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George H.W. Bush, RIP
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My favorite story about George Bush the elder is how on the White House tennis court, he would fire himself up when serving by shouting “Unleash Chang!” which, I believe, combined the old 1950s GOP slogan “Unleash Chiang” Kai-shek with the diminutive 1987 French Open champion baseliner Michael Chang.

This clever joke became a lost-in-the-fog legend about a mystical Chinese warrior named Chang among younger Bushes, who passed it on to Marco Rubio.

On the conspiracy theory front, I think it’s pretty plausible that Bush’s oil drilling firm Zapata Off-Shore, which was (illegally) operating in Mexican waters fairly near Cuba, provided logistical support to the CIA during the Bay of Pigs invasion. The nature of Bush’s relationship with the CIA before he became director of the CIA in the mid-1970s, supposedly the first “outsider” director, remains murky. There’s nothing outlandish or sinister about the idea that Bush would have been open to helping his Skull & Bones college buddies in the deep state out with their projects.

Zapata hired Jorge Díaz Serrano to be its front man in Mexico, because after 1938 American oil companies were banned from doing business in Mexico. Diaz Serrano went on to a tumultuous career, becoming head of the Mexican oil monopoly Pemex and then being one of the 3 Mexican officials sent to prison for corruption when the new Mexican president needed some symbolic scapegoats for all the corruption under Lopez Portillo.

A massive but usually overlooked theme in George H.W. Bush’s career was his goal of reversing 1938 and opening Mexico up to American business interests (in return for which America took some of Mexico’s surplus population off its hands). Thus NAFTA and his son Jeb’s life. Bush was somewhat successful in this stratagem, but at what cost?

It will be interesting to see how much attention is given over the next few days to the central role Mexico played in Bush’s interests.

Update: For example, the lengthy obituary in the New York Times doesn’t include the text string “Mexic”. Mexico just isn’t very interesting to most Americans these days, but it was very interesting to the Bush family.

WWII: Bush joined in the Navy in 1942 upon graduating from prep school. When he finished his training and was commissioned in June 1943, he was the youngest aviator in the Navy at age 18. He flew 58 combat missions in the TBM Avenger torpedo bomber, which was much improved over the TBD Devastator torpedo bomber that was wiped out at Midway. Still, any torpedo bomber was a big, slow target, and Bush got shot down by anti-aircraft fire once. He parachuted into the Pacific and was rescued by a sub after 4 hours.

In general, Bush was a prodigy of all-aroundness: e.g., after the war he graduated from Yale in 2.5 years while being captain of the baseball team and making it to the College World Series final twice. Bush was married at 20 and a father at 22. Overall, Bush was a superior individual without being supreme in any one aspect, rather like previous GOP previous Gerald Ford, whose record as the longest lived President he recently exceeded. (Jimmy Carter will likely break Bush’s age record early next year.)

Weird fact: Compton, California, the home of 1980s gangsta rap, was home to two future presidents in 1949.

Another aspect of Bush’s career is that many of the issues he had to make a decision upon still remain arguable. For example, after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, President Bush supported West German chancellor Helmut Kohl’s push for German reunification. A decade later in 1999, I sat about 3 feet away while former prime minister Margaret Thatcher and Carter-Reagan national security insider Gen. William Odom argued intensely for ten minutes over whether German reunification had been a good idea (Mrs. T arguing against reunification.)

In 2018, 29 years later, German reunification remains arguable. Would East Germany be poorer but happier if it were instead in the Visegrad alliance in central Europe? Did reunification lead to the Brexit vote by making Chancellor Merkel overly powerful? I dunno.

Similarly, who was right about NAFTA and Mexico: GHW Bush or R Perot?

Bush was the kind of guy who felt like he ought to be the one to make these type of tough calls.

 
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  1. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    RIP 41. It was refreshing how he raced around in his cigarette boat in the run-up to the Gulf War.

    Incidentally, re Twitter: Emil Kierkegaard was nice enough to tweet this about my Twitter jail sentence. I’d be grateful for any RTs.

  2. George H.W. Bush missed a colossal, once-in-a millenium chance. Upon the collapse of the Soviet Union and the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, he could have ended U.S. participation in NATO and withdrawn American forces from Europe. America could have become a normal country. Instead he elected to keep NATO intact and lie to the Russians that it would never expand to the east. I read the Washington Post report and if that paper’s praising you, you know you did something wrong. I don’t think objective historians will be kind to him or to his presidency and my reaction to his death is a shrug.

  3. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Will we have a week-long Trump-Bashing Funeral?

  4. Anon[182] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t have much to say about him , but he did play many roles throughout his life . Im sure there is plenty of intrigue that we will never hear about . Definitely an old school guy. Our situation would be different and slightly better if he served 2 terms , as he should have . Still too many mistakes and traitorous decisions were made in our recent history and he had a hand in most of it. I don’t think he was a net positive for the country but at least he looked competent and dignified as he sold us out to China.Nevertheless RIP Mr Bush , compared to Clinton and Obama you were practically a saint.

  5. Anon[311] • Disclaimer says:

    RIP. Will his obituaries mention his photo op groping? I wouldn’t put it past the mainnstream media.

    OT

    You know those weird New York Times stories where they send a reporter deep into flyover country and do an anthropological take on it? “I approached a native. I wondered, do they have a word for war? What are their native dances like?”

    There’s a bizarre opinion piece today that is a non-geographical version of those. A woman writes about the remarkable experience of quitting her New York job and becoming a … stay at home mom … to two, count ‘em, kids. New York Times readers with their single IVF test tube kid being raised by a Swedish nanny must be aghast. How is this even possible?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/30/opinion/sunday/stay-at-home-mom-two-kids.html

    They were hungry but threw food on the floor, they were tired but couldn’t nap, they were upset but inconsolable, they were constipated and had infections, they banged their heads purposefully on the hardwood floors and smeared yogurt through their clean hair.

    The truth was, becoming a stay-at-home mother was not unlike experiencing the death of a loved one, but the loved one I’d lost was myself. I couldn’t believe that the outside world still spun — that people kept watching the news and shopping at Banana Republic and sitting at little high-top tables in takeout salad places.

    • Replies: @Chief Seattle
    , @reiner Tor
  6. RIP. Remember that he actually cut defense spending, the “peace dividend” of 1991, after the fall of the Berlin wall. Now I know that wasn’t great for the SoCal economy, but on the other hand it likely preserved Carlsbad from being “built out” for a few important years when I lived their after college. So here’s one Bush I remember fondly.

  7. Anon[182] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    It is unacceptable to lie to Russians, because as we all know Russians never ever tell lies and we need to reciprocate their blessed behaviors. That , and also have you seen Mr Putin ride shirtless on a horse ?

  8. vinny says:

    RIP. We didn’t get the death bed confession on killing JFK, guess it was Cruz.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @republic
  9. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Last of the GG president(for better or worse) before boomers took over.

    Last presidency before Zionists gained total power.

    I never much liked him. He lacked a center, something Carter and Reagan had.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  10. @Diversity Heretic

    George H.W. Bush also signed the appalling Immigration Act of 1990, introduced by Edward Kennedy, that may have been almost as damaging to the demographic make-up of the United States as the original 1965 legislation. I won’t dance of his grave, but his presidency was, in retrospect, a failure in both foreign and domestic policy.

    And what did he accomplish in the Second World War aside from being shot down and losing the other two crew members in his aircraft?

    An Eastern Establishment mediocrity promoted far past his level of competence.

    • Agree: eah, Kylie
  11. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    In retrospect, his regime’s goading Hussein into invading Kuwait that led to Gulf War was a huge mistake and a crime with terrible repercussions.

    It’s my suspicion but Bush regime sent mixed signals to Hussein that the US wouldn’t come to Kuwait’s defense. The dummy fell for the bait… as did Gaddafi much later when the West offered friendship.

    Assad miraculously survived.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @WJ
    , @Bugg
    , @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
  12. At this moment I feel no ill will. I can only look back wistfully at the kind of place America must have been to produce such a life. I don’t suppose we shall see his like again.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  13. istevefan says:

    Bush 41 also opened up the pipeline of Somalian immigration by sending troops there 26 years ago this December. Wherever U.S. troops go, immigrants from there seem to come back.

  14. @Diversity Heretic

    Yep, AGREED, the peace dividend got blown on shock and awe.

  15. @Anon

    Back to the beginning of the species there were women that didn’t want kids but got them anyway due to biology. They may even have been a majority. The advent of easy birth control 50 years ago didn’t change things immediately because there were a lot of social norms that carried on by sheer momentum. But at this point our society is strongly selecting for offspring of mothers that want children. Not sure what other traits would be associated with wanting kids. Maybe we’re selecting for people without an acute sense of smell or hearing. But that risk aside, it doesn’t seem like a horrible thing overall.

  16. I do remember “read my lips, no new taxes”. No more lies out of this guy, now.

    Sorry, I did like the guy at the time, even after I didn’t vote for him (once I saw him make part of a campaign speech in Spanish – that was enough). I’ve liked him less and less, the more I’ve learned about him.

    I rail often against women’s right to vote, and I’m not backing down on that. However, I will mention here that I had a female relative who told me way back that there was something she didn’t trust about this guy. She was hard-left, but she liked Reagan more than GHW Bush … women’s intuition and all.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Kylie
  17. Dr. X says:

    G.H.W. Bush wasn’t perfect. He was as “Establishment” as you can get, and in 1980 ran against Reagan in the primaries before burying the hatchet at the convention.

    Despite that, and despite all the “New World Order” hokum, he did a lot right. The story of how he quit Yale during World War II, became a Navy pilot at age 18, was shot down and rescued by a submarine in the Pacific, went back to Yale, got married, and went on to become a millionaire, a congressman, Director of the CIA, and ultimately president, is incredible. No PTSD for this guy. He celebrated his 90th birthday jumping out of an airplane, and was a fan of the Oak Ridge Boys.

    Say what you will about him, but he really wasn’t half-bad — especially when you compare him to those who succeeded him. I remember being absolutely aghast in 1992 when he was defeated by the obvious con artist Clinton and his shrew of a wife… who we’re still plagued with as recently as two years ago — and possibly even in 2020!

    When I saw the Clintons and the Gores dancing like hippie teenagers to Fleetwood Mac after winning the election, I was struck at how undignified they looked compared to Bush. I never got over what a complete bitch Hillary “I could have stayed home and baked cookies” was compared to the gracious and dignified Barbara Bush.

    His sons and his airhead granddaughters did a lot to tarnish his memory, but Bush himself was a fundamentally decent guy, whom I remember fondly from three decades ago when I was an optimistic young buck with a young wife and a young kid and still believed that I lived in a decent and free country.

    I don’t believe that any more.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    , @Bubba
    , @MarkinLA
  18. DB Cooper says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    From what I remember NATO eastward expansion didn’t begin until the Clinton administration but I could be wrong. I think he managed the collapse of the Soviet Union with great finesse. The German people should thank him because Thatcher want to keep the two Germanys divided after the collapse of the Soviet Union and it is George H. W. Bush who rejected the idea.

  19. Dtbb says:

    RIP: My closest brush with 41 was when Air Force One buzzed Daytona Speedway at the 1992 Pepsi 400. I had pit passes but couldn’t use them because he was there. Was a great day though with my dad, his motor home and my three brothers.

  20. Barty says:

    He ran a perfect campaign in 1988 that utilized all his opponents weaknesses. His 1992 campaign by contrast did nothing but highlight his own flaws. The world completely changed out from under him and I don’t think he ever realized it.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @tyrone
  21. He had the common courtesy, whether he believed it or not, that Souter was his biggest (or among them mistakes). Not sure if he believed it, though. Presidents always want to look good on their encylopedia page. I think that’s what moderated Barry to a bit.

    BTW, almost bumped into Barbara at a mixer (literally). Didn’t know who she was, and when she turned to look at me, had a visage of shock (yes, I have a word per day calendar). She was very short in comparison to him. He just eyeballed me.

    *And yes, I know I know used the word incorrectly, but I wanted to be fancy.

  22. @Dave Pinsen

    I don’t even have a Twitter account, but when I click a link to a tweet like this from a blog I sometimes get a message that the content will not be shown because I’m suspected of being a DDOS-ing robot.

  23. syonredux says:

    Although the CIA has had its ups and downs since its inception in 1947, it has historically proven to be a popular career choice for many Yale graduates, most notably former President George H.W. Bush ’48 and legendary operatives William Bundy ’39 and James Jesus Angleton ’41.

    “It’s always been on the radar for Yale students that there is a career in the CIA,” he said.

    According to Jones, students are correct in their assumption: CIA recruiters are frequently on campus, conducting interviews through UCS and the School of Management. Information sessions and panels with CIA recruiters are widely attended, generating audiences that range between 70 and 80 students, he said. The agency most recently had a table at the Corporate Career Fair on Sept. 17. Jones said more than 700 students, a high percentage of those who attended the fair, visited the table.

    Of the many Yalies who express interest in working for the CIA each year, Jones said the agency typically hires several. And while it is true that other elite institutions, such as Harvard and Princeton, have sent numerous graduates into the ranks of the CIA, Yale’s impact on the agency is unparalleled.

    A number of Yale graduates have worked for the Office of Strategic Services, the CIA’s predecessor. They dominated the CIA’s leadership throughout the Cold War period and continue to join the agency in large numbers, said Diplomat-in-Residence Charles Hill, who teaches Studies in Grand Strategy with professors John Gaddis and Paul Kennedy.

    https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2004/09/24/for-god-country-yale-and-the-cia/

    YALE- A GREAT NURSERY OF SPOOKS

    The fact is, though, that Yale University has been a great nursery of spooks. A statue of Nathan Hale with a British noose about his neck, only regretting that he has but one life to give for his country, stands in front of the Central Intelligence Agency’s headquarters in Langley, Va. Appropriately, it is a copy of the one that stands on Yale’s Old Campus in New Haven, for Hale was a member of the Yale class of 1773. In more recent years, Yale has had, as Mr. Winks shows, a curiously persistent connection with the business of intelligence gathering. No other American university, it appears, has sent so many of its graduates into the profession.

    To a remarkable extent, the ethos first of the World War II Office of Strategic Services, and then of its offspring, the C.I.A., was influenced by Yale men, and therefore presumably by Yale. Think – naming names almost at random – of James Jesus Angleton, C. Tracy Barnes, Richard Bissell, William Bundy, Cord Meyer Jr. and Sherman Kent.

    The book begins with a chapter about Yale’s involvement with intelligence as a whole that documents how deeply American higher education was affected by World War II. It was not just that, as Mr. Winks estimates, 42 members of the class of ’43 went into the O.S.S., or that altogether at least 60 of the 397 Yale graduates who lost their lives in the war did so in the secret service. More insidious changes were at work. It was then that the F.B.I. first gained access to confidential files, and that so-called enemy alien faculty were put under surveillance, indeed made to turn in their shortwave radios. Worse still, from the point of view of academic freedom, university programs, like those of Yale’s Institute of International Studies, or of the Institute of Human Relations’ cross-cultural survey, were converted to the purposes of wartime intelligence. The line between asking anthropologists about the cultures of the Pacific theater and using them as covers might be blurred, but it was a dangerous one that many American (and some other) universities crossed.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1987/08/16/books/yale-a-great-nursery-of-spooks.html

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  24. @Diversity Heretic

    Agreed. Leaving aside his potential involvement with a presidential assassination, a presidential assassination attempt and the usual CIA criminality, Bush was President at a critical juncture of American history after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Bush could have chosen a Republic Not an Empire, but he chose the latter and here we are. Everything we face today is basically a result of Bush choosing to rule a decadent, broken, multicultural empire as opposed to choosing America. Bush could have chosen America over emperial shitshows in the Middle East.

    We now face a scenario where the West will no longer exist in two decades.

    It’s a tragedy, but that’s where we are at.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Disagree: bomag
  25. snorlax says:
    @Anon

    Speaking of the compulsively truthful Russian government, the only source for this supposed promise of Bush’s* is the Russian government.

    *Even if there was one, it was an informal agreement (not, for example, like a written treaty obligation to respect the territorial integrity of Ukraine in exchange for their giving up nukes) between one unseated president and another unseated president, of a country that no longer existed. And up until pretty recently Russia would’ve been more than welcome to join NATO themselves.

  26. @Achmed E. Newman

    Upon reflection, I probably shouldn’t have written ill about Mr. Bush just now. It’s not like he was still holding on to a position in which he was actively working to harm America till the day he died, like a T. Kennedy or J. McCain. Those are 2 guys about whom I wasn’t at all ashamed to say “I’m glad he died” when each did.

    I did like that he jumped out of an airplane on his birthday at 90 y/o too. Throwing up on a Japanese politician was pretty cool, I suppose, along with this way of speaking about “that Act-Up* crowd”, haha. I still remember the “wouldn’t be prudent” imitations on SNL.

    BTW, it’s weird that I’d written about G.H.W. Bush yesterday night or so with Johnny Walker, as I had no idea till 1/2 hour ago that Mr. Bush was even sick.

    .

    BTW, I remembered that very phrase, but have no memory whatsoever about who Act-Up was.

  27. J.Ross says: • Website
    @snorlax

    There was a big deep state wheel who advised strongly against expansion and I’m not remembering his name, but looking for him I came across this from 2009:

    After speaking with many of those involved and examining previously classified British and German documents in detail, SPIEGEL has concluded that there was no doubt that the West did everything it could to give the Soviets the impression that NATO membership was out of the question for countries like Poland, Hungary or Czechoslovakia.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/nato-s-eastward-expansion-did-the-west-break-its-promise-to-moscow-a-663315.html

    • Replies: @istevefan
  28. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Dr. X

    There was an article in the early ‘90s that claimed that Bush panicked, condemning his crew to death, rather than trying to land it, and in a Freudian slip, mentioned the date his bomber went down instead of December 7th as a “day that will live in infamy” in a Pearl Harbor commemoration speech. If Unz.com were around then, Ron might have published it.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @David In TN
  29. truthman says:

    RIP, I believe I voted for him in 1988 (my first Presidential election) over Ron Paul who was the Libertarian nominee. His worst mistake was signing the democrat immigration expansion bill which raised legal immigration from the already too high 650,000 per year or so, to about a million, where it is today. Had he vetoed it and made it a fighting issue, he would have gone done as a much better president.

  30. …after 1938 American oil companies were banned from doing business in Mexico.

    That was the year American farmers were told that carting slop from the north forty to the swine barn is “interstate commerce”. Mexicans had every right to distrust such a nefarious country.

  31. Mr. Anon says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    What was it that Nixon said (or at least, is reputed to have said) about Bush? “Brainless, but loyal.”

    Loyal to Nixon, the Government, and the Deep State that is. Not to the American People.

    RIP, if you like.

    But more relevantly, DLTDHYOTWO.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  32. Mr. Anon says:
    @istevefan

    Bush 41 also opened up the pipeline of Somalian immigration by sending troops there 26 years ago this December. Wherever U.S. troops go, immigrants from there seem to come back.

    Exactly. This is almost of the nature of an Iron Law.

    And Bush’s committing American soldiers to a foreign adventure, while he was a lame duck with something like two weeks left in office, was one of the most criminal, irresponsible things an American President has ever done. He should have left the matter to Clinton, who would have taken office in a few days and who, quite likely, never would have done it. I will give Clinton credit for pulling our forces out after the fiasco of the Battle of Mogadishu. He should have reversed Bush’s decision on January 21st.

  33. @Achmed E. Newman

    “that Act-Up* crowd”

    BTW, I remembered that very phrase, but have no memory whatsoever about who Act-Up was.

  34. Anonym says:

    I have liked these for a while.

    • Replies: @Detective Club
  35. J.Ross says: • Website

    DUTCH ROTHERHAM

    At least 1,400 white Dutch girls are sex-trafficked every year by nonwhite “immigrants” from Morocco, Turkey, the Caribbean and Gypsies from Eastern Europe, police in the Netherlands have admitted.

    News of the scandal has emerged after a joint peroration between police and “Watch Nederland,” one of the Dutch government’s Department of Social Welfare organizations, the Center against Child Abuse and Human Trafficking (“Centrum tegen Kinderhandel en Mensenhandel”) was reported by the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Dagblad.

    The investigation showed that the nonwhites first groom the girls to be their sexual partners, and then film themselves having sex with the girls. The videos are then used as blackmail – if the girl doesn’t agree to become a prostitute, then the video of the girl having sex is released on social media.

    Police specialists in human trafficking, Marijke van Overveld and Esmee Huijps, told the Alegemeen Dagblad that the traffickers are “Moroccans, Turks, Antilleans and Roma.”

    Authorities in the Netherlands are now starting to crackdown on the grooming of girls, with fake ads being placed by anti-trafficking organisations which lure criminals into a trap. They are then arrested by the police and prosecuted.

    Police in the Netherlands revealed that the profits from the pimping out of underage girls are used to fund greater criminal operations abroad, and are also used to fund Islamist networks across the world, including the Muslim Brotherhood and Chechen terrorist organizations.

    Source: https://dailyarchives.org/index.php/news/1827-1-400-white-dutch-girls-sex-trafficked-every-year-by-nonwhite-invaders-police-admit

    How likely is it that operations like this are actually taking place in every European country that admitted a large amount of unassimilated Muslims? This is after all what Muslims used Europe for over hundreds of years.
    Also doesn’t EU already have laws against “girlfriend revenge”? But of course laws only work when enforced.

  36. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    As in the Kids in the Hall sketch where Scott Thompson perfects his hair:
    –I’m from Queer Planet.
    –What’s that, are you the angry gays?
    –No, that’s Act Up. We’re the really angry gays.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  37. istevefan says:
    @snorlax

    Whether there was a written or verbal agreement is irrelevant. The smart decision was to worry about the rise of the global south and the threat posed by uncontrolled migration, not to continue the outdated thinking of 20th century politics.

    The wrong decision was made then and continues to be to this day. The proof is in the fact that Europe and the new world offshoots are on track to be irreversibly changed demographically in a manner akin to being completely invaded and conquered.

    If you could bring Eisenhower or Truman to 2018 via a time machine, they’d think the West had been defeated and conquered in a war and would be stupified that a) it wasn’t the USSR, b) the USSR no longer exists and c) that we seem oblivious to this invasion and remain fixated on the diminished Russians.

    Not transitioning from that 20th century mindset of national rivalry when given the chance by the peaceful end of the cold war to one of recognizing the migration wave that is swamping us, might be the biggest strategic mistake in history. We wasted a quarter century were we could have arrested this. Instead we continue to fixate on the Russians.

    And you justify it because there was no written agreement? Well I guess you won. Keep expanding NATO. Maybe if NATO can conquer Russia we can have a new homeland. At the rate of global migration we are going to need one.

  38. J.Ross says: • Website

    In Ohio a Somali “refugee” has raped, beaten, mutilated, and immolated a white woman.
    What with all the MeToo and Believe Her noise, I’m certain that the mainstream media will get right on this one.

    https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181031/murder-charges-filed-in-case-of-bobbie-simpson

  39. @Reg Cæsar

    I remember being in downtown Berkeley around 1999. I think Bill was bombing Iraq, and the chant in the streets was “Act Up, Fight Back, Fight AIDS, not Iraq”. Well, it sort of rhymes, and they had the whole central street shut down, from the bay to the hills (or sort of…).

  40. @Anon

    Will Trump be disinvited to the funeral, like McCain?

    Seriously, who ever heard of such a thing?

  41. @istevefan

    Bush 41 also opened up the pipeline of Somalian immigration by sending troops there 26 years ago this December. Wherever U.S. troops go, immigrants from there seem to come back.

    The Coens could re-do ‘The Mouse That Roared’ with this premise.

    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
  42. finally can we be sure.

    no new taxes.

    HW’s main legacy: he made the cover of Megadeth – Rust In Peace

    little reported fact: schwarzkopf wanted to take out saddam. HW told him no, push iraqi forces back into their place, but no further than that. then get out of iraq. no march on baghdad.

    too bad trump doesn’t tell these pissant current generals what to do instead of the other way around.

    • Agree: RVBlake
    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    , @MarkinLA
  43. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross

    I believe you are looking for George Kennan

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  44. Funny how he doesn’t fit the “phyzz” brigade’s view of what a man should be yet by every reasonable metric, he was one and a great man to boot.

    May his soul be reincarnated. Modern world needs more like HW.

  45. One of the greatest foreheads in politics, only beaten by Assad senior.

    • Replies: @Anonym
  46. @Diversity Heretic

    Yeah, Bush 1 was the quintessential Globalist. I can think of the Good things he did with 3 fingers but one needs about 20 fingers to cover his mistakes. Too often he appeared to not give a damn at all. Sad figure. Apart from the first Iraq war, he seemed to sleepwalk through his Presidency.

  47. Gunner says:

    I hope the #NeverTrump fools like Max Boot and Joe Scarborough enjoy all the “praises” that their new lefty comrades are giving the guy in death.

  48. anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:

    ‘Alright, his story checks out”.

  49. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    He assuredly opened the floodgates with the 1990 Immigration Act & the ramp up in Refugee intakes & TPS nonsense. Due to Bush 1 immigration policy – including the residual corruption in how the 86 Amnesty was administered in 89-90- there are probably about 20 Million more 3rd World immigrants in the US today. He well & truly gave it all away without so much as a murmur of concern.

    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
  50. “Say what you will about him, but he really wasn’t half-bad”

    he was pretty bad, knowing what we know now, and looking back on his time in office. the neocon’s pick, who deliberately tried to block reagan in 1980 and was forced on as vice president, created the diversity visa lottery in 1990, and most importantly, started the disastrous bush dynasty of mediocre men in way over their heads at the beck and call of invade the world invite the world neocons.

    these bush guys were never on our side, and were frauds who kept trying to turn the US into mexico, and saw themselves as the gringo owners of a brown hacienda that they would run for generations.

    that said, GH wasn’t the worst possible president. and he would have been re-elected if perot had not run. bill clinton was expected to lose. he was put up by the democrats to be the nominal candidate for an obvious successful re-election of a victorious war president.

    bill clinton should be a trivia question answer, and no more. “Who ran against George Bush in his successful re-election campaign of 1992?” “Some scummy womanizer from Arkansas.” not a major political figure in american history who was president for 8 years. that should have been the republican’s decade of victory. for winning the cold war. instead, a random, not very good democrat candidate coasted on the roaring 90s economy.

    who can name the guy who ran against reagan in 1984? against bush in 1988? against clinton in 1996? and so on. fewer and fewer people as time goes backwards.

    serious third party candidates, always bad news.

  51. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    Weird fact: Compton, California, the home of 1980s gangsta rap, was home to two future presidents in 1949.

    That’s not weird. That’s Amerikwa.

  52. I realize the following will be hard for a lot of commenters to grasp. Most of G.W.’s mistakes were caused by his being a mid-20th century establishment type. They wouldn’t think immigration increases would be a problem, because earlier waves of immigration had been fine. Keep up US military commitments, because if you don’t, a Hitler, Tojo, or Stalin will conquer everything. Unlimited free trade is good for the economy, and workers can get different jobs.
    After all, the biggest lie told during the 2016 presidential election was Clinton’s “It’s not the 1950′s anymore!” Most of her proposed policies only made sense if it was 1955.

  53. George Bush son of Prescott bush, financier of both Lenin’ s and Hitler’s revolution.
    A major member of skull and bones whose initiation means doing strange things in coffins in a crypt with Geronimo’s skull. Skull and bones was and remains a globalist organisation which fitted nicely into the jewish preoccupation of making everyone but their own tribe rootless cosmopolitans.
    A classic deep state operative who at least betrayed his country in a very gentlemanly and cordial way.

  54. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @istevefan

    It’s hard to think of a worse way to select immigrants, since our wars post-WW2 have tended to be in sh*tholes.

    • Replies: @BB753
  55. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    On the conspiracy theory front, I think it’s pretty plausible that Bush’s oil drilling firm Zapata Off-Shore, which was (illegally) operating in Mexican waters fairly near Cuba, provided logistical support to the CIA during the Bay of Pigs invasion.

    Do you think there’s any truth to the Franklin scandal stuff?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  56. Dan Hayes says:
    @Anon

    Anon[425]:

    Yes, I believe that we will be subjected to a slimmed-down version of the John McCain anti-Trump funeral orgy.

    My belief is based on the entitlement sense of the Bush Family. Be prepared to have GWB slink out his bolt hole along with supposedly smarter Jeb to make cameo appearances!

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
  57. He was a fine Old Money Massachusetts Wasp. They don’t make them like that anymore. RIP.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  58. jdoyle says:
    @Anon

    “dont waste a serious crisis”, or to that effect… sigh.

  59. jdoyle says: • Website

    Herbert walker is having lunch with Saddam now.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nayirah_testimony

    Good riddance.

  60. Bush Senior was the last president this country had who I could respect.

  61. Anon[113] • Disclaimer says:

    “Read my lips, no new taxes” was the “I will build a big beautiful wall” of its day.

  62. Lot says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Starve the censors: use Brave Browser or Firefox with UBlock Origin ad blocking plug-in. Cut the cable cord.

  63. @Diversity Heretic

    Back then I was quite conversant with immigration policy, but growing weary. Simpson-Mazzoli amnesty was “generous,” low-wage labor markets were devastated, employer sanctions were unenforced. Bush’s 1990 Act was little noticed, but worse than Simpson-Mazzoli. The stupid diversity visa lottery was introduced, and legal immigration was doubled. I said to myself, that doubling will quickly add up over time and have unpredictable results. People did not understand that a few percent per year compounds rapidly. Here we are.

    Illegal immigration is bad for the poor, but large annual legal immigration becomes bewildering for all.

    • Replies: @Lot
  64. LondonBob says:
    @DB Cooper

    Bush senior was lukewarm on the Ukraine going independent as they were worried about the ethnic conflicts it could unleash. Bush was nearly a great, had everything, but he just lacked something. I think the transition from Bush to Clinton was a watershed moment, as others have mentioned.

    • Replies: @MarcB.
  65. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    It wasn’t like dialing it back was some sort of fringe idea. George Kennan was appalled by the casual thoughtlessness of NATO expansion.
    The deep state was all for it , of course, and everyone else was indifferent. The veteran cold warriors were serious realists. It didn’t have to be this way.

    Bush was a little late on fiscal stimulus. I remember some executive order to pay all government bills ASAP. Clinton’s first few months benefitted from the last gasp Bush efforts which kicked in too late to save his campaign.

    He had the Resume, at least.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
  66. LondonBob says:
    @syonredux

    I expect Bush was recruited at Yale, prime CIA officer material of the era, oil executive is a typical cover. J Edgar Hoover was certainly under the impression Bush was CIA, the other George Bush at the CIA was a desk admin worker at Langley.

    I expect it was also Bush photographed at Dealey plaza, one of the small army of spooks and mercenaries brought there to muddy the waters.

  67. IHTG says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Not almost as damaging, much worse.

  68. LondonBob says:
    @snorlax

    Jack Matlock has confirmed not expanding NATO was an agreement, Matlock being another relic of that generation to be replaced by the clowns we have now running things.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  69. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @Barty

    Fall campaign. Beginning on September 21, 1988, the Americans for Bush arm of the National Security Political Action Committee (NSPAC), under the auspices of Floyd Brown, began running a campaign ad entitled “Weekend Passes”, using the Horton case to attack Dukakis.
    Willie Horton – Wikipedia

    What an effective ad. The Dems had to counter by calling it hate speech. They had nothing else.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @David In TN
  70. Anonym says:
    @TelfoedJohn

    Technically a fivehead but who’s counting.

  71. @prime noticer

    If W. would have followed his father’s lead, we would all have been better off, and there would still be several thousand living and/or non maimed veterans amongst us.

    And I say that as someone who drank the Kool-Aid fifteen years ago.

  72. RVBlake says:
    @DB Cooper

    I, too, believed the eastward expansion was a Clinton feat, in cahoots with Helmut Kohl.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  73. BB753 says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Unending wars to turn shitholes into even worse shitholes. And open the gates for angry shitholers from said countries to make their way into the US by the millions. To neocons it sounds like a plan.

  74. Funny how many of these Establishment guys are really just Yes Men without that much personal agency.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  75. LondonBob says:
    @RVBlake

    Clinton did it for domestic political reasons and lobbying from the arms companies.

    No mention of Bush Seniors clash with the Israel lobby?

    • Replies: @Flip
    , @RVBlake
  76. And what about Paul Walker? It’s the fifth anniversary!

    As to Bush the Elder, he often seems to be a giant compared to present establishment figures (and to be honest, Trump), but was he playing for white Americans? I don’t think so.

    Keeping NATO was maybe not a bad thing, but it opened the door for NATO expansion, which was definitely a bad idea, though done by Clinton. He also befriended the Clintons and voted for them, which means… he was an older, wiser McCain.

  77. “For example, the lengthy obituary in the New York Times doesn’t include the text string “Mexic” ….”

    Yeah, and if you search on “Dall,” you only get a mention of his 1964 opponent, the incumbent Sen. Yarborough, having a been a year before in JFK’s fateful motorcade in Dallas, and no mention of GHWB’s own mysterious presence in Dallas that day.

    But as the obit reads, GHWB’s Zapata never drilled a dry hole: There was likely very little coincidence or luck in his life.

  78. Anonymous[312] • Disclaimer says:

    Of course, George Bush I’s biggest legacy was the first Gulf War, which, ironically Margaret Thatcher goaded him into.

    If this was purely tangential to the Arab spring, the ensuing Merkel bumrush and the Browning of Europe is hard to say.

    That tosser Gorbachev who, charcteristically, supported American intervention to the hilt in Gulf War I was gone a few months later. His brownnosing of Bush evidently did him no good. After the psychopathy and madness of Yeltsin, another American stooge, came Putin – a Russian leader who actually had a brain, and was not afraid of standing up for himself. No fool he.

  79. Logan says:

    GHWB’s being shot down is a good deal more interesting than Steve mentions.

    Nine US airmen went into the drink that day while attacking Chichi-Jima, 150 miles north of Iwo-Jima.

    Eight were captured by the defenders, with only GHWB rescued by a US sub.

    The eight were tortured, executed and eaten. (Well at least one of them was eaten. They were all murdered.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chichijima_incident

    The commander was later tried and executed for this crime.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshio_Tachibana

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @llloyd
  80. Logan says:
    @John Lilburne


    George Bush son of Prescott bush, financier of both Lenin’ s and Hitler’s revolution.

    Since Prescott didn’t even go into the banking business till 1924, the year Lenin died, this seems unlikely.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  81. @snorlax

    The Cold War agreements were never put into writing, but it was always understood that they would be strictly followed, and breaking them would lead to very bad behavior, including nuclear annihilation of countries. The US blockaded Cuba in contravention of international law, but it was understood why they were doing it, so it was okay. The Soviet interventions in Hungary and Czechoslovakia brutally broke international law, but they, too, were understood. It was their side of the fence.

    Why is it so difficult to understand that those written treaties on Ukrainian borders were ratified with the general understanding that Ukraine would never join the western world. The moment it became impossible, it made the whole thing irrelevant. And it’s not like NATO has never previously waged aggressive wars, even to change borders. I don’t know if Russia would be cool with international law if they were allowed to use it when it was on their side (for example during the Kosovo crisis), but since the West broke dozens of treaties whenever it suited them, the Russians obviously don’t feel bad about breaking them whenever it suits them.

    Also, it doesn’t take a strategic genius to understand that the Russians are playing strategic defense here. They thought that their unilateral decision to withdraw from Eastern Europe and disband the USSR meant that while these were no longer Russian satellites, they were supposed to be a neutral zone between the two. Now they could accept some NATO expansion, but Ukraine was a red line for them, and it’s not like they didn’t tell it in advance. Ukraine had been subsidized by Russia for decades and a third of its military procurements were sourced from Ukraine. Not to mention the main port of their Black Sea fleet. So in a world where international law is readily discarded by the Americans and NATO, Russia will do the same. The difference is that one is often doing it for no particular reason (I haven’t found a convincing explanation for the Libya thing), while the other is doing it to protect what little is left of its sphere of influence, which is, if not highly moral, at least defensive, rational and predictable.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    , @Inquiring Mind
    , @anon
  82. RIP to a great American, a truly nice man and easily one of the greatest post-war American presidents. He dealt with a multitude of difficult issues that had been left undecided at the end of the Reagan Administration and did a superb job in closing them out such as the S&L crisis and the mess in Nicaragua. He broke his pledge to not raise taxes but the deficit deal he made got US finances under control and was the basis of the future prosperity in the 90s and mid 00s.

    The masterful closing out of the Cold War and dealing with the Soviet coup, not to mention the stunning prosecution of the Gulf War probably rank as the high point of American statecraft in the 20th century. It was a huge shame he lost to the sleazebag Clinton in 1992. What It Takes, the book by Richard Ben Cramer is an excellent look at the man. He was very underrated while President, hopefully the passage of time and the mixed record of his successors will lead to a proper appreciation of his talents.

    A good article by Jonathan Rauch on his many successes.

    https://www.jonathanrauch.com/jrauch_articles/bush_41_father_superior/

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  83. WJ says:
    @Anon

    The US ambassador to Iraq, April Glasbie, told Hussein that the US had no opinion on Arab-Arab conflicts. Then came the invasion and the completely fake stories of Kuwaiti babies tossed out of incubators by Iraqi troops. Bush didn’t respond . Then Margaret Thatcher taunted Bush about “going wobbly” and the “Amen Corner” (Pat Buchanan’s term) ramped up the propaganda and before you knew it Sec Def, Dick (Five draft deferments) Cheney was mobilizing Desert Shield, later to be Desert Storm.

    Hussein had no intention of going beyond Kuwait and in fact would have pulled out of Kuwait eventually. We could have left it alone like Glaspie stated and we would not have been occupying Saudi and OBL probably would have not organized 9/11.

  84. tyrone says:

    Bush taught Mccain ,Romney and rest of the stupid party how to lose …..will Trump-training work.

  85. … German reunification remains arguable.

    No. Germany and the German people are a nation. There was no other logical outcome but reunification. Anything else would have been an imposition from outside, as the Germans had already endured at other times. I don’t think Steve really believes otherwise.

    G.H.W. Bush was by all accounts a nice guy. In college, when he was vice president to Ronald Reagan, I knew a girl who knew him. Her father played baseball with him on that Yale team.

    The girl had a family name more famous at the time than Bush. “Poppy,” as she called him before the rest of us had ever heard it, would come to her house every Christmas to visit.

    He always brought a present for every child.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    , @istevefan
    , @anon
  86. @Anonym

    George HW Bush thought a lot of things were funny that most sane people would have considered horrifying. Poppy Bush was one mean bastard.

  87. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor

    The mainstream mourning of Mr. McCain didn’t seem to sweep up many around here. In contrast, the upthread comments praising GHWB (i) as a Clinton, et al, foil or (ii) as a praiseworthy President because of his exceptional military record fighting for Uncle Sam seem surprisingly sentimental and naive.

    These people are all part of the Establishment. Why do so many Americans, even on a website like this one, feel the need to pick meaningless sides, to root for certain rulers, to rank them as though they are old baseball players?

    I feel no more need to pay respects to this man upon his death than he would have had I moved along first.

  88. tyrone says:
    @Barty

    That’s why you have guys like Lee Atwater who do know what’s going on…..unless you’re Trump.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  89. Hunsdon says:
    @Anon

    Ooh, a snarky takedown. Well, I guess that settles the issue, doesn’t it? And never-you-mind what George Kennan thought about NATO expansion. I am entirely in agreement with Diversity Heretic.

  90. RIP. Mr. Bush.

    Only an average president, but 1989-1993 was a better time and America was a much better place to live in.

    Is it fair to blame a father for his son’s blunders?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  91. Between the destruction of the nation due to immigration and the innocent blood shed in Iraq, I hope there is a hell waiting to receive him.

  92. Hunsdon says:
    @anon

    I hadn’t seen your reference to Kennan, but had the same idea. A day late and a dollar short, that’s Hunsdon!

  93. Travis says:

    His greatest impact on the United States was the Immigration Act of 1990.
    “Today I am pleased to sign the ‘Immigration Act of 1990′—the most comprehensive reform of our immigration laws in 66 years.”- George Bush. “Immigration reform began in 1986 with an effort to close the “back door” on illegal immigration through enactment of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. Now, as we open the “front door” to increased legal immigration”

    Bush enthusiastically supported this bill , which created the diversity visa lottery and doubled legal immigration while ending the English requirement for naturalization. The Act also lifted the ban on homosexuals and HIV positive immigrants (but left the ban on prostitutes and Nazis)

    Hard for most people to believe , but prior to 1990 Immigration was capped at 500,000 per year since 1965. Besides these immigrant visas there were also expansion in nonimmigrant visas like the H-1B visa for highly skilled workers. Bush also created the temporary protected status (TPS visa), which the Attorney General may provide to immigrants who are temporarily unable to safely return to their home country because of ongoing armed conflict, an environmental disaster, or other extraordinary and temporary condition. It specifically benefited citizens of El Salvador.

    We can thank George Bush for permanently changing the demographics of the United States and helping 50 million legally immigrate into our nation. “I am also pleased to note that this Act facilitates immigration not just in numerical terms, but also in terms of basic entry rights of those beyond our borders.”- George Bush

  94. bomag says:
    @Anon

    … compared to Clinton and Obama you were practically a saint.

    And those two get much better press in the main stream.

  95. Art Deco says:
    @Canadian Observer

    He grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, his father commuting to Manhattan. His wife grew up five miles down the road in Westchester. His parents and in-laws grew up in the midwest.

  96. Bucky says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    That was Bill Clinton’s doing.

    Clinton, like Carter, is a low Protestant.

    That means that on some level, he worships and adores Jews.

    Bush senior in contrast is a high Protestant who has some tradition guiding him.

    Bush junior was a low Protestant.

    It was under Clinton that NATO expansion began. No doubt due to Madeline Albright. Clinton also coddled Israel because of course he did. He was aw-shucks I get to mediate in Israel like it was fulfilling his Sunday school boyhood dreams. Bush senior was known to coldly threaten Israel’s aid so that they would get to the Oslo accords.

  97. Art Deco says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    An Eastern Establishment mediocrity promoted far past his level of competence.

    He enlists in the military in 1942, is put on combat duty as a carrier pilot, and discharged a decorated veteran. He enters Yale, graduates with honors. He decamps to Texas, starts his own business, which he eventually sells for just shy of $1,000,000 in 1963 currency (about $6 million in today’s currency). He enters politics as a Republican (not the opportunistic choice in Houston in 1963) and after a 25 years in a half-dozen elective and appointive offices, lands the Presidency. He was also married for 73 years to his first and only wife and raised five children along the way. Sounds like a real mediocre guy.

    • Agree: JMcG
  98. 1) he stood up to AIPAC on WB settlements and the ten billion dollar “loan” and THE LOBBY punished him for it in 1992. No prez will defy them again. Bush the lessor learned from that defeat to cozy up to the Jewish community and neo cons….

    2) vision thing : he had none. In 1991,post Kuwait ,at 90% approval , he could have gotten almost anything through Congress. And what did he do for his electoral base ? Nothing.

    3) in April 1991, I recall reading that his 1992 platform would be based on “crime , Kuwait , quotas.” But No meaningful legislation to support his electoral base was attempted

    4) he had so little conviction over tax raises etc that pundits acknowledged that even Bob Dole would have horsetraded for something substantial in exchange for the tax increases

  99. bomag says:
    @Chief Seattle

    Maybe we’re selecting for…

    We might be selecting against things like executive function and use of symbolic logic.

    there were a lot of social norms that carried on by sheer momentum

    Seems like the sort of thing a civilization should carry forward if it is to survive.

  100. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon

    What was it that Nixon said (or at least, is reputed to have said) about Bush? “Brainless, but loyal.”

    I’m sure Bush got a chuckle out of being called ‘brainless’ by a man whose foray into the food processing business went belly up after less than a year, whose law career ‘ere entering politics was limited to a few years as a small town associate, who never held any kind of executive position until he was 55 years old, and who was a manifest incompetent as an administrator. (See the Henry Kissinger theory of Watergate: the work of clowns who actually took literally what Nixon said during one of his frequent emotional outbursts).

  101. @Anon

    What kind of person writes and reads this crap?

  102. Bugg says:
    @Anon

    Simply the never-ending Middle East wars are a blight on this country, financially, socially and personally. What reason do you tell the brave men and women who served and in some cases were maimed and killed in these fiascos? They’re still dying, getting hurt and being harmed today. We cannot go back and change things as in some alt history novel, but without the first Gulf War fair bet there is no 9/11 and no second.

    Being a constant war footing for going on 2+ decades has also been corrosive to our body politic. Instead of addressing our day to day needs as an ordinary country as per Diversity Heretic, we instead are tied down like Gulliver by nonsense. Our courts and security apparatus cannot help but be turned on citizens, and do so with impunity. Think if we were simply another country our politics would be less important.

    For all the lovely nonsense spewed today on Fox News, the Bush family with their taxes, wars and immigration stupidity has destroyed the party Reagan left them.While we can honor Bush’s serve in WWII, his legacy is a disaster.

  103. @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s not like he was still holding on to a position in which he was actively working to harm America till the day he died

    But he was voting for Hillary over Trump, and would probably have kept doing things like this. Giving the left the “you know, back then they were real conservatives. So he was still an actively harmful cuckservative right before his death.

    • Replies: @Flip
  104. pyrrhus says:
    @Anon

    HW was a CIA agent in 1963 and was present in Dallas on Nov.22, but later “forgot” that fact…He also reported a mentally impaired man as the possible shooter, but forgot that too….

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  105. @J.Ross

    Those guys could be funny, but we didn’t and don’t need to elevate people with such serious psychological and moral disorders to pop-culture prominence. The show was yet another step in normalizing that unnatural, unhealthy, and impractical (for the family and nation) lifestyle.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  106. To gain an insight into the vital roles numerous Bush family members have played, and continue playing in the Deep State, read: Family of Secrets, by Russ Baker.

    https://www.amazon.com/Family-Secrets-Americas-Invisible-Government/dp/1608190064

    • Replies: @Carroll Price
  107. @SporadicMyrmidon

    There were always simple ways to “fight AIDS”: stop having anal sex, which the body was not designed for and therefore causes tears which facilitate the spread of disease, and stop having sex with dozens and in the case of many homosexuals hundreds of “partners.”

    No federal funding needed to simply stop acting like an animal.

    • Agree: dfordoom, RVBlake
  108. pyrrhus says:
    @John Lilburne

    Time to declassify the Kennedy Assassination files?!

  109. @Dave Pinsen

    It’s impossible to know what happened. It’s not like such a slip proves anything at all, even for commenters. He might just have thought a lot of that event before his speech about the same war, and so he said the wrong date. I wouldn’t read much into it without any further evidence.

  110. @Achmed E. Newman

    I think the expensive Gulf War and its many consequences down the road due to JR qualify as more than enough “harming America.” Doesn’t matter if he wasn’t still involved at 90, the mess is still going on almost 30 years later and he started it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  111. countenance says: • Website

    I’m not quite digging your alt-history re German reunification.

    Merkel was born in Hamburg, so if reunification had never occurred, and had looked like it was never going to occur, a young Angela Merkel probably would have moved back west and eventually become West German Chancellor. Remember, here in our real world, she was a Helmut Kohl protege.

    Eastern Germany might have been better off, though.

    Bush 41 did exert the singular pressure that made German reunification happen, when other relevant world leaders of the time exerted some combination of overt and covert pressure to prevent it.

  112. Good riddance to that piece of CIA scum. Burn in Hell, Papa Bush!

  113. Don’t forget that one of Bush’s daughters-in-law is Mexican.

  114. @Reg Cæsar

    Those were days when the Left still had some integrity. ACT UP went after PETA for opposing animal testing that might have led to a cure for HIV. Now all the Left can do is bash straight white males. Ah, but those days are soon to come to an end with the scramble for Victim Pokemon points.

  115. Sean says:
    @Art Deco

    It is difficult to seem like a competent leader when you have the thankless task of winding up a lost war. Watergate was an attempt to gather information on something which remains unclear to this day. John Dean’s wife may have been married to a clown, she certainly had some colourful friends.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  116. sayless says:

    Apparently he could never remember where he was on November 22, 1963.

    I was five, and I can remember where I was.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  117. El Dato says:
    @snorlax

    Even if there was one, it was an informal agreement

    One of those people who hold to the “nobody heard it, it doesn’t count, nyah!” theory, eh?

    You are definitely not a guy I would be doing business with.

    (not, for example, like a written treaty obligation to respect the territorial integrity of Ukraine in exchange for their giving up nukes)

    It’s like with the wife.

    Meaning you will respect her if she stays true doesn’t mean you will respect her when she’s whoring around and calls in the no-win-no-fee lawyer.

    And up until pretty recently Russia would’ve been more than welcome to join NATO themselves.

    “Joining NATO” means mainly “must buy American” and “will help out bomb foreign countries with no good reasons while shutting up and letting the US do the talking”.

    Seriously, you get more benefits joining Aum Shinrikio.

  118. @DB Cooper

    Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia began pushing for NATO membership as early as late 1990, although membership was delayed until the Clinton Administration. Historians differ about what was said to the Russians in 1990, although my view is that Gorbachev would never have agreed to German reunification without some kind of understanding that an alliance that could no longer be justified as being against the Soviet Union would not be expanded into an alliance whose sole purpose was to threaten Russia. Whatever the Russians believed, George Kennan was spot on when he described NATO expansion as a strategic blunder of epic proportions.

    I also wonder if German reunification will prove a good thing, even for the German people. A clear east-west division is emerging in Germany following “Merke’s Boner” in 2015, shown most evidently in the levels of support for the new Alternatif fur Deutschland ethnonationalist political party. Germany’s fairly loose federal structure may yet save it, but the long-term prospects for a united Germany don’t look all that good to me. Holy Roman Empire, anyone?

  119. Corvinus says:

    “In 2018, 29 years later, German reunification remains arguable.”

    Not to Germans.

    As as far GHWB, he may have been an SOB at times, but he was far, far superior than the current clown in the Oval Office.

    Interesting how there have been no threads, Mr. Sailer, on the most recent actions taken by the Mueller investigation. Cagey, on your part, to NOT get sucked into the commentary. Perhaps you have read “Proof Of Collusion” and are even more convinced to remain silent on this matter?

  120. @reiner Tor

    I regard myself as fiercely independent in my opinions, but I hereby humbly express that I find myself 100 percent in agreement with the thoughts just expressed on the Charlie Foxtrot that NATO expansion has become. reiner Tor elegantly, concisely and precisely expresses my view on this much better than I could ever say.

  121. Polynikes says:

    Interesting comment section with lots of divergent opinions. I tend to fall on the side of those who see HW’s and Reagan’s legacy slipping because of their failures on immigration.

    With that said, I wonder if some of this is 20/20 hindsight. I was mostly in my youth then, but I remember the cold War and Russia dominating almost everything politically. At the time those two were given a lot of credit for successfully navigating the end of the soviet union.

    My guess is that his ultimate legacy will be like this comment section: mixed. He’ll be remembered for some successes, but nobody will forget his failures, either. He seemed like a decent person (and his marriage to a wonderful lady genuine) who did his best, even if it wasn’t always enough. I’ll try and remember him that way.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  122. George HW Bush was a treasonous globalizer rat who perfectly represented the evil and immoral scum that infests the Human Intelligence spy agencies.

    George HW Bush didn’t have the brains to be allowed anywhere near the Signals Intelligence side of the American Empire’s spy agencies.

    George HW Bush pushed for massive increases in legal immigration and he pushed amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    George HW Bush’s Immigration Act of 1990 massively increased legal immigration and it kept the illegal immigration floodgates open. Reagan’s 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders and George HW Bush’s 1990 Immigration Act were designed to attack and destroy the European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    Ronald Reagan and George HW Bush were evil and immoral globalizer rats who did everything they could to weaken and harm the United States.

    George HW Bush’s nation-wrecking attacks on the United States are representative of the scum who pollute and infest the Human Intelligence spy agencies.

    The CIA must be terminated and the Signals Intelligence guys must take over the duties currently mishandled by the evil, immoral treasonous rats in the Human Intelligence side of the American Empire’s spy agencies.

    17 intelligence agencies?

    More like 157 pods of brain-dead, money-grubbing boobs who look out for their own financial interests instead of the national security interests of the USA.

    George HW Bush is now roasting and rotting in the hottest pits of fiery HELL!

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anon
  123. @Redneck farmer

    I like to think that I do grasp it. I was a supporter of George H.W. Bush at the time of his presidency. It is now, however, that I grasp the error of my previous opinions. If HW had similarly “repented,” I would not judge him harshly. He never did, however, at least to my knowledge. To err is human and forgiveable, for reasons your comment lays out quite well. To persist in error when the failures of policy are increasingly evident, is the mark of a fool.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  124. Steve, how can you fail to mention Bush’s singular greatest achievement? The Anabolic Steroids Control Act of 1990?

    I mean, the clear and obvious good this single piece of legislation did (criminalizing bodybuilders) surely cancels out the disastrous long term consequences of Bush’s initiation of the modern version of ITW, ITW, amirite?

  125. @Dan Hayes

    I predict center stage will be occupied by George P Bush, the evident heir to the political aspirations of the Bush family. And, yes, Trump bashing will be the theme of the funeral and the commentary about it.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  126. Blindlight says: • Website

    Clearly, it is worrisome about any publication that will promote a positive remembrance George H, (NWO) Bush. I guess it reminds me that you really can’t trust anyone as truth gets compromised in order that good livings can be made and you agree not to name the root cause to enter the arena

  127. Bush also got the ICCPR ratified and that forced more genuine, if incremental, reform than any six Democratic administrations. So at some level he must have got acculturated in the course of his stint as UN Ambassador. CIA continually fights to undermine US state commitments like the ICCPR. And once you’ve taken in the mass of evidence in Russ Baker’s Family of Secrets, there is no way to deny Bush’s life’s work with the CIA. So he can evidently transcend CIA indoctrination.

  128. @Chief Seattle

    What other traits? Idiocracy: poor medium and long term planning?

    Either birth-control failures, or semi-intentionally getting pregnant and deciding that becoming an unmarried mother is a good-enough life plan.

  129. pyrrhus says:

    HW could have been a great President, but lacked character..Probably from the inception….http://theamericanchronicle.blogspot.com/2013/09/was-george-bush-in-dealey-plaza-on.html

  130. nsa says:

    Lying by omission is common…..especially in obits like this one. The vile Bush and his pal Baker whined constantly about getting rolled by the even more vile jooie lobby. No matter how much the two creeps compromised the actual interests of the American population, it was never enough for the jooies who demanded total fealty. Even the gratuitous destruction of Iraq wasn’t enough. Cost the silly old coot his second term……

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  131. @Art Deco

    I think his very mediocrity was a factor in the career you describe–he could always be counted on not to rock the boat with a genuinely original idea.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  132. bjondo says:

    like a lot of undesirable guests
    he stayed way past his
    leave time

    h, you will not be missed

    be like some chinese rulers
    take your kind with you

    5ds

  133. Altai says:

    OT: Interesting article I found. Similar to the oppression of competing with Beckys, this male complains about being found apparently wanting in physical appearance in the US.

    https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:OHgc2ROtYCAJ:https://www.racked.com/2016/1/20/10790122/india-colonialism-beauty-standards+&cd=42&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ie&client=ubuntu

    His grandfather apparently had blue eyes, the author does not, neurosis ensues. (I think it’s genuinely interesting to see the effects of light-skinned Indians becoming depressed that in the West they become ‘brown’) Instead of Becky with the blonde hair it’s Chandra with the blue eyes. (Though I am a little sceptical of how a half-Bengali has bright blue eyes. Maybe they were upper caste or the mother already had some European ancestry)

    As the ’90s spilled into the aughts, I let these spores of internalized judgment grow. I witnessed the ascent of Aishwarya Rai , before Priyanka Chopra, possibly the most famous of the few South Asian beauties who have captured the American popular imagination. A decade after winning Miss World in 1994, she was bequeathed the title of the most beautiful woman in the world by Julia Roberts, followed by the rest of America. With her blue eyes and fair skin, she seemed like some impossible union of East and West. Growing up, I’d notice that family friends occasionally sighed, wishing their daughters had eyes like Rai’s.

    He seems to acknowledge being ethnically-displaced is a bad thing. (Though he does use the term ‘felt displaced’ despite just telling they were.)

    I spent my childhood, like a lot of Bengali families, in central New Jersey. Edison was the epicenter of immigration from the subcontinent to the United States in the 1980s. I was born in the following decade, when the population of Indians had grown sizable enough to constitute the town’s majority. This bred some amount of resentment among people in central Jersey who weren’t Indian. Some felt displaced when the streets they’d known all along were filled with mom-and-pop sari shops. Others just flat-out despised us, hurling at us unimaginative pejoratives related to curry.

    If this article sounds very feminine in it’s because the author is gay and physical appearance in the gay community can become an obsession not unlike that of some women for the same reasons. Though with the added kind of Jewish style guilt of not being very ethnocentric.

    By the time I got to college in 2010, I’d left New Jersey for good. I went to school in the Bay Area, where I started dating guys. It was a pretty homogenous pool, mostly white and fresh out of the closet. I found myself talking to guys who earnestly referenced loving Gaga or Smash, engaging with a kind of lowest-common-denominator lexicon of gayness. Many of them hadn’t encountered Indian gay guys before. (Besides, with the exception of Zayn Malik, few South Asian men had permeated the greater cultural consciousness as sex symbols.)

    What did they make of me? Finding my way through this group, I tended not to broadcast my family’s background. When introducing myself to guys, I kept mum about details of my upbringing that would out me culturally — for example, the fact that Bengali was my first language. Perhaps it shouldn’t have surprised me when one guy, echoing the verbiage of my middle-school bus friend, told me casually that he didn’t think of me as Indian. I was, in his words, basically white.

    I reacted swiftly and furiously. I asked him what he imagined it meant to be Indian: someone who bobbed his head around imitating a bhangra dancer or spoke ad nauseam about his love for Bollywood? Or, perhaps a former spelling-bee champion or engineer?

    What I didn’t let on that day was that I was wracked with guilt. I’d accomplished precisely what my childhood had conditioned me to want: I was, in essence, being considered white. Though the communities I encountered in New Jersey and in college were overwhelmingly different in makeup, the same, suffocating standard of beauty persisted. The outcome felt nauseating.

    Only then did I understand how acutely I’d absorbed the colorism I encountered in these communities. It had seeped, like poison, into everything ; my dating life, my friendships, the relationship I had with my mirror. When my childhood wish came true, it didn’t feel like a victory; it tasted bitter. I had erased a vital part of myself.

    Why are we told importing these people will make Western countries more unified, open and indifferent to ancestry?

    Shortly after graduating college in 2014, my curiosity prompted me to take a DNA test. Now, I have a number on a computer screen, falling, as I suspected, somewhere between 1/16 and 1/8 — that indicates I have some blood from the British Isles. I’m working through what that number means: the colonial cruelty it implies, who it suggests that paternal ancestor was. Was he violent and terrible, as I’ve been taught to imagine so many British imperialists were?

    One thing the test confirms is that there is indeed a part of myself for which I’ll never have the full story. Knowing this isn’t an automatic corrective to my jumbled feelings, but it has given me some measure of resolve to embrace my identity and my features, both white and Bengali aspects of them.

    This mental shift doesn’t happen overnight. But these days, when I face the mirror, I don’t wish that I’d been born a white man. I see a bit of my mother, a woman with a dusky complexion. I see traces of my grandfather, a man with a sharp nose like mine. I stare silently at my features, hoping that one day, I’ll be able to read their histories as mine.

    I do get confused though, like Steve mentioning Jewish girls projecting their hatred of boy-favouritism at home onto the wider alien society, these articles by South Asians keep mentioning ‘Colourism’ among their relatives while apparently laying all the blame on the Western society.

  134. bjondo says:

    did H. bush pilot any aircraft
    after English war 2?

    Or

    just jump out

    attached to another jumper.

  135. George HW Bush was an immoral stooge whore functionary for the evil WASP/JEW ruling class of the American Empire.

    But George HW Bush was just a small part of the larger question as to what has been going on in the United States for decades.

    I wrote this in July of 2017 about the larger picture:

    The Republican Party has been a disaster for White Core Americans. You would have to go back to Ike to find a Republican president who was decent.

    Reagan’s 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders was a harbinger of doom for the California GOP. The 1990 immigration law signed and pushed by Bushy Boy #1 dramatically increased legal immigration.

    Reagan allowed the Neo-Con Jews to infiltrate the foreign policy establishment of the GOP. George W Bush allowed the Neo-Con Jews to steer the American Empire into the Iraq War debacle.

    President Trump started to jump in the polls during the New Hampshire presidential primary after he did two things: 1) Trump used the immigration issue to smash his GOP opponents and 2) Trump strongly went after the GOP ruling class and ruling class GOP stooges like Rubio and Jebby.

    The globalizer GOP that pushes open borders mass immigration, job-killing trade deal scams and Neo-Con foreign wars is just as dangerous and treasonous as the Democrat Party globalizers.

  136. New England WASP Republicans had been a core part of the country’s ruling class since the Civil War. GHWB is, in all likelihood, the last President we’ll see from that slice of American aristocracy (GWB is culturally much more Midland than Kennebunkport). And he epitomized it so well: temperamentally moderate, publicly modest, a bit staid and boring, perhaps. Like Steve said, not especially great at any particular thing, but securely competent at a lot of them.

    A country could do a lot worse than to be led by such people.

  137. John says: • Website

    I keep thinking Mexico should be interesting to me. Brazil, which is comparably big and ugly, is. And Mexico is much closer. Yet I find it hard to pay attention to the place. Its very closeness to the U.S. apparently serves as a great disincentive to doing anything well: it just doesn’t need to. My last visit was to Mexico City, which is a curious town and to which there are now direct flights from Austin. I thought I might be doing this little trip a lot. But no; there are so many better places to go to. The tiresome bedlam at the airport in Mexico City made me think positively of Zagreb and San Salvador; those places, and many others, have really come up in the world, or at least refused to accept underachievement.

    Mexico is one of the few countries – maybe the only country – which is never as interesting as the people who somehow take an interest in it. And yet those people have little to say about it. It seems that to study or exploit this place, you pretty much have to shelve cleverness and wit.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  138. Not everybody can afford to have your illegal Mexican housekeepers do your grocery shopping for you.

  139. JimB says:

    If George Bush had known that fracking would unlock undreamed of oil wealth on US territory, I wonder if he still would have come up with the idea of dissolving our southern border and annihilating America’s white working class. IMO it would have been better for America if he hadn’t been fished out of the Pacific.

  140. George HW Bush had at least one ancestor who fought in the American Secessionary War from the British Empire.

    George HW Bush was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution.

    Tweet from 2015:

  141. The impact of the House of Bush on the United States is largely negative. I’ve always thought of the Bush syndicate as a front for ancient evil, which is probably an exaggeration (although, if the rumors are true about Barbara Bush being the illegitimate daughter of that interesting Englishman Aleister Crowley, not much of an exaggeration).

    In American Dynasty (2003), conservative author Kevin Phillips depicts a Bush clan on the make, making their fortune through finance, war, and dubious federal government contracts to the now deceased patriarch’s progeny — see Jeb Bush and HUD.

    In The Franklin Scandal (2012) by Nick Bryant, and Confessions of a D.C. Madam (2015) by Henry W. Vinson, both well-documented books, Pappy Bush is outed as a customer of a prostitution ring that catered to D.C. elites with tastes for young flesh.

    George H.W. Bush could also be thought of as the Dick Cheney of the Reagan Administration. He ran a clandestine foreign policy in the 1980s through retired CIA officer Ted Shackley’s private network.

  142. @truthman

    He also signed the Lawyer’s Full Employment Act, err, ADA. He did so despite much wailing and gnashing from the “conservative” establishment.

  143. The Sununu mob in New Hampshire was in heavy with the Bush Organized Crime Syndicate. Still are.

    The Sununu mob members have nice smiles and congenial dispositions. It’s hard to really hate them, but as a patriotic Buchananite, I say screw it and try my best to gin up animosity against them.

    I pledge to never read Sununu’s book on George HW Bush.

    Tweet from 2015:

  144. MarcB. says:
    @LondonBob

    I think the transition from Bush to Clinton was a watershed moment, as others have mentioned.

    It provided the foothold for a New Left takeover of the Establishment.

  145. @Buzz Mohawk

    No. Germany and the German people are a nation. There was no other logical outcome but reunification. Anything else would have been an imposition from outside, as the Germans had already endured at other times. I don’t think Steve really believes otherwise.

    Agree–well said Buzz.

    Annecdote: Watched the ’88 Olympics with some German grad school, post-doc friends and the gal mentioned that they’d root for their Germans, but failing that these bizarro East Germans. (And these folks are Bavarians–the Texans of Germany.)

    Thatcher’s view was the petulance of someone who had lived through the war, the blitz. It was well past time to be beyond that. The missed opportunity at the end of the Soviet Union was actually not getting the Cold War behind us and trying to get Russia anchored into the West–a happily and proudly white West mind you, not this putrid porridge that we have now–rather than treated like a loser and looted by Wall Street goons. Germans getting their nation back shouldn’t have even been an issue.

  146. The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate has pushed for mass legal immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders for decades.

    George HW Bush was a member of the evil WASP/JEW ruling class of the American Empire.

    George HW Bush was an evil treasonous rat who pushed mass immigration in order to demographically attack the European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    I wrote this in December of 2017:

    There is no doubt organized Jewry plotted to racially transform the United States — and many other European Christian nations — by using mass immigration as a demographic weapon. It is a historical fact that can’t be disputed. I must add, however, that the WASP ruling class of the American Empire was a willing accomplice to the demographic execution of America.

    The WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire has colluded together to concentrate wealth and power and to actively attack the cultural cohesion of the United States. The WASP / Jew ruling class was best exemplified by the treasonous rats in the two Bush presidential administrations.

    Bushy Boy #1 used the 1990 Immigration Act to massively increase legal immigration and to encourage more illegal immigration. Bushy Boy #2 dragged the US military into the Iraq War debacle and the Afghanistan mess. The Neo-Conservative Jews in the Bushy Boy #2 administration wanted to use the US military as muscle to further the national security interests of Israel. I believe both Bush’s to be WASP treasonites who push nation-wrecking mass immigration and unnecessary war in the Middle East.

    Don’t forget or minimize the evil influence of treasonous WASP scum in the immigration invasion and foreign policy blunders of the American Empire. It is the WASP/ Jew ruling class of the American Empire that is evil and must be destroyed.

  147. @Lot

    Firefox is a bad browser that needs to die.

  148. I remember Ross Perot pounding the stuffing out of George HW Bush on sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and illegal immigration.

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate is evil and they have pushed mass legal immigration and illegal immigration for decades.

    We just saw Trumpy pounding the crap out of Jebby Bush on trade deal scams and immigration in the 2016 GOP presidential primary.

    Tweet from 2015:

    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
  149. @Corvinus

    There are many unsavory aspects in Trump’s business history, but nothing compared to the darkness weaved on the tax-payer dime by the likes of the Bush and Clinton syndicates. The Mueller “investigation” is an obfuscation operation designed to deflect attention away from the misdeeds of the Obama Administration and the criminality of the Clinton Foundation. I say this as someone who voted for Saint Obama twice. Do you have a dot on your head?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  150. @Anon

    have you seen Mr Putin ride shirtless on a horse ?

    It is easy to mock Putin’s outdoors photo ops, but they serve a purpose.

    When Yeltsin was setting a public example of drunkenness and obesity, the Russian nation was plagued by alcoholism, drug abuse, depression and declining life expectancy.

    Putin is setting a good personal example to help turn things around.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  151. I remember liking Bush while he was in office. For one thing, he held up loan guarantees to Israel because of their settlement building. His chief of staff, James Baker, was an alpha pit bull in this dogfight. Bush 41 was the first President to stand up to the Zio lobby since Eisenhower at Suez. And he knew it would probably cripple his chances at re-election. (Which it did) Thus the coded phrase “Annoy the Media, Re-elect Bush.”

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
  152. This damn puppy writer has “contradictory thoughts” about “gratuitous dunking-on-the-freshly-deceased.”

    I don’t!

    George HW Bush was an evil rat globalizer who pushed nation-wrecking mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and unnecessary overseas wars that did not advance the national security interests of the United States.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  153. dearieme says:

    By a British blogger:

    “From a solid war record in WW2 (unlike the confected Kennedy account) he clearly formed some suitably mature views on how the military should operate in a western democracy “.

    The last of the grown-up Presidents?

  154. According to the Wall Street Journal at the time, GHWB was told by Ed Feulner of the Heritage Foundation that it was okay to ban the import of militia-style semi-automatic weapons, thus giving the anti-gunners the impetus to get a ban on such weapons during the Clinton regime.

    Heritage Foundation, a so-called “conservative” think tank.

  155. Matra says:
    @DB Cooper

    The German people should thank him because Thatcher want to keep the two Germanys divided after the collapse of the Soviet Union and it is George H. W. Bush who rejected the idea.

    Thatcher and Mitterand were right. German unification has been a disaster. Germany has been destroying Europe since 1914.

  156. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco

    And what did Bush the Elder ever accomplish of any note or that was any good?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  157. Mr. Anon says:
    @anon

    Little remembered today is that it was Al Gore, in his primary campaign, who first brought up Willie Horton.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  158. @DB Cooper

    Clinton (in)famously said “All the great Presidents have been war Presidents.”

    His war of choice was, of course the Serbs- so the Slavs were in the sights from then on.

    And ten years after the illegal jailing and subsequent murdering of Milosovic, we were told

    “Hague finds Milosevic NOT GUILTY of War Crimes”

    engforum.pravda.ru/index.php?/topic/275059-hague-finds-milosevic-not-guilty-of-war-crimes/

    Didn’t get any play in the Oligarch press of course.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  159. I don’t think German reunification was avoidable.

    With 2 Germanys, there would have been a huge brain drain from East to West, unless the West took over the job of preventing that migration (which the West was clearly not going to do). That, along with the huge debts owed to the West by the East and the lack of competitive industry in the East, would have caused an economic collapse in the East. One way or another, the West was going to have to bail out the East.

  160. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco

    And you would know, being our resident mediocrity.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    , @Jim Don Bob
  161. George Bush the elder’s policy re Iraq was much better than George Jr.’s desire to make Iraq safe for democracy. Bush Sr., as we all know, refused to let US armed forces stay in Iraq.

    Some American generals apparently did argue for permission to pursue and pound on the retreating Iraqi army to the outskirts of BagDaddy-o just to make a more definitive statement about who’s boss, then withdrawing US forces from Iraq. Our armed forces would have kept outside of the Baghdad city limits, supposedly. This pursuit would have needed about two weeks more than Pres. Bush Sr. allowed.

    I think this proposal was a good idea provided that US military ppl. really didn’t stay in Iraq, but it didn’t happen.

    Here’s an off-topic item appropriate for iSteve:

    bloomberg-t-verizon-quit-conservative-lobbying-group>bloomberg-t-verizon-quit-conservative-lobbying-group

    SeekingAlpha.com referring to Bloomberg.com:

    Bloomberg: AT&T, Verizon quit conservative lobbying group

    Nov. 30, 2018 4:17 PM ET|About: AT&T Inc. (T)|By: Jason Aycock, SA News Editor

    AT&T (NYSE:T) and Verizon (NYSE:VZ) have quit the conservative business lobbying group American Legislative Exchange Council following a controversial July speech from activist David Horowitz, Bloomberg reports.

    AT&T confirmed it quit and “their convention speaker was a key factor in the decision,” AT&T told the news service. Verizon also confirmed it was out of the group, which presses for favorable legislation in statehouses nationwide.

    ALEC has distanced itself from Horowitz since the speech, saying he didn’t abide by programming rules.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center describes Horowitz as a “driving force of the anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant and anti-black movements.”

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  162. republic says:
    @vinny

    Bush said that he could not remember being in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Actually he was and some experts place him at the School book depository.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  163. @Intelligent Dasein

    Intell, I would venture to guess that he will also be the last US president to have actively served in a combat zone. After 41, only his son served in the military.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  164. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor

    Cold warriors (Kennen, Kissenger) might have thought about a neutral buffer country as being an advantage to the West. Do you want a country or a ditch between NATO and Russia? Thats pretty much the only alternative, with multiple detailed variations.

    By The late 90′s, all tacit geopolitical knowledge had been lost. People were talking about Russia being some sort of provisional member of NATO. The World had become dangerous because people (like the Clintons) forgot it was dangerous.

    No one was left that could see any downside to endless expansion of NATO/Europe. Why bother with borders if they are obsolete? New World Order. Globalism Inc.

  165. Jack D says:

    He parachuted into the Pacific and was rescued by a sub after 4 hours.

    He was damn lucky. The others on the mission who swam to shore were killed and EATEN by their Japanese captors. Them Japs were some BAD mf’ers – it’s really amazing that we don’t hate them more than we do – the Chinese and Koreans sure do. The fact that this cannibalism was suppressed for 70 years by the US government (“to spare the families distress”) may have had something to do with it – we needed Japan as a Cold War ally.

    Thus are the vagaries of fate – the wheel of fortune spins – it lands one way and you are POTUS and die at 94 , one more click of the wheel and you are tonight’s yakitori.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/06/george-hw-bushs-comrades-eaten-japanese-pow-guards/

  166. @Corvinus

    GHWB, he may have been an SOB at times, but he was far, far superior than the current clown in the Oval Office.

    So says the anti-American Leftist.

  167. I’m 48 years old, and have never voted for a member of the Bush family. In 1988 (about two months after I turned 18), I voted for Dukakis. I don’t regret that, as no Bush Sr. Presidency means no Bush dynasty, and thus hopefully no series of Iraq wars, and a much healthier society. If I had it to do over again, I’d probably vote for Ron Paul…although maybe not, since 1988 is basically the only time in my life that I’ve cast a vote that actually mattered, in so far as determining the outcome of the Electoral College (Dukakis came rather close to carrying California that year…which was the last time any Republican carried California).

  168. @Diversity Heretic

    Overlooked is his sensible refusal to pursue Saddam Hussein back to Baghdad after dealing with the 1991 Kuwait incident, there being “no exit scenario” as he is reported to have said. One wonders what he might said to Bush II about an exit scenarior for the latter’s Iraq Mission.

    • Replies: @Anon
  169. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    goading Hussein into invading Kuwait

    That’s a lie. Say that someone you knew said to you, “I think I’m going to kill and eat my neighbor’s dog” and you say, “I have nothing to say about that at this time”, would you say that you had “goaded” the guy into doing it?

    In any case, Bush never said this. Apparently, someone asked the US Ambassador to Kuwait or some mealy mouthed career State Dept. type and he gave that kind of non-answer answer as you would expect diplomats to do – that’s called “being diplomatic”. If Saddam took that as a green light from Bush to invade a neighboring state, that was on him. It’s not clear to me that if the US had said, “no way you should do that”, that he wouldn’t have done it anyway. Saddam would have thought that we were bluffing or something. He kept thinking that until we dug him out of his hole and hung him. The idea that Saddam’s criminality (and that’s what the guy was deep down – a thug elevated to head of state) was somehow the US’s fault is bullshit – it’s only true to the extent that EVERYTHING is the fault of the US (or at least everything that isn’t the fault of Israel).

  170. @AnotherDad

    The missed opportunity at the end of the Soviet Union was actually not getting the Cold War behind us and trying to get Russia anchored into the West–a happily and proudly white West mind you, not this putrid porridge that we have now–rather than treated like a loser and looted by Wall Street goons. Germans getting their nation back shouldn’t have even been an issue.

    I completely agree.

    • Replies: @anon
  171. J1234 says:

    I’m glad that he and Barbara passed so close to each other. My dad died this year at 98, and it was hard for him to have spent the last 10+ years without Mom.

    My wife and I were in Kennebunkport about 17 or 18 years ago and more than once walked by HW’s heavily secured peninsula, which most people referred to as “the compound”. I presumed at the time it was government security – secret service or whatever – but there may have been private security, as well. Since W was also president I guess that won’t change.

    What’s the policy for govt. provided post presidential security? Over the last 20 years we’ve had a plethora of ex-presidents, and it has to be expensive.

    HW was pretty much a so so president. That a former Allied WW2 aviator could come up with the phrase “New World Order” (which channeled Hitler’s phrase to one degree or another) was kind of amazing. I was mostly disappointed that he lost to Billary. Not exactly surprised, though; it appeared to me that he looked consistently worn out, drained and uninspired on the ’92 campaign trail. I am surprised he lasted so long after his presidency.

    • Replies: @Yissy
  172. @Diversity Heretic

    I could never see his face without recalling Dr Johnson’s remark about Mrs Thrale (who Johnson liked, and who had shown him much kindness): “Sir, the insolence of wealth will creep out.” https://tinyurl.com/yadqyhvp

  173. Flip says:
    @reiner Tor

    I am sure he was mad about Trump beating Jeb!.

  174. @Art Deco

    Nixon was an intellectual from nowhere as opposed to an Eastern son of wealth, thus really being an avatar politician for the silent majority, not an administrator. A bit too moderate and emotional at times, but at least fought more for his constituency than Brahmins like Kissinger and the Bushes that never thought outside the Ivy League genius box – heck he put them to work. Ideally they’d have a common American nationalist conservative goal, but they didn’t. In politics you need both the rabblerouser with the ear to the masses, and the suited up fellow traveler hunched over books and numbers. Without both working together, we have the present GOP.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  175. @AnotherDad

    The missed opportunity at the end of the Soviet Union was actually not getting the Cold War behind us and trying to get Russia anchored into the West–a happily and proudly white West mind you, not this putrid porridge that we have now–rather than treated like a loser and looted by Wall Street goons

    Britain would have fought that tooth & nail. They’ve always been obsessed with Russia. The real issue with Bush 41 and all U.S. Presidents is that most don’t have the intestinal fortitude to tell Britain to get stuffed. Trump may be the closest thing we have to that.

    • Agree: Bubba
    • Disagree: YetAnotherAnon
  176. @Diversity Heretic

    “I don’t think objective historians will be kind to him or to his presidency and my reaction to his death is a shrug.”

    Abosolutely correct. The fact of the matter to consider is how much would one expect from a person of such low moral fibre as George H W Busch.

    I have lived to see how this ex CIA man and Yale graduate would entrap a semi bedouin dictator named Saddam Hussein into a conflict that would drag the U S into an imperial war in the Middle East that would pit America against hundreds of millions of Arabs and Muslims. The winners from this conflict that has caused hundreds of thousands of deaths, homelessness and trauma were first the Israelis and next to the them big oil by default.

    However, what the great inquisitive writer and journalist David Icke uncovered about George H.W. Busch was far more shocking than any of his political failings or war crimes, namely his pedophile history. That such grave accusations went uncontested by the Busch family makes David Icke all the more credible.

    As Gerald Celente has often repeated ” Harvard, Yale and Princeton, bombs, bullets and banks”. George H.W. Busch is the quintessential product of secret societies that pervade these colleges and produces the leaders of the US whose political agenda disparages peace and glorifies war.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
    , @Art Deco
  177. Liza says:

    No, don’t rest in peace, Mr. Bush.

  178. @Charles Pewitt

    Bush the wrinkled was a piece of shit and knew it:

    George Herbert Walker Bush said : ‘Sarah, if the American people ever find out what we have done, they would chase us down the street and lynch us.’

  179. 1) Bush 41 attempted to stand up to AIPAC over the ten billion loan for the settlements. THE LOBBY defeated him, and as long as the US survives, no US president will cross them again. Bush 41 lacked the courage to take the issue to the country.

    Bush 41 defeat influenced Obama. Obama did not have the senate ratify his Iran agreement as a treaty, because Obama would have lost the vote. Bush 41 was careful to embrace neo-conservative positions on ME and Israel.

    2) Vision thing deficit: Strauss and Howe in theor 1991 book GENERATIONS highlighted Bush’s use of that metonym to illustrate how Civic generations in old age, in this case the GIs, fail to impose any vision on the nation. In reality, Bush 41 had a vision but it hardly included the bulk of his voters. He sold them out on immigration and NAFTA. His vision was that legacy Americans could survive without affirmative steps to address the problems of modernity.

    3)Presumably he was a tough negotiator on international matters, but he folded on his no new-tax pledge without getting anything in return. Bob Dole would have been a better prez, I think.

  180. As a POTUS, Bush left a lot to be desired. Voted against him in fact in ’92 (though for Perot, not that carnie from Arkansas with the grasping wife). As a man, he was first rate. In terms of his public activities, the book remains open.

  181. @truthman

    HW also signed the second ADA act which put the burden of proof on the defense through the concept of disparate impact.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  182. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    It’s my suspicion but Bush regime sent mixed signals to Hussein that the US wouldn’t come to Kuwait’s defense.

    SUSPICION? Look up “April Gillespie.” She basically TOLD Saddam that the U.S. would not come to the aid of Kuwait.

  183. @Chief Seattle

    Except that the environment created by the easy birth control (and thus easy sex) revolution selects for less fecund women (pill has side effects), for lower testosterone men, and for people less inclined to have families overall.

  184. @reiner Tor

    Why did Paul Walker cross the street?

    A: He wasn’t wearing his seat belt.

    Too soon?

  185. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Russians are, despite their whiteness, fundamentally Eastern in their nature and will never be fully part of the West. They don’t need to be part of the West (especially the globo-homo West we actually have – the “proudly white” West of your imagination no longer existed by the time of the Soviet downfall) – they are their own civilization. Certain aspects of Russian civilization are worse than what we have, certain aspects are better, but most of all they are a little different. They (unlike the Chinese) are part of Christendom but a different side of it. We are the descendants of the western Romans, they are the eastern Romans (the Byzantines). We are never going to be Russian and they are never going to be Western.

    Now could the transition have been handled better? For sure, but this is mostly on the head of the Russians (with Western naivete added in – we thought that Iraq was going to be a democracy too. Same for Afghanistan. We think that everyone is really an American at heart. They ain’t). The Germans had to handle a transition to capitalism and democracy in E. Germany and they handled it a lot better because they are Germans (and because they were willing to pour a lot of $ into it, which we weren’t).

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  186. @SporadicMyrmidon

    I presume you’re referring to University Avenue?

    • Replies: @SporadicMyrmidon
  187. Lot says:
    @New Dealer

    Some like to ignore the disastrous 1990 immigration bill because it doesn’t fit their Jewspiracy narrative.

    What 1990 did in particular is turbocharge African, Central American, Islamic and Haitain migration.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  188. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    That cartoon style dominated Nickelodeon bumper commercials and Linda Ellerbee “kids news” segments in the 1990s. Looks so dated now.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  189. donut says:

    I was going to post on this before. During the run up to the war the US Ambassador April Glaspie did tell the press that Saddam asked about what would be the US response . She stated she told him we had no concerns with Iraq and Kuwait . In the middle of the day unfortunately . I couldn’t believe what I was hearing . At the time I was off from the ship and watched the news for days to see if they would run that bit again . Imagine my surprise when they didn’t .

    I still remember the shit eating grin on that c**ksucker’s face when he announced the attack on Iraq

    If our country is going to be run by criminals I’d prefer the NAZIs to what we have now .

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
  190. • Replies: @OEMIKITLOB
  191. Bush Sr’s greatest achievements:

    - increasing the rate of immigration from “shithole countries”
    - concluding NAFTA, laying the ground for the the de-industrialisation of America
    - squandering the “peace dividend”
    - cold-shouldering Russia, turning her into an enemy for a generation or more
    - launching the (((New World Order))) agenda
    - starting the “reformatting of the Middle East”
    - hoisting Dubya on the American body politic

    Pretty impressive for a one-term president.

    Rot in Pieces.

  192. Anon[182] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Pewitt

    What is it like to be such a happy person . Charles ?

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @ben tillman
  193. @John Gruskos

    Agree. And Anon, I suggest you challenge Putin to a Judo match if you doubt his manliness.

    • Replies: @Anon
  194. eah says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    the appalling Immigration Act of 1990

    Yes, it’s rather interesting that Mr Sailer would publish an ‘RIP’ about the elder Bush without mentioning the truly loathsome 1990 immigration law, which if look at the details reads more or less like you’d imagine a SJW immigration law wish list today, including things like the absurd ‘Diversity Visa’ — RINO does not begin to describe the non-conservative nature of the elder Bush (and the apple clearly didn’t fall far from the tree).

    You can see posts like these as similar to those bemoaning the increased death toll among ghetto thugs after BLM: it’s Mr Sailer doing what he thinks he can do to avoid again being called “loathsome, reprllent racist filth” — but it won’t work.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @anonymous
  195. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot

    Some like to ignore the disastrous 1990 immigration bill because it doesn’t fit their Jewspiracy narrative.

    Yeah, nothing to see here:

    https://www.congress.gov/congressional-record/2006/05/24/senate-section/article/S5062-2

    Mr. SCHUMER: Mr. President, I see my good friend from New Hampshire coming to the floor to offer his amendment. I must rise in opposition to the soon to be pending amendment, which would essentially do away with the original purpose of the diversity visa program. As a Member of the House, I helped create this program, which my colleague, Senator Kennedy, created in the Senate in 1990.

  196. @Dave Pinsen

    When your plane is hit by ant-aircraft fire and is going down, you have to bail out. Bush’s torpedo bomber was over the ocean, don’t know if he could have landed. He decided to jump rather than attempt to land on the water’s surface.

    Even then it was a miracle an American submarine happened to come by. What was the chance of that?

    The nearest island was Japanese occupied. A grisly fate would have been Bush’s had he reached it.

  197. @anon

    “What an effective ad. The Dems had to counter by calling it hate speech. They had nothing else.”

    In 1988, they called the Horton ad “Racist,” their all-purpose pejorative. When they say this it means you have them dead to rights.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @anonymous
  198. Anon[182] • Disclaimer says:
    @ThreeCranes

    What Gruskos and yourself fail to realise is that I wasn’t making fun of Putin, rather the closet cases here and elsewhere who incessantly pedestalize and fetishize the man.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  199. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

    Geroge HW Bush is my least favorite US President.

    All the promise of the Ronald Reagan 49 state sweep victory was basically given away.

    George HW Bush campaigned 4 times (2 VP, 2 President) opposing anti White “Affirmative Action” , but in practice he was FOR anti White affirmative action.

    George HW Bush was basically elected by his handler Lee Atwater on the issue of stopping the worst Willie Horton Black African American crime, but in office he did nothing – Black crime exploded under Bush Sr. I lived in NYC during Bush Sr.’s 1988-92 civilization destroying crime ~ 2,000 murders a year, terrible daily attrocities like the Central Park gang rape, Utah tourist getting murdered on the subway defending his mom, Time Square the hard core porn, teen porn district, again not even a peep out of President George HW Bush.

    And then there was the first of many pointless Bush Neo Conservative invasions of Iraq. I did a one America First anti war campaign in Nashville Tennessee. Bush Sr. was actually making ridiculous pro war speeches that this was the way we would finally make true the dream of the organizers of the United Nations making for

    A New World Order.

    My God some supposedly Conservative Republican was making this global nonsense.

    And then there was the oh so predictably Rodney King Black riots of mass lotting, even murder. Again Bush Sr was AWOL and Bush Sr. went so far as to re prosecute under double jeopardy the White police officers who dealt practically with the violent, drunk, drug addicted Black criminal Rodney King.

    Howard Stern and I had the right response to all this:

    Howard Stern said words to the effect of:

    “Rodney Deserved to get his as* kicked”.

    Chris Rock the Black AA comedian said the same in “How Not to get your as* beat by the police”.

    In all of this George HW Bush seemed totally removed, his wife Barabara Bush had never done her own shopping, didn’t know what a shopping center scanner was and Barbara Bush so much enjoyed giving dinner parties for the likes of Nelson and Winnie Mandela and promoting Colin Powell as the next US president.

    Oh I despised the Bush family – worse than the Kennedys.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  200. @Jack D

    Saddam personally asked April Glaspie, the new US ambassador to Iraq. There are many versions of what Glaspie said, but it seems that she basically said things like the US had no opinion on such Arab-Arab conflict, and that this had been a consistent American opinion since the 1960s (when Iraq already had designs on Kuwait). It’s pretty obvious that a slightly more forceful language (something like “while we don’t care about your dispute with Kuwait, we are strongly committed to Kuwaiti independence”) would have prevented Saddam from engaging in this action, which proved disastrous to all involved, including Kuwait, the US, Iraq, Saddam himself, and the whole region and the world.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/April_Glaspie?wprov=sfti1

    • Replies: @Jack D
  201. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Just leaving them the hell alone would have gone a long way. Plus a little humanitarian aid when they were at their economic nadir. Nothing that would have taken much thought or effort.

  202. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Oh do shut up.

    You think beautiful Russian women like Anna Kournikova and Maria Sharapova aren’t a great part of our European civilization?

    Would you prefer hanging out with some HIV + bisexual homies 2 miles from me now in Englewood Chicago?

    It’s always been amazing to see White European Americans have some ridiculous confused rational why we have to hate, go to war with and kill other White European people like

    The Germans
    the Serbs
    Russian

    Some other church denomination.

    I curse you and your foolish, traitor kind.

    Go live in Baltimore, fly the US flag and try to tell everyone how much you hate Russians and Love Amukun FREEDOM.

  203. @eah

    Calling Steve a Nazi is something which only stupid people on stupid comment boards would say.

  204. Ibound1 says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Agree and he could have built a Wall and arranged free trade with the Anglosphere. Anything was possible – we could have gotten back on the path we left in 1941. Bush was “superior” and an utter mediocrity

  205. Dutch Boy says:

    Deutschland – Ja, NAFTA No!

  206. J.Ross says: • Website
    @RadicalCenter

    I am unchanged in my enthusiasm for Buddy Cole (who is highly honest and critical of things gay) even as I have come to view the bakery-closing activist-normalizers and the “American Beauty joggers” with disgust.

  207. J.Ross says: • Website
    @David In TN

    Yeah, because literally everything that happens must be procrusted into an illustration of how Trump ate the sun, BBC radio talked to some flat-out liar who talked about Bush’s presidency was a time of “civility.” I remember NNtN talking about Reagan being a drooling retard, a TV commercial saying Reagan would kill us all in nuclear fire (as opposed to Soviet hardliners who just wanted us to have health care), Dukakis being stupid because of how he looked in a photo op, Bush being stupid and racist as a way of identifying him, and sundry other civilities, and that’s just from what I directly saw on TV.

  208. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:
    @David In TN

    Yeah, except it was deceptive advertising – implying that somehow George the Yalie Bush was tougher on Black rapist crime than the Mass Liberal Mike Dukakis.

    I was living in NYC during the Black crime reign of terror of Bush Sr.’s Presidency.

    The Central Park jogger gang rape
    Rev. Al Sharpton inciting Black mobs during the Tawana Brawley rape hoax.
    Crown Heights Brooklyn anti Semitic pogrom (again led by Al Sharpton)
    2,000 plus annual murders

    I wrote letters published in the NY Post calling for the death penalty and restoration of law and order and also understanding that when Democratic governments can’t enforce basic safety and punish the worst rapists and murders, regular people will start supporting authoritarians on the Right and Left.

    Donald Trump took out a full page advertisement in the NY Post demanding the death penalty for Central Park wilding gang rapists.

    And in all this – the Yalie, President George Herbert Walk Bush was just sort of around, not paying attention to anything, having lunch and then getting all excited to invade Iraq and get Saddam Hussein.

    Horrible.

    So glad this idiot, disgrace to us WASPs is now dead.

  209. @donut

    It’s worse than you imply:

    “… Ambassador (to Iraq) April Gillespie, misinformed Saddam Hussein as to our country’s position to Iraq’s claim to Kuwait. She stated that we considered Iraq’s claim on Kuwait and the threats of Saddam Hussein to invade Kuwait to be an internal matter of Iraq.” –Congressional Record, V. 148, page 140, January 24, 2002

    Parentheses mine and emphasis added.

  210. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:
    @eah

    Yep.

    Only thing different between George HW Bush and the worst Dukakis, Kennedy, Obama, Supreme Court Lib Justice liberal Democrats was these these worse ever Liberal Democrats all went to Harvard and Bush went to Yale.

    But then Bush Jr (twin of Jethro on the Beverley Hillbillies) went to both Harvard and Yale so he’s covered there.

  211. OT but the car burning season has started early in la belle France. Looks as if the usual suspects are taking advantage of the “yellow vest” (anti-Macron) protests to do some undocumented shopping. Certainly the guy standing on the burning police car looks African.

    It’s compulsory to have at least one yellow vest in your car in France (along with warning triangle and a breathalyser) so they aren’t hard to get hold of.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6449407/Fresh-violence-Paris-riot-police-use-tear-gas-batons.html

  212. Anonymous[528] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    “The first person to use the issue was Al Gore in a Democratic debate in the primary, debating Michael Dukakis,” Keller says. He raised the issue of Dukakis having supported furloughs for prisoners, including murderers. He didn’t name Willie Horton, but he raised the issue.”

    After Dukakis made it through the primary season, Keller says that Republican political strategist Lee Atwater tapped into this messaging and brought it to a new level as Dukakis squared off against George H.W. Bush.

    The above is the ad with SJW after the fact handwringing. It was a Munich moment on crime. Dems weren’t going to get caught on the wrong side of that issue again. Clinton->Super predators was a result. As soon as it faded, they went along with BLM.

    Meanwhile….does anyone in their right mind agree with the furlough program?

    Trump may get caught up in the Dems criminal ‘justice’ reform bs.

    Obama spent all his weekends he wasn’t golfing looking for Federal commutation candidates and finally found a couple thousand. A pathetically small number of the ‘majority’ of black so called non violent inmates. Because, once you weed out potential Willy Hortons thats all thats left.

  213. Jack D says:
    @reiner Tor

    It’s pretty obvious that a slightly more forceful language (something like “while we don’t care about your dispute with Kuwait, we are strongly committed to Kuwaiti independence”) would have prevented Saddam from engaging in this action,

    As I said elsewhere today, when someone says that something is “obvious” this usually means that it isn’t. It’s not at all obvious to me that Saddam would have listened and obeyed. The US later made all sorts of (what turned out to be credible) threats and ultimatums to Saddam and not once did he accede to our demands until the moment that the Delta Force pulled him out of his spider hole.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @MarkinLA
  214. Am I misremembering or are giant heads a sometime iSteve fixation?

  215. Michelle says:

    Hey, Steve,
    They are going after Neil DeGrasse Tyson for sexual “Misconduct”, assault, groping, what have you!! We are living in terrifying times.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Anon
  216. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:

    For what its worth:

    Forget Lee Atwatter’s skills…credit goes to the deeply buried fact the Willie Horton became famous because:

    https://www.pulitzer.org/winners/staff-23

    1988 Pulitzer Prize

    General News Reporting:
    Staff of Lawrence (MA) Eagle-Tribune
    For an investigation that revealed serious flaws in the Massachusetts prison furlough system and led to significant statewide reforms.

    It was a story that was irresistable.

    This is interesting because of the extent that it has been memory holed. It had to have been the product of Attwater, no? But the SJW presstitutes teed it up.

  217. anon[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    looks like the truth about jews and muslims is hateful

  218. @Diversity Heretic

    By the time it was obvious things weren’t working, he was at the “don’t care” stage of life. (And frankly, probably thought things were OK). I’d say after 2004 it got obvious the post-WW2 consensus wasn’t going to work that way anymore. I am guessing the Boomers and more than a few Gen-Xers and Millenials will need to die before those ideas are eliminated.

  219. @Chief Seattle

    Oh, come on! It was he who backed Saddam into a corner and made it impossible for him to back down by waving his little fist and shouting “This will not stand!” Instead of telling him through channels and allowing him to save face. We’re still living with the consequences of that completely unnecessary war.

  220. Franz says:

    Similarly, who was right about NAFTA and Mexico: GHW Bush or R Perot?

    It says all the rest of us need to know that the chattering class can still even ask such a question.

    “War by Migration” will continue as long as the Communist tactic called “Free Trade” exists. They have been joined at the hip since the beginning.

  221. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    Apparently, someone asked the US Ambassador to Kuwait or some mealy mouthed career State Dept. type and he gave that kind of non-answer answer as you would expect diplomats to do – that’s called “being diplomatic”.

    I believe you are looking for April Glaspie. She was the ambassador to Iraq in the 1990 and supposedly told this to Saddam in July of 1990:

    But we have no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait. I was in the American Embassy in Kuwait during the late 1960s. The instruction we had during this period was that we should express no opinion on this issue and that the issue is not associated with America. James Baker has directed our official spokesmen to emphasize this instruction. We hope you can solve this problem using any suitable methods via Klibi (Chedli Klibi, Secretary General of the Arab League) or via President Mubarak. All that we hope is that these issues are solved quickly.

  222. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jack D

    We controlled Russia, we inserted Yeltsin and then laughed at them for tolerating Yeltsin, we stole everything that wasn’t bolted down while arbitrarily banning their products, but, hey, what does anyone want, they’re Orientals.

    • Replies: @anon
  223. @Buffalo Joe

    Well there are people who say Clinton and Obama were CIA assets.

  224. Yissy says:
    @J1234

    What’s the policy for govt. provided post presidential security?

    Full secret service coverage for you and your wife till you die. Your kids till they’re 16.
    Cost is over 10M a year.

    Thanks, Obama!

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-restores-lifetime-secret-service-for-former-presidents/

  225. anon[528] • Disclaimer says:

    Annals of Anti-Anti Racism:

    OK…who really cares?

    But this is the last chance to set the record straight about the true origin of the Willie Horton PR.

    The Pulitzer Prize Committee of 1988.

    Staff of Lawrence (MA) Eagle-Tribune

    This factoid is buried under tons of Op Ed debris.

    Horton was common knowledge at the time. It was a stand alone story that won a prize.

    I suppose the campaign ad put a picture and name on the story.

    The other interesting fact was that Dukakis knew this was coming and forgot to give the scripted answer that he was sympathetic to victims to the debate gaffe answer to the infamous Kitty Dukakis rape question.

    This is the origin of the unfalsifiable claim of dogwhistle racism. The Lawrrence Eagle-Tribune wasn’t using a dog whistle.

    The origin of the Horton story has been successfully ret-conned.

  226. @David In TN

    The submarine was alerted by other US aviators of his position. Those aviators also drove off Japanese naval boats raving towards Bush 41 position.

    Do you know the details of Bush’s other two crew members…did their parachutes fail to
    Open ?

    • Replies: @nsa
  227. @Jack D

    The US later made all sorts of (what turned out to be credible) threats and ultimatums to Saddam

    The US foreign policy is unable to deal with the need of other leaders’ need to save face. Apparently they want to purposely humiliate those proclaimed to be evil dictators, which resulted in multiple catastrophes. Losing face for these dictators usually means losing power, which then results in their deaths and that of their families and second cousins etc.

    It was of course very easy for Saddam to not invade Kuwait. It was very difficult for him to withdraw once he invaded. The American ultimatums were designed to humiliate him, instead of working out a diplomatic solution which would have allowed him to spin it as some kind of political victory. He basically hoped that by standing his ground there he might somehow force the Americans to an armistice, which could then be spin into some kind of victory, allowing him to save face and save his life. It worked for a while, though not exactly in the way he had hoped for.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  228. anon[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    We controlled Russia, we inserted Yeltsin and then laughed at them for tolerating Yeltsin, we stole everything that wasn’t bolted down while arbitrarily banning their products, but, hey, what does anyone want, they’re Orientals.

    narrow it down a little bit – who is this “we”?

    who got rich while looting Russia?

    • Replies: @nsa
    , @Big Bill
  229. America’s first openly globalist President, and so a liability. He looks better today simply in comparison to his son.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  230. nsa says:
    @Discharged EE

    Wiki et al claim the other two fliers in the Avenger successfully exited but were eventually tortured (tenderized?)and eaten by the Japs. Fellow fliers reported Bush hopped out first leaving the other two to their fate…hence the nickname thereafter, Bailout Bush. There are also hilarious flight reports detailing Bush and his pals strafing Jap lifeboats for laughs….signed by the great man, himself.

  231. donut says:

    WTF Sailer ? You throw chum in the water and take a leave of absence ? Your follows are beginning to snap at one another . For god’s sake I can nay hold her anymore Capt.

  232. nsa says:
    @anon

    Who got rich while looting Russia?

    (((Who))) got rich while looting Russia? Corrected it for you……..

  233. He lost the will to live when the great love of his life,Whitey Bulger,died.

  234. llloyd says: • Website
    @Logan

    As the commander was tried and executed, that is a sure sign that he was innocent at least of the cannibalism accusation.

  235. @Ali Choudhury

    George H.W. Bush was indeed a great American president–for China.

    At some level it really does come down to “the vision thing”.

    Bush was one of these WASPs, who while thoroughly a WASP through and through and feeling entitled to lead, seem to have no understanding that in fact America’s success is a result of WASP genes+culture not some sort of “magic dirt” accident. Bush had drunk the post-war minoritarian Kool-Aid and couldn’t figure out that there’s a difference between “civil rights”–as in giving blacks a fair shake–and abandoning the Anglo/white dominance that made America great.

    Earlier generations of WASPs, who had self-confidence in their race and culture, managed to be progressive and believe in things like eugenics and immigration control to maintain racial/cultural dominance.

    Bush is essentially a demonstration that for whatever education and life experience, if you do not fundamentally “get” HBD … you actually understand nothing By HBD here, I don’t mean the intricacies of every group’s IQ scores, but the understanding that various difference peoples are in fact different–the result of eons of gene/culture interactions. And you can’t just airdrop people from a different culture in and have them “work”.

    If Bush had just had that understanding and pride in his WASP heritage, he would have been a very different president. No 1991 immigration act debacle! He would have been working to mitigate the damage of the Simpson-Mazzoli amnesty–which probably wouldn’t have happened because he would have lobbied Reagan against it. Stepped up immigration enforcement, aggressive deportation of illegals. No-NAFTA push. Trade protection from China–certainly no cheering China’s rise and pushing free trade with them.

    Unfortunately, Bush for all his all-around competence, was a boob who really didn’t understand why the America his own ancestors had created was a great nation. Having such people as your nation’s leader is a disaster.

  236. Kylie says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    “I rail often against women’s right to vote, and I’m not backing down on that.”

    Good. Neither am I.

    “However, I will mention here that I had a female relative who told me way back that there was something she didn’t trust about this guy. She was hard-left, but she liked Reagan more than GHW Bush … women’s intuition and all.”

    I was raised by a liberal in a liberal environment so it took me a while to come to my senses. Nevertheless, I always preferred Reagan to GHW Bush. The latter reminded me of a soft-centered chocolate candy.

    N.B. Unlike many on the distaff side, I am not particularly fond of chocolate.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  237. De mortuis nil nisi bonum.

    Assuming that’s a valid rule, I just don’t have a damn thing to say about the late Skull & Bonesman, and the daddy of Dubya.

  238. @AnotherDad

    Bush is essentially a demonstration that for whatever education and life experience, if you do not fundamentally “get” HBD … you actually understand nothing By HBD here, I don’t mean the intricacies of every group’s IQ scores, but the understanding that various difference peoples are in fact different–the result of eons of gene/culture interactions. And you can’t just airdrop people from a different culture in and have them “work”.

    Great paragraph! So true.

  239. Lagertha says:

    I inadvertently, met GHWB in Kennebunkport in summer, 1988. I was a house guest with a family that was buddies with the Bushes. He was totally wasted (as was Barbara) but lucid….much like my large, extended family during summer occasions. We argued about policy, but it was mostly about (me arguing, duh) Russia falling, possibly, into the hands of oligarchs (Russia still has tons of untapped oil) – he was drunk, but polite, very befuddled…and Barbara, with her pearls (visual photograph of that), stole him away from the young blonde chick! Hahhaaaa – true story.

  240. J.Ross says: • Website

    Near future goal: forbid (or further limit) discussion of migrants using “hate speech” laws
    Globalists double down on everything (which is good for acceleration). The UN response to massive public disapproval of the Merkelboner will be to not let anybody criticize it. Yeah it’s the UN, yes this means nothing here, but if you live in Western Europe then these guidelines will effectively become your local law. Even if not implemented to the letter they show the stunning rigidity of our clueless and hatred-animated betters.

  241. Bubba says:
    @tyrone

    Thanks for mentioning the great Lee Atwater. After he died in 1991 the GOP lost its fight until candidate Trump came along in 2015. Karl Rove tried to follow in Atwater’s footsteps but he never fought back against the liberal agenda nor did he fight for Americans. Rove always let the insane liberals set the agenda and never countered their non-stop, anti-American venom.

    I wish President Trump would award the Medal of Freedom posthumously to Lee Atwater.

  242. J.Ross says: • Website

    GHW Bush also signed the lunatic Americans with Disabilities Act, a dishonest, unenforceable, utopian basis for parasitic lawsuits. Under the ADA doorknobs are technically forbidden, they’re supposed to be hooks and paddles.

  243. Be creative:

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  244. @Jack D

    Russians are, despite their whiteness, fundamentally Eastern in their nature and will never be fully part of the West….

    I don’t fundamentally disagree with this. I’m on board with my Huntington–Russia, Orthodox is a related but separate civilization from Western Christendom. A cousin.

    I was writing for brevity, not trying to go book length. The idea wasn’t that we’d magically westernize them, but that we’d tie them into the West.

    Specifically the thrust should have been to put the blame on “communism” not Russia. Be magnimous. Avoid any victory lap gloating. Include them as international security partners. Generous aid, investment and trade terms to link them to Europe and the broader West. We’d have been much, much, much better off seeing Russia rise than the Chinese.

    This would always have been difficult to pull off smoothly. And in fairness to Bush I, the worst of it came later unleashing the Harvard geniuses under Clinton, encouraging the looters and then letting the neocons loose to dream and preen and scheme with the US as sole superpower. The Russians actually got *poorer* after communism ended! That’s peachy. And a rightfully proud nationalistic Russian reaction to the US–neocon–bumptious hyperpower asininty was pretty inevitable. “Hey you didn’t beat us, we are big swinging dicks too!”

    As I said–missed opportunity.

    • Agree: Hunsdon
  245. @pyrrhus

    I never seen definitive “proof” that GHWB was actually in Dallas at 12:30 on 11/22/63. Certainly he was there in the morning, but the official story was that he was in Tyler, Texas, 100 miles away at the time of the murder.

    Could be.

    Nor have I ever seen any “proof” that he was actually photographed leaning against the Texas School Book Depository approximately one hour after the assassination.

    What I have seen is an authentic FBI memo from J. Edgar Hoover, dated 11/29/63, to the State Department’s Director of the Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

    That authentic FBI memo named “George Bush of the CIA” as one of two high-level attendees of a classified briefing the day after the Kennedy assassination in which the FBI laid out what they knew or suspected about anti-Castro Cuban reaction to the president’s murder.

    In other words, the CIA needed an insider to find out what the FBI had on the anti-Castro Cuban groups, all of whom were being run by the CIA itself.

    GHWB was their man at this meeting, a meeting which took place while the designated CIA patsy was still very much alive.

  246. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Michelle

    Bill Cosby was probably innocent, MeToo is a sacrificial defense mechanism for Hollywood pedophiles, Weinstein will probably get off, and I don’t care what a judge thinks about the guilt of a Nubian cosmologer when Judge Bernard Friedman rules that the unanaesthetized non-consensual non-medical mutilation of little girls is what George Washington wanted.

  247. “Similarly, who was right about NAFTA and Mexico: GHW Bush or R Perot?”

    If you ask the top 1%, GHW Bush was. If you look at NAFTA’s results toward the 99%, especially toward the bottom 50%, (e.g. ca.10-15 million manufacturing jobs lost/outsourced), as well as partially leading to the White Death or the Opiod crisis among the middle and lower white working classes, no question at all that it’s Perot that was proven correct.

    In point of fact the current understanding of the definition of outsourcing came about around the time of NAFTA. When one thinks of outsourcing US jobs, NAFTA is pointed to as a relevant example.

    And, unlike the early ’90′s, in 2018, the US has now several decades of data to examine NAFTA in light of jobs outsourced, the White Death, and other factors. But, opening Pamex up to US businessmen (the top 1%) it’s been a peachy keen godsend trade agreement.

    For example, while not directly related to NAFTA, the 2007 recession (one of the worst in US history) occurred after NAFTA was firmly entrenched and its byproduct, runaway illegal immigration was beginning to to to the foreground in US policy. Funny how NAFTA opened up other issues that weren’t even considered at the time of its passage.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  248. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @AnotherDad

    Steve’s written before about how WASPs have interbred with local elites in Hawaii. Maybe Bush thought that there’d eventually be Chinese-WASP happas running things.

    • Replies: @Anon
  249. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    Russians are, despite their whiteness, fundamentally Eastern in their nature and will never be fully part of the West.

    You could say similar things about Greeks, Israelis and others. And I imagine you will be able to say that increasingly about Western Europeans too. Either what was the West is being left behind, or what is the West is rapidly changing. I don’t think guys who lived as recently as Harry Truman would even recognize us anymore.

    They (unlike the Chinese) are part of Christendom but a different side of it.

    The key part is they are a part of Christendom and are not hostile to it. Meanwhile I don’t think you can say that about the West today. Werner Von Braun claimed he chose to emigrate to the USA and help us because we were Christians and the Soviets were atheists and he did not want to help them by providing them with such advanced technology. If he were alive today, I wonder what his take would be on the flip-flop of this difference.

    PS. I actually think Russians are more like Americans than many other so called Western nations. Now I am scoping this observation to rural, white and working class Americans. But it seems from anecdotal viewing of youtube videos, Russians are similar to our rednecks in terms of jovial behavior when it comes to off roading, guns, drinking, and other such low brow endeavors. Here are two funny clips, one of Russian soldiers messing around and getting their tank stuck in the mud, and the other of US soldiers doing the same. Obviously this isn’t scientific, but I do think there is some similarity in the attitudes between our country boys and theirs that I don’t see with other Euros.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  250. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Yemenis got a bum rap in a movie, RULES OF ENGAGEMENT.

    http://www.alhewar.com/RulesEngage.htm

    Now, they got a real bum rap.

  251. @Anon

    “I don’t think he was a net positive for the country . . .”

    That’s one way to put it. Another is Steve’s way: “The nature of Bush’s relationship with the CIA before he became director of the CIA in the mid-1970s, supposedly the first “outsider” director, remains murky. “

    GHWB’s relationship with the CIA “remains murky”?

    No.

    Here is J. Edgar Hoover himself to clear it up for us.

    On 11/23/63, the day after JFK’s murder, the CIA needed to know what the FBI suspected about the reactions in the anti-Castro Cuban groups, all of whom were run by the CIA.

    Who did they send to this crucial meeting, a meeting that took place while the CIA-designated patsy was still very much alive?

    “Mr. George Bush of the CIA

  252. Thea says:
    @Chief Seattle

    As Greg Cochran says, every society selects for something.

  253. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Michelle

    They are going after Neil DeGrasse Tyson for sexual “Misconduct”, assault, groping, what have you!!

    How come no woman’s going after Sailer, Unz, Roberts, Dinh, Buchanan, Saker, Karlin, Margolis, Derbyshire, Weissberg, Giraldi, and etc? This site needs more studs to get some #MeToo Controversy going.

    At least Tyson is Mr. Rocket Man.

  254. istevefan says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No. Germany and the German people are a nation. There was no other logical outcome but reunification.

    Every nation of the Warsaw Pact was communist. But they all existed as separate nations regardless of their form of government. The lone exception was East Germany. Once communism was thrown off, all those nations could revert to a new form of government. But since East Germany only existed as a communist state, there was no longer a reason for it to exist post communism. Unification was the logical outcome.

    That is why North Korea is so adamant on keeping their communist rule. If communism ever ceases in North Korea, there is no longer any reason for it to exist as a separate nation. Reunification would occur.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  255. @S. Anonyia

    I’m not arguing about what kind of Deep State/Necocon stuff the ex-President was involved with, Mr. Anonyia. He was not harming America as a political officeholder right up through the day he died like Juan McAmnesty and earlier, the U-boat commander, “Lion (sack o’ shit) of the Senate”, Ted Kennedy.

    Mr. Bush can die or not die, and it doesn’t bother me either way, just like, say (quite randomly) the Commie Daniel Ortega (also from the way past). However, for the case of the 2 Senators mentioned above. if the only way to get them to stop harming America was for them to die, then, on the days they died, I was very glad of it. They could have resigned long ago, and retired to obscurity, in which case I’d not be particularly happy on the day they died.

    I hope that explains my case, as I think you may not have understood fully. Thx.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  256. Big Bill says:
    @anon

    Talk to the US Federal Agents who were commissioned to travel around Russia supervising the distribution of ownership in Russian businesses to the workers (i.e. the new owners).

    One US Customs agent I knew would show up in a chauffeured Russian limousine, followed by (as she put it) some tough looking Russian guys in black limos. The new worker ownership arrangement would be explained to the chump workers, and the black limo guys would buy them out immediately for some rubles + bottles of vodka.

    I always wondered who informed the black limo guys of what distributions were being done, when and where they were being done, and how many rubles + vodka it would take to buy up ownership from the chump workers.

  257. @Kylie

    You, Ann Coulter, and I should get together and start a movement, then, Kylie. My aunt said more than that GHW Bush was a squish (if that is the description you are getting at with the candy). She said he just scared her.

    I will always have a spot in my heart for Ronnie Reagan. I got a series going about Ronnie vs. Donnie (Reagan vs. Trump, of course). Part 1 – after the intro., with more to come.

    You can send the chocolate over this way, if you’re not doing anything with it. After a while, the boy’s gonna get wise to my pilfering his Halloween candy.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  258. @AnotherDad

    My only argument with that good comment (as usual) is that civil rites were NOT some deal to give black people a fair shake. It was a way to favor them over white people, in employment, law and other institutions of society. LBJ was much worse for America, than GHW Bush, his son, and Bill Clinton were, as bad as they were, on their worst days.

  259. Kylie says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You never, ever disappoint.

  260. Ibound1 says:
    @Art Deco

    A superior man and mediocre to poor President. It is hardly to his credit others were even worse. NAFTA with Mexico, remaining in NATO after the fall of the USSR and not dismantling our military industrial invasion complex, sending poor signals to Iraq leading to the war, doing nothing, nothing, about immigration when it wasn’t too late – all of those things harmed our nation. Maybe they were fine for the Bush family.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  261. @Charles Pewitt

    Someone correct me if I’m incorrect here but I have a faint recollection that the Dems made sure Bush couldn’t fulfill his campaign promise and, naturally, he took the hit since he was the face and voice of the promise.

  262. Flip says:
    @LondonBob

    I remember reading about a supposed former Israeli spy who said that the Mossad was thinking about assasinating Bush due to his opposition.

  263. @anonymous

    I lived in NYC during Bush Sr.’s 1988-92 civilization destroying crime ~ 2,000 murders a year, terrible daily attrocities like the Central Park gang rape, Utah tourist getting murdered on the subway defending his mom, Time Square the hard core porn, teen porn district, again not even a peep out of President George HW Bush

    I lived in NYC then, too. To be fair, this was a result of Democrat mayors, Mario Cuomo and Dem prosecutors like Bob Morgenthau.

    Black crime exploded under Bush Sr

    I’d wager much of the explosive growth was in Hispanic crime, in particular Puerto Rican crime. Notice NYC got much safer once Puerto Ricans left the city by the 10s of thousands in the mid 90s. They went to Holyoke Mass., Bristol Ct and other unfortunate places that are now violent ghettos. The Happy Land Social Club massacre was committed by a Cuban, for what that’s worth.

  264. anon[565] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    G.H.W. Bush was by all accounts a nice guy.

    i hear other accounts apparently

  265. Bubba says:
    @Dr. X

    I remember being absolutely aghast in 1992 when he was defeated by the obvious con artist Clinton and his shrew of a wife…

    My reaction was the same at the time. Clinton reminded me of the guy who cheated, plagiarized and brown-nosed his way through college.

    When I saw the Clintons and the Gores dancing like hippie teenagers to Fleetwood Mac after winning the election, I was struck at how undignified they looked…

    Same here. And on that awful night, Clinton should have publicly thanked Ross Perot and the massive amount of GOP voters who stayed home. Bill did not get 50% of the vote either time he won. Bush had an incredibly high approval rating after the first Gulf War and quickly blew it.

    I actually went to a Clinton campaign rally at a state university campus in August, 1991. A large number of people were there, but it was not very enthusiastic. There was no groundswell of support at that rally – it was very quiet and muted compared to the Reagan campaign rallies in ’84. However, one thing was evident – Bill was acting like he was on coke when he gave his speech.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  266. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymouse

    Overlooked is his sensible refusal to pursue Saddam Hussein back to Baghdad after dealing with the 1991 Kuwait incident, there being “no exit scenario” as he is reported to have said.

    I don’t know. The thing about Bush was he was wishy-washy about everything. He never took a strong stance on anything. He talked tough about Hussein, but he didn’t finish the job. He told Kurds and Shias to rise up in expectation of liberation but then left them at the mercy of Hussein who butchered them.

    In retrospect, I think it would have been better if US did either nothing or finished the job. Let Hussein have Kuwait or go all in and take him out.

    Why would it have been better to take out Hussein in the Gulf War? Almost all the world was with the US. Russia, China, Europe, and most Arab nations. Syria and Saudis. Iran was happy to see Hussein punished too. Also, had the US moved in, Shias and Kurds, who would have made the solid majority of Iraqis, would have been happy to cooperate with the US.

    But US left Hussein in power. Shias and Kurds felt betrayed by the US. Also, because Hussein remained in power, there was the sanctions that killed 100,000s of people with hunger and disease. At the time of the Gulf War, Iraq was decent nation with okay living standards. People were not crazed and destitute. By the time US invaded in 2003, so many Iraqis had become zombified and deranged from yrs of poverty, desperation, and distrust. Bush II didn’t invade a fresh nation with healthy people but a traumatized population with bitterness all around.

    Also, US was pretty much all alone in 2003. All major nations stayed out except UK that got labeled as poodle. The Coalition of the Swilling were mercenary forces that took bribes from the US. It was pathetic. And what did Iraqis do the minute the US invaded. They looted and took apart the entire city because they’d been driven to utter desperation by merciless sanctions.

    And Middle East nations did whatever to sabotage US invasion. In the Gulf War, most Arab and Muslim nations were supportive because Hussein had acted arrogant and aggressive. Iranians remembered the 80s war. Syria never got along with Iraq. Most Muslim nations saw Hussein as a blowhard and knucklehead. So, when Hussein attacked Kuwait, they were troubled and wanted to see him crushed or gone. And, the US reason for the Gulf War seemed sound enough. Aiding a small weak nation from aggression.

    But what was US reason in the Gulf War? WMD and spreading democracy. This meant that ANY Muslim nation could be targeted as ‘terrorist’ and/or for ‘democracy building’. And this meant neighboring nations did everything to sabotage US project in Iraq. Iran wooed the new Shia regime. Syria and Turkey defacto offered refuge to the resistance.

    Bush I was willy nilly on too many things. He first supported the verdict in the Rodney King trial and then condemned it once the riots began. Conservatives didn’t trust him, but then, why would Libs support a Republican? He didn’t make a lot of enemies but didn’t make many loyal friends.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  267. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Bush’s worst legacy. His parenting was just awful. But maybe we can’t blame him. He was a busy man with lot on his hand. So, maybe the fault was with Barbara Bush.

  268. Bush hated Drumpf. This alone makes him a hero and a good person.

  269. George Bush Sr Is No WWII Hero

    By John S. McDonald
    1-1-04

    I am an 82 year old Navy pilot and I am outraged at
    television’s depiction of George Bush Sr.’s Pacific
    experiences. Now, I hear a book is forthcoming -
    Unbelievable!! I was in the Pacific at the same time as Bush
    and flew the same Avenger airplane. A small room in the rear
    of the Avenger was occupied by the radioman. The gunner went
    through the room to get up to his turret. Both wore a harness
    to which a chest type parachute could be attached – The gunner
    had to come down out of the turret to put on his chute. Bush
    said he was hit by anti-aircraft fire and the plane caught
    fire. Bush’s squadron was primarily used for patrol and saw
    very little combat. Bush claimed he warned the crew, over the
    intercom, to get out – got no answer and he could not yell
    back because of the armor plate behind him. He decided they
    were dead, so he bailed out. First, he failed to say he
    switched his mike from radio to intercom. Then being blocked
    by the armor is a bold faced lie! There was a sizable gap on
    either side of the armor. I used this space to call to my crew
    several times. The tough old Avenger simply did not catch
    fire!! It had self sealing gas tanks. In six months of
    operations, I never saw an Avenger catch fire. If the oil or
    hydraulic systems were damaged, great clouds of white smoke
    would stream out of the plane. I have no idea how many times i
    saw planes returning to their carriers trailing smoke but
    never a fire. What really happened? It was the pilots job to
    hold the plane level and slow it down so the crew could get
    out. Most certainly, the radioman was helping the gunner with
    his chute when Bush panicked and left the plane. Then the
    plane rolled into a dive giving the crew no chance. This story
    went through the fleet and all the Avenger pilots i knew were
    shocked at what they heard. I heard speculation of a
    Courts-Martial. Bush was very young. By his own admission, he
    reacted under stress. It is terrifying to have the cockpit
    fill with smoke. Possibly, he can be excused for reacting to
    fear and accepting it as another war time tragedy – but he has
    been glorified on the History channel, a book is being
    published, and worst of all, an aircraft carrier is to be
    named for him. This is unbelievable!! Bush performed badly and
    was certainly no hero. John S. McDonald

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  270. @Dave Pinsen

    Sue ‘em. They’re breaching their terms of service. They make money off you. In so doing, they must follow their TOS, And they didn’t.

  271. “Only an average president, but 1989-1993 was a better time and America was a much better place to live in.”

    i rate 1991 or 1992 as the all time peak of the united states, and probably the peak rating of any civilization in history, if nations could be rated by chess elo scores or something like that. maybe in the game Civilization. it was all slowly downhill from there.

    ‘Bush? “Brainless, but loyal.”’
    of course GH was relatively smart, but the point stands. GH had little or no vision, and neocons informed his few, dim ideas on the larger scale future of the globe. a new world order, a thousand points of light, this stuff was nonsense.

    megadeth was way, way closer to being accurate with their 1990 song “Holy Wars”. at the crossroads of history, with the cold war ending, which everybody at the time thought was by far the main important thing happening in the history of the world, the middle east wars that were starting to rise, and which GH was getting the US into, would grow over time to completely consume all the west’s resources.

    the cold war will be just be a chapter in history books now, whereas the population explosion of muslims, trying to take over the world, will be the central story of the 21st century. gorbachev is also on the cover of rust in peace. i used to think helmut kohl was too, but apparently that’s von weizsacker.

    “Simply the never-ending Middle East wars are a blight on this country, financially, socially and personally.”

    indeed.

  272. “George HW Bush lost the presidency because Ross Perot popped him on #immigration”

    GH lost re-election because perot took away too many of his votes in some states, which clinton then won by not having his votes split and winner take all default.

    1992 vote totals in millions: clinton 44, bush 39, perot 19.

    conservatively guessing that 75 percent of those perot votes would have been bush votes in a straight 1 on 1 election, bush should have been re-elected in a landslide. perot took away 19 million votes! 19 million!

    not even steve seems to have ever analyzed this election.

  273. @nsa

    No matter how much the two creeps compromised the actual interests of the American population, it was never enough for the jooies who demanded total fealty. Even the gratuitous destruction of Iraq wasn’t enough. Cost the silly old coot his second term……

    So, your theory is Ross Perot as an Elder of Zion? OK!

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  274. @Dave Pinsen

    Seriously, Dave, you dispassionately stated two easily demonstrable facts. You need to sue.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  275. @Anon

    Anon[182] wrote:

    It is unacceptable to lie to Russians, because as we all know Russians never ever tell lies and we need to reciprocate their blessed behaviors. That , and also have you seen Mr Putin ride shirtless on a horse ?

    The reason to avoid NATO expansion to the East and to avoid unnecessarily antagonizing Russia is not a matter of being “nice” to Russia. It is a matter of serving the interests of the United States of America.

    And a Russia that is integrated into Europe, a lowering of tensions (not to mention defense budgets), and, above all, peace are all most assuredly in the interest of the United States.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Anon
  276. Love him or hate him, the single coolest and most noble thing about Bush (if true) is the story told that, when asked why he didn’t bail out once his fuel tanks were on fire, he replied “Because I hadn’t completed the mission.”

    That right there is everything that made the United States Navy great.

    (Now, of course, ships are built without urinals….)

  277. @AnotherDad

    I doubt Bush was truly that much of a minoritarian, He probably did have pride in his culture…it’s just that was just a WASP who wanted to rule over an empire, simple as that. He wanted to set up his descendants nicely for the future.

    Also America’s success isn’t that contingent on WASPs, unless you are using an extremely broad definition. Many of our greatest pioneers/settlers were of southern stock, and even when they were English or Scottish they definitely didn’t consider themselves WASPs or share the qualities stereotypically associated with WASPS.

    Australia is another Anglo-founded settler nation, I don’t think they are so obsessed with WASPs or are even aware of the concept. They seem laidback.

    I think when people say WASPs they really mean the stodgy heirs to the Massachusetts/English Puritan tradition and nothing more.

    Also, if the U.S was primarily German/Irish/French Catholic it would probably be almost as well-off as it is today, perhaps in some respects (foreign adventurism, vacation days) better off.

  278. @anony-mouse

    It’s tasteless as all Hell to run something like the the day after a man has died.

  279. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @PhysicistDave

    It is unacceptable to lie to Russians, because as we all know Russians never ever tell lies and we need to reciprocate their blessed behaviors. That , and also have you seen Mr Putin ride shirtless on a horse ?

    The reason to avoid NATO expansion to the East and to avoid unnecessarily antagonizing Russia is not a matter of being “nice” to Russia. It is a matter of serving the interests of the United States of America.

    Actually, Gorbachev acted in good faith. Also, Yeltsin was more than willing to have good relations with the West. And Russia’s trust was most evident in allowing foreigners to dictate terms of privatization. It was the West, esp as it came under Jewish Power, that took advantage of a weakened Russia. It was like pimp treating a whore.

    Current ‘Western’ animus against Russia is that of a pimp angry at a whore that got away.

  280. J.Ross says: • Website
    @ben tillman

    I want to believe that this is how our courts work, but I suspect it’s more like this:

  281. @Art Deco

    I’m sure Bush got a chuckle out of being called ‘brainless’ by a man whose foray into the food processing business went belly up after less than a year, whose law career ‘ere entering politics was limited to a few years as a small town associate, who never held any kind of executive position until he was 55 years old, and who was a manifest incompetent as an administrator.

    Bush was a failure. He spent his life working to thwart his biological interests.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Mr. Anon
  282. @Charles Pewitt

    It would be very interesting to find the press reports before & after the 1990 Immigration Act was passed? Presumably the NYT, Time & Newsweek just had vague blather to report on it, but WTF was the American Right thinking? National Review? American Spectator? Vdare once said that Joe Sobran was agnostic on immigration and if so, it certainly recasts his reputation for Bravery & Acumen to more of sentimentality. From a distance, you wonder if everyone in the West was sleepwalking through 1990, just giddy & dazed from the fall of the Berlin Wall.
    *While Everyone Was Sleeping, Kennedy, Schumer, Bush & the Immigration Lawyers set the gears in motion to destroy Western Civ.*

  283. @Anon

    Ah, sorry. It’s hard to gauge tone in comments.

  284. @Mr. Anon

    One way or another, the West was going to have to bail out the East.

    John Mitchell was Nixon’s AG. He was reputed to have said, “If you know you are going to have to eat shit, you don’t want to take small bites.”

    That describes German reunification.

  285. Bubba says:
    @Lot

    LOL! Linda Ellerbee was the most smug and revolting teleprompter reader in the 80′s. Bella Abzug or Shirley Chisolm would have been more pleasing to my ears and eyes, though not by much.

    • Replies: @Lot
  286. @Anon

    Sometimes that might be a fitting response to one of Charles’s comments.

    But not this time.

    He is right to be angry. It’s healthy, and it’s necessary.

  287. @David Davenport

    Some American generals apparently did argue for permission to pursue and pound on the retreating Iraqi army to the outskirts of BagDaddy-o just to make a more definitive statement about who’s boss, then withdrawing US forces from Iraq. Our armed forces would have kept outside of the Baghdad city limits, supposedly. This pursuit would have needed about two weeks more than Pres. Bush Sr. allowed.

    Colin Powell talked HWB out of this. The Highway of Death looked bad on tv.

  288. @AnotherDad

    Astute comment! Your characterization of George HW Bush is true of many, if not most of the “Greatest Generation,” and the Boomers. Sadly, progress may have to proceed one funeral at a time.

  289. @Redneck farmer

    I realize the following will be hard for a lot of commenters to grasp. Most of G.W.’s mistakes were caused by his being a mid-20th century establishment type. They wouldn’t think immigration increases would be a problem, because earlier waves of immigration had been fine.

    They would if they were thoughtful. Obviously, immigration impoverishes the natives, as Ben Franklin pointed out 150 years earlier.

  290. @John Lilburne

    A classic deep state operative who at least betrayed his country in a very gentlemanly and cordial way.

    That is perfect.

  291. @RichardTaylor

    Funny how many of these Establishment guys are really just Yes Men without that much personal agency.

    Yep, human cattle.

  292. OT because I don’t give a damn about this or any other Bush and don’t get why anyone would except in a historical way and I’m not feeling nostalgic:

    Trump’s luck:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/peterallenparis/status/1068894531662348288

    If Macron is such a boy wonder and Trump such a nightmare how come it’s Paris, not D.C. that’s burning?

    (slight hyperbole to make a point)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  293. @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:

    In any case, Bush never said this. Apparently, someone asked the US Ambassador to Kuwait or some mealy mouthed career State Dept. type and he gave that kind of non-answer answer as you would expect diplomats to do – that’s called “being diplomatic”. If Saddam took that as a green light from Bush to invade a neighboring state, that was on him.

    Well, here is a good analysis from Stephen Walt based on a WikiLeaks release of US Ambassador April Glaspie’s cable giving details of Glaspie’s conversation with Saddam.

    Walt’s takeaway conclusion:

    In short, I think it is clear from the cable that the United States did unwittingly give a green light to Saddam, and certainly no more than a barely flickering yellow light. Glaspie certainly didn’t make it clear to him what would happen if he used force against Kuwait.

    Walt is an establishment expert on international relations and a professor at Harvard, but he has a reputation for being a lot more forthright and truthful than many of his peers: e.g., he has gotten himself in some trouble by trying to take a realist view of US policy towards Israel.

    I find his analysis convincing: i.e., the Bush Administration really screwed up and Ambassador Glaspie was just following orders.

    I’m not convinced this was an intentional, cunning ploy by Bush to trap Saddam: as the saying goes, never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    , @Jack D
  294. Consider certain aspects of the GI generation that we will not see again:
    GI presidents held the WH from 1961-1993. The 1st, JFK, had mourned his older brother ,Joe, killed . flying an experimental aircraft over France. JFK himself had acted heroically after his boat was rammed.
    Bush 41 narrowly dodged cannibalistic Japanese soldiers.

    The Boomers , Gen X, and Millenials wont match that service record profile

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    , @JMcG
  295. Kylie says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    “My aunt said more than that GHW Bush was a squish (if that is the description you are getting at with the candy). She said he just scared her.”

    Yes. He was a squish. I’m not sure if he scared me so much as made me uneasy. Those soft-centers are reliably unreliable. And given his background, Bush’s apparent need to be liked was unnerving. I thought the WASP types understood they were elected to lead, whether or not they were liked.

    Reagan may not have been a war hero but he was certainly stalwart, as his response to the attempt on his life showed.

  296. anon[200] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/01/books/chapters/1st-chapter-bush-tragedy.html?pagewanted=print

    Before finance for its own sake, Bushes and Walkers were involved with finances of industrial manufacturing that made stuff.

    As such, they hailed from St Louis and Columbus, OH closer to where stuff got made.

    Its not that this is virtuous in itself, but they weren’t isolated New Englanders. The financial center of gravity was Pittsburg (steel), Cleveland (oil) and so forth. All the New England stuff had gone to hell (Textiles,whaling, etc.)

    A different world from what I remember of the rustbelt.

    The Walkers went broke in MD. and had to move to St Louis. Prescot worked in Columbus.

    Whatever you think you know about WASPS is probably lacking nuance.

  297. @Jim Don Bob

    HW also signed the second ADA act which put the burden of proof on the defense through the concept of disparate impact…

    …which, for some unstated reason, is never applied to issues of gun control.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  298. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Had America withdrawn from NATO in say 1991 it would be a far happier country today.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  299. @Logan

    George Bush son of Prescott bush, financier of both Lenin’ s and Hitler’s revolution.

    Since Prescott didn’t even go into the banking business till 1924, the year Lenin died, this seems unlikely.

    Who sold Lenin the rope?

    Obviously, someone perspicacious enough to realize the Reds were already facing a shortage of hemp. As Lenin himself implied in his famous prediction.

  300. snorlax says:
    @LondonBob

    Quite the contrary, Matlock confirms that not only was there no agreement, but the subject never even came up during the Bush-Gorbachev summits. https://jackmatlock.com/2014/04/nato-expansion-was-there-a-promise/

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    , @reiner Tor
  301. @European-American

    If Macron is such a boy wonder and Trump such a nightmare how come it’s Paris, not D.C. that’s burning?

    There’s still stuff left to burn in Paris.

  302. @Bill Jones

    Clinton (in)famously said “All the great Presidents have been war Presidents.”

    That comes from historians. A black mark upon their profession.

    A first-rate president like Coolidge (is that damning with faint praise?) doesn’t give them much to write about.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  303. @Joe Levantine

    George Busch father, like son, was a creature of the deep state who was implicated with the assassination of JFK. A globalist to his bare bones, he had no qualms about pushing for regime change in South Africa in a way that left the White population out in the cold.

  304. @John

    Disagree. Mexico is tremendously interesting. In large part, due to its proximity to the U.S., and the way it has affected its politics. Had the ruling class just given up Texas (which, despite the missions, and a few towns, they never succeeded in colonizing) it would have been different.

    The U.S. – Mexican War had a similar effect that WWI had on the English aristocracy, it put a huge dent in their numbers, and with the criollo (white) population badly hurt, set the stage for foreign puppets, mestizo presidents, etc.

    Interesting now is that the Mexican Civil War killed millions, but emigration to the U.S. was not nearly as great then as it is now.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  305. Anonymous[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Last presidency before Zionists gained total power.

    Wow.

  306. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @PhysicistDave

    There was an excellent PBS documentary about the Gulf War a few years after that pointed out another screwup. The Bush admin gave Norman Schwarzkopf little guidance about dictating terms of the armistice to the Iraqi government, and he basically got outfoxed by them. They asked for permission to use their aviation, on account of all the bridges that we’d destroyed, and he said yes. They then used that, plus their 2 surviving Republican Guard divisions to defeat the Kurds and Sunnis. We later established no fly zones, but the revolts had been crushed by then.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  307. @istevefan

    Every nation of the Warsaw Pact was communist. But they all existed as separate nations regardless of their form of government. The lone exception was East Germany. Once communism was thrown off, all those nations could revert to a new form of government. But since East Germany only existed as a communist state, there was no longer a reason for it to exist post communism. Unification was the logical outcome.

    Except the USSR. It, too, only existed as a communist state, and there was no longer a reason for it to exist post communism.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @dfordoom
  308. @Houston 1992

    Houston 1992 wrote:

    Consider certain aspects of the GI generation that we will not see again: GI presidents held the WH from 1961-1993.

    Presumably Ike would count as a GI! And, Truman saw action during WW I.

    So, your dates should be 1945-1993, I suppose. On the other hand, Reagan spent most of his time in the service in the “First Motion Picture Unit.” Yeah, he was in the army, but still…

  309. Anonymous[265] • Disclaimer says:

    Reading all the praise and hagiography for GHW, one is struck by the non mention of one of his big, pet, projects as President, namely the disastrous American intervention in Somalia.

    Goaded into it by the notoriously bigoted nitwits of the ‘Congressional Black Caucus’ – a bigger man would have ignored those fools with the silence and contempt they deserve – Bush like his son was actuated by the need to show he ‘cared’ about black people, and possibly the need to assuage his guilt by the enormous letting of Arab blood unleashed by the US military in Iraq, which, of course, was purely down to his personal behest. In certain Muslim circles his name is spoken of as a Hitler.

    Anyway, the Somali adventure was a catastrophic, abject failure resulting in the repulsive sight of the public butchery of US military personnel.

    As Oscar Wilde might have put it, ‘The Unspeakable butchering the Uneatable’.

    • Replies: @David Davenport
  310. @San Fernando Curt

    Woodrow Wilson, JFK, Richard Nixon beat him by a couple of decades.

  311. @Anon

    Yes, in retrospect, starting the war with very strong words (Saddam=Hitler), but then leaving the job unfinished, and then, in a new turn of events, going in again over a decade later to finally topple Saddam, was clearly the worst of both worlds. I cannot really think of a worse course of events.

  312. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    PNTR with China and GATT had a worse effect than NAFTA.

  313. @istevefan

    We (American and Russian country boys) both defend ungrateful “sophisticates” who would be sold into slavery without us.

  314. LondonBob says:
    @kaganovitch

    Morton Meyerson was perhaps the key figure in Perot’s decision to run, Mort was an ardent Zionist and very much involved in the organised Jewish community. Running a third party candidate to split the vote was done to Taft with Roosevelt, so maybe.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  315. RVBlake says:
    @LondonBob

    I’d forgotten about Bush and Baker’s lack of enthusiasm for Israeli entanglements…That was definitely another era.

  316. @South Texas Guy

    About a 1/3 of the population of Mexico lived outside of it until the war ended.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  317. @Reg Cæsar

    That’s a great point! Why have I never before heard it anywhere?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  318. @anon

    Had America withdrawn from NATO in say 1991 it would be a far happier country today.

    So would Russia.

    The other European countries, Eastern and Western, might not have been, but so what? They would have come to their own equilibrium with Russia and each other. Who knows, maybe the EU would have invited Russia in at an early date, and all would have been well.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  319. LondonBob says:
    @snorlax

    Matlock seems to confirm there were broad agreements but circumstances change and you can’t bind your successors, so yes and no.

    Anyway I would be interested when and who made the decision to loot Russia rather seek to rehabilitate Russia, Versaille treatment as opposed to Marshall plan policy. Arch neocon Woolsey was appointed CIA Director by Clinton, followed by Zionist Deutch, Rubin was Secretary of the Treasury, Albright Secretary of State. Perhaps we can’t say if Bush would have pursued Clinton’s policy, but we do know what Clinton did, and the Russians had the Reuben brothers and Bill Browders of the world descend on their country.

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/uncategorized/so-who-really-tried-to-blackmail-yeltsin-takeover-russia-nsa-cia-or-investment-bankers/

  320. @reiner Tor

    “Except the USSR. It, too, only existed as a communist state, and there was no longer a reason for it to exist post communism.”

    The USSR was pretty much identical border-wise to the Russia of the Romanovs. It could have remained so and would probably have been a better place. The “stans” – the predominantly Muslim states to the south-east – are now a lot more corrupt than Russia (no pin-up itself).

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Art Deco
  321. @snorlax

    Because it was obvious that the rest of those countries would still be on the Russian side of the fence. The Yalta agreement was still in force, and no one ever invalidated it. By the way, the Yalta agreement itself was not really an agreement – it was only later implicitly and tacitly accepted that east of the river Elbe it was the Soviet sphere of influence and west of it the American sphere of influence.

    The Russians reluctantly accepted (they had little choice anyway) the eastern expansion of NATO in 1999, only for NATO to start a war of unprovoked aggression against the only friend of Russia left in the region. And that, literally a few days after the NATO enlargement. The Russians then reluctantly accepted another NATO expansion. But around 2005, with the Ukrainian Orange Revolution, they made it clear that Ukraine was their red line. Until 2014, it didn’t even have electoral support in Ukraine. Still floating the idea was bound to make the Russians overly hostile.

    However, this does sound like an oral agreement:

    the USSR would not use force in Eastern Europe and the U.S. would not “take advantage” of changes there

    Of course it was not “binding,” because it was not even put into writing. But similarly, neither was the Yalta “agreement,” or the Cuban crisis resolution, and a number of similar issues.

    By the way, it’s also obvious that until at least 1999, the Russians did act in good faith. Since then, they obviously haven’t.

  322. @PiltdownMan

    It’s possible most of those countries would be better off. NATO gives a false sense of security, so for example the Baltic countries spent next to nothing on defense. The NATO membership makes them especially susceptible to bad Western influence, including gay marriage and similar issues. An acute sense of betrayal would insulate us from all this to an extent.

  323. @YetAnotherAnon

    Russia is better off without the stans.

  324. @Bubba

    “However, one thing was evident – Bill (Clinton) was acting like he was on coke when he gave his speech.”

    Oh now. Just because his convicted coke-dealing brother, Roger Clinton, was quoted on an umdercover tape as saying that Bill “had a nose like a vacuum cleaner”.

    Says who?

    The widow of the private detective, Jerry Parks, hired by Vince Foster to collect dirt on Bill Clinton on behalf of Hillary Clinton, probably to be used as leverage in any future Clinton divorce proceedings.

    Did Vince Foster have the dirt on Bill Clinton, including tapes and photos?

    Yes.

    Did Bill find out?

    Of course.

    You figure out the rest . . .

    http://contrariansview.org/onashisite/WebVAX/ETnew/wclin14Jul96.html

    • Replies: @Bubba
  325. @Redneck farmer

    Just did a quick look to confirm my assertion, and I’m not seeing anywhere near 1/3 of Mexico’s pop. left during the revolution. It did go up, of course, but I’m not seeing (or remembering reading about) anywhere near on that level. I could be wrong, though.

  326. @republic

    Certainly GHWB was in Dallas earlier in the morning on 11/22/63. However, (officially) he and Barbara were in Tyler, Texas – 100 miles from Dallas – at the time of the assassination at 12:30 pm.

    Could be, but consider this:

    GHWB himself called the FBI (to accuse a different “lone-nut”) before “Oswald” had even been arrested (!!!) and told them that he, Bush, would be at the Dallas Sheraton Hotel.

    And, there is that authentic photo taken during the aftermath, outside the Texas School Book Depository, supposedly of GHWB’s look-a-like, leaning against the building.

    (That photo was first published in Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry’s 1969 book on the JFK murder, although Curry did not draw attention to it.)

    So, was GHWB really in Dealey Plaza in the immediate aftermath of the assassination, and if so, what kind of liar would claim (as Bush did) that he couldn’t remember where he was at the time?

    Very probably, but just from the photo, I can’t be absolutely 100% positive.

    However, here’s a better one:

    George Walker Bush (43, not 41) was tasked n the late 1970′s with “pressuring” (threatening) a man who had very casual contact with “Oswald” in 1959. (IOW, Bush 43 was very useful to the Deep State at least by the 1970′s.)

    Why?

    Because in the late 1970′s, the CIA was trying to talk to (coordinate/intimidate/eliminate if necessary) every single person on earth who ever talked to “Oswald” to control their description of “Oswald”.

    Why?

    Because the CIA was afraid “uncoordinated” witnesses would make it obvious that there was something very, very wrong with the Warren Commission’s narrative/biography of “Oswald”. That Warren Commission biography – the background of the “lone-nut” – was key to keeping concealed some other crucial Deep State secrets, secrets still hidden.

  327. Art Deco says:
    @Sandy Berger's Socks

    Only an average president, but 1989-1993 was a better time and America was a much better place to live in.

    The mini-era had its good points. One might recall, though, that the homicide rate was twice what it is today, the life expectancy lower, and real incomes lower.

  328. Art Deco says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The USSR was pretty much identical border-wise to the Russia of the Romanovs. It could have remained so and would probably have been a better place.

    Only in your imagination. None of Russia’s problems would be ameliorated by having a larger population of irritated ethnic minorities.

  329. republic says:

    https://archive.org/details/GeorgeBushTheUnauthorizedBiography

    Webster Tarpley wrote this unauthorized biography in 1988

    Subtitle: AMERICAN CALIGULA

    Lionel nation had a good wrap up The uncensored history
    Of George HW Bush

  330. Will Jones [AKA "Joel Arenson"] says:

    “In general, Bush was a prodigy of all-aroundness: e.g., after the war he graduated from Yale in 2.5 years while being captain of the baseball team and making it to the College World Series final twice.”

    I’m sure that it isn’t so much superior intelligence that Bush had but connections. Rich kids like him have always had it easy in places like Harvard. It’s arranged that they’re given easy courses to pass so they can be on things that they really want to do like Baseball. As for him passing Harvard in 2.5 years, I would be interested if his courses and grades were put out there for an unbiased investigator to really go over them. I doubt if he ever took a full load of courses. Why would he? He was set for life with the old man’s money.

    It would be easier to convince me of the man’s superior intelligence if he had been a self-made multi-millionaire, starting with nothing.

  331. MarkinLA says:
    @snorlax

    The US government endlessly claimed that the US (and NATO) was not an enemy of the Russian people but only communism. When they had a chance to prove it they showed the Russian people that they were considered the enemy.

    If the goal was to end the Cold War for good you have to take the necessary baby steps to achieve the goal. The US and NATO did not.

  332. MarkinLA says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He was the patriarch of a family that has continually tried to screw us over and continue to do so like any dynasty. Without him there would be no GWB and heb.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  333. Corvinus says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    “There are many unsavory aspects in Trump’s business history…”

    You mean potentially illegal aspects.

    “but nothing compared to the darkness weaved on the tax-payer dime by the likes of the Bush and Clinton syndicates”

    You’re going to have to do better than just platitudes.

    “The Mueller “investigation” is an obfuscation operation designed to deflect attention away from the misdeeds of the Obama Administration and the criminality of the Clinton Foundation.”

    No need to put investigation in quotes. And the obfuscation is all you.

    “I say this as someone who voted for Saint Obama twice. Do you have a dot on your head?”

    No, I’m not Indian.

  334. MarkinLA says:
    @prime noticer

    He had to. He put together a coalition with a lot of Arab states. The coalition would have fallen apart and it would have been messy. The UN resolution only called for expelling Iraq from Kuwait.

  335. Art Deco says:
    @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Nixon was an intellectual from nowhere as opposed to an Eastern son of wealth, thus really being an avatar politician for the silent majority, not an administrator.

    Nixon was from an exurb of Los Angeles. He came from the same class of people as did Robert Dole, Walter Mondale, Ronald Reagan, George McGovern, and Hubert Humphrey. It’s just that Nixon was (now and again) irritable about his social betters and these others weren’t. Nixon’s close friends – Bebe Rebozo, Robert Abplanalp, and Walter Annenberg – were all wealthy men (self-made in the case of Rebozo and Abplanalp) who were somewhat off-center in the country club venues of their prime.

    A bit too moderate and emotional at times, but at least fought more for his constituency

    He wasn’t antagonistic to that constituency, and spoke to it with respect. They didn’t get much out of the Administration substantively. (The source of their troubles was in state capitals, city halls, and the courts, by and large).

    than Brahmins like Kissinger and the Bushes that never thought outside the Ivy League genius box

    Kissinger was the son of a high school teacher who more or less imploded as a provider around age 51. IIRC, Paula Kissinger started a catering business to support the family because her husband was only earning meagre sums as a jobbing bookkeeper. The term ‘Brahmin’ does not mean what you fancy it means.

    George Bush left New England in 1948 and went to work as a salesman in West Texas, later starting his own business. Brother Prescott dropped out of school and landed a job with Pan Am, living in Latin America for five years. Brother Jonathan tried his hand at earning a living as a stage actor for a number of years. Brother Bucky was more conventional in his choices, but even he made it a point to not settle in New England or the BosWash corridor; he spent his life in St. Louis. Both George Bush and his brother Jonathan lived on short rations for a number of years as young men. Is this how they think in the Ivy League genius box?

    – heck he put them to work. Ideally they’d have a common American nationalist conservative goal, but they didn’t. In politics you need both the rabblerouser with the ear to the masses, and the suited up fellow traveler hunched over books and numbers. Without both working together, we have the present GOP.

    No clue who you fancy Nixon ‘put to work’. If you’re talking about his administration, his personnel system was atrocious. If you’re talking about macroeconomic policy, the Nixon Administration lurched from one failure to another.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Reg Cæsar
  336. MarkinLA says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Only because Chinese labor was even cheaper than Mexican labor – and less likely to cause trouble. Without NAFTA and the push for globalism, there would never have been a GATT and China.

  337. MarkinLA says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Are you sure we didn’t want them crushed? hasn’t that been one of our policies – foment insurrection and then do nothing while the dissidents are crushed?

  338. Art Deco says:
    @Sean

    It is difficult to seem like a competent leader when you have the thankless task of winding up a lost war.

    It wasn’t lost in 1969 and Nixon, Laird, and Kissinger did not think of their task in those terms. Kissinger stated it thus: to withdraw American troops as a matter of policy and not as a matter of defeat. Gen. Creighton Abrams was able after 1968 to implement a successful strategy which neutered the Viet Cong as a military force (and implemented an agrarian reform in South VietNam). The South VietNam government fell in 1975 to a conventional invasion by the North VietNam government, who might have been stopped had the U.S. military provided air cover to the South VietNam government, something Congress would not permit.

    Watergate was an attempt to gather information on something which remains unclear to this day. John Dean’s wife may have been married to a clown, she certainly had some colourful friends

    Again, the Nixon Administration had two interlocking crews running criminal operations, one directed by Egil Krogh, the other by Gordon Liddy. You also had Charles Colson’s staff (though they appear to have never gotten their more inventive plans off the drawing board). I think it’s likely Dean account of his doings between January and June of 1972 is fictional and Gordon Liddy has in the intervening years been quite vehement about that (with some corroboration from others). Both Liddy and Dean are agreed that John Mitchell and Jeb Magruder were fully cognizant of just what Liddy’s actual duties were at the Committee to Re-Elect the President and that Liddy made elaborate presentations to both men in jonesing for a budget for his operation. We also have it from Dean that John Ehrlichman knew all about (and, in fact had ordered) the Colson office’s preliminary planning to firebomb the Brookings Institution. If I’m not mistaken, Magruder and Liddy have confirmed that Gordon Strachan was in the loop on the activities of the Liddy crew at the CRP. So, Ehrlichman, Mitchell, and H.R. Haldeman’s secretary know all about these shenanigans and somehow the President is unawares?

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Sean
  339. MarkinLA says:
    @Jack D

    The real issue is do you want a war or don’t you? It is obvious that both GHWB and GWB wanted war with Iraq and did everything they could to get one.

  340. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon

    He was a decorated combat veteran who founded his own business and made himself a wealthy man from that business. (See his 1984 financial disclosures. Their net worth at that time indicates either no inheritance or only modest inheritance from either father).

    Both Nixon and Bush built a satisfactory family life (though it’s a reasonable inference that both Bushes were more at home in the world than either of the Nixons).

    Nixon had some successes in foreign policy, and not everyone sitting in that chair would have done what he did. His economic policies were an utter mess. The Bush crew made no major mistakes. In re the Nixon crew, there were only mistakes.

    People on these boards fancy rough trade, so Saddam Hussein being booted out of Kuwait bothers them. Normal people would mark that as an accomplishment.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  341. Art Deco says:
    @Ibound1

    A superior man and mediocre to poor President. It is hardly to his credit others were even worse. NAFTA with Mexico,

    You vastly overestimate the economic significance of trade deals.

    remaining in NATO after the fall of the USSR and not dismantling our military industrial invasion complex,

    I find it amusing how the alt-right adopts the framing and diction of the Chomskyite left. MBITRW, the ratio of military spending to domestic product declined without interruption from 1985 to 2000. Unlike other species of public spending, the military share actually fluctuates with external circumstances.

    sending poor signals to Iraq leading to the war,

    It’s also amusing that palaeo types and the red-haze left fancy that Saddam Hussein mobilizes a massive troop force and seizes a neighboring country because April Glaspie didn’t use the secret handshake.

    doing nothing, nothing, about immigration when it wasn’t too late – all of those things harmed our nation. Maybe they were fine for the Bush family.

    The Bushes are otiose about that generally and quite perverse in the case of W. That having been said, the only times since 1930 that the Republicans have held the Presidency and both houses of Congress was from 1953 to 1955 (when the Senate was divided 50-50), from January to May of 2001 (when any problem Republican in the Senate could derail any piece of legislation he cared to), and from 2003 to 2007 (where they were hampered by the Senate’s inane parliamentary rules and wherein the Republicans had a mean of 226 seats in the House). It would have been a close shave even if you’d had a committed president.

  342. Art Deco says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    I think his very mediocrity was a factor in the career you describe–he could always be counted on not to rock the boat with a genuinely original idea.

    So, in response to discrete examples of accomplishment, you tell me he was mediocre because reasons.

    No clue what, in the minds of those on these boards, would count as an ‘original’ idea (or why ‘originality’ makes for good policy).

  343. Art Deco says:
    @ben tillman

    Bush was a failure. He spent his life working to thwart his biological interests.

    This is a nonsense statement.

  344. MarkinLA says:
    @Dr. X

    Yeah, he wasn’t half bad. Unfortunately for us, the bad half part was him becoming a politician and screwing us. If he had only stayed in the good half part.

  345. @Bragadocious

    Don’t forget Bakers law firm represents the Saudis in all claims against 9/11. It is often thought the GHWB was the Saudi’s bitch in the USA. Not his son held hands with a Saudi Prince.

  346. JMcG says:
    @Houston 1992

    JFK was more highly refined scum than Bill Clinton, but scum nonetheless. He may have behaved well after he had his small, highly maneuverable PT boat rammed by a much larger Japanese destroyer, instantly killing two of his crew, but the point is he had no business in command. In his personal life he was rotten to the core.
    His brother Ted famously left Mary Joe Kopechne to drown in an act of the most despicable cravenness.
    His son, JFK junior killed himself, his wife, and her sister by flying his small plane in conditions for which he was completely unprepared.
    His older brother, Joe, seems to have genuinely died a heroe’s death for what that’s worth.
    The Kennedy clan has been an unmitigated disaster for this country and for everyone and everything it comes in contact with.

  347. @Art Deco

    Saddam Hussein mobilizes a massive troop force and seizes a neighboring country because April Glaspie didn’t use the secret handshake.

    Why did he even ask Glaspie, in your opinion, if he’d have invaded Kuwait anyway?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  348. Lot says:
    @Bubba

    Didn’t know she was a MSM anchorwoman beforehand. I do remember the smug.

    She had several different Nick tv shows, mostly newsmagazine style or educational specials that aired at 5am commercial-free, with the idea that teachers would set their VCR then play it later in class.

  349. Lot says:
    @Chief Seattle

    Carlsbad is developing pretty quickly but still very nice. The locals are OK with development but picky and won’t approve just anything because of “jobs” or “more tax revenue.”

  350. Art Deco says:
    @reiner Tor

    1. Just what did he ask her? Proper translation, black letters.

    2. And bloody why does it matter? Is it your contention that his risk assessment (in this case, that the United States would ship hundreds of thousands of troops thousands of miles) would turn crucially on some vague phrases from a career diplomat George Bush couldn’t have picked out of a police line-up?

  351. Art Deco says:
    @sayless

    He had a business to run and five children. You didn’t when you were five.

  352. Art Deco says:
    @Joe Levantine

    I have lived to see how this ex CIA man and Yale graduate would entrap a semi bedouin dictator named Saddam Hussein into a conflict that would drag the U S into an imperial war in the Middle East

    Saddam Hussein’s father and stepfather were both sedentary village dwellers and Saddam spent most of his upbringing with an uncle in Baghdad.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  353. @Redneck farmer

    NAFTA set the template for all, repeat, ALL trade agreements that have since come, most notably GATT and PNTR. Do not let NAFTA off the hook, which helped lead directly to the White Death (e.g. opioid crisis that has caused the total US White births to be outpaced by White deaths per yr).

    Repeat, do NOT let NAFTA off the hook re: permanent long term damage done to the US economy, the working class/middle classes, particularly in the Rust Belt States and even the South. Some might opine ‘but the opioids come from Asia, including China, don’t they?’. Yes they do. But the main reason unemployed whites are taking them is due in no small part to employment loss due to trade agreements such as NAFTA. As the White Death began in earnest in the late ’90′s/early ’00′s, roughly ten yrs after NAFTA’s passage, there is a direct cause and effect to job loss and opioid addiction. Funny how depression among whites wasn’t much of “a thing” until after trade agreements such as NAFTA caused the loss of millions upon millions of US jobs. Funny how that tends to work.

    Unlike PNTR and most other recent trade organizations, agreements, etc. NAFTA has been around for over 25 yrs. and thus has had a longer time to inflict more direct damage on the economy. President Trump recently signed a new trade agreement to basically “update” or extend NAFTA, perhaps to the entire South American continent. That will be just great, fine and dandy for the top 1%.

  354. Art Deco says:
    @John Lilburne

    George Bush son of Prescott bush, financier of both Lenin’ s and Hitler’s revolution.

    He was nothing of the kind. Brown Brothers Harriman raised capital for enterprises all over the world, and that included some industrial concerns in Germany during the Weimar period and during subsequent periods as well.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  355. @Art Deco

    “You vastly overestimate the economic significance of trade deals.”

    Spoken like a member of the top 1%.

    And you vastly underestimate the direct economic impact of trade agreements. What exactly about outsourcing US jobs, closing down factories, laying off US workers, and opening up shop in nations whose policies regarding doing business for foreign/globalist/multinational corporations don’t you understand? So, about 10-15 million jobs lost due to outsourcing, laying off of workers, illegal immigration, has little to no direct impact on the US economy? That’s what you’re basically saying.

    Keep in mind that NAFTA and its stepchildren trade agreements lead to unintended consequences such as the White Death/Opioid Crisis; Runaway Illegal immigration; Other policies such as the H-1B Visa program is also a pet issue for the top 1%. Rather than hire native born Americans in the tech industry, they’d prefer to insource non-citizens at half the rate they’d have to pay Americans, with no paying for benefits, pension, health care, etc. Also, ever notice that tech jobs for the most part are heavily non-unionized? Wonder why tech workers never think to organize into a union so that their interests can be better represented? It is simply an insult to one’s intelligence that a nation that has pioneered the global tech industry, and that has universities still among the world’s top in training future STEM workers cannot at all find enough native born American tech workers to hire.

    The current concept of outsourcing, and all the above mentioned unintended but direct consequences are the result of NAFTA and the later trade agreements that have followed. NAFTA is the template for outsourcing of US jobs which of course directly impacts the long term health of the US economy.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  356. @Anonymous

    Black Hawk down Mogadishu 1993

    Reading all the praise and hagiography for GHW, one is struck by the non mention of one of his big, pet, projects as President, namely the disastrous American intervention in Somalia.

    Who was Prez in Oct. 1993?

    <a href =

    The Battle of Mogadishu, or Day of the Rangers, was part of Operation Gothic Serpent. It was fought on 3–4 October 1993, in Mogadishu, Somalia, between forces of the United States—supported by UNOSOM II—and Somali militiamen loyal to the self-proclaimed president-to-be Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who had support from armed fighters. The battle is also referred to as the First Battle of Mogadishu, to distinguish it amongst the nine major Battles of Mogadishu during the decades-long Somali…

    See more on en.wikipedia.org ·

  357. @Redneck farmer

    I stopped voting for Boomers and Silents a few years ago. Dinosaurs stuck back in America’s glory days with no new answers for our modern problems. And they’ve infected some Gen X like Paul Ryan and Ted Cruz with their anachronistic mentality. Why won’t voters put them out to pasture? Ok, I did vote for Trump. But that’s my last Boomer vote!

  358. @Polynikes

    Reagan did well but Bush fumbled the ball crossing the goal line. The deep state is now doing a Jim Marshall and running the ball back for the other team.

  359. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco

    He was a decorated combat veteran who founded his own business and made himself a wealthy man from that business. (See his 1984 financial disclosures. Their net worth at that time indicates either no inheritance or only modest inheritance from either father).

    As did any number of other people.

    Both Nixon and Bush built a satisfactory family life (though it’s a reasonable inference that both Bushes were more at home in the world than either of the Nixons).

    Again, as did any number of other people, including my father, father-in-law, and uncle.

    The Bush crew made no major mistakes.

    The Immigration Act of 1990. The Americans with Disabilities Act. Both signed by Bush. All major mistakes. NAFTA – negotiated by Bush. The ridiculous Panama Invasion. Bush did nothing good for the actual American Nation. He was only really in his element while waging war.

    People on these boards fancy rough trade,

    Projection, Art? Leave your own private life out of this.

    And people hereabouts don’t favor thugs like Hussein. They favor having the government of thier country mind our own goddamned business.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  360. Mr. Anon says:
    @ben tillman

    Bush was a failure. He spent his life working to thwart his biological interests.

    The failure known as Art Deco certainly seems very animated in defending Bush’s memory.

    Maybe failures stick together.

  361. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Kissinger was a penniless refugee. After his first year in high school, he began attending school at night and worked in a shaving brush factory during the day. However, Kissinger had a very good war. As a German speaker he was placed in counter-intelligence and rose rapidly in responsibility (the cream rises to the top – his superiors quickly realized that he was a very sharp guy). There was an element of luck (originally the Army was going to send him to Lafayette to study engineering but the program was cancelled). After the war it was Harvard, undergrad, PhD and immediate faculty appointment and on from there.

  362. Jack D says:
    @PhysicistDave

    So you would agree that “Bush goaded Hussein into invading Kuwait” is not a true statement?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  363. Jack D says:
    @reiner Tor

    We didn’t own the butcher Saddam any opportunity to save face. He didn’t allow his enemies to save face. Nor their necks. If losing face had caused Saddam to be deposed that would have been a GOOD outcome. However, as it was, Saddam, through his ruthlessness, withstood the humiliating loss in Kuwait and remained in his palaces.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    , @reiner Tor
  364. MarkinLA says:
    @Jack D

    What was the goal? If it was to start a war then we did exactly as we did. If it was to get Iraq to leave Kuwait with as little damage as possible, then we failed.

  365. bjondo says:

    Iraq’s legitimate invasion of Kuwait none of US’s business.
    Kuwait was waging economic war (with US secret backer) against Iraq.
    Saddam tried for 2 years to come to some accomodation with Kuwait.
    Kuwait refused. Rabbit gives finger to a wolf? No way.

    US waging the war and wanted an invasion by Saddam.

    Thus, April Glaspie’s deception.

    Then US lied saying Iraq had tanks and soldiers at S. Arabia’s border ready to invade.

    Lie.

    And

    Kuwait was at one time part of Iraq.

    5ds

  366. Kylie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Coolidge is my favorite president.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  367. @Art Deco

    And yet his way of doing politics reflects a Bedouin mentality rather than that of a city dweller. Saddam Hussein was one if those rare politicians who thought that a man in charge of public office should respect and stick to his promises. When the Arab League pledged monetary aid to Lebanon at the end of its devastating civil war, Hussein was the only one to honour his promise among all the Arab Chiefs despite being entangled by a costly war with Iran. He took American Ambassador April Glasby’s word about American impartiality in the Iraqi Kuwaity conflict. Most business people, including some Americans, who dealt with the Iraqi government agreed that he was a man of honour despite being a tyrant. His naivety when dealing with matters of international politics does not imply a sophisticated person who was up to the task; in this sense he was more of a Bedouin than a man urban manners.
    He was played for a fool in his relationship with America and his country paid dearly for it.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  368. I remember in the 1988 election when Bush beat Iron Mike Dukakis in a blow out. If it had been a prize fight the ref would have stopped it. Bush even won California, thanks in part to the help from GOP Governor Pete Wilson. How times have changed in the Golden State. Most of the Republicans left the state in disgust during recent decades.

  369. @LondonBob

    Huh, I completely forgot about Meyerson. Is there any evidence that he was decisive influence on Perot campaign?

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  370. dfordoom says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    Except the USSR. It, too, only existed as a communist state, and there was no longer a reason for it to exist post communism.

    The world would be a much safer place today if the USSR still existed.

  371. WHAT says:
    @snorlax

    Ukraine as an object(it will never ever be a subject or agent lol) of that particular agreement ceased to exist in 2014. Ergo, russians made moves to protect their security, as they should have.

    Any so-called “agreement” with anglo, written or not, has no credibility afer Yugo bombings anyway.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  372. Dannyboy says:

    Fuck George Bush and his entire Yankee family.

    Hopefully his “New World Order” ass is rotting in Hell as we speak.

  373. @reiner Tor

    HW also signed the second ADA act which put the burden of proof on the defense through the concept of disparate impact…

    …which, for some unstated reason, is never applied to issues of gun control.

    That’s a great point! Why have I never before heard it anywhere?

    I’ve made it so many times in the comments here, I feel like a broken record. You’re the first to have picked up on it!

  374. @WHAT

    Any so-called “agreement” with anglo, written or not, has no credibility afer Yugo bombings anyway.

    Perfidious Albion’s seed?

    Ukraine as an object(it will never ever be a subject or agent lol)

    Ukraine and Belarus a century ago were known as “Little Russia” and “White Russia”. The latter still is, in most neighboring languages.

  375. @Art Deco

    No clue who you fancy Nixon ‘put to work’. If you’re talking about his administration, his personnel system was atrocious.

    Nixon stood up for, even fell on his sword for, his underlings, long after they deserved it. How many bosses would do that?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  376. Sean says:
    @Art Deco

    In 1966 Enoch Powell was asked for his opinion on what America should do about the Vietnam war by Dr Kissinger, Powell told Kissinger

    Kissinger made no comment, but later wrote to Powell staying that he should not take the silence as indicating disagreement. There was never any possibility of American victory in Vietnam without calling out the reserves as the army’s premier tactician General Harold Johnson (Chief of Staff of the United States Army from 1964 to 1968) said would have been necessary to win; a non-starter because of the threat that China would come in as they had in the Korean war. Yet the US army had little choice but to engage the enemy’s main formations, which had to be prevented from securing base areas where they could concentrate. This was cthe onventional warfare that had been disparaged as failing in Vietnam.

    General Creighton Abrams’s PR spin was he took emphasis away from what Westmoreland dubbed attrition. However Abrams’s first big operation resulted in the Battle of Hamburger Hill, a political disaster that effectively curtailed Abrams’s freedom to continue with such operations, It simply was not possible for both domestic and foreign policy reasons for America to use balls to the wall conventional warfare, and the main force North Vietnamese units were the problem that stopped counter insurgency being the panacea that JFK was led to believe, and many after have claimed. Korea and Vietnam were clear defeats, and it was China all along. Kissinger visited Chou in 1971, and signed America’s own Treaty of Paris ending the ground force US Vietnam war in 1973. China had to be got of side so they could tell Hanoi to end it. Fantasic as it seems the later bombing under Nixon was to bring Hanoi to negotiations: the US had to unleash a horrific campaign of bombing to batter Hanoi into accepting American capitulation. The North Vietnamese were loving it, they knew they could not be beaten because they controlled whether there were engagements with US forces, giving an option to simply avoid battle with US forces if the situation warranted it. As Johnson realised, the North Vietnamese regular units would always keep their casualties below what they considered a prohibitive level, and could not be swept away by US firepower unless America unleashed it’s full strength, which risked a land war with China.

    WALT Rostow was isolated by Kennedy’s minions when he advocated attacking North Vietnam and invading Laos, but the more hawkish President Johnson elevated him to national security adviser. Milne demonstrates skillfully that LBJ’s bombing policy came largely from Rostow, while his relentless positive spin kept the besieged president from knowing the full extent of the catastrophe until public opinion had turned against him… the unrepentant prophet of America’s victory over communism.

    Gordon Liddy was sued by Dean over an allegation that the Watergate bugs were actually planted on Dean’s orders so he could find out if the Democrats had information connecting him to a woman associated with a stripper and a call girl racket centered on the Watergate building.. Doesn’t mean it is true, but the location of the bugs was puzzling as they were apparently not placed on top Dem officials or anywhere that Democratic secret strategy meetings would be discussed. They were on the phone of a low ranking person, but some one who might easily be suspected of being aware of the escort dates. Nixon certainly knew there was illegal activity by his staff, but the motive for the Watergate operation and who was behind it remains unclear to this day.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  377. @Art Deco

    You’ve made 9000 comments about HW Bush, Art Deco.

    That is a lot of time and energy on a dead guy.

    Are you one of his relatives or former staffers or something?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Art Deco
  378. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mick Dundee

    During Bush’s vice presidency I got a ride in an Avenger. I can’t speak to the pilot’s report since this aircraft, like most surviving TBMs, had been reworked internally for fire fighting and the original configuration was much changed. I do remember the pilot/owner stating that at that time it was generally talked of in the warbird community that Bush had probably panicked and not done the maximum to get his crew out but that there was no proving it and for that reason the matter was best left alone.

    For what it’s worth, from a Monday morning quarterback perspective seventy years on, one of the great tragedies of the American WWII effort was that pilot training simply wasn’t very good in those days. It got a lot better in the jet days because it had to. Probably the pinnacle of USAF military pilot training was in the T-34/T-28/T-33 days, although the T-38 is a magnificent machine by any standard. (The Tweet is a glorified Cessna 310.) And letting eighteen year olds fly combat is probably not the best of all ideas either. But there was a war on, as the old guys told me when I was a kid.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonym
  379. @Jack D

    I didn’t say you owed him anything.

    I merely stated that if the goal was to evict him from Kuwait (and prevent further similar behavior), with as little later unintended side effects and as little cost as possible, then the policy chosen was very bad.

    I guess you will argue that the US didn’t want war, but its policies did very little to prevent it. It was bad for you, Americans. It was also bad for the rest of the world, but you might not care for others. I thought you might care for yourself.

    The policy of

    - not warning Saddam against an invasion
    - then when it happened, not letting him out of it
    - but then letting him in power, but with crippling sanctions and constant military harassment
    - and then taking him out over a decade later

    seems to have been a pretty bad policy, at least in hindsight you can certainly say that. It was bad for you.

    Saddam, through his ruthlessness, withstood the humiliating loss in Kuwait and remained in his palaces.

    You still don’t understand the world, and don’t even try to do so. It was not nearly as humiliating as withdrawing right after the invasion. He stayed in power despite the brutal American onslaught, and kept his country.

  380. @Jack D

    Jack D asked me:

    So you would agree that “Bush goaded Hussein into invading Kuwait” is not a true statement?

    Well, I don’t know for sure. I think a reasoanble explanation, as Walt argues, is that the Bush 41 Administration was simply incompetent when it came to foreign policy. Which is pretty funny, considering that the MSM is now extolling Bush as this man-of-the-world who had a deep understanding of the new global order.

    Bush was head of the CIA at one point, and when he was an undergrad at Yale, Yale was a well-known recruiting ground for the Company (e.g., W. F. Buckley). So, it all could have been a dastardly convoluted plan to lure Saddam onto a destructive path. I leaned in that direction back at the time (although of course I had no way of being sure).

    If you read the April Glaspie dispatch I linked to, I think it is overwhelmingly clear that she did in fact give Saddam what any reasonable person would interpret as a “green light” to invade Kuwait (I’ll hand it to Ms. Glaspie — her report was very detailed and informative). But was this just stupidity, either on her part or, as Steve Walt argues, more likely on the part of the Bush 41 Administration as a whole?

    As Schiller said, “Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain.”

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  381. LondonBob says:
    @kaganovitch

    You have to your own googling.

    I will guess that Perot got a lot more media coverage, and of a favourable kind, than Pat Buchanan did.

  382. @MarkinLA

    AGREED, Mark, but read my reply to S. Anonyia. cc: MarkInLA

  383. Mr. Anon says:
    @S. Anonyia

    Art Deco is a university librarian; he has a lot of time on his hands. Also a massive sense of inferiority, which results in his smug, petulant, annoying behavior.

    • Agree: Bubba
  384. Art Deco says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Spoken like a member of the top 1%.

    No, spoken like someone who has actually read econometric studies by advocates of liberal trade regimes.

  385. Art Deco says:
    @S. Anonyia

    No about 20 comments over the three threads the moderator has started on the topic. About half my comments were on side issues raised, not about the late President himself.

  386. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon

    As did any number of other people.

    No, building your own business and making yourself wealthy from that business is quite unusual. It’s something a low-single digit % of the male population manage. Most people who start their own business close it within a modest run of years because any earnings enhancement from self-employment is cancelled out by the added hassle.

    As did any number of other people.

    Yes, other people do this, but most people’s family lives are messy and disfigured in some way. His isn’t.

    And people hereabouts don’t favor thugs like Hussein. T

    Who am I going to believe, you or my own eyes?

    The statement was that he was a ‘mediocrity’, which is an inane judgment to make about a man who never failed at anything in his life and had some unusual accomplishments. Who are the non-mediocre people in your gas-filled head?

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  387. Art Deco says:
    @PhysicistDave

    If you read the April Glaspie dispatch I linked to, I think it is overwhelmingly clear that she did in fact give Saddam what any reasonable person would interpret as a “green light” to invade Kuwait (I’ll hand it to Ms. Glaspie

    Rubbish. But palaso narratives (c. Thomas Fleming, 1992) require this be true, so it’s ‘clear’.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @PhysicistDave
  388. Art Deco says:
    @Sean

    Sean, South VietNam fell to a conventional invasion in the first four months of 1975. The VietCong was never a political factor in post-war VietNam because by 1975 its existence on the ground was notional. That’s not going to change no matter how much distracting verbiage you produce, even if you name check Enoch Powell.

    • Replies: @Sean
  389. Art Deco says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nixon stood up for, even fell on his sword for, his underlings, long after they deserved it.

    Which ones?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  390. Art Deco says:
    @Joe Levantine

    And yet his way of doing politics reflects a Bedouin mentality rather than that of a city dweller. Saddam Hussein was one if those rare politicians who thought that a man in charge of public office should respect and stick to his promises.

    Mr. Anon assures me that there are no admirers of Saddam Hussein on these boards.

  391. Ibound1 says:
    @Art Deco

    You vastly overestimate the economic significance of trade deals.

    You vastly underestimate the economic significance of trade deals.
    Not much of an argument now is it?
    But why don’t you look to see how our manufacturing was gutted by NAFTA and China in the WTO without an exchange rate mechanism – exactly as the critics said it would be

    I find it amusing how the alt-right adopts the framing and diction of the Chomskyite left. MBITRW, the ratio of military spending to domestic product declined without interruption from 1985 to 2000. Unlike other species of public spending, the military share actually fluctuates with external circumstances.

    Im not alt-right. Ad hominem is not an argument either. And if you note my conversation was not about the level of military spending (where we are still the highest in the world by far) but on our defense posture and obligations. You miss again

    It’s also amusing that palaeo types and the red-haze left fancy that Saddam Hussein mobilizes a massive troop force and seizes a neighboring country because April Glaspie didn’t use the secret handshake.

    Im not a palaeo type whatever that is. Glaspie screwed up. You cannot be the hero and the goat at the same time. Had she told him – do not go into Kuwait and he went ahead anyway, you would have a point. But you don’t have a point. She screwed up and she worked for Bush

    It would have been a close shave [doing something about immigration] even if you’d had a committed president.

    Like I said. He did nothing on immigration and didn’t even try. The fact that Clinton did not, Obama did not, and Bush II did nothing does not excuse him. We sent our jobs to Mexico and at the time – Bush stated this would solve the illegal immigration issues. He was wrong. You dont get credit for being wrong.

    Superior Man and worse than mediocre President.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Art Deco
    , @Art Deco
  392. @Art Deco

    Well, isn’t that the definition of a “cover-up”? Your staff does wrong, you learn of it, but don’t sack them, let alone turn them in. Then pay the price yourself.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  393. Art Deco says:
    @Ibound1

    Only in your imagination have the incremental adjustments found in trade deals over the last 40-odd years ‘gutted’ manufacturing. Manufacturing output in real terms is higher than it was in 1970, but does employ fewer people. Also, the industrial mix of the United States has changed, with manufacturing accounting for a lower share of output than was the case 40-odd years ago. The same story applies all over the occidental world. The one affluent country where manufacturing has retained its position over the last generation (more or less) is Japan, which has been economically stagnant that whole time.

    I’d suggest you review the work of Bela Belassa on the effects of trade liberalization on welfare and economic dynamism. Small improvements and that’s all. Mancur Olson tried to develop a model of European economic development post-war which featured liberalized trade disrupting informal cartels because the observable welfare gains were so small.

  394. Sean says:
    @Art Deco

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/April_Glaspie
    Professors John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt write in the January/February 2003 edition of Foreign Policy that Saddam approached the U.S. to find out how it would react to an invasion into Kuwait. Along with Glaspie’s comment that “‘[W]e have no opinion on the Arab–Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait’, the U.S. State Department had earlier told Saddam that Washington had ‘no special defense or security commitments to Kuwait.‘ The United States may not have intended to give Iraq a green light, but that is effectively what it did.”[13]

  395. Art Deco says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    You think Nixon had altruistic motives in that whole fandango? I’m vending bridges.

    A whole raft of people, among them H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, John Mitchell, John Dean, Jeb Magruder, &c. &c. incurred criminal liability large and small in an effort to conceal the activities of Gordon Liddy and his crew. Some basically innocent people (Herbert Porter, Hugh Sloan, Dwight Chapin) were tripped up in minor process crimes because they were trying to avoid grassing up friends and colleagues. Chapin was the president’s appointments secretary. Worked in Nixon’s outer office. (Joe Maginnes has a brief sketch of Chapin, whom he met in 1968; he thought Chapin’s loyalty to Nixon frankly creepy).

  396. Art Deco says:
    @Ibound1

    Ad hominem is not an argument either.

    The term ‘ad hominen’ doesn’t mean what you fancy it means. People like you continually misrepresent the scale of military expenditure over time and the manpower deployments at home and abroad, because you mouth off without checking any data.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    , @Johann Ricke
  397. Art Deco says:
    @Ibound1

    Glaspie screwed up.

    Yeah, and she had bad hair that day too. People fuss about Glaspie because they want to stick the bill for Saddam’s behavior with the United States government. The contention was never anything but specious.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  398. @Art Deco

    Art Deco wrote to me:

    [Dave]If you read the April Glaspie dispatch I linked to, I think it is overwhelmingly clear that she did in fact give Saddam what any reasonable person would interpret as a “green light” to invade Kuwait (I’ll hand it to Ms. Glaspie

    [The Decadent One]Rubbish. But palaso narratives (c. Thomas Fleming, 1992) require this be true, so it’s ‘clear’.

    Did you actually read the cable Glaspie wrote to which I linked???

    Nah, I didn’t think so. Why would a genius like you have to be bothered with mere facts?!

    Glaspie’s own words, as she herself related them to her superiors are quite clear:

    30. NOTE: ON THE BORDER QUESTION, SADDAM REFERRED TO THE 1961 AGREEMENT AND A “LINE OF PATROL” IT HAD ESTABLISHED. THE KUWAITIS, HE SAID, HAD TOLD MUBARAK IRAQ WAS 20 KILOMETERS “IN FRONT” OF THIS LINE. THE AMBASSADOR SAID THAT SHE HAD SERVED IN KUWAIT 20 YEARS BEFORE; THEN, AS NOW, WE TOOK NO POSITION ON THESE ARAB AFFAIRS.

    You really don’t think that telling Saddam that we take “no position” in what he does to Kuwait isn’t a clear way of telling him, “Do what you want — we just don’t care”??

    Just go ahead and go to the trouble to read the cable. Or don’t: I doubt that facts ever have any influence on your exalted opinions.

    I will also note that I cited not Thomas Fleming, but Stephen Walt, who agrees with me as to the obvious implications here. I will leave to everyone to check out Walt’s resume and decide whether you or he is likely to have a better understanding of the nuts and bolts of diplomacy.

    Or, of course, everyone can just read the cable and see the obvious for himself.

    • Agree: Ibound1
  399. Ibound1 says:
    @Art Deco

    Calling me “alt right” is nothing but a sleazy attack, and that’s exactly what you meant to do.

    And you ignore my point – we have a defense posture which presumes the US has some obligation to defend Europe. We should have dispensed with that after the fall of the USSR.

  400. Ibound1 says:
    @Art Deco

    People fuss about her because she screwed up. That’s how private industry works as well.
    Only in the USG are you allowed to fail spectacularly and be offended that someone has the nerve to point it out.

  401. Sean says:
    @Art Deco

    I name checked Kissinger, as implicitly admitting in 1966 that withdrawal from Vietnam was going to be necessary. Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson got the US increasingly involved in Vietnam to prevent the communists taking power. The decision to withdraw had already been taken although the bombing halt was by Johnson who wanted to help Humphrey by starting talks that were purely for political advantage, because America could not accept North Vietnamese terms for ending the war.

    Courtesy of LBJ, assorted Bundys, Laird, Harriman North Vietnamese conceded nothing, got the bombing stopped, and hurt Nixon’s chances of becoming president, and when he got elected he was incredibly difficult for him to publicly restart the bombing, even though the communist mounted an offensive including rocket attacks on Saigon. Nixon decided on retaliation and acted on a prior suggestion by the head of the joint chiefs (and Abrams) to attack the communist VC and Northern regular headquarters in Cambodia with B52 bomber–much heavier than anything used before. The bombing was secret, but it was against enemy forces attacking American troops and intended to make the North negotiate seriously. Nixon also established relations with relations with China in order to put pressure on the Soviets to reign in the North Vietnamese. Along with unprecedented bombing It worked All in all, Nixon handled a difficult foreign policy situation quite well.

  402. @Art Deco

    The term ‘ad hominen’ doesn’t mean what you fancy it means. People like you continually misrepresent the scale of military expenditure over time and the manpower deployments at home and abroad, because you mouth off without checking any data.

    Everyone’s got a blind spot. For a lot of paleos, their blind spot is a complete indifference to the massive growth of government spending in the civilian sector, while focusing on military spending that is 1/10 of total government outlays, mainly because of the way civilian spending has grown like a malignant tumor in the last 100 years.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  403. republic says:

    Prescott Bush, was one of the backers of the Business plot of 1933, which was an attempted coup d’etat to overthrow FDR.

    His son tried the same thing against Reagan in 1981.

    The Bushes were a seditious lot!

  404. Ibound1 says:
    @Johann Ricke

    Spending in the civilian sector is for our own civilians . It may be excessive but social security is for our own citizenry and I have an interest in that. I have zero interest in defending South Korea with its enormous trade surplus with the US against the army to their north. You want our army to stay? Close the trade gap.

    • Agree: Sean
  405. Anonymous[198] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    The Tweet is a glorified Cessna 310.

    Oh, for crying out loud, the “Tweet” (T-37) is not a glorified Cessna 310.

  406. Anonym says:
    @Anonymous

    For what it’s worth, from a Monday morning quarterback perspective seventy years on, one of the great tragedies of the American WWII effort was that pilot training simply wasn’t very good in those days. It got a lot better in the jet days because it had to. Probably the pinnacle of USAF military pilot training was in the T-34/T-28/T-33 days, although the T-38 is a magnificent machine by any standard. (The Tweet is a glorified Cessna 310.) And letting eighteen year olds fly combat is probably not the best of all ideas either. But there was a war on, as the old guys told me when I was a kid.

    As I understand it one of the things that the US did better was training. For one, they would rotate their pilots out before they died or were crippled, to pass that experience on. The Japanese did not, and made several other poor decisions in that regard.

    http://pwencycl.kgbudge.com/F/i/Fighter_Pilots.htm

    • Replies: @Sean
  407. Sean says:
    @Anonym

    Bush was a Navy pilot. Quite apart from the greater demands of landing on a carrier, they are a cut above the Air Force, which is to the Navy a bit like the Marine infantry is to the Army: insufficient training, using obsolete tactics and suffering much higher casualties as a result. Still true of the AF in Vietnam.

  408. Sean says:

    Jimmy Carter will likely break Bush’s age record early next year.

    Carter’s wife not dying is the main factor. Bush got a nasty infection one day after his wife’s internment in April this year.

  409. @Kylie

    #MeToo!. Have you read Amity Shlaes’ book on him? I have not, so I’d like to see if it’s a good read.

    Sorry for the late reply, if you even get it at all. (I decided to read through this thread.)

  410. It’s awful to weaponize funerals, disinviting people or mocking them for attending the funerals of political adversaries, like some Democrats and Establishment Republicans do. What could be more pro-freedom than respecting political opponents by attending their funerals, even when their policy positions are anathema? Funerals should focus on the strengths of the individual, even a political leader in a Republic, where elected officials are rightfully subject to policy critiques, like the criticism in this article of America’s Bush-supported economic Empire in Latin America. Welfare-motivated illegal aliens storming the southern border often use it as an excuse for their invasion. But the attempt by the corporate MSM to use the funerals of aged former presidents as a way to bring factionalized Americans together is almost as calculating as dissing funeral attendees, like Paul Wellstone’s family did to Trent Lott, and it is not as effective as they think since it ignores historical context. They seem to think the Bush funerals are analogous to the JFK funeral—a funeral that served a calming purpose for the nation as a whole since an assassin had nullified an election by killing an elected head of state. In general, funerals are about private grief, which is not measurable by TV cameras. Some members of any family—political or not—love some members more deeply than others. The MSM cannot capture what is in the hearts of individuals by camera angles. None of this should be used as a PR strategy, and the private lives of political leaders are not the relevant thing in a Republic, anyway. It was important to generate a feeling of order after the Kennedy assassination, though, and the current funeral designers are simply not the equals of the artful Jackie Kennedy, a youthful style prodigy whose lifelong interest in design was on full display in everything she did. She did not have a battalion of PR people helping her, like today’s politicians, but then, part of her effectiveness was the historical context. The grandness and solemnity of the JFK funeral was more important due to the shock of true election tampering that ended the leadership of a sitting president via assassination. Even in a Republic, Jackie’s fit-for-a-king funeral design was apropos for that historical context.

  411. @Old Palo Altan

    Yes. I just checked Google Maps. They definitely had it shut down.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  412. @SporadicMyrmidon

    That would have been quite a sight, more impressive in its way, if less historically poignant, than the riots up and down Telegraph Avenue in 1969.
    I watched these with disdain, cheering on Governor Reagan’s tear-gas spewing helicopters with hearty enthusiasm, even after being affected by the gas myself.

    Heady days.

  413. Bubba says:
    @Paul Jolliffe

    Thanks for that! Incredible that he got away with all that snorting and drug dealing, but that is the way the Deep State rolls. And I must correct the date of that campaign speech – it was August, 1992.

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