always had large amounts of cash on him.”
     
    No clue whatsoever, there are many ways that a recent Cuban immigrant in 80's Miami could "always have large amounts of cash on him."

    The couple also agreed to pay Rubio $10 a week for each of their seven Samoyed dogs he washed. He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.

    That same house where Rubio earned his football-ticket money would soon be under surveillance by federal agents. ....

    Detectives had noticed a man behind the wheel of a Chevy Blazer that was appearing frequently among the stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars that flowed to and from the kingpin’s pet store.
     

    No way young Marco could even have suspected, in 80's Miami, that a "stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars" coming from a Cuban immigrant who wore his "paisley suit sleeves rolled up" could ever be involved with anything illegal.

    Replies: @5371, @Steve Sailer, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    That was fascinating. I don’t doubt you for a second, but when I bring this up later IRL, people will ask me to site my source. Where did you find that text about Orlando Cicilia and Marco Rubio?

    Slightly OT; Isn’t it about time for paisley to make a come back?

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    All quotes from Washington Post. Google Rubio Post Cocaine and you will find it. I could not figure out how to remove a creepy tracking string from the URL so did not post a link.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

  15. @donut
    @donut

    In case our our own memories don't torment us enough life has this or something equally uplifting in store for us :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWz75MYteX0

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

    I got goosebumps. It’s like the first time I heard “Surfin’ Bird” or “I Wanna Be Sedated”.

  16. @Steve Sailer
    @Lot

    "He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote."

    That's wasn't as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio's brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I'm not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he's ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that's the ethnic background -- Miami Vice -- he's from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn't Colombia, but still ... Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I'm sure he didn't get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I'm sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That's probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton.

    I'm sure Trump has dealt with a lot of "private sanitation" guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that's the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Stan D Mute, @Name Withheld, @Reg Cæsar

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn’t Colombia, but still … Jeb must have had a clue what was going on.

    As a Spanish fluent banker in Miami circa 1980, there is zero probability that ¡Jeb! didn’t know about the flood of drug cash buoying the S Fla market. First was the freighters of marijuana coming into Everglades City. Later, with routes well established, more profitable cocaine began flooding in. Routes shifted with the massive bust of Everglades City, instead of freighters dropping cargo onto small fishing boats that would sneak into the glades south of Naples, bales of coke were dropped offshore east of Miami and brought in on Don Arenow’s go-fast offshore speedboats into Haulover Inlet. There were also direct flights into Central Fla and even up into the gulf coast La, MS, and AL/AR (these often done by “former” US intelligence and military types)

    There are of course the definitive films Cocaine Cowboys and Cocaine Cowboys: Reloaded by Billy Corben. No films, but still some good info online about the Everglades City crews.

    Remember that it was 1979 when the Dadeland Massacre happened. This was peak news coverage and incited Reagan’s “War on Drugs.” Again, impossible to not know what was going on here. Equally impossible to not notice that the real kingpins got off with 4-10 year sentences at Club Fed and zero moneymen took a fall (possibly excepting Noriega). Meanwhile penny ante street dealers routinely got life sentences under State drug statutes and without the legal defense team (and negotiating power of ratting out other smugglers) the smuggler/importers had.

  17. The demographer, William H. Frey, specializes in migration. Prior to about fifteen years ago he was interviewed regularly on NPR when migration issues appeared. Then he disappeared from the airwaves. I learned later that Frey very honestly wanted to let listeners know that there was a downside to immigration into the USA, e.g., such immigration did lower the wages of native-born workers. After this he was no longer invited to speak on these issues. In the past couple of years he’s written a book about the joys of vibrant diversity. I can only assume that this is an attempt to wheedle back into the good graces of the MSM.

    BTW, I personally experienced something somewhat similar. Abiout twenty-five years ago, over the course of six months, several NYT reporters were doing stories on homicide trends in the USA and were steered to me as someone with a bit of expertise in the area. The resulting interviews were mutually frustrating. The reporters came to me not for information but for expert opinion to buttress their misguided conclusions. When it became clear that I would continue refusing to barter away my professional pride for a few paltry mentions in the NYT the calls were terminated and soon no more calls came. These days a widespread reputation for expertise all too often carries with it a whiff of whoredom.

  18. Check out “Cocaine Cowboys,” a great documentary about Miami in the late 70s through late 80s. It goes into detail about how Miami went from a pretty sleepy American tourist town to the go-go capital of Latin America via the drug trade.

    At the end they ask the survivors (mostly White guys) “was it worth it?” With “it” being murders/kidnappings/a mass cultural change/overdoses in exchange for real estate development. The answer is “No.”

  19. Exactly. How can Miami’s experience in one very special situation stand as a proxy for the whole USA, and implicitly for the theory that law of supply and demand does not apply to the labor market when “immigrants” are involved.

  20. One of the top stories on the local news in Miami yesterday was the demolition of a mansion once owned by Pablo Escobar – the godfather of the Medellin cocaine cartel.

    (The owner of Chicken Kitchen, a local yellow-rice-and-chopped-chicken chain, and his former-newscaster wife bought the private-island property to develop it for sale. They paid over $9 million.)

    Escobar had a big, very heavy safe buried on the grounds. But it now seems that someone found a way to steal it.

    They didn’t find any goodies embedded in the walls.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Stan Adams


    One of the top stories on the local news in Miami yesterday was the demolition of a mansion once owned by Pablo Escobar – the godfather of the Medellin cocaine cartel.

    (The owner of Chicken Kitchen, a local yellow-rice-and-chopped-chicken chain, and his former-newscaster wife bought the private-island property to develop it for sale. They paid over $9 million.)
     
    Interesting. There's nothing wrong with a little arroz con pollo!
  21. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Lot

    That was fascinating. I don't doubt you for a second, but when I bring this up later IRL, people will ask me to site my source. Where did you find that text about Orlando Cicilia and Marco Rubio?

    Slightly OT; Isn't it about time for paisley to make a come back?

    Replies: @Lot

    All quotes from Washington Post. Google Rubio Post Cocaine and you will find it. I could not figure out how to remove a creepy tracking string from the URL so did not post a link.

    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown
    @Lot

    Thank you.

  22. @anonymous
    The Mariel boat lift Cubans can't really be considered in the same category as other immigrants for anybody's economic study. The ones I met were unemployable people for the most part. Criminals, crazies, illiterates, homosexual prostitutes, institutionalized types, they weren't Cuba's best. Years later many were still behind prison bars where they later rioted. Others did things like murder their sponsors, commit armed robberies and many found their way into employment in the drug trade. Really not a valid group to use for immigrant-employment effect studies.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Really not a valid group to use for immigrant-employment effect studies.”

    Undoubtedly, you are one of those whites whose IQ is substandard.

    Miami was naturally the centerpiece behind the influx of cocaine from Central and South America in the 1970’s regardless if there was a Mariel boat lift. George Jung, a white dude, hooked up with the Medellin Cartel and monopolized the drug trade beginning in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. His distribution center inevitably would have associates who newly arrived from points South.

    Dade County crime statistics in the 1970’s had steadily increased in large part due to the efforts of Colombian cartels to gain a southern base for their operations, long before the Mariel refugees arrived. In 1980, there were 515 homicides in this county, with criminologist William Wilbanks concluded that Mariel refugees were responsible for only a quarter of the increase.

    Now, while the Miami Times in December 1980 ran a story regarding how homicide was up 103 percent, robbery was up 124 percent, and assault was up 109 percent, people assumed it was the boat people, without taking into account the wave of mayhem as a result of the McDuffie Riots—four white Miami cops had been found not guilty in the death Arthur McDuffie, a darkie.

    Out of the 125,000 from the first wave, it is estimated 2,000 to 2,500 had engaged in criminal activity, with another 500 who were mentally ill. Interesting to note that one way to get permission to leave Cuba during the boatlift was to sign what the Castro Regime described as a carta de escoria (literally, scum-letter) confessing to sexual crimes. Thousands of Cubans signed them, only to find themselves scooped up from shark-infested waters by American immigration officials.

    When federal immigration officials reviewed refugee records before securing their release, about 1,306 refugees who had committed crimes that warranted stays in minimum-security prisons, and 350 felons sent to maximum-security prisons, in America. That represents about 1.4 percent of the 120,000 refugees the panels screened, compared with the 6 percent of Americans who had committed a felony in 1980, according to FBI crime statistics from the time period.

    “The Mariel boat lift happened to coincide very closely in time and place with the cocaine boom of 1980.”

    Yes, it did. But correlation does not mean causation. I am summarizing one part of a study conducted by Ethan Lewis (2004) ”Working Paper No. 04-3 How Did The Miami Labor Market Absorb The Mariel Immigrants”. The author claims that large cities in the 1980’s, Miami included, as it endured changes in worker mix, were largely absorbed by within-industry changes in skill intensity** without a substantial depression in relative wages. Computer use had decreased rapidly among workers in markets where there was a relatively short supply of college-educated graduates. Thus, urban areas of the type witnessed an increase in the hiring of low-skilled workers to handle these responsibilities normally reserved for these specialized workers. In other words, workers in Miami were less likely be involved in skill-based technologies compared to other workers due to a lack of supply. Stated another way—Johnny company owner in Miami notices there is a lack of skilled workers who could make his business computer savvy and more efficient in their tasks. He decides to hire several unskilled workers, in this case immigrants, rather than a couple of trained workers, to perform those tasks, since those workers were relatively scarce in the area.

    Now, something directly from Ethan Lewis’ study—“Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years, compared to these cities. Statistically significant changes include the 6 percent decline in the employment rates of blacks and non-Cuban Hispanics relative to the comparison cities, but it is worth noting that the fall in employment rates is less than this for the subgroup most likely to be most competitive with the Mariel immigrants, high school dropouts. Changes to the structure of wages in Miami and these other cities are also statistically similar. The apparent 20 percent decline in wages for non-Cuban Hispanics is either spurious – it is not statistically significant – or not causally related to the Mariel boatlift, as it concentrated among more educated Hispanics. Thus the boat lift appears in these data to have had little lasting impact on the labor market outcomes of less skilled workers in Miami.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Corvinus

    Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years,



     
    Ho Hum, and yada yada, such dumb self-important twaddle, just endless posts from Prozac muncher C adding up to just a lot of hot air. Are you getting paid by the word?.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  23. the economy of Miami after an influx of 125,000 Cuban migrants between April and October 1980, the “Mariel boat lift.”

    If the influx of Marielitos (allegedly) didn’t depress working class and entry level wages, it most definitely created huge job growth for police officers and the criminal justice system.

  24. Wow… That was back when music videos told a story

  25. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    @anonymous

    "Really not a valid group to use for immigrant-employment effect studies."

    Undoubtedly, you are one of those whites whose IQ is substandard.

    Miami was naturally the centerpiece behind the influx of cocaine from Central and South America in the 1970’s regardless if there was a Mariel boat lift. George Jung, a white dude, hooked up with the Medellin Cartel and monopolized the drug trade beginning in the late 1970's and early 1980's. His distribution center inevitably would have associates who newly arrived from points South.

    Dade County crime statistics in the 1970’s had steadily increased in large part due to the efforts of Colombian cartels to gain a southern base for their operations, long before the Mariel refugees arrived. In 1980, there were 515 homicides in this county, with criminologist William Wilbanks concluded that Mariel refugees were responsible for only a quarter of the increase.

    Now, while the Miami Times in December 1980 ran a story regarding how homicide was up 103 percent, robbery was up 124 percent, and assault was up 109 percent, people assumed it was the boat people, without taking into account the wave of mayhem as a result of the McDuffie Riots—four white Miami cops had been found not guilty in the death Arthur McDuffie, a darkie.

    Out of the 125,000 from the first wave, it is estimated 2,000 to 2,500 had engaged in criminal activity, with another 500 who were mentally ill. Interesting to note that one way to get permission to leave Cuba during the boatlift was to sign what the Castro Regime described as a carta de escoria (literally, scum-letter) confessing to sexual crimes. Thousands of Cubans signed them, only to find themselves scooped up from shark-infested waters by American immigration officials.

    When federal immigration officials reviewed refugee records before securing their release, about 1,306 refugees who had committed crimes that warranted stays in minimum-security prisons, and 350 felons sent to maximum-security prisons, in America. That represents about 1.4 percent of the 120,000 refugees the panels screened, compared with the 6 percent of Americans who had committed a felony in 1980, according to FBI crime statistics from the time period.

    “The Mariel boat lift happened to coincide very closely in time and place with the cocaine boom of 1980.”

    Yes, it did. But correlation does not mean causation. I am summarizing one part of a study conducted by Ethan Lewis (2004) ”Working Paper No. 04-3 How Did The Miami Labor Market Absorb The Mariel Immigrants”. The author claims that large cities in the 1980’s, Miami included, as it endured changes in worker mix, were largely absorbed by within-industry changes in skill intensity** without a substantial depression in relative wages. Computer use had decreased rapidly among workers in markets where there was a relatively short supply of college-educated graduates. Thus, urban areas of the type witnessed an increase in the hiring of low-skilled workers to handle these responsibilities normally reserved for these specialized workers. In other words, workers in Miami were less likely be involved in skill-based technologies compared to other workers due to a lack of supply. Stated another way—Johnny company owner in Miami notices there is a lack of skilled workers who could make his business computer savvy and more efficient in their tasks. He decides to hire several unskilled workers, in this case immigrants, rather than a couple of trained workers, to perform those tasks, since those workers were relatively scarce in the area.

    Now, something directly from Ethan Lewis’ study—“Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years, compared to these cities. Statistically significant changes include the 6 percent decline in the employment rates of blacks and non-Cuban Hispanics relative to the comparison cities, but it is worth noting that the fall in employment rates is less than this for the subgroup most likely to be most competitive with the Mariel immigrants, high school dropouts. Changes to the structure of wages in Miami and these other cities are also statistically similar. The apparent 20 percent decline in wages for non-Cuban Hispanics is either spurious – it is not statistically significant – or not causally related to the Mariel boatlift, as it concentrated among more educated Hispanics. Thus the boat lift appears in these data to have had little lasting impact on the labor market outcomes of less skilled workers in Miami.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years,

    Ho Hum, and yada yada, such dumb self-important twaddle, just endless posts from Prozac muncher C adding up to just a lot of hot air. Are you getting paid by the word?.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @anonymous

    I wouldn't expect you to understand my post. At least I tried.


    dsgntd_plyr --"With “it” being murders/kidnappings/a mass cultural change/overdoses in exchange for real estate development. The answer is “No.”"

    I would say those individuals are attempting to save face.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article25357552.html

    "At the luxury end of the market, new condos are going for $618 per square foot in Brickell and $869 in Miami Beach, with the highest-end projects selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. Single-family homes in exclusive Coconut Grove, Coral Gables and Miami Beach neighborhoods can also trade for more than $1,000 per square foot.

    “Prices are getting too high,” agreed Cyril Bijaoui, a broker at Westside Estate Agency, a Los Angeles firm that recently opened a Coral Gables office. “Sellers’ expectations about what they can get have gone way up and people smell opportunities. But it’s creating buyer frustration and a definite slowdown."

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    Marco Rubio is not one who can, right now at least, claim ignorance of Cuban immigrant cocaine money. Working for his major cocaine trafficker brother-in-law was literally his first job! But he does claim to have not noticed anything unusual until the day bro in law was arrested.


    About the drug ring where Orlando Cicilia was the #2 man:


    What began as a marijuana-import operation in the late 1970s had blossomed into the far more lucrative business of distributing kilos of cocaine smuggled into South Florida from Colombia. During operation from 1976 to 1986, the ring moved half-a-million pounds of marijuana and 200 pounds of cocaine worth an estimated $75 million.

    “It was a very large operation,” said Delbert Woodburn, a Miami-Dade narcotics detective who investigated Tabraue in the late 1970s and early 1980s. “Planes from Colombia were coming into the Bahamas and the Keys, landing at small airports, dropping drugs into the Everglades.”

    Once Cicilia joined, he became the “front man,” insulating Tabraue by handing over drugs to buyers and coordinating shipments around the country, according to interviews, DEA field reports and grand jury testimony obtained by The Washington Post.

    As the business flourished, Cicilia took on the appearance of the quintessential Miami underworld hotshot, donning sunglasses and wearing his paisley suit sleeves rolled up.
     

    $75 million in the 80's is like $200 million now. But Marco, who I am sure never even saw Scarface or Miami Vice, had NO CLUE that a family member he saw everyday was involved with drugs.

    “Mario was the kingpin, and Orlando was his second in command,” said Michael Fisten, a homicide detective who worked on the case and is writing a book about it. “He always had large amounts of cash on him.”
     
    No clue whatsoever, there are many ways that a recent Cuban immigrant in 80's Miami could "always have large amounts of cash on him."

    The couple also agreed to pay Rubio $10 a week for each of their seven Samoyed dogs he washed. He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote.

    That same house where Rubio earned his football-ticket money would soon be under surveillance by federal agents. ....

    Detectives had noticed a man behind the wheel of a Chevy Blazer that was appearing frequently among the stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars that flowed to and from the kingpin’s pet store.
     

    No way young Marco could even have suspected, in 80's Miami, that a "stream of Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars" coming from a Cuban immigrant who wore his "paisley suit sleeves rolled up" could ever be involved with anything illegal.

    Replies: @5371, @Steve Sailer, @Gunnar von Cowtown, @Anonymous

    I have no use for Rubester but your comment is pretty dishonest on several points (almost as if you’re trying to smear the candidate — very rare on the Internet, I realize). Little brother Rube worked for his sister and her husband the gangster at their house, literally as a pool boy, not quite the unsavory street-crime job you imply. Also Cicilia was not the 2nd highest authority in the crew; read some more about it and you’ll learn he was clearly more of a local money launderer than a shot-caller. Is Rube not sufficiently embarrassed by the affiliation? Maybe, but he was 16 when the crook went away. The main hook for scandal since has been Rube getting the ex-con a realtor license. This development doesn’t exactly shatter anyone’s notion of the integrity of Florida’s real estate industry (or civil service)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    And I can imagine Rubio's sister not letting her handsome, popular little brother get too involved with her husband's dirty business, kind of like Michael Corleone is supposed to become a Senator not a mobster.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

  27. @Anonymous
    @Lot

    I have no use for Rubester but your comment is pretty dishonest on several points (almost as if you're trying to smear the candidate -- very rare on the Internet, I realize). Little brother Rube worked for his sister and her husband the gangster at their house, literally as a pool boy, not quite the unsavory street-crime job you imply. Also Cicilia was not the 2nd highest authority in the crew; read some more about it and you'll learn he was clearly more of a local money launderer than a shot-caller. Is Rube not sufficiently embarrassed by the affiliation? Maybe, but he was 16 when the crook went away. The main hook for scandal since has been Rube getting the ex-con a realtor license. This development doesn't exactly shatter anyone's notion of the integrity of Florida's real estate industry (or civil service)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    And I can imagine Rubio’s sister not letting her handsome, popular little brother get too involved with her husband’s dirty business, kind of like Michael Corleone is supposed to become a Senator not a mobster.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @Steve Sailer

    I get the impression that Rubio is the Hispanic Sargent Schultz. What is Spanish for"I see nothing, nothing!"

  28. @anonymous
    @Corvinus

    Table 1 provides some suggestive evidence confirming that the boatlift had little impact on Miami’s labor force, at least after 10 years,



     
    Ho Hum, and yada yada, such dumb self-important twaddle, just endless posts from Prozac muncher C adding up to just a lot of hot air. Are you getting paid by the word?.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    I wouldn’t expect you to understand my post. At least I tried.

    dsgntd_plyr –“With “it” being murders/kidnappings/a mass cultural change/overdoses in exchange for real estate development. The answer is “No.””

    I would say those individuals are attempting to save face.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article25357552.html

    “At the luxury end of the market, new condos are going for $618 per square foot in Brickell and $869 in Miami Beach, with the highest-end projects selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. Single-family homes in exclusive Coconut Grove, Coral Gables and Miami Beach neighborhoods can also trade for more than $1,000 per square foot.

    “Prices are getting too high,” agreed Cyril Bijaoui, a broker at Westside Estate Agency, a Los Angeles firm that recently opened a Coral Gables office. “Sellers’ expectations about what they can get have gone way up and people smell opportunities. But it’s creating buyer frustration and a definite slowdown.”

  29. @Stan Adams
    One of the top stories on the local news in Miami yesterday was the demolition of a mansion once owned by Pablo Escobar - the godfather of the Medellin cocaine cartel.

    (The owner of Chicken Kitchen, a local yellow-rice-and-chopped-chicken chain, and his former-newscaster wife bought the private-island property to develop it for sale. They paid over $9 million.)

    Escobar had a big, very heavy safe buried on the grounds. But it now seems that someone found a way to steal it.

    They didn't find any goodies embedded in the walls.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    One of the top stories on the local news in Miami yesterday was the demolition of a mansion once owned by Pablo Escobar – the godfather of the Medellin cocaine cartel.

    (The owner of Chicken Kitchen, a local yellow-rice-and-chopped-chicken chain, and his former-newscaster wife bought the private-island property to develop it for sale. They paid over $9 million.)

    Interesting. There’s nothing wrong with a little arroz con pollo!

  30. @Steve Sailer
    @Lot

    "He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote."

    That's wasn't as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio's brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I'm not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he's ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that's the ethnic background -- Miami Vice -- he's from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn't Colombia, but still ... Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I'm sure he didn't get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I'm sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That's probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton.

    I'm sure Trump has dealt with a lot of "private sanitation" guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that's the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Stan D Mute, @Name Withheld, @Reg Cæsar

    A great ad for Trump would show him negotiating with a mob boss at a table with all sorts of mobsters around with guns. The end of the ad would have him winning the negotiation saying “That’s the way I did it in New York with the tough guys”.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    And I can imagine Rubio's sister not letting her handsome, popular little brother get too involved with her husband's dirty business, kind of like Michael Corleone is supposed to become a Senator not a mobster.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    I get the impression that Rubio is the Hispanic Sargent Schultz. What is Spanish for”I see nothing, nothing!”

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @Lot

    "He made enough to buy tickets for all eight Dolphins regular-season home games, Rubio wrote."

    That's wasn't as hideously expensive as it is today, but yeah, that was still a lot of money back in the 1980s for a high school student.

    Rubio's brother-in-law was arrested when he was 16, so I'm not going to personally hold him morally accountable. But, still, the idea that Rubio deserves to be President because he's ethnically Hispanic is a little bizarre since that's the ethnic background -- Miami Vice -- he's from, and he ought to be a little embarrassed about being from Scarfaceville.

    In contrast, Jeb Bush was 27 when he chose to move from Caracas to Miami in late 1980 to make his fortune. Venezuela wasn't Colombia, but still ... Jeb must have had a clue what was going on. I'm sure he didn't get directly involved in the Big C in Miami, but he clearly benefited from the cocaine trade pouring money into Miami. As a banker for Texas Commerce Bank I'm sure he could have arranged to have moved to a town with a lot of Spanish speakers for the benefit of his wife that was more respectable, more sedate, more militaryish, such as San Antonio or El Paso or San Diego or somewhere on the West Coast of Florida, such as Tampa.

    But Jeb chose Miami in 1980. I spent a week in the Cape Canaveral area of Florida in July 1980 and it seemed pretty coked-up. And that was visiting the family of a guy with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. That's probably the nerdiest part of Florida, and still every bar was blasting "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton.

    I'm sure Trump has dealt with a lot of "private sanitation" guys who were obviously mobbed up, but that's the environment he was born into. I understand that Jeb felt like his older brother George W. had Texas (either Houston or Dallas?) locked up, but that still left him a variety of choices besides Miami.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Stan D Mute, @Name Withheld, @Reg Cæsar

    Venezuela wasn’t Colombia…

    Other than preferring baseball to soccer, how is Venezuela not Colombia?

    Actually, Colombia has had a better century so far than has Venezuela. Kind of like how Uganda is one of the more stable places in Africa today.

  33. @snorlax
    @Steve Sailer

    The Donald Trump presidential campaign is basically about whether we want to elect cocaine president.

    (IMHO, yeah, would be a big improvement)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The Donald Trump presidential campaign is basically about whether we want to elect cocaine president.

    (IMHO, yeah, would be a big improvement)

    Over the Panama Red in there now, yes.

    Too bad cocaine doesn’t look like America!

  34. Is this really the argument to make?

    Where I sit, those immigrants made Miami the murder capital of North America and caused disposessed African Americans to burn down large parts of the city.

    … Until George Bush and the war on drugs intervened. If you count the war n drugs in your economic model of the boat lift, there’s no way to show it as economically beneficial.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Rotten

    Is this really the argument to make?

    Maybe you are not getting it. This is social "science". It isn't about finding a universal truth about human activity. It is about finding an instance of human activity somewhere in the world - no matter how small, insignificant, or irrelevant - and building a study that proves what you intended to prove all along.

    Let's face it, this tiny little place at this small window of time is the only place where he could show his premise to be correct. And he still had to hide and manipulate a lot of facts.

    The only thing that matters now is not whether the study is flawed but whether there are other people of his political persuasion on the "peer review" panel for this drek. If so then this is valid science.

  35. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Leftist conservative
    these "scientific" studies are bought and paid for by the establishment....academia will provide you with any result you want. If you got the money, honey, they got the time.

    the Establishment is force-feeding American economic growth via mass immigration. We are the goose being fattened up with grain forced down our throat. We are livestock. The big corporations and the government and Hollywood, i.e., the Establishment, they are our ranchers, our owners. We are being fattened up with economic growth. Immigration means more cheap labor, despite what the bogus studies say. Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Immigration means more profits for our owners.

    Stay fat, dumb and happy, my fellow livestock.

    Replies: @anon, @MarkinLA

    Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Nope – they know it drives down wages – that’s why they do it and that’s why they have to pay people to lie.

    What they don’t understand is as immigration drives down wages and increases housing costs the proportion of income spent on basic necessities: housing, food, transport, energy etc goes up and spending on everything else goes down.

    So wages are lower but so are revenues as their poorer workers are now buying smaller amounts of cheaper stuff so the broader economy slowly sinks.

  36. @Lot
    @Gunnar von Cowtown

    All quotes from Washington Post. Google Rubio Post Cocaine and you will find it. I could not figure out how to remove a creepy tracking string from the URL so did not post a link.

    Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Thank you.

  37. @Leftist conservative
    these "scientific" studies are bought and paid for by the establishment....academia will provide you with any result you want. If you got the money, honey, they got the time.

    the Establishment is force-feeding American economic growth via mass immigration. We are the goose being fattened up with grain forced down our throat. We are livestock. The big corporations and the government and Hollywood, i.e., the Establishment, they are our ranchers, our owners. We are being fattened up with economic growth. Immigration means more cheap labor, despite what the bogus studies say. Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Immigration means more profits for our owners.

    Stay fat, dumb and happy, my fellow livestock.

    Replies: @anon, @MarkinLA

    Immigration means more shoppers in the malls. Immigration means more renters for the apartments.

    Yes, as long as they have their EBT cards to pay for it because their lousy pay won’t.

  38. @Rotten
    Is this really the argument to make?

    Where I sit, those immigrants made Miami the murder capital of North America and caused disposessed African Americans to burn down large parts of the city.

    ... Until George Bush and the war on drugs intervened. If you count the war n drugs in your economic model of the boat lift, there's no way to show it as economically beneficial.

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    Is this really the argument to make?

    Maybe you are not getting it. This is social “science”. It isn’t about finding a universal truth about human activity. It is about finding an instance of human activity somewhere in the world – no matter how small, insignificant, or irrelevant – and building a study that proves what you intended to prove all along.

    Let’s face it, this tiny little place at this small window of time is the only place where he could show his premise to be correct. And he still had to hide and manipulate a lot of facts.

    The only thing that matters now is not whether the study is flawed but whether there are other people of his political persuasion on the “peer review” panel for this drek. If so then this is valid science.

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