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Frum: How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns
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From The Atlantic:

How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns

The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.

After all, subscribers to The Atlantic must make up a huge fraction of America’s gun murderers.

By David Frum
SEPTEMBER 1, 2021

When the coronavirus pandemic struck last year, people throughout the developed world raced to buy toilet paper, bottled water, yeast for baking bread, and other basic necessities. Americans also stocked up on guns. They bought more than 23 million firearms in 2020, up 65 percent from 2019. First-time gun purchases were notably high. The surge has not abated in 2021. In January, Americans bought 4.3 million guns, a monthly record.

Last year was also a high-water mark for gun violence—more people were shot dead than at any time since the 1990s—though 2021 is shaping up to be even worse…

The shock and horror of mass shootings focus our attention. But most of the casualties are inflicted one by one by one. Americans use their guns to open fire on one another at backyard barbecues …

Frum likely got that from me but then changed it from “block party barbecues” to “backyard barbecues” to reassure Atlantic subscribers that the biggest danger of gun murders stems not from underclass blacks but from white suburban grillers, the kind who can’t get treated for their countless gunshot wounds because hospitals are jammed with their even more idiotic friends who have overdosed on ivermectin.

The legalistic approach to restricting gun ownership and reducing gun violence is failing. So is the assumption behind it. Drawing a bright line between the supposedly vast majority of “responsible,” “law abiding” gun owners and those shadowy others who cause all the trouble is a prudent approach for politicians, but it obscures the true nature of the problem. We need to stop deceiving ourselves about the importance of this distinction. …

They were not buying weapons for hunting. Only about 11.5 million Americans hunt in a given year, according to the latest Department of the Interior survey, fewer than the number who attend a professional ballet or modern-dance performance.

Nor were they buying weapons to play private militia. Fewer than 10 percent of Americans amass arsenals of five weapons or more. And for all the focus on assault rifles, they make up a small portion of the firearms in private hands: approximately 6 percent of all guns owned.

The weapon Americans most often buy is the modern semiautomatic handgun—affordable, light, and easy to use.

A certain number of David Frum articles are attempts to AtlanticWash my ideas, such as that the Biden Administration’s war on scary-looking long guns is irrelevant to the murder rate, because rural white people virtually never commit murder with their favorite types of guns. So he’s trying to focus attention on handguns without getting cancelled.

This is the weapon people stash in their nightstand and the glove compartment of their car. This is the weapon they tuck into their purse and shove into their waistband. Why? Two-thirds of American gun buyers explain that they bought their gun to protect themselves and their families.

And here is both the terrible tragedy of America’s gun habit and the best hope to end it. In virtually every way that can be measured, owning a firearm makes the owner, the owner’s family, and the people around them less safe. The hard-core gun owner will never accept this truth. But the 36 percent in the middle—they may be open to it, if they can be helped to perceive it.

… The weapons Americans buy to protect their loved ones are the weapons that end up being accidentally discharged into a loved one’s leg or chest or head. The weapons Americans buy to protect their young children are years later used for self-harm by their troubled teenagers. Or they are stolen from their car by criminals and used in robberies and murders. Or they are grabbed in rage and pointed at an ex-partner. …

Altogether, about 500 Americans a year die from unintended shootings. … Unintended shootings tend not to be lethal. They account for only about 1 percent of all U.S. gun deaths. But they account for more than one-third of American gun injuries—injuries that can leave people disabled or traumatized for life.

… America has a gun problem because so many Americans are deceived by so many illusions about what a gun will do for them, their family, their world. They imagine a gun as the guardian of their home and loved ones, rather than the standing invitation to harm, loss, and grief it so much more often proves to be.

America has a lot of guns and a lot of blacks and thus has a giant problem with blacks shooting each other. It’s doesn’t have all that big of a problem with whites shooting each other nor with blacks shooting whites.

One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

For example, even in the 1990s when South-Central Los Angeles was like Grand Theft Auto, Los Angeles’s white and Asian suburbs were pretty safe. Here’s somebody’s current list of the safest municipalities in California. The safest city in Los Angeles County is lovely Rancho Palos Verdes overlooking the Pacific. Rancho Palos Verdes is 22 miles from Compton. In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out.

Why not in SoCal? For one thing, racial profiling. For another, even Southern California’s exurbs are pretty densely populated, so there aren’t many rural cottages like in Clockwork Orange. Finally, Southern Californians are moderately heavily armed (as you might suspect from all the guns in Hollywood movies). Preying on outlying people is taking your life into your hands in Southern California.

It would be good to reverse the permissive trends in gun law. It would be good to ban the preferred weapons of mass shooters. It would be good to have a stronger system of background checks. It would be good to stop so many Americans from carrying guns in public.

The mass gun purchases of 2020 and 2021 have put even more millions of weapons into even more hands untrained to use and store those weapons responsibly.
But even if none of those things happens—and there is little sign of them happening anytime soon—progress can be made against gun violence, as progress was once made against other social evils: by persuading Americans to stop, one by one by one.

That would be a terrific idea, Dave, if you could start with first persuading the most likely to commit murder with their guns. But how many subscribers does The Atlantic have in the black neighborhoods of St. Louis, anyway?

… The mass gun purchases of 2020 and 2021 have put even more millions of weapons into even more hands untrained to use and store those weapons responsibly.

Hey, I’ve got a great idea! Let’s suggest to law-abiding citizens that they don’t need to arm themselves by making clear that The Establishment stands behind the police protecting them from Mostly Peaceful Protesters.

Also, we should encourage new gunowners to get together with firearms experts and learn proper techniques. Of course, that’s the last thing The Establishment wants: for citizens to get together and develop personal ties with other Second Amendment upholders.

… The gun buyers of 2020–21 are different from those of years past: They are more likely to be people of color and more likely to be women. They are not buying guns to join a race war, or to overthrow the government, or to wait for Armageddon in a bunker stocked with canned beans. They just want to deter a burglar or an assailant, should one come.

Those dangers are real, and it’s understandable that people would fear them and seek to avert them. But like the people who refuse lifesaving vaccines for fear of minutely rare side effects, American gun buyers are falling victim to bad risk analysis.

Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall. Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.

 
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  1. David, I’m your huckleberry.

    • LOL: GeneralRipper
  2. Altogether, about 500 Americans a year die from unintended shootings. … Unintended shootings tend not to be lethal. They account for only about 1 percent of all U.S. gun deaths. But they account for more than one-third of American gun injuries—injuries that can leave people disabled or traumatized for life.

    Especially if they’re taking Ivermectin!

    • LOL: InnerCynic
    • Replies: @epebble
    @JimDandy

    Frum is wasting his time writing this political screed if he wants to paint 500 deaths per year as some sort of national tragedy. It is not. Not at least after 2020. Even the number of overall Firearms homicides (14,000 in 2018), is high but not worth all the fear mongering it commands.

  3. While Frum, from his point of view (anti-gun), is right to try to shift to handguns. Going after rifles and shotguns is a loser these days.

    The pandemic, the crime surge as criminals were left to roam free, the 2020 communist riots across the country, Beto O’Rourke threatening to take away everyone’s guns, the rigged election, and the left deciding the 2020 riot over the rigged election—basically, the last 18 months has been a surefire way to make sure no voter wants his AR or hunting rifle taken, and lots of Americans bought rifles and shotguns for the first time last year as a precaution. There was a massive ammo shortage, too, thanks to all the new gun buyers, the hording mentality, and shipping delays, which of course led to more shortages as people rushed to buy whatever was available.

    Handguns aren’t seen by average joes as being weapons against 1984 camps or home invades. Rifles are the weapon in military fights, while shotguns (as every new gun owner learns when he first starts googling) are the best for home invaders and close-up attacks.

    Of course, the push for nationwide concealed carry that’s gone on in the last 10 years has also made handguns a point of interest for gun folks. And first-time or just-for-protection female gun owners are much more comfortable using a small handgun than a rifle or shotgun. So there’s a l

    So, in conclusion, Frum’s idea won’t bear much fruit these days. Perhaps he believes the U.S. won’t break up in the next 10 years and life will get back to normal, and therefore this longer strategy will be more successful. Or perhaps he just needed to fill some space for his Atlantic paycheck.

    • Replies: @magila
    @R.G. Camara

    I'm a shotgun guy myself, but given the numbers of teens who are using at least '3A' body armor, have shifted to a rifle as my primary home defense gun.

    Replies: @usNthem

    , @bomag
    @R.G. Camara

    Agree.

    Frum's article is a standard anti-gun argument.

    , @znon
    @R.G. Camara

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15's because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45's (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    If americans are serious about giving old Granny's the ability to decimate the screaming black hordes of Mau-Mau savages, then AR-15 all the way, hi capacity, easy to handle, no recoil for those aching arthritic shoulders, and points itself. A couple of video games are all you need for training.

    as regards the Concealed carry permits: I have one but was pulled over by a local cop while driving next to a high school parking lot. The first thing he said was "do you have a firearm?" He had checked from my plate and was fishing for a felony arrest ( possession of a handgun licensed or not within 300yards of school property in session or not) to pad his score at the cop shop. If they wanted to, and I believe they will soon, anyone who has a CCP is extremely vulnerable.

    Replies: @prosa123, @John Johnson, @TWS

  4. Paige Harden’s Upcoming Book “The Genetic Lottery,”
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/paige-hardens-upcoming-book-the-genetic-lottery/

    Mr. Sailer:

    This book is finally coming out, more than three years after you posted about it. Did you get an ARC? Are you planning to review it?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Anon

    Anon, have you seen Razib Khan's early review?

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420373452595232777

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420374863596777472

    https://twitter.com/unherd/status/1420262831602163715

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Anon

    , @George Taylor
    @Anon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.



    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.
     
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @bomag, @kaganovitch, @Anon, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @MEH 0910
    @Anon

    Confirmation and update on Kathryn Paige Harden's background:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters


    On sabbatical for the 2015-16 academic year, Harden and Elliot Tucker-Drob, a colleague to whom she was married at the time, were invited to New York City with their two young children—a three-year-old boy and a nine-month-old girl—as visiting scholars-in-residence at the Russell Sage Foundation.

    [...]
    Harden was raised in a conservative environment, and though she later rejected much of her upbringing, she has maintained a convert’s distrust of orthodoxy. Her father’s family were farmers and pipeline workers in Texas, and her grandparents—Pentecostalists who embraced faith healing and speaking in tongues—were lifted out of extreme poverty by the military.

    [...]
    Harden was joined in Bozeman by her younger brother, Micah, who was visiting from Memphis. We sat together on the covered patio of the airy house Harden had rented with her boyfriend, an architectural designer named Travis Avery. It was the longest spell she had ever spent away from her children, who were on a road trip with Tucker-Drob. (The couple got divorced in 2018.)
     
  5. More “people of color…and…women…owning guns”?
    What could make this worse,free ammunition?

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • LOL: Kylie
  6. Meanwhile, the increase in murders occurred in areas with already high murder rates.

    • Replies: @aj54
    @Redneck farmer

    of course, that is probably more to do with the assaults on policing since Floyd

  7. The one accomplishment Trump’s four years in power and continued political relevance have undoubtedly done is to shake loose the Neocons from the GOP. There is no going back after this. Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    • Agree: TWS, mc23
    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    @Pincher Martin

    Trump accomplished several things. The appointment of many conservative judges is a big issue, right or wrong.

    The four big things are:

    1). He brought the immigration issue to the forefront. It had been a minor issue to most Americans, and was seen as a regional issue only. It is now recognized by millions as the critical issue of our time.
    For someone like me,who has been screaming about this issue since the mid-70's, and a fan of Enoch Powell since his 68 speech, this was a huge issue. People like Ann Coulter were very late to the issue. He didn't realize the extent of the Deep State he was up against, and assumed that being President was like being a CEO where people did what he told them or got fired or demoted.

    2). He pointed out that Free Trade is a very bad idea in many cases, and that we were being seriously taken advantage of.

    3). He virtually single-handedly changed our national view of China from "good for business- great trading partner!" to "Public Enemy Number 1" and a huge threat to American Dominance.

    4). He never explicitly said it, but he has sparked what may finally turn out to be the birth of a White Racial Consciousness. It is certainly long overdue as our melting pot boils over. Whether enough Whites will wake up in time to save some semblance of this country from a Third-World Brazilian future remains to be seen.

    What is really amazing about Trump's incredible destruction of Hillary's expected Coronation is how both parties remain utterly clueless as to how he accomplished it. They are literally incapable of even vaguely understanding a world view held by tens of millions of their fellow citizens. And have shown zero interest in even attempting such an understanding since his loss to Biden. They truly believe that politics in the U.S. will go back to the way things were pre-Trump.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pincher Martin, @frankie p

    , @Thomas
    @Pincher Martin

    They're frantically seeking a new host, without much success.

    , @Currahee
    @Pincher Martin

    Yes, i.e. Rubin.

    , @HammerJack
    @Pincher Martin

    https://i.ibb.co/QcyZyJV/Screenshot-20210906-165945-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity. And so I need to explain to the Republicans here that it's not about who deserves reparations. It's about whether or not you want to win elections. Elder just gave this one away with an unforced error. A spectacularly stupid unforced error.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar

    , @MarkinLA
    @Pincher Martin

    Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    Oh, how I wish that was true. I talked to some dumb Republicans this weekend and got the typical Republican talking points on immigration - who's going to pick, the young are lazy, Trump got more Hispanics.....

    When I asked why things are getting worse in schools and government. I also asked how does bringing in 10 million new voters to only get 40% of them at most make sense, they immediately got mad.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson

  8. Meanwhile, for you do-it-yourselfer’s, Lowes new policy makes it easier to get what you need, when you need it!

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Zoos

    It's not just Lowe's. The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen. Employees other than loss prevention staff and, sometimes, managers are strictly prohibited from trying to intervene in any way.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    , @epebble
    @Zoos

    Two White guys walking out with carts full of building materials in a new Subaru - only in Oregon.

    BTW, this happened in north Salem ( a little south of Portland).

    https://www.keizertimes.com/posts/3213/blatant-shoplifting-incident-angers-keizer-community

    Replies: @ATBOTL

  9. How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns

    In lightly armed England…

    Englishmen were persuaded to give up their guns over centuries of mostly crime-free living. Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    But that was when England was still English.

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South. Has anybody compared 19th-century crime in both places?

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Reg Cæsar


    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South.
     
    Peter Hitchens once commented that the law and gun carry practices of Edwardian England make modern Texas look almost effeminate.
    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar


    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.
     
    This is one of those "Ripley's Believe It or Not" type things. Such Medieval laws, whether or not they were technically repealed, have not been enforced for at least a couple of centuries.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Expletive Deleted, @Bill Jones

    , @inertial
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I read Sherlock Holmes stories it struck me how Holmes and Dr. Watson, both private citizens, were running around London and English countryside always packing revolvers, and no one thought of it as the least bit unusual.

    Replies: @David In TN

    , @raga10
    @Reg Cæsar


    Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

     

    Not so; crime was quite rampant in England of old, but murders were relatively rare. Possibly because criminals were more likely to use their fists than guns (one notorious character in 17th century was called Whipping Tom because he would grab his (usually female) victims and spank them, while shouting 'spanko!')

    You can't use a gun if you don't have a gun; logic of this statement seems solid to me.

    A famous gang war erupted between two rival gangs in Sydney in the late 20's and 30's, notable because both gangs were led by women: one Tilly Devine and her arch rival, Kate Leigh. Their war was pretty violent and a lot of people got hurt and maimed. But relatively few actually died, because their weapon of choice was razor. Guns did exist by then, obviously - but legal penalties for using a gun were a lot harsher than they would be otherwise and police took shootings a lot more seriously than they would an ordinary brawl. So the gangsters didn't bother with guns: you could inflict sufficient damage with a razor.

    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    , @Catdog
    @Reg Cæsar

    >Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    That law was superseded in 1621 by a new law requiring that the pike-and-musket armed militia (the "trayned bands") practice on Sundays instead.

  10. Americans use their guns to open fire on one another at backyard barbecues


    FWP Frum is on to something. For instance, it’s those blondes you really have to watch out for.

    • Replies: @Slim
    @Hangnail Hans

    I've been looking out for blondes since I turned 12.

  11. Rancho Palos Verdes is not near any freeway. This protects it from bad-guy commuters. A second protective factor is the winding (read: Unintelligible, to some) streets of RPV. That’s my theory about the commuting predilections of bad guys.

    But to my point. Anticipatory anxiety. This is a different mental state from fear, where the tiger is right in front of you. The human brain has been called an “anticipation machine.” This has even been imaged by neuroscientists. Having a gun winds-down that very unpleasant anticipatory anxiety. That is no small thing.

    One more thing. Owning multiple guns is mentioned. When I was in a gun store, I asked the guy behind the counter, a former police officer, where he keeps his gun in the house. He replied “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    • Replies: @PseudoNhymm
    @SafeNow

    This is correct. PV safety has less to do with gun ownership than logistics. Half of the residents are chinese (ex?)pats who have never seen a gun let alone held one.

    Lack of freeway access and non-structured street layout is a big factor. It makes a quick escape require planning. Second: there's really only 2 ways in and out (4 if you've researched it), and "foreign" cars/people tend to stand out. The police aren't shy about profiling because.... profiling works. And then there's the license plate readers set up at the entry points...

    PV is easily fortified, and has been since the LA riots

    , @Mike1
    @SafeNow

    More importantly they have an incredibly aggressive police force there. The community in general and the police force seem to genuinely believe that the laws of the state and country don't apply.

  12. David Frum us just getting his googoo points for the week.

    After the last year and a half more Americans are convinced having a gun is essential, A few people I knew were on the fence before the lockdowns. But self-quarantine AND black lives matter/antifa? It was a slam-dunk. No more argument from normies.

  13. @Pincher Martin
    The one accomplishment Trump's four years in power and continued political relevance have undoubtedly done is to shake loose the Neocons from the GOP. There is no going back after this. Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel, @Thomas, @Currahee, @HammerJack, @MarkinLA

    Trump accomplished several things. The appointment of many conservative judges is a big issue, right or wrong.

    The four big things are:

    1). He brought the immigration issue to the forefront. It had been a minor issue to most Americans, and was seen as a regional issue only. It is now recognized by millions as the critical issue of our time.
    For someone like me,who has been screaming about this issue since the mid-70’s, and a fan of Enoch Powell since his 68 speech, this was a huge issue. People like Ann Coulter were very late to the issue. He didn’t realize the extent of the Deep State he was up against, and assumed that being President was like being a CEO where people did what he told them or got fired or demoted.

    2). He pointed out that Free Trade is a very bad idea in many cases, and that we were being seriously taken advantage of.

    3). He virtually single-handedly changed our national view of China from “good for business- great trading partner!” to “Public Enemy Number 1” and a huge threat to American Dominance.

    4). He never explicitly said it, but he has sparked what may finally turn out to be the birth of a White Racial Consciousness. It is certainly long overdue as our melting pot boils over. Whether enough Whites will wake up in time to save some semblance of this country from a Third-World Brazilian future remains to be seen.

    What is really amazing about Trump’s incredible destruction of Hillary’s expected Coronation is how both parties remain utterly clueless as to how he accomplished it. They are literally incapable of even vaguely understanding a world view held by tens of millions of their fellow citizens. And have shown zero interest in even attempting such an understanding since his loss to Biden. They truly believe that politics in the U.S. will go back to the way things were pre-Trump.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Charlesz Martel

    A Brazilesque future is one of the better case scenarios. I would suggest it's an impossibility. Brazil has never had the virulent anti-white hatred the US does.

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Charlesz Martel

    I'll be generous and give you the judges.

    But many of the GOP-nominated judges over the last several decades have slipped away from the conservative judicial philosophy they were nominated for. Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, for example, have already revealed this tendency, which might later bloom into either full-throated opposition to conservatism (like Stevens and Souter, with Roberts heading in this direction) or into judicial moderation (like O'Conner and Kennedy). Half of all GOP-nominated High Court judges since Eisenhower have abandoned conservative judicial principles.

    So while I'd typically wait before awarding the "W" on this one, I'll give it to you for now. No matter how bad Trump's judges turn out to be by the end, Hillary's would have been much worse.

    But it is a fair question to ask whether Trump could have done much better in his selection of his Suprem Court Justices than what we got. Few conservatives look at George W. Bush's tenure, anymore, and think John Roberts' nomination to the High Court was a victory for them. And most of us remember that we had to fight like hell against Bush's White House to get Harriet Miers out of there so that Samuel Alito, who has turned into a very good Supreme Court judge, could be nominated.

    *****

    As for your other issues, I'll give you #2 and #3, even if I suspect the trade deals Trump renegotiated are largely intact and will remain in force for the foreseeable future. Trump nibbled at the edges, but free trade still exists in the commerce between the U.S. and China, for example.

    But I won't give you #1 or #4

    Whenever a person is a presidential candidate, one can say he "brought the immigration issue to the forefront." For example, supporters of Bernie Sanders can say he "brought the issue of inequality to the forefront" and they would be right.

    But we expect more of presidents than we do of presidential candidates. They have to do more than just talk. They have to do more than bring an issue to the forefront.

    Trump had four years in power. What did he actually do to reduce immigration? Not much. He certainly didn't build a wall. And by the end of his presidency, including during his re-election bid, he rarely spoke about immigration. Ann Coulter is right. Trump became far less of an issue-oriented president over the four years of his presidency because Trump's issues kept getting in the way of his megalomania.

    As for the "white racial consciousness" thing, Trump's successful presidential campaign was more a beneficiary of that than it was a cause of it.

    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    , @frankie p
    @Charlesz Martel

    In addition, I believe that Trump was responsible for a huge increase in the distrust and disbelief in the Mainstream Media among American citizens in the center and one the right. Also, his ongoing war (yes, I know that he didn't follow through as he should have, with all the resources available to him) with Big Tech and Social Media shone a spotlight on the evil inherent in these monsters.

    Of course most of us on Unz were already well aware of these phenomena, but Trump certainly mainstreamed these ideas among the clueless.

  14. both frum and steve are wrong.

    idi amin would make a great president.

  15. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    Amin recruited his followers from his own ethnic group, the Kakwas, along with South Sudanese. By 1977, these three groups formed 60 percent of the 22 top generals and 75 percent of the cabinet. Similarly, Muslims formed 80 percent and 87.5 percent of these groups even though they were only 5 percent of the population. This helps explain why Amin survived eight attempted coups.

    “typical wikipedia anti-kakwa-ism and islamophobia conspiracy theory. everyone knows kakwas have the highest IQs in uganda.” — steve sailer

  16. The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.

    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary “responsible” voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    • Thanks: Dr. X, Gordo, GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @Mr. Anon

    I'm sure Mr Frum would assure you that those photos are fake, designed to stir up anti-Semitism amongst the gullible.

    Frum joined The Atlantic as a senior editor in March 2014. During the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict, Frum issued a series of tweets labeling as "fake" a photo of two blood-covered Palestinian youths bringing their father's body to a hospital in Khan Younis; the man had been killed in an Israeli airstrike.

    , @IHTG
    @Mr. Anon

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Mr. Anon, @anon

    , @SFG
    @Mr. Anon

    Thing is, if you're not full-on counter-Semitic you can just say, "Yeah, good for them, they have guns, and good for us, we have guns too!"

    The hypocrisy coming from Frum is another story. As IHTG says, he'd probably say they need them and Americans do not. I think as Camara says it's pretty clear Americans do now! I wouldn't be too surprised if the McCloskeys weren't expecting to use their guns--as I recall they made a bunch of mistakes in holding them and the like, and had been previously been Democrats.

    , @nsa
    @Mr. Anon

    Frummie is a vile warmongering canadian izzie-firster transplant. If he could, he would gladly pass a law that only jooies, negoids, homos, and women can own firearms......white males being too violent and irresponsible for gun ownership. If you are located in some diversified urban cesspool and feel the need to pack a gun, then it is time to relocate to a rural area where the threat of physical violence and crime is near nil. Use a concealed weapon in the public square and stick around for the cops, and you will quickly learn there is nothing more pathetic than a normal middle class yoyo enmeshed in the legal system.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Mr. Anon

    The pistols being shown MIGHT be owned by Israeli private citizens. Apparently, they have a MAY issue license ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overview_of_gun_laws_by_nation ). I read an article in a now defunct Chicago loop free newspaper years ago about someone describing how they obtained a Beretta pistol there and how you got a 50 rd box of ammo.

    As for the other weapons, basically, Jews over in Israel are like those here, TPTB do NOT want PRIVATE OWNERSHIP OF RIFLES.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNfvARxp1FM

    A militiaman in America with an AR-15 has greater potential for combat effectiveness than a WW2 British soldier with a full-automatic Stengun.

    Rifles are COMBAT POWER.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6T8ghI6OtU&list=PLyvMT0kbJnvsRx1mcd0zpT5CbfiFpnAWX

    German HK41 Semi-Auto Militia Rifle

    , @AndrewR
    @Mr. Anon

    Frum is a Jewish supremacist so idk why pointing out his hypocrisy would bother him

    , @InnerCynic
    @Mr. Anon

    How ironic that those who demand the right to defend themselves with weapons, out in the street no less, would also demand that your nation import millions of potential and likely lethal "migrants" while also calling for you to disarm yourself. The mind boggles.

    , @Larry, San Francisco
    @Mr. Anon

    Israel has a low murder rate as does the heavily armed Swiss.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Mr. Anon

    'What does David Frum think about these gun owners?'

    Silly question.

  17. Speaking of A Clockwork Orange,

  18. Frum: How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns

    As ever, Frum gets it the wrong way round. The Question should be:
    How to persuade American criminals to give up their guns

    Criminals in Victorian England had access to guns, but very few carried them. The consequences of killing someone in the act of robbery would result in an automatic hanging. Also, in a largely homogeneous society, detection rates for murder were very high. Even now, detection rates for murder in England are still very high.
    In America, applying this to a drug-addled class of blacks, who are responsible for most US gun crime, will be difficult. But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

  19. Some good examples of the dynamics Steve mentions from Chicago where white guilt has people feeling so bad that some won’t press charges on violent armed carjackers.

    Carjacking victim refuses to press charges against teen (who already has 4 armed robbery cases pending)

    https://cwbchicago.com/2021/09/carjacking-victim-refuses-to-press-charges-against-teen-who-already-has-4-armed-robbery-cases-pending.html

    Around 7 p.m. Wednesday, the 44-year-old victim was sitting inside his parked, running car on the parking lot of Cermak Fresh Market, 6623 North Damen, in Rogers Park, according to a CPD report. Suddenly, a man opened his passenger door and got inside. The intruder pressed a handgun to his forehead, demanded his valuables, and then told him to get out, the report said.

    He complied, and the offender drove away with his silver Toyota Camry, according to CPD spokesperson Kellie Bartoli. While officers were speaking with the victim, cops in the 1st (Central) Police District spotted the man’s stolen car at a BP gas station, 50 West Ida B. Wells.

    But when the victim realized that his car was still in good condition, he declined to pursue charges, according to a source. Bartoli confirmed that the victim refused to prosecute, but she did not give a reason for his decision.

    Cops arrested Martin anyway for the gun he allegedly had in his waistband. He’s charged with aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

    Prosecutors said during his bond court hearing that he has four pending armed robbery cases from before his 18th birthday. They did not provide details of those allegations. An assistant public defender said Martin has a two-year-old child and attended Legal Prep Career Academy.

    Wednesday’s victim is not the first person to forgive an armed carjacker this year.

    On February 3, a 28-year-old man was carjacked at gunpoint while shoveling out a parking space in West Town. Police arrested John Daniels, 19, as he drove the stolen car a short time later, according to a CPD report.

    While police were processing Daniels at the station, the victim’s driver’s license, debit card, and medical marijuana card fell out of his pants, the report said. But the victim decided not to pursue charges because he “felt sorry for” the people who took his Lexus because “they probably need a car.”

    Less than four months later, Daniels took an 11-year-old boy to Uptown, where they violently carjacked another man, according to prosecutors.

    That victim, a 59-year-old man, was viciously beaten and suffered a broken orbital bone, prosecutors said. Video allegedly shows Daniels standing over the fallen man and taking keys from his hand. The Uptown victim pressed charges.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Altai

    That article was updated:


    When the 28-year-old West Town carjacking victim was told about the battered old man, he replied, "Yeah... but they probably needed another car. Those people have big, extended families."

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    , @Currahee
    @Altai

    It is victims such as these who should be severely punished by an angry vigilante citizenry.

    , @Charlotte
    @Altai

    How reassuring that Martin attended the Legal Prep Charter Academy! http://www.legalprep.org/about1.html

    “Our students will use their academic and civic education to grow in their professional careers

    Those classes in criminal law and criminal procedures, participating in a mock trial (and the opportunity to “interact with legal professionals”) will no doubt come in handy as he deals with his four pending armed robbery cases and his new use of a weapon charge.

  20. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    I’m sure Mr Frum would assure you that those photos are fake, designed to stir up anti-Semitism amongst the gullible.

    Frum joined The Atlantic as a senior editor in March 2014. During the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict, Frum issued a series of tweets labeling as “fake” a photo of two blood-covered Palestinian youths bringing their father’s body to a hospital in Khan Younis; the man had been killed in an Israeli airstrike.

  21. … white suburban grillers….

    Is that the antonym of black urban chillers?

    • Replies: @JimB
    @The Alarmist

    Whites are the griller guerillas

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  22. The last paragraph makes you sound stuck-up.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Greta Handel

    I'm an unvaxxed legal gun owner. I'm beyond good and evil.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Greta Handel

    Steve's inability to differentiate between this vaccine and the current highly politicized public health sector from what has been the norm is a real head-scratcher. I don't believe it's willful blindness. His age group grew up in a time when the Establishment actually functioned, and wasn't captured by a cabal of Euro-American billionaire Gaians intent on culling the herd.

  23. @SafeNow
    Rancho Palos Verdes is not near any freeway. This protects it from bad-guy commuters. A second protective factor is the winding (read: Unintelligible, to some) streets of RPV. That’s my theory about the commuting predilections of bad guys.

    But to my point. Anticipatory anxiety. This is a different mental state from fear, where the tiger is right in front of you. The human brain has been called an “anticipation machine.” This has even been imaged by neuroscientists. Having a gun winds-down that very unpleasant anticipatory anxiety. That is no small thing.

    One more thing. Owning multiple guns is mentioned. When I was in a gun store, I asked the guy behind the counter, a former police officer, where he keeps his gun in the house. He replied “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @Mike1

    This is correct. PV safety has less to do with gun ownership than logistics. Half of the residents are chinese (ex?)pats who have never seen a gun let alone held one.

    Lack of freeway access and non-structured street layout is a big factor. It makes a quick escape require planning. Second: there’s really only 2 ways in and out (4 if you’ve researched it), and “foreign” cars/people tend to stand out. The police aren’t shy about profiling because…. profiling works. And then there’s the license plate readers set up at the entry points…

    PV is easily fortified, and has been since the LA riots

  24. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @IHTG

    Any veteran of a combat unit (thus 15% of all men) can obtain a gun permit regardless of where he lives.

    Meanwhile the Arab population is armed to the teeth with illegal guns.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam, @Dan Hayes

    , @Mr. Anon
    @IHTG


    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.
     
    And in America, lots of people live in "dangerous areas" and any law abiding citizen has an inviolable RIGHT to own guns. Perhaps Frum should go live in Israel if he likes their system better.
    , @anon
    @IHTG

    Well, then, he'd be lying. Again. To no one's surprise.

  25. @Greta Handel
    The last paragraph makes you sound stuck-up.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @SunBakedSuburb

    I’m an unvaxxed legal gun owner. I’m beyond good and evil.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @JimDandy

    Ditto, and much more difficult in the People's Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    Steve, that jab will only go into my cold, dead arm!

  26. Frum’s comments also remind me of a video I just saw of an interview ESPN did with DeAndre Yedlin. The US men’s soccer team had another disappointing (By historical standards, this team is quite poor) result against Canada in the World Cup qualifiers.

    So I clicked on defender DeAndre Yedlin’s profile link on ESPN and it autoplays a video where he talks about his (Ashkenazi Jewish, Seattle-dwelling) grandfather saying he was glad his grandson was living abroad as he’d fear for his life in the US…

    https://www.espn.com/football/english-premier-league/0/video/4106561/usmnts-yedlin-my-grandpa-says-im-safer-outside-the-us

    This guy grew up on the mean streets of 1990s/2000s Seattle and is half Ashkenazi (And apparently only 1/4 black) yet he dresses and fronts as if he is straight outta 1980/90s Compton. He is celebrating the chic of the very violent honour culture that drives the violence and murder rates in the US while pretending he is glad to be in Northern England because of his fear of American police. And his boomer Ashkenazi grandfather living in suburban Seattle sounds just like Frum.

    Yedlin identifies as one-quarter black, one-quarter Native American and half-Latvian Jewish. Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.

    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Altai


    Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.
     
    “Boo-hoo, sad story. Typical African-American dad story.”
    — Drake

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    , @3g4me
    @Altai

    @26 Altai: No one named Yedlin has ever been anything more than a magic paper/magic dirt American. If you regard natio as requiring an attorney, Jack D is your huckleberry. If you regard being American as being part of a people with the same language, history, and genetics, then someone like Yedlin is nothing more than an unfortunate accident of birth.

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @Altai


    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.
     
    Especially the normalized lying.


    Meanwhile can anyone explain the subcon indian who clicked AGREE on the following post?


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/how-will-the-press-spin-thursdays-census-announcement-of-a-declining-number-of-whites/#comment-4835873

  27. After all, subscribers to The Atlantic must make up a huge fraction of America’s gun murderers.

    No, but they make up a significant enough chunk of America’s future gun grabbers though. That’s what David Frum is out for.

    It was great to see a pro-2A post from you, Steve. I didn’t think this was too much up your alley, though maybe you wrote this simply due to your observations that Mr. Frum seems to have taken and, let’s just say, “tweaked” your material – especially about long guns vs. handguns.

    The NRA folks often note “the 2-A is not about duck hunting”, but they don’t seem to note enough that “it’s wasn’t about defending oneself against black criminals” either. I’ll give credit to Mr. Frum for at least leaving that real reason out of his objections. The self-defense purpose has turned out to be pretty important though. I have a personal observation, which I’ll put in a 2nd comment.

  28. @Altai
    Some good examples of the dynamics Steve mentions from Chicago where white guilt has people feeling so bad that some won't press charges on violent armed carjackers.

    Carjacking victim refuses to press charges against teen (who already has 4 armed robbery cases pending)

    https://cwbchicago.com/2021/09/carjacking-victim-refuses-to-press-charges-against-teen-who-already-has-4-armed-robbery-cases-pending.html


    Around 7 p.m. Wednesday, the 44-year-old victim was sitting inside his parked, running car on the parking lot of Cermak Fresh Market, 6623 North Damen, in Rogers Park, according to a CPD report. Suddenly, a man opened his passenger door and got inside. The intruder pressed a handgun to his forehead, demanded his valuables, and then told him to get out, the report said.

    He complied, and the offender drove away with his silver Toyota Camry, according to CPD spokesperson Kellie Bartoli. While officers were speaking with the victim, cops in the 1st (Central) Police District spotted the man’s stolen car at a BP gas station, 50 West Ida B. Wells.

    ...

    But when the victim realized that his car was still in good condition, he declined to pursue charges, according to a source. Bartoli confirmed that the victim refused to prosecute, but she did not give a reason for his decision.

    Cops arrested Martin anyway for the gun he allegedly had in his waistband. He’s charged with aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

    Prosecutors said during his bond court hearing that he has four pending armed robbery cases from before his 18th birthday. They did not provide details of those allegations. An assistant public defender said Martin has a two-year-old child and attended Legal Prep Career Academy.

    ...

    Wednesday’s victim is not the first person to forgive an armed carjacker this year.

    On February 3, a 28-year-old man was carjacked at gunpoint while shoveling out a parking space in West Town. Police arrested John Daniels, 19, as he drove the stolen car a short time later, according to a CPD report.

    While police were processing Daniels at the station, the victim’s driver’s license, debit card, and medical marijuana card fell out of his pants, the report said. But the victim decided not to pursue charges because he “felt sorry for” the people who took his Lexus because “they probably need a car.”

    ...

    Less than four months later, Daniels took an 11-year-old boy to Uptown, where they violently carjacked another man, according to prosecutors.

    That victim, a 59-year-old man, was viciously beaten and suffered a broken orbital bone, prosecutors said. Video allegedly shows Daniels standing over the fallen man and taking keys from his hand. The Uptown victim pressed charges.
     

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Currahee, @Charlotte

    That article was updated:

    When the 28-year-old West Town carjacking victim was told about the battered old man, he replied, “Yeah… but they probably needed another car. Those people have big, extended families.”

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @JimDandy

    As Steve has elaborated, those "big, extended families" need bigger houses too. Yours for instance.

  29. It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys. On the same token, in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that’s not an argument to disband the army.

    If you get a gun, though, please get training too.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @International Jew


    in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that’s not an argument to disband the army.
     
    One of my father's assignments, as WWII wound down, was to document and photograph all the fatalities at his Army/Air Force base -- not in Europe or Asia, in Texas

    Replies: @anon

    , @Charlesz Martel
    @International Jew

    The old saw that a gun is more likely to kill a family member or someone you know than a stranger is true, but extremely misleading.

    Many victims in drug killings knew their killers. Many dead store clerks did too, as do many victims of home invasions. Many victims of crime deals gone wrong did too- prostitutes and Johns, fences and thieves, etc. Blacks at large gatherings know each other. In a Cuban divorce, the killer knew the killee. Etc., etc.

    The image they want to promote is little Johnny killing his sister, little Susie. That's a function of irresponsible gun owners not storing their guns properly. The NRA used to run a comic to educate children about gun safety- "Eddie Eagle". The left used to howl like their balls were in a vise (if they had any balls) about how this was propagandizing the kiddies.

    Many gun deaths are suicides too.

    The left essentially lies about almost every social issue in this country. And then they pretend to understand science and technology, which they proceed to use in their attempts to destroy this country or give an advantage to our overseas competitors.

    "The people who manage the technology don't understand it, and those who understand it don't manage it" is a phrase I heard decades ago, which is painfully true. Don't know who first said it.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @Slim
    @International Jew

    There's been at least one gun in every one of my homes for 68 years. Those guns have never harmed me.

    , @anon
    @International Jew

    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys.

    It may well be that you have been lied to, and have chosen to blindly repeat said lies, rather than do the smallest amount of research.

    Sad.

  30. I’ll be convinced that guns don’t work when the security detail of big shots and politicians give up their guns.

  31. David Frum, the one-man automatic pitching machine, serving up softballs at a comfortable speed right down the middle of the strike zone, for iSteve to hit out of the park:

    • Agree: Unladen Swallow
  32. Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated…

    Kill two birds with one stone and get one of these:


    Shoot your intruders with vaccine.

    Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.

    Okay, Steve. You’ve successfully guilted me. I am armed, and I don’t want to be “that guy” in any other respect. That is persuasive, that plus Ron’s flawless logic:

    [MORE]

    According to the newspapers this morning, Goldman Sachs has now required all its employees to get vaxxed before they’re allowing to work in the office, a requirement that presumably will include all their upper-ranking executives. I’d expect this sort of policy will soon be followed by almost every other major Wall Street firm.

    So apparently the diabolical plot by our ruling elites to exterminate themselves is now moving forward at a good pace. People won’t be able to keep complaining about Wall Street once almost all the Wall Streeters have vaxxed themselves to death.

    If only our top financial executives had been shrewd enough to take their personal health tips from random eccentrics ranting on home-made videos rather than paying top-dollar for the private services of their ultra-elite personal physicians, they would have managed to avoid this grim fate.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw Mr. Unz's reply to you, Buzz. It doesn't prove anything, except, no it's not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they'll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn't make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
    I hope you haven't just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @BB753, @El Dato, @Sick 'n Tired, @Adam Smith

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Shoot your intruders with vaccine.
     
    You know why we don't see those anymore?

    Dear Mayo Clinic: I remember we used to get vaccines and other shots using an air gun, and lots of people could get shots quickly. I haven't seen this done for a long time. Why? Were problems discovered with that method? It seems that it would be an efficient way to give flu shots, for instance, in a really short time.

    A: Using an air gun -- also called a jet injector -- is a fast way to deliver vaccines. But jet injectors were discontinued for mass vaccinations about five years ago because of possible health risks.

    A jet injector uses high pressure to force a vaccine or other medication through a person's skin. Their speed made jet injectors very efficient, so many people could be vaccinated quickly. They were often used in the military. Although they weren't pain-free, jet injectors didn't involve needles. The result was less discomfort than a needle injection, and they caused less anxiety in people who were afraid of needles.

    In some cases, however, jet injectors could bring blood or other body fluids to the surface of the skin while the vaccine was being administered. Those fluids could contaminate the injector, creating the possibility that viruses could be transmitted to another person being vaccinated with the same device.

    Of particular concern were viruses transmitted by blood, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C. HIV can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) -- a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by damage to the immune system. Hepatitis can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and lead to serious liver damage.

    Greater awareness of these diseases and other blood-borne illnesses led to increased scrutiny of ways they might be spread. Although no widespread outbreaks of these diseases were caused by jet injectors, the risk of blood and body fluid contamination of the equipment made jet injectors no longer acceptable for vaccinations. Instead, most vaccines now are administered by needle injection, typically in the arm for adults and in the thigh for children.

    https://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/health/article/Ask-the-Mayo-Clinic-Whatever-happened-to-jet-1293851.php
     
  33. Two nearby neighbors’ houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don’t want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front – 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home – I believe they go by cars in the driveways – they ain’t masterminds – they’d rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it’s not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I’m sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I’d bet 1,000 bucks on – the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, “oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o’r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants.”

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed,

    Whoever burgled those homes probably, in my view, figured that homes, one if them double-signed, with BLM placards would also not have residents possessing guns for home defense.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @Prof. Woland, @Big Bill

    , @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Houses with BLM signs may be getting targeted because the thieves think there's a smaller chance of the homeowner pressing charges if the thieves are caught.

    Call it breaking and entering insurance-for crooks.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front – 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home – I believe they go by cars in the driveways – they ain’t masterminds – they’d rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?
     
    My kind of criminals!

    People with BLM signs are virtue signaling that their virtue is so, so great that they don't believe in rule-of-law--for blacks. So i think it's quite fair for blacks to go grab their stuff. (And other crims as well on "equal protection" grounds.)



    Not being interested in criminal activity, i'd just figured they were convenient markers of potential protein sources if the shit ever really--total collapse--hit the fan.
    , @Polistra
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Hit the BLM-positive house which is bound to be an easier mark (and which will serve milk and cookies), or torture the BadWhites some more? Decisions decisions.

    https://i.imgflip.com/2/12o7mz.jpg

    , @Dmon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    My California gubernatorial recall election campaign promise to post on World Star Hip-Hop the addresses of all houses displaying those yard signs is already paying dividends. Please make sure to vote for me with all of your mail-in ballots (up to the legal limit of 300).

    https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/300-recall-election-ballots-found-in-mans-car-in-torrance/2678071/

  34. In Massachusetts, The Boston Globe called for making gun license data public:
    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/07/03/opinion/should-you-know-if-your-neighbor-owns-gun/

    Frum is talking about persuasion, but this is clearly going in the direction of cancel culture: if you own a gun, then virtue-signaling corporations will not hire you.

    Very similar to how woke corporations suppress freedom of speech.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Undocumented Shopper

    In Massachusetts, The Boston Globe called for making gun license data public:

    The Glob should make the home addresses of all their employees public via a searchable database.

    Or GOAL could do it.

  35. @Buzz Mohawk

    Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated...
     
    Kill two birds with one stone and get one of these:


    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5462/9495422523_0d04a04c6e_z.jpg

    Shoot your intruders with vaccine.


    Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.
     
    Okay, Steve. You've successfully guilted me. I am armed, and I don't want to be "that guy" in any other respect. That is persuasive, that plus Ron's flawless logic:

    According to the newspapers this morning, Goldman Sachs has now required all its employees to get vaxxed before they’re allowing to work in the office, a requirement that presumably will include all their upper-ranking executives. I’d expect this sort of policy will soon be followed by almost every other major Wall Street firm.

    So apparently the diabolical plot by our ruling elites to exterminate themselves is now moving forward at a good pace. People won’t be able to keep complaining about Wall Street once almost all the Wall Streeters have vaxxed themselves to death.

    If only our top financial executives had been shrewd enough to take their personal health tips from random eccentrics ranting on home-made videos rather than paying top-dollar for the private services of their ultra-elite personal physicians, they would have managed to avoid this grim fate.
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin

    I saw Mr. Unz’s reply to you, Buzz. It doesn’t prove anything, except, no it’s not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they’ll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn’t make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.

    [MORE]
    I hope you haven’t just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    • Thanks: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    , @BB753
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Goldman Sachs doesn't rule the world. Neither do their CEOs. They're expendable.
    Wanna bet our real overlords are high on ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine? Jabs are for the peons. Do you really believe Bil Gates is stupid enough to shoot himself with his own crap?

    , @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Seriously, get your vaccination and stop making up complex pretzel arguments pulling in the current state of the weather, your boss's inner mindstate or the likelihood of getting hit by an asteroid.

    Contrariwise, stock up on vitamin D and evaluate the chance of

    1) Getting seriously ill
    2) Getting treatment when being seriously ill because the other seriously ill people are clogging the pipe


    tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
     
    Playing mental games like that is unbecoming.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Sick 'n Tired
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If you think the upper echelons at Goldman Sachs are getting the same vaccine as the people lining up for it at Walmart, I have a bridge in NYC you might be interested in purchasing.

    , @Adam Smith
  36. “is kind of like getting vaccinated” should read “is kind of like getting mRNA vaccinated” as the Chinese inactivated virus vaccine is strictly forbidden in the US.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @George


    “is kind of like getting vaccinated” should read “is kind of like getting mRNA vaccinated” as the Chinese inactivated virus vaccine is strictly forbidden in the US.
     
    Johnson and Johnson's Janssen unit's one jab adenovirus vector vaccine is chicken feed?

    (Well, actually, yes in my opinion because it's designed to be the most effective single jab vaccine, not the most effective, and I guess their two jabs eight weeks apart Phase III clinical trial didn't result in good enough results to try for an authorization or approval any time soon. Or they can't justify it based on manufacturing vs. demand for the single jab version, but they're not publishing anything on it yet.)

    You could also say the same thing about the Oxford vaccine as manufactured by AZ, Operation Warp Speed authorized by far more money for it than any other of their big bets, it has a US FDA strength Phase III trial that's long had the necessary time for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), but for reasons we can guess they haven't made an application. If those Chinese companies want to market their vaccines in the US they have to jump through the same hoops Janssen, Moderna and Pifzer/BioNTech did. Which they're not necessarily inclined to do based on the latest from Brazil where their FDA equivalent turned thumbs down on a recent shipment of vaccines from the PRC because they were made in a factory Brazil hadn't inspected. See also how Russia declined to let the Brazilians inspect all the necessary facilities making Sputnik V, although that's largely unobtanian due to severe difficulties in making the second dose.
  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw Mr. Unz's reply to you, Buzz. It doesn't prove anything, except, no it's not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they'll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn't make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
    I hope you haven't just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @BB753, @El Dato, @Sick 'n Tired, @Adam Smith

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I’ve known a couple. It’s hard to argue with Ron’s real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.

    [MORE]
    If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can’t even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can’t trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I’m just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn’t matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait — and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region’s biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don’t expect her to throw away her career. We’re not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won’t know when the war is over.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Take the touchback, start at the 25 yard line.

    The vaccine.

    A trillions times more true playing against the Delta varient.

    All the Best

    , @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For those if use who don't actually buy into the "every vaxxed person will die in a year horribly" Ron's point is meaningless.

    I don't know how much simpler I can make this: I prefer not to get the vaccine because I don't need it. Period. The rest of debate about the vaccine, including whether or not it is actually a vaccine by definition, is moot. That's not to say there aren't some very important issues to discuss about it. There are. But all are secondary.

    This is known as personal choice. Sailer and Unz and the rest of the Kovid Kultists have forgotten this basic fundamental right supposedly in existence in this supposedly free country.

    Sailer says those who choose not to get it are selfish, when in fact that is a deflection from his need to impose his own bit of personal tyranny upon the masses for his own selfish reasons. If Sailer or anyone else wants to vaccinate himself, I have nothing to say about it. Why can't he/they extend the same bit of liberty minded courtesy?

    Replies: @usNthem

    , @Wade Hampton
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Unz's argument is that smart people never do stupid things? That smart people are never conned?

    In 1841, Charles Mackay wrote a wonderful book "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds" which needs updating in light of the Fauci Flu hysteria.

    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, my wife took the jab; working at an Ivy with all of those Fundamentalist Covidians around always meant that the pressure would be on. I cautioned her against the growing evidence of adverse events, but as I am now retired, and of reduced income stream, her position supplies the larger portion of our household income in comparison with my SS, a modest pension, and some inherited financial instruments and stock, and this weighed in the balance.
    She is aware of my views, and doesn't pressure me.

    For further context, I believe that she had the Coof more than a year and a half ago (dry cough, persistant fever), and probably had as a consequence natural antibodies developed. (There were lots and lots of Chinese students at her university, fresh off of mid-year break at the time of her illness to provide a likely exposure to her back in early 2020). She recovered fairly quickly. I never seem to have been infected, ar least not symptomatically; as an asthmatic (very well controlled through an optimum controlling drug), I was careful to avoid this respiratory pathogen, whatever it might have been, through common sense measures (hand washing, no rubbing of eyes, my customary ongoing, judicious supplementation of vitamins and minerals, etc.). It was only in retrospect, reflecting upon her symptoms and the course of her illness, that I came to suspect that her illness was likely the Coof.

    Thus far, I see no indication of pernicious effects from her vaccination, but in the event that they occur, my solidarity is expressed through not taking the jab so that I will be well to take care of her, come what may.

    Speaking as a "free rider", of course. /s

    Respectfully,
    JJ

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm gonna have to reply to this one more fully under the next Flu Manchu thread. Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big "off-the-grid" types or going that way. Is that not the case? I do realize nobody wants to give up a good gig (i.e. your wife's job), but, man, that's pretty much fully giving in.

    We're in that dilemma. I have no big fear of getting the jab in the way my wife does. However, I'm refusing because I don't think the idea of Big Gov and Big Biz combining to mandate something as personal as this is RIGHT. Period! It's not right, Buzz.

    There's going to be some trouble on this, at least out of my family.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @InnerCynic, @Yawrate

    , @HammerJack
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won’t know when the war is over.
     
    Remember those poor, misguided, deluded souls? I remember hearing about their stories when I was very young. Now I sort of wish I were one of them.

    Because the war we're (not) fighting now doesn't look like it'll end well.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won’t know when the war is over.
     
    You don't exactly sound like somebody who is making a rational decision to take a medication because he thinks it's in his best interest. You sound like somebody who is caving into enormous social pressure to do what everyone else is doing.

    Is that the way medical decisions are supposed to be made?

    That's my whole problem with this vaccine. It isn't being treated as a medication - it's being treated as a loyalty oath.

    As far as I'm concerned: You want to take it? Take it. You don't? Don't. Those are the only considerations that should be relevant. The fact that everybody, and I mean everybody - vaccine propaganda is being pumped out of every media orifice, wants me to take it is part of what makes me not want to. Well, that, and the essentially experimental nature of it.

    He whole COVID narrative is suspect to me and has been right from the very start.

    Replies: @Old Prude

    , @Gabe Ruth
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The flaw in this argument is the idea that working at GS means you're a player. If you have a salary, you're not a player, even if it's really big and comes with nice bennies.

  38. Don’t you think this article is a response to the massive increase in handgun sales among first-time gun buyers that occurred because of the riots?

    Gun control advocates must be thinking that GoodWhites with guns at home is not a good thing for the narrative. As rioting seems to have petered out (or at least be getting less coverage), those GoodWhites’ former fear of handguns may be starting to outpace last year’s fear of chaos and youths. Now is the time to get them to turn in their handguns and get them thinking about all the lives they saved instead having those guns at home and thinking about how many lives those guns haven’t ended.

  39. Frum-bashing aside, his arguments are mostly sound. It’s interesting he draws a parallel with the phenomenon of panic-buying, because that’s another situation where such behaviour can be rational on an individual level but irrational on a communal one.

    • Troll: TWS
    • Replies: @anon
    @Henry's Cat

    Frum-bashing aside, his arguments are mostly sound.

    No, they are not.

  40. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    Achmed,

    Whoever burgled those homes probably, in my view, figured that homes, one if them double-signed, with BLM placards would also not have residents possessing guns for home defense.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    For you and the other repliers with these points, I had both the gun ownership thing and the leniency thing in mind. I don't know which one would have more sway in the subconsciouses of the criminal thugs, but, yes, this works out kinda nicely.

  41. Support for tougher gun laws was increasing steadily until the Warren Court dismantled the criminal justice system.

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Henry Canaday

    I don’t have a cite handy but I read something once, a poll taken back in the late ‘50s/early 60s showed a disturbingly high number of Americans in favor of either licensing or outright banning handguns. I don’t remember the exact percentage though.

  42. It’s pointless at this time to discuss solutions to rampant kneegrow gun violence when (((Frum’s tribe))) has exalted these throwbacks while making it damn nigh impossible to execute or deport monsters.

  43. I am surprised that Steve did not remember the most famous black reader of the Atlantic who also is a supporter of concealed carry.

  44. America doesnt have a gun problem, it has a Negro problem.

    Unfortunately, Negroalotry is the Official State Religion, so solving the problem is impossible.

    Posted at 6:06 CDT. Will see when, or if, Steve lets it through.

    • Agree: pyrrhus
  45. Maybe there would be less “gun violence” if the population wasn’t constantly exposed to “gun violence” via various media.

    “Hollywood” et al., should voluntarily decide to eliminate “gun violence” from their product. Indeed, why quibble?: They should eliminate all violence from their product.

    Also, they should de-sexualized their product to help reduce “unwanted pregnancies.”

    Hm, they should remove all undesirable human behaviors from their product. Why train people in how to act in an anti-social manner?

    • Agree: Rob, Old Prude
    • Replies: @Rob
    @Coemgen

    Could not decide whether to agree with or lol with this comment. I tried doing both, but RUnzilla’s software won’t let me!

    I just discovered mythcreants.com which is about sci-if/fantasy and rpgs (don’t you judge me!) several articles telling a “emailer” or himself, that having gun use in his novel would “endorse” gunplay in reality. found it.



    …Don’t have plots where the character’s problems come from gun control

    Like a zombie story where the survivors are doomed because of restrictions on private firearm ownership.

    Be realistic about how guns operate….
    Show that they need repair, show that they jam, show that they can damage your hearing.
     
    Not sure how realism in terms of covering fire and showing gun maintenance keeps people from getting shot. I guess less “sweeping fire” would help. But the reply to the letter should have been, “lol. Nothing you write affects shootings. Ghetto blacks don’t read.” Google would probably de-index his website.

    But your general point, agree and amplify would certainly help with guns. Books are not where the money is. Tv and movies? $! Trying to hurt Femocratic donors like Hollywood would be great. If we do it correctly, the left will eat their own. The other side are the ones promoting and profiting from violence. An imaginary letter, though it would have to fit in Tweetstorm. Can you @ people without it cutting into you word count? ‘At” a bunch of Hollywooderd

    “Gun violence kills x Americans annually. In spite of this ongoing tragedy, Hollywood continues to glorify gun violence x movie with gun violence grossed [insert number] in that same year. Thst’s $z real dollars for every dead American. @[director of movie] is that a good return on your investment?

    “y% of gun murders are young BLACK males. They are only α% of the population. [@BLACK actor], you shot β people in [movie] you shot γ BLACKS in movies the yr before. Do you try washing the blood off your hands?”

    “[@actor] δ American children were shot with AR-15 rifles in school shootings in current year-3 You shot ε people with an AR-15 in [movie earlier]. How many dead children is your paycheck worth?”

    “[@moviestudio] “The number of gun violence death grows every year. Smoking has declined. In part because Hollywood made the courageous decision to only depict cigarette smoking in a negative context. Villains smoke. Leading Women and men do not. Show the same courage with gun violence.

    Guns should always be portrayed as causing more problems, not solving them
    No heroes with assault style rifles in any context
    Cops should always say that they only need guns until private firearms are confiscated
    Beautiful women should reject any character who has used a gun, and say gun owners are just compensating for…
    Only effeminate homosexuals should perform drive-bys. Utilize trans and homophobia.”
    Actors who are classified as blacks and are depicting characters the audience will perceive as black should never use firearms. #BlackLivesMatter

    [@writers guild]Creativity thrives under constraints. Hollywood has the best writers, actors, and directors in the world. In earlier decades, movies never depicted semiautomatic weapons or non-RollyThing* handguns. Only right wingers and the alt-right want to watch movies with non-rollything* handguns or assault rifles.

    [@some movie studios @theatre chains] you can end gun violence in movies in one day.Theatres are a duopoly. You make money off the blood of blacks. You do not show NC 17 movies. Do not show gun violence movies

    [@Oscar, he decides who wins an Oscar, right?] Sexual pornography does not win mainstream Hollywood awards. Why do gun violence movies? You reward movies that kill children in real life. Oscar statuettes should be covered in blood!

    [@the people who rate movies] you rate movies NC-17 for sex. X number of Americans do not die as innocent bystanders from sex. Guns = NC17 or will you keep living on black blood?

    I am too lazy, but someone else could start this viral Twitter flash on movie studios. Studios will object to the blood-sucking Jew trope. To which everyone will realize they are trying to deflect righteous criticism, weakening the anti-anti-semitism shield.

    *I’m really not into guns!
  46. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw Mr. Unz's reply to you, Buzz. It doesn't prove anything, except, no it's not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they'll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn't make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
    I hope you haven't just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @BB753, @El Dato, @Sick 'n Tired, @Adam Smith

    Goldman Sachs doesn’t rule the world. Neither do their CEOs. They’re expendable.
    Wanna bet our real overlords are high on ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine? Jabs are for the peons. Do you really believe Bil Gates is stupid enough to shoot himself with his own crap?

    • Agree: By-tor
  47. @R.G. Camara
    While Frum, from his point of view (anti-gun), is right to try to shift to handguns. Going after rifles and shotguns is a loser these days.

    The pandemic, the crime surge as criminals were left to roam free, the 2020 communist riots across the country, Beto O'Rourke threatening to take away everyone's guns, the rigged election, and the left deciding the 2020 riot over the rigged election---basically, the last 18 months has been a surefire way to make sure no voter wants his AR or hunting rifle taken, and lots of Americans bought rifles and shotguns for the first time last year as a precaution. There was a massive ammo shortage, too, thanks to all the new gun buyers, the hording mentality, and shipping delays, which of course led to more shortages as people rushed to buy whatever was available.

    Handguns aren't seen by average joes as being weapons against 1984 camps or home invades. Rifles are the weapon in military fights, while shotguns (as every new gun owner learns when he first starts googling) are the best for home invaders and close-up attacks.

    Of course, the push for nationwide concealed carry that's gone on in the last 10 years has also made handguns a point of interest for gun folks. And first-time or just-for-protection female gun owners are much more comfortable using a small handgun than a rifle or shotgun. So there's a l

    So, in conclusion, Frum's idea won't bear much fruit these days. Perhaps he believes the U.S. won't break up in the next 10 years and life will get back to normal, and therefore this longer strategy will be more successful. Or perhaps he just needed to fill some space for his Atlantic paycheck.

    Replies: @magila, @bomag, @znon

    I’m a shotgun guy myself, but given the numbers of teens who are using at least ‘3A’ body armor, have shifted to a rifle as my primary home defense gun.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @magila

    Shotgun slugger - I doubt there’s any conventional body armor that’ll stop one of those.

    Replies: @JMcG

  48. David Frum knows exactly who’s doing the shooting, but since he is a coward and a liar, he won’t actually say it.

    “Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall.”

    Embarrassingly ridiculous statement. For a normie, purchasing a firearm is no more personally risky than purchasing an automobile. Getting vaccinated no more benefits the community than getting fitted for contact lenses. You’re not very good a suggestive marketing, considering.

    • Agree: Travis, V. Hickel
    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    @Mike Tre

    Yes, getting the mRNA vaccine doesn't benefit the community in any way, since you remain infectious, probably more infectious, as the CDC has admitted...

  49. Born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to a Jewish family, Frum is the son of the late Barbara Frum (née Rosberg), a well-known, Niagara Falls, New York-born journalist and broadcaster in Canada, and the late Murray Frum, a dentist, who later became a real estate developer, philanthropist, and art collector.

    Why is a Canadian Jew telling Americans to get rid of their guns?

    Maybe Frum should get the hell out of MY country and go back to Canada where he belongs and mind his own f–ing business…

    • Agree: By-tor, anarchyst
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Dr. X

    Same reason Jonathan Mason does.

  50. @Anon
    Paige Harden's Upcoming Book "The Genetic Lottery,"
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/paige-hardens-upcoming-book-the-genetic-lottery/

    Mr. Sailer:

    This book is finally coming out, more than three years after you posted about it. Did you get an ARC? Are you planning to review it?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @George Taylor, @MEH 0910

    Anon, have you seen Razib Khan’s early review?


    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @MEH 0910

    Exhibit A on why White women are the eternal and natural enemy of the White man.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Anon
    @MEH 0910

    I did see Khan's review. He has a longer, more recent follow-up review behind his SubStack paywall that I haven't read.

    From what I've read she's proposing something like Robert Plomin's idea of genetically "diagnosing" kids based on genetic sequencing, and then designing remedial early education for the dumb ones. The idea that we give eyeglasses to fix bad eyes, so let's do something for dumb kids. I'm not sure if Plomin really believes this harebrained idea would work, or whether it's Nazi cancellation insurance.

    At any rate, Harden's mentor Eric Turkheimer and Plomin have had a long-running feud, so it would be funny if Harden came out mimicking Plomin.

  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    Take the touchback, start at the 25 yard line.

    The vaccine.

    A trillions times more true playing against the Delta varient.

    All the Best

  52. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    For those if use who don’t actually buy into the “every vaxxed person will die in a year horribly” Ron’s point is meaningless.

    I don’t know how much simpler I can make this: I prefer not to get the vaccine because I don’t need it. Period. The rest of debate about the vaccine, including whether or not it is actually a vaccine by definition, is moot. That’s not to say there aren’t some very important issues to discuss about it. There are. But all are secondary.

    This is known as personal choice. Sailer and Unz and the rest of the Kovid Kultists have forgotten this basic fundamental right supposedly in existence in this supposedly free country.

    Sailer says those who choose not to get it are selfish, when in fact that is a deflection from his need to impose his own bit of personal tyranny upon the masses for his own selfish reasons. If Sailer or anyone else wants to vaccinate himself, I have nothing to say about it. Why can’t he/they extend the same bit of liberty minded courtesy?

    • Thanks: V. Hickel, Mr Mox
    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Mike Tre

    The problem is, this isn’t going to be allowed a “my body, my choice” situation. Hey, if you want to abort a kid, no problem. Don’t want to get vaxxed, big problem - for you/us. Look at what’s being proposed in Victoria, Aus.

  53. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @JMcG

    None-the-less, odds are that’s most likely the case.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JMcG


    ...a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

     

    https://laughingsquid.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/inspiring-man-born-without-arms-drives-his-beautiful-impala-with-his-legs.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Prof. Woland
    @JMcG


    “I’m always completely unarmed.”
     
    Unless they are a double amputee.
    , @Big Bill
    @JMcG

    My favorite thought experiment?

    Print up a stack of stickers saying "This house is a gun-free zone" and "This car is a gun-free zone" and sit at a table at lefty venues handing them out. Tell folks they are for putting on their front and rear doors or rear window.

    Alternatively, if you know an insufferable Progressive, just go stick one on their front door, eye level.

    Check how long they last.

  54. Only about 11.5 million Americans hunt in a given year, according to the latest Department of the Interior survey, fewer than the number who attend a professional ballet or modern-dance performance.

    Never give a gun to a man who doesn’t do modern performative dance.

  55. Hey, I’ve got a great idea! Let’s suggest to law-abiding citizens that they don’t need to arm themselves by making clear that The Establishment stands behind the police protecting them from Mostly Peaceful Protesters.

    Exactly.

    If the US murder rate could be brought down to the Egyptian one, which would be halving it and could be achieved by making the black murder rate in the US only as low the white one in the US, then ordinary people might not be so desperate to stock up on protection.

    To get it to the Swiss rate, where every adult man has a personal arsenal of firearms, may be too ambitious. US murders would have to be brought down by more than a factor of 10!

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Triteleia Laxa


    To get it to the Swiss rate, where every adult man has a personal arsenal of firearms, may be too ambitious. US murders would have to be brought down by more than a factor of 10!
     
    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don't seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.

    Replies: @By-tor

  56. The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.

    SPLOT! FRUMBRAIN FELL OUT.

    Didn’t continue reading.

    I guess running around in circles crying IKIKIKI is a “good argument” in today’s world.

    Former US Marine surrenders to police after killing four, including baby in his mother’s arms

    A gun battle ensued, and despite as many as hundreds of shots being fired between deputies and the suspect, no law enforcement officers were injured, Judd said. The sheriff lamented that Riley came out of the house with his hands up and no gun.

    “It would have been nice if he’d come out with a gun, and then we’d have been able to read a newspaper through him and we’d have had a different conversation here this morning,” Judd told reporters. “But when someone chooses to give up, we take them into custody peacefully.”

    And then

    Gun control advocates quickly seized on the massacre as another example of the need for stricter firearms laws, while others suggested that the shooter wasn’t killed by law enforcement because he’s white. But Judd argued a different political lesson was to be learned from the shootings.

    “Our crime rate in this county is at a 49-year low… but when you get a nutjob like this, statistical data makes no difference,” the sheriff said. “I mean, this guy was wired up on dope, on meth – you know, what those people think is low-level, non-violent meth – here’s your sign, today, again, and he came here for a gun battle.”

  57. “After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn’t do it. I sure as hell wouldn’t want to live in a society where the only people allowed guns are the police and the military.”

    William S. Burroughs

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Flip

    William Burroughs may not be the best pro-2A spokesman. He killed his wife while drunkenly playing William Tell, trying to shoot a glass she was balancing on top of her head.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Vollmer

  58. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    Thing is, if you’re not full-on counter-Semitic you can just say, “Yeah, good for them, they have guns, and good for us, we have guns too!”

    The hypocrisy coming from Frum is another story. As IHTG says, he’d probably say they need them and Americans do not. I think as Camara says it’s pretty clear Americans do now! I wouldn’t be too surprised if the McCloskeys weren’t expecting to use their guns–as I recall they made a bunch of mistakes in holding them and the like, and had been previously been Democrats.

  59. So Steve, to tie two subject threads together, when does David Frum persuade Americans to give up their automobiles, pickups, and SUV/CUVs?

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news/us-traffic-deaths-rose-in-2020-despite-significant-decline-in-road-travel/ar-BB1eeZCx#:~:text=The%20NSC%20estimates%20that%20in%202020%3A%201%2042%2C060,24%25%20from%201.20%20in%202019.%20More%20items…%20

    “The increase in the rate of 2020 motor vehicle deaths in the U.S. was the largest since 1924, according to a report from the National Safety Council (NSC). More than 42,000 people are estimated to have died on U.S. roadways last year, the largest motor vehicle death tally in 13 years.”

    The NSC estimates that in 2020:

    42,060 people died in crashes, eclipsing 2019’s estimate of 39,107 — an 8% increase.

    The estimated cost of deaths, injuries, and property damage to American society in 2020 was \$474.4 billion.“

    So looking at The Evil Guns:

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/2020-saw-more-gun-deaths-in-the-us-than-any-year-in-over-two-decades-showing-even-a-pandemic-couldn-t-stop-the-violence/ar-BB1eVJGz#:~:text=1%20There%20were%20a%20record%20number%20of%20gun,4%20See%20more%20stories%20on%20Insider%27s%20business%20page.

    “There were a record number of gun violence deaths in 2020: 19,379.
    This represents a huge leap from recent years, and the highest number in over two decades.”

    Now, I’m a little slow on math, but I do think 42,000 > 19,000.

    [MORE]

    So, For The Good Of Humanity, Americans must give up their beloved automobiles. I can even update Dave’s story for him:

    “The legalistic approach to restricting auto ownership and reducing automobile accidents is failing. So is the assumption behind it. Drawing a bright line between the supposedly vast majority of “responsible,” “law abiding” auto owners and those shadowy others who cause all the trouble is a prudent approach for politicians, but it obscures the true nature of the problem. We need to stop deceiving ourselves about the importance of this distinction. …”

    “And here is both the terrible tragedy of America’s auto habit and the best hope to end it. In virtually every way that can be measured, owning an automobile makes the owner, the owner’s family, and the people around them less safe. The hard-core auto owner will never accept this truth. But the 36 percent in the middle—they may be open to it, if they can be helped to perceive it.”

    “The vehicles Americans buy to transport their loved ones are the vehicles that end up being accidentally slammed into a loved one’s leg or rolling over their chest or head. The vehicles Americans buy to protect their young children are years later used for self-harm by their troubled teenagers. Or they are stolen from their driveway by criminals and used in robberies and murders. Or they are grabbed in rage and pointed at an ex-partner. ”

    “America has an auto problem because so many Americans are deceived by so many illusions about what an auto will do for them, their family, their world. They imagine an auto as the transport for their home and loved ones, rather than the standing invitation to harm, loss, and grief it so much more often proves to be.”

    Of course this will be tough on Atlantic subscribers who need an SUV to take Ashleigh, Kayleigh, and Jayden to soccer practice, gymnastics, and lacrosse, or to go to their summer home in the Hamptons, but sacrifices will need to be made for the good of society Comrade. And don’t you want everyone to be safe? 🙄

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @mmack


    So Steve, to tie two subject threads together, when does David Frum persuade Americans to give up their automobiles, pickups, and SUV/CUVs?
     
    Worry not. They want your cars too.

    There's a huge amount of "urban progressive" hate for regular flyover country Americans and their love of automobiles and freedom of movement. It's been a rather constant theme of the last half century. It's been on hold a bit these past few years as minoritarianism in full flower--immigration/"gender"/race--has been at the forefront, pushing all the "eco-y" stuff to the back burner.

    But come self-driving cars, they'll be back. The only trips allowed will be ones properly controlled and monitored and taxed by the state.

    Matty will pop up explaining that you owning a car and driving around as you see fit is in the way of the utopia that awaits us with One Billion Americans!
  60. Atlantic-washing’s actually a pretty good way to put it, he’s written a few pieces more or-less-arguing for immigration restriction:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/david-frum-how-much-immigration-is-too-much/583252/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/03/david-frum-reacts-immigration-responses/585391/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/why-americas-immigration-system-is-broken/593143/

    Steve’s basically the only conduit from the dissident right to the mainstream; people like Frum, Ross Douthat, and David Brooks at the right limit of currently-acceptable discourse read him and then pass his ideas off as their own.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @SFG

    Steve Jobs's widow owns the Atlantic. I wonder what he would have thought about her funding the lefties. He didn't seem very "woke" to me.

    Replies: @HA, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @3g4me
    @SFG

    @38 SFG: Steve is in no way 'dissident right.' HBD may be requisite but alone it is insufficient. Being anti-anti-White is not equivalent to being pro-White.

    , @LP5
    @SFG

    About that Atlantic-Washing, Frum must have some double-secret alter ego where he donates royalties to Steve. Is there a smoking invoice somewhere?

  61. When you consider that the invasion of Iraq was a flagrant breach of international law, killed a good million people, involved a lot of guns and that the sociopathic David Frum was one of its biggest cheerleaders and warmongers, sending Frum and Bush jr to an international war crimes tribunal would do more to reduce American gun crime than taking guns away from the rest of the population.

    I can’t believe that odious little sheet isn’t a complete pariah.

    • Agree: By-tor, Harry Baldwin
  62. @SFG
    Atlantic-washing's actually a pretty good way to put it, he's written a few pieces more or-less-arguing for immigration restriction:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/david-frum-how-much-immigration-is-too-much/583252/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/03/david-frum-reacts-immigration-responses/585391/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/why-americas-immigration-system-is-broken/593143/

    Steve's basically the only conduit from the dissident right to the mainstream; people like Frum, Ross Douthat, and David Brooks at the right limit of currently-acceptable discourse read him and then pass his ideas off as their own.

    Replies: @Flip, @3g4me, @LP5

    Steve Jobs’s widow owns the Atlantic. I wonder what he would have thought about her funding the lefties. He didn’t seem very “woke” to me.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Flip

    "Steve Jobs’s widow owns the Atlantic. I wonder what he would have thought about her funding the lefties. He didn’t seem very 'woke' to me."

    He was about as New-Age flaky as it gets. The fact that he parked in handicapped spaces even when he was healthy doesn't mean he wasn't woke -- it just means he was a jerk. Unless you're a leftist, that's not the same thing.

    And since people are mentioning free-riders and Unz's take on GoldmanSachs and vaccines, it's also worth recalling -- as Sailer has often noted -- that Jobs, being the New Age flake that he was, chose to buck the Big Pharma medical establishment when he came down with pancreatic cancer (although a rare form that had much better survival rates than the rest) and devote himself to "alternative" therapies instead of enduring chemo and all the other painful and chancy treatments that the real doctors were advising. I don't know what the analogs for Ivermectin and HCQ are in the case of pancreatic cancer but I suspect he had the money and the connections to pursue them all, at least for a while.

    That didn't work out so well. But at least pancreatic cancer isn't contagious, so he didn't wind up getting anyone else around him sick.

    Replies: @mike99588

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Flip

    Steve Jobs' widow also seems to have hung out with Ghislaine Maxwell, favourite daughter of Robert and consort of Jeffrey Epstein. Sean McCarthy's twitter feed shows a photo of them poolside together.

    What I don't know is if the pic was taken pre- or post-widowhood. The comments are 90% about Ghislaine's impressive bosom.

  63. Do you really want to compare gun ownership to vaccination? Shall I drive you to Philly where gun “owners” are killing and injuring people at a record pace? Also my well armed neighbors of which I have quite a few, don’t save me. The shotgun and rifles in my house do. You know like a well armed immune system.

  64. “their even more idiotic friends who have overdosed on ivermectin.” Rolling Stone has backed off their Ivermectin overdose story.

  65. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw Mr. Unz's reply to you, Buzz. It doesn't prove anything, except, no it's not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they'll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn't make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
    I hope you haven't just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @BB753, @El Dato, @Sick 'n Tired, @Adam Smith

    Seriously, get your vaccination and stop making up complex pretzel arguments pulling in the current state of the weather, your boss’s inner mindstate or the likelihood of getting hit by an asteroid.

    Contrariwise, stock up on vitamin D and evaluate the chance of

    1) Getting seriously ill
    2) Getting treatment when being seriously ill because the other seriously ill people are clogging the pipe

    tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.

    Playing mental games like that is unbecoming.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    I don't see how this is pretzel logic, El Dato:

    1) Been around this virus for 1 1/2 years. I've been exposed. I've not gotten sick from it. I don't need a vaccine.

    2) There are unknown health issues from the vax. I'm not awful worried about those for my case either, but see (1), still no point.

    3) Above all else, I'm not taking it because Government BigBiz is forcing it on us. I'm not sure what it will take for some weak-minded folks to take a stand.

    Contrawise, I don't NEED to take Vitamin D. I've been out in the sun for more than normal amounts of time (for me) since the PanicFest started. I stated that here many times - out with the kids - no masks, no floor stickers, no 6 ft. - from way back in March '20. I just laid out by the pool for 1 hour a couple of days ago, a bit too long, I think.

    On Vitamin D, I get the feeling that a lot of you people live up in Narsarsuq, Greenland or something. Is there no sun where you all live? GTFOutside.

    Nobody's clogging any pipe where I live, except for when Hospital Admins may get to firing nurses. That'll be just great for health care, right?

  66. One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

    I doubt it. European urban criminals don’t drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either. It could be because in Europe the underclass doesn’t have guns and rural people do (an advantage of rational gun laws), but I suspect the real reason is simply that POC type urban criminals lack the foresight and planning to even think about an undertaking requiring that kind of organization and time commitment.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Ireland has been, in recent years, plagued by thugs driving out of Dublin into the countryside and attacking vulnerable, usually elderly, farmers. I’ve linked to one such story, but there are plenty more.
    https://www.irishpost.com/news/attack-left-farmer-unconscious-prompts-call-greater-garda-presence-rural-areas-159600

    There were over 200 murders or cases of manslaughter in the Republic of Ireland between 2005 and 2015, the highest in the British Isles, this in an Island nation with an effective ban on privately owned handguns.
    https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/crime/republic-of-ireland-is-deadliest-place-to-live-in-irish-and-british-isles-new-figures-34614775.html

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Peter Akuleyev


    In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out.
     
    said Steve.
    Not so much. British and Irish rural roads are almost designed to be impassably blocked to vehicles at any point. I can't see any, still less the average, Postcode crew hiking even a few miles in the bone-chilling rain, wind and dark across stonewalled, hedged, fenced, ditched, ploughed and scrubland covered country.

    Just about every isolated bunch of houses has noisy, excitable dogs. With bad-tempered cattle in every other field (incidents involving particularly dogwalkers pop up every year; a Labour MP was nearly trampled to death a few years ago).

    All you have to do is nip down the field with a chainsaw and fell the odd overgrown hedgerow tree. The trees and tall hedges on each side are invariably banked and ditched, and the roads sweat-creatingly narrow and twisty, often single track. A completely unsigned, unmarked green maze, where even satnav will get you lost rather than helping even in broad daylight.

    Farmers are always on the qui vive and have a well-established mutual surveillance and comms net because of livestock rustlers (who just butcher the animals crudely and quietly in the field, rather than bothering with an easily-spotted cattle truck, and are likely used to handling animals; i.e. local rural crims). Probably ends up in urban kebabs and curry, like everything else.

    For a rapid response against vehicles, just hop in the Manitou, or John Deere with bale-tines, and chaaaaarge! down the 20-25 ft wide lane.
    I've had a number of linen-soiling encounters with harvest teams in a hurry. Those boys don't like to stop. Just drive up the verge as far as the ditch or wall (hoping there's no deliberately planted boulders there), or if there's time back up to a passing-place or field gate.

    Good luck with xtreme offroading through this lot
    https://www.godsowncounty.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/stone-walls-malham.jpg
    , @dearieme
    @Peter Akuleyev

    European urban criminals don’t drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either

    Yeah, that's what the Gypsies are for.

  67. @Verymuchalive

    Frum: How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns
     
    As ever, Frum gets it the wrong way round. The Question should be:
    How to persuade American criminals to give up their guns

    Criminals in Victorian England had access to guns, but very few carried them. The consequences of killing someone in the act of robbery would result in an automatic hanging. Also, in a largely homogeneous society, detection rates for murder were very high. Even now, detection rates for murder in England are still very high.
    In America, applying this to a drug-addled class of blacks, who are responsible for most US gun crime, will be difficult. But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    • Agree: Verymuchalive
    • Troll: Achmed E. Newman, TWS
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    , @3g4me
    @Peter Akuleyev

    @40 Peter Akuleyev: Besides being inadvertently ridiculous, you're a bald-faced liar. Africans (both northern and sub-saharan) commit most murders and rapes and other crimes in Europe and use guns, knives, bombs, and fire. Why don't you ban kitchen knives (England's latest attempt to pretend diversity /= war) and matches while you're at it? A civilized society is a White society, without the 2% gnawing away at its foundations.

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns."

    Same with most American drug addicts. The monkey-on-their-back keeps whispering in their ears about the next fix so they usually don't have the spare stolen coin to buy an illegal firearm. European and American drug-dealers conduct their business with a gun in their coat pocket.

    "That is how a civilized society functions."

    I lived in perhaps the most civilized European country and found it quite peaceful and relaxing. Then I grew bored and took a job as a bouncer at a nightclub filled with pretty young adults. I didn't find the friction I was looking for at that job. So I took to walking around the nearby neighborhood that housed the tough Turk element and felt strangely at home. My point is this after that lengthy digression: the USA has never been a fully civilized country. It's history, multi-racial population, and culture won't allow for it.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    , @Charlesz Martel
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Most Americans do not really understand European gun laws. In the 1980's, prior to a significant increase in European legal integration- each country still had its own currency then- many European gun laws were way more lenient than American laws. In France, with NO background checks or waiting periods, one could buy a semi-auto assault rifle with a silencer, a cane gun (a gun built into a walking cane), a non-lethal tennis ball gun that used 12 gauge primers to fire tennis balls at 100 mph to incapacitate people, which is a firearm in the U.S. as it uses combustion to propel a projectile, etc. Also switchblades and other edged weapons.

    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!

    The Schengen open-borders lunacy started the great tightening up of gun laws. Naturally, gun crime started shooting up. As Europe decided to import low IQ violent people, especially Muslims, this continued, along with the general decline in civility and other indicators of quality of life.

    The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it's about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.

    The time for gun control is over, short of our becoming a full-blown police state, which is where this all will end up before the country splits up.

    I wonder where the mixed people will go?

    In England, prior to a school massacre- which the authorities completely bungled as they ignored persistent warnings from gun clubs about a dangerous person trying to join their clubs- one could buy full auto belt-fed weapons as long as they were smooth-bored, which made them full-auto shotguns. There was even a belt-fed 12 gauge .50 Browning M-2 you could buy with no special approvals this way!

    Replies: @fish, @Corn, @Peter Akuleyev

    , @Mike1
    @Peter Akuleyev

    So much stupid...

    The open fascism on display in places like Spain gets shown around the world. Police don't behave like that around people who may be armed.

    Your implication that illegal residents don't have access to guns in Europe is just breathtakingly dumb. Europeans (especially the more Germanic ones) have a bizarre fantasy that rules equal on the ground reality.

    , @Kylie
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions."

    In a truly civilized Western society, every farmer would have a gun and every African drug addict would be deported to the African country of his--or his ancestors'--origin, regardless of his age.

    , @Oikeamielinen
    @Peter Akuleyev


    In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.
     
    You obviously don't know anything about Sweden.
    , @John Johnson
    @Peter Akuleyev

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Let me re-write that for you:
    Register all guns and force Blacks to stab each other....then call it civilization.

    That is the unspoken belief of most Democrats and bitter European men that let socialists talk them out of gun rights.

    There are areas of Montana where no one locks their doors and everyone has guns. Such areas are far safer than Paris. Why are we certain that guns are the problem again?

    Only about 5 years and 3D printers will be churning out handguns for everyone. Probably should face the reality of race now and drop this ridiculous WAR AGAINST GUNS AND POINTY OBJECTS that came from the left and cowardly right.

    Or put your head in the sand and wait to see what absurd move the European left comes up with.

    Swedish IKEA stops selling knives after African stabbing.
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2015/08/12/first-it-was-gun-control-now-its-knife-control-ikea-stops-selling-knives-after-store-stabbing/

  68. @R.G. Camara
    While Frum, from his point of view (anti-gun), is right to try to shift to handguns. Going after rifles and shotguns is a loser these days.

    The pandemic, the crime surge as criminals were left to roam free, the 2020 communist riots across the country, Beto O'Rourke threatening to take away everyone's guns, the rigged election, and the left deciding the 2020 riot over the rigged election---basically, the last 18 months has been a surefire way to make sure no voter wants his AR or hunting rifle taken, and lots of Americans bought rifles and shotguns for the first time last year as a precaution. There was a massive ammo shortage, too, thanks to all the new gun buyers, the hording mentality, and shipping delays, which of course led to more shortages as people rushed to buy whatever was available.

    Handguns aren't seen by average joes as being weapons against 1984 camps or home invades. Rifles are the weapon in military fights, while shotguns (as every new gun owner learns when he first starts googling) are the best for home invaders and close-up attacks.

    Of course, the push for nationwide concealed carry that's gone on in the last 10 years has also made handguns a point of interest for gun folks. And first-time or just-for-protection female gun owners are much more comfortable using a small handgun than a rifle or shotgun. So there's a l

    So, in conclusion, Frum's idea won't bear much fruit these days. Perhaps he believes the U.S. won't break up in the next 10 years and life will get back to normal, and therefore this longer strategy will be more successful. Or perhaps he just needed to fill some space for his Atlantic paycheck.

    Replies: @magila, @bomag, @znon

    Agree.

    Frum’s article is a standard anti-gun argument.

  69. @Altai
    Frum's comments also remind me of a video I just saw of an interview ESPN did with DeAndre Yedlin. The US men's soccer team had another disappointing (By historical standards, this team is quite poor) result against Canada in the World Cup qualifiers.

    So I clicked on defender DeAndre Yedlin's profile link on ESPN and it autoplays a video where he talks about his (Ashkenazi Jewish, Seattle-dwelling) grandfather saying he was glad his grandson was living abroad as he'd fear for his life in the US...

    https://www.espn.com/football/english-premier-league/0/video/4106561/usmnts-yedlin-my-grandpa-says-im-safer-outside-the-us

    This guy grew up on the mean streets of 1990s/2000s Seattle and is half Ashkenazi (And apparently only 1/4 black) yet he dresses and fronts as if he is straight outta 1980/90s Compton. He is celebrating the chic of the very violent honour culture that drives the violence and murder rates in the US while pretending he is glad to be in Northern England because of his fear of American police. And his boomer Ashkenazi grandfather living in suburban Seattle sounds just like Frum.

    Yedlin identifies as one-quarter black, one-quarter Native American and half-Latvian Jewish. Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.
     

    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.

    Replies: @Abe, @3g4me, @Hangnail Hans

    Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.

    “Boo-hoo, sad story. Typical African-American dad story.”
    — Drake

    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    @Abe

    "Once you go black, you're a single mother!"

  70. Sailer: How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Wokeism

    After all, readers of Sailer’s blog must make up a huge fraction of America’s wokesters.

    So he’s trying to focus attention on handguns without getting cancelled.

    Well, some people think The Atlantic will reach a wider target than The Unz Review.

    Anyway, if you ban guns nobody can buy them, including blacks. So mission accomplished. Unless the U.S.A. is like Brazil where contraband prevails.

  71. @Reg Cæsar

    How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns


    In lightly armed England...
     
    Englishmen were persuaded to give up their guns over centuries of mostly crime-free living. Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    But that was when England was still English.

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South. Has anybody compared 19th-century crime in both places?

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    Replies: @Corn, @Jack D, @inertial, @raga10, @Catdog

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South.

    Peter Hitchens once commented that the law and gun carry practices of Edwardian England make modern Texas look almost effeminate.

  72. Has anyone plotted annual handgun sales with the murder rate since ~1960? I don’t remember hearing about hugely growing sales during the crack wars, when turf murders were in isolated areas.

    You’d think people would have felt safer locked down in their homes last year, when they didn’t have to work in burning and looted downtowns, but the failure of too many local governments to keep the peace was too obvious. And they’ll keep voting for the same idiots.

  73. David Frum writes, “Only about 11.5 million Americans hunt in a given year, according to the latest Department of the Interior survey, fewer than the number who attend a professional ballet or modern-dance performance.”

    Where does Frum get his information about the number of people who annually attend at least one professional ballet or modern-dance performance? Is he making sure that a fan who attends three performances a year is not triple-counted? I don’t know much about the magazine business. Do the Atlantic editors demand information from a writer about his information sources (e.g., to include in a footnote)?

  74. @International Jew
    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys. On the same token, in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that's not an argument to disband the army.

    If you get a gun, though, please get training too.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Charlesz Martel, @Slim, @anon

    in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that’s not an argument to disband the army.

    One of my father’s assignments, as WWII wound down, was to document and photograph all the fatalities at his Army/Air Force base — not in Europe or Asia, in Texas

    • Replies: @anon
    @Known Fact

    About ten years ago a bus driver told me that her 27- year old son dropped dead while running around a track at an army base in Tennessee.

  75. I will know people like Frum are sincere in their concerns about guns when they propose draconian sentencing guidelines for the possession or use of illegal guns, and say this needs to be rigorously implemented in policing in our cities.

    The insanity of Frum’s idea of persuasion of law-abiding types to forego gun ownership to lower violence is that the most enthusiastic practitioners of criminal activity featuring guns do not care one bit about the cultural habits or beliefs of law-abiding people. You could eliminate all homicides committed by whites and our country would still have a homicide rate more than double other first world countries due to the industriousness of blacks alone.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Arclight


    I will know people like Frum are sincere in their concerns about guns when they propose draconian sentencing guidelines for the possession or use of illegal guns, and say this needs to be rigorously implemented in policing in our cities.
     
    I suspect that a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years for the discharge of a firearm during the commission of a felony, and a mandatory death penalty for a homicide using a firearm would reduce homicide rates. But they're not interested in reducing homicide rates - they're interested in disarming whitey.
  76. @Henry Canaday
    Support for tougher gun laws was increasing steadily until the Warren Court dismantled the criminal justice system.

    Replies: @Corn

    I don’t have a cite handy but I read something once, a poll taken back in the late ‘50s/early 60s showed a disturbingly high number of Americans in favor of either licensing or outright banning handguns. I don’t remember the exact percentage though.

  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    Houses with BLM signs may be getting targeted because the thieves think there’s a smaller chance of the homeowner pressing charges if the thieves are caught.

    Call it breaking and entering insurance-for crooks.

  78. Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall. Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community …

    Cheap shot. You could easily turn this on its head and argue that the non-vaccinated are taking some personal risk and inconvenience — like being banned or fired — for the greater good, in case the vaccines turn into one huge unintended consequence we can never take back. Or if they simply are not worth the inherent risk

    • Agree: usNthem
  79. @IHTG
    @Mr. Anon

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Mr. Anon, @anon

    Any veteran of a combat unit (thus 15% of all men) can obtain a gun permit regardless of where he lives.

    Meanwhile the Arab population is armed to the teeth with illegal guns.

    • Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam
    @International Jew

    if that's true, why don't those arabs ever use their "illegal" guns on jews?

    Replies: @True or not

    , @Dan Hayes
    @International Jew

    The NYPD as this city's licensing agency does not recognize any such combat veteran free card!

  80. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    Unz’s argument is that smart people never do stupid things? That smart people are never conned?

    In 1841, Charles Mackay wrote a wonderful book “Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds” which needs updating in light of the Fauci Flu hysteria.

  81. @Zoos
    Meanwhile, for you do-it-yourselfer's, Lowes new policy makes it easier to get what you need, when you need it!

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1434521333187153925?s=20

    Replies: @prosa123, @epebble

    It’s not just Lowe’s. The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen. Employees other than loss prevention staff and, sometimes, managers are strictly prohibited from trying to intervene in any way.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @prosa123

    This happens a lot more than people seem to think. Especially people who get their 'intelligence' from the mass media.

  82. What a stupid idea. Is city slicker Frum under the impression that our guns consist of rusty worthless old pawnshop revolvers? That we should just drop in the trash? Nice graphic, Atlantic.

    My Glock 19 cost \$500 when I bought it 15 years ago. My husband’s Sig Sauer and HK cost considerably more–drop those in the trash too? Or give them to the police?

    Come to think of it, my aged spouse has been giving his guns away to the kids, which is how family guns are usually transferred. Does that count?

    Good newish guns in working order are like gold.

  83. People still care what David Frum thinks…..?

    • Disagree: V. Hickel
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @fish

    I agree that David Frum is a dingbat. But he is echt neocon. And unfortunately neocons still rule America. Having neocons running America is a little like having a neighbor that trains fighting pitbulls and lets them run loose in your yard. The neighbor is crazy, but you can't ignore what he does.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9963319/Lindsey-Graham-says-REINVADE-Afghanistan-deal-terrorists-Talibans-safe-haven.html

  84. Fewer than 10 percent of Americans amass arsenals of five weapons or more.

    First, many men who have such “arsenals” will never tell the truth about how many guns are owned. Secondly, if a guy gets a shotgun and a .22 rifle as a teen it’s almost certain he’ll acquire a few more in adulthood. And finally, having a deer rifle, an AR-15 carbine, a .22 rifle, a hunting shotgun, a home defense shotgun, a concealable handgun, plus a large handgun (.45, .357 mag, etc.) for hiking, SHTF, or anti-carjacking insurance when visiting the city, is not that big a deal for men between the coastal cities. Five guns is a modestly stocked household IMHO.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @TWS
    @Neuday

    I lived in an extremely rural southern town for a few months. Every single home had an Arsenal in an old gun cabinet or the coat closest. Every single one had enough to arm and equip a platoon.

    Guns are in nearly every rural and suburban American home and given the social media pictures of every sainted rapper, song writer and astronaut the inner city is lousy with hand guns, shotguns and various semi auto carbines.

    Frum seriously underestimates his 'problem'

  85. Rural England is armed – although not to the same level as the US – with shotguns and silenced/supressed 22 cal rifles. The issue is the legal jeopardy the English home defender faces if he uses the slightest force or threat of force with a firearm.

    Canada is similar I suspect.

  86. @Triteleia Laxa

    Hey, I’ve got a great idea! Let’s suggest to law-abiding citizens that they don’t need to arm themselves by making clear that The Establishment stands behind the police protecting them from Mostly Peaceful Protesters.
     
    Exactly.

    If the US murder rate could be brought down to the Egyptian one, which would be halving it and could be achieved by making the black murder rate in the US only as low the white one in the US, then ordinary people might not be so desperate to stock up on protection.

    To get it to the Swiss rate, where every adult man has a personal arsenal of firearms, may be too ambitious. US murders would have to be brought down by more than a factor of 10!

    Replies: @Flip

    To get it to the Swiss rate, where every adult man has a personal arsenal of firearms, may be too ambitious. US murders would have to be brought down by more than a factor of 10!

    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don’t seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.

    • Replies: @By-tor
    @Flip


    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don’t seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.
     
    Those four states are perceived to have far fewer blacks and Central American illegals than others.

    Replies: @Flip

  87. @Peter Akuleyev
    One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

    I doubt it. European urban criminals don't drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either. It could be because in Europe the underclass doesn't have guns and rural people do (an advantage of rational gun laws), but I suspect the real reason is simply that POC type urban criminals lack the foresight and planning to even think about an undertaking requiring that kind of organization and time commitment.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Expletive Deleted, @dearieme

    Ireland has been, in recent years, plagued by thugs driving out of Dublin into the countryside and attacking vulnerable, usually elderly, farmers. I’ve linked to one such story, but there are plenty more.
    https://www.irishpost.com/news/attack-left-farmer-unconscious-prompts-call-greater-garda-presence-rural-areas-159600

    There were over 200 murders or cases of manslaughter in the Republic of Ireland between 2005 and 2015, the highest in the British Isles, this in an Island nation with an effective ban on privately owned handguns.
    https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/crime/republic-of-ireland-is-deadliest-place-to-live-in-irish-and-british-isles-new-figures-34614775.html

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
  88. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can’t expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution
     
    You prefer Canada's? Or California's?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get 'er done. We don't need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don't think like an American, so why don't you just get the hell out already?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @TWS
    @Jonathan Mason

    Just shut the hell up about American criminal justice. Nobody is telling you how to live in the Central American paradise you've found. You have no interest, stake, or say in America.

    Literally everything you write is uninformed, dangerous and foolish. At best you're misguided and blinkered. That is a charitable take on your relentlessly dangerous ignorance.

    Frankly, I am guessing you're larping as a European upper class twit straight out of Monty Python. No one can survive living by the idiocy you advocate.

    , @Neil Templeton
    @Jonathan Mason

    Perhaps Mr. Unz needs a "Thersites" tab.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Jonathan Mason

    The Constitution is just fine.

    None of my guns are registered and I do not have any license to own them. That is the way it is going to stay.

    I will give up my guns when the cops are disarmed. Until then, bugger off.

    , @aj54
    @Jonathan Mason

    "But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone."
    human nature does not change. You can find quotes from ancient Greece and Rome that are just as timely today as when they were first written down. The principles of the Constitution are intact. The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Jonathan Mason


    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.
     
    So true! Which explains why we still have slavery, get around in horse carriages, and communicate by horse mail, like Kevin Costner in The Postman. That damn Constitution keeps getting in the way of any progress.
    , @Muggles
    @Jonathan Mason


    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.
     
    Inside the body of someone who writes like this lies the beating heart of a newly resurrected Joseph Stalin. Just waiting to unleash on the "new kulaks."

    Not an ad hominem attack. Argument by analogy.
    , @Verymuchalive
    @Jonathan Mason


    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.
     
    Actually, this "antiquated" constitution would have worked perfectly well if there had been no Civil War. The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one. It also left very large numbers of illegally held firearms. There was no political will to do anything about it at the time, and little will thereafter. Finally, it emancipated the negro population. In the course of time, these negroes were able to acquire legally and illegally held firearms.
    The rest is, as the say, history.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Weaver
    @Jonathan Mason

    What does a "modern" constitution mean? The 14th Amendment changed the US dramatically, centralised it under the federal government. Before that amendment, there were no American citizens but rather citizens of each state. And citizenship was limited, by the federal legislature, to whites alone. That was not some change by the Supreme Court.

    The first African Americans were created by the 14th. Even Lincoln didn't free a slave. There were free blacks, even black and Amerindian slave holders, but no black or Amerindian citizens before the 14th.

    And after the 14th, the way the Amendment was interpreted, Coolidge had to grant citizenship to Amerindians. It wasn't until later that the 14th was reinterpreted to mean birthright citizenship as we have today.

    -

    If you're going to ban guns, then ban private security, ban guards and guard gates. If you want a "modern" constitution, then don't allow the wealthy to hide away in security while the poor are made victims of criminals.

    Also, do you realise that guns grant women equality? Without them, men have a significant strength advantage over women. I guess you don't mind that since you'd guarantee abortion in your "modern" Constitution.

    Replies: @raga10

  89. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    Buzz, my wife took the jab; working at an Ivy with all of those Fundamentalist Covidians around always meant that the pressure would be on. I cautioned her against the growing evidence of adverse events, but as I am now retired, and of reduced income stream, her position supplies the larger portion of our household income in comparison with my SS, a modest pension, and some inherited financial instruments and stock, and this weighed in the balance.
    She is aware of my views, and doesn’t pressure me.

    For further context, I believe that she had the Coof more than a year and a half ago (dry cough, persistant fever), and probably had as a consequence natural antibodies developed. (There were lots and lots of Chinese students at her university, fresh off of mid-year break at the time of her illness to provide a likely exposure to her back in early 2020). She recovered fairly quickly. I never seem to have been infected, ar least not symptomatically; as an asthmatic (very well controlled through an optimum controlling drug), I was careful to avoid this respiratory pathogen, whatever it might have been, through common sense measures (hand washing, no rubbing of eyes, my customary ongoing, judicious supplementation of vitamins and minerals, etc.). It was only in retrospect, reflecting upon her symptoms and the course of her illness, that I came to suspect that her illness was likely the Coof.

    Thus far, I see no indication of pernicious effects from her vaccination, but in the event that they occur, my solidarity is expressed through not taking the jab so that I will be well to take care of her, come what may.

    Speaking as a “free rider”, of course. /s

    Respectfully,
    JJ

  90. I’ll tell you how. Have the CDC dictate that everyone needs to give up their guns. Give it two weeks, and 98 percent of the legal guns will be surrendered.

  91. One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

    Boonie-Americans. Finally, a label I can self-apply.

    We-uns Boonie-Americans tend not only to own guns, but also shoot guns at things that move like rats and BMWs. If Suzi Suburbia buys a gun to protect herself but thinks she will handle the situation well when Deonte breaks into her house to mate with her and start a family, then she is wrong. Suzi is going to get preggers. And probably V.D.

    However, if Suzi breaks character and goes out to the boonies to practice correctly, which means practicing drawing the gun from her purse (or her inner thigh holster like Angelina Jolie – yum) and then aiming and firing at a target, about a thousand times over the course of a month or two, she won’t get preggers but Deonte will be the star attraction at the next ‘hood funeral/barbecue/mass shooting.

    For a side arm to be effective when used for self defense, the person needs to make drawing, aiming, shooting, then calling an attorney automatic as in muscle memory.

  92. Insist that Canada take him back.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Art Deco

    John Housemen. Buddy Ebsen. William Schallert. DeForest Kelley. William Windom. Darren McGavin. Martin Milner. Jack Cassidy. Ted Cassidy. Roddy McDowall. David Hedison. Billy Mumy. The Mummy. Clint Howard. Robert Conrad. Ted Bessell. Buddy Hackett. The Shriners Hospital kid that looks like Buddy Hackett. Stuart Whitman. Milton Seltzer. Milton's Toes. Vin Scully. Victor Buono. Sonny Bono. Bono. Robby Benson. Richard Thomas. William Conrad. Peter Graves. James Arness. Art Linkletter. Art Deco. Art's Deli. Lawrence Welk. Tim Conway. Phil Hendrie. James Doohan. Claude Akins. The Banana Splits. Jimmy Dean. Mike Lookinland. Martin Bormann. Warren Oates. Robert Quarry. Vincent Price. Shemp Howard. Robert Ryan. The cast of Cool Hand Luke. Richard Roundtree. Billy Jack. The guy who played Billy Jack. Peter Fonda. Stuart Margolin. Joe Santos. The cast of The Rat Patrol. Oliver Reed. Bo Hopkins. Jimmy Caan's coke connection on The Killer Elite. The Santa Claus at the Kmart in Hayward in 1977. Albert Salmi. Peter Falk. Sam Peckinpah. The Fossil Man on S3, Ep 12 of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Ross Martin. Robert Stack. Rabbi Finklestein. William Marshall. Ricardo Montalban. Morgan Woodward. The Mysterious Irwin Allen. Roy Thinnes. Rick Monday. Tom Bosley. Strother Martin. Charles Grey. Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Klaus Schwab. A Quinn Martin Production. The talking flute on H.R. Pufnstuf. Sid and Marty Krofft's Day Care for Single Mothers. Danny Bonaduce. The guy who set up the stereo system in your den. All these pix you withhold from me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Hangnail Hans, @Mike Tre

  93. @Peter Akuleyev
    One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

    I doubt it. European urban criminals don't drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either. It could be because in Europe the underclass doesn't have guns and rural people do (an advantage of rational gun laws), but I suspect the real reason is simply that POC type urban criminals lack the foresight and planning to even think about an undertaking requiring that kind of organization and time commitment.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Expletive Deleted, @dearieme

    In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out.

    said Steve.
    Not so much. British and Irish rural roads are almost designed to be impassably blocked to vehicles at any point. I can’t see any, still less the average, Postcode crew hiking even a few miles in the bone-chilling rain, wind and dark across stonewalled, hedged, fenced, ditched, ploughed and scrubland covered country.

    Just about every isolated bunch of houses has noisy, excitable dogs. With bad-tempered cattle in every other field (incidents involving particularly dogwalkers pop up every year; a Labour MP was nearly trampled to death a few years ago).

    All you have to do is nip down the field with a chainsaw and fell the odd overgrown hedgerow tree. The trees and tall hedges on each side are invariably banked and ditched, and the roads sweat-creatingly narrow and twisty, often single track. A completely unsigned, unmarked green maze, where even satnav will get you lost rather than helping even in broad daylight.

    Farmers are always on the qui vive and have a well-established mutual surveillance and comms net because of livestock rustlers (who just butcher the animals crudely and quietly in the field, rather than bothering with an easily-spotted cattle truck, and are likely used to handling animals; i.e. local rural crims). Probably ends up in urban kebabs and curry, like everything else.

    For a rapid response against vehicles, just hop in the Manitou, or John Deere with bale-tines, and chaaaaarge! down the 20-25 ft wide lane.
    I’ve had a number of linen-soiling encounters with harvest teams in a hurry. Those boys don’t like to stop. Just drive up the verge as far as the ditch or wall (hoping there’s no deliberately planted boulders there), or if there’s time back up to a passing-place or field gate.

    Good luck with xtreme offroading through this lot

  94. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution

    You prefer Canada’s? Or California’s?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Not sure that that is a good thing, but it seems that countries can implement new constitutions without the need for a revolution.

    The US is seriously in danger of falling apart, and it may become increasingly difficult to hold elections to choose governments that are accepted by the population.

    People are massively divided on issues like immigration, guns and policing, health care, how to hold elections, foreign policy, abortion. The West Coast, the East Coast, the north and the south, and the middle States have diverging populations and interests.

    It is not a foregone conclusion that the United States will hang together forever. Perhaps it will not break up in my lifetime, but in my children's, maybe.

    When I was young I did not think that the iron curtain would ever be pulled aside, and it was a total surprise to me when East and West Germany reunited. Shit happens, and it happens quickly.

    Replies: @El Dato, @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

  95. Frum’s message is Tutto nello Stato.

    You should depend on the state for your protection. That the state can’t protect you is irrelevant. It is your duty to conform. Your survival is of no consequence. Better you die than not conform.

    See also: Covid vaccination (sic). Masks. Lockdowns.

    I love this part:

    The weapons Americans buy to protect their loved ones are the weapons that end up being accidentally discharged into a loved one’s leg or chest or head.

    He’s concerned about your families. LOL. He couldn’t care less about you or your families. Surrender to the state. It’s for the children.

    More people are buying guns because current events show the government will NOT protect you. You are not their priority.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Gamecock

    Right. He's playing on people's fears of guns in attempt to stop GoodWhites from becoming comfortable with them, because that might lead them to change their minds on gun control.

  96. @Pincher Martin
    The one accomplishment Trump's four years in power and continued political relevance have undoubtedly done is to shake loose the Neocons from the GOP. There is no going back after this. Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel, @Thomas, @Currahee, @HammerJack, @MarkinLA

    They’re frantically seeking a new host, without much success.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  97. @Peter Akuleyev
    One reason that America has surprisingly few Clockwork Orange-style home invasions with urban criminals driving out to the boonies to attack locals is because Boonie-Americans tend to be so well-armed.

    I doubt it. European urban criminals don't drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either. It could be because in Europe the underclass doesn't have guns and rural people do (an advantage of rational gun laws), but I suspect the real reason is simply that POC type urban criminals lack the foresight and planning to even think about an undertaking requiring that kind of organization and time commitment.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Expletive Deleted, @dearieme

    European urban criminals don’t drive out to the boonies to attack rural Europeans either

    Yeah, that’s what the Gypsies are for.

  98. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution
     
    You prefer Canada's? Or California's?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Not sure that that is a good thing, but it seems that countries can implement new constitutions without the need for a revolution.

    The US is seriously in danger of falling apart, and it may become increasingly difficult to hold elections to choose governments that are accepted by the population.

    People are massively divided on issues like immigration, guns and policing, health care, how to hold elections, foreign policy, abortion. The West Coast, the East Coast, the north and the south, and the middle States have diverging populations and interests.

    It is not a foregone conclusion that the United States will hang together forever. Perhaps it will not break up in my lifetime, but in my children’s, maybe.

    When I was young I did not think that the iron curtain would ever be pulled aside, and it was a total surprise to me when East and West Germany reunited. Shit happens, and it happens quickly.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Jonathan Mason

    CIS as a best example, Yougoslavia as a worst example (though the latter was subject to a lot of machinations by irredentist NATO countries, in particular Germany, and Clinton's urge to unload in order to disrupt).

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Last time this came up you were touting the brilliance of the French system that was on its umpteenth revision of their constitution and its fifth or sixth republic. The thing is we already have democratic rule (of a sort). The Constitution is meant to constrain people like you from abrogating the liberties of American citizens for what you fondly imagine are the pressing needs of the present. In other words to be beyond the reach of ordinary majorities. Call me crazy but I, for one, would much sooner entrust my liberties to the hands of James Madison and John Adams than the likes of Nicolas Sarkozy and Emmanuel Macron. But maybe that’s just me. No offense, but there is a reason we kicked the likes of you out and back to Perfidious Albion.

    Replies: @inertial

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

     

    No, but California's and Canada's are much newer, thus much better, right? Our decimal coinage system is just as old as our Constitution. Is that outdated too? Shall we join the rest of the English-speaking world and take £sd?
  99. OT:

    Artificial Neural Network generates content from YOUR textual description at website at artflow.ai (no Wikipedia article yet)

    I didn’t try it because the waiting time is 520 minutes right now, but there is a selection of results at knowyourmeme, including happy merchant, like these.

    I’m gonna try “standard reader of Steve Sailer’s blog”

    Fells like a visual Watson. It’s probably scouring all the chans/imageboards possible to generate its stuff.

    [MORE]

  100. @Zoos
    Meanwhile, for you do-it-yourselfer's, Lowes new policy makes it easier to get what you need, when you need it!

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1434521333187153925?s=20

    Replies: @prosa123, @epebble

    Two White guys walking out with carts full of building materials in a new Subaru – only in Oregon.

    BTW, this happened in north Salem ( a little south of Portland).

    https://www.keizertimes.com/posts/3213/blatant-shoplifting-incident-angers-keizer-community

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    @epebble

    Those were Mexicans, bro.

  101. @JimDandy
    @Greta Handel

    I'm an unvaxxed legal gun owner. I'm beyond good and evil.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Ditto, and much more difficult in the People’s Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    Steve, that jab will only go into my cold, dead arm!

  102. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Not sure that that is a good thing, but it seems that countries can implement new constitutions without the need for a revolution.

    The US is seriously in danger of falling apart, and it may become increasingly difficult to hold elections to choose governments that are accepted by the population.

    People are massively divided on issues like immigration, guns and policing, health care, how to hold elections, foreign policy, abortion. The West Coast, the East Coast, the north and the south, and the middle States have diverging populations and interests.

    It is not a foregone conclusion that the United States will hang together forever. Perhaps it will not break up in my lifetime, but in my children's, maybe.

    When I was young I did not think that the iron curtain would ever be pulled aside, and it was a total surprise to me when East and West Germany reunited. Shit happens, and it happens quickly.

    Replies: @El Dato, @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    CIS as a best example, Yougoslavia as a worst example (though the latter was subject to a lot of machinations by irredentist NATO countries, in particular Germany, and Clinton’s urge to unload in order to disrupt).

  103. @Altai
    Frum's comments also remind me of a video I just saw of an interview ESPN did with DeAndre Yedlin. The US men's soccer team had another disappointing (By historical standards, this team is quite poor) result against Canada in the World Cup qualifiers.

    So I clicked on defender DeAndre Yedlin's profile link on ESPN and it autoplays a video where he talks about his (Ashkenazi Jewish, Seattle-dwelling) grandfather saying he was glad his grandson was living abroad as he'd fear for his life in the US...

    https://www.espn.com/football/english-premier-league/0/video/4106561/usmnts-yedlin-my-grandpa-says-im-safer-outside-the-us

    This guy grew up on the mean streets of 1990s/2000s Seattle and is half Ashkenazi (And apparently only 1/4 black) yet he dresses and fronts as if he is straight outta 1980/90s Compton. He is celebrating the chic of the very violent honour culture that drives the violence and murder rates in the US while pretending he is glad to be in Northern England because of his fear of American police. And his boomer Ashkenazi grandfather living in suburban Seattle sounds just like Frum.

    Yedlin identifies as one-quarter black, one-quarter Native American and half-Latvian Jewish. Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.
     

    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.

    Replies: @Abe, @3g4me, @Hangnail Hans

    @26 Altai: No one named Yedlin has ever been anything more than a magic paper/magic dirt American. If you regard natio as requiring an attorney, Jack D is your huckleberry. If you regard being American as being part of a people with the same language, history, and genetics, then someone like Yedlin is nothing more than an unfortunate accident of birth.

  104. Frum is a particularly unpleasant example of a particularly unpleasant group.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @Currahee

    He should change his name to 'David Reform' or 'David Reconstructionist'. 'David Frum' is false advertising.

  105. @SFG
    Atlantic-washing's actually a pretty good way to put it, he's written a few pieces more or-less-arguing for immigration restriction:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/david-frum-how-much-immigration-is-too-much/583252/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/03/david-frum-reacts-immigration-responses/585391/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/why-americas-immigration-system-is-broken/593143/

    Steve's basically the only conduit from the dissident right to the mainstream; people like Frum, Ross Douthat, and David Brooks at the right limit of currently-acceptable discourse read him and then pass his ideas off as their own.

    Replies: @Flip, @3g4me, @LP5

    @38 SFG: Steve is in no way ‘dissident right.’ HBD may be requisite but alone it is insufficient. Being anti-anti-White is not equivalent to being pro-White.

  106. How do you know David frum reads your articles?

    Also, why doesn’t the Atlantic or another online magazine hire you? You have the most prolific output of any living blogger, intellectual or journalist I’ve seen (with the possible exception of Chomsky) and come up with novel, original ideas that tend to explain observed social phenomena better than competing theories.

    If the marketplace of ideas were truly functioning, you’d be top of the field and rewarded for it.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @ginger bread man

    Steve is very bright, but he can't dance.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGI2d31M7Ns

    , @Billy Corr
    @ginger bread man

    The likes of Steve are anathema to the MSM.

    Not merely does he have a track record [easily googled] of hinting - if no more - that some ethno-cultural groups seem to have an irresistible urge to engage in certain specific forms of crime, but he keeps saying more and more non-PC stuff. Incorrigible - a serial offender.

  107. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    I’m gonna have to reply to this one more fully under the next Flu Manchu thread. Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case? I do realize nobody wants to give up a good gig (i.e. your wife’s job), but, man, that’s pretty much fully giving in.

    We’re in that dilemma. I have no big fear of getting the jab in the way my wife does. However, I’m refusing because I don’t think the idea of Big Gov and Big Biz combining to mandate something as personal as this is RIGHT. Period! It’s not right, Buzz.

    There’s going to be some trouble on this, at least out of my family.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?
     
    We are prepared to live "off-the-grid." That is the key.And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You've read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me "preppers?" I don't know, but I don't do things to fit into any kind of "lifestyle" or phrase or title. In other words, I don't live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    "On the other hand,"™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been "anti-vax," and I don't think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I'm not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don't really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now "inoculated" against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don't want to lose your respect.

    Replies: @Weaver, @SafeNow, @Polistra, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @InnerCynic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They won't throw away a "gig" but more than willing to throw away their lives. That should say something.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Yawrate
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I'm officially waiting for the NovaVax version of the CV19 vaccine: https://www.novavax.com/

    It's made the same way as the pertussis vaccine is made although it probably won't be nearly as effective. It may only be effective as the mRNA "vaccines" in that it will for 6 - 8 months. Who knows?

    But I've never liked the mRNA "vaccines" as they are bio-active for the very thing that makes CV19 dangerous. It's no wonder strange side effects happen given that the "vaccine" itself may not stay in your shoulder. And since you can still get Covid (and pass it along!) the mRNA "vaccines" are are no more than theraputic medicines you take in advance

  108. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    @40 Peter Akuleyev: Besides being inadvertently ridiculous, you’re a bald-faced liar. Africans (both northern and sub-saharan) commit most murders and rapes and other crimes in Europe and use guns, knives, bombs, and fire. Why don’t you ban kitchen knives (England’s latest attempt to pretend diversity /= war) and matches while you’re at it? A civilized society is a White society, without the 2% gnawing away at its foundations.

    • LOL: Peter Akuleyev
  109. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an eighteenth-century American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?
     
    Ecuador Gun Laws: In Ecuador, only firearms with a caliber of 9 millimeters or less are allowed. You cannot import a firearm from overseas. To own a firearm you must be a resident and be licensed, which requires you to undergo a criminal background and mental health evaluation. You must also explain why you want a gun, which could include hunting, target shooting, collecting, or self-defense.

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other, so worth a shot (ouch!).

    Seems like the text of the 28th Amendment has already been drafted (needs a few words changing), so now all it needs is a national referendum to approve it.

    Replies: @Undocumented Shopper, @Chris Mallory, @Expletive Deleted

  110. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    Frummie is a vile warmongering canadian izzie-firster transplant. If he could, he would gladly pass a law that only jooies, negoids, homos, and women can own firearms……white males being too violent and irresponsible for gun ownership. If you are located in some diversified urban cesspool and feel the need to pack a gun, then it is time to relocate to a rural area where the threat of physical violence and crime is near nil. Use a concealed weapon in the public square and stick around for the cops, and you will quickly learn there is nothing more pathetic than a normal middle class yoyo enmeshed in the legal system.

  111. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    The pistols being shown MIGHT be owned by Israeli private citizens. Apparently, they have a MAY issue license ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overview_of_gun_laws_by_nation ). I read an article in a now defunct Chicago loop free newspaper years ago about someone describing how they obtained a Beretta pistol there and how you got a 50 rd box of ammo.

    As for the other weapons, basically, Jews over in Israel are like those here, TPTB do NOT want PRIVATE OWNERSHIP OF RIFLES.

    A militiaman in America with an AR-15 has greater potential for combat effectiveness than a WW2 British soldier with a full-automatic Stengun.

    Rifles are COMBAT POWER.

    German HK41 Semi-Auto Militia Rifle

  112. @Pincher Martin
    The one accomplishment Trump's four years in power and continued political relevance have undoubtedly done is to shake loose the Neocons from the GOP. There is no going back after this. Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel, @Thomas, @Currahee, @HammerJack, @MarkinLA

    Yes, i.e. Rubin.

  113. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I saw Mr. Unz's reply to you, Buzz. It doesn't prove anything, except, no it's not a plot by Goldman Sacks. Lots of Big Biz outfits are coercing their employees to get vaccinated. These financial guys have no more backbone than other Americans and likely, less. Even if they have health objections, they'll put those aside to keep their lucrative jobs.

    Being non-vaccinated doesn't make you any free-rider. It might just mean you can think for yourself, have some good judgement, and you are tough enough to have not been coerced into submission.
    I hope you haven't just gone down and gotten jabbed.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @BB753, @El Dato, @Sick 'n Tired, @Adam Smith

    If you think the upper echelons at Goldman Sachs are getting the same vaccine as the people lining up for it at Walmart, I have a bridge in NYC you might be interested in purchasing.

  114. @Greta Handel
    The last paragraph makes you sound stuck-up.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @SunBakedSuburb

    Steve’s inability to differentiate between this vaccine and the current highly politicized public health sector from what has been the norm is a real head-scratcher. I don’t believe it’s willful blindness. His age group grew up in a time when the Establishment actually functioned, and wasn’t captured by a cabal of Euro-American billionaire Gaians intent on culling the herd.

  115. “We don’t want guns in our little town.”
    “Be smart for once in your life, ” he told me in the dark car. “It’s not what you want that matters.”
    — Don Delillo, White Noise

    Sam Seaborn : It’s not about personal freedom, and it certainly has nothing to do with public safety. It’s just that some people like guns.
    Ainsley Hayes : Yes, they do. But you know what’s more insidious than that? Your gun control position doesn’t have anything to do with public safety, and it’s certainly not about personal freedom. It’s about you don’t like people who *do* like guns. You don’t like the people. Think about that, the next time you make a joke about the South.
    — The West Wing, Season 2, Episode 4 “In This White House”

  116. @Altai
    Some good examples of the dynamics Steve mentions from Chicago where white guilt has people feeling so bad that some won't press charges on violent armed carjackers.

    Carjacking victim refuses to press charges against teen (who already has 4 armed robbery cases pending)

    https://cwbchicago.com/2021/09/carjacking-victim-refuses-to-press-charges-against-teen-who-already-has-4-armed-robbery-cases-pending.html


    Around 7 p.m. Wednesday, the 44-year-old victim was sitting inside his parked, running car on the parking lot of Cermak Fresh Market, 6623 North Damen, in Rogers Park, according to a CPD report. Suddenly, a man opened his passenger door and got inside. The intruder pressed a handgun to his forehead, demanded his valuables, and then told him to get out, the report said.

    He complied, and the offender drove away with his silver Toyota Camry, according to CPD spokesperson Kellie Bartoli. While officers were speaking with the victim, cops in the 1st (Central) Police District spotted the man’s stolen car at a BP gas station, 50 West Ida B. Wells.

    ...

    But when the victim realized that his car was still in good condition, he declined to pursue charges, according to a source. Bartoli confirmed that the victim refused to prosecute, but she did not give a reason for his decision.

    Cops arrested Martin anyway for the gun he allegedly had in his waistband. He’s charged with aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

    Prosecutors said during his bond court hearing that he has four pending armed robbery cases from before his 18th birthday. They did not provide details of those allegations. An assistant public defender said Martin has a two-year-old child and attended Legal Prep Career Academy.

    ...

    Wednesday’s victim is not the first person to forgive an armed carjacker this year.

    On February 3, a 28-year-old man was carjacked at gunpoint while shoveling out a parking space in West Town. Police arrested John Daniels, 19, as he drove the stolen car a short time later, according to a CPD report.

    While police were processing Daniels at the station, the victim’s driver’s license, debit card, and medical marijuana card fell out of his pants, the report said. But the victim decided not to pursue charges because he “felt sorry for” the people who took his Lexus because “they probably need a car.”

    ...

    Less than four months later, Daniels took an 11-year-old boy to Uptown, where they violently carjacked another man, according to prosecutors.

    That victim, a 59-year-old man, was viciously beaten and suffered a broken orbital bone, prosecutors said. Video allegedly shows Daniels standing over the fallen man and taking keys from his hand. The Uptown victim pressed charges.
     

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Currahee, @Charlotte

    It is victims such as these who should be severely punished by an angry vigilante citizenry.

  117. Maybe, we can practice gun control in our foreign policy by not sending billions of dollars worth of weapons to countries like Afghanistan?

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @JohnnyD

    But they're practiced?

  118. @SFG
    Atlantic-washing's actually a pretty good way to put it, he's written a few pieces more or-less-arguing for immigration restriction:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/david-frum-how-much-immigration-is-too-much/583252/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/03/david-frum-reacts-immigration-responses/585391/
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/why-americas-immigration-system-is-broken/593143/

    Steve's basically the only conduit from the dissident right to the mainstream; people like Frum, Ross Douthat, and David Brooks at the right limit of currently-acceptable discourse read him and then pass his ideas off as their own.

    Replies: @Flip, @3g4me, @LP5

    About that Atlantic-Washing, Frum must have some double-secret alter ego where he donates royalties to Steve. Is there a smoking invoice somewhere?

  119. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    Just shut the hell up about American criminal justice. Nobody is telling you how to live in the Central American paradise you’ve found. You have no interest, stake, or say in America.

    Literally everything you write is uninformed, dangerous and foolish. At best you’re misguided and blinkered. That is a charitable take on your relentlessly dangerous ignorance.

    Frankly, I am guessing you’re larping as a European upper class twit straight out of Monty Python. No one can survive living by the idiocy you advocate.

    • Agree: By-tor
  120. OT from RT. Who knows about this mayor?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @HammerJack

    Hammer, without Columbus' visitation to the New World, the buildings shown surrounding his statue in the photo would be adobe, and probably only one or two storys in height.

  121. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    Perhaps Mr. Unz needs a “Thersites” tab.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Neil Templeton

    Your comment will go over the head of everyone here, but thanks.

  122. Frum was one of the loudest voices for military intervention against countries that did/do not pose any threat to the US. Of course he is against the US population owning weapons to defend themselves, couching his arguments in a sort of paternalism that it’s “for your own good”. Even though the US population is becoming more and more willing to comply with every silly government dictate, that’s not enough for Frum. The world he wants will require government power to implement and any resistance will need to be met with overwhelming force.

  123. @Hangnail Hans

    Americans use their guns to open fire on one another at backyard barbecues
     
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7c/33/43/7c334314eec30bfd95e5dedc398de478.jpg

    FWP Frum is on to something. For instance, it's those blondes you really have to watch out for.

    Replies: @Slim

    I’ve been looking out for blondes since I turned 12.

  124. @Anon
    Paige Harden's Upcoming Book "The Genetic Lottery,"
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/paige-hardens-upcoming-book-the-genetic-lottery/

    Mr. Sailer:

    This book is finally coming out, more than three years after you posted about it. Did you get an ARC? Are you planning to review it?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @George Taylor, @MEH 0910

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.

    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @George Taylor

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1434860671385092100

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1434862670600187909
    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1434864847993425922
    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1434899098465980423

    , @bomag
    @George Taylor


    Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile
     
    Well, he at least admits that both have a bearing on outcomes, so it is sort of a win.
    , @kaganovitch
    @George Taylor

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    Can't say if it's genetic but at minimum certain cultural habits would appear to be correlated with a higher accident rate. For your edification ( this never gets old)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkq9apjrhBM

    , @Anon
    @George Taylor

    Nice catch! Thanks for the New Yorker link.

    Accidents, clumsinesss, and injury-prone-ness (in athletes) have all been said to be at least partially genetic (and Turkheimer's First Law of Behavioral Genetics says that also). Almost all traits are polygenetic, but weirdly there seems to be a single gene that can cause a certain type of clumsiness. Other types of accident behavior seem to be polygenic.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @George Taylor

    That NY interview is great, though somewhat depressing.

    Turkheimer as quoted


    “I think that Paige’s dilemma—and I don’t mean this in a bad way, because she takes the problem very seriously—is in that balance that everyone has to seek. If you’re me, who thinks that it’s all just correlation, then you’re the ‘gloomy prospect’ guy and everybody thinks you’re a wet blanket. And if you think, ‘Wow, the whole world turned out to be genetic,’ then you’re Charles Murray, and in between you have to walk this very careful path. "
     
    I thought that CM wrote in The Bell Curve that we didn't know how much was environment and how much genetic, but his informed guess was 50/50.

    Have his views changed as more data becomes available?

    Ms Harden is very attractive ("she couldn’t cross campus without being stopped for selfies"), and that's 100% a product of her genes. I doubt that hurt her career. Maybe Mr Turkheimer is regretting picking the pretty Southern Christian - you can never tell when they might stray off the mental reservation. Were no Leahs available?

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  125. @Altai
    Some good examples of the dynamics Steve mentions from Chicago where white guilt has people feeling so bad that some won't press charges on violent armed carjackers.

    Carjacking victim refuses to press charges against teen (who already has 4 armed robbery cases pending)

    https://cwbchicago.com/2021/09/carjacking-victim-refuses-to-press-charges-against-teen-who-already-has-4-armed-robbery-cases-pending.html


    Around 7 p.m. Wednesday, the 44-year-old victim was sitting inside his parked, running car on the parking lot of Cermak Fresh Market, 6623 North Damen, in Rogers Park, according to a CPD report. Suddenly, a man opened his passenger door and got inside. The intruder pressed a handgun to his forehead, demanded his valuables, and then told him to get out, the report said.

    He complied, and the offender drove away with his silver Toyota Camry, according to CPD spokesperson Kellie Bartoli. While officers were speaking with the victim, cops in the 1st (Central) Police District spotted the man’s stolen car at a BP gas station, 50 West Ida B. Wells.

    ...

    But when the victim realized that his car was still in good condition, he declined to pursue charges, according to a source. Bartoli confirmed that the victim refused to prosecute, but she did not give a reason for his decision.

    Cops arrested Martin anyway for the gun he allegedly had in his waistband. He’s charged with aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

    Prosecutors said during his bond court hearing that he has four pending armed robbery cases from before his 18th birthday. They did not provide details of those allegations. An assistant public defender said Martin has a two-year-old child and attended Legal Prep Career Academy.

    ...

    Wednesday’s victim is not the first person to forgive an armed carjacker this year.

    On February 3, a 28-year-old man was carjacked at gunpoint while shoveling out a parking space in West Town. Police arrested John Daniels, 19, as he drove the stolen car a short time later, according to a CPD report.

    While police were processing Daniels at the station, the victim’s driver’s license, debit card, and medical marijuana card fell out of his pants, the report said. But the victim decided not to pursue charges because he “felt sorry for” the people who took his Lexus because “they probably need a car.”

    ...

    Less than four months later, Daniels took an 11-year-old boy to Uptown, where they violently carjacked another man, according to prosecutors.

    That victim, a 59-year-old man, was viciously beaten and suffered a broken orbital bone, prosecutors said. Video allegedly shows Daniels standing over the fallen man and taking keys from his hand. The Uptown victim pressed charges.
     

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Currahee, @Charlotte

    How reassuring that Martin attended the Legal Prep Charter Academy! http://www.legalprep.org/about1.html

    “Our students will use their academic and civic education to grow in their professional careers

    Those classes in criminal law and criminal procedures, participating in a mock trial (and the opportunity to “interact with legal professionals”) will no doubt come in handy as he deals with his four pending armed robbery cases and his new use of a weapon charge.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  126. One of the reasons I don’t have a gun is that I know my tendency to anger. Too worried I would shoot someone I shouldn’t. Or myself.

    I say this as someone who is onboard with second amendment. I just know myself.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Anonymous

    Now if we can only get America's 40 million negroes on board with you, we could start making some progress around here.

  127. The post was going pretty well until the last paragraph – conflating responsible gun ownership with the responsibility to be a good community member and get the jab – for the good of all, of course.

  128. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won’t know when the war is over.

    Remember those poor, misguided, deluded souls? I remember hearing about their stories when I was very young. Now I sort of wish I were one of them.

    Because the war we’re (not) fighting now doesn’t look like it’ll end well.

  129. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    “In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns.”

    Same with most American drug addicts. The monkey-on-their-back keeps whispering in their ears about the next fix so they usually don’t have the spare stolen coin to buy an illegal firearm. European and American drug-dealers conduct their business with a gun in their coat pocket.

    “That is how a civilized society functions.”

    I lived in perhaps the most civilized European country and found it quite peaceful and relaxing. Then I grew bored and took a job as a bouncer at a nightclub filled with pretty young adults. I didn’t find the friction I was looking for at that job. So I took to walking around the nearby neighborhood that housed the tough Turk element and felt strangely at home. My point is this after that lengthy digression: the USA has never been a fully civilized country. It’s history, multi-racial population, and culture won’t allow for it.

    • Agree: Verymuchalive
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @SunBakedSuburb


    My point is this after that lengthy digression: the USA has never been a fully civilized country. It’s history, multi-racial population, and culture won’t allow for it.
     
    SunBaked, you are the thinking man's bouncer. Few Americans would be so honest, frank and to-the-point. 30 or so years ago, I could still meet a fair number of Americans like you. They are very rare now. Most have died. The new generation has been moulded by a corrupt education system, or cowed by political correctness ( though you could say that about nearly all the West ).

    I lived in perhaps the most civilized European country and found it quite peaceful and relaxing. Then I grew bored and took a job as a bouncer at a nightclub filled with pretty young adults. I didn’t find the friction I was looking for at that job. So I took to walking around the nearby neighborhood that housed the tough Turk element and felt strangely at home.
     
    It's pretty obvious that you are referring to Switzerland. Here's my Swiss story. I have gotten to know a Swiss couple, man and wife, in their mid-seventies. They lived in a city near my home for over 10 years. They left a large suburban house in Basel to live in a city centre flat. They told me that they feel much safer living in their flat than they would in central Basel, with its Turkish and North African "quarters". They felt they had to sell up at the time and seek a safe place to live. Long term, house prices would be affected.

    I asked them why they had chosen my part of Western Europe. They said that, if they had been younger, they would have considered the more rural areas of Australia and South Island, New Zealand, even Argentina and Uruguay. At their age, they felt they had to look at parts of Europe that were still safe, affordable and where they didn't need a visa or permit. They now live in a small town in the south, and haven't been back to Switzerland in nearly 10 years.

    I have met a number of Swiss in my travels near my home. Things in Switzerland are serious.

  130. @International Jew
    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys. On the same token, in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that's not an argument to disband the army.

    If you get a gun, though, please get training too.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Charlesz Martel, @Slim, @anon

    The old saw that a gun is more likely to kill a family member or someone you know than a stranger is true, but extremely misleading.

    Many victims in drug killings knew their killers. Many dead store clerks did too, as do many victims of home invasions. Many victims of crime deals gone wrong did too- prostitutes and Johns, fences and thieves, etc. Blacks at large gatherings know each other. In a Cuban divorce, the killer knew the killee. Etc., etc.

    The image they want to promote is little Johnny killing his sister, little Susie. That’s a function of irresponsible gun owners not storing their guns properly. The NRA used to run a comic to educate children about gun safety- “Eddie Eagle”. The left used to howl like their balls were in a vise (if they had any balls) about how this was propagandizing the kiddies.

    Many gun deaths are suicides too.

    The left essentially lies about almost every social issue in this country. And then they pretend to understand science and technology, which they proceed to use in their attempts to destroy this country or give an advantage to our overseas competitors.

    “The people who manage the technology don’t understand it, and those who understand it don’t manage it” is a phrase I heard decades ago, which is painfully true. Don’t know who first said it.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Charlesz Martel


    The old saw that a gun is more likely to kill a family member or someone you know than a stranger is true, but extremely misleading.
     
    It's even worse than you portray, for it's "not even wrong." Peaceable gun owners defending themselves and their families do not score their successes only by criminals killed. It's in fact illegal to intentionally kill someone in that and almost all contexts, what's allowed is the use of lethal force to deal with a threat of death or "grievous bodily harm" including rape (think about that for a bit in the context who's now leading the charge for US gun control...).

    For all that we hear from our ruling trash about "robberies gone wrong," again reminding us who they're tacitly allied with, it's obvious a great many criminal uses of guns do not result in the victim being killed for whatever reasons, and thus a lot of crimnals also don't score killing their victim as a win.
  131. What Frum needs to happen to him is to get mugged. He needs it badly.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Yancey Ward

    "What Frum needs to happen to him is to get mugged."

    Right before he's charged with war crimes, tried, convicted and hanged for the role he played in ginning up the phoney war on terror.

  132. @MEH 0910
    @Anon

    Anon, have you seen Razib Khan's early review?

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420373452595232777

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420374863596777472

    https://twitter.com/unherd/status/1420262831602163715

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Anon

    Exhibit A on why White women are the eternal and natural enemy of the White man.

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Whiskey

    Don’t know if that’s exactly the right take, given that most of us would still like to have sex. Especially the “eternal” and “natural” language, since in a lot of times and places that hasn’t been true.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Whiskey

    Jewish women.

    Like Jennifer Rubin.

  133. Totally benign ‘talk about my hair’ video:

    This lady tries 500 years of hairstyles.

    • Thanks: epebble
    • Replies: @Muggles
    @SFG


    This lady tries 500 years of hairstyles.
     
    Many men are under the illusion that women like to talk about penises.

    No, they really like to talk about their own hair. A lot.

    So relax guys. Just say something nice about her hair...
  134. @International Jew
    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys. On the same token, in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that's not an argument to disband the army.

    If you get a gun, though, please get training too.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Charlesz Martel, @Slim, @anon

    There’s been at least one gun in every one of my homes for 68 years. Those guns have never harmed me.

  135. @Charlesz Martel
    @Pincher Martin

    Trump accomplished several things. The appointment of many conservative judges is a big issue, right or wrong.

    The four big things are:

    1). He brought the immigration issue to the forefront. It had been a minor issue to most Americans, and was seen as a regional issue only. It is now recognized by millions as the critical issue of our time.
    For someone like me,who has been screaming about this issue since the mid-70's, and a fan of Enoch Powell since his 68 speech, this was a huge issue. People like Ann Coulter were very late to the issue. He didn't realize the extent of the Deep State he was up against, and assumed that being President was like being a CEO where people did what he told them or got fired or demoted.

    2). He pointed out that Free Trade is a very bad idea in many cases, and that we were being seriously taken advantage of.

    3). He virtually single-handedly changed our national view of China from "good for business- great trading partner!" to "Public Enemy Number 1" and a huge threat to American Dominance.

    4). He never explicitly said it, but he has sparked what may finally turn out to be the birth of a White Racial Consciousness. It is certainly long overdue as our melting pot boils over. Whether enough Whites will wake up in time to save some semblance of this country from a Third-World Brazilian future remains to be seen.

    What is really amazing about Trump's incredible destruction of Hillary's expected Coronation is how both parties remain utterly clueless as to how he accomplished it. They are literally incapable of even vaguely understanding a world view held by tens of millions of their fellow citizens. And have shown zero interest in even attempting such an understanding since his loss to Biden. They truly believe that politics in the U.S. will go back to the way things were pre-Trump.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pincher Martin, @frankie p

    A Brazilesque future is one of the better case scenarios. I would suggest it’s an impossibility. Brazil has never had the virulent anti-white hatred the US does.

  136. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get 'er done. We don't need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don't think like an American, so why don't you just get the hell out already?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an eighteenth-century American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?

    Ecuador Gun Laws: In Ecuador, only firearms with a caliber of 9 millimeters or less are allowed. You cannot import a firearm from overseas. To own a firearm you must be a resident and be licensed, which requires you to undergo a criminal background and mental health evaluation. You must also explain why you want a gun, which could include hunting, target shooting, collecting, or self-defense.

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other, so worth a shot (ouch!).

    Seems like the text of the 28th Amendment has already been drafted (needs a few words changing), so now all it needs is a national referendum to approve it.

    • Replies: @Undocumented Shopper
    @Jonathan Mason

    You should direct your complaint to Democrats.
    The reason that we don't amend the Constitution anymore is that Democrats decided that instead of amending the constitution they will appoint justices who will issue the rulings Democrats desire.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Jonathan Mason

    Bugger off. We don't need you or your nanny state government in the USA.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Jonathan Mason


    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other
     
    Afro-Ecuadorians make up 7.2 percent of the population.
    Almost as White as France (illegal to collect the relevant data, same as paternity; somewhere between 3 to 5 million blacks in a pop'n. of 65 m.), so about 5-6%
  137. It would be good to reverse the permissive trends in gun law.

    On the contrary, we need to REVERSE the flow of laws and attitudes to increase gun culture. Give guns as gifts to your children and make sure when they leave home to strike out on their own that they have a gun. And for goodness sake, make sure they have a gun BEFORE they marry that lunatic, brainwashed gun-controller spouse to be.

    More guns mean more FEAR on the part of David Frum and his readers. You want TPTB to fear you.

    It’s interesting that the cosmopolitan gun controller has come full circle to where they started at. After they got their massive victory in the Gun Control Act of 1968 where they banned mail order guns & ammo, military surplus guns and everything over .50 became NFA. Then they got McClure-Volkmer 1985 that banned new full-autos, followed by GHWB’s import ban on military-style semi-autos. Trump could have lifted that EO, but like always, gun people got nada from El Presidente.

    After the GCA 1968, they got a massive effort going against handguns, using the so-called “Saturday Night Special” as the primary foil. They succeeded in getting handguns BANNED (1984) in Jewish suburbs like Morton Grove, IL and adjacent areas. Their success would not have been possible without the full-scale packing of America’s judiciary with gun controllers. Gun owners lost the challenge in the IL SC when they ruled as long as you could get a rifle or shotgun, banning your PISTOL did not violate the Second Amendment(!).

    So the gun controllers, with their shill organisations like the National Coalition to Ban Handguns and Handgun Control, Inc. soldiered on against gun rights. Then, Patrick Purdy happened ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleveland_Elementary_School_shooting_(Stockton) ). All the handgun control organs suddenly incorporated rifles into purview. Now that the US SC has ruled handguns a constitutional thing, the David Frums have gone back to the exact anti-gun arguments they were using immediately post-1968.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Joe Stalin


    Give guns as gifts to your children and make sure when they leave home to strike out on their own that they have a gun.
     
    Guns guns guns. Hmm wasn't there once a better time, when your son or daughter could matriculate at Bowdoin or Haverford without the need to be fully armed? Ack, I'm just old-fashioned like that I guess.
  138. So seeing Frumm at The Atlantic is reminiscent of Pakistani’s in Rotherham. Let one in and before you know it, the place is crawling with them.
    Steve’s crack about “free-riders” made me laugh, Now that the Red Cross has formally stopped taking donations of their tainted blood from the “vaccinated” every one of these guys needing a transfusion is free riding on the Sane. Meanwhile Israel demonstrates that the surest way to get the delta release is to get vaccinated.

    After the next jab, and the 2 pills a day regime that Pfizer is pushing, will the vaxxed decide on what point they will get off their merry-go-round?
    10 Shots? 20?

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Bill Jones


    Now that the Red Cross has formally stopped taking donations of their tainted blood from the “vaccinated”
     
    After looking at the Red Cross blood donation FAQ, for example:

    Medications and Vaccinations

    COVID-19 Vaccine

    * Acceptable if you were vaccinated with a non-replicating, inactivated, or RNA-based COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by AstraZeneca, Janssen/J&J, Moderna, Novavax, or Pfizer providing you are symptom-free and fever-free.

    * Wait 2 weeks if you were vaccinated with a live attenuated COVID-19 vaccine. [None yet, but this just follows their general obvious policy on this type of vaccine.]

    * Wait 2 weeks if you were vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine but do not know if it was a non-replicating, inactivated, RNA based vaccine or a live attenuated vaccine.
     
    And before that:

    COVID-19 Antibody Testing

    How long will the Red Cross be antibody testing?

    All donations made prior to June 25 will be tested for COVID-19 antibodies. After June 25, 2021, the Red Cross will no longer be testing routine blood donations for COVID-19 antibodies.

    If the Red Cross determines a donated unit of blood has COVID-19 antibodies, will we reject the donation or allow it to be transfused?

    COVID-19 antibodies are not harmful to patients; the Red Cross will process the donation for transfusion to a patient. In fact, there are currently studies to understand if there may be some level of benefit to the patient.
     
    I suspect at best you're like so many other anti-vaxxers confounding regular blood donation for the usual blood products and convalescent plasma where natural immunity is favored because they also want antibodies against the "N" nucleocapsid protein. I know that was stated right after vaccinations began in the US, but it's not I gather relevant now because that therapy is no longer favored. And the Red Cross all but says in this section of their FAQ that they're no longer collecting blood for this purpose in addition to the above two questions and answers.
    , @Impolitic
    @Bill Jones

    > Now that the Red Cross has formally stopped taking donations of their tainted blood from the “vaccinated”

    Fake news

  139. Law-abiding citizens being armed is a danger to the left’s beloved criminal base.

    • Agree: HammerJack, By-tor
  140. @Redneck farmer
    Meanwhile, the increase in murders occurred in areas with already high murder rates.

    Replies: @aj54

    of course, that is probably more to do with the assaults on policing since Floyd

  141. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    Frum is a Jewish supremacist so idk why pointing out his hypocrisy would bother him

  142. Anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    @Anon

    Anon, have you seen Razib Khan's early review?

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420373452595232777

    https://twitter.com/kph3k/status/1420374863596777472

    https://twitter.com/unherd/status/1420262831602163715

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Anon

    I did see Khan’s review. He has a longer, more recent follow-up review behind his SubStack paywall that I haven’t read.

    From what I’ve read she’s proposing something like Robert Plomin’s idea of genetically “diagnosing” kids based on genetic sequencing, and then designing remedial early education for the dumb ones. The idea that we give eyeglasses to fix bad eyes, so let’s do something for dumb kids. I’m not sure if Plomin really believes this harebrained idea would work, or whether it’s Nazi cancellation insurance.

    At any rate, Harden’s mentor Eric Turkheimer and Plomin have had a long-running feud, so it would be funny if Harden came out mimicking Plomin.

  143. @IHTG
    @Mr. Anon

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Mr. Anon, @anon

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    And in America, lots of people live in “dangerous areas” and any law abiding citizen has an inviolable RIGHT to own guns. Perhaps Frum should go live in Israel if he likes their system better.

  144. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    Most Americans do not really understand European gun laws. In the 1980’s, prior to a significant increase in European legal integration- each country still had its own currency then- many European gun laws were way more lenient than American laws. In France, with NO background checks or waiting periods, one could buy a semi-auto assault rifle with a silencer, a cane gun (a gun built into a walking cane), a non-lethal tennis ball gun that used 12 gauge primers to fire tennis balls at 100 mph to incapacitate people, which is a firearm in the U.S. as it uses combustion to propel a projectile, etc. Also switchblades and other edged weapons.

    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!

    The Schengen open-borders lunacy started the great tightening up of gun laws. Naturally, gun crime started shooting up. As Europe decided to import low IQ violent people, especially Muslims, this continued, along with the general decline in civility and other indicators of quality of life.

    The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it’s about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.

    The time for gun control is over, short of our becoming a full-blown police state, which is where this all will end up before the country splits up.

    I wonder where the mixed people will go?

    In England, prior to a school massacre- which the authorities completely bungled as they ignored persistent warnings from gun clubs about a dangerous person trying to join their clubs- one could buy full auto belt-fed weapons as long as they were smooth-bored, which made them full-auto shotguns. There was even a belt-fed 12 gauge .50 Browning M-2 you could buy with no special approvals this way!

    • Thanks: Muggles
    • Replies: @fish
    @Charlesz Martel

    “ The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it’s about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.”


    No it won’t.....

    , @Corn
    @Charlesz Martel


    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!
     
    The different cultural attitudes towards silencers/suppressors interests me. In the US they’re strictly regulated, viewed as a tool of stealthy criminals in many quarters. In many other countries they’re simply viewed as noise reduction tools. It’s my understanding it’s considered rude in some countries to shoot without a silencer.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Charlesz Martel


    The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it’s about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.
     
    This is true. But Western Europe's problem - as far as guns are concerned - is less the low IQ NAMs, it is the higher IQ Eastern Europeans and Lebanese. They are the ones who are organized and smart enough to get around gun laws. Licensing and regulation does work to keep guns away from NAMs, especially if you have a police force that hasn't been castrated.
  145. @Abe
    @Altai


    Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.
     
    “Boo-hoo, sad story. Typical African-American dad story.”
    — Drake

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    “Once you go black, you’re a single mother!”

  146. OT – Lake Oroville is now almost empty, a couple of years after we all feared it might catastrophically overflow.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9962047/California-droughts-reduce-Lake-Oroville-levels-historic-low-24-cent-capacity.html

    “Houseboats have been forced to crowd together on the trickle of water that remains in Lake Oroville after the California droughts reduced the reservoir’s water levels to an ‘historic low’ of 24 percent capacity.

    The water level in the vital California reservoir is now at its lowest since September 1977, with locals saying they have never seen it so empty and officials warning of a detrimental impact on the local environment.

    In a storage yard near the lake, dozens of other boats have been stacked on wood by their owners in order to prevent their homes being marooned in the lake.”

    • Thanks: Mr. Anon
    • LOL: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @YetAnotherAnon


    The water level in the vital California reservoir is now at its lowest level recorded since September 1977.

    ................................

    Along its perimeter, a white 'bathtub ring' of minerals outlines where the high water line once stood, underscoring the acute water challenges for a region facing a growing population and a drought that is being worsened by hotter, drier weather brought on by climate change.
     
    I always like these articles. The lake is at it's lowest level since 1977. Wow! Another way of saying that is: it was as low in 1977 as it is today, before those 44 intervening years of climate change.

    Of course one thing that certainly is different today than in 1977 is that the population of California has nearly doubled and with no comensurate outbuilding of water infrastructure.
    , @HammerJack
    @YetAnotherAnon

    40 million people crammed into one state. Is there nothing they can't do?

    Also, is Matt Yglesias commenting on this? I'm not on Twitter so I don't know.

  147. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    How ironic that those who demand the right to defend themselves with weapons, out in the street no less, would also demand that your nation import millions of potential and likely lethal “migrants” while also calling for you to disarm yourself. The mind boggles.

  148. Locklin said it best about this dipshit Frum:

    As evidence mounts the vaccine wasn’t as effective as the propaganda said, we’re receiving calls for mandatory vaccination and persecution of the unvaccinated from precisely the same people who told us we needed to have a war in Mesopotamia and totalitarian surveillance state. David Frum has literally never been correct about anything, and the fact that this ridiculous, sinister neocon lizard is still taken seriously is in itself completely discrediting of “the establishment.” Since deplatforming and un-personing is now a fashionable way of dealing with sources of harmful “misinformation,” if anyone is deserving of this, it is David Frum, whose ideas have literally cost the US trillions of dollars, tens of thousands of lives, and sown chaos in large swathes of the world and caused 800,000 violent deaths. You could run a pretty good public policy institute by asking Frum what he thinks, and then suggesting the country do the opposite. For certain, Frum has done vastly more harm in the world with their actual misinformation than people like the Alex Jones.

    • Agree: mc23
    • Thanks: HammerJack
  149. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm gonna have to reply to this one more fully under the next Flu Manchu thread. Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big "off-the-grid" types or going that way. Is that not the case? I do realize nobody wants to give up a good gig (i.e. your wife's job), but, man, that's pretty much fully giving in.

    We're in that dilemma. I have no big fear of getting the jab in the way my wife does. However, I'm refusing because I don't think the idea of Big Gov and Big Biz combining to mandate something as personal as this is RIGHT. Period! It's not right, Buzz.

    There's going to be some trouble on this, at least out of my family.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @InnerCynic, @Yawrate

    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?

    We are prepared to live “off-the-grid.” That is the key.

    [MORE]
    And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You’ve read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me “preppers?” I don’t know, but I don’t do things to fit into any kind of “lifestyle” or phrase or title. In other words, I don’t live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    “On the other hand,”™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been “anti-vax,” and I don’t think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I’m not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don’t really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now “inoculated” against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don’t want to lose your respect.

    • Replies: @Weaver
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You can work online for some jobs now. I don't know if that helps. I've seen ads for 6 figure jobs, fully online work.

    Lately I've been reading, or trying to read, on how sewer systems are designed. I'd like to eventually understand, fully, how to be (mostly) independent. Hydroponics, etc. I do not like septic tanks. I'm aware everyone else loves them. I don't like them. I've seen them get smelly and disgusting. Sewers seem to work much better, though I've had trouble with sewers of course (eg. during flooding).

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    , @SafeNow
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Judging from your proper use of the objective and reflexive pronouns, you are anything but a fool. But we knew that anyway. (And, there are very few fools here. Differences of opinion, sure; but very few fools.)

    , @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Quite a few of your recent posts seem to be about you. It's fun sharing and all but I'd like to think we have bigger fish to fry here. Just a friendly suggestion mind you, and certainly not saying you're the only one. Maybe the TMI bathtub remark triggered me ;)

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, I didn't really mean "off the grid" as in off the electrical grid, buying nothing from the store, etc, though you wrote that you did for that year (and good on you). It's a general term for getting out of the system to the degree one can - homeschooling is possibly the most common and first step. The word "prepper" is no marketing term to me. It's a mindset. It's not just the mindset that things are going to get worse in a serious way, and quickly at some point, but that "hey, we've going to do things to get ready for that."

    I was the one who initially termed your wife's job as a "gig", I didn't mean any sleight by that. I would call my job a "gig", and it's the best and most lucrative job I've ever had. That's why I don't want to jeapordize it, but, OTOH, this:
    '
    I've not heard of any instance of a vaccine being made mandatory before, even for diseases much worse than this one. Why? Because a rights-respecting society figures people can make the decision for themselves. In this case, we know that the vaccinated are not necessarily less contagious anyway - the vax is a personal decision based on one's own judgement.

    The thing is, I'm not against this being mandatory based on thinking this is some Bill Gates-led mass-culling idea. I'm not saying that I trust any of these elites NOT to be up to this, but I'm simply against all the additional Totalitarianism, purposefully put into place so as not to "let this crisis go to waste". We let this same kind of thing get put into place 20 years ago, after 9/11. I don't want any part of this 2nd round.

    I don't get the solidarity thing, but if you are not worried about it, that's your decision. However, it's not mine. You may not know about all the institutional pressure being put on people who don't want to get vaxxed to do so - or maybe you do from your wife's experience.

    Someone in this great double-issue (hey, you started it, Steve) comment thread mentioned the health insurance premium there, but there are more serious other measures they threaten with - well, if you want to stay working there, that is. Later on, they'll come after you, as in Australia, even if you quit due to these threats. This brings us right back to the gun discussion, don't it?

  150. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm gonna have to reply to this one more fully under the next Flu Manchu thread. Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big "off-the-grid" types or going that way. Is that not the case? I do realize nobody wants to give up a good gig (i.e. your wife's job), but, man, that's pretty much fully giving in.

    We're in that dilemma. I have no big fear of getting the jab in the way my wife does. However, I'm refusing because I don't think the idea of Big Gov and Big Biz combining to mandate something as personal as this is RIGHT. Period! It's not right, Buzz.

    There's going to be some trouble on this, at least out of my family.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @InnerCynic, @Yawrate

    They won’t throw away a “gig” but more than willing to throw away their lives. That should say something.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @InnerCynic

    A hard-earned math professorship at a fancy, private university is not a "gig."Lots of people are facing this decision now. Weighing things in the balance, and listening to some very smart, well-informed people, makes the decision pretty damned easy.

    Look, I'm obviously as skeptical about SARS-CoV-2 as you are, but when a vaccine, needed or not, gets over the same hurdles as every other vaccine I have taken, why the hell would I care about getting it?

    I don't anymore. Good luck in your attempts to control the world. This is bigger and more complex than even you can grasp, and my approach to the problem is as valid as yours.

    And my brilliant wife will still be a math professor, and I will still be very proud of her.

  151. How does Frum still have a job? He mocked conservatives for opposing the Iraq War. He’s helped kill millions, not just the 1 million dead in Iraq. Many were injured, displaced, huge sums spent, and it was all based on a lie, the results counter to US interests.

    When a mass murderer says he wants to take people’s guns away… yikes.

  152. Pure rubbish. The legalistic restraints on gun ownership make it damn near impossible for me to obtain a pistol permit in Erie County, NY, where I live. Enforcing the laws when a crime is committed with a firearm would go a long way to resolving gun violence in America. Two examples: A Chicago resident legally bought a gun out of state and illegally sold it to a man in Chicago. This is called a “straw” purchase. The gun buyer used the gun in a shooting that resulted in 13 people being wounded. “Straw” purchases violate Federal Law, with fines up to \$250,000 and 10 years in jail. A federal judge sentenced the original buyer of the gun to no fine and 8 months. Second example, which you can find online at CWB-Chicago, 30 criminals in Chicago, all charged with using a gun in a crime, were released back on the streets after booking and all 30 committed another offense with a gun. So it seems gun crimes are not that important.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Buffalo Joe

    The whole idea of gun control is juvenile. In a country with up to 420,000,000 guns, anyone who wants to get a gun can get one.

  153. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?
     
    We are prepared to live "off-the-grid." That is the key.And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You've read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me "preppers?" I don't know, but I don't do things to fit into any kind of "lifestyle" or phrase or title. In other words, I don't live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    "On the other hand,"™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been "anti-vax," and I don't think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I'm not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don't really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now "inoculated" against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don't want to lose your respect.

    Replies: @Weaver, @SafeNow, @Polistra, @Achmed E. Newman

    You can work online for some jobs now. I don’t know if that helps. I’ve seen ads for 6 figure jobs, fully online work.

    Lately I’ve been reading, or trying to read, on how sewer systems are designed. I’d like to eventually understand, fully, how to be (mostly) independent. Hydroponics, etc. I do not like septic tanks. I’m aware everyone else loves them. I don’t like them. I’ve seen them get smelly and disgusting. Sewers seem to work much better, though I’ve had trouble with sewers of course (eg. during flooding).

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Weaver

    Septic tanks are great. Haven't had mine pumped out in 15 years. Don't pour grease or paint down the drain and don't flush Qtips, cigarettes, "flushable wipes" or other foreign objects down the toilet and you'll have no trouble. Also, don't drive heavy equipment over your tank or drain field.

  154. @Art Deco
    Insist that Canada take him back.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    John Housemen. Buddy Ebsen. William Schallert. DeForest Kelley. William Windom. Darren McGavin. Martin Milner. Jack Cassidy. Ted Cassidy. Roddy McDowall. David Hedison. Billy Mumy. The Mummy. Clint Howard. Robert Conrad. Ted Bessell. Buddy Hackett. The Shriners Hospital kid that looks like Buddy Hackett. Stuart Whitman. Milton Seltzer. Milton’s Toes. Vin Scully. Victor Buono. Sonny Bono. Bono. Robby Benson. Richard Thomas. William Conrad. Peter Graves. James Arness. Art Linkletter. Art Deco. Art’s Deli. Lawrence Welk. Tim Conway. Phil Hendrie. James Doohan. Claude Akins. The Banana Splits. Jimmy Dean. Mike Lookinland. Martin Bormann. Warren Oates. Robert Quarry. Vincent Price. Shemp Howard. Robert Ryan. The cast of Cool Hand Luke. Richard Roundtree. Billy Jack. The guy who played Billy Jack. Peter Fonda. Stuart Margolin. Joe Santos. The cast of The Rat Patrol. Oliver Reed. Bo Hopkins. Jimmy Caan’s coke connection on The Killer Elite. The Santa Claus at the Kmart in Hayward in 1977. Albert Salmi. Peter Falk. Sam Peckinpah. The Fossil Man on S3, Ep 12 of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Ross Martin. Robert Stack. Rabbi Finklestein. William Marshall. Ricardo Montalban. Morgan Woodward. The Mysterious Irwin Allen. Roy Thinnes. Rick Monday. Tom Bosley. Strother Martin. Charles Grey. Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Klaus Schwab. A Quinn Martin Production. The talking flute on H.R. Pufnstuf. Sid and Marty Krofft’s Day Care for Single Mothers. Danny Bonaduce. The guy who set up the stereo system in your den. All these pix you withhold from me.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @SunBakedSuburb

    "Your terms are acceptable."

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @SunBakedSuburb

    WtF dude. Is that your j/o material? Needs work.

    , @Mike Tre
    @SunBakedSuburb

    That was awesome.

  155. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an eighteenth-century American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?
     
    Ecuador Gun Laws: In Ecuador, only firearms with a caliber of 9 millimeters or less are allowed. You cannot import a firearm from overseas. To own a firearm you must be a resident and be licensed, which requires you to undergo a criminal background and mental health evaluation. You must also explain why you want a gun, which could include hunting, target shooting, collecting, or self-defense.

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other, so worth a shot (ouch!).

    Seems like the text of the 28th Amendment has already been drafted (needs a few words changing), so now all it needs is a national referendum to approve it.

    Replies: @Undocumented Shopper, @Chris Mallory, @Expletive Deleted

    You should direct your complaint to Democrats.
    The reason that we don’t amend the Constitution anymore is that Democrats decided that instead of amending the constitution they will appoint justices who will issue the rulings Democrats desire.

    • Agree: Coemgen, Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Undocumented Shopper

    I think both parties try to do that. Have you ever noticed that the issue of abortion is rarely discussed in political circles around the time of elections, but always discussed around the time of appointing a new supreme Court Justice?

    The assumption on both sides is that you want to appoint a Justice who has secret preformed ideas and rigid on the issue that will lead to him voting in a certain direction regardless of legal issues.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  156. “That rifle on the wall of the labourer’s cottage or working class flat is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.”

    ― George Orwell

    One is also reminded that in wonderful gun-controlled Mexico, the official murder rate per capita is about five times higher than in the gun-saturated USA.

  157. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people at Goldman Sachs are Masters of the Universe and part of The Establishment. I've known a couple. It's hard to argue with Ron's real point, which is that the people at the top, running things, would not walk with the rest of the herd unless it made sense for them to do so. That is exactly what they are doing.If they are fools rushing in early, then, that means trouble for all of us, because, like it or not, they are part of this big machine.

    Another thing: Ron told me in one comment that he got the Pfizer vaccine, which is now FDA approved. How can I argue with a guy whose IQ is so high I can't even count that far? I come here partly to learn things. (But mostly because I am addicted.)

    Never before have I turned down anything that was FDA approved. Yes, I know, we can't trust anything anymore. If things are that bad, though, I'm just glad I only have a couple or few decades left at most. I just doesn't matter what happens to me.

    There was a time when I was suffering from severe OCD, and I could not get the only drug that helped, because the FDA was so slow and conservative, that the drug was only available in Canada. I had to wait -- and I even volunteered for a double-blind, clinical trial because I was so desperate. I was a guest on the Rocky Mountain region's biggest radio talk show then to talk about about it, with the psychiatrist who was conducting the test.

    Because of that work, SSRIs became FDA approved.

    Oh, incidentally, my wife just found out her employer will require vaccination. If she has to do it, then I will do it out of solidarity. I don't expect her to throw away her career. We're not that powerful.

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won't know when the war is over.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mike Tre, @Wade Hampton, @JerseyJeffersonian, @Achmed E. Newman, @HammerJack, @Mr. Anon, @Gabe Ruth

    No jab yet, but I am not some WWII Japanese soldier holding out on a Pacific island who won’t know when the war is over.

    You don’t exactly sound like somebody who is making a rational decision to take a medication because he thinks it’s in his best interest. You sound like somebody who is caving into enormous social pressure to do what everyone else is doing.

    Is that the way medical decisions are supposed to be made?

    That’s my whole problem with this vaccine. It isn’t being treated as a medication – it’s being treated as a loyalty oath.

    As far as I’m concerned: You want to take it? Take it. You don’t? Don’t. Those are the only considerations that should be relevant. The fact that everybody, and I mean everybody – vaccine propaganda is being pumped out of every media orifice, wants me to take it is part of what makes me not want to. Well, that, and the essentially experimental nature of it.

    He whole COVID narrative is suspect to me and has been right from the very start.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Mr. Anon

    Good point. The only reasons I got the vaccine was to keep the Wife quiet and to lose the face diaper at work. Medical considerations did not come into it. How stupid is that?

  158. @InnerCynic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They won't throw away a "gig" but more than willing to throw away their lives. That should say something.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    A hard-earned math professorship at a fancy, private university is not a “gig.”

    [MORE]
    Lots of people are facing this decision now. Weighing things in the balance, and listening to some very smart, well-informed people, makes the decision pretty damned easy.

    Look, I’m obviously as skeptical about SARS-CoV-2 as you are, but when a vaccine, needed or not, gets over the same hurdles as every other vaccine I have taken, why the hell would I care about getting it?

    I don’t anymore. Good luck in your attempts to control the world. This is bigger and more complex than even you can grasp, and my approach to the problem is as valid as yours.

    And my brilliant wife will still be a math professor, and I will still be very proud of her.

    • Agree: JMcG
  159. “The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen”

    Hey, good news! I’m off to Walmart to shoplift some books. Some vegetables too. Putting on my sport coat now.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @SafeNow

    I have no objection to most retailers' no-confrontation policies when it comes to shoplifters. Too much can go too wrong if untrained employees try to stop shoplifters that for all anyone knows could be violent criminals. Not to mention that very few employees would do so even if they could. Except for very rare cases, mostly in sketchy urban areas, retailers almost never suffer meaningful financial damage from shoplifting. They lose more money from products accidentally dropped and broken in the aisles.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow


    Hey, good news! I’m off to Walmart to shoplift some books. Some vegetables too. Putting on my sport coat now.
     
    Can you boys pick me up some of that Cheeze Whiz?
  160. @Buzz Mohawk

    Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated...
     
    Kill two birds with one stone and get one of these:


    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5462/9495422523_0d04a04c6e_z.jpg

    Shoot your intruders with vaccine.


    Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.
     
    Okay, Steve. You've successfully guilted me. I am armed, and I don't want to be "that guy" in any other respect. That is persuasive, that plus Ron's flawless logic:

    According to the newspapers this morning, Goldman Sachs has now required all its employees to get vaxxed before they’re allowing to work in the office, a requirement that presumably will include all their upper-ranking executives. I’d expect this sort of policy will soon be followed by almost every other major Wall Street firm.

    So apparently the diabolical plot by our ruling elites to exterminate themselves is now moving forward at a good pace. People won’t be able to keep complaining about Wall Street once almost all the Wall Streeters have vaxxed themselves to death.

    If only our top financial executives had been shrewd enough to take their personal health tips from random eccentrics ranting on home-made videos rather than paying top-dollar for the private services of their ultra-elite personal physicians, they would have managed to avoid this grim fate.
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Joe Stalin

    Shoot your intruders with vaccine.

    You know why we don’t see those anymore?

    Dear Mayo Clinic: I remember we used to get vaccines and other shots using an air gun, and lots of people could get shots quickly. I haven’t seen this done for a long time. Why? Were problems discovered with that method? It seems that it would be an efficient way to give flu shots, for instance, in a really short time.

    A: Using an air gun — also called a jet injector — is a fast way to deliver vaccines. But jet injectors were discontinued for mass vaccinations about five years ago because of possible health risks.

    A jet injector uses high pressure to force a vaccine or other medication through a person’s skin. Their speed made jet injectors very efficient, so many people could be vaccinated quickly. They were often used in the military. Although they weren’t pain-free, jet injectors didn’t involve needles. The result was less discomfort than a needle injection, and they caused less anxiety in people who were afraid of needles.

    In some cases, however, jet injectors could bring blood or other body fluids to the surface of the skin while the vaccine was being administered. Those fluids could contaminate the injector, creating the possibility that viruses could be transmitted to another person being vaccinated with the same device.

    Of particular concern were viruses transmitted by blood, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C. HIV can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) — a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by damage to the immune system. Hepatitis can cause chronic inflammation of the liver and lead to serious liver damage.

    Greater awareness of these diseases and other blood-borne illnesses led to increased scrutiny of ways they might be spread. Although no widespread outbreaks of these diseases were caused by jet injectors, the risk of blood and body fluid contamination of the equipment made jet injectors no longer acceptable for vaccinations. Instead, most vaccines now are administered by needle injection, typically in the arm for adults and in the thigh for children.

    https://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/health/article/Ask-the-Mayo-Clinic-Whatever-happened-to-jet-1293851.php

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  161. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?
     
    We are prepared to live "off-the-grid." That is the key.And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You've read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me "preppers?" I don't know, but I don't do things to fit into any kind of "lifestyle" or phrase or title. In other words, I don't live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    "On the other hand,"™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been "anti-vax," and I don't think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I'm not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don't really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now "inoculated" against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don't want to lose your respect.

    Replies: @Weaver, @SafeNow, @Polistra, @Achmed E. Newman

    Judging from your proper use of the objective and reflexive pronouns, you are anything but a fool. But we knew that anyway. (And, there are very few fools here. Differences of opinion, sure; but very few fools.)

  162. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - Lake Oroville is now almost empty, a couple of years after we all feared it might catastrophically overflow.


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9962047/California-droughts-reduce-Lake-Oroville-levels-historic-low-24-cent-capacity.html

    "Houseboats have been forced to crowd together on the trickle of water that remains in Lake Oroville after the California droughts reduced the reservoir's water levels to an 'historic low' of 24 percent capacity.

    The water level in the vital California reservoir is now at its lowest since September 1977, with locals saying they have never seen it so empty and officials warning of a detrimental impact on the local environment.

    In a storage yard near the lake, dozens of other boats have been stacked on wood by their owners in order to prevent their homes being marooned in the lake."
     
    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/09/06/11/47560833-9962047-image-a-51_1630924268535.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @HammerJack

    The water level in the vital California reservoir is now at its lowest level recorded since September 1977.

    …………………………..

    Along its perimeter, a white ‘bathtub ring’ of minerals outlines where the high water line once stood, underscoring the acute water challenges for a region facing a growing population and a drought that is being worsened by hotter, drier weather brought on by climate change.

    I always like these articles. The lake is at it’s lowest level since 1977. Wow! Another way of saying that is: it was as low in 1977 as it is today, before those 44 intervening years of climate change.

    Of course one thing that certainly is different today than in 1977 is that the population of California has nearly doubled and with no comensurate outbuilding of water infrastructure.

    • Agree: JMcG, AnotherDad
  163. @prosa123
    @Zoos

    It's not just Lowe's. The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen. Employees other than loss prevention staff and, sometimes, managers are strictly prohibited from trying to intervene in any way.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    This happens a lot more than people seem to think. Especially people who get their ‘intelligence’ from the mass media.

  164. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front – 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home – I believe they go by cars in the driveways – they ain’t masterminds – they’d rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    My kind of criminals!

    People with BLM signs are virtue signaling that their virtue is so, so great that they don’t believe in rule-of-law–for blacks. So i think it’s quite fair for blacks to go grab their stuff. (And other crims as well on “equal protection” grounds.)

    Not being interested in criminal activity, i’d just figured they were convenient markers of potential protein sources if the shit ever really–total collapse–hit the fan.

  165. @George Taylor
    @Anon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.



    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.
     
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @bomag, @kaganovitch, @Anon, @YetAnotherAnon


    [MORE]

  166. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    The Constitution is just fine.

    None of my guns are registered and I do not have any license to own them. That is the way it is going to stay.

    I will give up my guns when the cops are disarmed. Until then, bugger off.

  167. @Altai
    Frum's comments also remind me of a video I just saw of an interview ESPN did with DeAndre Yedlin. The US men's soccer team had another disappointing (By historical standards, this team is quite poor) result against Canada in the World Cup qualifiers.

    So I clicked on defender DeAndre Yedlin's profile link on ESPN and it autoplays a video where he talks about his (Ashkenazi Jewish, Seattle-dwelling) grandfather saying he was glad his grandson was living abroad as he'd fear for his life in the US...

    https://www.espn.com/football/english-premier-league/0/video/4106561/usmnts-yedlin-my-grandpa-says-im-safer-outside-the-us

    This guy grew up on the mean streets of 1990s/2000s Seattle and is half Ashkenazi (And apparently only 1/4 black) yet he dresses and fronts as if he is straight outta 1980/90s Compton. He is celebrating the chic of the very violent honour culture that drives the violence and murder rates in the US while pretending he is glad to be in Northern England because of his fear of American police. And his boomer Ashkenazi grandfather living in suburban Seattle sounds just like Frum.

    Yedlin identifies as one-quarter black, one-quarter Native American and half-Latvian Jewish. Yedlin and his mother are Jewish. Yedlin is very close with his mother, Rebecca Yedlin, who had him when she was very young and is now a college sports instructor; his father has never been part of his life. He was raised by his maternal grandfather, Ira Nathan Yedlin, and step-grandmother, Vicki Walton.
     

    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.

    Replies: @Abe, @3g4me, @Hangnail Hans

    You may not like it but this is what peak post-America looks like.

    Especially the normalized lying.

    Meanwhile can anyone explain the subcon indian who clicked AGREE on the following post?

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/how-will-the-press-spin-thursdays-census-announcement-of-a-declining-number-of-whites/#comment-4835873

  168. @Reg Cæsar

    How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns


    In lightly armed England...
     
    Englishmen were persuaded to give up their guns over centuries of mostly crime-free living. Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    But that was when England was still English.

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South. Has anybody compared 19th-century crime in both places?

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    Replies: @Corn, @Jack D, @inertial, @raga10, @Catdog

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.

    This is one of those “Ripley’s Believe It or Not” type things. Such Medieval laws, whether or not they were technically repealed, have not been enforced for at least a couple of centuries.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here in Connecticut, I'm required by law to dunk my wife in the bathtub weekly to make sure she's not a witch. Instead of doing that, we just take baths together. :)

    She's actually a vampire from Transylvania!

    BTW, thank you for your intelligent comments about other things...

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Jack D

    No 2 son was a bit unsure about taking up his place at York. Still legal to (arrow-)shoot any Scotsman (he was born there) found within the City walls after dark.
    Same as any Scot found more than a mile, I think, above the high tide line on the Isle of Mann.
    Welshmen similarly constrained to the the east of Offa's Dyke, particularly in Chester.

    And as for a non-Freeman of the City driving his geese over London Bridge on a Tuesday, while whistling! Be lucky to get away with a mere breaking on the wheel, and dismemberment. Just walk it off, eh?

    , @Bill Jones
    @Jack D


    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.
     
    Reg made no claim that the requirement was met, merely that it was there.
  169. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an eighteenth-century American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?
     
    Ecuador Gun Laws: In Ecuador, only firearms with a caliber of 9 millimeters or less are allowed. You cannot import a firearm from overseas. To own a firearm you must be a resident and be licensed, which requires you to undergo a criminal background and mental health evaluation. You must also explain why you want a gun, which could include hunting, target shooting, collecting, or self-defense.

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other, so worth a shot (ouch!).

    Seems like the text of the 28th Amendment has already been drafted (needs a few words changing), so now all it needs is a national referendum to approve it.

    Replies: @Undocumented Shopper, @Chris Mallory, @Expletive Deleted

    Bugger off. We don’t need you or your nanny state government in the USA.

  170. @JimDandy
    @Altai

    That article was updated:


    When the 28-year-old West Town carjacking victim was told about the battered old man, he replied, "Yeah... but they probably needed another car. Those people have big, extended families."

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    As Steve has elaborated, those “big, extended families” need bigger houses too. Yours for instance.

  171. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    Hit the BLM-positive house which is bound to be an easier mark (and which will serve milk and cookies), or torture the BadWhites some more? Decisions decisions.

  172. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    “But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.”
    human nature does not change. You can find quotes from ancient Greece and Rome that are just as timely today as when they were first written down. The principles of the Constitution are intact. The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @aj54


    The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.
     
    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.

    Also there was no police force at the time and certainly nothing like cell phones or even landlines, so people living in rural settings needed firearms for their own protection otherwise they would constantly be under threat from predators.

    The first official police force in the US was established in Boston in 1838, well after the Constitution was written.

    https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/civil-rights-reimagining-policing/how-you-start-is-how-you-finish/

    It is true that slavery was abolished after the Civil War and that blacks were granted citizenship, but after the establishment of nationwide professional police forces and other law enforcement agencies, the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.

    Unfortunately the Second Amendment now works much more to the advantage of criminals rather than homesteaders, because criminals can easily find guns to steal even if they are not allowed to buy them, and homesteaders probably get more protection from video doorbells than from firearms.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Reg Cæsar, @JMcG

  173. Maybe Frum imagines he can make guns into the next “Axis of Evil.” Good luck.

    At any rate, the gun control lobby at this point looks like it’s on the verge of major setbacks. With Biden, the author of the 1994 crime bill (including the federal assault weapons ban) and one of the last national politicians viscerally committed to old school gun control, in the White House, the gun control people thought it was their moment. Adding in the collapse of the NRA into Trump-style grift was even sweeter.

    But not even eight months later, the Senate confirmation of their would-be ATF director is effectively dead. States are liberalizing their gun laws, rather than tightening them. Any new federal gun legislation is not going to happen in Biden’s term. The Supreme Court is very likely on the verge of nationalizing right-to-carry. And it’s become clear that the NRA wasn’t all that important to gun rights at all. (The degree to which they inflated the NRA into an insidious lobby fueled by money was a massive case of projection by a movement largely underwritten by one billionaire.)

    That Frum (who has a long record in support of gun control) is resorting to a call to push back the tide represented by all the newly-minted gun owners of the past year by “persuading” them is a tacit recognition of how far the gun control lobby has fallen short of its expectations of the past several years, and how much worse it’s likely to get with millions of new gun owners. It’s really an epic failure and an incredible misreading of political landscape driven by epistemic closure, when you think about it.

    • Replies: @Jared Nelson
    @Thomas

    I fully expect any consequential SCOTUS decision that rolls back the Left's so-called "progress" to simply be "resisted!" Ignored.

    The 2008 gun rights decision seemed to result in nothing more than Chicago and NYC instituting absurd, heavy handed ordinances on firearms storage and required training classes that could only be attended at inconveniently located facilities an hour or more away from most city dwellers! Net result was basically the same as a continued ban, it wasn't worth it for citizens to abide by!

    It's a repeat pattern, in the 90s after voters passed California civil rights amendment targeting affirmative action at state universities, they simply instituted a system that produced the same results with different admissions criteria!

    They're going to do what they want!

    Replies: @Thomas

    , @Anon'sAnon
    @Thomas

    All you say is true, but the Biden anti-gun people are pressing forward on all sort of fronts to make it difficult to exercise 2d amendment rights, through executive orders and regulatory oversights. Exorbitant taxes on gun purchases and ownership, prohibition of on-line ammo purchases, and the banning (starting shortly) of all Russian made ammunition. This last act (Russian ammo ban) impacts cheap steal case ammo and has pushed ammo prices up dramatically, nearly doubling in the past couple of weeks. The Russian ammo ban also takes away the viability of owning an AK-47 because there aren't any US ammo makers who compete in the 7.62 x 39 caliber steel case market (which is almost exclusively used by most AK owners).

    Replies: @Thomas

  174. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar


    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.
     
    This is one of those "Ripley's Believe It or Not" type things. Such Medieval laws, whether or not they were technically repealed, have not been enforced for at least a couple of centuries.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Expletive Deleted, @Bill Jones

    Here in Connecticut, I’m required by law to dunk my wife in the bathtub weekly to make sure she’s not a witch. Instead of doing that, we just take baths together. 🙂

    She’s actually a vampire from Transylvania!

    BTW, thank you for your intelligent comments about other things…

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Here in Connecticut, I’m required by law to dunk my wife in the bathtub weekly to make sure she’s not a witch. Instead of doing that, we just take baths together. 🙂
     
    Excellent solution!
  175. These end days of America–the nation, the geographic territory obviously remains–serve as a warning of the perils of importing a verbalist overclass–especially one specifically alienated from, seeing themselves as different from and superior to, the people.

    For 50+ our elite discourse hasn’t even tried to deal honestly and sensibly with America’s problems or come up with policies/solutions that are in the interest of Americans.

  176. @Mr. Anon

    The way to reduce gun violence is by convincing ordinary, “responsible” handgun owners that their weapons make them, their families, and those around them less safe.
     
    The way to reduce war violence is by convincing ordinary "responsible" voters that neocons like David Frum make them, their families and those around them less safe.

    What does David Frum think about these gun owners?

    https://www.turkishnews.com/en/content/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Women-at-the-Jewish-settlements.jpg

    https://img.welt.de/img/english-news/mobile100575789/4772500387-ci102l-w1024/eng-safa-GBT-BM-Bayern-Bat-Ayin-jpg.jpg

    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/2D3E2AE/palestinians-watch-a-jewish-settler-armed-with-a-m-16-automatic-rifle-walking-in-the-old-town-of-the-west-bank-town-of-hebron-may-30-2001-israeli-prime-minister-ariel-sharon-is-under-fire-from-jewish-settlers-over-what-they-see-as-his-passive-response-to-palestinian-attacks-that-have-turned-every-journey-on-a-west-bank-road-into-a-game-of-russian-roulette-nhaa-2D3E2AE.jpg

    https://m2w4k5m5.stackpathcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/jewish-settler-kids-guns.jpg

    https://i.redd.it/vqti3forxjk31.jpg

    https://mondoweiss.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/israel-guns.jpg

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @IHTG, @SFG, @nsa, @Joe Stalin, @AndrewR, @InnerCynic, @Larry, San Francisco, @Colin Wright

    Israel has a low murder rate as does the heavily armed Swiss.

  177. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D

    Here in Connecticut, I'm required by law to dunk my wife in the bathtub weekly to make sure she's not a witch. Instead of doing that, we just take baths together. :)

    She's actually a vampire from Transylvania!

    BTW, thank you for your intelligent comments about other things...

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Here in Connecticut, I’m required by law to dunk my wife in the bathtub weekly to make sure she’s not a witch. Instead of doing that, we just take baths together. 🙂

    Excellent solution!

  178. @Reg Cæsar

    How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns


    In lightly armed England...
     
    Englishmen were persuaded to give up their guns over centuries of mostly crime-free living. Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    But that was when England was still English.

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South. Has anybody compared 19th-century crime in both places?

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    Replies: @Corn, @Jack D, @inertial, @raga10, @Catdog

    When I read Sherlock Holmes stories it struck me how Holmes and Dr. Watson, both private citizens, were running around London and English countryside always packing revolvers, and no one thought of it as the least bit unusual.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @inertial

    Sherlock Homes would wake up Dr. Watson early in the morning and say, "Up Watson, the game's afoot." Watson would dress and drop a revolver in his pocket. And away they would go in a Hansom Cab.

  179. @Anonymous
    One of the reasons I don't have a gun is that I know my tendency to anger. Too worried I would shoot someone I shouldn't. Or myself.

    I say this as someone who is onboard with second amendment. I just know myself.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Now if we can only get America’s 40 million negroes on board with you, we could start making some progress around here.

    • Agree: Mrwolf
  180. To the author of post nr 13 :

    Quoting you : “Since his loss to Biden”

    Just what will it take til you knucklehead liberal lunatics realize that :

    He, DT, did not lose to Biden, and that he actually won by a huge margin.

    AJM

  181. @Thomas
    Maybe Frum imagines he can make guns into the next "Axis of Evil." Good luck.

    At any rate, the gun control lobby at this point looks like it's on the verge of major setbacks. With Biden, the author of the 1994 crime bill (including the federal assault weapons ban) and one of the last national politicians viscerally committed to old school gun control, in the White House, the gun control people thought it was their moment. Adding in the collapse of the NRA into Trump-style grift was even sweeter.

    But not even eight months later, the Senate confirmation of their would-be ATF director is effectively dead. States are liberalizing their gun laws, rather than tightening them. Any new federal gun legislation is not going to happen in Biden's term. The Supreme Court is very likely on the verge of nationalizing right-to-carry. And it's become clear that the NRA wasn't all that important to gun rights at all. (The degree to which they inflated the NRA into an insidious lobby fueled by money was a massive case of projection by a movement largely underwritten by one billionaire.)

    That Frum (who has a long record in support of gun control) is resorting to a call to push back the tide represented by all the newly-minted gun owners of the past year by "persuading" them is a tacit recognition of how far the gun control lobby has fallen short of its expectations of the past several years, and how much worse it's likely to get with millions of new gun owners. It's really an epic failure and an incredible misreading of political landscape driven by epistemic closure, when you think about it.

    Replies: @Jared Nelson, @Anon'sAnon

    I fully expect any consequential SCOTUS decision that rolls back the Left’s so-called “progress” to simply be “resisted!” Ignored.

    The 2008 gun rights decision seemed to result in nothing more than Chicago and NYC instituting absurd, heavy handed ordinances on firearms storage and required training classes that could only be attended at inconveniently located facilities an hour or more away from most city dwellers! Net result was basically the same as a continued ban, it wasn’t worth it for citizens to abide by!

    It’s a repeat pattern, in the 90s after voters passed California civil rights amendment targeting affirmative action at state universities, they simply instituted a system that produced the same results with different admissions criteria!

    They’re going to do what they want!

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Jared Nelson


    I fully expect any consequential SCOTUS decision that rolls back the Left’s so-called “progress” to simply be “resisted!” Ignored.

    ...

    They’re going to do what they want!
     

    Yeah, it doesn't work that way. As I alluded to in my original comment, gun rights are an issue on which the Left has faced actual rollback since the 1990s. Far more states have gone in the direction of gun rights versus control. The only reason for the stall since Heller and McDonald has been John Roberts' morphing into David Souter. (On SCOTUS appointments, like Bush father, like Bush son, I suppose.) That's maybe (hopefully!) irrelevant with a 6-3 court. When state and local officials just ignore the courts, the courts have a tendency to push back. To cite your two examples, Illinois was forced to adopt shall-issue (albeit with too many restrictions) by the Seventh Circuit almost a decade ago (three years after McDonald). And New York's intransigence is what teed up the current SCOTUS case.

    (BTW, I assume this tendency on the right to just throw up one's hands and say "what difference does it make? The left will do what they want!" is just a lazy excuse for doing nothing ever but bitch online. "Gush durn, Cleetus, dem libruls will do whatever they want. Pass the horse paste." Both gun rights and abortion are examples of what the right is capable of when it is actually committed to progress on issues it cares about, and doesn't waste its time on defeatism, conspiracy theorizing, or demagoguery.)


    It’s a repeat pattern, in the 90s after voters passed California civil rights amendment targeting affirmative action at state universities, they simply instituted a system that produced the same results with different admissions criteria!
     
    As a UC alum, I can tell you that you have no idea what you're talking about on this example either. The main effect of Proposition 209 was that the UCs went about 40% Asian, and stayed that way for decades. It wasn't until the last couple of years, and the impact of COVID, that the system even tried the end runs around the law they have been trying. The jury is still out as to whether they will succeed (Asian political activism is also a much more significant factor in California compared to 20 years ago).
  182. Gun suicides outnumber homicides about 2 to 1. Neither one is good, but they’re very different, and lumping them together in the same number is a common trick.

  183. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - Lake Oroville is now almost empty, a couple of years after we all feared it might catastrophically overflow.


    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9962047/California-droughts-reduce-Lake-Oroville-levels-historic-low-24-cent-capacity.html

    "Houseboats have been forced to crowd together on the trickle of water that remains in Lake Oroville after the California droughts reduced the reservoir's water levels to an 'historic low' of 24 percent capacity.

    The water level in the vital California reservoir is now at its lowest since September 1977, with locals saying they have never seen it so empty and officials warning of a detrimental impact on the local environment.

    In a storage yard near the lake, dozens of other boats have been stacked on wood by their owners in order to prevent their homes being marooned in the lake."
     
    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2021/09/06/11/47560833-9962047-image-a-51_1630924268535.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @HammerJack

    40 million people crammed into one state. Is there nothing they can’t do?

    Also, is Matt Yglesias commenting on this? I’m not on Twitter so I don’t know.

  184. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm gonna have to reply to this one more fully under the next Flu Manchu thread. Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big "off-the-grid" types or going that way. Is that not the case? I do realize nobody wants to give up a good gig (i.e. your wife's job), but, man, that's pretty much fully giving in.

    We're in that dilemma. I have no big fear of getting the jab in the way my wife does. However, I'm refusing because I don't think the idea of Big Gov and Big Biz combining to mandate something as personal as this is RIGHT. Period! It's not right, Buzz.

    There's going to be some trouble on this, at least out of my family.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @InnerCynic, @Yawrate

    I’m officially waiting for the NovaVax version of the CV19 vaccine: https://www.novavax.com/

    It’s made the same way as the pertussis vaccine is made although it probably won’t be nearly as effective. It may only be effective as the mRNA “vaccines” in that it will for 6 – 8 months. Who knows?

    But I’ve never liked the mRNA “vaccines” as they are bio-active for the very thing that makes CV19 dangerous. It’s no wonder strange side effects happen given that the “vaccine” itself may not stay in your shoulder. And since you can still get Covid (and pass it along!) the mRNA “vaccines” are are no more than theraputic medicines you take in advance

  185. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?
     
    We are prepared to live "off-the-grid." That is the key.And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You've read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me "preppers?" I don't know, but I don't do things to fit into any kind of "lifestyle" or phrase or title. In other words, I don't live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    "On the other hand,"™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been "anti-vax," and I don't think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I'm not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don't really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now "inoculated" against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don't want to lose your respect.

    Replies: @Weaver, @SafeNow, @Polistra, @Achmed E. Newman

    Quite a few of your recent posts seem to be about you. It’s fun sharing and all but I’d like to think we have bigger fish to fry here. Just a friendly suggestion mind you, and certainly not saying you’re the only one. Maybe the TMI bathtub remark triggered me 😉

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
  186. @Anon
    Paige Harden's Upcoming Book "The Genetic Lottery,"
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/paige-hardens-upcoming-book-the-genetic-lottery/

    Mr. Sailer:

    This book is finally coming out, more than three years after you posted about it. Did you get an ARC? Are you planning to review it?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @George Taylor, @MEH 0910

    Confirmation and update on Kathryn Paige Harden’s background:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    On sabbatical for the 2015-16 academic year, Harden and Elliot Tucker-Drob, a colleague to whom she was married at the time, were invited to New York City with their two young children—a three-year-old boy and a nine-month-old girl—as visiting scholars-in-residence at the Russell Sage Foundation.

    […]
    Harden was raised in a conservative environment, and though she later rejected much of her upbringing, she has maintained a convert’s distrust of orthodoxy. Her father’s family were farmers and pipeline workers in Texas, and her grandparents—Pentecostalists who embraced faith healing and speaking in tongues—were lifted out of extreme poverty by the military.

    […]
    Harden was joined in Bozeman by her younger brother, Micah, who was visiting from Memphis. We sat together on the covered patio of the airy house Harden had rented with her boyfriend, an architectural designer named Travis Avery. It was the longest spell she had ever spent away from her children, who were on a road trip with Tucker-Drob. (The couple got divorced in 2018.)

  187. @Charlesz Martel
    @Pincher Martin

    Trump accomplished several things. The appointment of many conservative judges is a big issue, right or wrong.

    The four big things are:

    1). He brought the immigration issue to the forefront. It had been a minor issue to most Americans, and was seen as a regional issue only. It is now recognized by millions as the critical issue of our time.
    For someone like me,who has been screaming about this issue since the mid-70's, and a fan of Enoch Powell since his 68 speech, this was a huge issue. People like Ann Coulter were very late to the issue. He didn't realize the extent of the Deep State he was up against, and assumed that being President was like being a CEO where people did what he told them or got fired or demoted.

    2). He pointed out that Free Trade is a very bad idea in many cases, and that we were being seriously taken advantage of.

    3). He virtually single-handedly changed our national view of China from "good for business- great trading partner!" to "Public Enemy Number 1" and a huge threat to American Dominance.

    4). He never explicitly said it, but he has sparked what may finally turn out to be the birth of a White Racial Consciousness. It is certainly long overdue as our melting pot boils over. Whether enough Whites will wake up in time to save some semblance of this country from a Third-World Brazilian future remains to be seen.

    What is really amazing about Trump's incredible destruction of Hillary's expected Coronation is how both parties remain utterly clueless as to how he accomplished it. They are literally incapable of even vaguely understanding a world view held by tens of millions of their fellow citizens. And have shown zero interest in even attempting such an understanding since his loss to Biden. They truly believe that politics in the U.S. will go back to the way things were pre-Trump.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pincher Martin, @frankie p

    I’ll be generous and give you the judges.

    But many of the GOP-nominated judges over the last several decades have slipped away from the conservative judicial philosophy they were nominated for. Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, for example, have already revealed this tendency, which might later bloom into either full-throated opposition to conservatism (like Stevens and Souter, with Roberts heading in this direction) or into judicial moderation (like O’Conner and Kennedy). Half of all GOP-nominated High Court judges since Eisenhower have abandoned conservative judicial principles.

    So while I’d typically wait before awarding the “W” on this one, I’ll give it to you for now. No matter how bad Trump’s judges turn out to be by the end, Hillary’s would have been much worse.

    But it is a fair question to ask whether Trump could have done much better in his selection of his Suprem Court Justices than what we got. Few conservatives look at George W. Bush’s tenure, anymore, and think John Roberts’ nomination to the High Court was a victory for them. And most of us remember that we had to fight like hell against Bush’s White House to get Harriet Miers out of there so that Samuel Alito, who has turned into a very good Supreme Court judge, could be nominated.

    *****

    As for your other issues, I’ll give you #2 and #3, even if I suspect the trade deals Trump renegotiated are largely intact and will remain in force for the foreseeable future. Trump nibbled at the edges, but free trade still exists in the commerce between the U.S. and China, for example.

    But I won’t give you #1 or #4

    Whenever a person is a presidential candidate, one can say he “brought the immigration issue to the forefront.” For example, supporters of Bernie Sanders can say he “brought the issue of inequality to the forefront” and they would be right.

    But we expect more of presidents than we do of presidential candidates. They have to do more than just talk. They have to do more than bring an issue to the forefront.

    Trump had four years in power. What did he actually do to reduce immigration? Not much. He certainly didn’t build a wall. And by the end of his presidency, including during his re-election bid, he rarely spoke about immigration. Ann Coulter is right. Trump became far less of an issue-oriented president over the four years of his presidency because Trump’s issues kept getting in the way of his megalomania.

    As for the “white racial consciousness” thing, Trump’s successful presidential campaign was more a beneficiary of that than it was a cause of it.

    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin


    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.
     
    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he's ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?

    Because if there is one, I'd gladly support him.

    Replies: @Flip, @Pincher Martin

  188. @SafeNow
    Rancho Palos Verdes is not near any freeway. This protects it from bad-guy commuters. A second protective factor is the winding (read: Unintelligible, to some) streets of RPV. That’s my theory about the commuting predilections of bad guys.

    But to my point. Anticipatory anxiety. This is a different mental state from fear, where the tiger is right in front of you. The human brain has been called an “anticipation machine.” This has even been imaged by neuroscientists. Having a gun winds-down that very unpleasant anticipatory anxiety. That is no small thing.

    One more thing. Owning multiple guns is mentioned. When I was in a gun store, I asked the guy behind the counter, a former police officer, where he keeps his gun in the house. He replied “I keep my guns all over the place.”

    Replies: @PseudoNhymm, @Mike1

    More importantly they have an incredibly aggressive police force there. The community in general and the police force seem to genuinely believe that the laws of the state and country don’t apply.

  189. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Go to Ecuador already and stay this time! Get ‘er done. We don’t need more people like you, here, Jonathan. You don’t think like an eighteenth-century American, so why don’t you just get the hell out already?
     
    Ecuador Gun Laws: In Ecuador, only firearms with a caliber of 9 millimeters or less are allowed. You cannot import a firearm from overseas. To own a firearm you must be a resident and be licensed, which requires you to undergo a criminal background and mental health evaluation. You must also explain why you want a gun, which could include hunting, target shooting, collecting, or self-defense.

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other, so worth a shot (ouch!).

    Seems like the text of the 28th Amendment has already been drafted (needs a few words changing), so now all it needs is a national referendum to approve it.

    Replies: @Undocumented Shopper, @Chris Mallory, @Expletive Deleted

    Ecuador does not seem to have a big problem with blacks shooting each other

    Afro-Ecuadorians make up 7.2 percent of the population.
    Almost as White as France (illegal to collect the relevant data, same as paternity; somewhere between 3 to 5 million blacks in a pop’n. of 65 m.), so about 5-6%

  190. @George Taylor
    @Anon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.



    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.
     
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @bomag, @kaganovitch, @Anon, @YetAnotherAnon

    Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile

    Well, he at least admits that both have a bearing on outcomes, so it is sort of a win.

  191. @IHTG
    @Mr. Anon

    He would probably say that Israel has gun control and only people who live in dangerous areas (such as the West Bank) are allowed to own them.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Mr. Anon, @anon

    Well, then, he’d be lying. Again. To no one’s surprise.

  192. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    So true! Which explains why we still have slavery, get around in horse carriages, and communicate by horse mail, like Kevin Costner in The Postman. That damn Constitution keeps getting in the way of any progress.

  193. anon[137] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys. On the same token, in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that's not an argument to disband the army.

    If you get a gun, though, please get training too.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Charlesz Martel, @Slim, @anon

    It may well be that your gun is more likely to kill you or your loved ones, than it is to protect you from bad guys.

    It may well be that you have been lied to, and have chosen to blindly repeat said lies, rather than do the smallest amount of research.

    Sad.

  194. @Charlesz Martel
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Most Americans do not really understand European gun laws. In the 1980's, prior to a significant increase in European legal integration- each country still had its own currency then- many European gun laws were way more lenient than American laws. In France, with NO background checks or waiting periods, one could buy a semi-auto assault rifle with a silencer, a cane gun (a gun built into a walking cane), a non-lethal tennis ball gun that used 12 gauge primers to fire tennis balls at 100 mph to incapacitate people, which is a firearm in the U.S. as it uses combustion to propel a projectile, etc. Also switchblades and other edged weapons.

    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!

    The Schengen open-borders lunacy started the great tightening up of gun laws. Naturally, gun crime started shooting up. As Europe decided to import low IQ violent people, especially Muslims, this continued, along with the general decline in civility and other indicators of quality of life.

    The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it's about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.

    The time for gun control is over, short of our becoming a full-blown police state, which is where this all will end up before the country splits up.

    I wonder where the mixed people will go?

    In England, prior to a school massacre- which the authorities completely bungled as they ignored persistent warnings from gun clubs about a dangerous person trying to join their clubs- one could buy full auto belt-fed weapons as long as they were smooth-bored, which made them full-auto shotguns. There was even a belt-fed 12 gauge .50 Browning M-2 you could buy with no special approvals this way!

    Replies: @fish, @Corn, @Peter Akuleyev

    “ The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it’s about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.”

    No it won’t…..

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  195. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar


    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.
     
    This is one of those "Ripley's Believe It or Not" type things. Such Medieval laws, whether or not they were technically repealed, have not been enforced for at least a couple of centuries.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Expletive Deleted, @Bill Jones

    No 2 son was a bit unsure about taking up his place at York. Still legal to (arrow-)shoot any Scotsman (he was born there) found within the City walls after dark.
    Same as any Scot found more than a mile, I think, above the high tide line on the Isle of Mann.
    Welshmen similarly constrained to the the east of Offa’s Dyke, particularly in Chester.

    And as for a non-Freeman of the City driving his geese over London Bridge on a Tuesday, while whistling! Be lucky to get away with a mere breaking on the wheel, and dismemberment. Just walk it off, eh?

  196. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Inside the body of someone who writes like this lies the beating heart of a newly resurrected Joseph Stalin. Just waiting to unleash on the “new kulaks.”

    Not an ad hominem attack. Argument by analogy.

  197. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    So much stupid…

    The open fascism on display in places like Spain gets shown around the world. Police don’t behave like that around people who may be armed.

    Your implication that illegal residents don’t have access to guns in Europe is just breathtakingly dumb. Europeans (especially the more Germanic ones) have a bizarre fantasy that rules equal on the ground reality.

    • LOL: Peter Akuleyev
  198. @SFG
    Totally benign 'talk about my hair' video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wao0_uB4Zw4

    This lady tries 500 years of hairstyles.

    Replies: @Muggles

    This lady tries 500 years of hairstyles.

    Many men are under the illusion that women like to talk about penises.

    No, they really like to talk about their own hair. A lot.

    So relax guys. Just say something nice about her hair…

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Thanks: Old Prude
  199. @inertial
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I read Sherlock Holmes stories it struck me how Holmes and Dr. Watson, both private citizens, were running around London and English countryside always packing revolvers, and no one thought of it as the least bit unusual.

    Replies: @David In TN

    Sherlock Homes would wake up Dr. Watson early in the morning and say, “Up Watson, the game’s afoot.” Watson would dress and drop a revolver in his pocket. And away they would go in a Hansom Cab.

  200. @Joe Stalin

    It would be good to reverse the permissive trends in gun law.
     
    On the contrary, we need to REVERSE the flow of laws and attitudes to increase gun culture. Give guns as gifts to your children and make sure when they leave home to strike out on their own that they have a gun. And for goodness sake, make sure they have a gun BEFORE they marry that lunatic, brainwashed gun-controller spouse to be.

    More guns mean more FEAR on the part of David Frum and his readers. You want TPTB to fear you.

    It's interesting that the cosmopolitan gun controller has come full circle to where they started at. After they got their massive victory in the Gun Control Act of 1968 where they banned mail order guns & ammo, military surplus guns and everything over .50 became NFA. Then they got McClure-Volkmer 1985 that banned new full-autos, followed by GHWB's import ban on military-style semi-autos. Trump could have lifted that EO, but like always, gun people got nada from El Presidente.

    After the GCA 1968, they got a massive effort going against handguns, using the so-called "Saturday Night Special" as the primary foil. They succeeded in getting handguns BANNED (1984) in Jewish suburbs like Morton Grove, IL and adjacent areas. Their success would not have been possible without the full-scale packing of America's judiciary with gun controllers. Gun owners lost the challenge in the IL SC when they ruled as long as you could get a rifle or shotgun, banning your PISTOL did not violate the Second Amendment(!).

    So the gun controllers, with their shill organisations like the National Coalition to Ban Handguns and Handgun Control, Inc. soldiered on against gun rights. Then, Patrick Purdy happened ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleveland_Elementary_School_shooting_(Stockton) ). All the handgun control organs suddenly incorporated rifles into purview. Now that the US SC has ruled handguns a constitutional thing, the David Frums have gone back to the exact anti-gun arguments they were using immediately post-1968.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    Give guns as gifts to your children and make sure when they leave home to strike out on their own that they have a gun.

    Guns guns guns. Hmm wasn’t there once a better time, when your son or daughter could matriculate at Bowdoin or Haverford without the need to be fully armed? Ack, I’m just old-fashioned like that I guess.

  201. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Not sure that that is a good thing, but it seems that countries can implement new constitutions without the need for a revolution.

    The US is seriously in danger of falling apart, and it may become increasingly difficult to hold elections to choose governments that are accepted by the population.

    People are massively divided on issues like immigration, guns and policing, health care, how to hold elections, foreign policy, abortion. The West Coast, the East Coast, the north and the south, and the middle States have diverging populations and interests.

    It is not a foregone conclusion that the United States will hang together forever. Perhaps it will not break up in my lifetime, but in my children's, maybe.

    When I was young I did not think that the iron curtain would ever be pulled aside, and it was a total surprise to me when East and West Germany reunited. Shit happens, and it happens quickly.

    Replies: @El Dato, @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Last time this came up you were touting the brilliance of the French system that was on its umpteenth revision of their constitution and its fifth or sixth republic. The thing is we already have democratic rule (of a sort). The Constitution is meant to constrain people like you from abrogating the liberties of American citizens for what you fondly imagine are the pressing needs of the present. In other words to be beyond the reach of ordinary majorities. Call me crazy but I, for one, would much sooner entrust my liberties to the hands of James Madison and John Adams than the likes of Nicolas Sarkozy and Emmanuel Macron. But maybe that’s just me. No offense, but there is a reason we kicked the likes of you out and back to Perfidious Albion.

    • Replies: @inertial
    @kaganovitch

    American political system had changed at least half a dozen times since the adoption of the original US Constitution. It's likely we are living through yet another such change. Other nations in such circumstances do the honest thing and adopt new Constitutions. In America, everyone pretends that the latest dispensation is precisely what the Founders meant back in 1787.

  202. @Pincher Martin
    @Charlesz Martel

    I'll be generous and give you the judges.

    But many of the GOP-nominated judges over the last several decades have slipped away from the conservative judicial philosophy they were nominated for. Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, for example, have already revealed this tendency, which might later bloom into either full-throated opposition to conservatism (like Stevens and Souter, with Roberts heading in this direction) or into judicial moderation (like O'Conner and Kennedy). Half of all GOP-nominated High Court judges since Eisenhower have abandoned conservative judicial principles.

    So while I'd typically wait before awarding the "W" on this one, I'll give it to you for now. No matter how bad Trump's judges turn out to be by the end, Hillary's would have been much worse.

    But it is a fair question to ask whether Trump could have done much better in his selection of his Suprem Court Justices than what we got. Few conservatives look at George W. Bush's tenure, anymore, and think John Roberts' nomination to the High Court was a victory for them. And most of us remember that we had to fight like hell against Bush's White House to get Harriet Miers out of there so that Samuel Alito, who has turned into a very good Supreme Court judge, could be nominated.

    *****

    As for your other issues, I'll give you #2 and #3, even if I suspect the trade deals Trump renegotiated are largely intact and will remain in force for the foreseeable future. Trump nibbled at the edges, but free trade still exists in the commerce between the U.S. and China, for example.

    But I won't give you #1 or #4

    Whenever a person is a presidential candidate, one can say he "brought the immigration issue to the forefront." For example, supporters of Bernie Sanders can say he "brought the issue of inequality to the forefront" and they would be right.

    But we expect more of presidents than we do of presidential candidates. They have to do more than just talk. They have to do more than bring an issue to the forefront.

    Trump had four years in power. What did he actually do to reduce immigration? Not much. He certainly didn't build a wall. And by the end of his presidency, including during his re-election bid, he rarely spoke about immigration. Ann Coulter is right. Trump became far less of an issue-oriented president over the four years of his presidency because Trump's issues kept getting in the way of his megalomania.

    As for the "white racial consciousness" thing, Trump's successful presidential campaign was more a beneficiary of that than it was a cause of it.

    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.

    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he’s ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?

    Because if there is one, I’d gladly support him.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Hangnail Hans

    Eisenhower, and I was pulling for Rand Paul in 2016.

    , @Pincher Martin
    @Hangnail Hans


    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.
     
    Some of this is true. But that's what a long U.S. presidential campaign is for - making political allies who will then help you implement the agenda you ran on.

    And Trump had allies during the campaign who claimed they wanted to shake up the system. They were all either arrested, departed because of scandal, or left because Trump couldn't stand them (or vice versa) soon after the election.

    A lot of this is Trump's fault. Few people of quality can stand being around such a megalomaniac unless they have similar flaws.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he’s ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?
     
    I don't like him, either. But I like his agenda. Unfortunately, I believe I'm more committed to Trump's agenda than Trump is committed to it.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

  203. @George Taylor
    @Anon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.



    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.
     
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @bomag, @kaganovitch, @Anon, @YetAnotherAnon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    Can’t say if it’s genetic but at minimum certain cultural habits would appear to be correlated with a higher accident rate. For your edification ( this never gets old)

  204. The growth of the Military/Industrial/Intelligence/Surveillance State is visible from space.

    9/11 Triggered a Homeland-Security Industrial Complex That Endures

    https://archive.fo/qrQ8R

    To paraphrase Christopher Wren’s epitaph: If you seek a monument to the NeoCons, look around you.

  205. @Buffalo Joe
    Pure rubbish. The legalistic restraints on gun ownership make it damn near impossible for me to obtain a pistol permit in Erie County, NY, where I live. Enforcing the laws when a crime is committed with a firearm would go a long way to resolving gun violence in America. Two examples: A Chicago resident legally bought a gun out of state and illegally sold it to a man in Chicago. This is called a "straw" purchase. The gun buyer used the gun in a shooting that resulted in 13 people being wounded. "Straw" purchases violate Federal Law, with fines up to $250,000 and 10 years in jail. A federal judge sentenced the original buyer of the gun to no fine and 8 months. Second example, which you can find online at CWB-Chicago, 30 criminals in Chicago, all charged with using a gun in a crime, were released back on the streets after booking and all 30 committed another offense with a gun. So it seems gun crimes are not that important.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    The whole idea of gun control is juvenile. In a country with up to 420,000,000 guns, anyone who wants to get a gun can get one.

  206. @Yancey Ward
    What Frum needs to happen to him is to get mugged. He needs it badly.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin

    “What Frum needs to happen to him is to get mugged.”

    Right before he’s charged with war crimes, tried, convicted and hanged for the role he played in ginning up the phoney war on terror.

  207. @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Last time this came up you were touting the brilliance of the French system that was on its umpteenth revision of their constitution and its fifth or sixth republic. The thing is we already have democratic rule (of a sort). The Constitution is meant to constrain people like you from abrogating the liberties of American citizens for what you fondly imagine are the pressing needs of the present. In other words to be beyond the reach of ordinary majorities. Call me crazy but I, for one, would much sooner entrust my liberties to the hands of James Madison and John Adams than the likes of Nicolas Sarkozy and Emmanuel Macron. But maybe that’s just me. No offense, but there is a reason we kicked the likes of you out and back to Perfidious Albion.

    Replies: @inertial

    American political system had changed at least half a dozen times since the adoption of the original US Constitution. It’s likely we are living through yet another such change. Other nations in such circumstances do the honest thing and adopt new Constitutions. In America, everyone pretends that the latest dispensation is precisely what the Founders meant back in 1787.

  208. @Jared Nelson
    @Thomas

    I fully expect any consequential SCOTUS decision that rolls back the Left's so-called "progress" to simply be "resisted!" Ignored.

    The 2008 gun rights decision seemed to result in nothing more than Chicago and NYC instituting absurd, heavy handed ordinances on firearms storage and required training classes that could only be attended at inconveniently located facilities an hour or more away from most city dwellers! Net result was basically the same as a continued ban, it wasn't worth it for citizens to abide by!

    It's a repeat pattern, in the 90s after voters passed California civil rights amendment targeting affirmative action at state universities, they simply instituted a system that produced the same results with different admissions criteria!

    They're going to do what they want!

    Replies: @Thomas

    I fully expect any consequential SCOTUS decision that rolls back the Left’s so-called “progress” to simply be “resisted!” Ignored.

    They’re going to do what they want!

    Yeah, it doesn’t work that way. As I alluded to in my original comment, gun rights are an issue on which the Left has faced actual rollback since the 1990s. Far more states have gone in the direction of gun rights versus control. The only reason for the stall since Heller and McDonald has been John Roberts’ morphing into David Souter. (On SCOTUS appointments, like Bush father, like Bush son, I suppose.) That’s maybe (hopefully!) irrelevant with a 6-3 court. When state and local officials just ignore the courts, the courts have a tendency to push back. To cite your two examples, Illinois was forced to adopt shall-issue (albeit with too many restrictions) by the Seventh Circuit almost a decade ago (three years after McDonald). And New York’s intransigence is what teed up the current SCOTUS case.

    (BTW, I assume this tendency on the right to just throw up one’s hands and say “what difference does it make? The left will do what they want!” is just a lazy excuse for doing nothing ever but bitch online. “Gush durn, Cleetus, dem libruls will do whatever they want. Pass the horse paste.” Both gun rights and abortion are examples of what the right is capable of when it is actually committed to progress on issues it cares about, and doesn’t waste its time on defeatism, conspiracy theorizing, or demagoguery.)

    It’s a repeat pattern, in the 90s after voters passed California civil rights amendment targeting affirmative action at state universities, they simply instituted a system that produced the same results with different admissions criteria!

    As a UC alum, I can tell you that you have no idea what you’re talking about on this example either. The main effect of Proposition 209 was that the UCs went about 40% Asian, and stayed that way for decades. It wasn’t until the last couple of years, and the impact of COVID, that the system even tried the end runs around the law they have been trying. The jury is still out as to whether they will succeed (Asian political activism is also a much more significant factor in California compared to 20 years ago).

  209. @Achmed E. Newman
    Two nearby neighbors' houses got broken into recently, in broad daylight. Indeed these black criminals don't want to take a chance of getting shot to death.

    Both of these houses have BLM signs out in front - 1 with 2 of them even. Did these guys pick those houses because just in the slight chance that someone was home - I believe they go by cars in the driveways - they ain't masterminds - they'd rather take that slight chance that someone is home in a woke house?

    These houses are in a nice neighborhood, but it's not far from the not-nice ones. They have cameras along with the alarms, I'm sure. I have not talked to them directly about what happened, but they have got to have images of what I'd bet 1,000 bucks on - the criminals are black.

    Yet, images of black criminals and all, "oh say, do those Black Lives Matter si-eye-igns yet wave, o'r the house of the woke and the home of the insurance claimants."

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @JMcG, @Anon, @AnotherDad, @Polistra, @Dmon

    My California gubernatorial recall election campaign promise to post on World Star Hip-Hop the addresses of all houses displaying those yard signs is already paying dividends. Please make sure to vote for me with all of your mail-in ballots (up to the legal limit of 300).

    https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/300-recall-election-ballots-found-in-mans-car-in-torrance/2678071/

  210. OT: The truth!

    artflow.ai generates:

  211. @R.G. Camara
    While Frum, from his point of view (anti-gun), is right to try to shift to handguns. Going after rifles and shotguns is a loser these days.

    The pandemic, the crime surge as criminals were left to roam free, the 2020 communist riots across the country, Beto O'Rourke threatening to take away everyone's guns, the rigged election, and the left deciding the 2020 riot over the rigged election---basically, the last 18 months has been a surefire way to make sure no voter wants his AR or hunting rifle taken, and lots of Americans bought rifles and shotguns for the first time last year as a precaution. There was a massive ammo shortage, too, thanks to all the new gun buyers, the hording mentality, and shipping delays, which of course led to more shortages as people rushed to buy whatever was available.

    Handguns aren't seen by average joes as being weapons against 1984 camps or home invades. Rifles are the weapon in military fights, while shotguns (as every new gun owner learns when he first starts googling) are the best for home invaders and close-up attacks.

    Of course, the push for nationwide concealed carry that's gone on in the last 10 years has also made handguns a point of interest for gun folks. And first-time or just-for-protection female gun owners are much more comfortable using a small handgun than a rifle or shotgun. So there's a l

    So, in conclusion, Frum's idea won't bear much fruit these days. Perhaps he believes the U.S. won't break up in the next 10 years and life will get back to normal, and therefore this longer strategy will be more successful. Or perhaps he just needed to fill some space for his Atlantic paycheck.

    Replies: @magila, @bomag, @znon

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15’s because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45’s (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    If americans are serious about giving old Granny’s the ability to decimate the screaming black hordes of Mau-Mau savages, then AR-15 all the way, hi capacity, easy to handle, no recoil for those aching arthritic shoulders, and points itself. A couple of video games are all you need for training.

    as regards the Concealed carry permits: I have one but was pulled over by a local cop while driving next to a high school parking lot. The first thing he said was “do you have a firearm?” He had checked from my plate and was fishing for a felony arrest ( possession of a handgun licensed or not within 300yards of school property in session or not) to pad his score at the cop shop. If they wanted to, and I believe they will soon, anyone who has a CCP is extremely vulnerable.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @znon

    Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15’s because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45’s (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    Many things went wrong in the Miami shootout and the limited stopping power of the FBI agents' firearms was just one of them. For example, one agent had his glasses knocked off when their car rammed the criminals' car and was helpless without them. Another agent, armed with a 12-gauge shotgun loaded with buckshot (way more stopping power than any .223) had his arm shattered by a bullet from the .223 at the very beginning of the melee and eventually was able to get off only one shot, with extreme difficulty. One aspect of the shootout that's gotten little attention is that the criminals' car was in the deep shade of a large spreading tree while the agents were fully exposed in the blazing Florida sun.
    As I understand it, none of the agents were armed with .38 Specials or .45's. A couple of them had .357 magnum revolvers, a round from which into one of the criminal's brains finally ended the shootout, while the others had 9mm's. It was a single shot from an agent's 9mm that soon became known as The Shot Heard Round the World and wrought massive changes in law enforcement armament. Fired at the beginning of the shootout, the bullet traveled the length of the criminal's outstretched arm, entered his chest, basically shredded one lung, and stopped about an inch from the heart. It was a very, very serious wound that by itself might have been fatal, but because it didn't quite reach the heart it wasn't immediately incapacitating. In the remaining 90 seconds the criminal was able to wreak havoc with the .223, resulting in the deaths of four agents (the second criminal had been incapacitated right from the start).
    Almost immediately, law enforcement agencies all over the country soured on their then-ubiquitous 9mm's, based on the performance of this one shot. The FBI switched to a 10mm round, but soon found the recoil was too much for some agents to handle - which surprises me, I thought FBI agents are supposed to be strong and fit. The FBI then switched to the .40S&W round, which was midway between the 9mm and 10mm in terms of power. Police departments all over the country began dropping their 9mm's in favor of the .40S&W. The NYPD was a rare exception in staying with the 9mm.
    More recently, the 9mm has come back into favor, after new bullet technology has increased its stopping power.

    Replies: @TWS

    , @John Johnson
    @znon

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15’s because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout

    If all guns were rifles then gun fatalities would in fact drop. This is because it would be harder for Blacks to conceal rifles.

    , @TWS
    @znon

    Cool story bro.

  212. @Charlesz Martel
    @International Jew

    The old saw that a gun is more likely to kill a family member or someone you know than a stranger is true, but extremely misleading.

    Many victims in drug killings knew their killers. Many dead store clerks did too, as do many victims of home invasions. Many victims of crime deals gone wrong did too- prostitutes and Johns, fences and thieves, etc. Blacks at large gatherings know each other. In a Cuban divorce, the killer knew the killee. Etc., etc.

    The image they want to promote is little Johnny killing his sister, little Susie. That's a function of irresponsible gun owners not storing their guns properly. The NRA used to run a comic to educate children about gun safety- "Eddie Eagle". The left used to howl like their balls were in a vise (if they had any balls) about how this was propagandizing the kiddies.

    Many gun deaths are suicides too.

    The left essentially lies about almost every social issue in this country. And then they pretend to understand science and technology, which they proceed to use in their attempts to destroy this country or give an advantage to our overseas competitors.

    "The people who manage the technology don't understand it, and those who understand it don't manage it" is a phrase I heard decades ago, which is painfully true. Don't know who first said it.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    The old saw that a gun is more likely to kill a family member or someone you know than a stranger is true, but extremely misleading.

    It’s even worse than you portray, for it’s “not even wrong.” Peaceable gun owners defending themselves and their families do not score their successes only by criminals killed. It’s in fact illegal to intentionally kill someone in that and almost all contexts, what’s allowed is the use of lethal force to deal with a threat of death or “grievous bodily harm” including rape (think about that for a bit in the context who’s now leading the charge for US gun control…).

    For all that we hear from our ruling trash about “robberies gone wrong,” again reminding us who they’re tacitly allied with, it’s obvious a great many criminal uses of guns do not result in the victim being killed for whatever reasons, and thus a lot of crimnals also don’t score killing their victim as a win.

  213. “Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall. Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.”

    The gun owner/vaccinated analogy is absurd, and the more accurate analogy would be the gun owner/unvaccinated (and I bet this is a reflection of current reality with 90% accuracy)

    Being “vaccinated” with a gene therapy that is neither safe nor effective isn’t exactly a benefit to the community overall.

    By the way, blacks do massive violence against whites with guns or whatever they can get their hands on.

    Frum is a deeply psychotic anti-white pos lunatic….he would say anything, tell any lie, to be able to disarm white Americans. Not too long ago Frum said something to the effect that whites are angry that they are becoming a minority and they will be powerless and dispossessed, but that’s what we’re doing and you can’t stop us.

  214. Gun control is not an American policy. We’re an armed nation by Constitutional design.

    But if TPTB wanted to convince people to change it, what policy set would be required?

    — Elite establishment/government–show absolute focus/commitment to the needs/interests of the productive, law abiding majority.

    — Elites/government absolutely committed to rule-of-law.

    — Police have adequate resources/training to quickly respond to any crime, arrest criminals and generally suppress crime, with full political support.

    — Criminals are prosecuted without fear or favor. Punishment for the guilty severe and certain.

    — Elites/government respectful of the differing needs of rural citizens and hunters/sportsmen.

    — Elites/government show no trace of tyranny, nor tyrannical inclination.

    How are they doing this past few years?

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  215. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Actually, this “antiquated” constitution would have worked perfectly well if there had been no Civil War. The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one. It also left very large numbers of illegally held firearms. There was no political will to do anything about it at the time, and little will thereafter. Finally, it emancipated the negro population. In the course of time, these negroes were able to acquire legally and illegally held firearms.
    The rest is, as the say, history.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Verymuchalive


    Finally, it emancipated the negro population.
     
    In the wrong place. Crime in America would have gone down after 1866 had they been emancipated to the continent on which God meant them to be. And productivity would have gone up.

    The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one.
     
    A "confederal" constitution which allowed some states to invade others in order to retrieve their stray livestock. Not a good start.

    Come on, you had five million non-citizens who had no right to be in this country, per the Supreme Court. Deportation was decades overdue.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

  216. @Charlesz Martel
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Most Americans do not really understand European gun laws. In the 1980's, prior to a significant increase in European legal integration- each country still had its own currency then- many European gun laws were way more lenient than American laws. In France, with NO background checks or waiting periods, one could buy a semi-auto assault rifle with a silencer, a cane gun (a gun built into a walking cane), a non-lethal tennis ball gun that used 12 gauge primers to fire tennis balls at 100 mph to incapacitate people, which is a firearm in the U.S. as it uses combustion to propel a projectile, etc. Also switchblades and other edged weapons.

    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!

    The Schengen open-borders lunacy started the great tightening up of gun laws. Naturally, gun crime started shooting up. As Europe decided to import low IQ violent people, especially Muslims, this continued, along with the general decline in civility and other indicators of quality of life.

    The gun issue is not an issue about guns- it's about NAMs living in your country. As America increasingly tears itself apart, this will become obvious to the dumbest liberal.

    The time for gun control is over, short of our becoming a full-blown police state, which is where this all will end up before the country splits up.

    I wonder where the mixed people will go?

    In England, prior to a school massacre- which the authorities completely bungled as they ignored persistent warnings from gun clubs about a dangerous person trying to join their clubs- one could buy full auto belt-fed weapons as long as they were smooth-bored, which made them full-auto shotguns. There was even a belt-fed 12 gauge .50 Browning M-2 you could buy with no special approvals this way!

    Replies: @fish, @Corn, @Peter Akuleyev

    There were laws in France that required a silencer be used within city limits, for noise reduction!

    The different cultural attitudes towards silencers/suppressors interests me. In the US they’re strictly regulated, viewed as a tool of stealthy criminals in many quarters. In many other countries they’re simply viewed as noise reduction tools. It’s my understanding it’s considered rude in some countries to shoot without a silencer.

  217. @Bill Jones
    So seeing Frumm at The Atlantic is reminiscent of Pakistani's in Rotherham. Let one in and before you know it, the place is crawling with them.
    Steve's crack about "free-riders" made me laugh, Now that the Red Cross has formally stopped taking donations of their tainted blood from the "vaccinated" every one of these guys needing a transfusion is free riding on the Sane. Meanwhile Israel demonstrates that the surest way to get the delta release is to get vaccinated.

    After the next jab, and the 2 pills a day regime that Pfizer is pushing, will the vaxxed decide on what point they will get off their merry-go-round?
    10 Shots? 20?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Impolitic

    Now that the Red Cross has formally stopped taking donations of their tainted blood from the “vaccinated”

    After looking at the Red Cross blood donation FAQ, for example:

    Medications and Vaccinations

    COVID-19 Vaccine

    * Acceptable if you were vaccinated with a non-replicating, inactivated, or RNA-based COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by AstraZeneca, Janssen/J&J, Moderna, Novavax, or Pfizer providing you are symptom-free and fever-free.

    * Wait 2 weeks if you were vaccinated with a live attenuated COVID-19 vaccine. [None yet, but this just follows their general obvious policy on this type of vaccine.]

    * Wait 2 weeks if you were vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine but do not know if it was a non-replicating, inactivated, RNA based vaccine or a live attenuated vaccine.

    And before that:

    COVID-19 Antibody Testing

    How long will the Red Cross be antibody testing?

    All donations made prior to June 25 will be tested for COVID-19 antibodies. After June 25, 2021, the Red Cross will no longer be testing routine blood donations for COVID-19 antibodies.

    If the Red Cross determines a donated unit of blood has COVID-19 antibodies, will we reject the donation or allow it to be transfused?

    COVID-19 antibodies are not harmful to patients; the Red Cross will process the donation for transfusion to a patient. In fact, there are currently studies to understand if there may be some level of benefit to the patient.

    I suspect at best you’re like so many other anti-vaxxers confounding regular blood donation for the usual blood products and convalescent plasma where natural immunity is favored because they also want antibodies against the “N” nucleocapsid protein. I know that was stated right after vaccinations began in the US, but it’s not I gather relevant now because that therapy is no longer favored. And the Red Cross all but says in this section of their FAQ that they’re no longer collecting blood for this purpose in addition to the above two questions and answers.

    • Agree: El Dato
  218. @Pincher Martin
    The one accomplishment Trump's four years in power and continued political relevance have undoubtedly done is to shake loose the Neocons from the GOP. There is no going back after this. Even dumb Republicans are now on to their grift.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel, @Thomas, @Currahee, @HammerJack, @MarkinLA


    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity. And so I need to explain to the Republicans here that it’s not about who deserves reparations. It’s about whether or not you want to win elections. Elder just gave this one away with an unforced error. A spectacularly stupid unforced error.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @HammerJack

    Elder never had a chance anyway.

    Had the stars and moon aligned for that magical moment on September 14th, the leading GOP candidate would have been promptly marginalized by the Democratic power elite and unable to govern for the next two years until he lost the next gubernatorial election in a landslide.

    Anyone who says otherwise doesn't know this state.

    The recall election was never about Republicans winning so much as it was about ensuring Newsom's political future went up in smoke.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @HammerJack


    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity
     
    Really. He actually believes slaves were worth anything. It was the biggest pyramid scheme since Egypt.

    Reparations are due the white guys who had to go into the fields at night and finish the job.

  219. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Art Deco

    John Housemen. Buddy Ebsen. William Schallert. DeForest Kelley. William Windom. Darren McGavin. Martin Milner. Jack Cassidy. Ted Cassidy. Roddy McDowall. David Hedison. Billy Mumy. The Mummy. Clint Howard. Robert Conrad. Ted Bessell. Buddy Hackett. The Shriners Hospital kid that looks like Buddy Hackett. Stuart Whitman. Milton Seltzer. Milton's Toes. Vin Scully. Victor Buono. Sonny Bono. Bono. Robby Benson. Richard Thomas. William Conrad. Peter Graves. James Arness. Art Linkletter. Art Deco. Art's Deli. Lawrence Welk. Tim Conway. Phil Hendrie. James Doohan. Claude Akins. The Banana Splits. Jimmy Dean. Mike Lookinland. Martin Bormann. Warren Oates. Robert Quarry. Vincent Price. Shemp Howard. Robert Ryan. The cast of Cool Hand Luke. Richard Roundtree. Billy Jack. The guy who played Billy Jack. Peter Fonda. Stuart Margolin. Joe Santos. The cast of The Rat Patrol. Oliver Reed. Bo Hopkins. Jimmy Caan's coke connection on The Killer Elite. The Santa Claus at the Kmart in Hayward in 1977. Albert Salmi. Peter Falk. Sam Peckinpah. The Fossil Man on S3, Ep 12 of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Ross Martin. Robert Stack. Rabbi Finklestein. William Marshall. Ricardo Montalban. Morgan Woodward. The Mysterious Irwin Allen. Roy Thinnes. Rick Monday. Tom Bosley. Strother Martin. Charles Grey. Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Klaus Schwab. A Quinn Martin Production. The talking flute on H.R. Pufnstuf. Sid and Marty Krofft's Day Care for Single Mothers. Danny Bonaduce. The guy who set up the stereo system in your den. All these pix you withhold from me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Hangnail Hans, @Mike Tre

    “Your terms are acceptable.”

  220. @Reg Cæsar

    How to Persuade Americans to Give Up Their Guns


    In lightly armed England...
     
    Englishmen were persuaded to give up their guns over centuries of mostly crime-free living. Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    But that was when England was still English.

    19th-century England had laxer laws than much of the US, particularly the South. Has anybody compared 19th-century crime in both places?

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960. How many bow-and-arrow homicides were there?

    Replies: @Corn, @Jack D, @inertial, @raga10, @Catdog

    Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

    Not so; crime was quite rampant in England of old, but murders were relatively rare. Possibly because criminals were more likely to use their fists than guns (one notorious character in 17th century was called Whipping Tom because he would grab his (usually female) victims and spank them, while shouting ‘spanko!’)

    You can’t use a gun if you don’t have a gun; logic of this statement seems solid to me.

    A famous gang war erupted between two rival gangs in Sydney in the late 20’s and 30’s, notable because both gangs were led by women: one Tilly Devine and her arch rival, Kate Leigh. Their war was pretty violent and a lot of people got hurt and maimed. But relatively few actually died, because their weapon of choice was razor. Guns did exist by then, obviously – but legal penalties for using a gun were a lot harsher than they would be otherwise and police took shootings a lot more seriously than they would an ordinary brawl. So the gangsters didn’t bother with guns: you could inflict sufficient damage with a razor.

    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @raga10


    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.
     
    Sure thing... the government and news media tells me this all the time... so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg, Billionaire financier of an empire of gun control organizations?

    UK Knife Crime Hits Record High, Despite London Mayor’s ‘Knife Control’

    The U.K., most notably London, has experienced a sharp increase in knife-related crime, despite “knife control” efforts to curb the violence, newly released figures detail.

    Knife crime in both England and Wales is up 8% from April 2018 to May 2019. U.K. police reports from 43 departments recorded 47,136 incidents involving sharp objects, an Office of National Statistics crime report says.

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2019/07/18/uk-knife-crime-hits-record-high-despite-london-mayors-knife-control/#:~:text=London%20Mayor%20Sadiq%20Khan%20implemented,since%202018%2C%20the%20report%20details.&text=Similarly%2C%20rape%20at%20knifepoint%20and,up%2018%25%20since%20last%20year.

     


    Selling, buying and carrying knives

    The maximum penalty for an adult carrying a knife is 4 years in prison and an unlimited fine. You’ll get a prison sentence if you’re convicted of carrying a knife more than once.

    Basic laws on knives

    It’s illegal to:

    - sell a knife to anyone under 18, unless it has a folding blade 3 inches long (7.62 cm) or less
    - carry a knife in public without good reason, unless it has a folding blade with a cutting edge 3 inches long or less
    - carry, buy or sell any type of banned knife
    - use any knife in a threatening way (even a legal knife)

    https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives
     

    Replies: @raga10, @Billy Corr

  221. @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin


    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.
     
    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he's ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?

    Because if there is one, I'd gladly support him.

    Replies: @Flip, @Pincher Martin

    Eisenhower, and I was pulling for Rand Paul in 2016.

  222. @Dr. X

    Born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to a Jewish family, Frum is the son of the late Barbara Frum (née Rosberg), a well-known, Niagara Falls, New York-born journalist and broadcaster in Canada, and the late Murray Frum, a dentist, who later became a real estate developer, philanthropist, and art collector.
     
    Why is a Canadian Jew telling Americans to get rid of their guns?

    Maybe Frum should get the hell out of MY country and go back to Canada where he belongs and mind his own f--ing business...

    Replies: @JMcG

    Same reason Jonathan Mason does.

  223. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Verymuchalive

    But measures to persuade American criminals to give up guns must be tried first, before anything else.

    The logical solution would seem to be require a license for gun ownership and to register all guns. In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @3g4me, @SunBakedSuburb, @Charlesz Martel, @Mike1, @Kylie, @Oikeamielinen, @John Johnson

    “In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don’t have guns. Every farmer does. That is how a civilized society functions.”

    In a truly civilized Western society, every farmer would have a gun and every African drug addict would be deported to the African country of his–or his ancestors’–origin, regardless of his age.

    • Agree: 3g4me
  224. @JimDandy
    Altogether, about 500 Americans a year die from unintended shootings. … Unintended shootings tend not to be lethal. They account for only about 1 percent of all U.S. gun deaths. But they account for more than one-third of American gun injuries—injuries that can leave people disabled or traumatized for life.

    Especially if they're taking Ivermectin!

    Replies: @epebble

    Frum is wasting his time writing this political screed if he wants to paint 500 deaths per year as some sort of national tragedy. It is not. Not at least after 2020. Even the number of overall Firearms homicides (14,000 in 2018), is high but not worth all the fear mongering it commands.

  225. Of course Steve had to throw a little vaccine propaganda at the end. Fooey!

  226. @George
    "is kind of like getting vaccinated" should read "is kind of like getting mRNA vaccinated" as the Chinese inactivated virus vaccine is strictly forbidden in the US.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    “is kind of like getting vaccinated” should read “is kind of like getting mRNA vaccinated” as the Chinese inactivated virus vaccine is strictly forbidden in the US.

    Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen unit’s one jab adenovirus vector vaccine is chicken feed?

    (Well, actually, yes in my opinion because it’s designed to be the most effective single jab vaccine, not the most effective, and I guess their two jabs eight weeks apart Phase III clinical trial didn’t result in good enough results to try for an authorization or approval any time soon. Or they can’t justify it based on manufacturing vs. demand for the single jab version, but they’re not publishing anything on it yet.)

    You could also say the same thing about the Oxford vaccine as manufactured by AZ, Operation Warp Speed authorized by far more money for it than any other of their big bets, it has a US FDA strength Phase III trial that’s long had the necessary time for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), but for reasons we can guess they haven’t made an application. If those Chinese companies want to market their vaccines in the US they have to jump through the same hoops Janssen, Moderna and Pifzer/BioNTech did. Which they’re not necessarily inclined to do based on the latest from Brazil where their FDA equivalent turned thumbs down on a recent shipment of vaccines from the PRC because they were made in a factory Brazil hadn’t inspected. See also how Russia declined to let the Brazilians inspect all the necessary facilities making Sputnik V, although that’s largely unobtanian due to severe difficulties in making the second dose.

  227. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "In Europe 17 year old African drug addicts don't have guns."

    Same with most American drug addicts. The monkey-on-their-back keeps whispering in their ears about the next fix so they usually don't have the spare stolen coin to buy an illegal firearm. European and American drug-dealers conduct their business with a gun in their coat pocket.

    "That is how a civilized society functions."

    I lived in perhaps the most civilized European country and found it quite peaceful and relaxing. Then I grew bored and took a job as a bouncer at a nightclub filled with pretty young adults. I didn't find the friction I was looking for at that job. So I took to walking around the nearby neighborhood that housed the tough Turk element and felt strangely at home. My point is this after that lengthy digression: the USA has never been a fully civilized country. It's history, multi-racial population, and culture won't allow for it.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    My point is this after that lengthy digression: the USA has never been a fully civilized country. It’s history, multi-racial population, and culture won’t allow for it.

    SunBaked, you are the thinking man’s bouncer. Few Americans would be so honest, frank and to-the-point. 30 or so years ago, I could still meet a fair number of Americans like you. They are very rare now. Most have died. The new generation has been moulded by a corrupt education system, or cowed by political correctness ( though you could say that about nearly all the West ).

    I lived in perhaps the most civilized European country and found it quite peaceful and relaxing. Then I grew bored and took a job as a bouncer at a nightclub filled with pretty young adults. I didn’t find the friction I was looking for at that job. So I took to walking around the nearby neighborhood that housed the tough Turk element and felt strangely at home.

    It’s pretty obvious that you are referring to Switzerland. Here’s my Swiss story. I have gotten to know a Swiss couple, man and wife, in their mid-seventies. They lived in a city near my home for over 10 years. They left a large suburban house in Basel to live in a city centre flat. They told me that they feel much safer living in their flat than they would in central Basel, with its Turkish and North African “quarters”. They felt they had to sell up at the time and seek a safe place to live. Long term, house prices would be affected.

    I asked them why they had chosen my part of Western Europe. They said that, if they had been younger, they would have considered the more rural areas of Australia and South Island, New Zealand, even Argentina and Uruguay. At their age, they felt they had to look at parts of Europe that were still safe, affordable and where they didn’t need a visa or permit. They now live in a small town in the south, and haven’t been back to Switzerland in nearly 10 years.

    I have met a number of Swiss in my travels near my home. Things in Switzerland are serious.

  228. Give up your guns and you will be like Australia– defenseless and locked up in your homes by a rogue police state.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @raga10
    @SavyinDallas


    Give up your guns and you will be like Australia– defenseless and locked up in your homes by a rogue police state.
     
    Meh, at one point in my life I had a choice to make: live in USA, or live in Australia. Having seen both I chose Australia and I am yet to regret my decision. But if I ever do, it will be because of Australian immigration policies that are far too relaxed for my liking rather than too strict!

    Well, I can always go back to Europe... if it too isn't completely overrun by Muslims by then.
  229. @HammerJack
    @Pincher Martin

    https://i.ibb.co/QcyZyJV/Screenshot-20210906-165945-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity. And so I need to explain to the Republicans here that it's not about who deserves reparations. It's about whether or not you want to win elections. Elder just gave this one away with an unforced error. A spectacularly stupid unforced error.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar

    Elder never had a chance anyway.

    Had the stars and moon aligned for that magical moment on September 14th, the leading GOP candidate would have been promptly marginalized by the Democratic power elite and unable to govern for the next two years until he lost the next gubernatorial election in a landslide.

    Anyone who says otherwise doesn’t know this state.

    The recall election was never about Republicans winning so much as it was about ensuring Newsom’s political future went up in smoke.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Pincher Martin

    Gotta admit, there's a lot of Donald Trump in that description.

  230. @mmack
    So Steve, to tie two subject threads together, when does David Frum persuade Americans to give up their automobiles, pickups, and SUV/CUVs?

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news/us-traffic-deaths-rose-in-2020-despite-significant-decline-in-road-travel/ar-BB1eeZCx#:~:text=The%20NSC%20estimates%20that%20in%202020%3A%201%2042%2C060,24%25%20from%201.20%20in%202019.%20More%20items...%20

    “The increase in the rate of 2020 motor vehicle deaths in the U.S. was the largest since 1924, according to a report from the National Safety Council (NSC). More than 42,000 people are estimated to have died on U.S. roadways last year, the largest motor vehicle death tally in 13 years.”

    The NSC estimates that in 2020:

    42,060 people died in crashes, eclipsing 2019's estimate of 39,107 — an 8% increase.

    The estimated cost of deaths, injuries, and property damage to American society in 2020 was $474.4 billion.“

    So looking at The Evil Guns:

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/2020-saw-more-gun-deaths-in-the-us-than-any-year-in-over-two-decades-showing-even-a-pandemic-couldn-t-stop-the-violence/ar-BB1eVJGz#:~:text=1%20There%20were%20a%20record%20number%20of%20gun,4%20See%20more%20stories%20on%20Insider%27s%20business%20page.

    “There were a record number of gun violence deaths in 2020: 19,379.
    This represents a huge leap from recent years, and the highest number in over two decades.”


    Now, I’m a little slow on math, but I do think 42,000 > 19,000.

    So, For The Good Of Humanity, Americans must give up their beloved automobiles. I can even update Dave’s story for him:

    “The legalistic approach to restricting auto ownership and reducing automobile accidents is failing. So is the assumption behind it. Drawing a bright line between the supposedly vast majority of “responsible,” “law abiding” auto owners and those shadowy others who cause all the trouble is a prudent approach for politicians, but it obscures the true nature of the problem. We need to stop deceiving ourselves about the importance of this distinction. …”

    “And here is both the terrible tragedy of America’s auto habit and the best hope to end it. In virtually every way that can be measured, owning an automobile makes the owner, the owner’s family, and the people around them less safe. The hard-core auto owner will never accept this truth. But the 36 percent in the middle—they may be open to it, if they can be helped to perceive it.”

    “The vehicles Americans buy to transport their loved ones are the vehicles that end up being accidentally slammed into a loved one’s leg or rolling over their chest or head. The vehicles Americans buy to protect their young children are years later used for self-harm by their troubled teenagers. Or they are stolen from their driveway by criminals and used in robberies and murders. Or they are grabbed in rage and pointed at an ex-partner. ”

    “America has an auto problem because so many Americans are deceived by so many illusions about what an auto will do for them, their family, their world. They imagine an auto as the transport for their home and loved ones, rather than the standing invitation to harm, loss, and grief it so much more often proves to be.”

    Of course this will be tough on Atlantic subscribers who need an SUV to take Ashleigh, Kayleigh, and Jayden to soccer practice, gymnastics, and lacrosse, or to go to their summer home in the Hamptons, but sacrifices will need to be made for the good of society Comrade. And don’t you want everyone to be safe? 🙄

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    So Steve, to tie two subject threads together, when does David Frum persuade Americans to give up their automobiles, pickups, and SUV/CUVs?

    Worry not. They want your cars too.

    There’s a huge amount of “urban progressive” hate for regular flyover country Americans and their love of automobiles and freedom of movement. It’s been a rather constant theme of the last half century. It’s been on hold a bit these past few years as minoritarianism in full flower–immigration/”gender”/race–has been at the forefront, pushing all the “eco-y” stuff to the back burner.

    But come self-driving cars, they’ll be back. The only trips allowed will be ones properly controlled and monitored and taxed by the state.

    Matty will pop up explaining that you owning a car and driving around as you see fit is in the way of the utopia that awaits us with One Billion Americans!

  231. Failure on my part: I saw this wipe and didn’t post it even though it was eminently iStevey. It was after all authored by David French. I mean David Frum. Whatever. But I did think, he mentions the record gun buying, but how often in the article does he mention the Ferguson Effect or the Police Staying Fetal? Just why could it be that people are buying guns?

  232. @SafeNow
    “The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen”

    Hey, good news! I’m off to Walmart to shoplift some books. Some vegetables too. Putting on my sport coat now.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Achmed E. Newman

    I have no objection to most retailers’ no-confrontation policies when it comes to shoplifters. Too much can go too wrong if untrained employees try to stop shoplifters that for all anyone knows could be violent criminals. Not to mention that very few employees would do so even if they could. Except for very rare cases, mostly in sketchy urban areas, retailers almost never suffer meaningful financial damage from shoplifting. They lose more money from products accidentally dropped and broken in the aisles.

    • Disagree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @prosa123

    Decadence. We allow the unallowable. For reasons.

    It will end when we reach the point it isn't allowable. There are easy ways to stop it. We will eventually get back there.

  233. “Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall. Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.

    Being a law-abiding gun owner is NOT the same as submitting to the lies of the Left about CoVid and risking your life by taking the non-vaccine for the non-life-threatening CoVid virus.
    Being a law-abiding gun owner means that you are against Leftist tyranny; and that includes being against submitting to the lies about CoVid.
    We need universal rebellion against the manufactured CoVid crisis. The left has used this to help them steal the presidential election and to destroy the White middle class.
    It’s not an accident that wherever the Left is in ascendant, there the CoVid tyranny is the greatest. That third-world hellhole California is a great example of this.
    And there is no personal risk being a gun owner. Shooting guns is easy as hell. Anyone can learn the basics in an afternoon. They won’t be experts, but they will be good enough to defend themselves and be safe gun owners. There are a few safety guidelines, but they are no big deal to anyone who has an IQ greater than the typical third-world savage.

  234. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar


    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.
     
    This is one of those "Ripley's Believe It or Not" type things. Such Medieval laws, whether or not they were technically repealed, have not been enforced for at least a couple of centuries.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Expletive Deleted, @Bill Jones

    Oh, and Englishmen were required to keep, maintain, and practice weekly with archery equipment until 1960.

    Reg made no claim that the requirement was met, merely that it was there.

  235. @The Alarmist

    ... white suburban grillers....
     
    Is that the antonym of black urban chillers?

    Replies: @JimB

    Whites are the griller guerillas

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @JimB

    As opposed to chiller gorillas.

    Replies: @JimB

  236. OT
    Wireman (the Wire) done gone via drugs and xxx sex. Omar Little? This dumb ass series was made for stupid libs to affirm themselves. I watched 10 minutes to see how lame it is (Truth)

    However, in 2002, he landed the definitive role for his career, playing Omar Little in The Wire.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9963685/The-star-Wire-actor-Michael-K-Williams-dead-New-York-City-apartment.html#comments

  237. @magila
    @R.G. Camara

    I'm a shotgun guy myself, but given the numbers of teens who are using at least '3A' body armor, have shifted to a rifle as my primary home defense gun.

    Replies: @usNthem

    Shotgun slugger – I doubt there’s any conventional body armor that’ll stop one of those.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @usNthem

    Body armor will definitely stop a shotgun slug from penetrating. However, one would certainly suffer blunt force trauma. Shotgun slugs are low velocity, and velocity is what defeats armor. The blow delivered to the target would be close to the blow delivered to the shooter’s shoulder by the shotgun buttstock.

    Replies: @usNthem

  238. This is off topic, but this is a 220 comment thread, so I don’t think this is a significant derailing.

    This is on the Supreme Court upholding the Texas anti-abortion law being a big victory for sonservatives. Does anyone here know a bunch (or any) young conservatives or alt-rightist, or dissident rightists? Preferably offline, because the internet/Twitter is not exactly representative of reality. On the other hand, the internet is where communication happens, so I can see it being to the right what universities are to the left, in that hings that were bizarre beliefs ten years ago are middle of the road in that milieu, and will be conventional wisdom (for cons and rightists) in ten years.

    Steve has been remarkably silent on this law and decision. Even if you don’t approve of abortion, the state outsourcing law enforcement to totally unregulated or overseen private actors who, because they aren’t the government, are not restricted by the Bill of Rights, should scare the poo out of us after the Summer of George (why has FloydFest not caught on? See here for context)

    [MORE]

    Do Young rightists care about abortion? Do they oppose it in Weimerica as it is actually practiced? Smart and average intelligent White women not having kids is not because of abortion, even as a proximate cause. The most proximate causes are condoms and HBC. Then comes the lack of “marriageable” men for women from upper middle class+ or perhaps any men for women of their appearance and weight for middle class-.

    Probably the “ultimate cause” is women being free from family and family-in-law carrots and stick (yes, I know I’m using ‘carrot a stick incorrectly) to have kids. You know how people are one of very few mammals that cannot synthesize their own vitamin C? I was told back in ‘96 that the “broken” enzyme evolved to catalyze a different reaction. That mutant gene only spread because humans or pre-humans, at least the ones that succeeded in reproducing, got lots of vitamin C from their diet, fruit and meat. Women maybe work similarly. Pregnancy is widely considered an unpleasant state by women in the modern west. Having a baby at home is pretty awful for the primary caregiver, virtually always the mother. In the not to distant past, much less centuries ago, neither was unpleasant. Family and in-laws supported pregnant women, called them beautiful, told them how great the kids would be. Gave the advice about morning sickness, helped with work. Look, I’m a dude and this was never covered in my anthro class, but it stands to reason. Mothers in-law in particular pressured their sons wives to have a kid, and them to have more kids. So did her own mother. I have read that women who live close to their mother have either more kids or first kid earlier, I forget, but this is obviously confounded by women’s personalities. But in a way it is not confounded. Women who are closer to their mothers reproduce more.After pregnancy, family members helped with work, not jobs.

    This is not to mention that husbands pushed for more children, and a woman’s social status was largely determined by how many kids she had, and whether they thrived or not.

    Today, for white women in the west, all this had changed..New moms are isolated with a kid all day, with no one but baby, dog, and tv for company. Lots live far away from their families. They don’t know their neighbors, and frequently the neighbors don’t have kids. Is it any wonder women (the ones who don’t have awful jobs) look forward to going back to work? Especially because social status for women is tied to the same things they are for men, career and money.

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money – resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    Unmarried women (whether never married or divorced) do not even have mothers in-law pressuring them to have kids. I have read that the fairly rare unwed mothers outside the lower classes usually only have one child. Over time, single motherhood will correlate even more with social class than it does now.

    Oh, the vitamin analogy. Like getting a vitamin from your diet, women got these “social vitamins” from other people. Coupled with a sex drive, women do not necessarily have instincts or tendencies to have many kids in the modern environment. It has nothing to do with abortion being available, per se.

    Combining all those things with so many (maybe a very solid majority) of men not reaching famous actor levels of wealth, renown, and attractiveness, or even willingness to contribute more resources than he consumes and not giving her an std he picked up from someone else he’s, y’knowing, for the lower classes and women do not want to have kids.

    Not to mention the massively increased cost to raise a kid in your social class for middle class plus. If you want to raise them in an environment similar to the one you grew up in, like low crime, not diverse in class or culture, but having the right number of Oreos, bananas, and whatever Mexicans and Indians are called when they adopt western norms. Plus getting them medical care and enough education to be more-or-less assured they’ll be in your social class or above (this is a strong desire for women especially it seems), and the have fewer kids.

    Hey Art Deco, can you remember/find what the inflation rate since, say 1965, 1985, 1995, one or all, has been if you calculate it using only housing, healthcare and education costs? Not necessarily “adjusting” for quality or increased consumption, as you cannot choose 1965 quality of medicine at 1965 prices; you cannot chose to live in a 1965 quality house, in 1965 neighborhoods, with 1965 demographics, etc; you cannot chose 1965 education for your kids and expect them to end up in the ever-shrink8ng middle class. Likewise, a computer is now a necessity growing up. I myself have suffered significantly from not having a computer growing up. Well, we had an apple IIC…

    Seriously Art, if you know that, or know where to find it, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing that number would be fantastic to own the libs and Reaganites both. If you could even point me to a place for data for that, then I can hassle Steve to crunch the numbers.

    I think the dissident right is savvy enough to grok that abortion is not on our list of top certainly 50 or 100 of our problems, even if they haven’t thought about the reasons.

    I mean, without abortion, but with the current wergeld paid to blacks through welfare, plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes! This time having a visually distinct, less intelligent, and less civilized population here, not as citizens, but with a sub-citizen legal status, exploited and mistreated because regardless of the law as written, they have little legal recourse when treated illegally…this time, the plan is

    1) Bring in inferior aliens
    2) Exploit them for cheap, unskilled labor
    3) ?
    4) Glorious, egalitarian high wage multicultural future!

    In fairness to step 2 there, blacks would not be better citizens had their ancestors not been mistreated, but we’re voluntary immigrants brought here as yeoman farmers to work crops they were more familiar with in climates where they did better than Northern European whites. Proof? How have their relatives done in the hundred odd countries in which they live?

    • Replies: @jsm
    @Rob

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money – resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?


    This is insightful. I think you're on to something. Not only do modern working women not have babies because there's just too much to do in a day for one person to manage it all -- get up, get kid ready, get self ready, get on freeway with howling kid who still wants to sleep, drive to daycare and drop off, back on freeway to drive to work, work all day, desperately try to get away from work despite demands to stay in order to be on time to pick up kid before daycare closes, drive freeway, pick up howling overtired kid who didn't get a decent nap, stop at grocery store with howling kid, get home, make food, bathe kid, do bedtime routine, put kid to sleep, return to kid who woke after an hour and put kid back to sleep, do it again in two hours, then two more, then two more, then in two more get up for the day and do it all over again... but I also think, you're right. There's an evolutionary psychology reason to avoid pregnancy when Gramma and Grampa and other extended family is far away that involves lack of resources.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    , @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Rob

    Thoughtful post. I was once strongly anti-abortion and now I just don’t care. Since being unapologetically white and straight is heading toward criminalization, with middle and upper class white women mostly agreeing, defending the principle of life for fetuses feels like a luxury.

    , @jsm
    @Rob

    Also, this:

    plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes!


    Spot on. Consider Jackson Hole, where the billionaires are pushing out the millionaires. The sun setting behind Grand Tetons is a view truly breathtaking.

    The brown folk that tidy up for the townspeople are brought by bus each morning through Snake River Canyon and sent back by 5, whereupon they're given leave to while away their leisure hours in the streets of poor, unsuspecting Driggs, ID, chugging six packs and passing out.

    Thusly tucked neatly behind the mountains for the night, they spoil not the view for Fat Cats taking their evening constitutional.

    La Nouvelle Sundown Town.

    Replies: @Rob

    , @Mr X
    @Rob

    The Texas law is a big victory for the humans that would otherwise be destroyed in abortions. Your remarks are a distraction from that fact.

    Replies: @Rob

  239. @prosa123
    @SafeNow

    I have no objection to most retailers' no-confrontation policies when it comes to shoplifters. Too much can go too wrong if untrained employees try to stop shoplifters that for all anyone knows could be violent criminals. Not to mention that very few employees would do so even if they could. Except for very rare cases, mostly in sketchy urban areas, retailers almost never suffer meaningful financial damage from shoplifting. They lose more money from products accidentally dropped and broken in the aisles.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    Decadence. We allow the unallowable. For reasons.

    It will end when we reach the point it isn’t allowable. There are easy ways to stop it. We will eventually get back there.

  240. @International Jew
    @IHTG

    Any veteran of a combat unit (thus 15% of all men) can obtain a gun permit regardless of where he lives.

    Meanwhile the Arab population is armed to the teeth with illegal guns.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam, @Dan Hayes

    if that’s true, why don’t those arabs ever use their “illegal” guns on jews?

    • Replies: @True or not
    @bombthe3gorgesdam

    Arabs are kept in check because whenever they use violence against Jews, Jews retaliate disproportionately, which is how you persuade a group of people who don't recognise your existence to not attempt to delete your existence.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam

  241. “The safest city in Los Angeles County is lovely Rancho Palos Verdes overlooking the Pacific. Rancho Palos Verdes is 22 miles from Compton. In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out.”

    Distance from Compton to Malibu is about 42 miles. Strange thing is that as car obsessed SoCal seemed to be (US car culture post WW2 more or less originated in SoCal), one would think that Crips or Bloods, wanting to do some major damage and plan a major crime spree, would hop on the 405 and
    head toward the ‘bu. But you never see that happen. And it’s not like Crips and Bloods aren’t packing heat. 42 miles away is basically a walk in the park for driving thru SoCal. And yet it simply doesn’t happen. Malibu must have one tough police force that deters potential crime waves from happening in their neighborhood.

    In the multi decade crime show Columbo, the erstwhile detective was always tracking down the perps in Beverly Hills, Bel Air, and of course in Malibu. But in real life, one simply doesn’t see this happen. After all, if these places were so crime ridden, the beautiful people wouldn’t live there.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    All sorts of Southern California suburbs are rather safe. Thousand Oaks in Ventura County some years ranks near the top of lists of the safest medium size municipalities in the country.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Dmon

    , @John Johnson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Distance from Compton to Malibu is about 42 miles. Strange thing is that as car obsessed SoCal seemed to be (US car culture post WW2 more or less originated in SoCal), one would think that Crips or Bloods, wanting to do some major damage and plan a major crime spree, would hop on the 405 and
    head toward the ‘bu. But you never see that happen. And it’s not like Crips and Bloods aren’t packing heat. 42 miles away is basically a walk in the park for driving thru SoCal. And yet it simply doesn’t happen. Malibu must have one tough police force that deters potential crime waves from happening in their neighborhood.


    Malibu has a tough police force? LOL oh man you should actually drive around California before commenting.

    What type of crime spree are you imagining?

    Black people can be seen from miles away in Malibu.

    Crips and Bloods aren't as dumb as you assume. No reason to drive out to Malibu and get on 1000 cameras when you can just rob a local drug dealer. Those Malibu mansions are surrounded with private security.

  242. @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For those if use who don't actually buy into the "every vaxxed person will die in a year horribly" Ron's point is meaningless.

    I don't know how much simpler I can make this: I prefer not to get the vaccine because I don't need it. Period. The rest of debate about the vaccine, including whether or not it is actually a vaccine by definition, is moot. That's not to say there aren't some very important issues to discuss about it. There are. But all are secondary.

    This is known as personal choice. Sailer and Unz and the rest of the Kovid Kultists have forgotten this basic fundamental right supposedly in existence in this supposedly free country.

    Sailer says those who choose not to get it are selfish, when in fact that is a deflection from his need to impose his own bit of personal tyranny upon the masses for his own selfish reasons. If Sailer or anyone else wants to vaccinate himself, I have nothing to say about it. Why can't he/they extend the same bit of liberty minded courtesy?

    Replies: @usNthem

    The problem is, this isn’t going to be allowed a “my body, my choice” situation. Hey, if you want to abort a kid, no problem. Don’t want to get vaxxed, big problem – for you/us. Look at what’s being proposed in Victoria, Aus.

  243. @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @Prof. Woland, @Big Bill

    None-the-less, odds are that’s most likely the case.

  244. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Art Deco

    John Housemen. Buddy Ebsen. William Schallert. DeForest Kelley. William Windom. Darren McGavin. Martin Milner. Jack Cassidy. Ted Cassidy. Roddy McDowall. David Hedison. Billy Mumy. The Mummy. Clint Howard. Robert Conrad. Ted Bessell. Buddy Hackett. The Shriners Hospital kid that looks like Buddy Hackett. Stuart Whitman. Milton Seltzer. Milton's Toes. Vin Scully. Victor Buono. Sonny Bono. Bono. Robby Benson. Richard Thomas. William Conrad. Peter Graves. James Arness. Art Linkletter. Art Deco. Art's Deli. Lawrence Welk. Tim Conway. Phil Hendrie. James Doohan. Claude Akins. The Banana Splits. Jimmy Dean. Mike Lookinland. Martin Bormann. Warren Oates. Robert Quarry. Vincent Price. Shemp Howard. Robert Ryan. The cast of Cool Hand Luke. Richard Roundtree. Billy Jack. The guy who played Billy Jack. Peter Fonda. Stuart Margolin. Joe Santos. The cast of The Rat Patrol. Oliver Reed. Bo Hopkins. Jimmy Caan's coke connection on The Killer Elite. The Santa Claus at the Kmart in Hayward in 1977. Albert Salmi. Peter Falk. Sam Peckinpah. The Fossil Man on S3, Ep 12 of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Ross Martin. Robert Stack. Rabbi Finklestein. William Marshall. Ricardo Montalban. Morgan Woodward. The Mysterious Irwin Allen. Roy Thinnes. Rick Monday. Tom Bosley. Strother Martin. Charles Grey. Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Klaus Schwab. A Quinn Martin Production. The talking flute on H.R. Pufnstuf. Sid and Marty Krofft's Day Care for Single Mothers. Danny Bonaduce. The guy who set up the stereo system in your den. All these pix you withhold from me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Hangnail Hans, @Mike Tre

    WtF dude. Is that your j/o material? Needs work.

  245. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "The safest city in Los Angeles County is lovely Rancho Palos Verdes overlooking the Pacific. Rancho Palos Verdes is 22 miles from Compton. In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out."

    Distance from Compton to Malibu is about 42 miles. Strange thing is that as car obsessed SoCal seemed to be (US car culture post WW2 more or less originated in SoCal), one would think that Crips or Bloods, wanting to do some major damage and plan a major crime spree, would hop on the 405 and
    head toward the 'bu. But you never see that happen. And it's not like Crips and Bloods aren't packing heat. 42 miles away is basically a walk in the park for driving thru SoCal. And yet it simply doesn't happen. Malibu must have one tough police force that deters potential crime waves from happening in their neighborhood.

    In the multi decade crime show Columbo, the erstwhile detective was always tracking down the perps in Beverly Hills, Bel Air, and of course in Malibu. But in real life, one simply doesn't see this happen. After all, if these places were so crime ridden, the beautiful people wouldn't live there.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    All sorts of Southern California suburbs are rather safe. Thousand Oaks in Ventura County some years ranks near the top of lists of the safest medium size municipalities in the country.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess my question pertains to why. Why are these neighborhoods so safe, considering that just a few hoods away, there's some mighty bad neighborhoods. People in Inglewood, Compton, Watts, etc do have access to cars, they can hop on the freeways to do some damage in the nice areas such as Malibu. But that doesn't seem to happen. So either these neighborhoods are safe for various reasons, including a major police presence that actively polices their neighborhoods. After all, lots of people in CA carry guns, so do the bad guys. But that doesn't stop the bad guys (e.g. gang members etc) from attacking other people in their neighborhoods. Wonder if another reason under the radar is at play: convenience. It's too much work to drive 4o plus miles to Malibu and the safe hoods, and instead much easier to stay in one's own hood and commit crimes.

    That's what was so unsual about the 2020 riots in SoCal. BLM protesters actually went to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills to loot and burn down buildings. Normally the protesters skip over the nice areas in major metros. This was the exception to the rule.

    What would be the major reasons as to why certain neighborhoods are and remain safe in SoCal, even in the midst of not so nice neighborhoods?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Dmon
    @Steve Sailer

    And Will Smith lives/lived in Thousand Oaks. And Snoop Dogg lives in Diamond Bar, which is also much safer than the national average. See - dispersion to the suburbs does help white people and turn black gangstas into solid citizens. Malibu property crime is above the national average - Moar Affordable Housing in Malibu! I know alot of you guys have voted in the recall election already, but I promise to add this plank to my platform if you vote for me with the rest of your ballots. If you have already used up your supply, additional ballots are available at local Democratic Precinct Offices, elderly neighbors mail boxes, secure cardboard vote collection boxes in empty parking lots, and other official ballot mule pickup locations. Contact your local SEIU or California Teachers Association representative for details.

  246. My grandfather slept with a pistol under his pillow until his first heart attack. He’d been a bank cashier before federal deposit insurance. A careful man in the segregated South, he was probably prepared for a race war. We found 5 pistols in their bedroom, 2 shotguns in the hall closet, and more long guns in the attic after Grandma died 50 years later.

    One person I knew well died twirling a pistol on his finger at a party. I’ve met one half of two murder-suicides. I need to get out more.

  247. @raga10
    @Reg Cæsar


    Not only were there few animal predators in the Industrial Age cities to which they moved, there were few human predators as well.

     

    Not so; crime was quite rampant in England of old, but murders were relatively rare. Possibly because criminals were more likely to use their fists than guns (one notorious character in 17th century was called Whipping Tom because he would grab his (usually female) victims and spank them, while shouting 'spanko!')

    You can't use a gun if you don't have a gun; logic of this statement seems solid to me.

    A famous gang war erupted between two rival gangs in Sydney in the late 20's and 30's, notable because both gangs were led by women: one Tilly Devine and her arch rival, Kate Leigh. Their war was pretty violent and a lot of people got hurt and maimed. But relatively few actually died, because their weapon of choice was razor. Guns did exist by then, obviously - but legal penalties for using a gun were a lot harsher than they would be otherwise and police took shootings a lot more seriously than they would an ordinary brawl. So the gangsters didn't bother with guns: you could inflict sufficient damage with a razor.

    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.

    Sure thing… the government and news media tells me this all the time… so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg, Billionaire financier of an empire of gun control organizations?

    UK Knife Crime Hits Record High, Despite London Mayor’s ‘Knife Control’

    The U.K., most notably London, has experienced a sharp increase in knife-related crime, despite “knife control” efforts to curb the violence, newly released figures detail.

    Knife crime in both England and Wales is up 8% from April 2018 to May 2019. U.K. police reports from 43 departments recorded 47,136 incidents involving sharp objects, an Office of National Statistics crime report says.

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2019/07/18/uk-knife-crime-hits-record-high-despite-london-mayors-knife-control/#:~:text=London%20Mayor%20Sadiq%20Khan%20implemented,since%202018%2C%20the%20report%20details.&text=Similarly%2C%20rape%20at%20knifepoint%20and,up%2018%25%20since%20last%20year.

    Selling, buying and carrying knives

    The maximum penalty for an adult carrying a knife is 4 years in prison and an unlimited fine. You’ll get a prison sentence if you’re convicted of carrying a knife more than once.

    Basic laws on knives

    It’s illegal to:

    – sell a knife to anyone under 18, unless it has a folding blade 3 inches long (7.62 cm) or less
    – carry a knife in public without good reason, unless it has a folding blade with a cutting edge 3 inches long or less
    – carry, buy or sell any type of banned knife
    – use any knife in a threatening way (even a legal knife)

    https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives

    • Replies: @raga10
    @Joe Stalin


    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg
     
    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically. Joe Average on the street would be better off if there were fewer guns around because:

    - he'd be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don't have a gun you're not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn't going to escalate.

    - as I was suggesting with my razor gangs example, you have better chances of survival if you *do* get into a fight. Yes, it's unfortunate that people in England are now stabbing each other at increasing rate, but it would be worse if they were shooting each other.

    - police have better chances of doing their work if there fewer and less lethal weapons out there. They would be also less jumpy and trigger-happy, leading to fewer "police violence" scenarios.

    - coming back to my razor gangs example: Sydney police used to crack down heavily on gun users back then. They could afford to do that, because gun use was much less frequent. Which led to criminals even less likely to use guns. It was a circle of positive feedback.

    - Finally, police would simply be cheaper for us to fund, because they wouldn't need all those army surplus armoured vehicles, heavy guns and god knows what else. For a long time English policemen used to not even carry guns in their regular duty (I don't know if that's changed now). They didn't need them. And it's not that the public was so law abiding - that's just wishful thinking. Crime was always there to some degree, just not to a degree that would require heavy weapons to manage.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Stalin, @anonymous

    , @Billy Corr
    @Joe Stalin

    Nobody really cares terribly much about the stabbings which enliven the British news reports.

    The stabbings in dear old London Town are not sanguinary affrays between Etonians and Harrovians [although the very thought is an exciting one.]

    The stabbings are usually disputes over drug-dealing turf.

    Black gang members stab other black gang members in places like Hackney and Peckham; ordinary citizens are largely unaffected.

  248. @Rob
    This is off topic, but this is a 220 comment thread, so I don’t think this is a significant derailing.

    This is on the Supreme Court upholding the Texas anti-abortion law being a big victory for sonservatives. Does anyone here know a bunch (or any) young conservatives or alt-rightist, or dissident rightists? Preferably offline, because the internet/Twitter is not exactly representative of reality. On the other hand, the internet is where communication happens, so I can see it being to the right what universities are to the left, in that hings that were bizarre beliefs ten years ago are middle of the road in that milieu, and will be conventional wisdom (for cons and rightists) in ten years.

    Steve has been remarkably silent on this law and decision. Even if you don’t approve of abortion, the state outsourcing law enforcement to totally unregulated or overseen private actors who, because they aren’t the government, are not restricted by the Bill of Rights, should scare the poo out of us after the Summer of George (why has FloydFest not caught on? See here for context)

    Do Young rightists care about abortion? Do they oppose it in Weimerica as it is actually practiced? Smart and average intelligent White women not having kids is not because of abortion, even as a proximate cause. The most proximate causes are condoms and HBC. Then comes the lack of “marriageable” men for women from upper middle class+ or perhaps any men for women of their appearance and weight for middle class-.

    Probably the “ultimate cause” is women being free from family and family-in-law carrots and stick (yes, I know I’m using ‘carrot a stick incorrectly) to have kids. You know how people are one of very few mammals that cannot synthesize their own vitamin C? I was told back in ‘96 that the “broken” enzyme evolved to catalyze a different reaction. That mutant gene only spread because humans or pre-humans, at least the ones that succeeded in reproducing, got lots of vitamin C from their diet, fruit and meat. Women maybe work similarly. Pregnancy is widely considered an unpleasant state by women in the modern west. Having a baby at home is pretty awful for the primary caregiver, virtually always the mother. In the not to distant past, much less centuries ago, neither was unpleasant. Family and in-laws supported pregnant women, called them beautiful, told them how great the kids would be. Gave the advice about morning sickness, helped with work. Look, I’m a dude and this was never covered in my anthro class, but it stands to reason. Mothers in-law in particular pressured their sons wives to have a kid, and them to have more kids. So did her own mother. I have read that women who live close to their mother have either more kids or first kid earlier, I forget, but this is obviously confounded by women’s personalities. But in a way it is not confounded. Women who are closer to their mothers reproduce more.After pregnancy, family members helped with work, not jobs.

    This is not to mention that husbands pushed for more children, and a woman’s social status was largely determined by how many kids she had, and whether they thrived or not.

    Today, for white women in the west, all this had changed..New moms are isolated with a kid all day, with no one but baby, dog, and tv for company. Lots live far away from their families. They don’t know their neighbors, and frequently the neighbors don’t have kids. Is it any wonder women (the ones who don’t have awful jobs) look forward to going back to work? Especially because social status for women is tied to the same things they are for men, career and money.

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money - resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    Unmarried women (whether never married or divorced) do not even have mothers in-law pressuring them to have kids. I have read that the fairly rare unwed mothers outside the lower classes usually only have one child. Over time, single motherhood will correlate even more with social class than it does now.

    Oh, the vitamin analogy. Like getting a vitamin from your diet, women got these “social vitamins” from other people. Coupled with a sex drive, women do not necessarily have instincts or tendencies to have many kids in the modern environment. It has nothing to do with abortion being available, per se.

    Combining all those things with so many (maybe a very solid majority) of men not reaching famous actor levels of wealth, renown, and attractiveness, or even willingness to contribute more resources than he consumes and not giving her an std he picked up from someone else he’s, y’knowing, for the lower classes and women do not want to have kids.

    Not to mention the massively increased cost to raise a kid in your social class for middle class plus. If you want to raise them in an environment similar to the one you grew up in, like low crime, not diverse in class or culture, but having the right number of Oreos, bananas, and whatever Mexicans and Indians are called when they adopt western norms. Plus getting them medical care and enough education to be more-or-less assured they’ll be in your social class or above (this is a strong desire for women especially it seems), and the have fewer kids.

    Hey Art Deco, can you remember/find what the inflation rate since, say 1965, 1985, 1995, one or all, has been if you calculate it using only housing, healthcare and education costs? Not necessarily “adjusting” for quality or increased consumption, as you cannot choose 1965 quality of medicine at 1965 prices; you cannot chose to live in a 1965 quality house, in 1965 neighborhoods, with 1965 demographics, etc; you cannot chose 1965 education for your kids and expect them to end up in the ever-shrink8ng middle class. Likewise, a computer is now a necessity growing up. I myself have suffered significantly from not having a computer growing up. Well, we had an apple IIC…

    Seriously Art, if you know that, or know where to find it, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing that number would be fantastic to own the libs and Reaganites both. If you could even point me to a place for data for that, then I can hassle Steve to crunch the numbers.

    I think the dissident right is savvy enough to grok that abortion is not on our list of top certainly 50 or 100 of our problems, even if they haven’t thought about the reasons.

    I mean, without abortion, but with the current wergeld paid to blacks through welfare, plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes! This time having a visually distinct, less intelligent, and less civilized population here, not as citizens, but with a sub-citizen legal status, exploited and mistreated because regardless of the law as written, they have little legal recourse when treated illegally…this time, the plan is

    1) Bring in inferior aliens
    2) Exploit them for cheap, unskilled labor
    3) ?
    4) Glorious, egalitarian high wage multicultural future!

    In fairness to step 2 there, blacks would not be better citizens had their ancestors not been mistreated, but we’re voluntary immigrants brought here as yeoman farmers to work crops they were more familiar with in climates where they did better than Northern European whites. Proof? How have their relatives done in the hundred odd countries in which they live?

    Replies: @jsm, @John Milton’s Ghost, @jsm, @Mr X

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money – resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    This is insightful. I think you’re on to something. Not only do modern working women not have babies because there’s just too much to do in a day for one person to manage it all — get up, get kid ready, get self ready, get on freeway with howling kid who still wants to sleep, drive to daycare and drop off, back on freeway to drive to work, work all day, desperately try to get away from work despite demands to stay in order to be on time to pick up kid before daycare closes, drive freeway, pick up howling overtired kid who didn’t get a decent nap, stop at grocery store with howling kid, get home, make food, bathe kid, do bedtime routine, put kid to sleep, return to kid who woke after an hour and put kid back to sleep, do it again in two hours, then two more, then two more, then in two more get up for the day and do it all over again… but I also think, you’re right. There’s an evolutionary psychology reason to avoid pregnancy when Gramma and Grampa and other extended family is far away that involves lack of resources.

    • Agree: epebble
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @jsm

    I think it's mostly that Mom (and her society) think that a kid needs all that attention. They don't. They need a few sibs, a few friends, a few books, a father, and discipline.

  249. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Art Deco

    John Housemen. Buddy Ebsen. William Schallert. DeForest Kelley. William Windom. Darren McGavin. Martin Milner. Jack Cassidy. Ted Cassidy. Roddy McDowall. David Hedison. Billy Mumy. The Mummy. Clint Howard. Robert Conrad. Ted Bessell. Buddy Hackett. The Shriners Hospital kid that looks like Buddy Hackett. Stuart Whitman. Milton Seltzer. Milton's Toes. Vin Scully. Victor Buono. Sonny Bono. Bono. Robby Benson. Richard Thomas. William Conrad. Peter Graves. James Arness. Art Linkletter. Art Deco. Art's Deli. Lawrence Welk. Tim Conway. Phil Hendrie. James Doohan. Claude Akins. The Banana Splits. Jimmy Dean. Mike Lookinland. Martin Bormann. Warren Oates. Robert Quarry. Vincent Price. Shemp Howard. Robert Ryan. The cast of Cool Hand Luke. Richard Roundtree. Billy Jack. The guy who played Billy Jack. Peter Fonda. Stuart Margolin. Joe Santos. The cast of The Rat Patrol. Oliver Reed. Bo Hopkins. Jimmy Caan's coke connection on The Killer Elite. The Santa Claus at the Kmart in Hayward in 1977. Albert Salmi. Peter Falk. Sam Peckinpah. The Fossil Man on S3, Ep 12 of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Ross Martin. Robert Stack. Rabbi Finklestein. William Marshall. Ricardo Montalban. Morgan Woodward. The Mysterious Irwin Allen. Roy Thinnes. Rick Monday. Tom Bosley. Strother Martin. Charles Grey. Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Klaus Schwab. A Quinn Martin Production. The talking flute on H.R. Pufnstuf. Sid and Marty Krofft's Day Care for Single Mothers. Danny Bonaduce. The guy who set up the stereo system in your den. All these pix you withhold from me.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @Hangnail Hans, @Mike Tre

    That was awesome.

  250. @SavyinDallas
    Give up your guns and you will be like Australia-- defenseless and locked up in your homes by a rogue police state.

    Replies: @raga10

    Give up your guns and you will be like Australia– defenseless and locked up in your homes by a rogue police state.

    Meh, at one point in my life I had a choice to make: live in USA, or live in Australia. Having seen both I chose Australia and I am yet to regret my decision. But if I ever do, it will be because of Australian immigration policies that are far too relaxed for my liking rather than too strict!

    Well, I can always go back to Europe… if it too isn’t completely overrun by Muslims by then.

  251. @Whiskey
    @MEH 0910

    Exhibit A on why White women are the eternal and natural enemy of the White man.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @JohnnyWalker123

    Don’t know if that’s exactly the right take, given that most of us would still like to have sex. Especially the “eternal” and “natural” language, since in a lot of times and places that hasn’t been true.

  252. @JohnnyD
    Maybe, we can practice gun control in our foreign policy by not sending billions of dollars worth of weapons to countries like Afghanistan?

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    But they’re practiced?

  253. @Gamecock
    Frum's message is Tutto nello Stato.

    You should depend on the state for your protection. That the state can't protect you is irrelevant. It is your duty to conform. Your survival is of no consequence. Better you die than not conform.

    See also: Covid vaccination (sic). Masks. Lockdowns.

    I love this part:

    The weapons Americans buy to protect their loved ones are the weapons that end up being accidentally discharged into a loved one’s leg or chest or head.
     
    He's concerned about your families. LOL. He couldn't care less about you or your families. Surrender to the state. It's for the children.

    More people are buying guns because current events show the government will NOT protect you. You are not their priority.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Right. He’s playing on people’s fears of guns in attempt to stop GoodWhites from becoming comfortable with them, because that might lead them to change their minds on gun control.

  254. If boats, trains, busses, and planes were to convey all Africans back to Africa, and all Central Americans back to the magic triangle, you would see Americans turning in their guns. On their way to the biggest party this country has ever seen.

  255. @ginger bread man
    How do you know David frum reads your articles?

    Also, why doesn’t the Atlantic or another online magazine hire you? You have the most prolific output of any living blogger, intellectual or journalist I’ve seen (with the possible exception of Chomsky) and come up with novel, original ideas that tend to explain observed social phenomena better than competing theories.

    If the marketplace of ideas were truly functioning, you’d be top of the field and rewarded for it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Billy Corr

    Steve is very bright, but he can’t dance.

  256. @Rob
    This is off topic, but this is a 220 comment thread, so I don’t think this is a significant derailing.

    This is on the Supreme Court upholding the Texas anti-abortion law being a big victory for sonservatives. Does anyone here know a bunch (or any) young conservatives or alt-rightist, or dissident rightists? Preferably offline, because the internet/Twitter is not exactly representative of reality. On the other hand, the internet is where communication happens, so I can see it being to the right what universities are to the left, in that hings that were bizarre beliefs ten years ago are middle of the road in that milieu, and will be conventional wisdom (for cons and rightists) in ten years.

    Steve has been remarkably silent on this law and decision. Even if you don’t approve of abortion, the state outsourcing law enforcement to totally unregulated or overseen private actors who, because they aren’t the government, are not restricted by the Bill of Rights, should scare the poo out of us after the Summer of George (why has FloydFest not caught on? See here for context)

    Do Young rightists care about abortion? Do they oppose it in Weimerica as it is actually practiced? Smart and average intelligent White women not having kids is not because of abortion, even as a proximate cause. The most proximate causes are condoms and HBC. Then comes the lack of “marriageable” men for women from upper middle class+ or perhaps any men for women of their appearance and weight for middle class-.

    Probably the “ultimate cause” is women being free from family and family-in-law carrots and stick (yes, I know I’m using ‘carrot a stick incorrectly) to have kids. You know how people are one of very few mammals that cannot synthesize their own vitamin C? I was told back in ‘96 that the “broken” enzyme evolved to catalyze a different reaction. That mutant gene only spread because humans or pre-humans, at least the ones that succeeded in reproducing, got lots of vitamin C from their diet, fruit and meat. Women maybe work similarly. Pregnancy is widely considered an unpleasant state by women in the modern west. Having a baby at home is pretty awful for the primary caregiver, virtually always the mother. In the not to distant past, much less centuries ago, neither was unpleasant. Family and in-laws supported pregnant women, called them beautiful, told them how great the kids would be. Gave the advice about morning sickness, helped with work. Look, I’m a dude and this was never covered in my anthro class, but it stands to reason. Mothers in-law in particular pressured their sons wives to have a kid, and them to have more kids. So did her own mother. I have read that women who live close to their mother have either more kids or first kid earlier, I forget, but this is obviously confounded by women’s personalities. But in a way it is not confounded. Women who are closer to their mothers reproduce more.After pregnancy, family members helped with work, not jobs.

    This is not to mention that husbands pushed for more children, and a woman’s social status was largely determined by how many kids she had, and whether they thrived or not.

    Today, for white women in the west, all this had changed..New moms are isolated with a kid all day, with no one but baby, dog, and tv for company. Lots live far away from their families. They don’t know their neighbors, and frequently the neighbors don’t have kids. Is it any wonder women (the ones who don’t have awful jobs) look forward to going back to work? Especially because social status for women is tied to the same things they are for men, career and money.

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money - resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    Unmarried women (whether never married or divorced) do not even have mothers in-law pressuring them to have kids. I have read that the fairly rare unwed mothers outside the lower classes usually only have one child. Over time, single motherhood will correlate even more with social class than it does now.

    Oh, the vitamin analogy. Like getting a vitamin from your diet, women got these “social vitamins” from other people. Coupled with a sex drive, women do not necessarily have instincts or tendencies to have many kids in the modern environment. It has nothing to do with abortion being available, per se.

    Combining all those things with so many (maybe a very solid majority) of men not reaching famous actor levels of wealth, renown, and attractiveness, or even willingness to contribute more resources than he consumes and not giving her an std he picked up from someone else he’s, y’knowing, for the lower classes and women do not want to have kids.

    Not to mention the massively increased cost to raise a kid in your social class for middle class plus. If you want to raise them in an environment similar to the one you grew up in, like low crime, not diverse in class or culture, but having the right number of Oreos, bananas, and whatever Mexicans and Indians are called when they adopt western norms. Plus getting them medical care and enough education to be more-or-less assured they’ll be in your social class or above (this is a strong desire for women especially it seems), and the have fewer kids.

    Hey Art Deco, can you remember/find what the inflation rate since, say 1965, 1985, 1995, one or all, has been if you calculate it using only housing, healthcare and education costs? Not necessarily “adjusting” for quality or increased consumption, as you cannot choose 1965 quality of medicine at 1965 prices; you cannot chose to live in a 1965 quality house, in 1965 neighborhoods, with 1965 demographics, etc; you cannot chose 1965 education for your kids and expect them to end up in the ever-shrink8ng middle class. Likewise, a computer is now a necessity growing up. I myself have suffered significantly from not having a computer growing up. Well, we had an apple IIC…

    Seriously Art, if you know that, or know where to find it, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing that number would be fantastic to own the libs and Reaganites both. If you could even point me to a place for data for that, then I can hassle Steve to crunch the numbers.

    I think the dissident right is savvy enough to grok that abortion is not on our list of top certainly 50 or 100 of our problems, even if they haven’t thought about the reasons.

    I mean, without abortion, but with the current wergeld paid to blacks through welfare, plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes! This time having a visually distinct, less intelligent, and less civilized population here, not as citizens, but with a sub-citizen legal status, exploited and mistreated because regardless of the law as written, they have little legal recourse when treated illegally…this time, the plan is

    1) Bring in inferior aliens
    2) Exploit them for cheap, unskilled labor
    3) ?
    4) Glorious, egalitarian high wage multicultural future!

    In fairness to step 2 there, blacks would not be better citizens had their ancestors not been mistreated, but we’re voluntary immigrants brought here as yeoman farmers to work crops they were more familiar with in climates where they did better than Northern European whites. Proof? How have their relatives done in the hundred odd countries in which they live?

    Replies: @jsm, @John Milton’s Ghost, @jsm, @Mr X

    Thoughtful post. I was once strongly anti-abortion and now I just don’t care. Since being unapologetically white and straight is heading toward criminalization, with middle and upper class white women mostly agreeing, defending the principle of life for fetuses feels like a luxury.

  257. @znon
    @R.G. Camara

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15's because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45's (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    If americans are serious about giving old Granny's the ability to decimate the screaming black hordes of Mau-Mau savages, then AR-15 all the way, hi capacity, easy to handle, no recoil for those aching arthritic shoulders, and points itself. A couple of video games are all you need for training.

    as regards the Concealed carry permits: I have one but was pulled over by a local cop while driving next to a high school parking lot. The first thing he said was "do you have a firearm?" He had checked from my plate and was fishing for a felony arrest ( possession of a handgun licensed or not within 300yards of school property in session or not) to pad his score at the cop shop. If they wanted to, and I believe they will soon, anyone who has a CCP is extremely vulnerable.

    Replies: @prosa123, @John Johnson, @TWS

    Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15’s because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45’s (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    Many things went wrong in the Miami shootout and the limited stopping power of the FBI agents’ firearms was just one of them. For example, one agent had his glasses knocked off when their car rammed the criminals’ car and was helpless without them. Another agent, armed with a 12-gauge shotgun loaded with buckshot (way more stopping power than any .223) had his arm shattered by a bullet from the .223 at the very beginning of the melee and eventually was able to get off only one shot, with extreme difficulty. One aspect of the shootout that’s gotten little attention is that the criminals’ car was in the deep shade of a large spreading tree while the agents were fully exposed in the blazing Florida sun.
    As I understand it, none of the agents were armed with .38 Specials or .45’s. A couple of them had .357 magnum revolvers, a round from which into one of the criminal’s brains finally ended the shootout, while the others had 9mm’s. It was a single shot from an agent’s 9mm that soon became known as The Shot Heard Round the World and wrought massive changes in law enforcement armament. Fired at the beginning of the shootout, the bullet traveled the length of the criminal’s outstretched arm, entered his chest, basically shredded one lung, and stopped about an inch from the heart. It was a very, very serious wound that by itself might have been fatal, but because it didn’t quite reach the heart it wasn’t immediately incapacitating. In the remaining 90 seconds the criminal was able to wreak havoc with the .223, resulting in the deaths of four agents (the second criminal had been incapacitated right from the start).
    Almost immediately, law enforcement agencies all over the country soured on their then-ubiquitous 9mm’s, based on the performance of this one shot. The FBI switched to a 10mm round, but soon found the recoil was too much for some agents to handle – which surprises me, I thought FBI agents are supposed to be strong and fit. The FBI then switched to the .40S&W round, which was midway between the 9mm and 10mm in terms of power. Police departments all over the country began dropping their 9mm’s in favor of the .40S&W. The NYPD was a rare exception in staying with the 9mm.
    More recently, the 9mm has come back into favor, after new bullet technology has increased its stopping power.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @prosa123

    They hire women too. And they're not called 'feebs' just because they stink at law enforcement.

  258. @Rob
    This is off topic, but this is a 220 comment thread, so I don’t think this is a significant derailing.

    This is on the Supreme Court upholding the Texas anti-abortion law being a big victory for sonservatives. Does anyone here know a bunch (or any) young conservatives or alt-rightist, or dissident rightists? Preferably offline, because the internet/Twitter is not exactly representative of reality. On the other hand, the internet is where communication happens, so I can see it being to the right what universities are to the left, in that hings that were bizarre beliefs ten years ago are middle of the road in that milieu, and will be conventional wisdom (for cons and rightists) in ten years.

    Steve has been remarkably silent on this law and decision. Even if you don’t approve of abortion, the state outsourcing law enforcement to totally unregulated or overseen private actors who, because they aren’t the government, are not restricted by the Bill of Rights, should scare the poo out of us after the Summer of George (why has FloydFest not caught on? See here for context)

    Do Young rightists care about abortion? Do they oppose it in Weimerica as it is actually practiced? Smart and average intelligent White women not having kids is not because of abortion, even as a proximate cause. The most proximate causes are condoms and HBC. Then comes the lack of “marriageable” men for women from upper middle class+ or perhaps any men for women of their appearance and weight for middle class-.

    Probably the “ultimate cause” is women being free from family and family-in-law carrots and stick (yes, I know I’m using ‘carrot a stick incorrectly) to have kids. You know how people are one of very few mammals that cannot synthesize their own vitamin C? I was told back in ‘96 that the “broken” enzyme evolved to catalyze a different reaction. That mutant gene only spread because humans or pre-humans, at least the ones that succeeded in reproducing, got lots of vitamin C from their diet, fruit and meat. Women maybe work similarly. Pregnancy is widely considered an unpleasant state by women in the modern west. Having a baby at home is pretty awful for the primary caregiver, virtually always the mother. In the not to distant past, much less centuries ago, neither was unpleasant. Family and in-laws supported pregnant women, called them beautiful, told them how great the kids would be. Gave the advice about morning sickness, helped with work. Look, I’m a dude and this was never covered in my anthro class, but it stands to reason. Mothers in-law in particular pressured their sons wives to have a kid, and them to have more kids. So did her own mother. I have read that women who live close to their mother have either more kids or first kid earlier, I forget, but this is obviously confounded by women’s personalities. But in a way it is not confounded. Women who are closer to their mothers reproduce more.After pregnancy, family members helped with work, not jobs.

    This is not to mention that husbands pushed for more children, and a woman’s social status was largely determined by how many kids she had, and whether they thrived or not.

    Today, for white women in the west, all this had changed..New moms are isolated with a kid all day, with no one but baby, dog, and tv for company. Lots live far away from their families. They don’t know their neighbors, and frequently the neighbors don’t have kids. Is it any wonder women (the ones who don’t have awful jobs) look forward to going back to work? Especially because social status for women is tied to the same things they are for men, career and money.

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money - resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    Unmarried women (whether never married or divorced) do not even have mothers in-law pressuring them to have kids. I have read that the fairly rare unwed mothers outside the lower classes usually only have one child. Over time, single motherhood will correlate even more with social class than it does now.

    Oh, the vitamin analogy. Like getting a vitamin from your diet, women got these “social vitamins” from other people. Coupled with a sex drive, women do not necessarily have instincts or tendencies to have many kids in the modern environment. It has nothing to do with abortion being available, per se.

    Combining all those things with so many (maybe a very solid majority) of men not reaching famous actor levels of wealth, renown, and attractiveness, or even willingness to contribute more resources than he consumes and not giving her an std he picked up from someone else he’s, y’knowing, for the lower classes and women do not want to have kids.

    Not to mention the massively increased cost to raise a kid in your social class for middle class plus. If you want to raise them in an environment similar to the one you grew up in, like low crime, not diverse in class or culture, but having the right number of Oreos, bananas, and whatever Mexicans and Indians are called when they adopt western norms. Plus getting them medical care and enough education to be more-or-less assured they’ll be in your social class or above (this is a strong desire for women especially it seems), and the have fewer kids.

    Hey Art Deco, can you remember/find what the inflation rate since, say 1965, 1985, 1995, one or all, has been if you calculate it using only housing, healthcare and education costs? Not necessarily “adjusting” for quality or increased consumption, as you cannot choose 1965 quality of medicine at 1965 prices; you cannot chose to live in a 1965 quality house, in 1965 neighborhoods, with 1965 demographics, etc; you cannot chose 1965 education for your kids and expect them to end up in the ever-shrink8ng middle class. Likewise, a computer is now a necessity growing up. I myself have suffered significantly from not having a computer growing up. Well, we had an apple IIC…

    Seriously Art, if you know that, or know where to find it, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing that number would be fantastic to own the libs and Reaganites both. If you could even point me to a place for data for that, then I can hassle Steve to crunch the numbers.

    I think the dissident right is savvy enough to grok that abortion is not on our list of top certainly 50 or 100 of our problems, even if they haven’t thought about the reasons.

    I mean, without abortion, but with the current wergeld paid to blacks through welfare, plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes! This time having a visually distinct, less intelligent, and less civilized population here, not as citizens, but with a sub-citizen legal status, exploited and mistreated because regardless of the law as written, they have little legal recourse when treated illegally…this time, the plan is

    1) Bring in inferior aliens
    2) Exploit them for cheap, unskilled labor
    3) ?
    4) Glorious, egalitarian high wage multicultural future!

    In fairness to step 2 there, blacks would not be better citizens had their ancestors not been mistreated, but we’re voluntary immigrants brought here as yeoman farmers to work crops they were more familiar with in climates where they did better than Northern European whites. Proof? How have their relatives done in the hundred odd countries in which they live?

    Replies: @jsm, @John Milton’s Ghost, @jsm, @Mr X

    Also, this:

    plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes!

    Spot on. Consider Jackson Hole, where the billionaires are pushing out the millionaires. The sun setting behind Grand Tetons is a view truly breathtaking.

    The brown folk that tidy up for the townspeople are brought by bus each morning through Snake River Canyon and sent back by 5, whereupon they’re given leave to while away their leisure hours in the streets of poor, unsuspecting Driggs, ID, chugging six packs and passing out.

    Thusly tucked neatly behind the mountains for the night, they spoil not the view for Fat Cats taking their evening constitutional.

    La Nouvelle Sundown Town.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @jsm

    Heartbreaking for the Idahoans and the (i’m guessing) Guatemalans. In the long run, it is better to be rich in a first world country than in a third world country. That’s why rich Americans don’t move to Belize. This does not apply if you like 14 yo prostitutes and novel drugs. Rip McAfee. Y’know I went to one college where computer antivirus billionaire Norton Antivirus (too lazy to look up his name) attended before Antivirus was a household name (Reed College) and another where the other computer security billionaire, McAfee Antivirus (no relation) went (Roanoke College). Alas, I will never be a billionaire. Probably cuz my name’s not Antivirus.

    Ok, little googling shows that Belize is a playground for the super rich. But it seems to be popular with the scuzzier sort of rich. People go there because they speak English? I thought the whole point of Mixtec speaking maids was that they couldn’t understand what you were saying? The wealthy be crazy, yo! But rich expats seem to be in the news for drugs and murders. If there are drugs, and billionaires, and beaches, I’m guessing there are also girls (and boys!) who perform private services for the wealthy men?

    Oho! Belize did not become independent until 1981. People were optimistic about Africa in 1960’s, when it was still possible to believe that despite not really coming up with “nations” on their own, or “wheels” or “machinery” or “science” or “writing” or “sails” or “domestication” or “glass” or “distilled alcohol” or tobacco (maybe Indians can take credit for this, but they just used it? did they domesticate it?) or firearms that they would be developing very fast now that those pesky colonialists weren’t stealing their wealth. The infrastructure that the British built is still running. Much like the infrastructure built by Americans is still creaking along with 100-odd million third worlders who cannot produce enough, uh, production to maintain it. The Indy in 1981 will come up later.

    Lots more after you just click that little More tag, you want to, don’t you? Please?!?


    Thank you! Here’s your prize.

    Maybe Belize will do better than the other Central American nations because of British law, language, and genes than the Spanish ones? Certainly the British colonies in North America and Oceania have done better than any Spanish colony anywhere. I guess it depends on how many of mestizos and creoles are British hybrids vs how many are Spanish hybrids from Honduras looking to scrub the last European toilets in Central America
    Back to first world wealthy than third world wealthy. Even if you like the Caymans for sun and tax sheltering, those taxes avoided have to come out of production Somewhere. In the case of Caribbean and Central American tax shelters - there are some “Utopian” tax shelters coming in Honduras. They’ll certainly be tax shelters, I lol at Utopian, but would love to wrong. Given that historically, central and South America have not been able to produce enough wealth per capita to meet the basic needs of much of the population, the rich in their haciendas and fancy neighborhoods of cities were in a precarious position. It is one thing to be docile when your belly is full and you fat, but lean hungry men are desperate.

    They are not in that situation now, but that is not their doing. A rising China lifts a lot of third world boats. Seriously, even some African countries are not dollar/day for big chunks of the population. China both buys a lot of raw materials from third world countries - we for example, send them scrap metal and waste paper - and exports cheaper manufactured goods for consumption, improved services, and more efficient primary production than the first world nations like S Korea, Japan, and Germany - what, you thought America would be on that list? Waddaya Retahded? We export porn! - China is not much for helping other nations climb the value chain. Though since China wants to be a zeroth world nation - perhaps one day when China is exporting genetic engineering bundles for $30,000/child the boy package tall, dark handsome, and athletic, and the girl package, not quite as tall, but fair, and blonde, and beautiful, with the verbal, spatial, and mathematical bundles available only to Chinese, including Chinese who live overseas. Perhaps then they will let some of their manufacturing go to the third world. Perhaps not. The America Lessons will be taught to all the elite Chinese. Well, maybe you can immigrate to China? Yeah, no. China remembers the Lesson of the Smart Aliens (Jews) and the Lesson of the Dumb Aliens (Blacks and Mexicans) far too well to let you ship them your desperate poor people or your increasingly desperate selves.

    Ok, back to being rich in the third world. Without a hyperpower, a country that produces world stability (more or less) under a single ideology, especially globalism with immigration and free trade, being third world rich gets a lot less fun. America stops exporting grain, beef, and animal feed, because civil war? Then the poor get desperate, and the middle class starts googling revolución. The US thinks it’s still the hyperpower, and throws a fit over China’s new One Nation, Three Systems policy that brings Taiwan back into the fold, so China starts selling a quarter of the quadrillion dollar US national debt, and your dollars are worthless? You are no longer rich, you are poor. Better have left some money in pesetas! Newly militarized Japan gets in pissing match with China, demands that your country stop exports to China? China demands the same vis-à-vis Japan? New Cold War! Now you can’t go on vacation anywhere!

    The third world rich greatly benefit from the current system. So do the first world rich. When the first workd’s not productive, then they are no longer rich!

  259. @Flip
    @Triteleia Laxa


    To get it to the Swiss rate, where every adult man has a personal arsenal of firearms, may be too ambitious. US murders would have to be brought down by more than a factor of 10!
     
    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don't seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.

    Replies: @By-tor

    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don’t seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.

    Those four states are perceived to have far fewer blacks and Central American illegals than others.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @By-tor

    Indeed, sort of like Switzerland is full of Swiss.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  260. @jsm
    @Rob

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money – resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?


    This is insightful. I think you're on to something. Not only do modern working women not have babies because there's just too much to do in a day for one person to manage it all -- get up, get kid ready, get self ready, get on freeway with howling kid who still wants to sleep, drive to daycare and drop off, back on freeway to drive to work, work all day, desperately try to get away from work despite demands to stay in order to be on time to pick up kid before daycare closes, drive freeway, pick up howling overtired kid who didn't get a decent nap, stop at grocery store with howling kid, get home, make food, bathe kid, do bedtime routine, put kid to sleep, return to kid who woke after an hour and put kid back to sleep, do it again in two hours, then two more, then two more, then in two more get up for the day and do it all over again... but I also think, you're right. There's an evolutionary psychology reason to avoid pregnancy when Gramma and Grampa and other extended family is far away that involves lack of resources.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    I think it’s mostly that Mom (and her society) think that a kid needs all that attention. They don’t. They need a few sibs, a few friends, a few books, a father, and discipline.

  261. • Replies: @epebble
    @Bill Jones

    She is making it sound very ominous. We don't live in terror of Influenza. Vaccination is very, very minor inconvenience compared to Colonoscopy, Mammograms, Pap smear, ECG, etc., procedures. which we routinely accept as the cost of staying alive.

  262. Anyone compute the impact of all Democrats giving up handguns?

  263. @SafeNow
    “The majority of retailers, in fact it could well be almost all, have policies against trying to stop shoplifters no matter how brazen”

    Hey, good news! I’m off to Walmart to shoplift some books. Some vegetables too. Putting on my sport coat now.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey, good news! I’m off to Walmart to shoplift some books. Some vegetables too. Putting on my sport coat now.

    Can you boys pick me up some of that Cheeze Whiz?

  264. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    All sorts of Southern California suburbs are rather safe. Thousand Oaks in Ventura County some years ranks near the top of lists of the safest medium size municipalities in the country.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Dmon

    I guess my question pertains to why. Why are these neighborhoods so safe, considering that just a few hoods away, there’s some mighty bad neighborhoods. People in Inglewood, Compton, Watts, etc do have access to cars, they can hop on the freeways to do some damage in the nice areas such as Malibu. But that doesn’t seem to happen. So either these neighborhoods are safe for various reasons, including a major police presence that actively polices their neighborhoods. After all, lots of people in CA carry guns, so do the bad guys. But that doesn’t stop the bad guys (e.g. gang members etc) from attacking other people in their neighborhoods. Wonder if another reason under the radar is at play: convenience. It’s too much work to drive 4o plus miles to Malibu and the safe hoods, and instead much easier to stay in one’s own hood and commit crimes.

    That’s what was so unsual about the 2020 riots in SoCal. BLM protesters actually went to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills to loot and burn down buildings. Normally the protesters skip over the nice areas in major metros. This was the exception to the rule.

    What would be the major reasons as to why certain neighborhoods are and remain safe in SoCal, even in the midst of not so nice neighborhoods?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s.

    Lots of home security cameras now.

    Racial profiling by cops.

    Police.

    Big increase in armed homeowners since 1992 riots.

    Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home.

    Target hardening of property.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  265. @Whiskey
    @MEH 0910

    Exhibit A on why White women are the eternal and natural enemy of the White man.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @JohnnyWalker123

    Jewish women.

    Like Jennifer Rubin.

  266. Englishmen aren’t allowed to own firearms; but we can buy replicas of Swiss halberds.
    So if you don’t want to get poleaxed, don’t try to sneak into my house, or I’m going to get medieval on your ass.

    • LOL: Kolya Krassotkin
  267. Question: Who is Frum?
    Answer: I don’t know

  268. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let me say just that I had thought you and your wife were big “off-the-grid” types or going that way. Is that not the case?
     
    We are prepared to live "off-the-grid." That is the key.And I did live off the grid, completely, for most of a year before I went to college, in a log cabin I built. You've read my comments. I am prepared to do that again if necessary, only now better. Does this make my wife and me "preppers?" I don't know, but I don't do things to fit into any kind of "lifestyle" or phrase or title. In other words, I don't live to fit into some kind of market research category.

    If the SHTF, I can support my wife and myself with no outside help. I am prepared.

    "On the other hand,"™ we both enjoy all the benefits of modern, American life. That includes modern medicine. I have never been "anti-vax," and I don't think you are either. I still do think this whole SARS-CoV-2 thing is overblown, and I'm not now open to (the Pfizer) vaccination just because I think the virus is that dangerous. I am open to it for other reasons.

    To put is simply, if the vaccine is safe, I don't really care what it does. Travel through Europe will also be a lot easier. I live in a real world I neither created nor control, and I must deal with it.

    Furthermore, not only has Ron Unz made logical, persuasive arguments here, but also others I respect have too, such as Jack D. and iSteve S.

    What good is it to come here unless one is willing to listen?

    Disappointing you makes me feel bad, just as giving so much ammunition here to those who dislike me and have recently insulted me already has. You might say I am now "inoculated" against caring about coming across as a fool on the internet, but I don't want to lose your respect.

    Replies: @Weaver, @SafeNow, @Polistra, @Achmed E. Newman

    Buzz, I didn’t really mean “off the grid” as in off the electrical grid, buying nothing from the store, etc, though you wrote that you did for that year (and good on you). It’s a general term for getting out of the system to the degree one can – homeschooling is possibly the most common and first step. The word “prepper” is no marketing term to me. It’s a mindset. It’s not just the mindset that things are going to get worse in a serious way, and quickly at some point, but that “hey, we’ve going to do things to get ready for that.”

    I was the one who initially termed your wife’s job as a “gig”, I didn’t mean any sleight by that. I would call my job a “gig”, and it’s the best and most lucrative job I’ve ever had. That’s why I don’t want to jeapordize it, but, OTOH, this:

    I’ve not heard of any instance of a vaccine being made mandatory before, even for diseases much worse than this one. Why? Because a rights-respecting society figures people can make the decision for themselves. In this case, we know that the vaccinated are not necessarily less contagious anyway – the vax is a personal decision based on one’s own judgement.

    The thing is, I’m not against this being mandatory based on thinking this is some Bill Gates-led mass-culling idea. I’m not saying that I trust any of these elites NOT to be up to this, but I’m simply against all the additional Totalitarianism, purposefully put into place so as not to “let this crisis go to waste”. We let this same kind of thing get put into place 20 years ago, after 9/11. I don’t want any part of this 2nd round.

    I don’t get the solidarity thing, but if you are not worried about it, that’s your decision. However, it’s not mine. You may not know about all the institutional pressure being put on people who don’t want to get vaxxed to do so – or maybe you do from your wife’s experience.

    Someone in this great double-issue (hey, you started it, Steve) comment thread mentioned the health insurance premium there, but there are more serious other measures they threaten with – well, if you want to stay working there, that is. Later on, they’ll come after you, as in Australia, even if you quit due to these threats. This brings us right back to the gun discussion, don’t it?

  269. @Joe Stalin
    @raga10


    I realize that ship has probably sailed by now but the truth is, if people could be convinced to give up their guns they really would be better off.
     
    Sure thing... the government and news media tells me this all the time... so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg, Billionaire financier of an empire of gun control organizations?

    UK Knife Crime Hits Record High, Despite London Mayor’s ‘Knife Control’

    The U.K., most notably London, has experienced a sharp increase in knife-related crime, despite “knife control” efforts to curb the violence, newly released figures detail.

    Knife crime in both England and Wales is up 8% from April 2018 to May 2019. U.K. police reports from 43 departments recorded 47,136 incidents involving sharp objects, an Office of National Statistics crime report says.

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2019/07/18/uk-knife-crime-hits-record-high-despite-london-mayors-knife-control/#:~:text=London%20Mayor%20Sadiq%20Khan%20implemented,since%202018%2C%20the%20report%20details.&text=Similarly%2C%20rape%20at%20knifepoint%20and,up%2018%25%20since%20last%20year.

     


    Selling, buying and carrying knives

    The maximum penalty for an adult carrying a knife is 4 years in prison and an unlimited fine. You’ll get a prison sentence if you’re convicted of carrying a knife more than once.

    Basic laws on knives

    It’s illegal to:

    - sell a knife to anyone under 18, unless it has a folding blade 3 inches long (7.62 cm) or less
    - carry a knife in public without good reason, unless it has a folding blade with a cutting edge 3 inches long or less
    - carry, buy or sell any type of banned knife
    - use any knife in a threatening way (even a legal knife)

    https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives
     

    Replies: @raga10, @Billy Corr

    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg

    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically. Joe Average on the street would be better off if there were fewer guns around because:

    – he’d be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don’t have a gun you’re not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn’t going to escalate.

    – as I was suggesting with my razor gangs example, you have better chances of survival if you *do* get into a fight. Yes, it’s unfortunate that people in England are now stabbing each other at increasing rate, but it would be worse if they were shooting each other.

    – police have better chances of doing their work if there fewer and less lethal weapons out there. They would be also less jumpy and trigger-happy, leading to fewer “police violence” scenarios.

    – coming back to my razor gangs example: Sydney police used to crack down heavily on gun users back then. They could afford to do that, because gun use was much less frequent. Which led to criminals even less likely to use guns. It was a circle of positive feedback.

    – Finally, police would simply be cheaper for us to fund, because they wouldn’t need all those army surplus armoured vehicles, heavy guns and god knows what else. For a long time English policemen used to not even carry guns in their regular duty (I don’t know if that’s changed now). They didn’t need them. And it’s not that the public was so law abiding – that’s just wishful thinking. Crime was always there to some degree, just not to a degree that would require heavy weapons to manage.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @raga10

    Micheal Bloomberg upheld the government's side of the gun control bargain by empowering the NYPD to crack down hard on guys carrying illegal guns.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Joe Stalin
    @raga10


    – he’d be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don’t have a gun you’re not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn’t going to escalate.
     
    That's a classic rational I've actually seen in gun controller printed literature. Only thing is, why do you have to endure a fist fight when you haven't attacked anyone, when you are an innocent party. What you are saying is akin saying you must engage in hand to hand combat rather than using a firearm to defend yourself. Are we not morally entitled to the right of self-defense? What if you come under a standard urban swarming attack by youths?

    In the USA, it's our right.

    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically.
     
    Micheal Bloomberg is a very rich man; why would you make an argument about Joe Average NOT being armed is better than for Joe, but that it's okay for a rich gun controller to be protected by guns because he can afford it?

    THE SAFE, NOT SORRY LESSONS

    It would be hard to find a more ferocious warrior for gun owners’ civil rights than Tanya Metaksa. The anti-gun magazine Mother Jones called her “one of the most powerful lobbyists in America,” and the Associated Press described her as “a blunt, no-nonsense voice for the gun lobby in Washington.” I had the privilege of meeting her and hearing her speak back in the day.

    She would introduce herself as “Metaksa, not Metaska. AK, as in AK-47.” A year prior to her retirement from the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, where she served as Executive Director, the Harper Collins subsidiary Regan Books published her book Safe, Not Sorry: Keeping Yourself and Your Family Safe in a Violent Age.

    I thought the most powerful part of that book was the section in which Tanya focused on women who had faced homicidal attack. Four of them prevailed, because they were able to reach handguns in time to fight back and win. One of them could not, because the law in that place and time forbade her to. Here, thanks to Tanya, are their stories.

    https://americanhandgunner.com/our-experts/the-safe-not-sorry-lessons/

     

    , @anonymous
    @raga10

    Are you an American? That's a pretty dumb take. Police are expensive because of public union power (salaries, benefits, short hours leading to overstaffing, overtime for useless duties i.e. guarding the ballgame etc., inability to "police" disability claims), not due to the cost of hardware.

    Replies: @raga10

  270. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess my question pertains to why. Why are these neighborhoods so safe, considering that just a few hoods away, there's some mighty bad neighborhoods. People in Inglewood, Compton, Watts, etc do have access to cars, they can hop on the freeways to do some damage in the nice areas such as Malibu. But that doesn't seem to happen. So either these neighborhoods are safe for various reasons, including a major police presence that actively polices their neighborhoods. After all, lots of people in CA carry guns, so do the bad guys. But that doesn't stop the bad guys (e.g. gang members etc) from attacking other people in their neighborhoods. Wonder if another reason under the radar is at play: convenience. It's too much work to drive 4o plus miles to Malibu and the safe hoods, and instead much easier to stay in one's own hood and commit crimes.

    That's what was so unsual about the 2020 riots in SoCal. BLM protesters actually went to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills to loot and burn down buildings. Normally the protesters skip over the nice areas in major metros. This was the exception to the rule.

    What would be the major reasons as to why certain neighborhoods are and remain safe in SoCal, even in the midst of not so nice neighborhoods?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s.

    Lots of home security cameras now.

    Racial profiling by cops.

    Police.

    Big increase in armed homeowners since 1992 riots.

    Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home.

    Target hardening of property.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s."

    There still remain plenty of luxury cars in SoCal (Bentley, Rolls Royce, Ferrari, etc) which would count as stealable items of value. Carjackings still do occur in the US. For example, rapper T.I. once did a song about taking a Bentley coupe to the chop shop.


    "Racial profiling by cops.

    Police."

    Defund the Police mvt remains fairly strong on the West Coast, no? Profiling technically is supposed to be racist.


    "Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home."

    Hopefully this will suffice for the long term. The drug trade has been known to spread out across the US and leave the large metros for the exurbs.

    Slightly off topic but relevant to point. Would coastal areas on the edge of LA County, like say, Malibu or the Beach Cities be considered exurbs of LA? Back East, they certainly would be considered to be exurbs of a major metro area, even though it doesn't appear to be that they are.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  271. typical vaccines protect the unvaccinated, because they are sterilizing. To be sterilizing a vaccine must prevent infection. Since you never get infected you never replicate the virus and thus do not shed it. If you do not shed it the potential path of the viral life-cycle for that particular infection ends with you and thus you cannot pass on or cause a mutation. People vaccinated for mumps and Polio cannot contract the disease and spread it to others. So getting these sterilizing vaccines will protect the unvaccinated population.

    The mRNA vaccines are non-sterilizing. A vaccine that is not sterilizing permits the virus to infect you and replicate and as a result you can infect others. Such a “vaccine” may act to reduce symptomatic disease. You don’t know you’re sick and you don’t get sick or have few symptoms. Unfortunately since you don’t know you’re sick but are infected and the virus is both replicating in you and shedding you are more-likely to spread the infection to others. During the COVID vaccine trials in 2020 they deliberately did not test any of the recipients for asymptomatic infections. Non-sterilizing vaccines do not suppress anything.

    If you get the COVID vaccines you are just as likely to give the virus to others as the unvaxxed. This is particularly important if the “others” are seriously medically-compromised and take no precautions because they believe they’re safe around you. The reason you may be more-likely to spread the virus to others is that if the vaccine suppresses your symptoms you will not know you’re sick, and thus you will have no reason to limit contact with others. This makes the jabbed literal Typhoid Marys.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Travis

    Exactly. The unvaccinated are not free riders since the vaccinated can spread Corinavirus to others. Most of those getting hospitalized today caught COVID from a fully vaccinated adult.

    My vaccinated co-workers are not protecting me from CV and are actually more likely to spread the virus unknowingly since they may not get any symptoms.

    Blaming the variants on the in vaccinated is like blaming antibiotic resistance strains of staph on people not taking antibiotics. The new variants will probably evade the vaccine antibodies, since the majority of Americans have these non-neutralizing antibodies. This was predicted by many virologists and us the reason we never used non-sterilizing vaccines in the past.

  272. @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed,

    Whoever burgled those homes probably, in my view, figured that homes, one if them double-signed, with BLM placards would also not have residents possessing guns for home defense.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    For you and the other repliers with these points, I had both the gun ownership thing and the leniency thing in mind. I don’t know which one would have more sway in the subconsciouses of the criminal thugs, but, yes, this works out kinda nicely.

  273. @raga10
    @Joe Stalin


    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg
     
    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically. Joe Average on the street would be better off if there were fewer guns around because:

    - he'd be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don't have a gun you're not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn't going to escalate.

    - as I was suggesting with my razor gangs example, you have better chances of survival if you *do* get into a fight. Yes, it's unfortunate that people in England are now stabbing each other at increasing rate, but it would be worse if they were shooting each other.

    - police have better chances of doing their work if there fewer and less lethal weapons out there. They would be also less jumpy and trigger-happy, leading to fewer "police violence" scenarios.

    - coming back to my razor gangs example: Sydney police used to crack down heavily on gun users back then. They could afford to do that, because gun use was much less frequent. Which led to criminals even less likely to use guns. It was a circle of positive feedback.

    - Finally, police would simply be cheaper for us to fund, because they wouldn't need all those army surplus armoured vehicles, heavy guns and god knows what else. For a long time English policemen used to not even carry guns in their regular duty (I don't know if that's changed now). They didn't need them. And it's not that the public was so law abiding - that's just wishful thinking. Crime was always there to some degree, just not to a degree that would require heavy weapons to manage.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Stalin, @anonymous

    Micheal Bloomberg upheld the government’s side of the gun control bargain by empowering the NYPD to crack down hard on guys carrying illegal guns.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer



    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg

     

    Micheal Bloomberg upheld the government’s side..
     
    When did Bloomberg become Irish? Did some of the NYPD rub off on him?


    People with the name Micheál

  274. What would Teddy Roosevelt say? Ah, yes: Frum has no more backbone than a chocolate eclair.

  275. David frum, you’re a tool of the left. Don’t come back to Canada. We all think you’re a communist fruitcake.

  276. @Steve Sailer
    @raga10

    Micheal Bloomberg upheld the government's side of the gun control bargain by empowering the NYPD to crack down hard on guys carrying illegal guns.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg

    Micheal Bloomberg upheld the government’s side..

    When did Bloomberg become Irish? Did some of the NYPD rub off on him?

    People with the name Micheál

  277. @Rob
    This is off topic, but this is a 220 comment thread, so I don’t think this is a significant derailing.

    This is on the Supreme Court upholding the Texas anti-abortion law being a big victory for sonservatives. Does anyone here know a bunch (or any) young conservatives or alt-rightist, or dissident rightists? Preferably offline, because the internet/Twitter is not exactly representative of reality. On the other hand, the internet is where communication happens, so I can see it being to the right what universities are to the left, in that hings that were bizarre beliefs ten years ago are middle of the road in that milieu, and will be conventional wisdom (for cons and rightists) in ten years.

    Steve has been remarkably silent on this law and decision. Even if you don’t approve of abortion, the state outsourcing law enforcement to totally unregulated or overseen private actors who, because they aren’t the government, are not restricted by the Bill of Rights, should scare the poo out of us after the Summer of George (why has FloydFest not caught on? See here for context)

    Do Young rightists care about abortion? Do they oppose it in Weimerica as it is actually practiced? Smart and average intelligent White women not having kids is not because of abortion, even as a proximate cause. The most proximate causes are condoms and HBC. Then comes the lack of “marriageable” men for women from upper middle class+ or perhaps any men for women of their appearance and weight for middle class-.

    Probably the “ultimate cause” is women being free from family and family-in-law carrots and stick (yes, I know I’m using ‘carrot a stick incorrectly) to have kids. You know how people are one of very few mammals that cannot synthesize their own vitamin C? I was told back in ‘96 that the “broken” enzyme evolved to catalyze a different reaction. That mutant gene only spread because humans or pre-humans, at least the ones that succeeded in reproducing, got lots of vitamin C from their diet, fruit and meat. Women maybe work similarly. Pregnancy is widely considered an unpleasant state by women in the modern west. Having a baby at home is pretty awful for the primary caregiver, virtually always the mother. In the not to distant past, much less centuries ago, neither was unpleasant. Family and in-laws supported pregnant women, called them beautiful, told them how great the kids would be. Gave the advice about morning sickness, helped with work. Look, I’m a dude and this was never covered in my anthro class, but it stands to reason. Mothers in-law in particular pressured their sons wives to have a kid, and them to have more kids. So did her own mother. I have read that women who live close to their mother have either more kids or first kid earlier, I forget, but this is obviously confounded by women’s personalities. But in a way it is not confounded. Women who are closer to their mothers reproduce more.After pregnancy, family members helped with work, not jobs.

    This is not to mention that husbands pushed for more children, and a woman’s social status was largely determined by how many kids she had, and whether they thrived or not.

    Today, for white women in the west, all this had changed..New moms are isolated with a kid all day, with no one but baby, dog, and tv for company. Lots live far away from their families. They don’t know their neighbors, and frequently the neighbors don’t have kids. Is it any wonder women (the ones who don’t have awful jobs) look forward to going back to work? Especially because social status for women is tied to the same things they are for men, career and money.

    Far from family, few friends, and stressed about money - resources. In pre-history women who got pregnant in that situation surely had strictly worse odds of survival and net children thriving enough to reproduce themselves than women who waited until their situation was better?

    Unmarried women (whether never married or divorced) do not even have mothers in-law pressuring them to have kids. I have read that the fairly rare unwed mothers outside the lower classes usually only have one child. Over time, single motherhood will correlate even more with social class than it does now.

    Oh, the vitamin analogy. Like getting a vitamin from your diet, women got these “social vitamins” from other people. Coupled with a sex drive, women do not necessarily have instincts or tendencies to have many kids in the modern environment. It has nothing to do with abortion being available, per se.

    Combining all those things with so many (maybe a very solid majority) of men not reaching famous actor levels of wealth, renown, and attractiveness, or even willingness to contribute more resources than he consumes and not giving her an std he picked up from someone else he’s, y’knowing, for the lower classes and women do not want to have kids.

    Not to mention the massively increased cost to raise a kid in your social class for middle class plus. If you want to raise them in an environment similar to the one you grew up in, like low crime, not diverse in class or culture, but having the right number of Oreos, bananas, and whatever Mexicans and Indians are called when they adopt western norms. Plus getting them medical care and enough education to be more-or-less assured they’ll be in your social class or above (this is a strong desire for women especially it seems), and the have fewer kids.

    Hey Art Deco, can you remember/find what the inflation rate since, say 1965, 1985, 1995, one or all, has been if you calculate it using only housing, healthcare and education costs? Not necessarily “adjusting” for quality or increased consumption, as you cannot choose 1965 quality of medicine at 1965 prices; you cannot chose to live in a 1965 quality house, in 1965 neighborhoods, with 1965 demographics, etc; you cannot chose 1965 education for your kids and expect them to end up in the ever-shrink8ng middle class. Likewise, a computer is now a necessity growing up. I myself have suffered significantly from not having a computer growing up. Well, we had an apple IIC…

    Seriously Art, if you know that, or know where to find it, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing that number would be fantastic to own the libs and Reaganites both. If you could even point me to a place for data for that, then I can hassle Steve to crunch the numbers.

    I think the dissident right is savvy enough to grok that abortion is not on our list of top certainly 50 or 100 of our problems, even if they haven’t thought about the reasons.

    I mean, without abortion, but with the current wergeld paid to blacks through welfare, plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes! This time having a visually distinct, less intelligent, and less civilized population here, not as citizens, but with a sub-citizen legal status, exploited and mistreated because regardless of the law as written, they have little legal recourse when treated illegally…this time, the plan is

    1) Bring in inferior aliens
    2) Exploit them for cheap, unskilled labor
    3) ?
    4) Glorious, egalitarian high wage multicultural future!

    In fairness to step 2 there, blacks would not be better citizens had their ancestors not been mistreated, but we’re voluntary immigrants brought here as yeoman farmers to work crops they were more familiar with in climates where they did better than Northern European whites. Proof? How have their relatives done in the hundred odd countries in which they live?

    Replies: @jsm, @John Milton’s Ghost, @jsm, @Mr X

    The Texas law is a big victory for the humans that would otherwise be destroyed in abortions. Your remarks are a distraction from that fact.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Mr X

    So you think the state should raise all these unwanted blacks and Mexican babies?

    You really think that’s a fantastic use of your taxes? Not nec. Yours if you don’t live in Texas.

  278. @znon
    @R.G. Camara

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15's because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout, where 1 badly wounded bank robber with a .223 mini-14 managed to incapacitate or kill a large number of police, then armed mostly with .45's (a slow moving antiquated bullet that produces the same takedown rate of a .32 hollow point) and .38 specials.

    If americans are serious about giving old Granny's the ability to decimate the screaming black hordes of Mau-Mau savages, then AR-15 all the way, hi capacity, easy to handle, no recoil for those aching arthritic shoulders, and points itself. A couple of video games are all you need for training.

    as regards the Concealed carry permits: I have one but was pulled over by a local cop while driving next to a high school parking lot. The first thing he said was "do you have a firearm?" He had checked from my plate and was fishing for a felony arrest ( possession of a handgun licensed or not within 300yards of school property in session or not) to pad his score at the cop shop. If they wanted to, and I believe they will soon, anyone who has a CCP is extremely vulnerable.

    Replies: @prosa123, @John Johnson, @TWS

    If the Overlords really wanted to reduce gun fatalities they would encourage handgun availability over long arms. Handguns are much less lethal than long guns such as AR-15’s because the lower velocity does not create the tissue damaging shock wave of a .223. Re; the Miami Shootout

    If all guns were rifles then gun fatalities would in fact drop. This is because it would be harder for Blacks to conceal rifles.

  279. @HammerJack
    OT from RT. Who knows about this mayor?

    https://i.ibb.co/rwckqt4/Screenshot-20210906-115302-RT-News.jpg

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Hammer, without Columbus’ visitation to the New World, the buildings shown surrounding his statue in the photo would be adobe, and probably only one or two storys in height.

  280. @bombthe3gorgesdam
    @International Jew

    if that's true, why don't those arabs ever use their "illegal" guns on jews?

    Replies: @True or not

    Arabs are kept in check because whenever they use violence against Jews, Jews retaliate disproportionately, which is how you persuade a group of people who don’t recognise your existence to not attempt to delete your existence.

    • Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam
    @True or not

    I doubt that's true, as it doesn't stop Palestinian gentiles from throwing relatively harmless rocks at jewish armored vehicles in the occupied territories, pointless and fatalistic actions for which they are punished with live ammunition aimed and shot into their sex organs, heads, guts, etc. by the sadistic and cowardly jewish soldiers. If they are "armed to the teeth" as proud ethnic self-identifier International Jew says, and they can expect to be mowed down with live ammunition either way, why limit their action to stone throwing?

    Replies: @International Jew

  281. @Jonathan Mason
    @Reg Cæsar

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    The current constitution in Ecuador has existed since 2008 and is the 20th constitution of the country!

    Not sure that that is a good thing, but it seems that countries can implement new constitutions without the need for a revolution.

    The US is seriously in danger of falling apart, and it may become increasingly difficult to hold elections to choose governments that are accepted by the population.

    People are massively divided on issues like immigration, guns and policing, health care, how to hold elections, foreign policy, abortion. The West Coast, the East Coast, the north and the south, and the middle States have diverging populations and interests.

    It is not a foregone conclusion that the United States will hang together forever. Perhaps it will not break up in my lifetime, but in my children's, maybe.

    When I was young I did not think that the iron curtain would ever be pulled aside, and it was a total surprise to me when East and West Germany reunited. Shit happens, and it happens quickly.

    Replies: @El Dato, @kaganovitch, @Reg Cæsar

    A new constitution does not necessarily mean just copying the constitution of some other country or one of the states.

    No, but California’s and Canada’s are much newer, thus much better, right? Our decimal coinage system is just as old as our Constitution. Is that outdated too? Shall we join the rest of the English-speaking world and take £sd?

  282. @aj54
    @Jonathan Mason

    "But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone."
    human nature does not change. You can find quotes from ancient Greece and Rome that are just as timely today as when they were first written down. The principles of the Constitution are intact. The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.

    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.

    Also there was no police force at the time and certainly nothing like cell phones or even landlines, so people living in rural settings needed firearms for their own protection otherwise they would constantly be under threat from predators.

    The first official police force in the US was established in Boston in 1838, well after the Constitution was written.

    https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/civil-rights-reimagining-policing/how-you-start-is-how-you-finish/

    It is true that slavery was abolished after the Civil War and that blacks were granted citizenship, but after the establishment of nationwide professional police forces and other law enforcement agencies, the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.

    Unfortunately the Second Amendment now works much more to the advantage of criminals rather than homesteaders, because criminals can easily find guns to steal even if they are not allowed to buy them, and homesteaders probably get more protection from video doorbells than from firearms.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Jonathan Mason


    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.
     

    Slavery and the Second Amendment


    Servile Insurrection and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

    Clayton E. Cramer[1]

    Abstract: It has become very popular by those arguing for the Second Amendment is simply an obsolete antiquity to claim that the Second Amendment’s original purpose was the preservation of slavery. This article examines the evidence used to justify this claim and finds the evidence wanting. Debates and other texts of the time show a consistent explanation by both Federalists and Antifederalists for a right to keep and bear arms, and one not designed to prevent insurrection, but to make it possible.

    The Bogus Hypothesis

    Carl T. Bogus “Hidden History of the Second Amendment” tells us, “The Second Amendment’s history has been hidden because neither James Madison, who was the principle author of the Second Amendment, nor those he was attempting to outmaneuver politically, laid their motives on the table.” [2] Near the end of his article, Professor Bogus admits, “[T]he evidence is almost entirely circumstantial. Madison never expressly stated that he wrote the Second Amendment for that purpose…. Another reason is that the available records are woefully incomplete.”[3]

    We also have the word of one of Bogus’ villains that servile insurrection was not a concern:

    [T]he United States exhibit to the world the first instance, as far as we can learn, of a nation, unattacked by external force, unconvulsed by domestic insurrections, assembling voluntarily, deliberating fully, and deciding calmly, concerning that system of government under which they would wish that they and their posterity should live. [emphasis added][4]

    Slavery Did Not Motivate the Second Amendment

    Unlike the Bogus claim which acknowledges that the evidence is circumstantial, the evidence that we can actually find, shows that both Federalist and Antifederalist believed that the right to possess arms was to effectuate insurrection against a potentially tyrannical national government, not fear of slave rebellion. The distribution of requests for a right to keep and bear arms is contrary to a fear by slave states of rebellion.

    https://claytonecramer.blogspot.com/2021/06/slavery-and-second-amendment.html
     

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    ... the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.
     
    As did that of the First, the Fourth, the Fifth, and especially the Third.


    Or do you expect George VII to quarter troops in our homes?


    https://www.closerweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/prince-george-1.jpg?fit=200%2C1
    , @JMcG
    @Jonathan Mason

    The US Constitution predates the Haitian Slave Revolt by twenty years. The Second Amendment is in the Bill of Rights because King George lit the fuse of the American Revolution by sending his army into the hinterlands of Massachusetts to seize arms and powder from his subjects.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  283. @Coemgen
    Maybe there would be less "gun violence" if the population wasn't constantly exposed to "gun violence" via various media.

    "Hollywood" et al., should voluntarily decide to eliminate "gun violence" from their product. Indeed, why quibble?: They should eliminate all violence from their product.

    Also, they should de-sexualized their product to help reduce "unwanted pregnancies."

    Hm, they should remove all undesirable human behaviors from their product. Why train people in how to act in an anti-social manner?

    Replies: @Rob

    Could not decide whether to agree with or lol with this comment. I tried doing both, but RUnzilla’s software won’t let me!

    [MORE]

    I just discovered mythcreants.com which is about sci-if/fantasy and rpgs (don’t you judge me!) several articles telling a “emailer” or himself, that having gun use in his novel would “endorse” gunplay in reality. found it.

    …Don’t have plots where the character’s problems come from gun control

    Like a zombie story where the survivors are doomed because of restrictions on private firearm ownership.

    Be realistic about how guns operate….
    Show that they need repair, show that they jam, show that they can damage your hearing.

    Not sure how realism in terms of covering fire and showing gun maintenance keeps people from getting shot. I guess less “sweeping fire” would help. But the reply to the letter should have been, “lol. Nothing you write affects shootings. Ghetto blacks don’t read.” Google would probably de-index his website.

    But your general point, agree and amplify would certainly help with guns. Books are not where the money is. Tv and movies? \$! Trying to hurt Femocratic donors like Hollywood would be great. If we do it correctly, the left will eat their own. The other side are the ones promoting and profiting from violence. An imaginary letter, though it would have to fit in Tweetstorm. Can you @ people without it cutting into you word count? ‘At” a bunch of Hollywooderd

    “Gun violence kills x Americans annually. In spite of this ongoing tragedy, Hollywood continues to glorify gun violence x movie with gun violence grossed [insert number] in that same year. Thst’s \$z real dollars for every dead American. @[director of movie] is that a good return on your investment?

    “y% of gun murders are young BLACK males. They are only α% of the population. [@BLACK actor], you shot β people in [movie] you shot γ BLACKS in movies the yr before. Do you try washing the blood off your hands?”

    “[@actor] δ American children were shot with AR-15 rifles in school shootings in current year-3 You shot ε people with an AR-15 in [movie earlier]. How many dead children is your paycheck worth?”

    “[@moviestudio] “The number of gun violence death grows every year. Smoking has declined. In part because Hollywood made the courageous decision to only depict cigarette smoking in a negative context. Villains smoke. Leading Women and men do not. Show the same courage with gun violence.

    Guns should always be portrayed as causing more problems, not solving them
    No heroes with assault style rifles in any context
    Cops should always say that they only need guns until private firearms are confiscated
    Beautiful women should reject any character who has used a gun, and say gun owners are just compensating for…
    Only effeminate homosexuals should perform drive-bys. Utilize trans and homophobia.”
    Actors who are classified as blacks and are depicting characters the audience will perceive as black should never use firearms. #BlackLivesMatter

    [@writers guild]Creativity thrives under constraints. Hollywood has the best writers, actors, and directors in the world. In earlier decades, movies never depicted semiautomatic weapons or non-RollyThing* handguns. Only right wingers and the alt-right want to watch movies with non-rollything* handguns or assault rifles.

    [@some movie studios @theatre chains] you can end gun violence in movies in one day.Theatres are a duopoly. You make money off the blood of blacks. You do not show NC 17 movies. Do not show gun violence movies

    [@Oscar, he decides who wins an Oscar, right?] Sexual pornography does not win mainstream Hollywood awards. Why do gun violence movies? You reward movies that kill children in real life. Oscar statuettes should be covered in blood!

    [@the people who rate movies] you rate movies NC-17 for sex. X number of Americans do not die as innocent bystanders from sex. Guns = NC17 or will you keep living on black blood?

    I am too lazy, but someone else could start this viral Twitter flash on movie studios. Studios will object to the blood-sucking Jew trope. To which everyone will realize they are trying to deflect righteous criticism, weakening the anti-anti-semitism shield.

    *I’m really not into guns!

  284. @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @Prof. Woland, @Big Bill

    …a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, sure, with an automatic transmission. Thanks for the laugh.

  285. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    All sorts of Southern California suburbs are rather safe. Thousand Oaks in Ventura County some years ranks near the top of lists of the safest medium size municipalities in the country.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Dmon

    And Will Smith lives/lived in Thousand Oaks. And Snoop Dogg lives in Diamond Bar, which is also much safer than the national average. See – dispersion to the suburbs does help white people and turn black gangstas into solid citizens. Malibu property crime is above the national average – Moar Affordable Housing in Malibu! I know alot of you guys have voted in the recall election already, but I promise to add this plank to my platform if you vote for me with the rest of your ballots. If you have already used up your supply, additional ballots are available at local Democratic Precinct Offices, elderly neighbors mail boxes, secure cardboard vote collection boxes in empty parking lots, and other official ballot mule pickup locations. Contact your local SEIU or California Teachers Association representative for details.

  286. @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @Prof. Woland, @Big Bill

    “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Unless they are a double amputee.

  287. @raga10
    @Joe Stalin


    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg
     
    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically. Joe Average on the street would be better off if there were fewer guns around because:

    - he'd be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don't have a gun you're not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn't going to escalate.

    - as I was suggesting with my razor gangs example, you have better chances of survival if you *do* get into a fight. Yes, it's unfortunate that people in England are now stabbing each other at increasing rate, but it would be worse if they were shooting each other.

    - police have better chances of doing their work if there fewer and less lethal weapons out there. They would be also less jumpy and trigger-happy, leading to fewer "police violence" scenarios.

    - coming back to my razor gangs example: Sydney police used to crack down heavily on gun users back then. They could afford to do that, because gun use was much less frequent. Which led to criminals even less likely to use guns. It was a circle of positive feedback.

    - Finally, police would simply be cheaper for us to fund, because they wouldn't need all those army surplus armoured vehicles, heavy guns and god knows what else. For a long time English policemen used to not even carry guns in their regular duty (I don't know if that's changed now). They didn't need them. And it's not that the public was so law abiding - that's just wishful thinking. Crime was always there to some degree, just not to a degree that would require heavy weapons to manage.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Stalin, @anonymous

    – he’d be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don’t have a gun you’re not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn’t going to escalate.

    That’s a classic rational I’ve actually seen in gun controller printed literature. Only thing is, why do you have to endure a fist fight when you haven’t attacked anyone, when you are an innocent party. What you are saying is akin saying you must engage in hand to hand combat rather than using a firearm to defend yourself. Are we not morally entitled to the right of self-defense? What if you come under a standard urban swarming attack by youths?

    In the USA, it’s our right.

    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically.

    Micheal Bloomberg is a very rich man; why would you make an argument about Joe Average NOT being armed is better than for Joe, but that it’s okay for a rich gun controller to be protected by guns because he can afford it?

    THE SAFE, NOT SORRY LESSONS

    It would be hard to find a more ferocious warrior for gun owners’ civil rights than Tanya Metaksa. The anti-gun magazine Mother Jones called her “one of the most powerful lobbyists in America,” and the Associated Press described her as “a blunt, no-nonsense voice for the gun lobby in Washington.” I had the privilege of meeting her and hearing her speak back in the day.

    She would introduce herself as “Metaksa, not Metaska. AK, as in AK-47.” A year prior to her retirement from the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, where she served as Executive Director, the Harper Collins subsidiary Regan Books published her book Safe, Not Sorry: Keeping Yourself and Your Family Safe in a Violent Age.

    I thought the most powerful part of that book was the section in which Tanya focused on women who had faced homicidal attack. Four of them prevailed, because they were able to reach handguns in time to fight back and win. One of them could not, because the law in that place and time forbade her to. Here, thanks to Tanya, are their stories.

    https://americanhandgunner.com/our-experts/the-safe-not-sorry-lessons/

  288. @By-tor
    @Flip


    Vermont, New Hampshire, Idaho, and Montana don’t seem to have any problems with gun violence despite the minimal laws.
     
    Those four states are perceived to have far fewer blacks and Central American illegals than others.

    Replies: @Flip

    Indeed, sort of like Switzerland is full of Swiss.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Flip


    Indeed, sort of like Switzerland is full of Swiss.
     
    The Swiss have holes. 25% of Swiss residents are foreign born.

    Giving women the vote will do that to ya.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  289. @Neil Templeton
    @Jonathan Mason

    Perhaps Mr. Unz needs a "Thersites" tab.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Your comment will go over the head of everyone here, but thanks.

  290. @Jonathan Mason
    @aj54


    The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.
     
    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.

    Also there was no police force at the time and certainly nothing like cell phones or even landlines, so people living in rural settings needed firearms for their own protection otherwise they would constantly be under threat from predators.

    The first official police force in the US was established in Boston in 1838, well after the Constitution was written.

    https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/civil-rights-reimagining-policing/how-you-start-is-how-you-finish/

    It is true that slavery was abolished after the Civil War and that blacks were granted citizenship, but after the establishment of nationwide professional police forces and other law enforcement agencies, the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.

    Unfortunately the Second Amendment now works much more to the advantage of criminals rather than homesteaders, because criminals can easily find guns to steal even if they are not allowed to buy them, and homesteaders probably get more protection from video doorbells than from firearms.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Reg Cæsar, @JMcG

    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.

    Slavery and the Second Amendment

    Servile Insurrection and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

    Clayton E. Cramer[1]

    Abstract: It has become very popular by those arguing for the Second Amendment is simply an obsolete antiquity to claim that the Second Amendment’s original purpose was the preservation of slavery. This article examines the evidence used to justify this claim and finds the evidence wanting. Debates and other texts of the time show a consistent explanation by both Federalists and Antifederalists for a right to keep and bear arms, and one not designed to prevent insurrection, but to make it possible.

    The Bogus Hypothesis

    Carl T. Bogus “Hidden History of the Second Amendment” tells us, “The Second Amendment’s history has been hidden because neither James Madison, who was the principle author of the Second Amendment, nor those he was attempting to outmaneuver politically, laid their motives on the table.” [2] Near the end of his article, Professor Bogus admits, “[T]he evidence is almost entirely circumstantial. Madison never expressly stated that he wrote the Second Amendment for that purpose…. Another reason is that the available records are woefully incomplete.”[3]

    We also have the word of one of Bogus’ villains that servile insurrection was not a concern:

    [T]he United States exhibit to the world the first instance, as far as we can learn, of a nation, unattacked by external force, unconvulsed by domestic insurrections, assembling voluntarily, deliberating fully, and deciding calmly, concerning that system of government under which they would wish that they and their posterity should live. [emphasis added][4]

    Slavery Did Not Motivate the Second Amendment

    Unlike the Bogus claim which acknowledges that the evidence is circumstantial, the evidence that we can actually find, shows that both Federalist and Antifederalist believed that the right to possess arms was to effectuate insurrection against a potentially tyrannical national government, not fear of slave rebellion. The distribution of requests for a right to keep and bear arms is contrary to a fear by slave states of rebellion.

    https://claytonecramer.blogspot.com/2021/06/slavery-and-second-amendment.html

    • Thanks: TWS
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Joe Stalin

    Thank for your reply, Comrade.

    I don't really agree with the arguments found in the article you quoted, and find the argument a bit simplistic. The reasons for the Second Amendment being written into the Constitution were a lot more nuanced.

    This is a very complicated issue to address in this kind of forum, so I will stick to a couple of points.

    1) If the real purpose of the Second Amendment was to protect citizens from the federal government, then it sure wasn't much use in the Whiskey Rebellion when Washington and Madison were the oppressors, and it is hardly likely that after the experience of Shay's Rebellion they wanted to further bolster armed resistance to the federal government.

    2) The 'well-regulated' militias were actually the primary law enforcement agency used to keep slaves in line.

    3) The Second Amendment was intended to keep firearms out of the hands of blacks, whether free or slave, and of Indians and to keep whites ahead of the game.

    4) Even if the real intention was to give citizens the ability to resist federal oppression, which it wasn't, then that also became obsolete long ago. Citizens of today could not resist the US army with the weapons that individuals are permitted today, as the White House could simply call up drones to call at their address.

    5) Other original reasons for having the Second Amendment included that a great deal of the population, especially in rural areas depended on hunting for food. One of the most popular of American foods, even more so than apple pie, was baked squirrel. Additionally people in rural areas did need guns for self protection as there was no organized police force at the time, and citizens were expected to arrest wanted criminals.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Joe Stalin

    , @Anonymous
    @Joe Stalin

    This is the Michael Moore view of the issue (see Bowling for Columbine), in which the modern gun control movement is depicted as the heir and successor of the civil rights movement of the 20th century, and of the anti-slavery movement of the 19th century. The same struggle, the same cause, the same heroes and villains.

  291. @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve seen hundreds of houses with BLM signs and “Hate has no home here” and “Refugees Welcome.”
    I’ve never seen a house with a sign that says, “Guns have no home here” or a T-shirt that says “I’m always completely unarmed.”

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar, @Prof. Woland, @Big Bill

    My favorite thought experiment?

    Print up a stack of stickers saying “This house is a gun-free zone” and “This car is a gun-free zone” and sit at a table at lefty venues handing them out. Tell folks they are for putting on their front and rear doors or rear window.

    Alternatively, if you know an insufferable Progressive, just go stick one on their front door, eye level.

    Check how long they last.

  292. @True or not
    @bombthe3gorgesdam

    Arabs are kept in check because whenever they use violence against Jews, Jews retaliate disproportionately, which is how you persuade a group of people who don't recognise your existence to not attempt to delete your existence.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam

    I doubt that’s true, as it doesn’t stop Palestinian gentiles from throwing relatively harmless rocks at jewish armored vehicles in the occupied territories, pointless and fatalistic actions for which they are punished with live ammunition aimed and shot into their sex organs, heads, guts, etc. by the sadistic and cowardly jewish soldiers. If they are “armed to the teeth” as proud ethnic self-identifier International Jew says, and they can expect to be mowed down with live ammunition either way, why limit their action to stone throwing?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @bombthe3gorgesdam

    It seems you've been watching Hamas Sunday morning cartoons.

    The reality is that Israeli soldiers are under orders to take every kind of shit and abuse. As you can see from Ahd Tamimi's videos of herself provoking said soldiers.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam

  293. @International Jew
    @IHTG

    Any veteran of a combat unit (thus 15% of all men) can obtain a gun permit regardless of where he lives.

    Meanwhile the Arab population is armed to the teeth with illegal guns.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam, @Dan Hayes

    The NYPD as this city’s licensing agency does not recognize any such combat veteran free card!

  294. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Quite so!

    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.

    Not too long after the American revolution, the French revolution took place and promised equality, Liberty, and fraternity to all citizens.

    Unfortunately the residents of Haiti, seeing what happened in the United States and in France mistakenly assumed that they were entitled to Liberty and equality too, and ended up killing most of the landowning class in Haiti, as per the reign of terror in France.

    This fear of slave rebellions fueled much of the legislation of the first part of the 19th century. Even as recently as 1856, chief justice Rodger Taney went home for lunch, and informed his wife that he had permanently solved the problem of slavery by ruling that blacks were not legally citizens of the USA.

    Although this seems a long time ago now, this was also the year of the the native rebellions in India, and it must have seemed like a scary time for the peace-loving planters of the USA.

    Now we have a situation where the white population of the United States continues to arm itself to the teeth under ancient laws that also permits black criminals and Mexican cartels themselves to the teeth.

    The gun manufacturers, like the Sackler brothers, ought to be prosecuted under the RICO laws, as they are clearly using businesses to facilitate crime. You can't expect to solve the problem at the retail level.

    The requirement for an individual license for each gun, and for each gun to carry an insurance policy, would be a good start. But it would need a modern constitution first to replace the failing old one.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Achmed E. Newman, @TWS, @Neil Templeton, @Chris Mallory, @aj54, @Pincher Martin, @Muggles, @Verymuchalive, @Weaver

    What does a “modern” constitution mean? The 14th Amendment changed the US dramatically, centralised it under the federal government. Before that amendment, there were no American citizens but rather citizens of each state. And citizenship was limited, by the federal legislature, to whites alone. That was not some change by the Supreme Court.

    The first African Americans were created by the 14th. Even Lincoln didn’t free a slave. There were free blacks, even black and Amerindian slave holders, but no black or Amerindian citizens before the 14th.

    And after the 14th, the way the Amendment was interpreted, Coolidge had to grant citizenship to Amerindians. It wasn’t until later that the 14th was reinterpreted to mean birthright citizenship as we have today.

    If you’re going to ban guns, then ban private security, ban guards and guard gates. If you want a “modern” constitution, then don’t allow the wealthy to hide away in security while the poor are made victims of criminals.

    Also, do you realise that guns grant women equality? Without them, men have a significant strength advantage over women. I guess you don’t mind that since you’d guarantee abortion in your “modern” Constitution.

    • Agree: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @raga10
    @Weaver


    If you’re going to ban guns, then ban private security, ban guards and guard gates.
     
    As a proponent of fewer guns, that would be completely acceptable to me.

    Also, do you realise that guns grant women equality?
     

    I'm sorry but I trust your concern for women equality about as much as I trust neocon's concern for women rights in Afghanistan.... Let them learn Kung Fu.
  295. I took a look at the list. Having grown up in San Jose I was surprised to see Hollister and Morgan Hill on it. I’m assuming this is due to gentrification.

  296. @Currahee
    Frum is a particularly unpleasant example of a particularly unpleasant group.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    He should change his name to ‘David Reform’ or ‘David Reconstructionist’. ‘David Frum’ is false advertising.

  297. @Flip
    @SFG

    Steve Jobs's widow owns the Atlantic. I wonder what he would have thought about her funding the lefties. He didn't seem very "woke" to me.

    Replies: @HA, @YetAnotherAnon

    “Steve Jobs’s widow owns the Atlantic. I wonder what he would have thought about her funding the lefties. He didn’t seem very ‘woke’ to me.”

    He was about as New-Age flaky as it gets. The fact that he parked in handicapped spaces even when he was healthy doesn’t mean he wasn’t woke — it just means he was a jerk. Unless you’re a leftist, that’s not the same thing.

    And since people are mentioning free-riders and Unz’s take on GoldmanSachs and vaccines, it’s also worth recalling — as Sailer has often noted — that Jobs, being the New Age flake that he was, chose to buck the Big Pharma medical establishment when he came down with pancreatic cancer (although a rare form that had much better survival rates than the rest) and devote himself to “alternative” therapies instead of enduring chemo and all the other painful and chancy treatments that the real doctors were advising. I don’t know what the analogs for Ivermectin and HCQ are in the case of pancreatic cancer but I suspect he had the money and the connections to pursue them all, at least for a while.

    That didn’t work out so well. But at least pancreatic cancer isn’t contagious, so he didn’t wind up getting anyone else around him sick.

    • Replies: @mike99588
    @HA

    Jobs' version of "alternative" was so pathetic, it's hard to believe. He just punted for 9 months.

    "Instead, Jobs opted for a combination of diet, spiritualists, macrobiotics -- "roots and vegetables", as Isaacson describes them -- and waited 9 months to begin treatment in earnest. By then, the cancer had spread from his pancreas to the surrounding tissue. "He said, 'I didn't want my body to be opened."

    Frankly, over the last 30 years, the best cancer successes I've seen were intelligent combinations of conventional medicine and "alternative" - informed use of nutraceuticals and informed experimental use of mild generic drugs that inhibited cancers with lower side effects.

    It can also be hard to get the best out of conventional medicine - like advanced surgeries and combinations of modalities, where "minor" specific improvements are life and death details.

  298. @Known Fact
    @International Jew


    in peacetime, 100% of violent deaths in the US Army are from causes other than combat. And yet that’s not an argument to disband the army.
     
    One of my father's assignments, as WWII wound down, was to document and photograph all the fatalities at his Army/Air Force base -- not in Europe or Asia, in Texas

    Replies: @anon

    About ten years ago a bus driver told me that her 27- year old son dropped dead while running around a track at an army base in Tennessee.

  299. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s.

    Lots of home security cameras now.

    Racial profiling by cops.

    Police.

    Big increase in armed homeowners since 1992 riots.

    Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home.

    Target hardening of property.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s.”

    There still remain plenty of luxury cars in SoCal (Bentley, Rolls Royce, Ferrari, etc) which would count as stealable items of value. Carjackings still do occur in the US. For example, rapper T.I. once did a song about taking a Bentley coupe to the chop shop.

    “Racial profiling by cops.

    Police.”

    Defund the Police mvt remains fairly strong on the West Coast, no? Profiling technically is supposed to be racist.

    “Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home.”

    Hopefully this will suffice for the long term. The drug trade has been known to spread out across the US and leave the large metros for the exurbs.

    Slightly off topic but relevant to point. Would coastal areas on the edge of LA County, like say, Malibu or the Beach Cities be considered exurbs of LA? Back East, they certainly would be considered to be exurbs of a major metro area, even though it doesn’t appear to be that they are.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Suburbs in Southern California would be any non-urban areas in the Los Angeles Basin, the San Fernando Valley or the San Gabriel Valley.

    But since there isn't a big difference between urban and suburban building densities in SoCal, the urban-suburban distinction is vague. Is Santa Monica urban or suburban? Is Compton suburban or urban? Physically, they aren't that different, with mostly small houses or medium sized apartment buildings. Heck, West Hollywood is mostly small houses and that's about as (upscale) urban as SoCal gets.

    Exurbs would be, I guess, places where you have to drive through unpopulated mountains to get to, such as the northern exurbs of Santa Clarita and high desert Palmdale and Lancaster, or the pleasant northwestern communities of Ventura County, which are separated by a minor mountain range from the San Fernando Valley. The Inland Empire of Riverside and San Bernardino counties are considered exurban. There are usually batches of hills that set them somewhat apart from classic suburbs of the San Gabriel Valley, but once again it's pretty vague whether, say, Diamond Bar is suburban or exurban.

    Another way to think about it is that Santa Clarita and Simi Valley are suburbs of the San Fernando Valley, which is a classic suburb. So I guess that makes them exurbs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  300. @Pincher Martin
    @HammerJack

    Elder never had a chance anyway.

    Had the stars and moon aligned for that magical moment on September 14th, the leading GOP candidate would have been promptly marginalized by the Democratic power elite and unable to govern for the next two years until he lost the next gubernatorial election in a landslide.

    Anyone who says otherwise doesn't know this state.

    The recall election was never about Republicans winning so much as it was about ensuring Newsom's political future went up in smoke.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Gotta admit, there’s a lot of Donald Trump in that description.

  301. @Undocumented Shopper
    In Massachusetts, The Boston Globe called for making gun license data public:
    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/07/03/opinion/should-you-know-if-your-neighbor-owns-gun/

    Frum is talking about persuasion, but this is clearly going in the direction of cancel culture: if you own a gun, then virtue-signaling corporations will not hire you.

    Very similar to how woke corporations suppress freedom of speech.

    Replies: @anon

    In Massachusetts, The Boston Globe called for making gun license data public:

    The Glob should make the home addresses of all their employees public via a searchable database.

    Or GOAL could do it.

  302. @bombthe3gorgesdam
    @True or not

    I doubt that's true, as it doesn't stop Palestinian gentiles from throwing relatively harmless rocks at jewish armored vehicles in the occupied territories, pointless and fatalistic actions for which they are punished with live ammunition aimed and shot into their sex organs, heads, guts, etc. by the sadistic and cowardly jewish soldiers. If they are "armed to the teeth" as proud ethnic self-identifier International Jew says, and they can expect to be mowed down with live ammunition either way, why limit their action to stone throwing?

    Replies: @International Jew

    It seems you’ve been watching Hamas Sunday morning cartoons.

    The reality is that Israeli soldiers are under orders to take every kind of shit and abuse. As you can see from Ahd Tamimi’s videos of herself provoking said soldiers.

    • Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam
    @International Jew

    Why don't you just try to answer the very simple question I put to you? Why, if these palestinians are "armed to the teeth" as you claim, don't they ever use these arms on jews, but instead limit themselves to tossing stones, setting tires on fire, shooting small bottle rockets in the general direction of israel, and whatever other lame, totally ineffectual actions they take?

    Replies: @International Jew

  303. @Henry's Cat
    Frum-bashing aside, his arguments are mostly sound. It's interesting he draws a parallel with the phenomenon of panic-buying, because that's another situation where such behaviour can be rational on an individual level but irrational on a communal one.

    Replies: @anon

    Frum-bashing aside, his arguments are mostly sound.

    No, they are not.

  304. @raga10
    @Joe Stalin


    so how many armed guards protect Micheal Bloomberg
     
    Armed guards protected people in power for as long as people in power existed, but I am talking statistically. Joe Average on the street would be better off if there were fewer guns around because:

    - he'd be less likely to get shot in some stupid dispute with his neighbour because as I said, if you don't have a gun you're not going to use it. They might just get into a fist fight because people are people, but at least their dispute isn't going to escalate.

    - as I was suggesting with my razor gangs example, you have better chances of survival if you *do* get into a fight. Yes, it's unfortunate that people in England are now stabbing each other at increasing rate, but it would be worse if they were shooting each other.

    - police have better chances of doing their work if there fewer and less lethal weapons out there. They would be also less jumpy and trigger-happy, leading to fewer "police violence" scenarios.

    - coming back to my razor gangs example: Sydney police used to crack down heavily on gun users back then. They could afford to do that, because gun use was much less frequent. Which led to criminals even less likely to use guns. It was a circle of positive feedback.

    - Finally, police would simply be cheaper for us to fund, because they wouldn't need all those army surplus armoured vehicles, heavy guns and god knows what else. For a long time English policemen used to not even carry guns in their regular duty (I don't know if that's changed now). They didn't need them. And it's not that the public was so law abiding - that's just wishful thinking. Crime was always there to some degree, just not to a degree that would require heavy weapons to manage.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Stalin, @anonymous

    Are you an American? That’s a pretty dumb take. Police are expensive because of public union power (salaries, benefits, short hours leading to overstaffing, overtime for useless duties i.e. guarding the ballgame etc., inability to “police” disability claims), not due to the cost of hardware.

    • Replies: @raga10
    @anonymous


    Are you an American?
     
    Nope - see my other post in this thread.

    Police are expensive because of public union power (salaries, benefits, short hours leading to overstaffing, overtime for useless duties i.e. guarding the ballgame etc., inability to “police” disability claims)
     
    True, but that doesn't mean gear can't be expensive as well. There have been cases of police departments getting second-had military gear for free, but then getting stuck with maintenance and repair bills adding up quickly:

    "costs associated with acquiring military equipment like the MRAP can add up to tens of thousands of dollars yearly in maintenance and repair.”
    https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/8/2/the-high-cost-of-free-mraps

    and

    How a free Army helicopter cost Newark police more than $2M:
    https://www.nj.com/news/2015/01/how_a_free_army_helicopter_cost_newark_police_more_than_2m.html

    As for administrative costs you mention... I once worked at a company where workers were getting injured at work a lot so they were spending huge amounts on compensation, rehabilitation and worst of all, insurance. Because they had many accidents, their insurance premiums were terrible. I imagine it must be similar for police. Well, if cops were getting shot at less often, maybe their administrative costs would go down.

  305. Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall. Being the free-rider who isn’t vaccinated in a highly vaccinated community or who doesn’t own a gun in a well-armed low crime community can be the ideal position from a selfish perspective, but lots of people don’t like being that guy.

    There are those of us in good health, who don’t have metabolic syndrome or umpteen other comorbidities, who are at low risk of getting complications from covid, who go out and about unvaccinated and unmasked. We aim to expose ourselves to the disease (as we can get over it easily) so as to increase herd immunity and thereby do our bit for society. It’s a small risk and it doesn’t involve cooperating with Big Pharma or the medical establishment.

  306. @Thomas
    Maybe Frum imagines he can make guns into the next "Axis of Evil." Good luck.

    At any rate, the gun control lobby at this point looks like it's on the verge of major setbacks. With Biden, the author of the 1994 crime bill (including the federal assault weapons ban) and one of the last national politicians viscerally committed to old school gun control, in the White House, the gun control people thought it was their moment. Adding in the collapse of the NRA into Trump-style grift was even sweeter.

    But not even eight months later, the Senate confirmation of their would-be ATF director is effectively dead. States are liberalizing their gun laws, rather than tightening them. Any new federal gun legislation is not going to happen in Biden's term. The Supreme Court is very likely on the verge of nationalizing right-to-carry. And it's become clear that the NRA wasn't all that important to gun rights at all. (The degree to which they inflated the NRA into an insidious lobby fueled by money was a massive case of projection by a movement largely underwritten by one billionaire.)

    That Frum (who has a long record in support of gun control) is resorting to a call to push back the tide represented by all the newly-minted gun owners of the past year by "persuading" them is a tacit recognition of how far the gun control lobby has fallen short of its expectations of the past several years, and how much worse it's likely to get with millions of new gun owners. It's really an epic failure and an incredible misreading of political landscape driven by epistemic closure, when you think about it.

    Replies: @Jared Nelson, @Anon'sAnon

    All you say is true, but the Biden anti-gun people are pressing forward on all sort of fronts to make it difficult to exercise 2d amendment rights, through executive orders and regulatory oversights. Exorbitant taxes on gun purchases and ownership, prohibition of on-line ammo purchases, and the banning (starting shortly) of all Russian made ammunition. This last act (Russian ammo ban) impacts cheap steal case ammo and has pushed ammo prices up dramatically, nearly doubling in the past couple of weeks. The Russian ammo ban also takes away the viability of owning an AK-47 because there aren’t any US ammo makers who compete in the 7.62 x 39 caliber steel case market (which is almost exclusively used by most AK owners).

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Anon'sAnon

    I'm aware of what the Biden Administration is attempting to do. I've commented on all the proposed ATF rulemaking. (Have you? GOA makes it easy on their website.)

    The President can't tax ammunition by fiat nor can he ban online ammo sales. The proposed regulations are unlikely to take actual effect for at least a year while they wend their way truth the courts (making millions of people felons overnight is ample grounds for an injunction pending determination on the merits).

    And with respect to the Russian ammo thing, with what's gone on in the ammo market generally over the past year, I doubt it will take very long for additional supply to catch up. Expect new 7.62x39 steel-case production to pop up soon in Belarus, Moldova, etc. The American market is too big to miss out on.

    (Incidentally, I don't know too many gun owners who only have an AK but who don't also have an AR. For most American gun owners, an AK would usually be either a range toy, an affectation, or a fallback. The preeminence of the AR and 5.56mm in the US, and what that means for the national market in parts, accessories, and ammo, means that that's the default semiauto rifle and cartridge most people are going to have.)

    In short, I acknowledge that there are various marginal things the Administration can try to do to harass gun owners. I lived through the Obama-era ammo shortage too. But they are just that: marginal and harassing. This presidency appears to be running out of political capital quickly enough that I'm not that worried.

    If you are worried though, the best thing you can do is consider contributing to GOA, FPC, SAF, or your other favorite gun rights organization. That's much more productive than hand-wringing, or even buying another gun.

  307. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Decline in the value of stealable items since the 1970s."

    There still remain plenty of luxury cars in SoCal (Bentley, Rolls Royce, Ferrari, etc) which would count as stealable items of value. Carjackings still do occur in the US. For example, rapper T.I. once did a song about taking a Bentley coupe to the chop shop.


    "Racial profiling by cops.

    Police."

    Defund the Police mvt remains fairly strong on the West Coast, no? Profiling technically is supposed to be racist.


    "Drug trade suffices to keep potential burglars and muggers at home."

    Hopefully this will suffice for the long term. The drug trade has been known to spread out across the US and leave the large metros for the exurbs.

    Slightly off topic but relevant to point. Would coastal areas on the edge of LA County, like say, Malibu or the Beach Cities be considered exurbs of LA? Back East, they certainly would be considered to be exurbs of a major metro area, even though it doesn't appear to be that they are.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Suburbs in Southern California would be any non-urban areas in the Los Angeles Basin, the San Fernando Valley or the San Gabriel Valley.

    But since there isn’t a big difference between urban and suburban building densities in SoCal, the urban-suburban distinction is vague. Is Santa Monica urban or suburban? Is Compton suburban or urban? Physically, they aren’t that different, with mostly small houses or medium sized apartment buildings. Heck, West Hollywood is mostly small houses and that’s about as (upscale) urban as SoCal gets.

    Exurbs would be, I guess, places where you have to drive through unpopulated mountains to get to, such as the northern exurbs of Santa Clarita and high desert Palmdale and Lancaster, or the pleasant northwestern communities of Ventura County, which are separated by a minor mountain range from the San Fernando Valley. The Inland Empire of Riverside and San Bernardino counties are considered exurban. There are usually batches of hills that set them somewhat apart from classic suburbs of the San Gabriel Valley, but once again it’s pretty vague whether, say, Diamond Bar is suburban or exurban.

    Another way to think about it is that Santa Clarita and Simi Valley are suburbs of the San Fernando Valley, which is a classic suburb. So I guess that makes them exurbs.

    • Thanks: JimB
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    A relative just recently moved to San Bernadino area (Redlands) after having lived in Marina Del Rey for a decade. The differences are stark. Going from zero above sea level to about 4,1oo ft above sea level, to the lack of a major homeless population. The air is cleaner (albeit the occasional brush fires). The area seems to be less loony leftland crazy, and it's gun country (or at least more apparently obvious that it is). Home prices aren't outlandish. One can afford a reasonably priced house for about the same price as back East. Redlands being about halfway between Palm Springs and LA is about the best that one can get--not too far from major city, the desert, or the beach, while just far enough away to avoid the unseemly aspects of what the LA metro is slowly becoming.

    Don't know how good the schools are in San Bernadino but they can't be any worse than those that comprise LA Unified.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  308. Anon[564] • Disclaimer says:
    @George Taylor
    @Anon

    I wonder if there is a genetic basis for hand gun accidents? Do some ethnicities have a higher accident rate than others? Seems to be true with cars.

    interesting recent article.



    Harden assumed that such leeriness was the vestige of a bygone era, when genes were described as the “hard-wiring” of individual fate, and that her critics might be reassured by updated information. Two weeks before her family was due to return to Texas, she e-mailed the fellows a new study, in Psychological Science, led by Daniel Belsky, at Duke. The paper drew upon a major international collaboration that had identified sites on the genome that evinced a statistically significant correlation with educational attainment; Belsky and his colleagues used that data to compile a “polygenic score”—a weighted sum of an individual’s relevant genetic variants—that could partly explain population variance in reading ability and years of schooling. His study sampled New Zealanders of northern-European descent and was carefully controlled for childhood socioeconomic status. “Hope that you find this interesting food for thought,” she wrote.

    William Darity, a professor of public policy at Duke and perhaps the country’s leading scholar on the economics of racial inequality, answered curtly, starting a long chain of replies. Given the difficulties of distinguishing between genetic and environmental effects on social outcomes, he wrote, such investigations were at best futile: “There will be no reason to pursue these types of research programs at all, and they can be rendered to the same location as Holocaust denial research.
     
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/09/13/can-progressives-be-convinced-that-genetics-matters

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @bomag, @kaganovitch, @Anon, @YetAnotherAnon

    Nice catch! Thanks for the New Yorker link.

    Accidents, clumsinesss, and injury-prone-ness (in athletes) have all been said to be at least partially genetic (and Turkheimer’s First Law of Behavioral Genetics says that also). Almost all traits are polygenetic, but weirdly there seems to be a single gene that can cause a certain type of clumsiness. Other types of accident behavior seem to be polygenic.

  309. @Jonathan Mason
    @aj54


    The slave state remark was changed by Amendment more than 100 years ago. You have fallen a bit behind the times yourself.
     
    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.

    Also there was no police force at the time and certainly nothing like cell phones or even landlines, so people living in rural settings needed firearms for their own protection otherwise they would constantly be under threat from predators.

    The first official police force in the US was established in Boston in 1838, well after the Constitution was written.

    https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/civil-rights-reimagining-policing/how-you-start-is-how-you-finish/

    It is true that slavery was abolished after the Civil War and that blacks were granted citizenship, but after the establishment of nationwide professional police forces and other law enforcement agencies, the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.

    Unfortunately the Second Amendment now works much more to the advantage of criminals rather than homesteaders, because criminals can easily find guns to steal even if they are not allowed to buy them, and homesteaders probably get more protection from video doorbells than from firearms.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Reg Cæsar, @JMcG

    … the Second Amendment remained in place after its original utility had ceased to exist.

    As did that of the First, the Fourth, the Fifth, and especially the Third.

    Or do you expect George VII to quarter troops in our homes?

    https://www.closerweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/prince-george-1.jpg?fit=200%2C1

  310. @Verymuchalive
    @Jonathan Mason


    But the United States is stuck with the antiquated Constitution that was written when the US was still a slave state, and before the invention of the railroad, the internal combustion engine, and the telephone.
     
    Actually, this "antiquated" constitution would have worked perfectly well if there had been no Civil War. The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one. It also left very large numbers of illegally held firearms. There was no political will to do anything about it at the time, and little will thereafter. Finally, it emancipated the negro population. In the course of time, these negroes were able to acquire legally and illegally held firearms.
    The rest is, as the say, history.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Finally, it emancipated the negro population.

    In the wrong place. Crime in America would have gone down after 1866 had they been emancipated to the continent on which God meant them to be. And productivity would have gone up.

    The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one.

    A “confederal” constitution which allowed some states to invade others in order to retrieve their stray livestock. Not a good start.

    Come on, you had five million non-citizens who had no right to be in this country, per the Supreme Court. Deportation was decades overdue.

    • Agree: Verymuchalive
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @Reg Cæsar

    Abe Lincoln, despite all his high crimes and misdemeanours, actually wanted negroes returned to Africa. He might have been the only man who could have accomplished this. As with other assassinations, you must ask: cui bono ? Any serious attempts at repatriation stopped thereafter.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  311. @jsm
    @Rob

    Also, this:

    plus the subsidies we pay for the rich to have servants. Yes!


    Spot on. Consider Jackson Hole, where the billionaires are pushing out the millionaires. The sun setting behind Grand Tetons is a view truly breathtaking.

    The brown folk that tidy up for the townspeople are brought by bus each morning through Snake River Canyon and sent back by 5, whereupon they're given leave to while away their leisure hours in the streets of poor, unsuspecting Driggs, ID, chugging six packs and passing out.

    Thusly tucked neatly behind the mountains for the night, they spoil not the view for Fat Cats taking their evening constitutional.

    La Nouvelle Sundown Town.

    Replies: @Rob

    Heartbreaking for the Idahoans and the (i’m guessing) Guatemalans. In the long run, it is better to be rich in a first world country than in a third world country. That’s why rich Americans don’t move to Belize. This does not apply if you like 14 yo prostitutes and novel drugs. Rip McAfee. Y’know I went to one college where computer antivirus billionaire Norton Antivirus (too lazy to look up his name) attended before Antivirus was a household name (Reed College) and another where the other computer security billionaire, McAfee Antivirus (no relation) went (Roanoke College). Alas, I will never be a billionaire. Probably cuz my name’s not Antivirus.

    Ok, little googling shows that Belize is a playground for the super rich. But it seems to be popular with the scuzzier sort of rich. People go there because they speak English? I thought the whole point of Mixtec speaking maids was that they couldn’t understand what you were saying? The wealthy be crazy, yo! But rich expats seem to be in the news for drugs and murders. If there are drugs, and billionaires, and beaches, I’m guessing there are also girls (and boys!) who perform private services for the wealthy men?

    Oho! Belize did not become independent until 1981. People were optimistic about Africa in 1960’s, when it was still possible to believe that despite not really coming up with “nations” on their own, or “wheels” or “machinery” or “science” or “writing” or “sails” or “domestication” or “glass” or “distilled alcohol” or tobacco (maybe Indians can take credit for this, but they just used it? did they domesticate it?) or firearms that they would be developing very fast now that those pesky colonialists weren’t stealing their wealth. The infrastructure that the British built is still running. Much like the infrastructure built by Americans is still creaking along with 100-odd million third worlders who cannot produce enough, uh, production to maintain it. The Indy in 1981 will come up later.

    Lots more after you just click that little More tag, you want to, don’t you? Please?!?

    [MORE]

    Thank you! Here’s your prize.

    Maybe Belize will do better than the other Central American nations because of British law, language, and genes than the Spanish ones? Certainly the British colonies in North America and Oceania have done better than any Spanish colony anywhere. I guess it depends on how many of mestizos and creoles are British hybrids vs how many are Spanish hybrids from Honduras looking to scrub the last European toilets in Central America
    Back to first world wealthy than third world wealthy. Even if you like the Caymans for sun and tax sheltering, those taxes avoided have to come out of production Somewhere. In the case of Caribbean and Central American tax shelters – there are some “Utopian” tax shelters coming in Honduras. They’ll certainly be tax shelters, I lol at Utopian, but would love to wrong. Given that historically, central and South America have not been able to produce enough wealth per capita to meet the basic needs of much of the population, the rich in their haciendas and fancy neighborhoods of cities were in a precarious position. It is one thing to be docile when your belly is full and you fat, but lean hungry men are desperate.

    They are not in that situation now, but that is not their doing. A rising China lifts a lot of third world boats. Seriously, even some African countries are not dollar/day for big chunks of the population. China both buys a lot of raw materials from third world countries – we for example, send them scrap metal and waste paper – and exports cheaper manufactured goods for consumption, improved services, and more efficient primary production than the first world nations like S Korea, Japan, and Germany – what, you thought America would be on that list? Waddaya Retahded? We export porn! – China is not much for helping other nations climb the value chain. Though since China wants to be a zeroth world nation – perhaps one day when China is exporting genetic engineering bundles for \$30,000/child the boy package tall, dark handsome, and athletic, and the girl package, not quite as tall, but fair, and blonde, and beautiful, with the verbal, spatial, and mathematical bundles available only to Chinese, including Chinese who live overseas. Perhaps then they will let some of their manufacturing go to the third world. Perhaps not. The America Lessons will be taught to all the elite Chinese. Well, maybe you can immigrate to China? Yeah, no. China remembers the Lesson of the Smart Aliens (Jews) and the Lesson of the Dumb Aliens (Blacks and Mexicans) far too well to let you ship them your desperate poor people or your increasingly desperate selves.

    Ok, back to being rich in the third world. Without a hyperpower, a country that produces world stability (more or less) under a single ideology, especially globalism with immigration and free trade, being third world rich gets a lot less fun. America stops exporting grain, beef, and animal feed, because civil war? Then the poor get desperate, and the middle class starts googling revolución. The US thinks it’s still the hyperpower, and throws a fit over China’s new One Nation, Three Systems policy that brings Taiwan back into the fold, so China starts selling a quarter of the quadrillion dollar US national debt, and your dollars are worthless? You are no longer rich, you are poor. Better have left some money in pesetas! Newly militarized Japan gets in pissing match with China, demands that your country stop exports to China? China demands the same vis-à-vis Japan? New Cold War! Now you can’t go on vacation anywhere!

    The third world rich greatly benefit from the current system. So do the first world rich. When the first workd’s not productive, then they are no longer rich!

  312. @Bill Jones
    And in other "Things we never saw coming" there's this

    https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/aussie-health-chief-covid-will-be-us-forever-people-will-have-get-used-endless-booster

    Replies: @epebble

    She is making it sound very ominous. We don’t live in terror of Influenza. Vaccination is very, very minor inconvenience compared to Colonoscopy, Mammograms, Pap smear, ECG, etc., procedures. which we routinely accept as the cost of staying alive.

  313. @International Jew
    @bombthe3gorgesdam

    It seems you've been watching Hamas Sunday morning cartoons.

    The reality is that Israeli soldiers are under orders to take every kind of shit and abuse. As you can see from Ahd Tamimi's videos of herself provoking said soldiers.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam

    Why don’t you just try to answer the very simple question I put to you? Why, if these palestinians are “armed to the teeth” as you claim, don’t they ever use these arms on jews, but instead limit themselves to tossing stones, setting tires on fire, shooting small bottle rockets in the general direction of israel, and whatever other lame, totally ineffectual actions they take?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @bombthe3gorgesdam

    You're asking me to answer a rhetorical question packed with at least three wildly counterfactual assumptions. I'd have to start by setting facts straight, which would take way more time than I have for you.

    Replies: @bombthe3gorgesdam

  314. @HammerJack
    @Pincher Martin

    https://i.ibb.co/QcyZyJV/Screenshot-20210906-165945-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity. And so I need to explain to the Republicans here that it's not about who deserves reparations. It's about whether or not you want to win elections. Elder just gave this one away with an unforced error. A spectacularly stupid unforced error.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Reg Cæsar

    Republicans are so stupid that it strains credulity

    Really. He actually believes slaves were worth anything. It was the biggest pyramid scheme since Egypt.

    Reparations are due the white guys who had to go into the fields at night and finish the job.

    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  315. @Mike Tre
    David Frum knows exactly who's doing the shooting, but since he is a coward and a liar, he won't actually say it.

    "Being a law-abiding legal gun-owner is kind of like getting vaccinated: you take some personal risks but benefit the community overall."

    Embarrassingly ridiculous statement. For a normie, purchasing a firearm is no more personally risky than purchasing an automobile. Getting vaccinated no more benefits the community than getting fitted for contact lenses. You're not very good a suggestive marketing, considering.

    Replies: @pyrrhus

    Yes, getting the mRNA vaccine doesn’t benefit the community in any way, since you remain infectious, probably more infectious, as the CDC has admitted…

  316. @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin


    You need to admit that Tump was a far better talker than he was an executive for any new policy direction. He spoke like a radical, but he governed like a typical Republican.
     
    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he's ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?

    Because if there is one, I'd gladly support him.

    Replies: @Flip, @Pincher Martin

    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.

    Some of this is true. But that’s what a long U.S. presidential campaign is for – making political allies who will then help you implement the agenda you ran on.

    And Trump had allies during the campaign who claimed they wanted to shake up the system. They were all either arrested, departed because of scandal, or left because Trump couldn’t stand them (or vice versa) soon after the election.

    A lot of this is Trump’s fault. Few people of quality can stand being around such a megalomaniac unless they have similar flaws.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he’s ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?

    I don’t like him, either. But I like his agenda. Unfortunately, I believe I’m more committed to Trump’s agenda than Trump is committed to it.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Pincher Martin

    Along with many others, I could tolerate the megalomania much more easily if it weren't accompanied by such abject stupidity.

    The really sad--nay, tragic--thing now is that Trump is preventing the ascent of a more reasoned and principled candidate.

    Though, the Dems' demographic transition of the nation has probably forestalled the success of any such person and moreover, there's no such person in sight anyway.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  317. @Joe Stalin
    @Jonathan Mason


    Correct, but a large part of the reason for the Second Amendment was that the US was a slave state and there was a need to quickly round up militias or armed posses called slave patrols to put down slave rebellions or hunt down runaway slaves. No one wanted to see another Haiti.
     

    Slavery and the Second Amendment


    Servile Insurrection and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

    Clayton E. Cramer[1]

    Abstract: It has become very popular by those arguing for the Second Amendment is simply an obsolete antiquity to claim that the Second Amendment’s original purpose was the preservation of slavery. This article examines the evidence used to justify this claim and finds the evidence wanting. Debates and other texts of the time show a consistent explanation by both Federalists and Antifederalists for a right to keep and bear arms, and one not designed to prevent insurrection, but to make it possible.

    The Bogus Hypothesis

    Carl T. Bogus “Hidden History of the Second Amendment” tells us, “The Second Amendment’s history has been hidden because neither James Madison, who was the principle author of the Second Amendment, nor those he was attempting to outmaneuver politically, laid their motives on the table.” [2] Near the end of his article, Professor Bogus admits, “[T]he evidence is almost entirely circumstantial. Madison never expressly stated that he wrote the Second Amendment for that purpose…. Another reason is that the available records are woefully incomplete.”[3]

    We also have the word of one of Bogus’ villains that servile insurrection was not a concern:

    [T]he United States exhibit to the world the first instance, as far as we can learn, of a nation, unattacked by external force, unconvulsed by domestic insurrections, assembling voluntarily, deliberating fully, and deciding calmly, concerning that system of government under which they would wish that they and their posterity should live. [emphasis added][4]

    Slavery Did Not Motivate the Second Amendment

    Unlike the Bogus claim which acknowledges that the evidence is circumstantial, the evidence that we can actually find, shows that both Federalist and Antifederalist believed that the right to possess arms was to effectuate insurrection against a potentially tyrannical national government, not fear of slave rebellion. The distribution of requests for a right to keep and bear arms is contrary to a fear by slave states of rebellion.

    https://claytonecramer.blogspot.com/2021/06/slavery-and-second-amendment.html
     

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Anonymous

    Thank for your reply, Comrade.

    I don’t really agree with the arguments found in the article you quoted, and find the argument a bit simplistic. The reasons for the Second Amendment being written into the Constitution were a lot more nuanced.

    This is a very complicated issue to address in this kind of forum, so I will stick to a couple of points.

    1) If the real purpose of the Second Amendment was to protect citizens from the federal government, then it sure wasn’t much use in the Whiskey Rebellion when Washington and Madison were the oppressors, and it is hardly likely that after the experience of Shay’s Rebellion they wanted to further bolster armed resistance to the federal government.

    2) The ‘well-regulated’ militias were actually the primary law enforcement agency used to keep slaves in line.

    3) The Second Amendment was intended to keep firearms out of the hands of blacks, whether free or slave, and of Indians and to keep whites ahead of the game.

    4) Even if the real intention was to give citizens the ability to resist federal oppression, which it wasn’t, then that also became obsolete long ago. Citizens of today could not resist the US army with the weapons that individuals are permitted today, as the White House could simply call up drones to call at their address.

    5) Other original reasons for having the Second Amendment included that a great deal of the population, especially in rural areas depended on hunting for food. One of the most popular of American foods, even more so than apple pie, was baked squirrel. Additionally people in rural areas did need guns for self protection as there was no organized police force at the time, and citizens were expected to arrest wanted criminals.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @Jonathan Mason

    No, Jonathan. The Second was designed to counter the control freaks. It is relevant today, and will remain so for as long as men who desire liberty still breathe.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Jonathan Mason


    1) If the real purpose of the Second Amendment was to protect citizens from the federal government, then it sure wasn’t much use in the Whiskey Rebellion when Washington and Madison were the oppressors,
     
    And yet here we are, two centuries after the Second Amendment, the Michael Bloombergs, the George Soros, indeed, the David Frums work 24/7 to seek the disarmament of the America people.

    Why Jews Hate Guns

    It’s no secret that one of the largest blocs of people pressing for so-called “gun control” is the culturally (aka not-so-religious) American Jewish community. This confounds many observers who would expect that Jews, with such a stunning history of oppression and murder by humanity’s villains, would cling tenaciously to personal firearms and the ability to protect themselves as the Hebrew Scriptures instruct.

    http://jpfo.org/articles-assd02/why-jews-hate-guns.htm
     
    Israel as a matter of practice disallows the ownership of rifles, for the same reason that the UK sought to control rifles in the early twentieth century. Rifles are the people's combat power.

    If the Firearms Act of 1920 had licensed only handguns, Shortt's claims before the Commons
    would be at least superficially plausible. If the Firearms Act of 1920 had included all firearms, it might be argued that it been drafted in an overly broad manner in an attempt to disarm criminals. But the inclusion of rifles (but not shotguns) in this licensing measure suggest that the fear expressed throughout more than two years of Cabinet discussions and reports drove this bill: Bolshevik revolution. In a revolutionary struggle against soldiers, a shotgun's value is limited because its range is limited. Soldiers armed with rifles can engage a insurgent force
    armed with shotguns at a distance of 100 to 150 yards with no fear of serious injury, even if the insurgents outnumber the soldiers by a significant margin. Soldiers confronting revolutionaries with rifles, however, would be at serious risk of injury or death, depending on the number or marksmanship of the revolutionaries.


    Furthermore, the concern about radicalized veterans that play such a prominent part in secret reports throughout 1919 and 1920 is easy to understand as part of the fear of revolution. Contrary to the myth of the Minuteman in the American Revolution, armed civilians have seldom played a significant effective part in any war against an organized military. The major deficiency of armed civilians is partly a shortage of modern weapons of mass destruction, partly a matter of training, and partly the psychologically toughening experience
    of combat itself.

    http://www.dvc.org.uk/dunblane/clayton_1.pdf

     


    Surveying the landscape in the summer of 1892, Ida B. Wells advised, that “the Winchester rifle deserved a place of honor in every Black home.” This was no empty rhetorical jab. She was advancing a considered personal security policy and specifically referencing two recent episodes where armed Blacks saved their neighbors from lynch mobs.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2014/01/29/negroes-and-the-gun-a-winchester-in-every-black-home/

     

  318. @Weaver
    @Jonathan Mason

    What does a "modern" constitution mean? The 14th Amendment changed the US dramatically, centralised it under the federal government. Before that amendment, there were no American citizens but rather citizens of each state. And citizenship was limited, by the federal legislature, to whites alone. That was not some change by the Supreme Court.

    The first African Americans were created by the 14th. Even Lincoln didn't free a slave. There were free blacks, even black and Amerindian slave holders, but no black or Amerindian citizens before the 14th.

    And after the 14th, the way the Amendment was interpreted, Coolidge had to grant citizenship to Amerindians. It wasn't until later that the 14th was reinterpreted to mean birthright citizenship as we have today.

    -

    If you're going to ban guns, then ban private security, ban guards and guard gates. If you want a "modern" constitution, then don't allow the wealthy to hide away in security while the poor are made victims of criminals.

    Also, do you realise that guns grant women equality? Without them, men have a significant strength advantage over women. I guess you don't mind that since you'd guarantee abortion in your "modern" Constitution.

    Replies: @raga10

    If you’re going to ban guns, then ban private security, ban guards and guard gates.

    As a proponent of fewer guns, that would be completely acceptable to me.

    Also, do you realise that guns grant women equality?

    I’m sorry but I trust your concern for women equality about as much as I trust neocon’s concern for women rights in Afghanistan…. Let them learn Kung Fu.

  319. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "The safest city in Los Angeles County is lovely Rancho Palos Verdes overlooking the Pacific. Rancho Palos Verdes is 22 miles from Compton. In lightly armed England, that would be a sitting duck for inner city criminals to drive out."

    Distance from Compton to Malibu is about 42 miles. Strange thing is that as car obsessed SoCal seemed to be (US car culture post WW2 more or less originated in SoCal), one would think that Crips or Bloods, wanting to do some major damage and plan a major crime spree, would hop on the 405 and
    head toward the 'bu. But you never see that happen. And it's not like Crips and Bloods aren't packing heat. 42 miles away is basically a walk in the park for driving thru SoCal. And yet it simply doesn't happen. Malibu must have one tough police force that deters potential crime waves from happening in their neighborhood.

    In the multi decade crime show Columbo, the erstwhile detective was always tracking down the perps in Beverly Hills, Bel Air, and of course in Malibu. But in real life, one simply doesn't see this happen. After all, if these places were so crime ridden, the beautiful people wouldn't live there.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    Distance from Compton to Malibu is about 42 miles. Strange thing is that as car obsessed SoCal seemed to be (US car culture post WW2 more or less originated in SoCal), one would think that Crips or Bloods, wanting to do some major damage and plan a major crime spree, would hop on the 405 and
    head toward the ‘bu. But you never see that happen. And it’s not like Crips and Bloods aren’t packing heat. 42 miles away is basically a walk in the park for driving thru SoCal. And yet it simply doesn’t happen. Malibu must have one tough police force that deters potential crime waves from happening in their neighborhood.

    Malibu has a tough police force? LOL oh man you should actually drive around California before commenting.

    What type of crime spree are you imagining?

    Black people can be seen from miles away in Malibu.

    Crips and Bloods aren’t as dumb as you assume. No reason to drive out to Malibu and get on 1000 cameras when you can just rob a local drug dealer. Those Malibu mansions are surrounded with private security.

  320. @Mr X
    @Rob

    The Texas law is a big victory for the humans that would otherwise be destroyed in abortions. Your remarks are a distraction from that fact.

    Replies: @Rob

    So you think the state should raise all these unwanted blacks and Mexican babies?

    You really think that’s a fantastic use of your taxes? Not nec. Yours if you don’t live in Texas.

  321. @Anon'sAnon
    @Thomas

    All you say is true, but the Biden anti-gun people are pressing forward on all sort of fronts to make it difficult to exercise 2d amendment rights, through executive orders and regulatory oversights. Exorbitant taxes on gun purchases and ownership, prohibition of on-line ammo purchases, and the banning (starting shortly) of all Russian made ammunition. This last act (Russian ammo ban) impacts cheap steal case ammo and has pushed ammo prices up dramatically, nearly doubling in the past couple of weeks. The Russian ammo ban also takes away the viability of owning an AK-47 because there aren't any US ammo makers who compete in the 7.62 x 39 caliber steel case market (which is almost exclusively used by most AK owners).

    Replies: @Thomas

    I’m aware of what the Biden Administration is attempting to do. I’ve commented on all the proposed ATF rulemaking. (Have you? GOA makes it easy on their website.)

    The President can’t tax ammunition by fiat nor can he ban online ammo sales. The proposed regulations are unlikely to take actual effect for at least a year while they wend their way truth the courts (making millions of people felons overnight is ample grounds for an injunction pending determination on the merits).

    And with respect to the Russian ammo thing, with what’s gone on in the ammo market generally over the past year, I doubt it will take very long for additional supply to catch up. Expect new 7.62×39 steel-case production to pop up soon in Belarus, Moldova, etc. The American market is too big to miss out on.

    (Incidentally, I don’t know too many gun owners who only have an AK but who don’t also have an AR. For most American gun owners, an AK would usually be either a range toy, an affectation, or a fallback. The preeminence of the AR and 5.56mm in the US, and what that means for the national market in parts, accessories, and ammo, means that that’s the default semiauto rifle and cartridge most people are going to have.)

    In short, I acknowledge that there are various marginal things the Administration can try to do to harass gun owners. I lived through the Obama-era ammo shortage too. But they are just that: marginal and harassing. This presidency appears to be running out of political capital quickly enough that I’m not that worried.

    If you are worried though, the best thing you can do is consider contributing to GOA, FPC, SAF, or your other favorite gun rights organization. That’s much more productive than hand-wringing, or even buying another gun.

  322. @Jonathan Mason
    @Joe Stalin

    Thank for your reply, Comrade.

    I don't really agree with the arguments found in the article you quoted, and find the argument a bit simplistic. The reasons for the Second Amendment being written into the Constitution were a lot more nuanced.

    This is a very complicated issue to address in this kind of forum, so I will stick to a couple of points.

    1) If the real purpose of the Second Amendment was to protect citizens from the federal government, then it sure wasn't much use in the Whiskey Rebellion when Washington and Madison were the oppressors, and it is hardly likely that after the experience of Shay's Rebellion they wanted to further bolster armed resistance to the federal government.

    2) The 'well-regulated' militias were actually the primary law enforcement agency used to keep slaves in line.

    3) The Second Amendment was intended to keep firearms out of the hands of blacks, whether free or slave, and of Indians and to keep whites ahead of the game.

    4) Even if the real intention was to give citizens the ability to resist federal oppression, which it wasn't, then that also became obsolete long ago. Citizens of today could not resist the US army with the weapons that individuals are permitted today, as the White House could simply call up drones to call at their address.

    5) Other original reasons for having the Second Amendment included that a great deal of the population, especially in rural areas depended on hunting for food. One of the most popular of American foods, even more so than apple pie, was baked squirrel. Additionally people in rural areas did need guns for self protection as there was no organized police force at the time, and citizens were expected to arrest wanted criminals.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Joe Stalin

    No, Jonathan. The Second was designed to counter the control freaks. It is relevant today, and will remain so for as long as men who desire liberty still breathe.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Neil Templeton

    They may have taught you that in high school history. But don't be another brick in the wall.

    https://youtu.be/YR5ApYxkU-U

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Neil Templeton

    But really, how can you look at the history of the Shay's Rebellion, Whiskey Rebellion, and Fries's Rebellion and come to the conclusion that the Second Amendment was about curtailing central government power?

    In each case the federal government lacked the finances to raise militias to put down rebellions and state militias were required to maintain internal order, put down rebellions, and enforce tax collection including federal tax collection.

    (Incidentally, Jefferson's remark at the time of Shay's Rebellion--more or less a mini civil war in itself in Massachusetts--about the blood of martyrs seems to me to be entirely flippant, and was made at a time when Jefferson was in Paris enjoying himself as a boulevardier sipping cafe-au-lait with his mocha sister-in-law Sally Hemings.)

    Look at the Whiskey Rebellion during the presidency of G. Washington. At Hamilton's urging, with the support of Madison, Congress enacted heavy British style taxation on whiskey producers and distillers in Pennsylvania rebelled and refused to pay the tax, and formed armed resistance to tax collectors.

    Washington, G. invoked the Militia Act of 1792 to summon up state militias and put down the rebellion by force. The Bill of Rights was enacted in 1991, so tell me how the Second Amendment was intended to curtail federal powers. And is there any figure in history who was more federal than G. Washington? The man even got his mugshot on the dollar bill.

    Then you had later rebellions of various types, for example the German Coast Uprising of slaves in 1811, which was put down by militias, and the Nat Turner slave rebellion of 1831 that was put down by militias who inflicted brutal reprisals and mass executions of people not all of whom had been involved in the uprising.

    In each case, and various other rebellions that followed, the militias enabled by the Second Amendment were law enforcement acting on behalf of state and federal authorities, not acting to limit federal power.

    The years of the Revolution and subsequent decades were certainly very turbulent times that included various rebellions, the slave revolution in Haiti, the voluntary abolition of slavery in the British and French empires in 1833 and 1848 respectively, various Indian wars, and the Civil War itself, but whatever the issues, the Second Amendment has clearly outlived its usefulness and any individual who tries to invoke the Second Amendment to avoid IRS assessments today would be in for a world of suffering and would be crushed by the heirs of G. Washington in his namesake city in the District of Columbia.

  323. @Pincher Martin
    @Hangnail Hans


    Trump had [has] virtually no friends. He was trying to govern without any personal political infrastructure at all. So naturally he retrenched toward the best thing available: a Republican establishment which was ambivalent at best.
     
    Some of this is true. But that's what a long U.S. presidential campaign is for - making political allies who will then help you implement the agenda you ran on.

    And Trump had allies during the campaign who claimed they wanted to shake up the system. They were all either arrested, departed because of scandal, or left because Trump couldn't stand them (or vice versa) soon after the election.

    A lot of this is Trump's fault. Few people of quality can stand being around such a megalomaniac unless they have similar flaws.

    It pains me to defend the man because I despise him, and he’s ready to do still more damage. But answer me these two questions: who was the last president never to have held previous political office? And which viable candidate in 2016 or 2020 ran on a more appealing [not to mention disruptive] platform?
     
    I don't like him, either. But I like his agenda. Unfortunately, I believe I'm more committed to Trump's agenda than Trump is committed to it.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    Along with many others, I could tolerate the megalomania much more easily if it weren’t accompanied by such abject stupidity.

    The really sad–nay, tragic–thing now is that Trump is preventing the ascent of a more reasoned and principled candidate.

    Though, the Dems’ demographic transition of the nation has probably forestalled the success of any such person and moreover, there’s no such person in sight anyway.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Hangnail Hans


    The really sad–nay, tragic–thing now is that Trump is preventing the ascent of a more reasoned and principled candidate.
     
    Well, on this point, if on no other, we will disagree.

    I was disappointed in the GOP establishment long before Trump showed up. And I believe he is more of a symptom than a cause of that establishment's well-deserved decline. We had plenty of chances for someone else to lead. No one ever did. Trump filled the void.

    I think there are good reasons for this. The GOP intellectual class twenty years ago was filled with people a lot like Frum. Some were grifters. Some were leftovers from the Reagan Era. None were any good. Few had any really new policy ideas that would advance conservatism in a new era which was quite different from the period in which the chief problems were the Cold War, high crime, and high taxes on the middle class.

    As a result the last Bush administration was a disaster. Nearly all of his policies were bad. What's worse, unlike Trump, Bush was committed to them. This is what we should expect when we don't have any good ideas percolating up from our intellectual cadres to our political cadres.

  324. @Charlesz Martel
    @Pincher Martin

    Trump accomplished several things. The appointment of many conservative judges is a big issue, right or wrong.

    The four big things are:

    1). He brought the immigration issue to the forefront. It had been a minor issue to most Americans, and was seen as a regional issue only. It is now recognized by millions as the critical issue of our time.
    For someone like me,who has been screaming about this issue since the mid-70's, and a fan of Enoch Powell since his 68 speech, this was a huge issue. People like Ann Coulter were very late to the issue. He didn't realize the extent of the Deep State he was up against, and assumed that being President was like being a CEO where people did what he told them or got fired or demoted.

    2). He pointed out that Free Trade is a very bad idea in many cases, and that we were being seriously taken advantage of.

    3). He virtually single-handedly changed our national view of China from "good for business- great trading partner!" to "Public Enemy Number 1" and a huge threat to American Dominance.

    4). He never explicitly said it, but he has sparked what may finally turn out to be the birth of a White Racial Consciousness. It is certainly long overdue as our melting pot boils over. Whether enough Whites will wake up in time to save some semblance of this country from a Third-World Brazilian future remains to be seen.

    What is really amazing about Trump's incredible destruction of Hillary's expected Coronation is how both parties remain utterly clueless as to how he accomplished it. They are literally incapable of even vaguely understanding a world view held by tens of millions of their fellow citizens. And have shown zero interest in even attempting such an understanding since his loss to Biden. They truly believe that politics in the U.S. will go back to the way things were pre-Trump.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pincher Martin, @frankie p

    In addition, I believe that Trump was responsible for a huge increase in the distrust and disbelief in the Mainstream Media among American citizens in the center and one the right. Also, his ongoing war (yes, I know that he didn’t follow through as he should have, with all the resources available to him) with Big Tech and Social Media shone a spotlight on the evil inherent in these monsters.

    Of course most of us on Unz were already well aware of these phenomena, but Trump certainly mainstreamed these ideas among the clueless.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  325. @Reg Cæsar
    @Verymuchalive


    Finally, it emancipated the negro population.
     
    In the wrong place. Crime in America would have gone down after 1866 had they been emancipated to the continent on which God meant them to be. And productivity would have gone up.

    The Union victory replaced the old confederal constitution with a federal one.
     
    A "confederal" constitution which allowed some states to invade others in order to retrieve their stray livestock. Not a good start.

    Come on, you had five million non-citizens who had no right to be in this country, per the Supreme Court. Deportation was decades overdue.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Abe Lincoln, despite all his high crimes and misdemeanours, actually wanted negroes returned to Africa. He might have been the only man who could have accomplished this. As with other assassinations, you must ask: cui bono ? Any serious attempts at repatriation stopped thereafter.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Verymuchalive


    Abe Lincoln, despite all his high crimes and misdemeanours, actually wanted negroes returned to Africa.
     
    It's my understanding he abandoned that idea when it was realized they could be turned in to reliable Republican voters, which I also understand worked until FDR.
  326. @JimB
    @The Alarmist

    Whites are the griller guerillas

    Replies: @The Alarmist