The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Gallup Study: Trump Voters Tend to be Successful Individuals Concerned About Their Troubled Communities
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Washington Post’s Wonkblog:

A massive new study debunks a widespread theory for Donald Trump’s success

By Max Ehrenfreund and Jeff Guo August 12 at 11:00 AM

Economic distress and anxiety across working-class white America have become a widely discussed explanation for the success of Donald Trump. It seems to make sense. Trump’s most fervent supporters tend to be white men without college degrees. This same group has suffered economically in our increasingly globalized world, as machines have replaced workers in factories and labor has shifted overseas. Trump has promised to curtail trade and other perceived threats to American workers, including immigrants.

Yet a major new analysis from Gallup, based on 87,000 interviews the polling company conducted over the past year, suggests this narrative is not complete. While there does seem to be a relationship between economic anxiety and Trump’s appeal, the straightforward connection that many observers have assumed does not appear in the data.

According to this new analysis, those who view Trump favorably have not been disproportionately affected by foreign trade or immigration, compared with people with unfavorable views of the Republican presidential nominee. The results suggest that his supporters, on average, do not have lower incomes than other Americans, nor are they more likely to be unemployed.

Yet while Trump’s supporters might be comparatively well off themselves, they come from places where their neighbors endure other forms of hardship. In their communities, white residents are dying younger, and it is harder for young people who grow up poor to get ahead.

The Gallup analysis is the most comprehensive statistical profile of Trump’s supporters so far. Jonathan Rothwell, the economist at Gallup who conducted the analysis, sorted the respondents by their Zip code and then compared those findings with a host of other data from a variety of sources. After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.

Rothwell conducted this kind of analysis not only among the broad group of Americans polled by Gallup. He was also able to focus specifically on white respondents, and even just on white Republicans. In general, his results were the same regardless of the group analyzed.

Rothwell’s research includes far more data than past statistical studies of Trump. It also provides a detailed view not only of the people who support him but also of the places where they live. Academics and other analysts will continue to study the Trump phenomenon in months and years to come, and may, of course, reach different explanations.

This research leaves some mysteries unsolved. Something is afflicting the places where Trump’s supporters live, but Trump’s supporters do not exhibit more severe economic distress than do those who view him unfavorably. Perhaps, Rothwell suggests, Trump’s supporters are concerned less about themselves than about how the community’s children are faring.

Those racists

Whatever it is, competition from migrant labor or the decline of factory work appear to be inadequate explanations.

Trump is giving his supporters a misleading account of their ills, Rothwell said. “He says they are suffering because of globalization,” Rothwell said. “He says they’re suffering because of immigration and a diversifying country, but I can’t find any evidence of that.”

Trump’s support does come from a place of adversity, though, and Rothwell said Trump’s prescriptions — tariffs on imported goods, restrictions on immigration and mass deportation — seem disconnected from his voters’ real problems.

“I don’t see how any of those things would help with their health problems, with the lack of intergenerational mobility,” Rothwell said.

I presume the way Rothwell’s analysis works is something like this: Consider two towns, Palo Alto, CA and Port Clinton, OH, which is the hometown of Harvard academic Robert D. Putnam. There are a lot of immigrants in Palo Alto and not many in Port Clinton. The white people in Palo Alto are doing great and the white people in Port Clinton are not. Ergo, tightening immigration policy couldn’t possibly help whites in Port Clinton.

In my review in Taki’s Magazine of Putnam’s book about how much more miserable his Rust Belt home has gotten over the last half century, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, however, I pointed out:

One advantage that Midwestern kids of the Putnam / [Charles] Murray generation had over today’s Midwesterners is that they could easily afford to move to California. Back in 1960, when only 16 million people lived in the Golden State, compared to 39 million today, new freeways were bringing cheap suburban land within reasonable commuting range of decent paying factory and office jobs. The California magnet also benefited stay-at-homes by driving up the wages Midwestern employers had to pay to keep their workers from decamping for the West Coast.

The WaPo goes on:

Five findings in particular from Rothwell’s work are noteworthy: those related to economic factors such as income, manufacturing and opportunity, as well as his conclusions about health and racial diversity.

From polls, it is clear that Trump’s supporters tend to be blue-collar men with lower levels of education. Yet important questions remain. For instance, do these people support Trump because they are on the margins of the economy or for other reasons?

To answer these questions, Rothwell gathered data, mostly from Gallup’s regular telephone interviews. In those interviews, pollsters asked how favorably respondents viewed the presidential candidates and collected a variety of other information, including where respondents lived, their race and ethnicity, their religion, their education, their employment and their income. Rothwell also compiled information about the communities where people lived — how healthy the residents were, the local effects of trade, and the level of economic opportunity. He compared all these factors to determine which were closely associated with Trump’s supporters.

Among people who had similar educations, lived in similar places, belonged to the same religion and so on, those with greater incomes were modestly more likely to favor Trump. They were just as likely to be either working or looking for work as others.

In one respect, that conclusion was expected. White households tend be more affluent than other households, and Trump’s supporters are overwhelmingly white. The same is true of Republicans in general. Yet when Rothwell focused only on white Republicans, he also found that demographically similar respondents who were more affluent viewed Trump more favorably.

These results suggest that personal finances cannot alone account for Trump’s appeal. His popularity with less-educated men is probably due to some other trait that these supporters share.

Several recent analyses have attributed Trump’s success to the disappearance of the factory worker, and to competition with imported goods — especially from China. An essay in the Atlantic in May attributed Trump’s success to the gradual decline of employment in the manufacturing sector because of technology and globalization.

“Manufacturing provided steady work for unionized workers without a four-year diploma,” Derek Thompson wrote. “When it collapsed, so did unions and the fortunes of non-college men.”

On Thursday, a Wall Street Journal report was published online with the headline “How the China Shock, Deep and Swift, Spurred the Rise of Trump.” The authors concluded that Trump had won the Republican primary in 89 of the 100 counties most negatively affected by competition from China, measured according to an index developed by a group of academic economists. …

Trump’s supporters are blue-collar, and many people working in those occupations have jobs in construction, repair or transportation — all of which are protected from Chinese competition. Chinese workers might be assembling semiconductors, but they are not adjusting the thermostat or changing the oil. …

Opportunity

Trump supporters might not be experiencing acute economic distress, but they are living in places that lack economic opportunity for the next generation.

Rothwell used data from Harvard economists Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren, who studied how children born in the 1980s moved up or down the economic ladder depending on where they grew up. Children raised in places with high economic mobility, such as Boston or Pittsburgh, often surpassed their parents in socioeconomic status. Children raised in places with low economic mobility, such as Raleigh, N.C., and Indianapolis, struggled just to do as well as their parents in adulthood.

Trump was especially popular in these parts of the country.

My analysis of Chetty’s data revealed that some parts of the country, such as the Great Plains, were doing better in 2011-12 than in 1996-2000, while others parts, such as the Carolinas, were doing worse. Chetty was looking for long term differences between localities in policies or culture, but mostly he just found regional economic cycles: the Carolinas were doing great during the golf resort boom of the late 1990s and were hurting when the market for second homes on golf courses collapsed in this century. The Great Plains did well in 2011-2012 due to Chinese demand for food and energy.

Trump tended to do better in the hurting states and Cruz in prospering states.

I pointed out back in 2015 in a blog post entitled “Ted Cruz, Raj Chetty, and Sioux County, Iowa’s Magic Dirt,” that Ted Cruz was doing well in parts of the country that did well in Chetty’s comparison of parents’ income in 1996-2000 to kids’ income in 2011-12. Chetty’s best county in America for working class income growth was Sioux County, Iowa. In the Iowa Caucus, Ted Cruz carried Sioux County with 33%, while Trump was fourth with 11%.

Why does Trump’s message resonate the most in these low-mobility areas? The data do not provide a clear answer. It is possible that Trump’s supporters, while still better off than many of their neighbors, are worse off than they might have been in the past. Rothwell examined their incomes, but he did not have data on how those incomes had changed over time.

Polling conducted by The Washington Post and ABC News earlier this year, for example, also found no connection between current income and support for Trump. Respondents were also asked, however, whether they felt they were struggling to maintain their standard of living or whether they felt comfortable in their situation and that they were moving up. Those who said they felt they were struggling were more likely to support Trump.

Rothwell also suggested the reason might have something to do with parents and children. Trump voters tend to be older, blue-collar workers, and recent generations have had more difficulty getting well-paying jobs that didn’t require much education. Those opportunities have largely dried up. And now, Trump supporters tend to live in places where the world has gotten visibly tougher for the kids on the block. It’s easier to agree with Trump’s narrative about American decline when you have seen your own child fall down the economic ladder.

This may help explain one puzzle that has stumped election observers so far. Trump has found success playing up economic grievances, stoking anxieties about immigrants, and complaining about Chinese competition. How is it then, that so many of his supporters seem to be economically secure? It could be that Trump supporters aren’t worried for themselves, but for their children.

There’s nothing more un-American than voting to “secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.” That not who we are.

By the way, if wonder why there has been such a Revolt of the Inarticulate ever since Trump rode down the escalator in Trump Tower leading to the media declaring all out war on about 45% of American voters, take a look at the ending of Robert D. “Bowling Alone” Putnam’s book Our Kids:

… speaking of the recent arrival of unaccompanied immigrant kids, Jay Ash, city manager and native of the gritty, working-class Boston suburb of Chelsea, drew on a more generous, communitarian tradition: “If our kids are in trouble – my kids, our kids, anyone’s kids – we all have a responsibility to look after them.”

In today’s America, not only is Ash right, but even those among us who think like Emerson should acknowledge our responsibility to these children. For America’s poor kids do belong to us and we to them. They are our kids.

No, they are not “our kids.” You just said they are “unaccompanied immigrant kids.” They’re not “America’s poor kids,” they are foreign lawbreakers whose parents are trying to exploit obtuse Americans. We have enough poor kids of our own. We can’t take responsibility for the other couple billion on Earth.

And yet … Professor Putnam is not a stupid man nor is he an extremist. He is the voice of respectable centrism.

Still, the end of his book is absurd.

And, as far as I can tell, no other reviewer noticed. Every other critic just nodded along with this reductio ad absurdum of the conventional mindset of our time. It’s a revealing moment about Our Elites and whose side they see themselves as being on.

 
Hide 218 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Damn, despite all the trees, these researchers could not find the forest. No doubt, we need more research to cloud the picture, and make false assumptions on the road to nebulous conclusions.

  2. From the article:

    Among those who are similar in terms of income, education and other factors, those who view Trump favorably are more likely to be found in white enclaves — racially isolated Zip codes where the amount of diversity is lower than in surrounding areas.

    They don’t make this clear, but Trump supporteres might be able to afford to live in racially isolated zipcodes, but they are mostly from high immigrant/high diversity areas. Cruz and sometimes Rubio did well in all the caucus states with low immigration. Trump destroyed in all the high immigration states.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @education realist

    Trump's first huge win was Massachusetts where he almost won 50% in a crowded field.

    The state that pushed him to victory was New York with 60%.

    , @Portlander
    @education realist

    Right, and just because they can afford to insulate, doesn't mean they appreciate having to insulate. Huge opportunity costs there. One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    Replies: @GOUSAAMER114, @MarkinLA

  3. Trump tended to do better in the hurting states and Cruz in prospering states.

    I pointed out back in 2015 in a blog post entitled “Ted Cruz, Raj Chetty, and Sioux County, Iowa’s Magic Dirt,” that Ted Cruz was doing well in parts of the country that did well in Chetty’s comparison of parents’ income in 1996-2000 to kids’ income in 2011-12. Chetty’s best county in America for working class income growth was Sioux County, Iowa. In the Iowa Caucus, Ted Cruz carried Sioux County with 33%, while Trump was fourth with 11%.

    I suppose that explains the Paul R vs. Paul N outcome. Though my money is still on fraud. Way too big a margin of victory there. I think Paul R panicked and over-did it on setting the fix.

    I’m still waiting to see a contemporary incumbent lose an election when they see the challenger coming. Losses by back-bench nobodies don’t count.

    • Replies: @gruff
    @Portlander

    Ryan's previous elections were either uncontested or won by huge margins. Nehlen actually got a larger share of the vote than previous opponents. Fraud is not at all likely.

    , @Alden
    @Portlander

    I'd like to see the reasons for rise in working class income in Sioux county Iowa.
    Maybe the farmers use machinery rather than Mexican welfare recipients? Maybe a nuclear power plant, military base or college campus, something was built which kept the construction trades booming?

    It could not have been any kind of slaughter house or food processing plant because the entire food industry imports Hispanic Indians and puts them in welfare

    Just saying, I'd like to know more about the reasons incomes were so high while stagnating and falling in the rest of the country

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  4. @education realist
    From the article:

    Among those who are similar in terms of income, education and other factors, those who view Trump favorably are more likely to be found in white enclaves — racially isolated Zip codes where the amount of diversity is lower than in surrounding areas.

    They don't make this clear, but Trump supporteres might be able to afford to live in racially isolated zipcodes, but they are mostly from high immigrant/high diversity areas. Cruz and sometimes Rubio did well in all the caucus states with low immigration. Trump destroyed in all the high immigration states.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Portlander

    Trump’s first huge win was Massachusetts where he almost won 50% in a crowded field.

    The state that pushed him to victory was New York with 60%.

  5. @education realist
    From the article:

    Among those who are similar in terms of income, education and other factors, those who view Trump favorably are more likely to be found in white enclaves — racially isolated Zip codes where the amount of diversity is lower than in surrounding areas.

    They don't make this clear, but Trump supporteres might be able to afford to live in racially isolated zipcodes, but they are mostly from high immigrant/high diversity areas. Cruz and sometimes Rubio did well in all the caucus states with low immigration. Trump destroyed in all the high immigration states.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Portlander

    Right, and just because they can afford to insulate, doesn’t mean they appreciate having to insulate. Huge opportunity costs there. One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    • Replies: @GOUSAAMER114
    @Portlander

    Exactly right. I live in a super zip neighborhood. It's pretty much all white. But we're surrounded by the third world. Like Trump, my interests are not high-brow. I am very just American. I like Subway and McDonalds. I have kids so I now kind of have to go to the mall and zoo. I can't take the diversity. I just want my country back. I hate the unpleasant conversation when ordering my food with the 40 year old Spanish speaker who always gets it wrong. I hate that the movie theater looks like its third world. I hate walking into Subway and only half of the people speak English. I hate that the local public school - where no one would ever send their kids - educates Mexico's lower class. This doesn't even touch on Islam. There should be NO Islam in the US.

    I'm not that old, but I remember when we had a country. I identify with my fellow Americans who just want to live in neighborhoods with fellow Americans. I can afford to isolate, but it is still incredibly unpleasant.

    I have been a Trumper before Trump. I loved Jeff Sessions and even Stephen Miller two years ago. I will be devastated if Trump doesn't win. It will tell me that America is over.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kylie, @TomSchmidt

    , @MarkinLA
    @Portlander

    One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    They are not as stupid as they seem. They know what all the reasons for Trump's success are and if they got a 10 million dollar grant for it would give you a very comprehensive and largely correct list. However, they have to stick to the narrative that Trump supporters are somehow unhinged if they want to continue to get paid.

    There are reasons beyond simple economics that they won't even bother to touch on.

  6. Hardly a scientific analysis, but I must say that the Trump signs I see are all in solidly middle class neighborhoods. They are not in exclusive neighborhoods, just in established ones occupied by post war successes.

    Readers can check this out for themselves.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

  7. • Replies: @jill
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Wait till he gets to New York and rides the MTA where naked people are being photographed smoking crack. Bet you never saw that in Honduras, Santo. Welcome to the real 3rd world, Santo.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/subway-rider-smokes-crack-naked-no-3-train-article-1.2746618

    And how about all the new American babies being born addicted to drugs. Did you notice that in Honduras, Santo?

    http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/08/addicted_newborns.html

    Why are you coming here, really?

    And what about America's richest communities flooded with so much heroin that the social workers are in need of counseling, Santo?

    http://easthamptonstar.com/Education/2016331/Drug-Expert-Ive-Never-Seen-It-This

    Is your President Juan Orlando Hernández releasing 46000 drug dealers from jail like our president is doing?

    https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/10/06/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-federal-prisoner-release#.xjkA8e2hK

    Santo, get right back on that train and go home, for your own sake.

    Replies: @Anon

  8. Another way to state your headline is that there’s a leadership crisis in the US.

    I didn’t read the whole article, but I suspect that’s it.

  9. … have jobs in construction, repair or transportation — all of which are protected from Chinese competition.

    But they are not protected from Mexican immigration.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @iSteveFan

    They're not even all protected from the Chinese. The extension to the Bay Bridge was built in sections in China.

  10. iSteveFan says:

    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    Class gender thing Female oriented aristocratic societies tend towards Antoinette ism. Let them eat cake.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Bill, @dcite

    , @Maj. Kong
    @iSteveFan

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left's power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don't because of cultural animus against America's founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur "Uncle Tom" to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term "self-hating Jew", Asians have the term "banana".

    For whites, we have "cuck" to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people "natural Republicans that don't know it yet". This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    Replies: @Das, @Laugh Track, @Lurker, @Rose Madder

    , @Jim Sweeney
    @iSteveFan

    A perfect point, perfectly made. Never seen it made before either so congratulations.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @iSteveFan

    The Democrats are also never asked why they are overwhelmingly supported by the biggest aggregation of shallow, insipid, and narcissistic people in the world - Hollywood.

    , @International Jew
    @iSteveFan


    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient
     
    It's been this way going back, at least, to that famous comment by some New Yorker, "How could Nixon have won? No one I know voted for him."

    As for me, I've seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they've had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    I've also been introduced as, "This is ____, the most intelligent conservative I've ever met."

    Replies: @Anonym, @guest, @Kylie

  11. @Thomas O. Meehan
    Hardly a scientific analysis, but I must say that the Trump signs I see are all in solidly middle class neighborhoods. They are not in exclusive neighborhoods, just in established ones occupied by post war successes.

    Readers can check this out for themselves.

    Replies: @epebble

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    Was this before or after the Trump meltdown right after the Democratic convention?

    From what I've seen, the starch has gone out of the whole election season, and probably won't come back until it becomes competitive again, if it ever does.

    The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn't be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @epebble

    , @Henry Bowman
    @epebble

    Ever think that maybe Trump Supporters do not want to Dox themselves?

    Replies: @epebble, @Anonymous

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking."

    Megadittos. I saw and heard lots of Portlanders (and Oregonians generally) feeling the Bern, but since Mrs. Strokes-a-Lot sewed up the nomination....... crickets. And I think you answered your own question: Oregon goes 60/40 to the Democrat even if they nominate a warm pile of dog vomit, so who cares about the election here in Oregon.

    Replies: @whorefinder

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    And yet, though the election in Oregon is a fait accompli for the Democrats, the local gaystream media outlets run daily attack pieces against Trump. It's surreal. I should write them all a letter asking why bother with the Trumphobia in a state that goes 60/40 Democrat regardless?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @gruff
    @epebble

    Central Portland here. There are still Bernie signs up all over the place. I think people had the wind knocked out of them by Sanders's sellout.

    There was a local bar that briefly had a painting of Hitler in a MAGA hat on the wall.

    , @dsgntd_plyr
    @epebble

    i live in a deep blue area of a deep blue state. no one is publicly expressing support for hillary clinton (it's all anti-trump). no buttons, shirts, lawn signs, bumper stickers. nothing.

    but i see one or two bernie bumper stickers, or people walking around in one of his shirts everyday.

    Replies: @snorlax, @European in America

    , @Olorin
    @epebble

    Same here in Pugetopolis.

    I don't think it's lack of interest, except inasmuch as many people are waking up to how American Pravda works and figuring involvement is pointless.

    I think it's far more ominous.

    Most people I know who are voting for Trump are only whispering to one another, after much up-front signalling, that that is their choice. This may be a reflection of my day circles. My play circles--like my shooting sports clubs--people are much more out about it.

    Two people I've talked to who had Trump stickers on their vehicles (one Dodge Ram, one Prius-type thing) had their cars vandalized in the state capitol city of Olympia.

    Word travels fast. Working men would rather spend money on our kids and friends than having our insurance rates siphon more off to the FIRE industry.

    After all, we provoked the political rape by wearing the wrong t-shirt. No kidding, I had a buddy whose insurance agent told him that regarding his Romney sticker in 2012. "We're recommending people not put political stickers on their cars. It increases the risk of vandalism." And we all know that saving the insurance industry from Risk and payouts is Job One.

    A couple of mestizo guys I know who build nice rifles and are part of several local RKBA organizations I'm part of said they are voting for Trump but don't dare tell anyone or signal it, because "their cousins" will "make sure they pay."

    Even that is minor. The constant drumbeat of systematic low-level American Pravda attacks--including locally--are creating fear in day to day life.

    I know half a dozen guys in civil service (infrastructure workers) who have confided incidents where they've observed someone being threatened by their own union members for supporting Trump/opposing Hillary. (AFSCME endorsed her very early on.)

    The Trump supporters I know are either "millionaires next door" or working hard in that direction even where there is no hope, under the current economic and political regime, of them ever having 30-50 years of hard work and prudent budgeting translated into a surplus that they, not Congress, decide how to spend.

    The Trump supporters I know are of all ages, all religious types, a wide range of economic situations, both urban and rural. I know Trump supporters with no college schooling, and Trump supporters with Ph.D.s, and everything in between.

    A notable proportion describe themselves as "ex-liberals" or "ex-progressives." I know half a dozen women who are supporting Trump, who have sidled up to me whispering that someone said it would be OK to talk to me about it.

    So far all have been honest, but that could change. For, another buddy said that someone asked him about Trump, he answered regarding his support...and the lady went back and doxxed him to her Hillbots.

    Now, he says, he's getting low-level harassment on the job, including claims of "hate speech," and such. For example, the campus where he works has disgusting tap water. Everybody nows it. It's a source of constant complaints. Every unit buys in bottled water or filters its own (paid for privately by the workers).

    He filled a glass in his unit's kitchen, observed the rusty murk, and said to a buddy of his, "Does this campus import its water supply from some Third World nation?" I asked the buddy for his version, which matched closely enough that I trust the story.

    A Hillbot in the kitchen heard him comment on the water and complained to his supervisor that he had made a racist statement that created a Hostile Work Environment.

    Her real problem with him? He's a heterosexual white Christian man. She told him that to his face several years ago. She is blameless for her -isms. His are the equivalent of original sin and evil.

    "Trump" is just a lightning rod for these attacks.

    Finally, the role of opiates and other life-destroying drugs, both legal and illegal, plays a huge role in this. You know how widespread whites' self-numbing is in the PNW.

    ALL the stoner adults I know are refusing to vote, because Old Commie Uncle Bernie took a dive for The Party, and bought himself another house instead of keeping up The Good Fight.

    Which leads us to your "China and Russia" point.

    Tell me. Where do you think Bolshevism went after 1945?

  12. @iSteveFan
    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump's supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Maj. Kong, @Jim Sweeney, @Mr. Anon, @International Jew

    Class gender thing Female oriented aristocratic societies tend towards Antoinette ism. Let them eat cake.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    @Whiskey

    Marie Aintoinette was a lot less whiny than you are at least. And compared to your case of blue balls she had to face a lot more adversity at the end.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    , @Bill
    @Whiskey

    Are you capable of writing even a single sentence that isn't shitted up with your apalling, offensive ignorance?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @dcite
    @Whiskey

    She never said that. The propagandists were as clever then as they are now, and knew what buttons to push. Naturally, some French buttons had choux à la crème on them. It's really odd that their most iconic monarch/general -- who established some order out of the chaos -- had a pastry named after him. If he had just stayed in France eating napoleons instead of being one, millions would have been spared much misery.

    M.A. was sensitive to the poor, as were a number of others of the aristocracy. Her loyal friend, Princess Marie Louise de Savoy, who had spent a good part of her life helping with charitable activities, was gruesomely killed by a mob after being condemned. The propagandists had spread rumors that this reserved lady, whose private life had never before been the subject of gossip or rumor, was M.A.'s lesbian lover. Yes, even then. While we make fun of British prudery, I don't think an English mob would have cared as much, but maybe I'm wrong.

  13. A lot of this “analysis”, as reported, sounds like an exercise in willful stupidity.

    After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.

    and,

    Yet when Rothwell focused only on white Republicans, he also found that demographically similar respondents who were more affluent viewed Trump more favorably.

    What in God’s name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect? Who cares about the barely discernible residual effects?

    How do these marginal effects provide some great insight into “the Trump voter” which the dominant demographic factors don’t?

    If Trump’s appeal is unusually strong among the white working class, and relatively weak among the white professional class, isn’t that the thing that’s important? If Trump appeals far more to men than women than is typical, isn’t that the thing that’s important?

    This guy Rothwell seems like a cretin, and worse, a blind and biased cretin, as made evident in his remarks:

    Trump is giving his supporters a misleading account of their ills, Rothwell said. “He says they are suffering because of globalization,” Rothwell said. “He says they’re suffering because of immigration and a diversifying country, but I can’t find any evidence of that.”

    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @candid_observer


    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.
     
    Well, the restaurants.

    And hey, I hear all those immigrant women are submissive and want generous beta-provider white husbands.

    Globalism is the rising tide that lifts all boats and waistlines.
    , @AlphaSupremo
    @candid_observer

    Foreign competition affects workers at nearly every labor level. Here's what I compete against:

    http://www.jobsintech.io/immigration_companies/infosys-limited/charts

    Replies: @Tom-in-VA

    , @International Jew
    @candid_observer


    What in God’s name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect?
     
    To learn how much the various demographic factors matter, and (the residual part) to assess how much is left unexplained.

    This is very standard statistical practice, and predates all our current culture wars. If you want to understand it at a technical level, start by looking up "least squares regression". (I won't get any more specific, as I don't know your background...)

    Replies: @candid_observer

  14. So damn annoying the way it is just assumed that everyone always just votes their own direct economic interest. The notion that people might care about something bigger than themselves and how they see things going for the country as a whole seems lost on mainstream commenters.

    I’m doing well living in one of Murray’s super ZIPs in a blue state and my kids are very likely to be just as successful as my my wife and I but I’m not blind and I’m not happy with how I see things going for our country overall. That shouldn’t be so shocking and I shouldn’t be an outlier. I hope I’m not.

    • Agree: International Jew
  15. The appeal of Trump is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma to these guys.

  16. @iSteveFan
    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump's supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Maj. Kong, @Jim Sweeney, @Mr. Anon, @International Jew

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left’s power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don’t because of cultural animus against America’s founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur “Uncle Tom” to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term “self-hating Jew”, Asians have the term “banana”.

    For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people “natural Republicans that don’t know it yet”. This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    • Replies: @Das
    @Maj. Kong

    "But the real key to the left’s power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP."

    Do they? Paul Ryan's "small government" proposals involve devastating a bunch of universal programs like Social Security and Medicare, which benefit nearly everyone.

    Affluent engineers and lawyers don't want to have to hunt for health care in their old age with a voucher any more than factory and construction workers do.

    There's a reason why those programs used to be considered a "third rail" of politics. Even a conservative Republican doctor doesn't want you mucking with his Social Security check.

    "For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?"

    Before Trump, the GOP was only slightly less bad than Dems on a whole range of cultural and immigration-related issues, while being worse on most economic issues.

    Do you honestly think someone's a "renegade" because they prefer Dems to politicians like Jeb Bush or Paul Ryan?

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    , @Laugh Track
    @Maj. Kong


    For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?
     
    Unitarians?
    , @Lurker
    @Maj. Kong

    I call them cucks too, the difference is their cuckritude is built-in in way it isn't with conservative cucks. The left will rapidly internalise whatever the latest thinking is without any need for persuasion.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Rose Madder
    @Maj. Kong


    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?
     
    Just call them anti-whites.
  17. @candid_observer
    A lot of this "analysis", as reported, sounds like an exercise in willful stupidity.

    After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.
     
    and,

    Yet when Rothwell focused only on white Republicans, he also found that demographically similar respondents who were more affluent viewed Trump more favorably.
     
    What in God's name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect? Who cares about the barely discernible residual effects?

    How do these marginal effects provide some great insight into "the Trump voter" which the dominant demographic factors don't?

    If Trump's appeal is unusually strong among the white working class, and relatively weak among the white professional class, isn't that the thing that's important? If Trump appeals far more to men than women than is typical, isn't that the thing that's important?

    This guy Rothwell seems like a cretin, and worse, a blind and biased cretin, as made evident in his remarks:


    Trump is giving his supporters a misleading account of their ills, Rothwell said. “He says they are suffering because of globalization,” Rothwell said. “He says they’re suffering because of immigration and a diversifying country, but I can’t find any evidence of that.”
     
    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @AlphaSupremo, @International Jew

    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.

    Well, the restaurants.

    And hey, I hear all those immigrant women are submissive and want generous beta-provider white husbands.

    Globalism is the rising tide that lifts all boats and waistlines.

  18. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The British lying press – lead, as usual by those rabid dogs at The Economist magazine – have screamed the same Goebbels-like mantra loud enough and long enough for it to become ‘accepted wisdom’. Here, brexit voters were roundly libelled as being old, poor and ill-educated, so that the remainics could, no doubt, preen and paint themselves as ‘morally’ and ‘intellectually’ superior.
    The funny thing is that the mealy-mouthed lefties at The Guardian – self-styled anti-snobs and anti-‘class system’ defenders of the disadvantged ran with the meme with gusto. If only brexiters were black…..

    Anyhow, the real and only reason for brexit was the the quite arcane and learned doctrine of ‘parliamentary supremacy, as evolved since the time of Simon De Montfort, King John, the English civil war, the ‘glorious revolution’, the great reform acts etc etc, which is most ably described the works of Dicey.

    Hardly the reading matter of a load of ill educated paupers.

  19. I’ll be voting for Trump not because I feel harmed by foreign trade or immigrants but because I am sick and tired of the incredible lies and corruption among our elites.

    My wife and I have three doctoral degrees between us: we are certainly not blue-collar. But, in the last five decades, we have personally seen incredible levels of corruption in higher education, the medical profession, the scientific community, the legal profession, the defense industry, the clergy, etc. — all based on our own personal experiences, not on news reports.

    I’ve had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.

    Will Trump do that? I don’t know. But the fear that the elites demonstrate towards Trump is a good sign.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    • Replies: @Fed Up
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave, I'm right there with you. This corruption must stop.

    Fed Up in Pennsylvania

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @PhysicistDave

    As I said above "leadership crisis". The politicians of both parties are not obviously working in our interests.

    Lack of faith in the leaders covers a broad range of things from refusing to recognize our sovereignty to corruption to choosing economic policies that benefit small minorities to failing to enforce law and order.

    It's an intuition which might not even be recognized by the people who have it.

    Since it's a feeling based on a multidude of things over time, it's not something you can pin down easily by asking people about their incomes and ideologies and not going to clearly point to one demographic that will benefit. That's why these poll takers are having so much trouble. "worried about their communities" is probably as close as anyone will get.

    , @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave in Sacramento

    In my life time I've noticed an ethnic sexist cleansing of White men from the medical profession in California I'm sure you have too.

    Replies: @dr kill

    , @Bill
    @PhysicistDave

    Amen. Preach, brother!

  20. “For America’s poor kids do belong to us and we to them. They are our kids.”

    This Putnam-Quote by Steve Sailer with regard to poor american and poor immigrant kids alike, marks a crucial point in western thinking.

    Because it marks the intersection between the personal and the universal.

    Human rights are universal. They grant ervery person the same human dignity.

    This is judeo-christian thinking and as such at the heart of our selfrespect as westeners.

    But: All men have the same human dignity is often – and misleadingly – being looked upon as the same as: Love your neighbour like yourself.

    This is just bad theology, because Love thy neighbour like yourself doesn’t mean love erverybody else on the world like yourself. See: Love your neighbour like yourself is not universalistic: It’s local, so to speak.

    German Philosopher Robert Spaemann, once an adviser to pope Benedict XVI., pointed this problem out with regard to Angela Merkel, when Merkel said, that being poor is one of the good reasons to come to Europe.

    Old Spaemn has nothing to loose, he is 89 – and he speaks out.

    Putnam and the like – for a myriad of reasons – don’t get this point. Others obviously do. – Not for the first time, Steve Sailer is onto something very important.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Dieter Kief

    I know you're in Germany, Dieter, and are not familiar with "the gritty, working-class Boston suburb of Chelsea", but native son Jay Ash, now Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development and looking to become the city manager of Cambridge, was given a crappy, Third World majority city to run, and during his tenure as city manager was given tens of millions in state and federal money to prove everything liberals stand for: that the poor, benighted mestizos can be made into solid Americans.

    The result? Chelsea is now a crappy, Third World majority city with the highest violent crime rate in New England.

    What did Chelsea used to be? About half Jewish through the 50s.

    "Between 1890-1900 Chelsea's Jewish population grew from 100-3,000 and by 1910, around 10,000 Jews lived in Chelsea, nearly one-third of the entire population of the city. In the 1930s there were about 20,000 Jewish residents in Chelsea out of a total population of almost 46,000."--the Mystic River Jewish Communities Project

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  21. If trump voters tend to be old, then they may be the last generation of white Americans who have their shit together. The problems of globalisation and immigration are predominately borne by young and slightly less than middle-aged whites.

  22. I’m afraid it is hard to accept that so many “elites” have no empathy for their fellow citizens.

    And yet they demonstrate it daily.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @AndyBoy

    The latest Peggy Noonan column expresses this persuasively. I'm not much of a Noonan fan, but her August 11 column, titled "How Global Elites Forsake Their Countrymen: Those in power see people at the bottom as aliens whose bizarre emotions they must try to manage," represents a real breakthrough among respectable media pundits.

    Replies: @dr kill

    , @jill
    @AndyBoy

    As Obama’s Manufacturing Czar, Ron Bloom said:

    “Generally speaking, we get the joke. We know that the free market is nonsense. We know that the whole point is to game the system, to beat the market, or at least find someone who will pay you a lot of money ‘cause they’re convinced that there is a free lunch. We know this is largely about power, that it’s an adults-only no-limit game. We kind of agree with Mao that political power comes largely from the barrel of a gun. And we get it, that if you want a friend, you should get a dog.”- Ron Bloom, Keynote address at the 6th Annual Distressed Investing Forum, Union League Club, New York, February 27-28, 2008.


    or from this supposed kindly old man:

    "You want everybody educated to their potential. You want people to reach their potential. That still won't work for some people in a highly developed market system. I mean if this were a sports-based system, you could give me a PhD in football, and I could practice eight hours a day, and I might be able to carry the water from, not onto the field, but from the locker room to the bench. There's just some people don't fit well into a highly skilled market-based economy.
    They're perfectly decent citizens. We'll send them off to Afghanistan, but they are not going to command a big price.”

    Warren Buffet September 8, 2015

    or from Charlie Munger, Buffet's side kick, right after the bank bailout:

    “You should thank God” for bank bailouts. Now, if you talk about bailouts for everybody else, there comes a place where if you just start bailing out all the individuals instead of telling them to adapt, the culture dies."
    “At a certain place you’ve got to say to the people, ‘Suck it in and cope, buddy. Suck it in and cope.’”

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  23. I wonder if the study took this into account. We got these in reruns years after, but when I was a kid this was, and still is I think, funny as hell. Try telling the second joke about the son Malcom around people you don’t know and you’d be lynched.

    Ace has a post up about a coloring thingy for (I assume) very young kids asking them to identify their gender. I know this is an outlier but 20 years ago, this would have meant summary dismissal, if not outright murder.

    ** Sorry if this is a second posting of this video. I can’t remember where I saw it first, and like Steve, I have a fondness for Natty Light that can sometimes lead me astray.

    • Replies: @Morton Knox
    @South Texas Guy

    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VHS channel in Philadelphia.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  24. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    “Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.”

    Was this before or after the Trump meltdown right after the Democratic convention?

    From what I’ve seen, the starch has gone out of the whole election season, and probably won’t come back until it becomes competitive again, if it ever does.

    The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn’t be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Boethiuss


    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn’t be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.
     
    They might have been lost from Day 1. Mexicans = rapists still hurts. And the Heritage Foundation justice picks.

    Smart Trump could have framed immigration restriction and trade protectionism as not-racist, just good for the little guy, but correct me if I'm wrong but aren't Portlanders primarily motivated by gender-race-sex progressivism, and were therefore always out of bounds if not destined to be absorbed by Clinton? As the DNC leak confirmed, Bernie was delaying her pivot to the centre, but what of it? Trump's gaffes have given them a danger to vote *against*, so Clinton can have her milquetoast Republicans and eat them too.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Boethiuss

    "The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state."

    Yes, Portlanders will reflexively, mindlessly vote for Shrillary or whoever has the "D" next to his/her name. But in no way was the Portland mentality up for grabs this election cycle -- whether they're conscious of it or not, Portlanders CHOOSE to live in the Whitest large city in America, and they atone for their secular sin of latent racism by loudly proclaiming anti-racist platitudes whenever possible and voting D as early and as often as they can.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @epebble
    @Boethiuss

    There was some excitement during D primaries for Bernie; But once it was over, the balloon popped and all interest was lost. I might have spotted one or two Trump stickers on cars, invariably out of towners. Don't remember anything for Hillary. I suspect Trump supporters, if there are any, are too ashamed to publicly express it in this strong SJW town.

  25. @iSteveFan

    ... have jobs in construction, repair or transportation — all of which are protected from Chinese competition.
     
    But they are not protected from Mexican immigration.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    They’re not even all protected from the Chinese. The extension to the Bay Bridge was built in sections in China.

  26. From what I gather, there has been a “browning” of America going on everywhere, and it has accelerated bigly in Obama’s second term. Whites who are voting Trump are noticing it where they live, and don’t like it. The spergy author of the study is overlooking a possibly huuuge factor among rightwing whites of all classes: They don’t like seeing ugly outsiders in their communities (and all over TV for that matter) and may recognize the increasing proliferation of non-whites as a categorical aesthetically dysgenic development.

    Much of this happens subconsciously, manifesting in disdain that has to be rationalized in polite conversation. One can publicly object to increasing crime, crowded schools, etc. etc. but no one will simply blurt out the truth: Diversity, generally speaking, is f’n UGLY. And it matters. A lot. Ann Coulter (sort of jokingly, but not really IMO) said this regarding how she would choose new citizens:

    I will do it on looks, IQ, height — oh, and speaking English.

    I’m thinking that in the looks department, Ann would choose people that looked like America. 1950’s New England America. Or “Canadian Border” America.

    One may quibble if Ann herself is a paragon of beauty, or say that fat white People of Walmart are the ugliest of all, but if one greatly appreciates the white (aka European) phenotype at its best, then mass non-white immigration to white lands, and its potential for subsuming the white phenotype in a mystery meat brownish morass, is a disaster for humanity for that reason alone.

  27. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    Ever think that maybe Trump Supporters do not want to Dox themselves?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Henry Bowman

    This is a nice neighborhood; But a Trump sign will definitely attract strange looks and murmurs. And I think one will quickly lose any friends or visitors.

    , @Anonymous
    @Henry Bowman

    That's certainly my rationale for hiding my power level. Don't need my car keyed by some Bernout who thinks Trump is responsible for his guy's cuckholdry.

    Trump supporters exist here in Portland; we're just silent, and far from a majority. But let us hope there's more of us in places like PA, VA, FL, OH...

  28. Trump’s supporters are blue-collar, and many people working in those occupations have jobs in construction, repair or transportation — all of which are protected from Chinese competition.

    That the obviousness of Central Americans taking those jobs isn’t mentioned doesn’t raise a mention shows how these journalists are incapable of taking on this issue honestly.

  29. @Maj. Kong
    @iSteveFan

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left's power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don't because of cultural animus against America's founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur "Uncle Tom" to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term "self-hating Jew", Asians have the term "banana".

    For whites, we have "cuck" to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people "natural Republicans that don't know it yet". This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    Replies: @Das, @Laugh Track, @Lurker, @Rose Madder

    “But the real key to the left’s power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP.”

    Do they? Paul Ryan’s “small government” proposals involve devastating a bunch of universal programs like Social Security and Medicare, which benefit nearly everyone.

    Affluent engineers and lawyers don’t want to have to hunt for health care in their old age with a voucher any more than factory and construction workers do.

    There’s a reason why those programs used to be considered a “third rail” of politics. Even a conservative Republican doctor doesn’t want you mucking with his Social Security check.

    “For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?”

    Before Trump, the GOP was only slightly less bad than Dems on a whole range of cultural and immigration-related issues, while being worse on most economic issues.

    Do you honestly think someone’s a “renegade” because they prefer Dems to politicians like Jeb Bush or Paul Ryan?

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @Das

    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a "conservative Republican" is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.

    While the Republican establishment is certainly no paragon of virtue, I do consider the Republican voter base to be far more favorable. Many upper income voters are liberal as a way to virtue signal themselves as better than those eeevil conservatives. I have little respect for the Long Island liberal that wants tight zoning regulations locally, but mass immigration to prove that they aren't racist. The same goes for those living with wealthy neighbors and well-funded police denigrating the common rural gun owner.

    And at least we can say that Jeb Bush maintained Florida as a state with no income tax. There is no reason we 'need' an over-compensated unionized public sector, or an education system entitled to our largesse. No state in the country needs to be high tax like California, but the Democratic Party's electoral fortunes and the very existence of the left depend on it.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  30. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Why does Trump’s message resonate the most in these low-mobility areas? The data do not provide a clear answer.”

    If you ask the wrong question then you won’t get the right answer.

    Maybe the economic indicators used by the people who design these polls frame the issue in the wrong terms.

    What if, as Marx, Veblen and Fromm postulated, man is a making animal, homo habilis? What if a person’s self worth is tied to his/her creating something of worth? What if most of us have not just an urge or desire to be makers but a fundamental need to be productive? To be effective? What if being competent gives us a sense of mastery over our own destiny that roots us, alleviates anxiety and establishes a sense of self-worth and identity? What if low-level service jobs don’t provide the same existential sense of mastery?

    Veblen pointed out that jobs in which people make stuff automatically makes them “objectivists”; they develop a consciousness that is “out of themselves”, attuned to the Laws of Nature because they must deal with the world as it is. People who don’t make stuff can believe in a magical world of make believe because there is no feedback from their work that points up their shortcomings and so compels them to address the inadequacies of their world view. Their outlook becomes untethered from this world.

    So, making things gives us inherent satisfaction because of pride in what we have accomplished and because it demonstrates to ourselves that we are effective. All human beings need to feel effective i.e. that there is a predictable relationship between their input and the resulting output. This is key to our sanity.

    Maybe Trump voters feel (correctly) that the position to which they are relegated by their Globalist Masters renders them powerless servants and they sense their own vulnerability because their jobs provide them with no sense of self mastery or pride in being part of a grander worthy project. It is hard to even imagine that persons engaged in America’s Space Shuttle project weren’t ennobled by their sense of pride in contributing to such an adventure and technical cultural achievement.

    This explains why makers e.g. house framers et al, who do have jobs that provide the type of satisfaction listed above, are concerned about the future and instinctively–even if they can’t articulate why–vote for the guy who at least seems to be aware of the problem.

    • Agree: Romanian
    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Anonymous

    You, Sir, are a poet.

    Off-topic:

    Amren has an article on Sam Francis' magnum opus appearing in print, "Leviathan and its enemies"

    http://www.amren.com/features/2016/08/sam-francis-on-the-roots-of-liberal-hegemony/

    No kindle version wth

    I have read quite a bit of his work, especially explaining James Burnham's thought. He was a very good writer. I recommend this very good primer, it's just 50 pages long but will have you ruminating for weeks http://www.mmisi.org/pr/12_01/francis.pdf

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    I assume you have read the book Shop Class as Soul Craft, written by a Chicago PhD who worked at a think tank, but quit because he found more intellectual challenge and genuine thinking amongst the guild of motorcycle mechanics? If not, read it: it backs your themes here wonderfully.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Anonymous

  31. All of this searching for reasons that people are supporting Trump by looking solely at economic data miss the really big picture. The Trump supporters I know back him because he seems genuinely interested in Americans and the best for the U.S.A.

    Here in New York just a few evenings ago a neighbor from Guatemala joined us for a few glasses of wine and bourbon. He’s a nice guy who had come to the U.S. illegally in the 1980s but now is a gainfully employed citizen. He began spouting off about “his people” and the fact that the “Spanish” voters would overwhelmingly vote against Trump and ensure that he could not win in the national election. I don’t usually think about my own heritage, but I can’t help but recall that my father’s family history starts with an immigrant arriving in NYC from Prussia around 1830 and we have documents showing that a family member fought at Gettysburg as part of a NY regiment. I also know for a fact that no one in my mother’s side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Old fogey


    It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.
     
    As a long-time New Yorker, but non-native to the metropolitan area, I've been fascinated by the near obsession of people here with one another's heritage. When queried with the typical "What are you," I answer "an American." A puzzled look is the usual reaction.

    There are many (too many IMO) that take pride in native and ethnic origin over pride in being an American. There's nothing wrong with honoring one's familial heritage--of course I'm old enough to remember a time before Hyphenated-Americans. In my book, you're either an American or you're not.

    Replies: @Anon, @S. Anonyia, @TomSchmidt

    , @Kylie
    @Old fogey

    "I also know for a fact that no one in my mother’s side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American."

    Same here, only my mother's side of the family came from the outskirts of Vienna. My grandmother had only received a sixth grade education in the old country but once here, she learned to speak, read and write English. She had pierced ears but when my mother asked to have her ears pierced back in the 1930's, my grandmother told her no, because "American girls don't do that". That was the standard.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    , @Brutusale
    @Old fogey

    My grandfather escaped his fate in the old country when he was 12. He got educated, found employment, bought property, married a wife of different European descent, raised 8 children and enjoyed his 92 years with feelings of accomplishment and contentment.

    By the time I came along he spoke unaccented English; I never heard the mother tongue spoken in his house. Whenever anyone started up about "well, back in the old country", he would give them a look that could etch titanium and ask why they were here if things were so good there.

    His smartassed, callow grandson asked him once, while helping him in his enormous garden, why he worked so hard on his flowers and vegetables when he ran away from a life of farm drudgery? "Here I want to!" he said, much more gently than I deserved.

    As American a sentiment as you'll hear.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Old fogey

  32. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Boethiuss
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    Was this before or after the Trump meltdown right after the Democratic convention?

    From what I've seen, the starch has gone out of the whole election season, and probably won't come back until it becomes competitive again, if it ever does.

    The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn't be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @epebble

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn’t be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    They might have been lost from Day 1. Mexicans = rapists still hurts. And the Heritage Foundation justice picks.

    Smart Trump could have framed immigration restriction and trade protectionism as not-racist, just good for the little guy, but correct me if I’m wrong but aren’t Portlanders primarily motivated by gender-race-sex progressivism, and were therefore always out of bounds if not destined to be absorbed by Clinton? As the DNC leak confirmed, Bernie was delaying her pivot to the centre, but what of it? Trump’s gaffes have given them a danger to vote *against*, so Clinton can have her milquetoast Republicans and eat them too.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "Smart Trump could have framed immigration restriction and trade protectionism as not-racist, just good for the little guy, but correct me if I’m wrong but aren’t Portlanders primarily motivated by gender-race-sex progressivism, and were therefore always out of bounds if not destined to be absorbed by Clinton? As the DNC leak confirmed, Bernie was delaying her pivot to the centre, but what of it? Trump’s gaffes have given them a danger to vote *against*, so Clinton can have her milquetoast Republicans and eat them too."

    Could be, but I think you're underemphasizing the extent that Bernie supporters wanted to repudiate her policies, such as they were understood to be, and her pattern of governance through corrupt associations. Given that our nominee is Donald Trump that option vanished pretty quickly (and the fact that he refused to debate Sanders late in the primary season which was a major tactical mistake).

  33. @PhysicistDave
    I'll be voting for Trump not because I feel harmed by foreign trade or immigrants but because I am sick and tired of the incredible lies and corruption among our elites.

    My wife and I have three doctoral degrees between us: we are certainly not blue-collar. But, in the last five decades, we have personally seen incredible levels of corruption in higher education, the medical profession, the scientific community, the legal profession, the defense industry, the clergy, etc. -- all based on our own personal experiences, not on news reports.

    I've had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.

    Will Trump do that? I don't know. But the fear that the elites demonstrate towards Trump is a good sign.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Replies: @Fed Up, @Chrisnonymous, @Alden, @Bill

    Dave, I’m right there with you. This corruption must stop.

    Fed Up in Pennsylvania

  34. Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the “Babies Welcome” proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as “racist”.
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to “solve the demographic crisis”. The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don’t have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you’re a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as “racist”, “völkisch” (loving your own people), and “xenophobic” because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was “populist”, the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn’t include “all families”, the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and “Bio-Germans” (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer’s rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.

    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one’s own people as a sin.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Romanian

    It is very difficult to maintain any sort of good will towards the elites and their pseudoleftist enablers.

    Sailer the Pacifist, what do you suggest we do about these people? Can power be wrested peacefully from them? Once attaining power, what should we do about these people?

    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym

    , @WhatEvvs
    @Romanian

    The decline in birth rates everywhere except Africa wouldn't be such a big deal - in fact, it would be a good thing - except for the fact that birth rates aren't declining in Africa. And migration.

    Replies: @rod1963

    , @The most deplorable one
    @Romanian

    It's almost as if the main parties are employing a three-step plan:

    1. Import Muslims.
    2. Muslims lovexxxx German women.
    3. More babies.

    Of course, I cribbed the plan from here:

    https://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/08/you-say-you-want-revolution.html#c273399174576843982

    , @Bert
    @Romanian

    What the hell is a "representative for independent voters"? I've never heard that term before.

    Replies: @Romanian

    , @International Jew
    @Romanian


    Bio-Germans” (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child.
     
    He-he, as opposed to Trans-Germans?
  35. This may help explain one puzzle that has stumped election observers so far. Trump has found success playing up economic grievances, stoking anxieties about immigrants, and complaining about Chinese competition. How is it then, that so many of his supporters seem to be economically secure? It could be that Trump supporters aren’t worried for themselves, but for their children.

    That’s a large part of it.


    These places have not been effected much by immigration, and Rothwell believes that is no coincidence. He argues that when people have more personal experience of people from other countries, they develop friendlier attitudes toward immigrants.

    This is not my experience. Familiarity breeds contempt.

  36. Success in America used to mean being a leader in your community.

    Now it means not needing to be aware of your community.

  37. I also find it interesting that all else being equal, Trump supporters are more affluent. This says a number of things – better at knowing where the money is going, for one. Financially, they have their shit together. And also more likely to pay tax. People who care about finances care about where their taxes are going. In general, they aren’t going to want to see their taxes go to people who are milking the system. People who are good with money tend to be long-term planners – those who see where the country is going to end up in a generation or two will think we are in for some major pain.

    It also points towards some respect for what Trump has accomplished himself. Business success is very easy for those who have never attempted it. Those who have tried know how tough it is and respect those who can do it successfully.

  38. @Romanian
    Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8EQFbqu-8

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the "Babies Welcome" proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as "racist".
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to "solve the demographic crisis". The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don't have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you're a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as "racist", "völkisch" (loving your own people), and "xenophobic" because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was "populist", the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn't include "all families", the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and "Bio-Germans" (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer's rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.
     
    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one's own people as a sin.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @WhatEvvs, @The most deplorable one, @Bert, @International Jew

    It is very difficult to maintain any sort of good will towards the elites and their pseudoleftist enablers.

    Sailer the Pacifist, what do you suggest we do about these people? Can power be wrested peacefully from them? Once attaining power, what should we do about these people?

    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AndrewR

    As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    As shown in Afghanistan, the elites in their commuter planes and helicopters would be very vulnerable to attack from RPGs. So, while they won't take steps to secure the border from invasion by millions of bipeds, you can be sure they would and do take steps to prevent the smuggling of arms.

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What's left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.

    We haven't had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century and that's just as well. Too many innocent lives are lost in these kinds of displays. But perhaps now that Obama has and is currently letting in so many Muslims, his legacy will be to have put an end to our relatively long period of civil tranquility. Hope and Change, baby!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    , @Anonym
    @AndrewR


    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.
     
    It's not rocket science is it? We can still use our demographic majority to peacefully usher in the God Emperor, so our side is agitating in that direction.

    At this stage it is pretty dumb to advocate a violent solution as it will be the certain end of the individual and their ability to start a family etc. You yourself are free to start boning up on the FPS games and paintball though, or whatever floats your boat.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  39. The anti-Trump comments at the Wapo mostly consist of “Trump supporters are stupid white racists”. One of the more intelligent anti-Trump comments:

    Here’s my guess. Trump supporters come from a demographic that is literally dying off (white Christian) and they see their political strength severely in decline. They understand that there is little hope of reversing this trend and because of that loss they are very angry. Much of that anger is fueled by racist attitudes.

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out. They display belligerence and they want only belligerence from their candidate. They have no hope for change. They are out to wreck.

    Technically they can actually control these forces in 2016, by voting in DJT. He’s the first person to promise any meaningful change in their lifetimes. Rather than being dismissive, one would think it might be a bit of a wake-up call that this situation is untenable… the majority of the people making up the most powerful nation on earth, comprised of the same demographic who originally did make it the most powerful… and they are angry. Maybe they don’t like being told to die off while we tax you and replace you with cheaper brown people, whether in the actual USA or overseas.

    • Replies: @e
    @Anonym

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out.

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their "lash[ing] out." Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered "lash[ing] out"?

    It's writing/"analyses"/word twisting like that from progressives and anti-Trumpers that might explain much of Trump's support, don'tchathink?

    I honestly don't know whom I detest more--the Clintons and their corruption or the American press. How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Anonym, @Harry Baldwin

    , @candid_observer
    @Anonym

    The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition.

    If the white working class is ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence, they are on these very traits nonetheless miles above the groups the left embraces. Blacks are notoriously and obviously on average far more ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence; likewise Hispanics; likewise any of the favored ethnicities/races of the left.

    The only difference is that these supposedly horrendous traits are entirely forgiven by the left, for no other reason than that the left favors these groups, and has invented a system of victimology to justify their bias.

    For the left, it is always and everywhere the white working class that must take the hit.

    And this all makes for the larger point that it is the denial of HBD that lies at the core of our political troubles. The left's system of victimology collapses if these groups aren't really victims of some mysterious, immensely powerful force of racism, but are simply performing as their genes will allow them.

    If anyone wonders why the questions of HBD are important, they might consider that virtually everything we as a country focus on in our politics would be changed permanently and for the better if HBD were acknowledged. We are attempting to solve problems that can't be solved, and, inevitably because of the failures, growing ever more desperate, absurd, and destructive in our efforts.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  40. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they’ve expressed support for Trump. We’ve read news stories — suppressed by the MSM of course — about individuals who’ve been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we’ve learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I’ve never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it’s hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party’s corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    • Agree: Old fogey
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Agree. And that is why I continue to believe that DJT will crush Hillary 60-40 in the election. Even honest polls. quit laughing!, are off by at least 10 points because people are reluctant if not downright scared to openly support him. The secrecy of the ballot booth is another matter.

    , @dr kill
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    So true. There is no lack of interest, only the hard-learned knowledge that wearing a MAGA t-shirt can get you spit upon. I see the same thing here in the New Winter White House. (TM) I drive 200 miles a day and see only 1 bumper sticker of either candidate in all that time. both sides are keeping their powder dry.

    , @epebble
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I am sure we will never have vandalism of any Trump supporter in our neighborhood; but social ostracism is guaranteed. For most people, that may be worse than losing a sign or getting litter thrown.

    , @stillCARealist
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    this is depressingly true all around. We learned it good and hard during the Prop 8 campaign. The other side has no scruples whatsoever and will vandalize and destroy whatever they think they can get away with. The media would hardly touch it because those homo- terrorists are their pets.

    Funny thing is, I don't fear blacks or Hispanics. I fear white liberals.

    , @Difference maker
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I wonder if the disruption at the Chicago rally in March shouldn't have been met with more force both during and afterward

    Though no doubt the media waiting to shout nazi from the rooftops

  41. @PhysicistDave
    I'll be voting for Trump not because I feel harmed by foreign trade or immigrants but because I am sick and tired of the incredible lies and corruption among our elites.

    My wife and I have three doctoral degrees between us: we are certainly not blue-collar. But, in the last five decades, we have personally seen incredible levels of corruption in higher education, the medical profession, the scientific community, the legal profession, the defense industry, the clergy, etc. -- all based on our own personal experiences, not on news reports.

    I've had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.

    Will Trump do that? I don't know. But the fear that the elites demonstrate towards Trump is a good sign.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Replies: @Fed Up, @Chrisnonymous, @Alden, @Bill

    As I said above “leadership crisis”. The politicians of both parties are not obviously working in our interests.

    Lack of faith in the leaders covers a broad range of things from refusing to recognize our sovereignty to corruption to choosing economic policies that benefit small minorities to failing to enforce law and order.

    It’s an intuition which might not even be recognized by the people who have it.

    Since it’s a feeling based on a multidude of things over time, it’s not something you can pin down easily by asking people about their incomes and ideologies and not going to clearly point to one demographic that will benefit. That’s why these poll takers are having so much trouble. “worried about their communities” is probably as close as anyone will get.

  42. @candid_observer
    A lot of this "analysis", as reported, sounds like an exercise in willful stupidity.

    After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.
     
    and,

    Yet when Rothwell focused only on white Republicans, he also found that demographically similar respondents who were more affluent viewed Trump more favorably.
     
    What in God's name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect? Who cares about the barely discernible residual effects?

    How do these marginal effects provide some great insight into "the Trump voter" which the dominant demographic factors don't?

    If Trump's appeal is unusually strong among the white working class, and relatively weak among the white professional class, isn't that the thing that's important? If Trump appeals far more to men than women than is typical, isn't that the thing that's important?

    This guy Rothwell seems like a cretin, and worse, a blind and biased cretin, as made evident in his remarks:


    Trump is giving his supporters a misleading account of their ills, Rothwell said. “He says they are suffering because of globalization,” Rothwell said. “He says they’re suffering because of immigration and a diversifying country, but I can’t find any evidence of that.”
     
    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @AlphaSupremo, @International Jew

    Foreign competition affects workers at nearly every labor level. Here’s what I compete against:

    http://www.jobsintech.io/immigration_companies/infosys-limited/charts

    • Replies: @Tom-in-VA
    @AlphaSupremo

    This report on NPR yesterday talked about migrant farm workers in south Texas striking for higher pay and better working conditions (like water and porta pots).

    http://www.npr.org/2016/08/12/489491157/texas-farmworker-1966-strike-was-like-heading-into-war

    "Workers decided in the spring of 1966 to walk off the job. Union leaders from California — including Cesar Chavez — came to Texas and helped organize the strike
    Their demands were simple: They wanted work contracts, wages of $1.25 an hour, water breaks and access to bathrooms.

    "It was like heading into war," Diaz says, "because ranchers were not budging."

    Indeed, ranchers dissed the farmworkers' demands and called in the Texas Rangers.

    "They used to beat us up and would arrest us," Vera says.

    But even beatings and arrests failed to break the strike. So ranchers opted for a different route. They started busing in workers from Mexico."

    Apparently, increasing the labor supply can keep wages down. Who knew?

    "One thing hasn't changed though: farm work in Texas is still plagued with abuse. And those who dare to speak up on this side of the border continue to be easily replaced by those from the other side."

    In NPR world, working to reduce immigration to improve your wages and working conditions is fine and dandy if you are brown. If not, you are obviously racist.

  43. “If our kids are in trouble – my kids, our kids, anyone’s kids – we all have a responsibility to look after them.”

    I’ll believe that they really believe that when the politicians who have earned hundreds of millions from their “public service” (Al Gore, Tony Blair, the Clintons, and shortly the Obamas) take all the millions they’ve earned in bribes and distribute it to “anyone’s kids” and not merely their own.

  44. They used to call it noblesse oblige.

    • Replies: @Morton Knox
    @countenance

    60% of those earning less than $50,000 per year voted for Obama in 2012. Hillary will also be more dependent on those struggling economically than Trump.

    typically the democrats portray the GOP candidates as being a threat to welfare and being the party of the wealthy. Trump has the opportunity to change this narrative.

  45. @AndyBoy
    I'm afraid it is hard to accept that so many "elites" have no empathy for their fellow citizens.

    And yet they demonstrate it daily.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @jill

    The latest Peggy Noonan column expresses this persuasively. I’m not much of a Noonan fan, but her August 11 column, titled “How Global Elites Forsake Their Countrymen: Those in power see people at the bottom as aliens whose bizarre emotions they must try to manage,” represents a real breakthrough among respectable media pundits.

    • Agree: Barnard
    • Replies: @dr kill
    @Harry Baldwin

    That she is still employed tells me all I need to know about the WSJ. They will be the last to close, but close they will. Reading her is an example of the jobs Americans won't do.

  46. Where are these analyses for Hillary voters?

  47. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
    Ayyadurai is founder and CEO of a tech company in Kendell Square, Cambridge, MA. He’s also married to actress Fran Drescher.
    Ayyadurai is super articulate and a big Trump supporter and had the most scathing comments about Hillary. Carr had him in to discuss emails and servers and why what Hillary did was so egregious. They need to get this guy out there more. He was fantastic.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

    • Agree: EriK
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anonymous


    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
     
    He wasn't the inventor of email. He apparently coined the term, however.

    Nonetheless, I'm glad he's supporting Trump.

    Replies: @Lurker

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymous

    Based on the info in his bio, he was a year behind Chris Christie in high school #SmallWorld

  48. @Romanian
    Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8EQFbqu-8

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the "Babies Welcome" proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as "racist".
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to "solve the demographic crisis". The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don't have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you're a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as "racist", "völkisch" (loving your own people), and "xenophobic" because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was "populist", the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn't include "all families", the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and "Bio-Germans" (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer's rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.
     
    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one's own people as a sin.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @WhatEvvs, @The most deplorable one, @Bert, @International Jew

    The decline in birth rates everywhere except Africa wouldn’t be such a big deal – in fact, it would be a good thing – except for the fact that birth rates aren’t declining in Africa. And migration.

    • Replies: @rod1963
    @WhatEvvs

    Well sir you hit the nail on the head, the driving force behind all of the mass migrations pushed on us by the elites.

    A country with low population and scare workforce can charge more for labor which industry hates, whereas a country flooded with migrants, drops the wage floor right out from under the workers and ensures workers remain disposable and replaceable.

    This is what globalism is all about. Why off-shore your factory to Shanghai when you can bring hordes of Asians to America instead and let uncle Sam shoulder the burden of supporting this labor force.

    It's win win for the elites.

    For the rest of us, it's going to be hell.

  49. WhatEvvs [AKA "Mipchunk"] says:

    I’ve seen many cases where the findings of a sociologist are overturned by a fresh look at the data.

    I’m suspicious of Putnam’s finding that all ethnic diversity is bad. Some kinds of ethnic diversity are great. (Massapequa AKA “Mazzapizza” I’m looking at you.)

    And some kinds of ethnic diversity are disastrous. Bed-Stuy, I’m looking at you.

  50. Hollywood and the (government-run) education system has raised our children to value every endeavor but parenting; to value every profession but motherhood. Little wonder, then, that they grow up to devalue parenting.

    If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we’re going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We’re going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don’t have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around.

    Very large numbers of Westerners these days aren’t bothered by the fact that they can’t afford children because they’ve been taught not to want children, anyway.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Wilkey

    Oh you mean Friends and Seinfeld weren't the cultural uplift we thought they were? Remember LA Law back in the 80's? That was Friends for the smart set, and just as slutty.

    Frankly I think the popularity of HGTV and the Food Network is that they remind people of home and family, two building blocks of successful lives that have been rejected by the rest of the TV culture.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilkey

    On the car radio I often listen to oldies from the 1950s - mid-10960s. It's striking how many of those songs were about being in love and wanting to get married. Has there been a rock song about wanting to get married in the last 30 years? (I'm not talking about country music.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Wilkey

    , @Boethiuss
    @Wilkey

    "If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we’re going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We’re going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don’t have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around."

    That's a very important point that explains a lot of what created the Trump nomination. Steve has talked a lot about Putnam and social capital, but specifically pertaining to white Republican-leaning America, there's a tremendous imbalance of social capital in favor of religious/churchgoing people.

    There's also a tremendous cultural divide between religious and secular white Republicans. This flew under radar for a long time (not least for me) because there's not a lot of animosity between them. The seculars care about immigration and more broadly anything related to maximizing their quality of life. The religious care about abortion and more broadly anything related to good character.

    Inside Republican politics, the religious have always won out because they were the ones who had the social capital to organize politically. For the seculars to take over, it had to be behind the candidacy of somebody who parachuted in from outside like Trump. And now that he's here, it's clear for me that the seculars deserve more representation than they've gotten recently.

    But, they should also appreciate that a decent part of the reason why things have deteriorated as much as they is precisely from secularity. Oddly enough, that's one of the reasons why I appreciated Ted Cruz more and more as the primary season went on. As graceless as he could be sometimes, he still represented reality that in fact we _need_ more Biblethumping. And the people who need it the most tend to be the ones who least like it.

  51. “Trump’s supporters are blue-collar, and many people working in those occupations have jobs in construction, repair or transportation — all of which are protected from Chinese competition. Chinese workers might be assembling semiconductors, but they are not adjusting the thermostat or changing the oil. …”

    Que?

  52. @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    Class gender thing Female oriented aristocratic societies tend towards Antoinette ism. Let them eat cake.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Bill, @dcite

    Marie Aintoinette was a lot less whiny than you are at least. And compared to your case of blue balls she had to face a lot more adversity at the end.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Sam Haysom

    Spoken like a Democrat criticizing Trump. My analysis stands -- White unmarried/newly married women back Hillary, men back Trump. Not by a little, but by a lot. The Gender Gap is fairly big, around twenty points plus. Nearly all of Trump's slump in the polls is due to White women.

    Now, you can scream that White women are the pure, driven snow and that particularly unmarried White women are "natural conservatives" like say Indian Engineers and the Nation of Islam and Chinese exiled oligarchs, but your invective pretty much guarantees the bankruptcy of your thinking and low IQ.

    Unlike Japan, unlike South Korea, every place in the West the elites pretty much hate hate hate their own people. This includes even Israel where hard-left elites with lots of money (the two are pretty much the same thing) push for Open Borders and the like. Only a fairly corrupt in itself rival faction ala Bibi has kept them from power.

    Japan and South Korea certainly have elites, the nations are just not female oriented, and have btw a very restricted consumer market leaving far less mass consumerism that puts societies on female-oriented steroids. The West has ALWAYS been more female oriented, and up until the 1960s this was a huge strength, the pill, the condom, anonymous urban living, and vast increases in women's earning power and urbanization left most women with little ties or value to their male peers in contrast to pre-1960.

    And the West has ALWAYS had a huge tendency among its elites to intermarry other foreign elites: the British Royal Family is essentially Hanoverian, related to both the former German Royal Family and the Russian one, feudalism and royalism treated people as property to be exchanged, along with territory, nationalism came much, much later, as Eugen Weber's "Peasants into Frenchmen" demonstrates -- as late as the 1840s much of France did not consider itself French, rather Norman, Breton, Occitan, etc. with mutually unintelligible dialects.

    TL:DR summary: The West is reverting back to feudal elite type, supercharged by a huge number of unmarried or late-married White women stuck in consumerism mode and aping the aristocratic fashions of elites who consider their foreign cousins and inlaws more important than their people. And critically don't fear an assertive middle class turning them out like poor Louis Phillipe.

  53. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    “Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking.”

    Megadittos. I saw and heard lots of Portlanders (and Oregonians generally) feeling the Bern, but since Mrs. Strokes-a-Lot sewed up the nomination……. crickets. And I think you answered your own question: Oregon goes 60/40 to the Democrat even if they nominate a warm pile of dog vomit, so who cares about the election here in Oregon.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    The D's fear a huge enthusiasm gap. Obama's turnout in 2008 was huge because of the historic nature and the hype by the media. But that was an aberration.

    The D's plan has been to import a lot of cow-brained darkies who don't turn out en massefor voting, allowing the D's to get their graft with minimal civil oversight a few small special interest groups pushing them around.

    but they problem is the D's need to get to that mass racial replacement first---which is awfully hard to do with whites around getting angry at corruption and getting motivated by a guy like Trump and storming the Bastille with the Tea Party and Trump and such.

    To swim in a sea of blue that don't make much waves is the dream of the Left, but they've only managed to set up those conditions in highly urbanized areas. Outside of those places, the non-whites don't venture unless they are in agreement with the more red whites out there.

  54. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    “Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.”

    And yet, though the election in Oregon is a fait accompli for the Democrats, the local gaystream media outlets run daily attack pieces against Trump. It’s surreal. I should write them all a letter asking why bother with the Trumphobia in a state that goes 60/40 Democrat regardless?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It's important to stoke the Trumphobia to help suppress the voters' gag reflex as they pull the lever for Cacklepants.

  55. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Wait till he gets to New York and rides the MTA where naked people are being photographed smoking crack. Bet you never saw that in Honduras, Santo. Welcome to the real 3rd world, Santo.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/subway-rider-smokes-crack-naked-no-3-train-article-1.2746618

    And how about all the new American babies being born addicted to drugs. Did you notice that in Honduras, Santo?

    http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/08/addicted_newborns.html

    Why are you coming here, really?

    And what about America’s richest communities flooded with so much heroin that the social workers are in need of counseling, Santo?

    http://easthamptonstar.com/Education/2016331/Drug-Expert-Ive-Never-Seen-It-This

    Is your President Juan Orlando Hernández releasing 46000 drug dealers from jail like our president is doing?

    https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/10/06/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-federal-prisoner-release#.xjkA8e2hK

    Santo, get right back on that train and go home, for your own sake.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @jill

    I wonder if liberals have caught on to the connection between Obama's release of drug dealers and the recent spike in shootings in big city black areas. Probably not.

  56. “A massive new study debunks a widespread theory for Donald Trump’s success”

    How about a massive new study of Hillary’s success?

    I was visiting relatives in upstate NY last week. In their smallish very white liberal town I saw lawn signs: 3 Bernie, 1 Hillary, 1 Kang and Kodos. There were also lawn signs for a few local pols, and some environmental issues and one for the repeal of a gun law, the SAFE act.

  57. @Boethiuss
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    Was this before or after the Trump meltdown right after the Democratic convention?

    From what I've seen, the starch has gone out of the whole election season, and probably won't come back until it becomes competitive again, if it ever does.

    The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn't be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @epebble

    “The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.”

    Yes, Portlanders will reflexively, mindlessly vote for Shrillary or whoever has the “D” next to his/her name. But in no way was the Portland mentality up for grabs this election cycle — whether they’re conscious of it or not, Portlanders CHOOSE to live in the Whitest large city in America, and they atone for their secular sin of latent racism by loudly proclaiming anti-racist platitudes whenever possible and voting D as early and as often as they can.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I live is a nice community just outside of Boston. Few NAMs with quite a few East Asians and East Indians. There is a lot of race mixing but is almost exclusively white/Asian. It is so orderly and nice. You feel safe and it feels harmonious. It is a blue area in a blue state. But, funny enough, when the whites here can't have kids and seek to adopt, they don't adopt from the large supply of black babies here in the U.S., they spend a lot of money and time off work and go and adopt babies from China, Korea, or Russia. Racists!

  58. @AndyBoy
    I'm afraid it is hard to accept that so many "elites" have no empathy for their fellow citizens.

    And yet they demonstrate it daily.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @jill

    As Obama’s Manufacturing Czar, Ron Bloom said:

    “Generally speaking, we get the joke. We know that the free market is nonsense. We know that the whole point is to game the system, to beat the market, or at least find someone who will pay you a lot of money ‘cause they’re convinced that there is a free lunch. We know this is largely about power, that it’s an adults-only no-limit game. We kind of agree with Mao that political power comes largely from the barrel of a gun. And we get it, that if you want a friend, you should get a dog.”- Ron Bloom, Keynote address at the 6th Annual Distressed Investing Forum, Union League Club, New York, February 27-28, 2008.

    or from this supposed kindly old man:

    “You want everybody educated to their potential. You want people to reach their potential. That still won’t work for some people in a highly developed market system. I mean if this were a sports-based system, you could give me a PhD in football, and I could practice eight hours a day, and I might be able to carry the water from, not onto the field, but from the locker room to the bench. There’s just some people don’t fit well into a highly skilled market-based economy.
    They’re perfectly decent citizens. We’ll send them off to Afghanistan, but they are not going to command a big price.”

    Warren Buffet September 8, 2015

    or from Charlie Munger, Buffet’s side kick, right after the bank bailout:

    “You should thank God” for bank bailouts. Now, if you talk about bailouts for everybody else, there comes a place where if you just start bailing out all the individuals instead of telling them to adapt, the culture dies.”
    “At a certain place you’ve got to say to the people, ‘Suck it in and cope, buddy. Suck it in and cope.’”

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @jill

    Thanks for the great quotes. Munger generally is harsh towards the stock option scamming crew that wrecks our companies, so we can forgive him being heartless to those on the bottom. Buffett, by contrast, has become a crony capitalist, especially after 2008.

  59. Many of my friends and associates are Trump supporters. And they are not, strictly speaking, “blue-collar”. Most, however, emerged from a blue-collar familial background and are at least second-generation Americans whose grandparents emigrated from Europe. Economically they are doing quite well and indeed fit the very profile which is described in the WaPo article.

    The suggestion that what animates their support for Trump is a genuine concern not necessarily for THEIR future but for the future of their progeny is a valid point indeed.

  60. @iSteveFan
    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump's supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Maj. Kong, @Jim Sweeney, @Mr. Anon, @International Jew

    A perfect point, perfectly made. Never seen it made before either so congratulations.

  61. @South Texas Guy
    I wonder if the study took this into account. We got these in reruns years after, but when I was a kid this was, and still is I think, funny as hell. Try telling the second joke about the son Malcom around people you don't know and you'd be lynched.

    https://youtu.be/epKqu_VHbQU

    Ace has a post up about a coloring thingy for (I assume) very young kids asking them to identify their gender. I know this is an outlier but 20 years ago, this would have meant summary dismissal, if not outright murder.

    ** Sorry if this is a second posting of this video. I can't remember where I saw it first, and like Steve, I have a fondness for Natty Light that can sometimes lead me astray.

    Replies: @Morton Knox

    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VHS channel in Philadelphia.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Morton Knox


    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VH[F] channel in Philadelphia.
     
    17, 29, or 48? Don't ever remember seeing that when I visited my grandparents, though my uncle mentioned that he was a fan.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Morton Knox

  62. @Dieter Kief
    "For America’s poor kids do belong to us and we to them. They are our kids."

    This Putnam-Quote by Steve Sailer with regard to poor american and poor immigrant kids alike, marks a crucial point in western thinking.

    Because it marks the intersection between the personal and the universal.

    Human rights are universal. They grant ervery person the same human dignity.

    This is judeo-christian thinking and as such at the heart of our selfrespect as westeners.

    But: All men have the same human dignity is often - and misleadingly - being looked upon as the same as: Love your neighbour like yourself.

    This is just bad theology, because Love thy neighbour like yourself doesn't mean love erverybody else on the world like yourself. See: Love your neighbour like yourself is not universalistic: It's local, so to speak.

    German Philosopher Robert Spaemann, once an adviser to pope Benedict XVI., pointed this problem out with regard to Angela Merkel, when Merkel said, that being poor is one of the good reasons to come to Europe.

    Old Spaemn has nothing to loose, he is 89 - and he speaks out.

    Putnam and the like - for a myriad of reasons - don't get this point. Others obviously do. - Not for the first time, Steve Sailer is onto something very important.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    I know you’re in Germany, Dieter, and are not familiar with “the gritty, working-class Boston suburb of Chelsea”, but native son Jay Ash, now Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development and looking to become the city manager of Cambridge, was given a crappy, Third World majority city to run, and during his tenure as city manager was given tens of millions in state and federal money to prove everything liberals stand for: that the poor, benighted mestizos can be made into solid Americans.

    The result? Chelsea is now a crappy, Third World majority city with the highest violent crime rate in New England.

    What did Chelsea used to be? About half Jewish through the 50s.

    “Between 1890-1900 Chelsea’s Jewish population grew from 100-3,000 and by 1910, around 10,000 Jews lived in Chelsea, nearly one-third of the entire population of the city. In the 1930s there were about 20,000 Jewish residents in Chelsea out of a total population of almost 46,000.”–the Mystic River Jewish Communities Project

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Brutusale

    Hi Brutusdale - I'm very interested not only in cases of social progress (South Korea) or stability (Japan), but also in places of disorder and decline.
    May I say, that in the late 70ies I've even spent a few weeks in the then heavily deteriorating Detroit. - I've hichthiked into Detroit. The first two guys who picked me up there - one of them was in the best mood, because he had just left prison. They were on drugs. My girlfriend lived in a house right at a park near the center of Detroit and when she moved in, we were told that this were the rules: a)We should not lock the house up, so that whoever wanted could come in and make sure, that there was nothing woth to take away. b) Just bring nothing of worth anyway.
    Plus - I know quite a range of poeple on the brink. And have worked with quite a few of them.
    I do know, that it's not easy...
    Even though - I hardly get it, when I read what Linh Dinh wrote this week on his blog here at Unz Report about a business advisor who seems to have teached at inner city schools in Detroit.

    What you write about Celsea neatly fits into the picture Linh Dinh is painting via his (now) small business advisor about Detroit's inner city schools. Maybe the Cambridge you write about and the inner city schools Linh Dinh writes about are the worst examples; and maybe not all of what Linh Dinhs small business advisor tells about Detroit Schools is true. But even then: just to think that by and large things like that seem to be c o n s t a n t l y going on in US- society, be it in Detroit, or in Chelsea or elswhere, makes me wonder: How come?

    By the way: Physisist Dave - commenter No. 19 seems to beat the same drum as - may I say: we? - do.
    What Putnam is concerned, I just wanted to support Steve Sailers view, that Putnam makes a mistake. The same mistake, Angela Merkel makes: To invide the world, no matter what, and think that's human - or christian.
    It's neither, nor. And it will not help us the tiniest bit.

  63. Can’t use my old handle, oh well.

    The two words I’d use to describe the Trump voters I know are “pissed off”.

  64. @Wilkey
    Hollywood and the (government-run) education system has raised our children to value every endeavor but parenting; to value every profession but motherhood. Little wonder, then, that they grow up to devalue parenting.

    If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we're going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We're going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don't have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around.

    Very large numbers of Westerners these days aren't bothered by the fact that they can't afford children because they've been taught not to want children, anyway.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    Oh you mean Friends and Seinfeld weren’t the cultural uplift we thought they were? Remember LA Law back in the 80’s? That was Friends for the smart set, and just as slutty.

    Frankly I think the popularity of HGTV and the Food Network is that they remind people of home and family, two building blocks of successful lives that have been rejected by the rest of the TV culture.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @stillCARealist

    Do-it-yourself shows (home improvement, cooking) are my family's new goto. They've definitely supplanted sitcoms.

    And looking at my prior post I have to apologize for the serious lack of editing.

  65. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Romanian
    Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8EQFbqu-8

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the "Babies Welcome" proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as "racist".
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to "solve the demographic crisis". The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don't have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you're a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as "racist", "völkisch" (loving your own people), and "xenophobic" because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was "populist", the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn't include "all families", the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and "Bio-Germans" (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer's rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.
     
    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one's own people as a sin.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @WhatEvvs, @The most deplorable one, @Bert, @International Jew

    It’s almost as if the main parties are employing a three-step plan:

    1. Import Muslims.
    2. Muslims lovexxxx German women.
    3. More babies.

    Of course, I cribbed the plan from here:

    https://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/08/you-say-you-want-revolution.html#c273399174576843982

  66. @countenance
    They used to call it noblesse oblige.

    Replies: @Morton Knox

    60% of those earning less than $50,000 per year voted for Obama in 2012. Hillary will also be more dependent on those struggling economically than Trump.

    typically the democrats portray the GOP candidates as being a threat to welfare and being the party of the wealthy. Trump has the opportunity to change this narrative.

  67. @Portlander

    Trump tended to do better in the hurting states and Cruz in prospering states.

    I pointed out back in 2015 in a blog post entitled “Ted Cruz, Raj Chetty, and Sioux County, Iowa’s Magic Dirt,” that Ted Cruz was doing well in parts of the country that did well in Chetty’s comparison of parents’ income in 1996-2000 to kids’ income in 2011-12. Chetty’s best county in America for working class income growth was Sioux County, Iowa. In the Iowa Caucus, Ted Cruz carried Sioux County with 33%, while Trump was fourth with 11%.
     
    I suppose that explains the Paul R vs. Paul N outcome. Though my money is still on fraud. Way too big a margin of victory there. I think Paul R panicked and over-did it on setting the fix.

    I'm still waiting to see a contemporary incumbent lose an election when they see the challenger coming. Losses by back-bench nobodies don't count.

    Replies: @gruff, @Alden

    Ryan’s previous elections were either uncontested or won by huge margins. Nehlen actually got a larger share of the vote than previous opponents. Fraud is not at all likely.

  68. Weird I can never get posts here about H1Bs approved until the number of comments hits at least 50 so that they’re lost in the shuffle. I think Sailer carries a torch for the Hindus.

  69. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    Central Portland here. There are still Bernie signs up all over the place. I think people had the wind knocked out of them by Sanders’s sellout.

    There was a local bar that briefly had a painting of Hitler in a MAGA hat on the wall.

  70. @stillCARealist
    @Wilkey

    Oh you mean Friends and Seinfeld weren't the cultural uplift we thought they were? Remember LA Law back in the 80's? That was Friends for the smart set, and just as slutty.

    Frankly I think the popularity of HGTV and the Food Network is that they remind people of home and family, two building blocks of successful lives that have been rejected by the rest of the TV culture.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Do-it-yourself shows (home improvement, cooking) are my family’s new goto. They’ve definitely supplanted sitcoms.

    And looking at my prior post I have to apologize for the serious lack of editing.

  71. OT: Steve, regarding your hypothesis in Taki’s that athletes can’t switch nationalities, this morning former Jamaican sprinter Andrew Fisher lined up and ran for Bahrain.

    http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/sport/athletics/Fisher-says-no-name-change-despite-Bahrain-switch_61673

    “Of course it was difficult to make the switch,” he said, after running a season’s best 10.07 seconds at the Jamaica International Invitational in early May.

    “It was a decision that took months to come to. I love Jamaica and didn’t think I could live anywhere else,” said the man who has a personal best 9.94 seconds, set in Madrid last year.

    He was hesitant to talk about the process that led to his changing allegiances saying initially that it is “private information”. He later told the Observer he was not the one who made the initial contact.


    There are no plans, he said however, to change his name, as some athletes have done.

    “No, there will be no change of names,” he said.

    “Andrew Fisher is my name, my dad gave me this name so no change. No one asked me to change it either.”

    He is, however, impressed with what he has seen of his new ‘home’, and says the switch has been going well.

    “It’s been going all right, I am based here though but been to Bahrain once. It’s a beautiful country. I love it there but it’s very hot, way hotter than Jamaica.”

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @415 reasons

    There is a 'British' runner - Mo Farah.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mo_Farah

    A Somali in other words. A couple of years ago it transpired he was living the US (he was already training there). Certain unkind souls pointed out online that this showed his 'British' identity for the sham it is. Useless, outraged cucks then popped up bleating that if we weren't more supportive then Mo would become a US citizen and then where would be?! 'We' wouldnt be winning all those gold medals.

    Of course this only served to illustrate the hollow nature of their argument.

  72. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking."

    Megadittos. I saw and heard lots of Portlanders (and Oregonians generally) feeling the Bern, but since Mrs. Strokes-a-Lot sewed up the nomination....... crickets. And I think you answered your own question: Oregon goes 60/40 to the Democrat even if they nominate a warm pile of dog vomit, so who cares about the election here in Oregon.

    Replies: @whorefinder

    The D’s fear a huge enthusiasm gap. Obama’s turnout in 2008 was huge because of the historic nature and the hype by the media. But that was an aberration.

    The D’s plan has been to import a lot of cow-brained darkies who don’t turn out en massefor voting, allowing the D’s to get their graft with minimal civil oversight a few small special interest groups pushing them around.

    but they problem is the D’s need to get to that mass racial replacement first—which is awfully hard to do with whites around getting angry at corruption and getting motivated by a guy like Trump and storming the Bastille with the Tea Party and Trump and such.

    To swim in a sea of blue that don’t make much waves is the dream of the Left, but they’ve only managed to set up those conditions in highly urbanized areas. Outside of those places, the non-whites don’t venture unless they are in agreement with the more red whites out there.

  73. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    Agree. And that is why I continue to believe that DJT will crush Hillary 60-40 in the election. Even honest polls. quit laughing!, are off by at least 10 points because people are reluctant if not downright scared to openly support him. The secrecy of the ballot booth is another matter.

  74. e says:
    @Anonym
    The anti-Trump comments at the Wapo mostly consist of "Trump supporters are stupid white racists". One of the more intelligent anti-Trump comments:

    Here's my guess. Trump supporters come from a demographic that is literally dying off (white Christian) and they see their political strength severely in decline. They understand that there is little hope of reversing this trend and because of that loss they are very angry. Much of that anger is fueled by racist attitudes.

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can't control? They lash out. They display belligerence and they want only belligerence from their candidate. They have no hope for change. They are out to wreck.
     

    Technically they can actually control these forces in 2016, by voting in DJT. He's the first person to promise any meaningful change in their lifetimes. Rather than being dismissive, one would think it might be a bit of a wake-up call that this situation is untenable... the majority of the people making up the most powerful nation on earth, comprised of the same demographic who originally did make it the most powerful... and they are angry. Maybe they don't like being told to die off while we tax you and replace you with cheaper brown people, whether in the actual USA or overseas.

    Replies: @e, @candid_observer

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out.

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their “lash[ing] out.” Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered “lash[ing] out”?

    It’s writing/”analyses”/word twisting like that from progressives and anti-Trumpers that might explain much of Trump’s support, don’tchathink?

    I honestly don’t know whom I detest more–the Clintons and their corruption or the American press. How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @e


    How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?
     
    Well, these days there is probably a lot more truth in Pravda.
    , @Anonym
    @e

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their “lash[ing] out.” Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered “lash[ing] out”?

    Lashing out... there hasn't been anything unprovoked as far as I know. There has been some absence of turning the other cheek at rallies. Some sizable part of the country would like to see a defense of the white demographic, involving a return to country of origin of all the illegals. If this requires force, then so be it. It's working within the system though.

    These leftists, they think it's amusing to taunt a cornered animal. They have no idea.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @e

    They lash out.</

    Translation: "Officer, it all started when he hit me back."

  75. @Anonym
    The anti-Trump comments at the Wapo mostly consist of "Trump supporters are stupid white racists". One of the more intelligent anti-Trump comments:

    Here's my guess. Trump supporters come from a demographic that is literally dying off (white Christian) and they see their political strength severely in decline. They understand that there is little hope of reversing this trend and because of that loss they are very angry. Much of that anger is fueled by racist attitudes.

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can't control? They lash out. They display belligerence and they want only belligerence from their candidate. They have no hope for change. They are out to wreck.
     

    Technically they can actually control these forces in 2016, by voting in DJT. He's the first person to promise any meaningful change in their lifetimes. Rather than being dismissive, one would think it might be a bit of a wake-up call that this situation is untenable... the majority of the people making up the most powerful nation on earth, comprised of the same demographic who originally did make it the most powerful... and they are angry. Maybe they don't like being told to die off while we tax you and replace you with cheaper brown people, whether in the actual USA or overseas.

    Replies: @e, @candid_observer

    The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition.

    If the white working class is ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence, they are on these very traits nonetheless miles above the groups the left embraces. Blacks are notoriously and obviously on average far more ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence; likewise Hispanics; likewise any of the favored ethnicities/races of the left.

    The only difference is that these supposedly horrendous traits are entirely forgiven by the left, for no other reason than that the left favors these groups, and has invented a system of victimology to justify their bias.

    For the left, it is always and everywhere the white working class that must take the hit.

    And this all makes for the larger point that it is the denial of HBD that lies at the core of our political troubles. The left’s system of victimology collapses if these groups aren’t really victims of some mysterious, immensely powerful force of racism, but are simply performing as their genes will allow them.

    If anyone wonders why the questions of HBD are important, they might consider that virtually everything we as a country focus on in our politics would be changed permanently and for the better if HBD were acknowledged. We are attempting to solve problems that can’t be solved, and, inevitably because of the failures, growing ever more desperate, absurd, and destructive in our efforts.

    • Agree: ben tillman, Anonym
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @candid_observer

    "The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition."

    I have a few friends and colleagues who like to call Republicans stupid. Whenever I come across news items like the latest violence in Chicago I make it a point to joke about it being caused by "ignorant Republicans." Perhaps they'll catch on eventually.

    My sense is that most Democrats are completely oblivious to the double standard they appply. They compare (some) white Democrats to all Republicans, completely ignoring blacks, Hispanics, retarded government bureaucrats, etc. Pointing it out to them as often as possible is the only way to get them to open their eyes.

    Replies: @cipher

  76. @candid_observer
    @Anonym

    The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition.

    If the white working class is ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence, they are on these very traits nonetheless miles above the groups the left embraces. Blacks are notoriously and obviously on average far more ignorant, uneducated, racist, bigoted, and prone to violence; likewise Hispanics; likewise any of the favored ethnicities/races of the left.

    The only difference is that these supposedly horrendous traits are entirely forgiven by the left, for no other reason than that the left favors these groups, and has invented a system of victimology to justify their bias.

    For the left, it is always and everywhere the white working class that must take the hit.

    And this all makes for the larger point that it is the denial of HBD that lies at the core of our political troubles. The left's system of victimology collapses if these groups aren't really victims of some mysterious, immensely powerful force of racism, but are simply performing as their genes will allow them.

    If anyone wonders why the questions of HBD are important, they might consider that virtually everything we as a country focus on in our politics would be changed permanently and for the better if HBD were acknowledged. We are attempting to solve problems that can't be solved, and, inevitably because of the failures, growing ever more desperate, absurd, and destructive in our efforts.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    “The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition.”

    I have a few friends and colleagues who like to call Republicans stupid. Whenever I come across news items like the latest violence in Chicago I make it a point to joke about it being caused by “ignorant Republicans.” Perhaps they’ll catch on eventually.

    My sense is that most Democrats are completely oblivious to the double standard they appply. They compare (some) white Democrats to all Republicans, completely ignoring blacks, Hispanics, retarded government bureaucrats, etc. Pointing it out to them as often as possible is the only way to get them to open their eyes.

    • Agree: David In TN
    • Replies: @cipher
    @Wilkey

    "My sense is that most Democrats are completely oblivious to the double standard they appply...the only way to get them to open their eyes."

    One must treat Leftists (Democrats and Cuck-Republicans) as rebellious little girls and bring them to heel always and forever. Even when the rebellious little girl dwells within the guy, not yet a man, working in the cubicle next to yours.

    In other words Adam must command Eve to set the fruit down, then walk her out of the fig grove wherein the Serpent beguiled her.

  77. A few years back the cleaning staff at a high end hotel in Texas morphed from mostly black Americans to mostly non-english speaking Latinos, and I recall thinking, what does something like this mean for the local community. While it is simple correlation and not necessarily causation, I can only note that my local colleagues have all retreated to gated communities or moved even farther out.

    If I vote for Trump, it is because he gets what unrestrained immigration to enrich the criminal elite represented by the likes of Hillary and the cucks does to the larger fabric of our society. The Dems tell us the diversity makes the tapestry more beautiful, and the cucks tell us we need the labor to boost our labor pool. Either way, they’ve decided to unravel the tapestry we already have and replace it with one more pleasing to them for whatever reasons.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @The Alarmist


    the cucks tell us we need the labor to boost our labor pool.
     
    This assertion is so repeatedly offered it's become embedded as an economic fact. And in Germany and Europe, too. It should be treated as the nonsense on stilts that it is.

    The employment to population ratio is ~49%. An advanced economy needs more capital investment--not more labor input--for living standards to continue to rise. More low wage, unskilled labor works against this prospect. Unskilled workers are priced out of the labor force with higher minimum wages, and automation will squeeze what remains.

    It's as if out elites harken back to the gilded age (or the Depression) when household staffs predominated among the well-to-do.

    Instead, corporations load up on debt to pay dividends and buy-in stock to keep their nose-bleed stock price levitated.
  78. @Romanian
    Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8EQFbqu-8

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the "Babies Welcome" proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as "racist".
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to "solve the demographic crisis". The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don't have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you're a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as "racist", "völkisch" (loving your own people), and "xenophobic" because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was "populist", the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn't include "all families", the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and "Bio-Germans" (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer's rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.
     
    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one's own people as a sin.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @WhatEvvs, @The most deplorable one, @Bert, @International Jew

    What the hell is a “representative for independent voters”? I’ve never heard that term before.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Bert

    Somebody should correct me if I am wrong, but you can't have every parliamentarian take the stage to give his two cents. So one guy represents one party, another guy another party and so on, in order to deliver general positions.

  79. I find it ridiculous how voters’ self-interest is so narrowly defined as to exclude everything but economics, and not even all of economics but mostly just jobs and income. Some aspects of Trump’s immigration pitch are so obvious that even social scientists oughtta notice them, like national security and “law and order.” Which have economic aspects, obviously, but aren’t exclusively economic.

    Also, there are aesthetic interests. Immigrants are ugly and live uglier lives than I prefer. There are communitarian interests (or whatever you call them). I want to live next to people like me. There are cultural interests. Immigrants are stupider on average and bring down the national IQ, thereby coarsening the culture. Plus, they don’t add anything to the culture besides food, despite the pretenses of multiculturalism. There are the interests of future generations, yes, and there are the interests of our fellow Americans. Which aren’t our interests, but are close enough for some voters.

    None of those are easily quantifiable, so they ignore them. Then they pretend that since Trump voters have jobs they’re being irrational and not voting their interests. Which makes researchers’ jobs easier,which I guess is in their self-interest.

    • Agree: Old fogey
  80. @AlphaSupremo
    @candid_observer

    Foreign competition affects workers at nearly every labor level. Here's what I compete against:

    http://www.jobsintech.io/immigration_companies/infosys-limited/charts

    Replies: @Tom-in-VA

    This report on NPR yesterday talked about migrant farm workers in south Texas striking for higher pay and better working conditions (like water and porta pots).

    http://www.npr.org/2016/08/12/489491157/texas-farmworker-1966-strike-was-like-heading-into-war

    “Workers decided in the spring of 1966 to walk off the job. Union leaders from California — including Cesar Chavez — came to Texas and helped organize the strike
    Their demands were simple: They wanted work contracts, wages of $1.25 an hour, water breaks and access to bathrooms.

    “It was like heading into war,” Diaz says, “because ranchers were not budging.”

    Indeed, ranchers dissed the farmworkers’ demands and called in the Texas Rangers.

    “They used to beat us up and would arrest us,” Vera says.

    But even beatings and arrests failed to break the strike. So ranchers opted for a different route. They started busing in workers from Mexico.”

    Apparently, increasing the labor supply can keep wages down. Who knew?

    “One thing hasn’t changed though: farm work in Texas is still plagued with abuse. And those who dare to speak up on this side of the border continue to be easily replaced by those from the other side.”

    In NPR world, working to reduce immigration to improve your wages and working conditions is fine and dandy if you are brown. If not, you are obviously racist.

  81. @Portlander

    Trump tended to do better in the hurting states and Cruz in prospering states.

    I pointed out back in 2015 in a blog post entitled “Ted Cruz, Raj Chetty, and Sioux County, Iowa’s Magic Dirt,” that Ted Cruz was doing well in parts of the country that did well in Chetty’s comparison of parents’ income in 1996-2000 to kids’ income in 2011-12. Chetty’s best county in America for working class income growth was Sioux County, Iowa. In the Iowa Caucus, Ted Cruz carried Sioux County with 33%, while Trump was fourth with 11%.
     
    I suppose that explains the Paul R vs. Paul N outcome. Though my money is still on fraud. Way too big a margin of victory there. I think Paul R panicked and over-did it on setting the fix.

    I'm still waiting to see a contemporary incumbent lose an election when they see the challenger coming. Losses by back-bench nobodies don't count.

    Replies: @gruff, @Alden

    I’d like to see the reasons for rise in working class income in Sioux county Iowa.
    Maybe the farmers use machinery rather than Mexican welfare recipients? Maybe a nuclear power plant, military base or college campus, something was built which kept the construction trades booming?

    It could not have been any kind of slaughter house or food processing plant because the entire food industry imports Hispanic Indians and puts them in welfare

    Just saying, I’d like to know more about the reasons incomes were so high while stagnating and falling in the rest of the country

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    The price of farmland went up steadily in Sioux County, Iowa, peaking at $20k per acre in 2013.

    The China Boom Era was a good time to be an American farmer.

  82. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Boethiuss

    "The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state."

    Yes, Portlanders will reflexively, mindlessly vote for Shrillary or whoever has the "D" next to his/her name. But in no way was the Portland mentality up for grabs this election cycle -- whether they're conscious of it or not, Portlanders CHOOSE to live in the Whitest large city in America, and they atone for their secular sin of latent racism by loudly proclaiming anti-racist platitudes whenever possible and voting D as early and as often as they can.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I live is a nice community just outside of Boston. Few NAMs with quite a few East Asians and East Indians. There is a lot of race mixing but is almost exclusively white/Asian. It is so orderly and nice. You feel safe and it feels harmonious. It is a blue area in a blue state. But, funny enough, when the whites here can’t have kids and seek to adopt, they don’t adopt from the large supply of black babies here in the U.S., they spend a lot of money and time off work and go and adopt babies from China, Korea, or Russia. Racists!

  83. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    i live in a deep blue area of a deep blue state. no one is publicly expressing support for hillary clinton (it’s all anti-trump). no buttons, shirts, lawn signs, bumper stickers. nothing.

    but i see one or two bernie bumper stickers, or people walking around in one of his shirts everyday.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @dsgntd_plyr

    Anecdotally, a lot of my fellow millennials seem to be only vaguely or even outright un-aware that Bernie is no longer a candidate.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @European in America
    @dsgntd_plyr

    Yup, same here. In downtown Chicago, which is Democrazi central, all year I haven't seen a single "I'm with her" sticker or anything of the sort. Lots of anti-Trump hysteria, but very little enthusiasm for HRC. On the other hand, one guy in my building does have a Trump bumper sticker on his car (brave soul).

    Replies: @Brutusale

  84. From the WaPo article: “Research from Pew suggests that there is a relationship between the character of people’s neighborhoods and their views on immigrants. A study from 2006 found that native-born Americans living in Zip codes with lots of immigrants tended to hold immigrants in higher esteem. For instance, they were about twice as likely to say that immigrants “strengthen the US with their hard work and talents.”

    I bet many of those native-born Americans were of the same ethnicity as the immigrants.

    Either that or they were [stereo] typically clueless SWPL’s.

  85. @Sam Haysom
    @Whiskey

    Marie Aintoinette was a lot less whiny than you are at least. And compared to your case of blue balls she had to face a lot more adversity at the end.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    Spoken like a Democrat criticizing Trump. My analysis stands — White unmarried/newly married women back Hillary, men back Trump. Not by a little, but by a lot. The Gender Gap is fairly big, around twenty points plus. Nearly all of Trump’s slump in the polls is due to White women.

    Now, you can scream that White women are the pure, driven snow and that particularly unmarried White women are “natural conservatives” like say Indian Engineers and the Nation of Islam and Chinese exiled oligarchs, but your invective pretty much guarantees the bankruptcy of your thinking and low IQ.

    Unlike Japan, unlike South Korea, every place in the West the elites pretty much hate hate hate their own people. This includes even Israel where hard-left elites with lots of money (the two are pretty much the same thing) push for Open Borders and the like. Only a fairly corrupt in itself rival faction ala Bibi has kept them from power.

    Japan and South Korea certainly have elites, the nations are just not female oriented, and have btw a very restricted consumer market leaving far less mass consumerism that puts societies on female-oriented steroids. The West has ALWAYS been more female oriented, and up until the 1960s this was a huge strength, the pill, the condom, anonymous urban living, and vast increases in women’s earning power and urbanization left most women with little ties or value to their male peers in contrast to pre-1960.

    And the West has ALWAYS had a huge tendency among its elites to intermarry other foreign elites: the British Royal Family is essentially Hanoverian, related to both the former German Royal Family and the Russian one, feudalism and royalism treated people as property to be exchanged, along with territory, nationalism came much, much later, as Eugen Weber’s “Peasants into Frenchmen” demonstrates — as late as the 1840s much of France did not consider itself French, rather Norman, Breton, Occitan, etc. with mutually unintelligible dialects.

    TL:DR summary: The West is reverting back to feudal elite type, supercharged by a huge number of unmarried or late-married White women stuck in consumerism mode and aping the aristocratic fashions of elites who consider their foreign cousins and inlaws more important than their people. And critically don’t fear an assertive middle class turning them out like poor Louis Phillipe.

  86. @Wilkey
    @candid_observer

    "The thing that always strikes me about this dismissal by the left of the white working class as ignorant racists, bigots, etc. is how absurd those complaints are given the composition of the left coalition."

    I have a few friends and colleagues who like to call Republicans stupid. Whenever I come across news items like the latest violence in Chicago I make it a point to joke about it being caused by "ignorant Republicans." Perhaps they'll catch on eventually.

    My sense is that most Democrats are completely oblivious to the double standard they appply. They compare (some) white Democrats to all Republicans, completely ignoring blacks, Hispanics, retarded government bureaucrats, etc. Pointing it out to them as often as possible is the only way to get them to open their eyes.

    Replies: @cipher

    “My sense is that most Democrats are completely oblivious to the double standard they appply…the only way to get them to open their eyes.”

    One must treat Leftists (Democrats and Cuck-Republicans) as rebellious little girls and bring them to heel always and forever. Even when the rebellious little girl dwells within the guy, not yet a man, working in the cubicle next to yours.

    In other words Adam must command Eve to set the fruit down, then walk her out of the fig grove wherein the Serpent beguiled her.

  87. “I’ve had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.”

    It’s getting to be past time for a 60s-like change that changes the top. The current top that resulted from the 60s is no longer relevant. Times change.

  88. Let me add that though Trump is likely to lose unless he can peel off enough White women to deny Hillary her margin of victory, the long term effects of anti-White policies are going to be a disaster.

    Trump supporters are the key elements of a revolution — middle class people with something to lose. Revolutions are not made by street rabble. They are made by mid level officers, police, lawyers, doctors, bakers, small business owners, who see themselves falling into poverty.

    The constant purging of White (men) has allowed the coalition of the elite/high and the low, to gain support of White women in the spoils table, as junior partners. What happens when every TV show and movie is Black/Hispanic/Asian, no Whites allowed? When every corporate job is Black/Hispanic/Asian? When every government position is like that? When discrimination against Whites in favor of non-Whites is the open law of the land instead of the sub-rosa one now?

    The key element in Trump support is the Network Effect of anti-White discrimination. Whites do not have large, extended families where cousins and uncles get jobs for them in tribal alliances. They rely on relatively clean meritocratic societies where hiring is on ability not exclusive tribal color/race/religion markers. Whites suddenly barred from rising up and facing a constant, downward spiral in the future with less and less ability to even maintain their position are what is called “pre-revolutionary” conditions and the addition of White women fairly rapidly as they too are purged (there are only so many positions for people of color after all) will historically produce a fairly unified White working/middle class profoundly angry at being made third class serfs in very rapidly non-White majority nations.

    Trumpism is caused by the network effect of anti-White discrimination. Networks that exclude and discriminate against Whites create Trump supporters even over and above high-status virtue signaling (“I’m so high status and powerful I can afford discrimination against me.”) Particularly since global competition makes money/status/power very uncertain.

  89. @Portlander
    @education realist

    Right, and just because they can afford to insulate, doesn't mean they appreciate having to insulate. Huge opportunity costs there. One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    Replies: @GOUSAAMER114, @MarkinLA

    Exactly right. I live in a super zip neighborhood. It’s pretty much all white. But we’re surrounded by the third world. Like Trump, my interests are not high-brow. I am very just American. I like Subway and McDonalds. I have kids so I now kind of have to go to the mall and zoo. I can’t take the diversity. I just want my country back. I hate the unpleasant conversation when ordering my food with the 40 year old Spanish speaker who always gets it wrong. I hate that the movie theater looks like its third world. I hate walking into Subway and only half of the people speak English. I hate that the local public school – where no one would ever send their kids – educates Mexico’s lower class. This doesn’t even touch on Islam. There should be NO Islam in the US.

    I’m not that old, but I remember when we had a country. I identify with my fellow Americans who just want to live in neighborhoods with fellow Americans. I can afford to isolate, but it is still incredibly unpleasant.

    I have been a Trumper before Trump. I loved Jeff Sessions and even Stephen Miller two years ago. I will be devastated if Trump doesn’t win. It will tell me that America is over.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @GOUSAAMER114

    Trump is the Hail Mary pass, I agree.

    If it's Queen Hill who gets elected, then the Southern border opens up (and the Canadian one) and SCOTUS starts discovering "hate speech" and "assault weapons" are outside the bounds of Constitutional protection. At that point, what's left of whatever conservatism is either meekly acquiesces or starts organizing for secession.

    , @Kylie
    @GOUSAAMER114

    So well said. I feel the exact same way. It's not about the economy for me (though I have friends who support Trump for whom it is). It's about the culture. I'm sick of the diversity the left has foisted off on us.

    , @TomSchmidt
    @GOUSAAMER114

    Subway and McDonalds are part of the corporatist elite America. Better you should go to a locally owned restaurant where profits aren't maximized by buying the cheapest ingredients, paying the workers little money, and encouraging the creation of regulations that suppress small businesses. And most of the profits are moved to those at the top of the pyramid. McDonald's CEO Easterbrook brought home a little under $8million last year; you can be sure neither the workers nor the shareholders did as well.

    Basically, McDonalds America leads inexorably to the country we live in, where economics trumps all. Secede from it. It might cost you a buck more for your sandwich, though.

  90. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @AndrewR
    @Romanian

    It is very difficult to maintain any sort of good will towards the elites and their pseudoleftist enablers.

    Sailer the Pacifist, what do you suggest we do about these people? Can power be wrested peacefully from them? Once attaining power, what should we do about these people?

    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym

    As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    As shown in Afghanistan, the elites in their commuter planes and helicopters would be very vulnerable to attack from RPGs. So, while they won’t take steps to secure the border from invasion by millions of bipeds, you can be sure they would and do take steps to prevent the smuggling of arms.

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.

    We haven’t had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century and that’s just as well. Too many innocent lives are lost in these kinds of displays. But perhaps now that Obama has and is currently letting in so many Muslims, his legacy will be to have put an end to our relatively long period of civil tranquility. Hope and Change, baby!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such.
     
    There is a large number of 30 to 50-something white males retired from the military who now work one or two degrees of separation from this as contractors or civilian government or military employees who live in such an insular world they think America's biggest problem is "Russia's aggression" toward NATO expansion. I kid you not. Just go to the massive military industrial complexes (Pentagon, DIA HQ, or Naval Intelligence in Suitland) and see the largest concentration of nerdy and pseudo alpha whites males acting like it's 1982 and they are something important out of a Tom Clancy's novel or Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men. This number is much larger than anyone realizes. It's government welfare for white guys and a lot of them like the way things are. And they live in Ashburn or Reston and fairly isolated from what's going on in the larger world. They're the ones who will vote for Hillary because they don't like Trump questioning the role of NATO or saying we should get along with Russia and stop starting conflicts in the Middle East.

    Replies: @11B4P

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    We haven’t had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century . . .

    Timothy McVeigh? 1995?

    , @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    .....

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater."

    I read stuff like this and want to cry. This is wildly implausible plus betrays an enormous historical ignorance of our Civil War (or a refusal to contemplate it, one or the other).

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let's do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let's just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Henry Bowman, @MarkinLA

  91. @Maj. Kong
    @iSteveFan

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left's power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don't because of cultural animus against America's founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur "Uncle Tom" to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term "self-hating Jew", Asians have the term "banana".

    For whites, we have "cuck" to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people "natural Republicans that don't know it yet". This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    Replies: @Das, @Laugh Track, @Lurker, @Rose Madder

    For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    Unitarians?

  92. @epebble
    @Thomas O. Meehan

    Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement - absolutely nothing - about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia.

    Replies: @Boethiuss, @Henry Bowman, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @gruff, @dsgntd_plyr, @Olorin

    Same here in Pugetopolis.

    I don’t think it’s lack of interest, except inasmuch as many people are waking up to how American Pravda works and figuring involvement is pointless.

    I think it’s far more ominous.

    Most people I know who are voting for Trump are only whispering to one another, after much up-front signalling, that that is their choice. This may be a reflection of my day circles. My play circles–like my shooting sports clubs–people are much more out about it.

    Two people I’ve talked to who had Trump stickers on their vehicles (one Dodge Ram, one Prius-type thing) had their cars vandalized in the state capitol city of Olympia.

    Word travels fast. Working men would rather spend money on our kids and friends than having our insurance rates siphon more off to the FIRE industry.

    After all, we provoked the political rape by wearing the wrong t-shirt. No kidding, I had a buddy whose insurance agent told him that regarding his Romney sticker in 2012. “We’re recommending people not put political stickers on their cars. It increases the risk of vandalism.” And we all know that saving the insurance industry from Risk and payouts is Job One.

    A couple of mestizo guys I know who build nice rifles and are part of several local RKBA organizations I’m part of said they are voting for Trump but don’t dare tell anyone or signal it, because “their cousins” will “make sure they pay.”

    Even that is minor. The constant drumbeat of systematic low-level American Pravda attacks–including locally–are creating fear in day to day life.

    I know half a dozen guys in civil service (infrastructure workers) who have confided incidents where they’ve observed someone being threatened by their own union members for supporting Trump/opposing Hillary. (AFSCME endorsed her very early on.)

    The Trump supporters I know are either “millionaires next door” or working hard in that direction even where there is no hope, under the current economic and political regime, of them ever having 30-50 years of hard work and prudent budgeting translated into a surplus that they, not Congress, decide how to spend.

    The Trump supporters I know are of all ages, all religious types, a wide range of economic situations, both urban and rural. I know Trump supporters with no college schooling, and Trump supporters with Ph.D.s, and everything in between.

    A notable proportion describe themselves as “ex-liberals” or “ex-progressives.” I know half a dozen women who are supporting Trump, who have sidled up to me whispering that someone said it would be OK to talk to me about it.

    So far all have been honest, but that could change. For, another buddy said that someone asked him about Trump, he answered regarding his support…and the lady went back and doxxed him to her Hillbots.

    Now, he says, he’s getting low-level harassment on the job, including claims of “hate speech,” and such. For example, the campus where he works has disgusting tap water. Everybody nows it. It’s a source of constant complaints. Every unit buys in bottled water or filters its own (paid for privately by the workers).

    He filled a glass in his unit’s kitchen, observed the rusty murk, and said to a buddy of his, “Does this campus import its water supply from some Third World nation?” I asked the buddy for his version, which matched closely enough that I trust the story.

    A Hillbot in the kitchen heard him comment on the water and complained to his supervisor that he had made a racist statement that created a Hostile Work Environment.

    Her real problem with him? He’s a heterosexual white Christian man. She told him that to his face several years ago. She is blameless for her -isms. His are the equivalent of original sin and evil.

    “Trump” is just a lightning rod for these attacks.

    Finally, the role of opiates and other life-destroying drugs, both legal and illegal, plays a huge role in this. You know how widespread whites’ self-numbing is in the PNW.

    ALL the stoner adults I know are refusing to vote, because Old Commie Uncle Bernie took a dive for The Party, and bought himself another house instead of keeping up The Good Fight.

    Which leads us to your “China and Russia” point.

    Tell me. Where do you think Bolshevism went after 1945?

  93. @Anonymous
    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
    Ayyadurai is founder and CEO of a tech company in Kendell Square, Cambridge, MA. He's also married to actress Fran Drescher.
    Ayyadurai is super articulate and a big Trump supporter and had the most scathing comments about Hillary. Carr had him in to discuss emails and servers and why what Hillary did was so egregious. They need to get this guy out there more. He was fantastic.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

    Replies: @ben tillman, @ScarletNumber

    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

    He wasn’t the inventor of email. He apparently coined the term, however.

    Nonetheless, I’m glad he’s supporting Trump.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @ben tillman

    He wasn’t the inventor of email.

    Correct.

    He apparently coined the term, however

    No.

    He developed an email program he called 'EMAIL' which he also had copyrighted. He appears to have traded on the misunderstandings this has caused ever since, busily promoting himself as the originator and inventor.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/who-invented-email-ray-tomlinson-or-shiva-ayyadurai/article8323987.ece

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

  94. The end of Putnam’s book illustrates the crisis of the modern political system.

    We used to have a “social contract” between the rulers and the ruled. Nowadays our rulers tend to think of themselves as citizens of the world, and they want to have a social contract with the poor of the whole world. They feel that damaged children from Somalia are more worthy of their attention than the people of their own country, whom they see as fat, entitled, ignorant plebs.

    What better way to help the Somalis, and educate the plebs, than to bring the former to the home towns of the latter?

    When political donors want the same thing, in order to depress wages, the policy becomes irresistible.

    Democracy obstructs this process, because it enforces some kind of contract between the rulers and their electorate. A President like Trump is inevitable. What is surprising is that his arrival has taken so long.

  95. Trump Voters Tend to be Successful Individuals Concerned About Their Troubled Communities

    Here I am, waving my hands!

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Me too!

  96. @WhatEvvs
    @Romanian

    The decline in birth rates everywhere except Africa wouldn't be such a big deal - in fact, it would be a good thing - except for the fact that birth rates aren't declining in Africa. And migration.

    Replies: @rod1963

    Well sir you hit the nail on the head, the driving force behind all of the mass migrations pushed on us by the elites.

    A country with low population and scare workforce can charge more for labor which industry hates, whereas a country flooded with migrants, drops the wage floor right out from under the workers and ensures workers remain disposable and replaceable.

    This is what globalism is all about. Why off-shore your factory to Shanghai when you can bring hordes of Asians to America instead and let uncle Sam shoulder the burden of supporting this labor force.

    It’s win win for the elites.

    For the rest of us, it’s going to be hell.

  97. OT: Does Tim Tebow have a real chance to make it to MLB?

    NYT< 08/13/16 – Taking Tebow’s Bat Seriously

    Chad Moeller played 11 seasons in the major leagues, bouncing among seven teams, including the Yankees, with a .226 career average. Now Moeller runs a baseball academy in Scottsdale, Ariz., and said his star pupil — Tim Tebow — could basically match Moeller’s batting average already.

    “He could pull off .220 in the big leagues right now, without doing anything else, simply because his swing’s really, really good and his mental toughness is just flat-out off the charts,”…

    Tebow, who turns 29 on Sunday, has not played baseball competitively since 2005, when he was a high school junior. Two years later, he won the Heisman Trophy as quarterback for the University of Florida, before an N.F.L. career with Denver and the Jets that could not match the hype that surrounded him…

    Moeller said a spot in the Arizona Fall League, against advanced prospects, would be ideal for Tebow. He added that a realistic time frame for Tebow to reach the majors would be two years, if not sooner…

  98. @iSteveFan
    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump's supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Maj. Kong, @Jim Sweeney, @Mr. Anon, @International Jew

    The Democrats are also never asked why they are overwhelmingly supported by the biggest aggregation of shallow, insipid, and narcissistic people in the world – Hollywood.

  99. @Morton Knox
    @South Texas Guy

    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VHS channel in Philadelphia.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VH[F] channel in Philadelphia.

    17, 29, or 48? Don’t ever remember seeing that when I visited my grandparents, though my uncle mentioned that he was a fan.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @ben tillman

    Of course, those are all UHF stations. Ironically in NYC Benny Hill did air on a VHF station: WOR-TV9.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @Morton Knox
    @ben tillman

    I think it was channel 29...in 1979 it was on at 7:00 every night, but too many women complained that the show was not appropriate for young boys and they moved it to 11:3o PM in 1980.

  100. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    So true. There is no lack of interest, only the hard-learned knowledge that wearing a MAGA t-shirt can get you spit upon. I see the same thing here in the New Winter White House. (TM) I drive 200 miles a day and see only 1 bumper sticker of either candidate in all that time. both sides are keeping their powder dry.

  101. @Harry Baldwin
    @AndyBoy

    The latest Peggy Noonan column expresses this persuasively. I'm not much of a Noonan fan, but her August 11 column, titled "How Global Elites Forsake Their Countrymen: Those in power see people at the bottom as aliens whose bizarre emotions they must try to manage," represents a real breakthrough among respectable media pundits.

    Replies: @dr kill

    That she is still employed tells me all I need to know about the WSJ. They will be the last to close, but close they will. Reading her is an example of the jobs Americans won’t do.

  102. @Old fogey
    All of this searching for reasons that people are supporting Trump by looking solely at economic data miss the really big picture. The Trump supporters I know back him because he seems genuinely interested in Americans and the best for the U.S.A.

    Here in New York just a few evenings ago a neighbor from Guatemala joined us for a few glasses of wine and bourbon. He's a nice guy who had come to the U.S. illegally in the 1980s but now is a gainfully employed citizen. He began spouting off about "his people" and the fact that the "Spanish" voters would overwhelmingly vote against Trump and ensure that he could not win in the national election. I don't usually think about my own heritage, but I can't help but recall that my father's family history starts with an immigrant arriving in NYC from Prussia around 1830 and we have documents showing that a family member fought at Gettysburg as part of a NY regiment. I also know for a fact that no one in my mother's side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Kylie, @Brutusale

    It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.

    As a long-time New Yorker, but non-native to the metropolitan area, I’ve been fascinated by the near obsession of people here with one another’s heritage. When queried with the typical “What are you,” I answer “an American.” A puzzled look is the usual reaction.

    There are many (too many IMO) that take pride in native and ethnic origin over pride in being an American. There’s nothing wrong with honoring one’s familial heritage–of course I’m old enough to remember a time before Hyphenated-Americans. In my book, you’re either an American or you’re not.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Forbes

    I grew up in Western New York (the eastern Midwest) as an American descended from immigrants who came here long ago. When I wine to college with mostly Downstaters, I suddenly had to embrace my long forgotten "Irish" heritage although I'm not even 50% Irish. It's an east coast thing.

    Further, after college, I got into an argument with an Armenian woman I worked with because she refused to accept my answer to her question, "what are you?". I simply said, "American".

    Replies: @Forbes

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Forbes

    Hate to say it but that's not just a New York thing, and you must be from 1840 or earlier if you remember a time when there were no hyphenated Americans. Maybe before that - Andrew Jackson boasted about his Irish heritage, after all.

    Even down South, rednecks whose families have been here since the 1700s brag about their ancestry, whether it's "Irish", "Cherokee", or French/German/Scottish/whatever. They are all probably mostly of English descent but they latch on to whatever line is most unusual in their family tree.

    One set of my grandparents (dead now, born in early 1920s) each talked about their heritage a lot. If you asked them "what are you?" they would give you their predominant ancestry first. It didn't mean they weren't patriotic. When they went abroad they would definitely say they were American. Their families had been here since the 1860s/70s.

    I suspect many whites latch onto their ancestry because it's a defense mechanism. They have to sit through their history classes where half the curriculum is devoted to the cruelty of slavery and the evils of the white man. People are going talk about whatever they can to have some pride, it's only human.

    Change the history curriculum, and you can solve this hyphenated American problem.

    Replies: @Forbes

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Forbes

    In my book, you’re either an American or you’re not.

    Funny. When I go overseas now, I don't identify as an "American," but as a New Yorker. I think that feeds into the dynamic you encounter in the City. I think foreigners cannot generally become
    Americans in first generation, but they can be New Yorkers. Firmly rooted in a neighborhood that is mono-ethnic (and this continues today, but not with any European ethnicities except Russians in South Brooklyn and Irish in the Bronx), they meet on the neutral ground of Manhattan. To not have a tribe that will protect you makes you a mark for the grifters that this place engenders.

  103. Pundits can’t decide whether culture or economics explain Trump’s rise. They don’t understand that globalism involves both. It destroys all traditional ways of life so that the only way people can gain status and worth is to buy it. We’ve always had poor people, but now they are despised and hopeless. You can be the greatest husband and dad in the world, but tv has been crapping on those roles for 50 years. You deserve contempt because you can’t afford to take your kids to Disneyland and never will.

    One thing I wonder is whether the elites have relatives. Do they look at their cousins and just see a parade of Ivy League grads? Don’t they have any relatives who are janitors or health aides?

  104. @candid_observer
    A lot of this "analysis", as reported, sounds like an exercise in willful stupidity.

    After statistically controlling factors such as education, age and gender, Rothwell was able to determine which traits distinguished those who favored Trump from those who did not, even among people who appeared to be similar in other respects.
     
    and,

    Yet when Rothwell focused only on white Republicans, he also found that demographically similar respondents who were more affluent viewed Trump more favorably.
     
    What in God's name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect? Who cares about the barely discernible residual effects?

    How do these marginal effects provide some great insight into "the Trump voter" which the dominant demographic factors don't?

    If Trump's appeal is unusually strong among the white working class, and relatively weak among the white professional class, isn't that the thing that's important? If Trump appeals far more to men than women than is typical, isn't that the thing that's important?

    This guy Rothwell seems like a cretin, and worse, a blind and biased cretin, as made evident in his remarks:


    Trump is giving his supporters a misleading account of their ills, Rothwell said. “He says they are suffering because of globalization,” Rothwell said. “He says they’re suffering because of immigration and a diversifying country, but I can’t find any evidence of that.”
     
    How does this clown presume to say that immigration is not having these sorts of negative effects for Trump voters? This is just his dogmatic, elite globalism speaking.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @AlphaSupremo, @International Jew

    What in God’s name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect?

    To learn how much the various demographic factors matter, and (the residual part) to assess how much is left unexplained.

    This is very standard statistical practice, and predates all our current culture wars. If you want to understand it at a technical level, start by looking up “least squares regression”. (I won’t get any more specific, as I don’t know your background…)

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @International Jew

    Look, I get how in certain contexts understanding the residual effects is important.

    But not in this case.

    Suppose, as seems to be true, Trump is winning over the white working class at a much higher rate than is usual -- suppose he gets an additional 20% of that vote over the usual. Suppose, now, that if one controls for being white working class, there is a residual effect whereby the somewhat better off white working class tend slightly more often to favor him than others, but that it's small -- as is reported to be the case -- say 5% more of the working class that favors is in the better off class than one would expect proportionately to their representation in the population. Then why is the small marginal effect somehow the thing that gives you the insight into the "Trump voter", rather than the dominant effect here, namely the 20% additional working class he is winning over? Obviously, he is winning over many more of the working class of all levels of affluence, even if he is winning over slightly more of the affluent ones.

    One would think it's obvious that the real question here as to the mind of the Trump voter involves Trump's appeal across the entirety of the white working class. The only case in which it might be important that Trump particularly appeals to the better off working class is if the greatest proportion of the additional voters he draws are in fact the better off (which presumably don't ordinarily go Republican). Even in that case, though, if Trump retains the rest of the working class as usual, and they are by a good distance the most common sort of working class voter for Trump, I don't see how the additional better off voters can fairly be said to represent the typical Trump voter.

  105. @iSteveFan
    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump's supporters are somehow deficient, or are losers because they are poor with minimal education. Yet blacks, who on average are probably poorer and no better educated, are lionized for their support of the democrats. Hillary will never have to apologize for being supported by a core who live in poverty and have high drop-out rates.

    Democrat voters will vote for more gibmedats, and they are applauded for voting their economic interests. Trump voters will not vote for gibmedats, but rather they will vote for policies to make their labor more scarce and to prevent jobs from being off-shored. And this is somehow an affront to who we are as Americans. Trump voters would rather work and make an honest dollar, and that somehow makes them angry.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Maj. Kong, @Jim Sweeney, @Mr. Anon, @International Jew

    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient

    It’s been this way going back, at least, to that famous comment by some New Yorker, “How could Nixon have won? No one I know voted for him.”

    As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    I’ve also been introduced as, “This is ____, the most intelligent conservative I’ve ever met.”

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @International Jew

    As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    Ain't that the truth. Lol about the iceberg.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @guest
    @International Jew

    "some New Yorker"

    Pauline Kael. I think she said she knew one person who voted for him.

    , @Kylie
    @International Jew

    "As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me."

    I allow only a handful of people to know my political views. People don't even ask what those views might be. I pass as a liberal among liberals. I'm height/weight proportionate, well-informed and have typically SWPL interests.

    This is how I know just how shallow, ignorant, and hateful the mindset of liberals really is--because they speak freely and openly in front of me.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Romanian

  106. @jill
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Wait till he gets to New York and rides the MTA where naked people are being photographed smoking crack. Bet you never saw that in Honduras, Santo. Welcome to the real 3rd world, Santo.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/subway-rider-smokes-crack-naked-no-3-train-article-1.2746618

    And how about all the new American babies being born addicted to drugs. Did you notice that in Honduras, Santo?

    http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/08/addicted_newborns.html

    Why are you coming here, really?

    And what about America's richest communities flooded with so much heroin that the social workers are in need of counseling, Santo?

    http://easthamptonstar.com/Education/2016331/Drug-Expert-Ive-Never-Seen-It-This

    Is your President Juan Orlando Hernández releasing 46000 drug dealers from jail like our president is doing?

    https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/10/06/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-federal-prisoner-release#.xjkA8e2hK

    Santo, get right back on that train and go home, for your own sake.

    Replies: @Anon

    I wonder if liberals have caught on to the connection between Obama’s release of drug dealers and the recent spike in shootings in big city black areas. Probably not.

  107. @Brutusale
    @Dieter Kief

    I know you're in Germany, Dieter, and are not familiar with "the gritty, working-class Boston suburb of Chelsea", but native son Jay Ash, now Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development and looking to become the city manager of Cambridge, was given a crappy, Third World majority city to run, and during his tenure as city manager was given tens of millions in state and federal money to prove everything liberals stand for: that the poor, benighted mestizos can be made into solid Americans.

    The result? Chelsea is now a crappy, Third World majority city with the highest violent crime rate in New England.

    What did Chelsea used to be? About half Jewish through the 50s.

    "Between 1890-1900 Chelsea's Jewish population grew from 100-3,000 and by 1910, around 10,000 Jews lived in Chelsea, nearly one-third of the entire population of the city. In the 1930s there were about 20,000 Jewish residents in Chelsea out of a total population of almost 46,000."--the Mystic River Jewish Communities Project

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Hi Brutusdale – I’m very interested not only in cases of social progress (South Korea) or stability (Japan), but also in places of disorder and decline.
    May I say, that in the late 70ies I’ve even spent a few weeks in the then heavily deteriorating Detroit. – I’ve hichthiked into Detroit. The first two guys who picked me up there – one of them was in the best mood, because he had just left prison. They were on drugs. My girlfriend lived in a house right at a park near the center of Detroit and when she moved in, we were told that this were the rules: a)We should not lock the house up, so that whoever wanted could come in and make sure, that there was nothing woth to take away. b) Just bring nothing of worth anyway.
    Plus – I know quite a range of poeple on the brink. And have worked with quite a few of them.
    I do know, that it’s not easy…
    Even though – I hardly get it, when I read what Linh Dinh wrote this week on his blog here at Unz Report about a business advisor who seems to have teached at inner city schools in Detroit.

    What you write about Celsea neatly fits into the picture Linh Dinh is painting via his (now) small business advisor about Detroit’s inner city schools. Maybe the Cambridge you write about and the inner city schools Linh Dinh writes about are the worst examples; and maybe not all of what Linh Dinhs small business advisor tells about Detroit Schools is true. But even then: just to think that by and large things like that seem to be c o n s t a n t l y going on in US- society, be it in Detroit, or in Chelsea or elswhere, makes me wonder: How come?

    By the way: Physisist Dave – commenter No. 19 seems to beat the same drum as – may I say: we? – do.
    What Putnam is concerned, I just wanted to support Steve Sailers view, that Putnam makes a mistake. The same mistake, Angela Merkel makes: To invide the world, no matter what, and think that’s human – or christian.
    It’s neither, nor. And it will not help us the tiniest bit.

  108. There’s another immigration issue that no one’s really addressing directly but Steve, you mention it pretty explicitly in this post in your self-quote of your Taki’s Magazine review of Putnam’s book:

    One advantage that Midwestern kids of the Putnam / [Charles] Murray generation had over today’s Midwesterners is that they could easily afford to move to California. Back in 1960, when only 16 million people lived in the Golden State, compared to 39 million today, new freeways were bringing cheap suburban land within reasonable commuting range of decent paying factory and office jobs. The California magnet also benefited stay-at-homes by driving up the wages Midwestern employers had to pay to keep their workers from decamping for the West Coast.

    On the one hand, illegal immigration from other countries is lauded by Democrats and most of their end of the political spectrum. But in all of the actual cities and counties in which Democrats exercise local power immigration from other cities and counties is defacto prohibited. That was probably a significant factor supporting the wages of people everywhere else. in the past but now it’s basically impossible for everyone except (a) those with the highest incomes (or wealth); or (b) those willing to live with roommates or working family members (especially illegal numbers of them). I’ve tried to imagine how someone could support lots of immigration from other countries and yet think that there’s nothing wrong with local policies that result in housing that’s so expensive and so limited in supply that almost all of the ‘affordable’ variety has to be parceled out via lottery. I’m sure now that cognitive dissonance, or willful ignorance, explain almost all of this. None of these people seem to get that lots of places have these same policies or that other people might want to prioritize intra-national immigration (or at least the possibility of it) over international (let alone illegal) immigration.

    I’m always angered thinking about how the areas of the country with the greatest support for immigration from other countries are precisely those that are the most hostile to making a living (legally); most of that hostility directed at policies that would actual decrease the costs of housing.

    The Japanese lucked out in that their national legislature specifically countered the same anti-intra-national-immigration policies that were making their cities so expensive to live in:

    In the 1980s, Japanese cities were experiencing the same inflated housing bubbles that U.S. cities are today. Their planning methods, moreover, were rooted in Western notions about separating uses and limiting density. The federal government recognized that these regulations were the problem, so in 2002, it passed the Urban Renaissance Law. The law stripped municipalities of the ability to control private property. As a result, owners can build a variety of uses on their land, regardless of resistance from local bureaucrats or neighbors.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Kenny

    As a Val, I was always highly cognizant that the residents of Malibu and Beverly Hills were xenophobic nativists toward people like me.

  109. @AndrewR
    @Romanian

    It is very difficult to maintain any sort of good will towards the elites and their pseudoleftist enablers.

    Sailer the Pacifist, what do you suggest we do about these people? Can power be wrested peacefully from them? Once attaining power, what should we do about these people?

    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Anonym

    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.

    It’s not rocket science is it? We can still use our demographic majority to peacefully usher in the God Emperor, so our side is agitating in that direction.

    At this stage it is pretty dumb to advocate a violent solution as it will be the certain end of the individual and their ability to start a family etc. You yourself are free to start boning up on the FPS games and paintball though, or whatever floats your boat.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anonym

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it's obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Replies: @Anonym

  110. @Romanian
    Here is some awesome Sailerbait:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8EQFbqu-8

    Description

    Steffen Königer, a conservative politician of the new Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, last known for his viral video where he mocked a LGBTTQQ+ Green Party proposal by greeting them in 60 different genders, has read the "Babies Welcome" proposal of the party in the Landtag Parliament of Brandenburg and met heavy resistance from all parties who unanimously rejected the proposal as "racist".
    Germany is plagued by the lowest birth rate in the world with a quarter of German women staying childless their entire lives. The current solution of establishment parties is to import millions of male Muslim migrants to "solve the demographic crisis". The AfD seeks a different approach and intends to give 10,000€ in an interest-free loan to every young German couple who decides to have a child in order to increase the German birth rate.
    After the second child, the parents only have to repay half, after the 3rd child they don't have to repay anything of the total of 30,000€. Currently there are no real financial incentives to have a family, unless you're a foreigner and unemployed.

    Every single party, of whom all spokeswomen were notably female, rejected the proposal as "racist", "völkisch" (loving your own people), and "xenophobic" because a requirement is to actually live in the state and have German citizenship for at least 8 years.
    The Christian Democratic Union said it was "populist", the Social Democrats said it was racist because it didn't include "all families", the Left Party (formerly Communist party) said it was misogynistic, racist that all children are equal and "Bio-Germans" (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child. The Green party called it the new Hitler program and stressed that single mothers, minorities, LGBT and poor families are the ones who need true support, not the antiquated traditional families.

    The representative for independent voters also called the program deeply xenophobic and racist.

    Königer's rebuttal was that the establishment parties are the ones that are truly discriminating. They are more than willing to pay 3500€ every single month for every single unaccompanied refugee minor but unwilling to pay 10,000€ to support German families to raise a child. The billions that are wasted to deliberately replace the German people should rather be spent on avoiding its demise, so he says.
     
    This is amazing. The left is acknowledging a (irrelevant to them) biological basis to being German while also defining love of one's own people as a sin.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @WhatEvvs, @The most deplorable one, @Bert, @International Jew

    Bio-Germans” (sic!) are no more desirable than any other child.

    He-he, as opposed to Trans-Germans?

  111. @Boethiuss
    @epebble

    "Here in the affluent Whiteopia of suburban Portland, Oregon, I am seeing something strange: no signs, stickers, conversation, no excitement – absolutely nothing – about both candidates and the election. Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    Was this before or after the Trump meltdown right after the Democratic convention?

    From what I've seen, the starch has gone out of the whole election season, and probably won't come back until it becomes competitive again, if it ever does.

    The upper-middle class D base, ie Portland, will still be for Hillary but not really give it much thought. This is the real lost opportunity this cycle. The Portland mentality was up grabs more this cycle than since I dunno, whenever Oregon was a solid Republican state.

    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn't be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @epebble

    There was some excitement during D primaries for Bernie; But once it was over, the balloon popped and all interest was lost. I might have spotted one or two Trump stickers on cars, invariably out of towners. Don’t remember anything for Hillary. I suspect Trump supporters, if there are any, are too ashamed to publicly express it in this strong SJW town.

  112. @International Jew
    @iSteveFan


    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient
     
    It's been this way going back, at least, to that famous comment by some New Yorker, "How could Nixon have won? No one I know voted for him."

    As for me, I've seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they've had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    I've also been introduced as, "This is ____, the most intelligent conservative I've ever met."

    Replies: @Anonym, @guest, @Kylie

    As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    Ain’t that the truth. Lol about the iceberg.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Anonym

    iSteve and vdare and Derb are, of course, in the part below the waterline.

    Replies: @Anonym

  113. Very similar newspapers have been giving very similar explanations for what they see as the “Brexit disaster”: it is all the fault of uneducated white men in revolt against globalisation. True, the post-industrial cities of northern England voted to leave the EU, but so did the prosperous, Thatcherite south in even greater strength. The real explanation is that support for Brexit correlated with age, and there are fewer graduates in the older age groups who grew up before you needed a degree to run a swimming pool.

    I see that support for Trump is also higher among older voters http://on.wsj.com/1TtyLdt and I imagine that the same effect is at work.

    • Replies: @celt darnell
    @Philip Neal

    The question of counting "university educated" as opposed to Brexit is absolutely counting the youth vote twice.

    If you attended university in the UK before 1990, you represented less than 20% of the population (it was even lower in 1970). Now if you attend university, you represent around 50% of the population.

    Tony Blair's government massively expanded higher education in the UK -- his government also massively dumbed it down with degrees such as "media studies."

    Any Brexiteer over the age of 40 (and that's the age when the "leavers" begin to predominate) who attended university, probably belonged there.

    After that, no so much.

  114. @Henry Bowman
    @epebble

    Ever think that maybe Trump Supporters do not want to Dox themselves?

    Replies: @epebble, @Anonymous

    This is a nice neighborhood; But a Trump sign will definitely attract strange looks and murmurs. And I think one will quickly lose any friends or visitors.

  115. For America’s poor kids do belong to us and we to them. They are our kids.

    They’re not “America’s poor kids,” they are foreign lawbreakers whose parents are trying to exploit obtuse Americans.

    Still, the end of his book is absurd.

    This is all a huge semantic misunderstanding, probably caused by Professor Putnam’s inattentive editors. Quite clearly a punctuation error. They misplaced the possessive apostrophe on Americas. It should have been Americas’ poor kids , and then it all makes perfect sense, and Professor Putnam is absolved from believing in any kind of absurdity.

    Americas as in the American continent:

    The Americas, also collectively called America,[5][6][7] encompass the totality of North America and South America.[8][9][10] Together they make up most of Earth’s western hemisphere[11] and comprise the New World.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americas

    From Ushuaia to Prudhoe Bay we/they are all one big, happy American family: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan-American_Highway

    Those darn editors …

  116. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    I am sure we will never have vandalism of any Trump supporter in our neighborhood; but social ostracism is guaranteed. For most people, that may be worse than losing a sign or getting litter thrown.

  117. Interesting new Pew study

    http://www.people-press.stfi.re/2016/08/03/few-clinton-or-trump-supporters-have-close-friends-in-the-other-camp/

    I have a LOT of very liberal friends who may not realize that they know a Trump supporter. But they do.

  118. @Kenny
    There's another immigration issue that no one's really addressing directly but Steve, you mention it pretty explicitly in this post in your self-quote of your Taki's Magazine review of Putnam's book:

    One advantage that Midwestern kids of the Putnam / [Charles] Murray generation had over today’s Midwesterners is that they could easily afford to move to California. Back in 1960, when only 16 million people lived in the Golden State, compared to 39 million today, new freeways were bringing cheap suburban land within reasonable commuting range of decent paying factory and office jobs. The California magnet also benefited stay-at-homes by driving up the wages Midwestern employers had to pay to keep their workers from decamping for the West Coast.
     
    On the one hand, illegal immigration from other countries is lauded by Democrats and most of their end of the political spectrum. But in all of the actual cities and counties in which Democrats exercise local power immigration from other cities and counties is defacto prohibited. That was probably a significant factor supporting the wages of people everywhere else. in the past but now it's basically impossible for everyone except (a) those with the highest incomes (or wealth); or (b) those willing to live with roommates or working family members (especially illegal numbers of them). I've tried to imagine how someone could support lots of immigration from other countries and yet think that there's nothing wrong with local policies that result in housing that's so expensive and so limited in supply that almost all of the 'affordable' variety has to be parceled out via lottery. I'm sure now that cognitive dissonance, or willful ignorance, explain almost all of this. None of these people seem to get that lots of places have these same policies or that other people might want to prioritize intra-national immigration (or at least the possibility of it) over international (let alone illegal) immigration.

    I'm always angered thinking about how the areas of the country with the greatest support for immigration from other countries are precisely those that are the most hostile to making a living (legally); most of that hostility directed at policies that would actual decrease the costs of housing.

    The Japanese lucked out in that their national legislature specifically countered the same anti-intra-national-immigration policies that were making their cities so expensive to live in:

    In the 1980s, Japanese cities were experiencing the same inflated housing bubbles that U.S. cities are today. Their planning methods, moreover, were rooted in Western notions about separating uses and limiting density. The federal government recognized that these regulations were the problem, so in 2002, it passed the Urban Renaissance Law. The law stripped municipalities of the ability to control private property. As a result, owners can build a variety of uses on their land, regardless of resistance from local bureaucrats or neighbors.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    As a Val, I was always highly cognizant that the residents of Malibu and Beverly Hills were xenophobic nativists toward people like me.

  119. Anonymous • Disclaimer says: • Website

    The question those in the First World have to answer is gruesomely simple: are they willing to defend the their own territory as they would if faced with an armed invader and by doing so preserve their way of life and safety , or will they allow a fatal sentimentality to paralyse the entirely natural wish to stop invaders until the native populations of the First World are at best a tolerated minority in their own ancestral lands and at worst the subject of acts of genocide.

    The Prime Minister of Hungary Victor Orlan has had the courage to point out something which is obvious but anathema to the politically correct elites of Europe, namely, that immigration on the current scale will result in Europeans becoming a minority in their own continent with a consequent loss of European values. Anyone who thinks that Europe (and the rest of the First World) is not in danger should think on these facts:

    The population of the world is approximately 7 billion. At the most generous estimate only one billion live in the First World.
    The population of the world is estimated to grow by another two billion by 2050 with all the growth being in the Third World.
    The white population of the world is projected to be in a minority in Europe and North America by 2050.
    The First World already has large minorities of those from racial and ethnic groups whose antecedents are in the Third World and who have had their sense of victimhood at the hands of whites fed assiduously by white liberals for over 50 years. Once established in a First World country they agitate for the right to bri9ng relatives over and to relax immigration control generally. A recent report by the think tank Policy Exchange estimates that one third of the UK population with be from an ethnic minority by 2050.
    Political power in most of the First World is in the hands of politicians who arequislings in the service of internationalism in its modern guise of globalism.
    Those working in the mass media of the First World share the ideology of First World politicians with bells on, missing no chance to propagandise in favour of mass immigration.
    The First World is funding its own destruction by feeding the Third World with huge amounts of Aid . This promotes war throughout the Third World (providing a driver for Third World immigrants to the First World) and, most importantly, increases the populations of the Third World which rapidly outstrip the economic carrying capacity of their societies.

    Read more at

    https://englandcalling.wordpress.com/2015/09/04/defend-your-national-territory-or-lose-it/

  120. @Maj. Kong
    @iSteveFan

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left's power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don't because of cultural animus against America's founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur "Uncle Tom" to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term "self-hating Jew", Asians have the term "banana".

    For whites, we have "cuck" to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people "natural Republicans that don't know it yet". This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    Replies: @Das, @Laugh Track, @Lurker, @Rose Madder

    I call them cucks too, the difference is their cuckritude is built-in in way it isn’t with conservative cucks. The left will rapidly internalise whatever the latest thinking is without any need for persuasion.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lurker

    The use of the word 'cuck' and its derivatives has been far too overplayed, like liberals using 'racism'. Its getting to the point where its tiresome to constantly see it repeatedly in every other comment in each thread.

    Replies: @EriK

  121. @PhysicistDave
    I'll be voting for Trump not because I feel harmed by foreign trade or immigrants but because I am sick and tired of the incredible lies and corruption among our elites.

    My wife and I have three doctoral degrees between us: we are certainly not blue-collar. But, in the last five decades, we have personally seen incredible levels of corruption in higher education, the medical profession, the scientific community, the legal profession, the defense industry, the clergy, etc. -- all based on our own personal experiences, not on news reports.

    I've had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.

    Will Trump do that? I don't know. But the fear that the elites demonstrate towards Trump is a good sign.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Replies: @Fed Up, @Chrisnonymous, @Alden, @Bill

    Dave in Sacramento

    In my life time I’ve noticed an ethnic sexist cleansing of White men from the medical profession in California I’m sure you have too.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    @Alden

    It's the money. Smart white guys are following the money, and the Proggs have destroyed medicine as a lucrative career. Enjoy your Nigerian MD at the local MedRx, y'all.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  122. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    this is depressingly true all around. We learned it good and hard during the Prop 8 campaign. The other side has no scruples whatsoever and will vandalize and destroy whatever they think they can get away with. The media would hardly touch it because those homo- terrorists are their pets.

    Funny thing is, I don’t fear blacks or Hispanics. I fear white liberals.

    • Agree: Kylie
  123. @International Jew
    @iSteveFan


    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient
     
    It's been this way going back, at least, to that famous comment by some New Yorker, "How could Nixon have won? No one I know voted for him."

    As for me, I've seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they've had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    I've also been introduced as, "This is ____, the most intelligent conservative I've ever met."

    Replies: @Anonym, @guest, @Kylie

    “some New Yorker”

    Pauline Kael. I think she said she knew one person who voted for him.

  124. @Alden
    @Portlander

    I'd like to see the reasons for rise in working class income in Sioux county Iowa.
    Maybe the farmers use machinery rather than Mexican welfare recipients? Maybe a nuclear power plant, military base or college campus, something was built which kept the construction trades booming?

    It could not have been any kind of slaughter house or food processing plant because the entire food industry imports Hispanic Indians and puts them in welfare

    Just saying, I'd like to know more about the reasons incomes were so high while stagnating and falling in the rest of the country

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The price of farmland went up steadily in Sioux County, Iowa, peaking at $20k per acre in 2013.

    The China Boom Era was a good time to be an American farmer.

  125. @Anonym
    @International Jew

    As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    Ain't that the truth. Lol about the iceberg.

    Replies: @International Jew

    iSteve and vdare and Derb are, of course, in the part below the waterline.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @International Jew

    iSteve and vdare and Derb are, of course, in the part below the waterline.

    Given your likely friends and relatives, you'd better have some smelling salts on hand if/when you go there.

    I find that the optimum time to "go there" is when there is a topic of conversation where there is a white guy or group of white people who are being treated unfairly wrt other races. This works well if there is also someone making money from the situation where white middle/working class people are being treated poorly. Or, if the media is being dishonest or not reporting something. Islamic terror and "youth" riots are also choice times.

  126. @GOUSAAMER114
    @Portlander

    Exactly right. I live in a super zip neighborhood. It's pretty much all white. But we're surrounded by the third world. Like Trump, my interests are not high-brow. I am very just American. I like Subway and McDonalds. I have kids so I now kind of have to go to the mall and zoo. I can't take the diversity. I just want my country back. I hate the unpleasant conversation when ordering my food with the 40 year old Spanish speaker who always gets it wrong. I hate that the movie theater looks like its third world. I hate walking into Subway and only half of the people speak English. I hate that the local public school - where no one would ever send their kids - educates Mexico's lower class. This doesn't even touch on Islam. There should be NO Islam in the US.

    I'm not that old, but I remember when we had a country. I identify with my fellow Americans who just want to live in neighborhoods with fellow Americans. I can afford to isolate, but it is still incredibly unpleasant.

    I have been a Trumper before Trump. I loved Jeff Sessions and even Stephen Miller two years ago. I will be devastated if Trump doesn't win. It will tell me that America is over.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kylie, @TomSchmidt

    Trump is the Hail Mary pass, I agree.

    If it’s Queen Hill who gets elected, then the Southern border opens up (and the Canadian one) and SCOTUS starts discovering “hate speech” and “assault weapons” are outside the bounds of Constitutional protection. At that point, what’s left of whatever conservatism is either meekly acquiesces or starts organizing for secession.

  127. @Anonymous
    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
    Ayyadurai is founder and CEO of a tech company in Kendell Square, Cambridge, MA. He's also married to actress Fran Drescher.
    Ayyadurai is super articulate and a big Trump supporter and had the most scathing comments about Hillary. Carr had him in to discuss emails and servers and why what Hillary did was so egregious. They need to get this guy out there more. He was fantastic.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

    Replies: @ben tillman, @ScarletNumber

    Based on the info in his bio, he was a year behind Chris Christie in high school #SmallWorld

  128. @ben tillman
    @Morton Knox


    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VH[F] channel in Philadelphia.
     
    17, 29, or 48? Don't ever remember seeing that when I visited my grandparents, though my uncle mentioned that he was a fan.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Morton Knox

    Of course, those are all UHF stations. Ironically in NYC Benny Hill did air on a VHF station: WOR-TV9.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @ScarletNumber

    Yeah, I screwed that up. It's been a long time since I've even thought of those terms.

  129. @Old fogey
    All of this searching for reasons that people are supporting Trump by looking solely at economic data miss the really big picture. The Trump supporters I know back him because he seems genuinely interested in Americans and the best for the U.S.A.

    Here in New York just a few evenings ago a neighbor from Guatemala joined us for a few glasses of wine and bourbon. He's a nice guy who had come to the U.S. illegally in the 1980s but now is a gainfully employed citizen. He began spouting off about "his people" and the fact that the "Spanish" voters would overwhelmingly vote against Trump and ensure that he could not win in the national election. I don't usually think about my own heritage, but I can't help but recall that my father's family history starts with an immigrant arriving in NYC from Prussia around 1830 and we have documents showing that a family member fought at Gettysburg as part of a NY regiment. I also know for a fact that no one in my mother's side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Kylie, @Brutusale

    “I also know for a fact that no one in my mother’s side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.”

    Same here, only my mother’s side of the family came from the outskirts of Vienna. My grandmother had only received a sixth grade education in the old country but once here, she learned to speak, read and write English. She had pierced ears but when my mother asked to have her ears pierced back in the 1930’s, my grandmother told her no, because “American girls don’t do that”. That was the standard.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @Kylie

    Yes, indeed! Exactly the same story in my own family. My mother onlyy had her ears pierced when she was in her 70s, when it became impossible to buy good earrings that were not designed for non-pierced ears. Before that she would do anything so as not to look as if she "just came off the boat." I have no desire whatsoever to pierce my ears and happily wear lovely vintage clips and screw-backs from eBay.

    Perhaps one characteristic mainly found among Trump supporters is that they are descendants of people who resolutely did not want to return to "the old country," while my Guatemalan neighbor always talks about making enough money in the U.S. so that he can live high on the hog back home.

  130. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Forbes
    @Old fogey


    It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.
     
    As a long-time New Yorker, but non-native to the metropolitan area, I've been fascinated by the near obsession of people here with one another's heritage. When queried with the typical "What are you," I answer "an American." A puzzled look is the usual reaction.

    There are many (too many IMO) that take pride in native and ethnic origin over pride in being an American. There's nothing wrong with honoring one's familial heritage--of course I'm old enough to remember a time before Hyphenated-Americans. In my book, you're either an American or you're not.

    Replies: @Anon, @S. Anonyia, @TomSchmidt

    I grew up in Western New York (the eastern Midwest) as an American descended from immigrants who came here long ago. When I wine to college with mostly Downstaters, I suddenly had to embrace my long forgotten “Irish” heritage although I’m not even 50% Irish. It’s an east coast thing.

    Further, after college, I got into an argument with an Armenian woman I worked with because she refused to accept my answer to her question, “what are you?”. I simply said, “American”.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Anon

    Central NY, here--and you'll know where I mean.

  131. @International Jew
    @iSteveFan


    I do find it distasteful the implication in the campaign coverage that Trump’s supporters are somehow deficient
     
    It's been this way going back, at least, to that famous comment by some New Yorker, "How could Nixon have won? No one I know voted for him."

    As for me, I've seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they've had a chance to get to know me and like me.

    I've also been introduced as, "This is ____, the most intelligent conservative I've ever met."

    Replies: @Anonym, @guest, @Kylie

    “As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me.”

    I allow only a handful of people to know my political views. People don’t even ask what those views might be. I pass as a liberal among liberals. I’m height/weight proportionate, well-informed and have typically SWPL interests.

    This is how I know just how shallow, ignorant, and hateful the mindset of liberals really is–because they speak freely and openly in front of me.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Kylie

    Yeah, it's amazing in a blue area how many/most people just start out spouting SJW crap on the assumption that NO ONE could possibly disagree with what they have to say. They are in for a big surprise come Election Day.

    , @Romanian
    @Kylie

    It's weird for me to read these tales from the land of the brave and the free, because I have no issues talking about my politics with friends, family or at work. Still, we are one of those countries that bans certain symbols, personality worship (not Ceausescu, but the fascist pantheon), and Holocaust denial, so there's no fully free speech. Of course, the moral standard around here, in the upper middle class, is to adopt a very SWPL\liberal worldview. They're subsequently shocked that the smartest person they know is a Natzee. I even know a guy who's a tatted up, mohawked anarcho-capitalist bartending after journalism school with egalitarian sensibilities and he told me to lay off Stormfront during a very impassioned boardgame night argument. The thing is that social classes around here are a lot more compressed, so your friends are more diverse, mine especially for being a very upwardly mobile small-towner. The engineers and the blue collars get me instinctively, even when they lack the means to verbalize or rationalize their preferences. The apolitical white collars are queasy about what's happening, but stick to the liberal script until they're triggered. The women are at the extremes, either Mutti Merkel or full Marion Le Pen. It's the rich, the very political, the hipsters, the longhairs and the Romania-as-a-Western-country aspirationalists that are into the whole colonialism, oppression, racism thing. But even they are innately redpilled by the Gypsies, they just lack the proper context to understand the West's problems.

  132. @Anonym
    @AndrewR


    You are endlessly listing the crimes of our traitorous elite but you NEVER suggest solutions and you censor anyone who suggests a non Sesame Street solution.
     
    It's not rocket science is it? We can still use our demographic majority to peacefully usher in the God Emperor, so our side is agitating in that direction.

    At this stage it is pretty dumb to advocate a violent solution as it will be the certain end of the individual and their ability to start a family etc. You yourself are free to start boning up on the FPS games and paintball though, or whatever floats your boat.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it’s obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @AndrewR

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it’s obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I'll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing... if that's "obvious" to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump.

    Ever notice how concentrated the soft power is? CNN, MSNBC, NYT, NPR. Just a few organizations wield a huge amount of power. It would be nice if they did their job and reported most of the relevant events and both sides of the story.

    Replies: @11B4P, @Boethiuss

  133. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @AndrewR

    As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    As shown in Afghanistan, the elites in their commuter planes and helicopters would be very vulnerable to attack from RPGs. So, while they won't take steps to secure the border from invasion by millions of bipeds, you can be sure they would and do take steps to prevent the smuggling of arms.

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What's left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.

    We haven't had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century and that's just as well. Too many innocent lives are lost in these kinds of displays. But perhaps now that Obama has and is currently letting in so many Muslims, his legacy will be to have put an end to our relatively long period of civil tranquility. Hope and Change, baby!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such.

    There is a large number of 30 to 50-something white males retired from the military who now work one or two degrees of separation from this as contractors or civilian government or military employees who live in such an insular world they think America’s biggest problem is “Russia’s aggression” toward NATO expansion. I kid you not. Just go to the massive military industrial complexes (Pentagon, DIA HQ, or Naval Intelligence in Suitland) and see the largest concentration of nerdy and pseudo alpha whites males acting like it’s 1982 and they are something important out of a Tom Clancy’s novel or Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men. This number is much larger than anyone realizes. It’s government welfare for white guys and a lot of them like the way things are. And they live in Ashburn or Reston and fairly isolated from what’s going on in the larger world. They’re the ones who will vote for Hillary because they don’t like Trump questioning the role of NATO or saying we should get along with Russia and stop starting conflicts in the Middle East.

    • Replies: @11B4P
    @Anonymous

    I joined the Army in 1986, had a break in service and just retired from active duty last year.

    I know the type of people you described right down to the Russia obsession. I hate to say this but it's worse then you think.

    When I joined in 1986 people in the Army used to be patriotic, in the last few years I was starting to run in to people who were openly hostile to this country. The junior officers have been indoctrinated at the universities and are mostly leftists or at best cuckservatives, the enlisted are worse, most of them are ignorant degenerates, I had a white 11C SSG working for me who cried while listening to an Obama speech because he was so moved by him.

    I could go on, but honestly I don't care anymore, it's not my Army.

  134. @International Jew
    @Anonym

    iSteve and vdare and Derb are, of course, in the part below the waterline.

    Replies: @Anonym

    iSteve and vdare and Derb are, of course, in the part below the waterline.

    Given your likely friends and relatives, you’d better have some smelling salts on hand if/when you go there.

    I find that the optimum time to “go there” is when there is a topic of conversation where there is a white guy or group of white people who are being treated unfairly wrt other races. This works well if there is also someone making money from the situation where white middle/working class people are being treated poorly. Or, if the media is being dishonest or not reporting something. Islamic terror and “youth” riots are also choice times.

  135. @AndrewR
    @Anonym

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it's obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Replies: @Anonym

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it’s obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I’ll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing… if that’s “obvious” to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump.

    Ever notice how concentrated the soft power is? CNN, MSNBC, NYT, NPR. Just a few organizations wield a huge amount of power. It would be nice if they did their job and reported most of the relevant events and both sides of the story.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @11B4P
    @Anonym

    "Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president."

    They did get Jesus to run for President, He ran under the name Ted Cruz.

    , @Boethiuss
    @Anonym

    "Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I’ll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing… if that’s “obvious” to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump."

    I don't think Trump wants Hillary to win, but he is resigned for her to win. It's why he's been carping all week about how the election is rigged. You can bet your house he wouldn't be talking that way if he were winning.

    Like other commenters have pointed out, this cycle is decidedly downbeat relative to any in my memory. The D's voters don't care: they're voting for HRC but not happy about it. Trump doesn't care, the GOP establishment doesn't care because they're busy ignoring the Presidential race and trying to save themselves downticket. Even Bill and President Obama don't seem very agitated about the matter. The only ones who care are Hillary and us.

  136. @Anonym
    @AndrewR

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it’s obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I'll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing... if that's "obvious" to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump.

    Ever notice how concentrated the soft power is? CNN, MSNBC, NYT, NPR. Just a few organizations wield a huge amount of power. It would be nice if they did their job and reported most of the relevant events and both sides of the story.

    Replies: @11B4P, @Boethiuss

    “Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president.”

    They did get Jesus to run for President, He ran under the name Ted Cruz.

  137. @Alden
    @PhysicistDave

    Dave in Sacramento

    In my life time I've noticed an ethnic sexist cleansing of White men from the medical profession in California I'm sure you have too.

    Replies: @dr kill

    It’s the money. Smart white guys are following the money, and the Proggs have destroyed medicine as a lucrative career. Enjoy your Nigerian MD at the local MedRx, y’all.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @dr kill

    Nah, the 5% at the top will have the "gold-plated" health plans with the white/Asian MDs. Everyone else will have plans sending them to Clinics-R-Us to consult with Dr. Robot. Skip the Nigerian, proceed directly to the machine.

  138. @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    Class gender thing Female oriented aristocratic societies tend towards Antoinette ism. Let them eat cake.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Bill, @dcite

    Are you capable of writing even a single sentence that isn’t shitted up with your apalling, offensive ignorance?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill

    Name calling is not an argument.

    Replies: @Bill

  139. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such.
     
    There is a large number of 30 to 50-something white males retired from the military who now work one or two degrees of separation from this as contractors or civilian government or military employees who live in such an insular world they think America's biggest problem is "Russia's aggression" toward NATO expansion. I kid you not. Just go to the massive military industrial complexes (Pentagon, DIA HQ, or Naval Intelligence in Suitland) and see the largest concentration of nerdy and pseudo alpha whites males acting like it's 1982 and they are something important out of a Tom Clancy's novel or Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men. This number is much larger than anyone realizes. It's government welfare for white guys and a lot of them like the way things are. And they live in Ashburn or Reston and fairly isolated from what's going on in the larger world. They're the ones who will vote for Hillary because they don't like Trump questioning the role of NATO or saying we should get along with Russia and stop starting conflicts in the Middle East.

    Replies: @11B4P

    I joined the Army in 1986, had a break in service and just retired from active duty last year.

    I know the type of people you described right down to the Russia obsession. I hate to say this but it’s worse then you think.

    When I joined in 1986 people in the Army used to be patriotic, in the last few years I was starting to run in to people who were openly hostile to this country. The junior officers have been indoctrinated at the universities and are mostly leftists or at best cuckservatives, the enlisted are worse, most of them are ignorant degenerates, I had a white 11C SSG working for me who cried while listening to an Obama speech because he was so moved by him.

    I could go on, but honestly I don’t care anymore, it’s not my Army.

  140. @PhysicistDave
    I'll be voting for Trump not because I feel harmed by foreign trade or immigrants but because I am sick and tired of the incredible lies and corruption among our elites.

    My wife and I have three doctoral degrees between us: we are certainly not blue-collar. But, in the last five decades, we have personally seen incredible levels of corruption in higher education, the medical profession, the scientific community, the legal profession, the defense industry, the clergy, etc. -- all based on our own personal experiences, not on news reports.

    I've had enough: this society needs a thorough, abrupt housecleaning of its dominant social strata.

    Will Trump do that? I don't know. But the fear that the elites demonstrate towards Trump is a good sign.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Replies: @Fed Up, @Chrisnonymous, @Alden, @Bill

    Amen. Preach, brother!

  141. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @e
    @Anonym

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out.

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their "lash[ing] out." Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered "lash[ing] out"?

    It's writing/"analyses"/word twisting like that from progressives and anti-Trumpers that might explain much of Trump's support, don'tchathink?

    I honestly don't know whom I detest more--the Clintons and their corruption or the American press. How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Anonym, @Harry Baldwin

    How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    Well, these days there is probably a lot more truth in Pravda.

  142. @Kylie
    @International Jew

    "As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me."

    I allow only a handful of people to know my political views. People don't even ask what those views might be. I pass as a liberal among liberals. I'm height/weight proportionate, well-informed and have typically SWPL interests.

    This is how I know just how shallow, ignorant, and hateful the mindset of liberals really is--because they speak freely and openly in front of me.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Romanian

    Yeah, it’s amazing in a blue area how many/most people just start out spouting SJW crap on the assumption that NO ONE could possibly disagree with what they have to say. They are in for a big surprise come Election Day.

    • Agree: Kylie
  143. @Bill
    @Whiskey

    Are you capable of writing even a single sentence that isn't shitted up with your apalling, offensive ignorance?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Name calling is not an argument.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Jim Don Bob

    Grass is green.

  144. @e
    @Anonym

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out.

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their "lash[ing] out." Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered "lash[ing] out"?

    It's writing/"analyses"/word twisting like that from progressives and anti-Trumpers that might explain much of Trump's support, don'tchathink?

    I honestly don't know whom I detest more--the Clintons and their corruption or the American press. How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Anonym, @Harry Baldwin

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their “lash[ing] out.” Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered “lash[ing] out”?

    Lashing out… there hasn’t been anything unprovoked as far as I know. There has been some absence of turning the other cheek at rallies. Some sizable part of the country would like to see a defense of the white demographic, involving a return to country of origin of all the illegals. If this requires force, then so be it. It’s working within the system though.

    These leftists, they think it’s amusing to taunt a cornered animal. They have no idea.

  145. @GOUSAAMER114
    @Portlander

    Exactly right. I live in a super zip neighborhood. It's pretty much all white. But we're surrounded by the third world. Like Trump, my interests are not high-brow. I am very just American. I like Subway and McDonalds. I have kids so I now kind of have to go to the mall and zoo. I can't take the diversity. I just want my country back. I hate the unpleasant conversation when ordering my food with the 40 year old Spanish speaker who always gets it wrong. I hate that the movie theater looks like its third world. I hate walking into Subway and only half of the people speak English. I hate that the local public school - where no one would ever send their kids - educates Mexico's lower class. This doesn't even touch on Islam. There should be NO Islam in the US.

    I'm not that old, but I remember when we had a country. I identify with my fellow Americans who just want to live in neighborhoods with fellow Americans. I can afford to isolate, but it is still incredibly unpleasant.

    I have been a Trumper before Trump. I loved Jeff Sessions and even Stephen Miller two years ago. I will be devastated if Trump doesn't win. It will tell me that America is over.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kylie, @TomSchmidt

    So well said. I feel the exact same way. It’s not about the economy for me (though I have friends who support Trump for whom it is). It’s about the culture. I’m sick of the diversity the left has foisted off on us.

  146. @International Jew
    @candid_observer


    What in God’s name is the point of looking for some marginal effect after controlling for these various demographic factors, if it is the demographic factors themselves that display the dominant effect?
     
    To learn how much the various demographic factors matter, and (the residual part) to assess how much is left unexplained.

    This is very standard statistical practice, and predates all our current culture wars. If you want to understand it at a technical level, start by looking up "least squares regression". (I won't get any more specific, as I don't know your background...)

    Replies: @candid_observer

    Look, I get how in certain contexts understanding the residual effects is important.

    But not in this case.

    Suppose, as seems to be true, Trump is winning over the white working class at a much higher rate than is usual — suppose he gets an additional 20% of that vote over the usual. Suppose, now, that if one controls for being white working class, there is a residual effect whereby the somewhat better off white working class tend slightly more often to favor him than others, but that it’s small — as is reported to be the case — say 5% more of the working class that favors is in the better off class than one would expect proportionately to their representation in the population. Then why is the small marginal effect somehow the thing that gives you the insight into the “Trump voter”, rather than the dominant effect here, namely the 20% additional working class he is winning over? Obviously, he is winning over many more of the working class of all levels of affluence, even if he is winning over slightly more of the affluent ones.

    One would think it’s obvious that the real question here as to the mind of the Trump voter involves Trump’s appeal across the entirety of the white working class. The only case in which it might be important that Trump particularly appeals to the better off working class is if the greatest proportion of the additional voters he draws are in fact the better off (which presumably don’t ordinarily go Republican). Even in that case, though, if Trump retains the rest of the working class as usual, and they are by a good distance the most common sort of working class voter for Trump, I don’t see how the additional better off voters can fairly be said to represent the typical Trump voter.

  147. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry Bowman
    @epebble

    Ever think that maybe Trump Supporters do not want to Dox themselves?

    Replies: @epebble, @Anonymous

    That’s certainly my rationale for hiding my power level. Don’t need my car keyed by some Bernout who thinks Trump is responsible for his guy’s cuckholdry.

    Trump supporters exist here in Portland; we’re just silent, and far from a majority. But let us hope there’s more of us in places like PA, VA, FL, OH…

  148. @415 reasons
    OT: Steve, regarding your hypothesis in Taki's that athletes can't switch nationalities, this morning former Jamaican sprinter Andrew Fisher lined up and ran for Bahrain.

    http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/sport/athletics/Fisher-says-no-name-change-despite-Bahrain-switch_61673


    “Of course it was difficult to make the switch,” he said, after running a season’s best 10.07 seconds at the Jamaica International Invitational in early May.

    “It was a decision that took months to come to. I love Jamaica and didn’t think I could live anywhere else,” said the man who has a personal best 9.94 seconds, set in Madrid last year.

    He was hesitant to talk about the process that led to his changing allegiances saying initially that it is “private information”. He later told the Observer he was not the one who made the initial contact.

    ...
    There are no plans, he said however, to change his name, as some athletes have done.

    “No, there will be no change of names,” he said.

    “Andrew Fisher is my name, my dad gave me this name so no change. No one asked me to change it either.”

    He is, however, impressed with what he has seen of his new ‘home’, and says the switch has been going well.

    “It’s been going all right, I am based here though but been to Bahrain once. It’s a beautiful country. I love it there but it’s very hot, way hotter than Jamaica.”

     

    Replies: @Lurker

    There is a ‘British’ runner – Mo Farah.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mo_Farah

    A Somali in other words. A couple of years ago it transpired he was living the US (he was already training there). Certain unkind souls pointed out online that this showed his ‘British’ identity for the sham it is. Useless, outraged cucks then popped up bleating that if we weren’t more supportive then Mo would become a US citizen and then where would be?! ‘We’ wouldnt be winning all those gold medals.

    Of course this only served to illustrate the hollow nature of their argument.

  149. @Anonymous
    @Boethiuss


    The Bernie voters were represented a lot of naive Leftism, but also a healthy rejection of the intellectual sterility of Obama and Clinton. We should have at least given them a legit pitch. Unfortunately the bluster and buffoonery of Trump guaranteed that they really wouldn’t be bothered to deal with his policy instincts, such as they are.
     
    They might have been lost from Day 1. Mexicans = rapists still hurts. And the Heritage Foundation justice picks.

    Smart Trump could have framed immigration restriction and trade protectionism as not-racist, just good for the little guy, but correct me if I'm wrong but aren't Portlanders primarily motivated by gender-race-sex progressivism, and were therefore always out of bounds if not destined to be absorbed by Clinton? As the DNC leak confirmed, Bernie was delaying her pivot to the centre, but what of it? Trump's gaffes have given them a danger to vote *against*, so Clinton can have her milquetoast Republicans and eat them too.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    “Smart Trump could have framed immigration restriction and trade protectionism as not-racist, just good for the little guy, but correct me if I’m wrong but aren’t Portlanders primarily motivated by gender-race-sex progressivism, and were therefore always out of bounds if not destined to be absorbed by Clinton? As the DNC leak confirmed, Bernie was delaying her pivot to the centre, but what of it? Trump’s gaffes have given them a danger to vote *against*, so Clinton can have her milquetoast Republicans and eat them too.”

    Could be, but I think you’re underemphasizing the extent that Bernie supporters wanted to repudiate her policies, such as they were understood to be, and her pattern of governance through corrupt associations. Given that our nominee is Donald Trump that option vanished pretty quickly (and the fact that he refused to debate Sanders late in the primary season which was a major tactical mistake).

  150. @Das
    @Maj. Kong

    "But the real key to the left’s power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP."

    Do they? Paul Ryan's "small government" proposals involve devastating a bunch of universal programs like Social Security and Medicare, which benefit nearly everyone.

    Affluent engineers and lawyers don't want to have to hunt for health care in their old age with a voucher any more than factory and construction workers do.

    There's a reason why those programs used to be considered a "third rail" of politics. Even a conservative Republican doctor doesn't want you mucking with his Social Security check.

    "For whites, we have “cuck” to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?"

    Before Trump, the GOP was only slightly less bad than Dems on a whole range of cultural and immigration-related issues, while being worse on most economic issues.

    Do you honestly think someone's a "renegade" because they prefer Dems to politicians like Jeb Bush or Paul Ryan?

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a “conservative Republican” is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.

    While the Republican establishment is certainly no paragon of virtue, I do consider the Republican voter base to be far more favorable. Many upper income voters are liberal as a way to virtue signal themselves as better than those eeevil conservatives. I have little respect for the Long Island liberal that wants tight zoning regulations locally, but mass immigration to prove that they aren’t racist. The same goes for those living with wealthy neighbors and well-funded police denigrating the common rural gun owner.

    And at least we can say that Jeb Bush maintained Florida as a state with no income tax. There is no reason we ‘need’ an over-compensated unionized public sector, or an education system entitled to our largesse. No state in the country needs to be high tax like California, but the Democratic Party’s electoral fortunes and the very existence of the left depend on it.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Maj. Kong


    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a “conservative Republican” is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.
     
    I disagree. Obviously, things like Social Security should not be administered by a central government, but at this point Social Security and Medicare are racial issues, and nothing else. They're a way to channel White taxes back to White people. Attacks on Social Security and Medicare are attacks on Whites.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  151. “From polls, it is clear that Trump’s supporters tend to be blue-collar men with lower levels of education. ”

    I love how liberal elites and media will say or do anything regardless of how contradictory it is to what they pretend to be about, if it advances their current goal. And how their supporters fail to notice it and/or forget about it 5 minutes later.

    Over and over, the liberal media claim the upper moral hand by claiming their side are the champions of the poor and working class, the downtrodden, yet they have cheerfully categorized over and over Trump supporters as blue collar idiots when it suits their whim of attacking Trump and trying to give a bad name to anyone who supports him, regardless of whether its also a direct attack on blue collar, low-education workers.

    Not to mention the fact that he’s probably got as much support among white collar middle class America, so its a lie to begin with, but obviously, it shows they believe that blue collar workers are a dim group who should feel ashamed of poverty and low education, or they wouldn’t use it as an insult. And don’t mind using it as an insult when it suits their whims.

    There should be a website/blog simply listing liberal hypocrisies. The writer would have no shortage of new columns.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Grandpa Jack

    In the Democrats' world of "the ends justify the means," hypocrisy and double-standards aren't bugs--they're features. Their every impulse is emotional frisson--your rejection demonstrates you're uncaring. They're the big picture people, while you're caught up in details that are debatable. They just 'know' things that are beyond your comprehension. Just ask 'em, they'll tell you.

  152. @Wilkey
    Hollywood and the (government-run) education system has raised our children to value every endeavor but parenting; to value every profession but motherhood. Little wonder, then, that they grow up to devalue parenting.

    If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we're going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We're going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don't have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around.

    Very large numbers of Westerners these days aren't bothered by the fact that they can't afford children because they've been taught not to want children, anyway.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    On the car radio I often listen to oldies from the 1950s – mid-10960s. It’s striking how many of those songs were about being in love and wanting to get married. Has there been a rock song about wanting to get married in the last 30 years? (I’m not talking about country music.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Harry Baldwin

    In the 1980s, I noticed that love songs by Los Lobos, the instrumentally great Chicano band from East L.A., tended to be like country songs in assuming that marriage and kids were part of the package.

    , @Wilkey
    @Harry Baldwin

    Train's "Marry Me" is pretty dang good. Not sure how high it rose on the charts (do they still have charts?)

  153. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Oregon is solidly blue; but the complete lack of interest is shocking. I wonder if this is how elections feel in China or Russia."

    And yet, though the election in Oregon is a fait accompli for the Democrats, the local gaystream media outlets run daily attack pieces against Trump. It's surreal. I should write them all a letter asking why bother with the Trumphobia in a state that goes 60/40 Democrat regardless?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    It’s important to stoke the Trumphobia to help suppress the voters’ gag reflex as they pull the lever for Cacklepants.

  154. @Lurker
    @Maj. Kong

    I call them cucks too, the difference is their cuckritude is built-in in way it isn't with conservative cucks. The left will rapidly internalise whatever the latest thinking is without any need for persuasion.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The use of the word ‘cuck’ and its derivatives has been far too overplayed, like liberals using ‘racism’. Its getting to the point where its tiresome to constantly see it repeatedly in every other comment in each thread.

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Anonymous

    Agree and it's annoying. Vox Day literally wrote the book on cuckservatives and he rarely uses the cuck shorthand (if ever). It's a good book too.

  155. @e
    @Anonym

    So what do they do with their anger fueled by forces they can’t control? They lash out.

    Uh, thing is, I have no evidence of their "lash[ing] out." Do you? Is voting for a particular candidate now considered "lash[ing] out"?

    It's writing/"analyses"/word twisting like that from progressives and anti-Trumpers that might explain much of Trump's support, don'tchathink?

    I honestly don't know whom I detest more--the Clintons and their corruption or the American press. How, I ask myself, are they really any different than PRAVDA?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Anonym, @Harry Baldwin

    They lash out.</

    Translation: "Officer, it all started when he hit me back."

  156. @Wilkey
    Hollywood and the (government-run) education system has raised our children to value every endeavor but parenting; to value every profession but motherhood. Little wonder, then, that they grow up to devalue parenting.

    If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we're going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We're going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don't have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around.

    Very large numbers of Westerners these days aren't bothered by the fact that they can't afford children because they've been taught not to want children, anyway.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    “If whites are to start replacing ourselves, we’re going to have to start treating them as more than lifestyle accessories and one-offs. We’re going to have to return to raising children to value motherhood. Religion used to teach that, but now most people don’t have a religion. The culture (Ozzie & Harriet, Leave It to Beaver) used to teach that, but now the most popular television shows are about twentysomethings wasting a decade or two of their lives hanging out in bars and sleeping around.”

    That’s a very important point that explains a lot of what created the Trump nomination. Steve has talked a lot about Putnam and social capital, but specifically pertaining to white Republican-leaning America, there’s a tremendous imbalance of social capital in favor of religious/churchgoing people.

    There’s also a tremendous cultural divide between religious and secular white Republicans. This flew under radar for a long time (not least for me) because there’s not a lot of animosity between them. The seculars care about immigration and more broadly anything related to maximizing their quality of life. The religious care about abortion and more broadly anything related to good character.

    Inside Republican politics, the religious have always won out because they were the ones who had the social capital to organize politically. For the seculars to take over, it had to be behind the candidacy of somebody who parachuted in from outside like Trump. And now that he’s here, it’s clear for me that the seculars deserve more representation than they’ve gotten recently.

    But, they should also appreciate that a decent part of the reason why things have deteriorated as much as they is precisely from secularity. Oddly enough, that’s one of the reasons why I appreciated Ted Cruz more and more as the primary season went on. As graceless as he could be sometimes, he still represented reality that in fact we _need_ more Biblethumping. And the people who need it the most tend to be the ones who least like it.

  157. @Anonymous
    @AndrewR

    As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    As shown in Afghanistan, the elites in their commuter planes and helicopters would be very vulnerable to attack from RPGs. So, while they won't take steps to secure the border from invasion by millions of bipeds, you can be sure they would and do take steps to prevent the smuggling of arms.

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What's left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.

    We haven't had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century and that's just as well. Too many innocent lives are lost in these kinds of displays. But perhaps now that Obama has and is currently letting in so many Muslims, his legacy will be to have put an end to our relatively long period of civil tranquility. Hope and Change, baby!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    We haven’t had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century . . .

    Timothy McVeigh? 1995?

  158. @Buzz Mohawk
    Trump Voters Tend to be Successful Individuals Concerned About Their Troubled Communities

    Here I am, waving my hands!

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...

    Me too!

  159. @Anonymous
    @AndrewR

    As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    As shown in Afghanistan, the elites in their commuter planes and helicopters would be very vulnerable to attack from RPGs. So, while they won't take steps to secure the border from invasion by millions of bipeds, you can be sure they would and do take steps to prevent the smuggling of arms.

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What's left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.

    We haven't had any serious, politically motivated bombing for a century and that's just as well. Too many innocent lives are lost in these kinds of displays. But perhaps now that Obama has and is currently letting in so many Muslims, his legacy will be to have put an end to our relatively long period of civil tranquility. Hope and Change, baby!

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Harry Baldwin, @Boethiuss

    “As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    …..

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater.”

    I read stuff like this and want to cry. This is wildly implausible plus betrays an enormous historical ignorance of our Civil War (or a refusal to contemplate it, one or the other).

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let’s do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Boethiuss


    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let’s do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.
     
    Yeah, why can't average Americans be more acquiescent and accept our fate. Like the doddering old man who goes along with being relegated to some facility where he spends last days on earth being abused by African "caretakers". It's so much more dignified than the racist old coot who refuses to be assigned to such a fate.

    Under George W. Bush, Republicans had control of the White House, Congress, and the Supreme Court. What did the average American get in return? All we got is more of what Donald Trump says we need less of. And half of the country agrees with him.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    , @Henry Bowman
    @Boethiuss


    elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.
     
    No, we need people like Trump as they are outsiders..

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    , @MarkinLA
    @Boethiuss

    instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker

    Yeah, why not "take it over" with Lindsey Graham and John McCain? I don't see much difference between any of these 5.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

  160. @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilkey

    On the car radio I often listen to oldies from the 1950s - mid-10960s. It's striking how many of those songs were about being in love and wanting to get married. Has there been a rock song about wanting to get married in the last 30 years? (I'm not talking about country music.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Wilkey

    In the 1980s, I noticed that love songs by Los Lobos, the instrumentally great Chicano band from East L.A., tended to be like country songs in assuming that marriage and kids were part of the package.

  161. @ben tillman
    @Anonymous


    Yesterday, Howie Carr (WRKO in Boston) had on his radio show a guy he met at a Trump get together on Cape Cod. The guy, Shiva Ayyadurai (BS, MS, PhD, MIT), was the inventor of email at the age of 14 while a high school student volunteering at where his mother worked at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
     
    He wasn't the inventor of email. He apparently coined the term, however.

    Nonetheless, I'm glad he's supporting Trump.

    Replies: @Lurker

    He wasn’t the inventor of email.

    Correct.

    He apparently coined the term, however

    No.

    He developed an email program he called ‘EMAIL’ which he also had copyrighted. He appears to have traded on the misunderstandings this has caused ever since, busily promoting himself as the originator and inventor.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/who-invented-email-ray-tomlinson-or-shiva-ayyadurai/article8323987.ece

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

  162. @dsgntd_plyr
    @epebble

    i live in a deep blue area of a deep blue state. no one is publicly expressing support for hillary clinton (it's all anti-trump). no buttons, shirts, lawn signs, bumper stickers. nothing.

    but i see one or two bernie bumper stickers, or people walking around in one of his shirts everyday.

    Replies: @snorlax, @European in America

    Anecdotally, a lot of my fellow millennials seem to be only vaguely or even outright un-aware that Bernie is no longer a candidate.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @snorlax

    Are they vaguely aware that Bernie and his wife just bought a $600,000 summer home on Lake Champlain?

  163. @Anonym
    @AndrewR

    The God Emperor is a hypernarcissistic fool with no business near the presidency or any job more powerful than garbageman. And frankly at this point it’s obvious he wants Hillary to win.

    Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I'll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing... if that's "obvious" to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump.

    Ever notice how concentrated the soft power is? CNN, MSNBC, NYT, NPR. Just a few organizations wield a huge amount of power. It would be nice if they did their job and reported most of the relevant events and both sides of the story.

    Replies: @11B4P, @Boethiuss

    “Wake me when you get Jesus to run for president. In the meantime, I’ll take a wall thankyouverymuch. The Hillary thing… if that’s “obvious” to you, I think it says more about your sense of reality than what you think it does about Trump.”

    I don’t think Trump wants Hillary to win, but he is resigned for her to win. It’s why he’s been carping all week about how the election is rigged. You can bet your house he wouldn’t be talking that way if he were winning.

    Like other commenters have pointed out, this cycle is decidedly downbeat relative to any in my memory. The D’s voters don’t care: they’re voting for HRC but not happy about it. Trump doesn’t care, the GOP establishment doesn’t care because they’re busy ignoring the Presidential race and trying to save themselves downticket. Even Bill and President Obama don’t seem very agitated about the matter. The only ones who care are Hillary and us.

  164. @Whiskey
    @iSteveFan

    Class gender thing Female oriented aristocratic societies tend towards Antoinette ism. Let them eat cake.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Bill, @dcite

    She never said that. The propagandists were as clever then as they are now, and knew what buttons to push. Naturally, some French buttons had choux à la crème on them. It’s really odd that their most iconic monarch/general — who established some order out of the chaos — had a pastry named after him. If he had just stayed in France eating napoleons instead of being one, millions would have been spared much misery.

    M.A. was sensitive to the poor, as were a number of others of the aristocracy. Her loyal friend, Princess Marie Louise de Savoy, who had spent a good part of her life helping with charitable activities, was gruesomely killed by a mob after being condemned. The propagandists had spread rumors that this reserved lady, whose private life had never before been the subject of gossip or rumor, was M.A.’s lesbian lover. Yes, even then. While we make fun of British prudery, I don’t think an English mob would have cared as much, but maybe I’m wrong.

  165. @dsgntd_plyr
    @epebble

    i live in a deep blue area of a deep blue state. no one is publicly expressing support for hillary clinton (it's all anti-trump). no buttons, shirts, lawn signs, bumper stickers. nothing.

    but i see one or two bernie bumper stickers, or people walking around in one of his shirts everyday.

    Replies: @snorlax, @European in America

    Yup, same here. In downtown Chicago, which is Democrazi central, all year I haven’t seen a single “I’m with her” sticker or anything of the sort. Lots of anti-Trump hysteria, but very little enthusiasm for HRC. On the other hand, one guy in my building does have a Trump bumper sticker on his car (brave soul).

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @European in America

    In my deep-blue MA town: a few Hillary bumper stickers, (Dems are the party of Fags & Hags and we have plenty of both), no Hillary signs, a few Trump bumper stickers, one Trump sign and three MAGA hats, one on a young black guy! I had to ask him if it was ironic, and he said no, he loved Trump.

  166. @Anonymous
    @Lurker

    The use of the word 'cuck' and its derivatives has been far too overplayed, like liberals using 'racism'. Its getting to the point where its tiresome to constantly see it repeatedly in every other comment in each thread.

    Replies: @EriK

    Agree and it’s annoying. Vox Day literally wrote the book on cuckservatives and he rarely uses the cuck shorthand (if ever). It’s a good book too.

  167. @snorlax
    @dsgntd_plyr

    Anecdotally, a lot of my fellow millennials seem to be only vaguely or even outright un-aware that Bernie is no longer a candidate.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Are they vaguely aware that Bernie and his wife just bought a $600,000 summer home on Lake Champlain?

  168. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    .....

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater."

    I read stuff like this and want to cry. This is wildly implausible plus betrays an enormous historical ignorance of our Civil War (or a refusal to contemplate it, one or the other).

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let's do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let's just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Henry Bowman, @MarkinLA

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let’s do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    Yeah, why can’t average Americans be more acquiescent and accept our fate. Like the doddering old man who goes along with being relegated to some facility where he spends last days on earth being abused by African “caretakers”. It’s so much more dignified than the racist old coot who refuses to be assigned to such a fate.

    Under George W. Bush, Republicans had control of the White House, Congress, and the Supreme Court. What did the average American get in return? All we got is more of what Donald Trump says we need less of. And half of the country agrees with him.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "Yeah, why can’t average Americans be more acquiescent and accept our fate. Like the doddering old man who goes along with being relegated to some facility where he spends last days on earth being abused by African “caretakers”. It’s so much more dignified than the racist old coot who refuses to be assigned to such a fate. "

    WTF? If you didn't want that fate you shouldn't have voted for Donald in a primary because most likely that's what you're getting.

    "Under George W. Bush, Republicans had control of the White House, Congress, and the Supreme Court. What did the average American get in return? All we got is more of what Donald Trump says we need less of. And half of the country agrees with him."

    But how many of those are going to vote for him? Not enough, so what does it help?

  169. @ScarletNumber
    @ben tillman

    Of course, those are all UHF stations. Ironically in NYC Benny Hill did air on a VHF station: WOR-TV9.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Yeah, I screwed that up. It’s been a long time since I’ve even thought of those terms.

  170. What is often assumed is that there is still a meritocracy particularly for the well educated. I can assure you that young white men can graduate from a good college with a competitive STEM degree such as software engineering and fail to receive a single job offer while his Chinese/Indian/Black peers are scoped up. (Competitive refers to 15/300 grads).

    My management experience was constant pressure to avoid hiring white men. If one was hired despite the pressure not to it could be career limiting for any involved in he hiring decision.

    There are 100s of thousands of STEM grads world wide. Now that talent is global as many engineers as needed can be imported.

    It is interesting that done are figuring thus out finally. Many boomer parents in my experience do not have a clue what their white offspring are up against.

    Technocratic class being imported for the top and grunt labour for the bottom jobs. Literally a squeezing out of the base Amercan population. Recent graduates do however receive interest from other countries who are not trying to diversify leading to an exodus of talent.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Rose Madder

    "Many boomer parents in my experience do not have a clue what their white offspring are up against."

    Most people have no idea. Boomers, Gen X, Millenials. They're all boiling frogs.

  171. @Maj. Kong
    @iSteveFan

    It could be correctly said to note that lower income voters are voting in their rational self-interest for welfare statism. But the real key to the left's power comes from the educated middle and upper income voters. Those voters have a rational reason to vote for lower taxes and a smaller government % of GDP. But they don't because of cultural animus against America's founding people.*

    Blacks have the slur "Uncle Tom" to describe any black voter/activist/politician that is insufficiently loyal. Jews have the term "self-hating Jew", Asians have the term "banana".

    For whites, we have "cuck" to describe sellouts of Conservatism Inc, but we have no tribal persuader to act against the white suburban center-left voter present in many Northeast and Midwest suburbs.

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    *Conservatism Inc calls these people "natural Republicans that don't know it yet". This only works when you have a one dimensional view of politics. These voters (Indian engineers for example) would likely vote for the right-wing BJP in India, but will only be right wing amongst their own people.

    Replies: @Das, @Laugh Track, @Lurker, @Rose Madder

    Can anyone think of what to call these renegades?

    Just call them anti-whites.

  172. Trump is playing good strategy game. If he loses, he can claim the elections were rigged. If nothing else, it will make Hillary’s winning look illegitimate and cast a cloud on her administration as the Dems did to GWB. All in all, a good strategy if it can breed greater voter cynicism in politics and elections.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-warns-of-election-cheating-as-he-fires-up-recruitment-of-poll-watchers/2016/08/13/cac7223c-617f-11e6-8e45-477372e89d78_story.html

  173. @Philip Neal
    Very similar newspapers have been giving very similar explanations for what they see as the "Brexit disaster": it is all the fault of uneducated white men in revolt against globalisation. True, the post-industrial cities of northern England voted to leave the EU, but so did the prosperous, Thatcherite south in even greater strength. The real explanation is that support for Brexit correlated with age, and there are fewer graduates in the older age groups who grew up before you needed a degree to run a swimming pool.

    I see that support for Trump is also higher among older voters http://on.wsj.com/1TtyLdt and I imagine that the same effect is at work.

    Replies: @celt darnell

    The question of counting “university educated” as opposed to Brexit is absolutely counting the youth vote twice.

    If you attended university in the UK before 1990, you represented less than 20% of the population (it was even lower in 1970). Now if you attend university, you represent around 50% of the population.

    Tony Blair’s government massively expanded higher education in the UK — his government also massively dumbed it down with degrees such as “media studies.”

    Any Brexiteer over the age of 40 (and that’s the age when the “leavers” begin to predominate) who attended university, probably belonged there.

    After that, no so much.

  174. @Anonymous
    "Why does Trump’s message resonate the most in these low-mobility areas? The data do not provide a clear answer."

    If you ask the wrong question then you won't get the right answer.

    Maybe the economic indicators used by the people who design these polls frame the issue in the wrong terms.

    What if, as Marx, Veblen and Fromm postulated, man is a making animal, homo habilis? What if a person's self worth is tied to his/her creating something of worth? What if most of us have not just an urge or desire to be makers but a fundamental need to be productive? To be effective? What if being competent gives us a sense of mastery over our own destiny that roots us, alleviates anxiety and establishes a sense of self-worth and identity? What if low-level service jobs don't provide the same existential sense of mastery?

    Veblen pointed out that jobs in which people make stuff automatically makes them "objectivists"; they develop a consciousness that is "out of themselves", attuned to the Laws of Nature because they must deal with the world as it is. People who don't make stuff can believe in a magical world of make believe because there is no feedback from their work that points up their shortcomings and so compels them to address the inadequacies of their world view. Their outlook becomes untethered from this world.

    So, making things gives us inherent satisfaction because of pride in what we have accomplished and because it demonstrates to ourselves that we are effective. All human beings need to feel effective i.e. that there is a predictable relationship between their input and the resulting output. This is key to our sanity.

    Maybe Trump voters feel (correctly) that the position to which they are relegated by their Globalist Masters renders them powerless servants and they sense their own vulnerability because their jobs provide them with no sense of self mastery or pride in being part of a grander worthy project. It is hard to even imagine that persons engaged in America's Space Shuttle project weren't ennobled by their sense of pride in contributing to such an adventure and technical cultural achievement.

    This explains why makers e.g. house framers et al, who do have jobs that provide the type of satisfaction listed above, are concerned about the future and instinctively--even if they can't articulate why--vote for the guy who at least seems to be aware of the problem.

    Replies: @Romanian, @TomSchmidt

    You, Sir, are a poet.

    Off-topic:

    Amren has an article on Sam Francis’ magnum opus appearing in print, “Leviathan and its enemies”

    http://www.amren.com/features/2016/08/sam-francis-on-the-roots-of-liberal-hegemony/

    No kindle version wth

    I have read quite a bit of his work, especially explaining James Burnham’s thought. He was a very good writer. I recommend this very good primer, it’s just 50 pages long but will have you ruminating for weeks http://www.mmisi.org/pr/12_01/francis.pdf

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Romanian

    Thanks for the links. I read them both. Very thought provoking. I must digest a while.

    Cheers.

    Replies: @Romanian

  175. @Kylie
    @International Jew

    "As for me, I’ve seen people stunned when they learn about my politics (and not even the whole iceberg!), after they’ve had a chance to get to know me and like me."

    I allow only a handful of people to know my political views. People don't even ask what those views might be. I pass as a liberal among liberals. I'm height/weight proportionate, well-informed and have typically SWPL interests.

    This is how I know just how shallow, ignorant, and hateful the mindset of liberals really is--because they speak freely and openly in front of me.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Romanian

    It’s weird for me to read these tales from the land of the brave and the free, because I have no issues talking about my politics with friends, family or at work. Still, we are one of those countries that bans certain symbols, personality worship (not Ceausescu, but the fascist pantheon), and Holocaust denial, so there’s no fully free speech. Of course, the moral standard around here, in the upper middle class, is to adopt a very SWPL\liberal worldview. They’re subsequently shocked that the smartest person they know is a Natzee. I even know a guy who’s a tatted up, mohawked anarcho-capitalist bartending after journalism school with egalitarian sensibilities and he told me to lay off Stormfront during a very impassioned boardgame night argument. The thing is that social classes around here are a lot more compressed, so your friends are more diverse, mine especially for being a very upwardly mobile small-towner. The engineers and the blue collars get me instinctively, even when they lack the means to verbalize or rationalize their preferences. The apolitical white collars are queasy about what’s happening, but stick to the liberal script until they’re triggered. The women are at the extremes, either Mutti Merkel or full Marion Le Pen. It’s the rich, the very political, the hipsters, the longhairs and the Romania-as-a-Western-country aspirationalists that are into the whole colonialism, oppression, racism thing. But even they are innately redpilled by the Gypsies, they just lack the proper context to understand the West’s problems.

  176. @Kylie
    @Old fogey

    "I also know for a fact that no one in my mother’s side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American."

    Same here, only my mother's side of the family came from the outskirts of Vienna. My grandmother had only received a sixth grade education in the old country but once here, she learned to speak, read and write English. She had pierced ears but when my mother asked to have her ears pierced back in the 1930's, my grandmother told her no, because "American girls don't do that". That was the standard.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    Yes, indeed! Exactly the same story in my own family. My mother onlyy had her ears pierced when she was in her 70s, when it became impossible to buy good earrings that were not designed for non-pierced ears. Before that she would do anything so as not to look as if she “just came off the boat.” I have no desire whatsoever to pierce my ears and happily wear lovely vintage clips and screw-backs from eBay.

    Perhaps one characteristic mainly found among Trump supporters is that they are descendants of people who resolutely did not want to return to “the old country,” while my Guatemalan neighbor always talks about making enough money in the U.S. so that he can live high on the hog back home.

    • Agree: Kylie
  177. @Old fogey
    All of this searching for reasons that people are supporting Trump by looking solely at economic data miss the really big picture. The Trump supporters I know back him because he seems genuinely interested in Americans and the best for the U.S.A.

    Here in New York just a few evenings ago a neighbor from Guatemala joined us for a few glasses of wine and bourbon. He's a nice guy who had come to the U.S. illegally in the 1980s but now is a gainfully employed citizen. He began spouting off about "his people" and the fact that the "Spanish" voters would overwhelmingly vote against Trump and ensure that he could not win in the national election. I don't usually think about my own heritage, but I can't help but recall that my father's family history starts with an immigrant arriving in NYC from Prussia around 1830 and we have documents showing that a family member fought at Gettysburg as part of a NY regiment. I also know for a fact that no one in my mother's side of the family ever returned to Prague even for a visit once they had reached these shores from Bohemia about a hundred years ago. It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Kylie, @Brutusale

    My grandfather escaped his fate in the old country when he was 12. He got educated, found employment, bought property, married a wife of different European descent, raised 8 children and enjoyed his 92 years with feelings of accomplishment and contentment.

    By the time I came along he spoke unaccented English; I never heard the mother tongue spoken in his house. Whenever anyone started up about “well, back in the old country”, he would give them a look that could etch titanium and ask why they were here if things were so good there.

    His smartassed, callow grandson asked him once, while helping him in his enormous garden, why he worked so hard on his flowers and vegetables when he ran away from a life of farm drudgery? “Here I want to!” he said, much more gently than I deserved.

    As American a sentiment as you’ll hear.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Brutusale

    Your grandfather expressed a common sentiment among immigrants, particularly among northern Europeans. The first generation didn't have to consider feelings or focus groups to know that integrating with their new adopted country would require acceptance of the language and ways of locals. The second generation got tossed into the deep end of the pool and that made them learn how to be citizens and how to think more for themselves.

    , @Old fogey
    @Brutusale

    Your grandfather must have been a wonderful man. I envy you. Few of us had living grandparents when we were growing up back in the 1940s. I was lucky in that my mother had two aunts that I visited at the time. Nowadays people take having grandparents around for granted, forgetting what an actual blessing it is to have large number of wiser heads still with us.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  178. @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill

    Name calling is not an argument.

    Replies: @Bill

    Grass is green.

  179. @dr kill
    @Alden

    It's the money. Smart white guys are following the money, and the Proggs have destroyed medicine as a lucrative career. Enjoy your Nigerian MD at the local MedRx, y'all.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Nah, the 5% at the top will have the “gold-plated” health plans with the white/Asian MDs. Everyone else will have plans sending them to Clinics-R-Us to consult with Dr. Robot. Skip the Nigerian, proceed directly to the machine.

  180. @European in America
    @dsgntd_plyr

    Yup, same here. In downtown Chicago, which is Democrazi central, all year I haven't seen a single "I'm with her" sticker or anything of the sort. Lots of anti-Trump hysteria, but very little enthusiasm for HRC. On the other hand, one guy in my building does have a Trump bumper sticker on his car (brave soul).

    Replies: @Brutusale

    In my deep-blue MA town: a few Hillary bumper stickers, (Dems are the party of Fags & Hags and we have plenty of both), no Hillary signs, a few Trump bumper stickers, one Trump sign and three MAGA hats, one on a young black guy! I had to ask him if it was ironic, and he said no, he loved Trump.

  181. @Bert
    @Romanian

    What the hell is a "representative for independent voters"? I've never heard that term before.

    Replies: @Romanian

    Somebody should correct me if I am wrong, but you can’t have every parliamentarian take the stage to give his two cents. So one guy represents one party, another guy another party and so on, in order to deliver general positions.

  182. @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilkey

    On the car radio I often listen to oldies from the 1950s - mid-10960s. It's striking how many of those songs were about being in love and wanting to get married. Has there been a rock song about wanting to get married in the last 30 years? (I'm not talking about country music.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Wilkey

    Train’s “Marry Me” is pretty dang good. Not sure how high it rose on the charts (do they still have charts?)

  183. @Forbes
    @Old fogey


    It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.
     
    As a long-time New Yorker, but non-native to the metropolitan area, I've been fascinated by the near obsession of people here with one another's heritage. When queried with the typical "What are you," I answer "an American." A puzzled look is the usual reaction.

    There are many (too many IMO) that take pride in native and ethnic origin over pride in being an American. There's nothing wrong with honoring one's familial heritage--of course I'm old enough to remember a time before Hyphenated-Americans. In my book, you're either an American or you're not.

    Replies: @Anon, @S. Anonyia, @TomSchmidt

    Hate to say it but that’s not just a New York thing, and you must be from 1840 or earlier if you remember a time when there were no hyphenated Americans. Maybe before that – Andrew Jackson boasted about his Irish heritage, after all.

    Even down South, rednecks whose families have been here since the 1700s brag about their ancestry, whether it’s “Irish”, “Cherokee”, or French/German/Scottish/whatever. They are all probably mostly of English descent but they latch on to whatever line is most unusual in their family tree.

    One set of my grandparents (dead now, born in early 1920s) each talked about their heritage a lot. If you asked them “what are you?” they would give you their predominant ancestry first. It didn’t mean they weren’t patriotic. When they went abroad they would definitely say they were American. Their families had been here since the 1860s/70s.

    I suspect many whites latch onto their ancestry because it’s a defense mechanism. They have to sit through their history classes where half the curriculum is devoted to the cruelty of slavery and the evils of the white man. People are going talk about whatever they can to have some pride, it’s only human.

    Change the history curriculum, and you can solve this hyphenated American problem.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @S. Anonyia

    I don't disagree with you. The school curriculum has turned teaching history into a form of cultural anthropology--all about racism, colonialism, imperialism. Whites are bad, bad, bad, the 'other' is celebrated. But it really is, as they call it: social studies, not history. The unknowing ignorance of US history by HS grads and college students has been well-documented.

    I grew up with a lot of first and second generation Irish, Italians, and Jews--many of them the first generation to go to college--when college meant something, not a 4 or 5 or 6 year hiatus from the real world of work and life. Of course, fitting-in (a form of assimilation) with your fellow students was the zeitgeist--not being a freak show, as it appears today.

    And my comment was also in contrast to my experience living in Denver in the '80s, as when someone asked where you were from--they meant "What state?"

  184. @GOUSAAMER114
    @Portlander

    Exactly right. I live in a super zip neighborhood. It's pretty much all white. But we're surrounded by the third world. Like Trump, my interests are not high-brow. I am very just American. I like Subway and McDonalds. I have kids so I now kind of have to go to the mall and zoo. I can't take the diversity. I just want my country back. I hate the unpleasant conversation when ordering my food with the 40 year old Spanish speaker who always gets it wrong. I hate that the movie theater looks like its third world. I hate walking into Subway and only half of the people speak English. I hate that the local public school - where no one would ever send their kids - educates Mexico's lower class. This doesn't even touch on Islam. There should be NO Islam in the US.

    I'm not that old, but I remember when we had a country. I identify with my fellow Americans who just want to live in neighborhoods with fellow Americans. I can afford to isolate, but it is still incredibly unpleasant.

    I have been a Trumper before Trump. I loved Jeff Sessions and even Stephen Miller two years ago. I will be devastated if Trump doesn't win. It will tell me that America is over.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kylie, @TomSchmidt

    Subway and McDonalds are part of the corporatist elite America. Better you should go to a locally owned restaurant where profits aren’t maximized by buying the cheapest ingredients, paying the workers little money, and encouraging the creation of regulations that suppress small businesses. And most of the profits are moved to those at the top of the pyramid. McDonald’s CEO Easterbrook brought home a little under $8million last year; you can be sure neither the workers nor the shareholders did as well.

    Basically, McDonalds America leads inexorably to the country we live in, where economics trumps all. Secede from it. It might cost you a buck more for your sandwich, though.

  185. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @epebble

    I know many Trump supporters and am one myself. We are cautious expressing our opinions and do not use bumper stickers , post signs, or get into political conversations with strangers. We all personally know persons whose property has been vandalized because of open support or who have been confronted in exceptionally, even frighteningly, hostile ways because they've expressed support for Trump. We've read news stories -- suppressed by the MSM of course -- about individuals who've been assaulted, attacked with deadly weapons, even shot, because they openly supported Trump. We are providing cash and volunteer work to his campaign and we are looking forward to voting for him this fall but we've learned to practice caution.

    Clinton supporters like Soros and his brown shirt thugs have corrupted the political process in ways I've never seen in my long lifetime. They are aided and abetted by the MSM. I suspect that even anti-Trump voters and many pro-Clinton voters are appalled at the corruption that Clinton and her supporters have introduced into this campaign. Once these persons have had it ground into their faces that a massive conspiracy was all that allowed Clinton to beat Sanders in the Democrat Party primary, it's hard for them to avoid further revelations about Clinton;s and the Democrat Party's corruption. As a result many have muted their support for this vile sack of corruption and incompetence.

    I suspect that these two observations gfo a long way towards explaining the muted support you are observing.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @dr kill, @epebble, @stillCARealist, @Difference maker

    I wonder if the disruption at the Chicago rally in March shouldn’t have been met with more force both during and afterward

    Though no doubt the media waiting to shout nazi from the rooftops

  186. From polls, it is clear that Trump’s supporters tend to be blue-collar men with lower levels of education. WaPo

    Trump carried Sarasota, Florida in the primary where I live and we don’t have any of these! Seriously,
    Trump campaigned and won overwhelmingly among Republicans, not Yellow Dog Democrats, so this statement makes little sense.

  187. @Rose Madder
    What is often assumed is that there is still a meritocracy particularly for the well educated. I can assure you that young white men can graduate from a good college with a competitive STEM degree such as software engineering and fail to receive a single job offer while his Chinese/Indian/Black peers are scoped up. (Competitive refers to 15/300 grads).

    My management experience was constant pressure to avoid hiring white men. If one was hired despite the pressure not to it could be career limiting for any involved in he hiring decision.

    There are 100s of thousands of STEM grads world wide. Now that talent is global as many engineers as needed can be imported.

    It is interesting that done are figuring thus out finally. Many boomer parents in my experience do not have a clue what their white offspring are up against.

    Technocratic class being imported for the top and grunt labour for the bottom jobs. Literally a squeezing out of the base Amercan population. Recent graduates do however receive interest from other countries who are not trying to diversify leading to an exodus of talent.

    Replies: @Anon

    “Many boomer parents in my experience do not have a clue what their white offspring are up against.”

    Most people have no idea. Boomers, Gen X, Millenials. They’re all boiling frogs.

  188. @jill
    @AndyBoy

    As Obama’s Manufacturing Czar, Ron Bloom said:

    “Generally speaking, we get the joke. We know that the free market is nonsense. We know that the whole point is to game the system, to beat the market, or at least find someone who will pay you a lot of money ‘cause they’re convinced that there is a free lunch. We know this is largely about power, that it’s an adults-only no-limit game. We kind of agree with Mao that political power comes largely from the barrel of a gun. And we get it, that if you want a friend, you should get a dog.”- Ron Bloom, Keynote address at the 6th Annual Distressed Investing Forum, Union League Club, New York, February 27-28, 2008.


    or from this supposed kindly old man:

    "You want everybody educated to their potential. You want people to reach their potential. That still won't work for some people in a highly developed market system. I mean if this were a sports-based system, you could give me a PhD in football, and I could practice eight hours a day, and I might be able to carry the water from, not onto the field, but from the locker room to the bench. There's just some people don't fit well into a highly skilled market-based economy.
    They're perfectly decent citizens. We'll send them off to Afghanistan, but they are not going to command a big price.”

    Warren Buffet September 8, 2015

    or from Charlie Munger, Buffet's side kick, right after the bank bailout:

    “You should thank God” for bank bailouts. Now, if you talk about bailouts for everybody else, there comes a place where if you just start bailing out all the individuals instead of telling them to adapt, the culture dies."
    “At a certain place you’ve got to say to the people, ‘Suck it in and cope, buddy. Suck it in and cope.’”

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Thanks for the great quotes. Munger generally is harsh towards the stock option scamming crew that wrecks our companies, so we can forgive him being heartless to those on the bottom. Buffett, by contrast, has become a crony capitalist, especially after 2008.

  189. @Brutusale
    @Old fogey

    My grandfather escaped his fate in the old country when he was 12. He got educated, found employment, bought property, married a wife of different European descent, raised 8 children and enjoyed his 92 years with feelings of accomplishment and contentment.

    By the time I came along he spoke unaccented English; I never heard the mother tongue spoken in his house. Whenever anyone started up about "well, back in the old country", he would give them a look that could etch titanium and ask why they were here if things were so good there.

    His smartassed, callow grandson asked him once, while helping him in his enormous garden, why he worked so hard on his flowers and vegetables when he ran away from a life of farm drudgery? "Here I want to!" he said, much more gently than I deserved.

    As American a sentiment as you'll hear.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Old fogey

    Your grandfather expressed a common sentiment among immigrants, particularly among northern Europeans. The first generation didn’t have to consider feelings or focus groups to know that integrating with their new adopted country would require acceptance of the language and ways of locals. The second generation got tossed into the deep end of the pool and that made them learn how to be citizens and how to think more for themselves.

  190. @Anonymous
    "Why does Trump’s message resonate the most in these low-mobility areas? The data do not provide a clear answer."

    If you ask the wrong question then you won't get the right answer.

    Maybe the economic indicators used by the people who design these polls frame the issue in the wrong terms.

    What if, as Marx, Veblen and Fromm postulated, man is a making animal, homo habilis? What if a person's self worth is tied to his/her creating something of worth? What if most of us have not just an urge or desire to be makers but a fundamental need to be productive? To be effective? What if being competent gives us a sense of mastery over our own destiny that roots us, alleviates anxiety and establishes a sense of self-worth and identity? What if low-level service jobs don't provide the same existential sense of mastery?

    Veblen pointed out that jobs in which people make stuff automatically makes them "objectivists"; they develop a consciousness that is "out of themselves", attuned to the Laws of Nature because they must deal with the world as it is. People who don't make stuff can believe in a magical world of make believe because there is no feedback from their work that points up their shortcomings and so compels them to address the inadequacies of their world view. Their outlook becomes untethered from this world.

    So, making things gives us inherent satisfaction because of pride in what we have accomplished and because it demonstrates to ourselves that we are effective. All human beings need to feel effective i.e. that there is a predictable relationship between their input and the resulting output. This is key to our sanity.

    Maybe Trump voters feel (correctly) that the position to which they are relegated by their Globalist Masters renders them powerless servants and they sense their own vulnerability because their jobs provide them with no sense of self mastery or pride in being part of a grander worthy project. It is hard to even imagine that persons engaged in America's Space Shuttle project weren't ennobled by their sense of pride in contributing to such an adventure and technical cultural achievement.

    This explains why makers e.g. house framers et al, who do have jobs that provide the type of satisfaction listed above, are concerned about the future and instinctively--even if they can't articulate why--vote for the guy who at least seems to be aware of the problem.

    Replies: @Romanian, @TomSchmidt

    I assume you have read the book Shop Class as Soul Craft, written by a Chicago PhD who worked at a think tank, but quit because he found more intellectual challenge and genuine thinking amongst the guild of motorcycle mechanics? If not, read it: it backs your themes here wonderfully.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @TomSchmidt

    Crawford's second book, "The World Beyond Your Head" is very good too.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @Anonymous
    @TomSchmidt

    I've read it. A fine book. His father was a theoretical Physicist. I recall one section in particular in which his father remarked to him words to the effect that "if one had a piece of frictionless rope, then, pulling on one end only, they could untie such and such a knot".

    And the mechanic son's mind was brought up with a jolt. Right there was the difference between the two worlds. Everyone who has struggled with knots that have been tightened by having been used to tow a car or anchor a boat knows that untying it is right up there with the most cussedly difficult thing a person can do and takes persuasion with a marlinspike, awl, screwdriver, what have you and probably entails stabbing themselves, breaking a fingernail and a few judicious epithets to lubricate one's relation with whatever Deity they hold dear. The "frictionless rope" theorist is simply out of touch with the stubborn nature of the world of things he lives in--a world that only enlightened muscle power can change and influence.

    I agree with Eamonn Fingleton and Ian Fletcher. We need hard industries not only because they form the backbone of any first world society, but for their beneficial effect on the psyche of their workers. A people doing work that requires smarts become smarter.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  191. @Forbes
    @Old fogey


    It was inconceivable for anyone in my family to consider himself anything but an American.
     
    As a long-time New Yorker, but non-native to the metropolitan area, I've been fascinated by the near obsession of people here with one another's heritage. When queried with the typical "What are you," I answer "an American." A puzzled look is the usual reaction.

    There are many (too many IMO) that take pride in native and ethnic origin over pride in being an American. There's nothing wrong with honoring one's familial heritage--of course I'm old enough to remember a time before Hyphenated-Americans. In my book, you're either an American or you're not.

    Replies: @Anon, @S. Anonyia, @TomSchmidt

    In my book, you’re either an American or you’re not.

    Funny. When I go overseas now, I don’t identify as an “American,” but as a New Yorker. I think that feeds into the dynamic you encounter in the City. I think foreigners cannot generally become
    Americans in first generation, but they can be New Yorkers. Firmly rooted in a neighborhood that is mono-ethnic (and this continues today, but not with any European ethnicities except Russians in South Brooklyn and Irish in the Bronx), they meet on the neutral ground of Manhattan. To not have a tribe that will protect you makes you a mark for the grifters that this place engenders.

    • Agree: Forbes
  192. @ben tillman
    @Morton Knox


    Thanks for posting Benny Hill. He always cheers me up. Used to watch it almost every night when I was 9 years old in 1979 with my old man on the local VH[F] channel in Philadelphia.
     
    17, 29, or 48? Don't ever remember seeing that when I visited my grandparents, though my uncle mentioned that he was a fan.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Morton Knox

    I think it was channel 29…in 1979 it was on at 7:00 every night, but too many women complained that the show was not appropriate for young boys and they moved it to 11:3o PM in 1980.

  193. @Brutusale
    @Old fogey

    My grandfather escaped his fate in the old country when he was 12. He got educated, found employment, bought property, married a wife of different European descent, raised 8 children and enjoyed his 92 years with feelings of accomplishment and contentment.

    By the time I came along he spoke unaccented English; I never heard the mother tongue spoken in his house. Whenever anyone started up about "well, back in the old country", he would give them a look that could etch titanium and ask why they were here if things were so good there.

    His smartassed, callow grandson asked him once, while helping him in his enormous garden, why he worked so hard on his flowers and vegetables when he ran away from a life of farm drudgery? "Here I want to!" he said, much more gently than I deserved.

    As American a sentiment as you'll hear.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Old fogey

    Your grandfather must have been a wonderful man. I envy you. Few of us had living grandparents when we were growing up back in the 1940s. I was lucky in that my mother had two aunts that I visited at the time. Nowadays people take having grandparents around for granted, forgetting what an actual blessing it is to have large number of wiser heads still with us.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Old fogey

    I will always remember him sitting under a tree in his back yard (he had 10 acres right on Buzzards Bay), a glass of Narragansett lager in one hand and a cigar in the other, dog by his side and the Red Sox on the radio, surrounded by his children and grandchildren. My mom, his oldest child, told me that he once told her that he could never have dreamed of that kind of life when he was a child.

    He earned it, but he never forgot who gave him the chance.

  194. Whatever it is, competition from migrant labor or the decline of factory work appear to be inadequate explanations.

    The media notion that a shrinking industrial base is only a problem for “white men,” was always patently false and is an example of either deliberate deception or (to be more charitable), incompetence.

    Here’s a 2011 picture from a GM engine plant in Ohio:

    http://www.inautonews.com/gms-dmax-engine-plant-announces-layoffs

    And here’s a picture of the highly diverse (yet somehow still “redundant”) workforce, earlier this year at Carrier in Indiana:

    Repeat something enough times and a lot of people will assume it to be true. Who said that? Was it Trump? Or was it actually his supposed doppelgänger? –you know the one with the funny mustache who’s been dead for 70-plus years? It doesn’t matter because the marketing execs, speech writers, and J-school graduates all know that it gets results…

  195. @The Alarmist
    A few years back the cleaning staff at a high end hotel in Texas morphed from mostly black Americans to mostly non-english speaking Latinos, and I recall thinking, what does something like this mean for the local community. While it is simple correlation and not necessarily causation, I can only note that my local colleagues have all retreated to gated communities or moved even farther out.

    If I vote for Trump, it is because he gets what unrestrained immigration to enrich the criminal elite represented by the likes of Hillary and the cucks does to the larger fabric of our society. The Dems tell us the diversity makes the tapestry more beautiful, and the cucks tell us we need the labor to boost our labor pool. Either way, they've decided to unravel the tapestry we already have and replace it with one more pleasing to them for whatever reasons.

    Replies: @Forbes

    the cucks tell us we need the labor to boost our labor pool.

    This assertion is so repeatedly offered it’s become embedded as an economic fact. And in Germany and Europe, too. It should be treated as the nonsense on stilts that it is.

    The employment to population ratio is ~49%. An advanced economy needs more capital investment–not more labor input–for living standards to continue to rise. More low wage, unskilled labor works against this prospect. Unskilled workers are priced out of the labor force with higher minimum wages, and automation will squeeze what remains.

    It’s as if out elites harken back to the gilded age (or the Depression) when household staffs predominated among the well-to-do.

    Instead, corporations load up on debt to pay dividends and buy-in stock to keep their nose-bleed stock price levitated.

  196. @Anon
    @Forbes

    I grew up in Western New York (the eastern Midwest) as an American descended from immigrants who came here long ago. When I wine to college with mostly Downstaters, I suddenly had to embrace my long forgotten "Irish" heritage although I'm not even 50% Irish. It's an east coast thing.

    Further, after college, I got into an argument with an Armenian woman I worked with because she refused to accept my answer to her question, "what are you?". I simply said, "American".

    Replies: @Forbes

    Central NY, here–and you’ll know where I mean.

  197. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_Ayyadurai

    Wow, there is a lot of really bad self-serving history out there. And too many BS con-artists, maybe from places that have a higher cultural norm involving that sort of self-promotion, with the expectation that the illiterates will never catch up. From the link:

    “…As a high school student in 1979, he developed an electronic version of an interoffice mail system, which he called “EMAIL” and copyrighted in 1982. That name’s resemblance to the generic term “email” and the claims he later made for the program have led to controversy over Ayyadurai’s place in the history of computer technology. Mass media interest in his work has been followed by public retractions or removals of claims that he invented email by organizations such as The Washington Post and The Huffington Post, as well as the Smithsonian Institution.”

    I developed a campus wide email system in the mid 1970s that was used for a while. There was nothing new about email, it was old at the time. Continuing from the above link:

    “…it contained no features that were not present on previous electronic mail systems and had no obvious influence on later systems. “The most striking thing about Ayyadurai’s claim to have invented electronic mail is how late it comes. Somehow it took him thirty years to alert the world to [his] greatest achievement.”…”

    …by 1980, “electronic mail had been in use at MIT for 15 years, Xerox had built a modern, mouse-driven graphical email system for office communication, Compuserve was selling email access to the public, and email had for many years been the most popular application on what was soon to become the Internet…

    …MIT disassociated itself from Ayyadurai’s EMAIL Lab and funding was dropped. MIT also revoked Ayyadurai’s contract to lecture at the bioengineering department…”

    Email was one of the two “killer apps” of the Arpanet (the other was file transfer), but almost all old mainframes had some sort of mail program that allowed the mainframes users (of which there might have been dozens to hundreds online at one time) to communicate with each other.

    Because of the overlap in teletype messaging systems (1920s and 1930s) and interactive computers, it is probably very hard to say when “the invention” of email occurred. IBM marketing is probably being optimistic here about being “first”, some weasel words (“transform”, “interoffice”) qualify this first, but might not stand out:

    “…The first computer-based system to transform the flow of interoffice data was the IBM ® Internal Tele-Processing System, installed at the company in 1963 and built with the new IBM 7740 as its hub. The system used leased, dedicated communications lines—including transoceanic cables—to carry business data and administrative messages to and from offices scattered around the world. With real-time responsiveness, the system enabled its central computer at IBM corporate headquarters to process data as it was received and to respond instantaneously to inquiries from distant points on its network.”

    In terms of early mainframes widely used that supported email (probably preceded by early military-type systems), an early one would have been DTSS, the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System, that ran on GE hardware:

    “Its implementation began in 1963, by a student team…

    …On May 1, 1964, at 4:00 a.m., the system began operations. It remained in operation until the end of 1999. DTSS was originally implemented to run on a GE-200 series computer…

    …The 635 version provided interactive time-sharing to up to nearly 300 simultaneous users…”

    About DTSS at the original site (note DTSS software was written by its users; much software at this time was what we would now call open source, because software was not sold separately):

    “…By the 1967–68 school year, DTSS had a library of about 500 programs… In addition to 2,600 Dartmouth users, 5,550 people at ten universities and 23 high schools accessed DTSS. By the early 1970s the campus had more than 150 terminals in 25 buildings. … The system allowed email-type messages to be passed between users and real-time chat via a precursor to the Unix talk program.”

  198. @Maj. Kong
    @Das

    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a "conservative Republican" is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.

    While the Republican establishment is certainly no paragon of virtue, I do consider the Republican voter base to be far more favorable. Many upper income voters are liberal as a way to virtue signal themselves as better than those eeevil conservatives. I have little respect for the Long Island liberal that wants tight zoning regulations locally, but mass immigration to prove that they aren't racist. The same goes for those living with wealthy neighbors and well-funded police denigrating the common rural gun owner.

    And at least we can say that Jeb Bush maintained Florida as a state with no income tax. There is no reason we 'need' an over-compensated unionized public sector, or an education system entitled to our largesse. No state in the country needs to be high tax like California, but the Democratic Party's electoral fortunes and the very existence of the left depend on it.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a “conservative Republican” is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.

    I disagree. Obviously, things like Social Security should not be administered by a central government, but at this point Social Security and Medicare are racial issues, and nothing else. They’re a way to channel White taxes back to White people. Attacks on Social Security and Medicare are attacks on Whites.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @ben tillman

    They're a way to channel taxes to older white people, who have been on the receiving end of a non-stop gravy train. The fact is that the wealth transfer to older whites has made it much harder for younger whites to have children and has caused the demographic catastrophe you note in the comment, where the majority of payers soon will be minority, while the birth demographics of 65 years ago receives the benefits.

    The generation born between 1926 and 1943 will pay no net taxes to the Federal Government. That they are white means less than that their desire to pour assets into the old helped prevent the next generation of middle-class whites.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  199. @Grandpa Jack
    "From polls, it is clear that Trump’s supporters tend to be blue-collar men with lower levels of education. "

    I love how liberal elites and media will say or do anything regardless of how contradictory it is to what they pretend to be about, if it advances their current goal. And how their supporters fail to notice it and/or forget about it 5 minutes later.

    Over and over, the liberal media claim the upper moral hand by claiming their side are the champions of the poor and working class, the downtrodden, yet they have cheerfully categorized over and over Trump supporters as blue collar idiots when it suits their whim of attacking Trump and trying to give a bad name to anyone who supports him, regardless of whether its also a direct attack on blue collar, low-education workers.

    Not to mention the fact that he's probably got as much support among white collar middle class America, so its a lie to begin with, but obviously, it shows they believe that blue collar workers are a dim group who should feel ashamed of poverty and low education, or they wouldn't use it as an insult. And don't mind using it as an insult when it suits their whims.

    There should be a website/blog simply listing liberal hypocrisies. The writer would have no shortage of new columns.

    Replies: @Forbes

    In the Democrats’ world of “the ends justify the means,” hypocrisy and double-standards aren’t bugs–they’re features. Their every impulse is emotional frisson–your rejection demonstrates you’re uncaring. They’re the big picture people, while you’re caught up in details that are debatable. They just ‘know’ things that are beyond your comprehension. Just ask ’em, they’ll tell you.

  200. @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    .....

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater."

    I read stuff like this and want to cry. This is wildly implausible plus betrays an enormous historical ignorance of our Civil War (or a refusal to contemplate it, one or the other).

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let's do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let's just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Henry Bowman, @MarkinLA

    elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    No, we need people like Trump as they are outsiders..

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    @Henry Bowman

    "No, we need people like Trump as they are outsiders.."

    Ted Kaczynski is an outsider too but it doesn't help us. Ultimately we need at least some measure of competence, credibility and good intention or the whole thing doesn't work.

  201. @S. Anonyia
    @Forbes

    Hate to say it but that's not just a New York thing, and you must be from 1840 or earlier if you remember a time when there were no hyphenated Americans. Maybe before that - Andrew Jackson boasted about his Irish heritage, after all.

    Even down South, rednecks whose families have been here since the 1700s brag about their ancestry, whether it's "Irish", "Cherokee", or French/German/Scottish/whatever. They are all probably mostly of English descent but they latch on to whatever line is most unusual in their family tree.

    One set of my grandparents (dead now, born in early 1920s) each talked about their heritage a lot. If you asked them "what are you?" they would give you their predominant ancestry first. It didn't mean they weren't patriotic. When they went abroad they would definitely say they were American. Their families had been here since the 1860s/70s.

    I suspect many whites latch onto their ancestry because it's a defense mechanism. They have to sit through their history classes where half the curriculum is devoted to the cruelty of slavery and the evils of the white man. People are going talk about whatever they can to have some pride, it's only human.

    Change the history curriculum, and you can solve this hyphenated American problem.

    Replies: @Forbes

    I don’t disagree with you. The school curriculum has turned teaching history into a form of cultural anthropology–all about racism, colonialism, imperialism. Whites are bad, bad, bad, the ‘other’ is celebrated. But it really is, as they call it: social studies, not history. The unknowing ignorance of US history by HS grads and college students has been well-documented.

    I grew up with a lot of first and second generation Irish, Italians, and Jews–many of them the first generation to go to college–when college meant something, not a 4 or 5 or 6 year hiatus from the real world of work and life. Of course, fitting-in (a form of assimilation) with your fellow students was the zeitgeist–not being a freak show, as it appears today.

    And my comment was also in contrast to my experience living in Denver in the ’80s, as when someone asked where you were from–they meant “What state?”

  202. @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    I assume you have read the book Shop Class as Soul Craft, written by a Chicago PhD who worked at a think tank, but quit because he found more intellectual challenge and genuine thinking amongst the guild of motorcycle mechanics? If not, read it: it backs your themes here wonderfully.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Anonymous

    Crawford’s second book, “The World Beyond Your Head” is very good too.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Forbes

    I shall have to read it. Time to check if there is an audiobook for my auto commute, displacing my formerly placid train commute.

  203. @Romanian
    @Anonymous

    You, Sir, are a poet.

    Off-topic:

    Amren has an article on Sam Francis' magnum opus appearing in print, "Leviathan and its enemies"

    http://www.amren.com/features/2016/08/sam-francis-on-the-roots-of-liberal-hegemony/

    No kindle version wth

    I have read quite a bit of his work, especially explaining James Burnham's thought. He was a very good writer. I recommend this very good primer, it's just 50 pages long but will have you ruminating for weeks http://www.mmisi.org/pr/12_01/francis.pdf

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thanks for the links. I read them both. Very thought provoking. I must digest a while.

    Cheers.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Anonymous

    Good for you, mate.

    Can you imagine what Marx or Lenin could have done with a blog? ;)

  204. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    I assume you have read the book Shop Class as Soul Craft, written by a Chicago PhD who worked at a think tank, but quit because he found more intellectual challenge and genuine thinking amongst the guild of motorcycle mechanics? If not, read it: it backs your themes here wonderfully.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Anonymous

    I’ve read it. A fine book. His father was a theoretical Physicist. I recall one section in particular in which his father remarked to him words to the effect that “if one had a piece of frictionless rope, then, pulling on one end only, they could untie such and such a knot”.

    And the mechanic son’s mind was brought up with a jolt. Right there was the difference between the two worlds. Everyone who has struggled with knots that have been tightened by having been used to tow a car or anchor a boat knows that untying it is right up there with the most cussedly difficult thing a person can do and takes persuasion with a marlinspike, awl, screwdriver, what have you and probably entails stabbing themselves, breaking a fingernail and a few judicious epithets to lubricate one’s relation with whatever Deity they hold dear. The “frictionless rope” theorist is simply out of touch with the stubborn nature of the world of things he lives in–a world that only enlightened muscle power can change and influence.

    I agree with Eamonn Fingleton and Ian Fletcher. We need hard industries not only because they form the backbone of any first world society, but for their beneficial effect on the psyche of their workers. A people doing work that requires smarts become smarter.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    I've spoken with Eamonn and have his book. He makes a great point about how much banking had advanced at the start of the 20th century in assisting commerce, and how little it has done since.

    you'd also like Jane Jacobs. If you've not read The Economy of Cities, and Cities and the Wealth of Nations, take a gander. Left-liberal though she is, she still knows that real industries and "Jacobs externalities" are the keys to economic growth and societal development.

  205. @Forbes
    @TomSchmidt

    Crawford's second book, "The World Beyond Your Head" is very good too.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    I shall have to read it. Time to check if there is an audiobook for my auto commute, displacing my formerly placid train commute.

  206. @Anonymous
    @TomSchmidt

    I've read it. A fine book. His father was a theoretical Physicist. I recall one section in particular in which his father remarked to him words to the effect that "if one had a piece of frictionless rope, then, pulling on one end only, they could untie such and such a knot".

    And the mechanic son's mind was brought up with a jolt. Right there was the difference between the two worlds. Everyone who has struggled with knots that have been tightened by having been used to tow a car or anchor a boat knows that untying it is right up there with the most cussedly difficult thing a person can do and takes persuasion with a marlinspike, awl, screwdriver, what have you and probably entails stabbing themselves, breaking a fingernail and a few judicious epithets to lubricate one's relation with whatever Deity they hold dear. The "frictionless rope" theorist is simply out of touch with the stubborn nature of the world of things he lives in--a world that only enlightened muscle power can change and influence.

    I agree with Eamonn Fingleton and Ian Fletcher. We need hard industries not only because they form the backbone of any first world society, but for their beneficial effect on the psyche of their workers. A people doing work that requires smarts become smarter.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    I’ve spoken with Eamonn and have his book. He makes a great point about how much banking had advanced at the start of the 20th century in assisting commerce, and how little it has done since.

    you’d also like Jane Jacobs. If you’ve not read The Economy of Cities, and Cities and the Wealth of Nations, take a gander. Left-liberal though she is, she still knows that real industries and “Jacobs externalities” are the keys to economic growth and societal development.

  207. @ben tillman
    @Maj. Kong


    Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Pay-go progams like it only work when the working population is exponentially growing.

    If a “conservative Republican” is griping about the loss of Social Security, its just one more example of the leftward drift that Western society has been headed in.
     
    I disagree. Obviously, things like Social Security should not be administered by a central government, but at this point Social Security and Medicare are racial issues, and nothing else. They're a way to channel White taxes back to White people. Attacks on Social Security and Medicare are attacks on Whites.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    They’re a way to channel taxes to older white people, who have been on the receiving end of a non-stop gravy train. The fact is that the wealth transfer to older whites has made it much harder for younger whites to have children and has caused the demographic catastrophe you note in the comment, where the majority of payers soon will be minority, while the birth demographics of 65 years ago receives the benefits.

    The generation born between 1926 and 1943 will pay no net taxes to the Federal Government. That they are white means less than that their desire to pour assets into the old helped prevent the next generation of middle-class whites.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @TomSchmidt


    They’re a way to channel taxes to older white people, who have been on the receiving end of a non-stop gravy train. The fact is that the wealth transfer to older whites has made it much harder for younger whites to have children and has caused the demographic catastrophe you note in the comment, where the majority of payers soon will be minority, while the birth demographics of 65 years ago receives the benefits.
     
    Of course, hoarding of resources by older Whites has hurt the younger generations, but this would be no long-term consequences if not for immigration. Immigration is the cause.
  208. The corollary are NAM’s who provide for themselves and their families yet support generous welfare programs for the unstable members of their community. Struggling people tend to be less engaged in politics regardless of race, so it’s reasonable to surmise much of pro-worker Trump sentiment is a form of noblesse oblige.

  209. @Anonymous
    @Romanian

    Thanks for the links. I read them both. Very thought provoking. I must digest a while.

    Cheers.

    Replies: @Romanian

    Good for you, mate.

    Can you imagine what Marx or Lenin could have done with a blog? 😉

  210. Trump Voters Tend to be Successful Individuals Concerned About Their Troubled Communities

    So what The Science is saying, is that supporting Trump is an Act Of Love.(TM)
    Nothing more, nothing less.
    Cool.

  211. @Henry Bowman
    @Boethiuss


    elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.
     
    No, we need people like Trump as they are outsiders..

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    “No, we need people like Trump as they are outsiders..”

    Ted Kaczynski is an outsider too but it doesn’t help us. Ultimately we need at least some measure of competence, credibility and good intention or the whole thing doesn’t work.

  212. @Old fogey
    @Brutusale

    Your grandfather must have been a wonderful man. I envy you. Few of us had living grandparents when we were growing up back in the 1940s. I was lucky in that my mother had two aunts that I visited at the time. Nowadays people take having grandparents around for granted, forgetting what an actual blessing it is to have large number of wiser heads still with us.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    I will always remember him sitting under a tree in his back yard (he had 10 acres right on Buzzards Bay), a glass of Narragansett lager in one hand and a cigar in the other, dog by his side and the Red Sox on the radio, surrounded by his children and grandchildren. My mom, his oldest child, told me that he once told her that he could never have dreamed of that kind of life when he was a child.

    He earned it, but he never forgot who gave him the chance.

  213. @Portlander
    @education realist

    Right, and just because they can afford to insulate, doesn't mean they appreciate having to insulate. Huge opportunity costs there. One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    Replies: @GOUSAAMER114, @MarkinLA

    One would think these economic pencil-necks would be able to figure that out.

    They are not as stupid as they seem. They know what all the reasons for Trump’s success are and if they got a 10 million dollar grant for it would give you a very comprehensive and largely correct list. However, they have to stick to the narrative that Trump supporters are somehow unhinged if they want to continue to get paid.

    There are reasons beyond simple economics that they won’t even bother to touch on.

  214. @Boethiuss
    @Anonymous

    "As someone commented elsewhere, a violent solution would not be possible without an outside source of arms. A resistance would need rocket propelled grenades, shoulder fired missiles and automatic rifles, along with tons of ammunition.

    .....

    Most (all) people who are intelligent enough to see and understand what is going on are too comfortable or wealthy to risk losing their good life by engaging in assassinations and such. What’s left is empty posturing e.g. New Black Panther types standing around voting booths with shotguns, the oddball white libertarian ostentatiously sporting a Makarov side arm in a shoulder holster or shirtless black yoof hurling chunks of asphalt at lines of police sporting the latest clear polycarbonate shield. Pure theater."

    I read stuff like this and want to cry. This is wildly implausible plus betrays an enormous historical ignorance of our Civil War (or a refusal to contemplate it, one or the other).

    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let's do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let's just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Henry Bowman, @MarkinLA

    instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker

    Yeah, why not “take it over” with Lindsey Graham and John McCain? I don’t see much difference between any of these 5.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    @MarkinLA

    "Yeah, why not “take it over” with Lindsey Graham and John McCain? I don’t see much difference between any of these 5."

    Well, when push comes to shove we don't have to worry about that. We can all make do with President Hillary, which at this point is overwhelmingly likely what we're going to get. Thanks for nothing.

  215. @TomSchmidt
    @ben tillman

    They're a way to channel taxes to older white people, who have been on the receiving end of a non-stop gravy train. The fact is that the wealth transfer to older whites has made it much harder for younger whites to have children and has caused the demographic catastrophe you note in the comment, where the majority of payers soon will be minority, while the birth demographics of 65 years ago receives the benefits.

    The generation born between 1926 and 1943 will pay no net taxes to the Federal Government. That they are white means less than that their desire to pour assets into the old helped prevent the next generation of middle-class whites.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    They’re a way to channel taxes to older white people, who have been on the receiving end of a non-stop gravy train. The fact is that the wealth transfer to older whites has made it much harder for younger whites to have children and has caused the demographic catastrophe you note in the comment, where the majority of payers soon will be minority, while the birth demographics of 65 years ago receives the benefits.

    Of course, hoarding of resources by older Whites has hurt the younger generations, but this would be no long-term consequences if not for immigration. Immigration is the cause.

  216. @MarkinLA
    @Boethiuss

    instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker

    Yeah, why not "take it over" with Lindsey Graham and John McCain? I don't see much difference between any of these 5.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    “Yeah, why not “take it over” with Lindsey Graham and John McCain? I don’t see much difference between any of these 5.”

    Well, when push comes to shove we don’t have to worry about that. We can all make do with President Hillary, which at this point is overwhelmingly likely what we’re going to get. Thanks for nothing.

  217. @Anonymous
    @Boethiuss


    Instead of stocking up on RPGs and helicopters, let’s do something easier, better, and more effective: instead of defeating the federal government and its associated powers as an enemy, let’s just take it over instead: elect Mike Pence, Ben Sasse, or Scott Walker instead of going on a suicide run with Donald Trump.
     
    Yeah, why can't average Americans be more acquiescent and accept our fate. Like the doddering old man who goes along with being relegated to some facility where he spends last days on earth being abused by African "caretakers". It's so much more dignified than the racist old coot who refuses to be assigned to such a fate.

    Under George W. Bush, Republicans had control of the White House, Congress, and the Supreme Court. What did the average American get in return? All we got is more of what Donald Trump says we need less of. And half of the country agrees with him.

    Replies: @Boethiuss

    “Yeah, why can’t average Americans be more acquiescent and accept our fate. Like the doddering old man who goes along with being relegated to some facility where he spends last days on earth being abused by African “caretakers”. It’s so much more dignified than the racist old coot who refuses to be assigned to such a fate. ”

    WTF? If you didn’t want that fate you shouldn’t have voted for Donald in a primary because most likely that’s what you’re getting.

    “Under George W. Bush, Republicans had control of the White House, Congress, and the Supreme Court. What did the average American get in return? All we got is more of what Donald Trump says we need less of. And half of the country agrees with him.”

    But how many of those are going to vote for him? Not enough, so what does it help?

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS