The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
From the Wastebasket of Frank Gehry ...
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Frank Gehry is such a celebrity architect that crumpled-up pieces of paper from the bottom of his wastebasket are now getting built.

Feel free to contribute jokes about what this Brain Health Center’s design is doing to the brain health of the poor patients.

 
Hide 99 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. For patients with warped minds. I like it. Deconstructivism is the rat rod of architecture.

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    This building is convincing proof that Mr. Gehry is the exact opposite of anally retentive.

  2. Happened in the Simpsons too.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  3. It happened in the Simpsons too.

  4. Someone may prank the patients with tales that the x-ray and CT scanners are so powerful that the building is melting from excess power surge radiation. Being Vegas, it’s a gamble whether your scans are nice and bright or equivalent to a 1945 suburb of Hiroshima.

  5. If that was the building for a vertigo clinic it’ll be deemed cruel and unusual.

  6. An internet search revealed that this pile of junk surprisingly actually exists!

  7. When I was 5 years old, this is exactly how imagined insane asylums looked like.

    • LOL: fish, ThreeCranes
  8. Looks as though Mr Gehry has paid a visit to R’lyeh:

    Without knowing what futurism is like, Johansen achieved something very close to it when he spoke of the city; for instead of describing any definite structure or building, he dwells only on broad impressions of vast angles and stone surfaces—surfaces too great to belong to any thing right or proper for this earth, and impious with horrible images and hieroglyphs. I mention his talk about angles because it suggests something Wilcox had told me of his awful dreams. He had said that the geometry of the dream-place he saw was abnormal, non-Euclidean, and loathsomely redolent of spheres and dimensions apart from ours. Now an unlettered seaman felt the same thing whilst gazing at the terrible reality.

    -“The Call of Cthulhu”

    • LOL: El Dato
  9. From the perspective of woke logic the building is a perfect cube, except that some parts had to be made to fit.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  10. anon[105] • Disclaimer says:

    Frank Gehry, birth name Frank Owen Goldberg. Thanks Wiki for confirming the “Every. Single. Time” angle.

    Thats a brain health building huh? It looks like a migrane-headache come-t0-life. I wonder if Goldberg designed it like H.H.Holmes infamous murder castle on the inside with floors marked wrong, doors that opened to brick walls, sound-and-air-proofed rooms with two-way mirrors (so Holmes could watch vicitims suffocate), and a few trap doors over quick-lime pits in the cellar. It looks like it ought to have at least one hidden room. I’d expect nothing less from a mind warped enough with hate to inflict a building like this on Nevada. One would think architects w0uld want to inspire, not depress……….that is unless he hated the people in the area.

    • Agree: AndrewR, northeast
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @anon


    Frank Gehry, birth name Frank Owen Goldberg. Thanks Wiki for confirming the “Every. Single. Time” angle.
     
    Jerry Seinfeld specifically mentioned this during his interview on Norm Macdonald Live.
  11. Frank Gehry is such a celebrity architect that crumpled-up pieces of paper from the bottom of his wastebasket are now getting built.

    Hey, it worked for James Thurber, whose cartooning career started that way.

    https://more.cartooncollections.com/james-thurber-cartoons-exclusively-on-cartooncollections-com/

    https://www.dispatch.com/article/20151106/ENTERTAINMENT/311069706

  12. I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative. There is a reason why far more people are still reading poetry by Wordsworth than almost any poetry written in the last 50 years. Wordsworth stuck to the rules, yet still managed to write poems which were both beautiful and profound.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Wilkey


    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative.
     
    This.

    Most people who claim to be "artists" are useless people who don't know much, don't have the curiosity or desire to learn much about the world, but think their brain farts should be of interest.

    People who desperately want to "say something" without having anything to say.

    ~~

    A mirror of our culture with "Pride" Parades, mentally ill men claiming to be women, BLM.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

     

    There is precedent. An airport bar, long gone, was named the Lone Eagle, after Charles Lindbergh. Who was a teetotaler. The whole terminal is named for him; how long can that last?
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Wilkey


    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative.

     

    Yes, and it goes even deeper. What's valued isn't just 'harmless eccentric' weird -- it's destructive, hate-fueled weirdness.
  13. A brilliantly effective way to combat the difficult challenges that mental health professionals traditionally face in getting reluctant new patients to admit that they actually have serious problems.
    As these often obstreperous folks approach this building for the first time they must surely be thinking “If all the normal people I see walking around here keep behaving like they believe this giant crushed-up beer can is a serious mental hospital, then I really AM nuts!”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @jimfromto

    Exactly! (Ran out of responses.)

    , @Polistra
    @jimfromto

    Looked at another way, it's instant wreckage. Saves several steps, although from what I can ascertain the likes of "Gehry" and his type enjoy the various stages along the way.

    Imagine a city made of of things like this. Imagine a society. Wreckage.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

  14. Anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:

    E. Michael Jones would say it’s the Jewish response to Bauhaus architecture.

    “Enron shares Mr. Gehry’s ongoing search for ‘the moment of truth’—the moment when the functional approach to a problem becomes infused with the artistry that produces a truly innovative solution. This is the search Enron embarks on every day, by questioning the conventional to change business paradigms and create new markets that will shape the New Economy. It is the shared sense of challenge that we admire most in Frank Gehry, and we hope that this exhibition will bring you as much inspiration as it has brought us.”
    Jeff Skilling on Frank Gehry

    “My buildings look as if they are just thrown together. We work very hard to achieve this.”
    Frank Gehry on Frank Gehry

    From: The Logos of Architecture and Its Opponents by E. Michael Jones (Fidelity Press, 2012)

    • Thanks: Kyle
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    “My buildings look as if they are just thrown together. We work very hard to achieve this.”

    Frank Gehry on Frank Gehry
     
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/1c/d3/60/1cd3603fd07c7a8c20d63701a564bf08.jpg
  15. Ay caramba!! This heap looks as though it was eaten by a wolf then sh#t down a cliff.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  16. Perhaps Gehry retrieved a crumpled up piece of acid paper from Salvador Dali’s trash can?

    • Replies: @J1234
    @Mike Tre

    LOL! Seriously, though, the architects, administrators and health professionals employed by this place have to be smart enough to see the inherent derisive humor invited by using such a design for a "brain health" center, right? Or wrong? Is creating our new opposite-world that important to them?

  17. I hate it when you crunch it up but it won’t stay crunched!

  18. @jimfromto
    A brilliantly effective way to combat the difficult challenges that mental health professionals traditionally face in getting reluctant new patients to admit that they actually have serious problems.
    As these often obstreperous folks approach this building for the first time they must surely be thinking "If all the normal people I see walking around here keep behaving like they believe this giant crushed-up beer can is a serious mental hospital, then I really AM nuts!"

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Polistra

    Exactly! (Ran out of responses.)

  19. Not only does Mr-Only-Pays-Attention-To-Form-And-Has-No-Clue-About-Function keep making buildings that leak, he’s only copying the incompetence of Frank Lloyd Wright, whose buildings are also notorious for leaking.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @Anon

    So was Mrs. Wright.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    , @Kibernetika
    @Anon

    Seems that some California based architects are now fleeing for points east. Instinctively some in SoCal want to bug out of Cali, but they are terrified of travelling through the US by car. What monsters lurk there in the heartland? It's fascinating, really. They seem surprised that I'm still alive.

  20. Remember LA’s Pile of Tin Cans Walt Disney Concert Hall? I remember an adoring hagiography on PBS about the guy once. He’s got the Pile of Cans almost built. And then, when it’s almost just about done, he suddenly realizes he ought to check to see if the acoustics are alright on the inside! It never occurred to him that a concert hall needs good acoustics! Fuking hack.

    And let us not broach that all those mirrored surfaces heat up the shit out of the surrounding neighborhood.

    Forethought is for suckers.

  21. Now they tell us.

    • Agree: Kyle
  22. • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What the hell is that?

    Johnny, use the "More" tag with a "not safe after eating" warning.

  23. In defense of Frank Gehry, he did something sensible recently that might save Los Angeles a lot of trouble.

    Environmentalists have been demanding for decades that the ugly concrete ditch Los Angeles River be restored to its original natural state. That would be nice, except that the LA River is, about once every few decades a massive flood threat. For example, up to 1825 it flowed from downtown LA west to Marina Del Rey, but in a giant flood shifted to its current course from downtown south to the Harbor.

    So Mayor Garcetti bought himself some time by announcing to the environmentalists that he was having Los Angeles’s resident architectural genius Frank Gehry look into what to do about the LA River.

    After a few years, Gehry recently announced his big plan: rather than attempt to restore the river to its wild state, because that would be too dangerous in terms of LA being wiped out in a 100 year flood, he’d come up with plans to put a lid over the concrete ditch river in the most crowded Mexican slum of South-Central LA and build a nice park on top for kids soccer and family picnics. The environmentalists were mad, but Gehry presented his modest proposal with a lot of Racial Reckoning rhetoric that left the white environmentalists stumped about how to protest.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Steve Sailer

    Is it just me, or is the purpose of most environmentalism nowadays to set humanity up for its next near extinction event?

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    Gehry's lid would create a new setting for movie car chases, but lighting might be a problem.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, when there's a good hard downpour in the Valley--i.e. not golfing weather--do you ever lug kayak down to the "river" and make the run down to Long Beach?

    , @TWS
    @Steve Sailer

    Do you want morlocks? Because that's how you get morlocks.

  24. Increasingly, Gehry’s designs look like crumpled up pieces of paper.

    Center for Brain Health? It looks like the fever-dream of a lunatic.

    And what’s a center for Brain Health doing in Las Vegas?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Gehry's peak designs 20 years ago - Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. - look fairly elegant rather than like wadded-up silver duct tape. The Disney invokes sailboats, which everybody likes to look at.

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Barnard, @Chrisnonymous

  25. Modern art is simply demonic, reflecting the artists’ warped, twisted and possesed souls.

  26. @jimfromto
    A brilliantly effective way to combat the difficult challenges that mental health professionals traditionally face in getting reluctant new patients to admit that they actually have serious problems.
    As these often obstreperous folks approach this building for the first time they must surely be thinking "If all the normal people I see walking around here keep behaving like they believe this giant crushed-up beer can is a serious mental hospital, then I really AM nuts!"

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Polistra

    Looked at another way, it’s instant wreckage. Saves several steps, although from what I can ascertain the likes of “Gehry” and his type enjoy the various stages along the way.

    Imagine a city made of of things like this. Imagine a society. Wreckage.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Polistra

    Didn't the movie "Idiocracy" have buildings like this?

  27. @Steve Sailer
    In defense of Frank Gehry, he did something sensible recently that might save Los Angeles a lot of trouble.

    Environmentalists have been demanding for decades that the ugly concrete ditch Los Angeles River be restored to its original natural state. That would be nice, except that the LA River is, about once every few decades a massive flood threat. For example, up to 1825 it flowed from downtown LA west to Marina Del Rey, but in a giant flood shifted to its current course from downtown south to the Harbor.

    So Mayor Garcetti bought himself some time by announcing to the environmentalists that he was having Los Angeles's resident architectural genius Frank Gehry look into what to do about the LA River.

    After a few years, Gehry recently announced his big plan: rather than attempt to restore the river to its wild state, because that would be too dangerous in terms of LA being wiped out in a 100 year flood, he'd come up with plans to put a lid over the concrete ditch river in the most crowded Mexican slum of South-Central LA and build a nice park on top for kids soccer and family picnics. The environmentalists were mad, but Gehry presented his modest proposal with a lot of Racial Reckoning rhetoric that left the white environmentalists stumped about how to protest.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @TWS

    Is it just me, or is the purpose of most environmentalism nowadays to set humanity up for its next near extinction event?

  28. May I tell what really happened, because the damaged brain center image won’t spring from a simple piece of paper at all – it would lack the curvature and the 3-d-effects? – So: Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine and ripped out the centerfold and tore it unintentionally. Then he got angry and crumpled it. You might not believe what I say, but it works. With this method applied, You get what you need (to become a world-famous architect).

    May I reveal something else: Life is not that interesting for many people. That’s why they love it when the arts give them something to wonder, to laugh and to talk about (this is well known now for 2000+ years – and it is true for iSteve readers, too).

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @Dieter Kief

    Nonsense! My life is fascinating.
    Oh look, there's a rerun of 'Columbo'!

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Dieter Kief


    Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine ...
     
    In the 70’s Playboy did an illustrated humor article on little-known aircraft of WW2.

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission, there was a Soviet transport plane with a Gehry-style front end.

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @James J O'Meara, @Dieter Kief

  29. @Mr. Anon
    Increasingly, Gehry's designs look like crumpled up pieces of paper.

    Center for Brain Health? It looks like the fever-dream of a lunatic.

    And what's a center for Brain Health doing in Las Vegas?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Gehry’s peak designs 20 years ago – Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. – look fairly elegant rather than like wadded-up silver duct tape. The Disney invokes sailboats, which everybody likes to look at.

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer


    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.
     
    Exactly.

    One could see how this brain building approach would be better, say, for a museum of cinema. Think about it: If he did something like this, but with big, individual windows representing frames of film, then he could create a building that looks like a pile of movie film on the cutting-room floor.

    It would still be depressing, though. Isn't that one of the effects of the "modern" architecture of our time? Depression?

    , @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    Both are ugly. Everything single building Gehry designed should be torn down.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe Gehry's designs depend on how much he gets paid. A la, "nice architectural contract ya got here. Be a shame if somebody completed it as a joke."

  30. With that grass, they could shoot a beer commercial there.

    Is that supposed to be part of the look?

    Anyway, how can it possibly be good to make a brain health building so convoluted that it brings to mind mental illness?

  31. If Frank Gehry designed a golf course …

    • LOL: ic1000
  32. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Gehry's peak designs 20 years ago - Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. - look fairly elegant rather than like wadded-up silver duct tape. The Disney invokes sailboats, which everybody likes to look at.

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Barnard, @Chrisnonymous

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    Exactly.

    One could see how this brain building approach would be better, say, for a museum of cinema. Think about it: If he did something like this, but with big, individual windows representing frames of film, then he could create a building that looks like a pile of movie film on the cutting-room floor.

    It would still be depressing, though. Isn’t that one of the effects of the “modern” architecture of our time? Depression?

  33. @Steve Sailer
    In defense of Frank Gehry, he did something sensible recently that might save Los Angeles a lot of trouble.

    Environmentalists have been demanding for decades that the ugly concrete ditch Los Angeles River be restored to its original natural state. That would be nice, except that the LA River is, about once every few decades a massive flood threat. For example, up to 1825 it flowed from downtown LA west to Marina Del Rey, but in a giant flood shifted to its current course from downtown south to the Harbor.

    So Mayor Garcetti bought himself some time by announcing to the environmentalists that he was having Los Angeles's resident architectural genius Frank Gehry look into what to do about the LA River.

    After a few years, Gehry recently announced his big plan: rather than attempt to restore the river to its wild state, because that would be too dangerous in terms of LA being wiped out in a 100 year flood, he'd come up with plans to put a lid over the concrete ditch river in the most crowded Mexican slum of South-Central LA and build a nice park on top for kids soccer and family picnics. The environmentalists were mad, but Gehry presented his modest proposal with a lot of Racial Reckoning rhetoric that left the white environmentalists stumped about how to protest.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @TWS

    Gehry’s lid would create a new setting for movie car chases, but lighting might be a problem.

  34. @Anon
    Not only does Mr-Only-Pays-Attention-To-Form-And-Has-No-Clue-About-Function keep making buildings that leak, he's only copying the incompetence of Frank Lloyd Wright, whose buildings are also notorious for leaking.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Kibernetika

    So was Mrs. Wright.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Father O'Hara

    Yes, but other than that she was structurally sound, because Someone else designed her.

  35. So why doesn’t the streetlight match the aesthetic?

  36. I’m getting a concussion just looking at it.

  37. @Dieter Kief
    May I tell what really happened, because the damaged brain center image won't spring from a simple piece of paper at all - it would lack the curvature and the 3-d-effects? - So: Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine and ripped out the centerfold and tore it unintentionally. Then he got angry and crumpled it. You might not believe what I say, but it works. With this method applied, You get what you need (to become a world-famous architect).

    May I reveal something else: Life is not that interesting for many people. That's why they love it when the arts give them something to wonder, to laugh and to talk about (this is well known now for 2000+ years - and it is true for iSteve readers, too).

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Paul Mendez

    Nonsense! My life is fascinating.
    Oh look, there’s a rerun of ‘Columbo’!

  38. Low-budget sci-fi directors are always looking for dystopian futuristic backdrops they can use on the cheap.

  39. It’s another thing that reminds you that the people who commission this stuff are not normal human beings. Alas, they seem to run everything.

  40. @Dieter Kief
    May I tell what really happened, because the damaged brain center image won't spring from a simple piece of paper at all - it would lack the curvature and the 3-d-effects? - So: Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine and ripped out the centerfold and tore it unintentionally. Then he got angry and crumpled it. You might not believe what I say, but it works. With this method applied, You get what you need (to become a world-famous architect).

    May I reveal something else: Life is not that interesting for many people. That's why they love it when the arts give them something to wonder, to laugh and to talk about (this is well known now for 2000+ years - and it is true for iSteve readers, too).

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Paul Mendez

    Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine …

    In the 70’s Playboy did an illustrated humor article on little-known aircraft of WW2.

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission, there was a Soviet transport plane with a Gehry-style front end.

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Paul Mendez


    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,
     
    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycXEgIRWGqs
    [29:04]

    Replies: @S

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Paul Mendez

    "In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission"

    The better to surrender?

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Paul Mendez


    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.
     
    Yeah - that' how even the Russians had some fun in those cold cold - days od old - wonderful joke!
  41. @Father O'Hara
    @Anon

    So was Mrs. Wright.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    Yes, but other than that she was structurally sound, because Someone else designed her.

  42. Reminds me of the “pretty good isn’t good enough” commercial with the almost reinstated surgeon and terrified patient.

  43. Cleveland Clinic is a tax leech.

    Its a “non-profit” with annual revenues of about $9B. It reminds me of the old Hughes Aircraft.

    In 2019 alone it received $140M in federal research funding (i.e. pork). CEO makes $3M.

    It chooses expansion locations with an eye towards big property tax breaks it can negotiate in those places.

    Ruvo was a big liquor distributor in Vegas. Considering the association between alcoholism and brain dysfunction, it’s actually quite amusing that his name is above the building’s main entrance (if it has one).

    [MORE]

    I am so sick and tired of tax-subsidized, memorials in-perpetuity atop the vanity projects of rich guys.

  44. @Steve Sailer
    In defense of Frank Gehry, he did something sensible recently that might save Los Angeles a lot of trouble.

    Environmentalists have been demanding for decades that the ugly concrete ditch Los Angeles River be restored to its original natural state. That would be nice, except that the LA River is, about once every few decades a massive flood threat. For example, up to 1825 it flowed from downtown LA west to Marina Del Rey, but in a giant flood shifted to its current course from downtown south to the Harbor.

    So Mayor Garcetti bought himself some time by announcing to the environmentalists that he was having Los Angeles's resident architectural genius Frank Gehry look into what to do about the LA River.

    After a few years, Gehry recently announced his big plan: rather than attempt to restore the river to its wild state, because that would be too dangerous in terms of LA being wiped out in a 100 year flood, he'd come up with plans to put a lid over the concrete ditch river in the most crowded Mexican slum of South-Central LA and build a nice park on top for kids soccer and family picnics. The environmentalists were mad, but Gehry presented his modest proposal with a lot of Racial Reckoning rhetoric that left the white environmentalists stumped about how to protest.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @TWS

    Steve, when there’s a good hard downpour in the Valley–i.e. not golfing weather–do you ever lug kayak down to the “river” and make the run down to Long Beach?

  45. @Wilkey
    I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative. There is a reason why far more people are still reading poetry by Wordsworth than almost any poetry written in the last 50 years. Wordsworth stuck to the rules, yet still managed to write poems which were both beautiful and profound.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @The Last Real Calvinist

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative.

    This.

    Most people who claim to be “artists” are useless people who don’t know much, don’t have the curiosity or desire to learn much about the world, but think their brain farts should be of interest.

    People who desperately want to “say something” without having anything to say.

    ~~

    A mirror of our culture with “Pride” Parades, mentally ill men claiming to be women, BLM.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @AnotherDad

    +1

  46. @Paul Mendez
    @Dieter Kief


    Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine ...
     
    In the 70’s Playboy did an illustrated humor article on little-known aircraft of WW2.

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission, there was a Soviet transport plane with a Gehry-style front end.

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @James J O'Meara, @Dieter Kief

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,

    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:

    [29:04]

    • Replies: @S
    @Joe Stalin



    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,
     
    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:
     
    Neat about the Cheyenne prototypes, it seemed revolutionary. Too bad they canceled the project. [That dud TOW missile fired at the public demonstration sure didn't help.]

    The navy studied TOS Star Trek bridge for use on its ships, but didn't adopt the design.

    It seems the swivel chair, which looks great as a hypothesis, doesn't ever seem to get much past the prototype when it comes to the military.

    https://boundingintocomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Kirk_in_Enterprise_command_chair-768x614.jpg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  47. @Polistra
    @jimfromto

    Looked at another way, it's instant wreckage. Saves several steps, although from what I can ascertain the likes of "Gehry" and his type enjoy the various stages along the way.

    Imagine a city made of of things like this. Imagine a society. Wreckage.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    Didn’t the movie “Idiocracy” have buildings like this?

  48. @Paul Mendez
    @Dieter Kief


    Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine ...
     
    In the 70’s Playboy did an illustrated humor article on little-known aircraft of WW2.

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission, there was a Soviet transport plane with a Gehry-style front end.

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @James J O'Meara, @Dieter Kief

    “In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission”

    The better to surrender?

  49. @AnotherDad
    @Wilkey


    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative.
     
    This.

    Most people who claim to be "artists" are useless people who don't know much, don't have the curiosity or desire to learn much about the world, but think their brain farts should be of interest.

    People who desperately want to "say something" without having anything to say.

    ~~

    A mirror of our culture with "Pride" Parades, mentally ill men claiming to be women, BLM.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    +1

  50. @Wilkey
    I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative. There is a reason why far more people are still reading poetry by Wordsworth than almost any poetry written in the last 50 years. Wordsworth stuck to the rules, yet still managed to write poems which were both beautiful and profound.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @The Last Real Calvinist

    I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

    There is precedent. An airport bar, long gone, was named the Lone Eagle, after Charles Lindbergh. Who was a teetotaler. The whole terminal is named for him; how long can that last?

  51. I’m someone who hates modern art but loves Gehry’s stuff.

    Lived in LA when Disney was built and thought it was a fantastic addition (also think it’s a fantastic place to hear music*–I went to a Christmas organ show that was unreal: http://aforestofpipes.com/). Visited Prague and thought the Dancing House was awesome. Went to the Bilbao and thought it was cool.

    Personally, I think Gehry is the wrong hill to die on if you oppose contemporary architecture trends.

    *the la philharmonic used to complain about having to do the Hollywood Bowl because the acoustics are terrible even though it’s a fun venue. Disney has great acoustics.

  52. At least buildings like this are a change from the endless, near identical glass boxes that are most modern buildings.

  53. @Paul Mendez
    @Dieter Kief


    Frank Gehry once studied a Playboy Magazine ...
     
    In the 70’s Playboy did an illustrated humor article on little-known aircraft of WW2.

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission, there was a Soviet transport plane with a Gehry-style front end.

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @James J O'Meara, @Dieter Kief

    The explanation was that an engineer accidentally wrinkled the plans, but since damaging state property was a capital offense, he went ahead and built it that way.

    Yeah – that’ how even the Russians had some fun in those cold cold – days od old – wonderful joke!

  54. There’s a Gehry building on the campus of M.I.T. too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stata_Center

    I always wondered what theoreticians and engineers who work and study the orderly patterns of nature make of having this big thumb jammed into their eye socket. Maybe they even enjoy it.

    More likely–it’s a way of learning/performing an elite antinomian aesthetic. Cf. Bourdieu, Distinction.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Guest29048


    There’s a Gehry building on the campus of M.I.T. too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stata_Center

    I always wondered what theoreticians and engineers who work and study the orderly patterns of nature make of having this big thumb jammed into their eye socket. Maybe they even enjoy it.
     
    I know of absolutely no one who "uses" the Stata center who likes it. In large part because these people were not consulted about it, and when they were, like Tom Knight who needed a a sloping floor and drain, were ignored after being consulted. And as implied in a previous comment, it leaks.
  55. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Gehry's peak designs 20 years ago - Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. - look fairly elegant rather than like wadded-up silver duct tape. The Disney invokes sailboats, which everybody likes to look at.

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Barnard, @Chrisnonymous

    Both are ugly. Everything single building Gehry designed should be torn down.

  56. So that building in the photo isn’t the ‘after’ picture from a recent airliner crash into the building?

    Did they use the M C Escher company for their elevator contracting?

  57. Huge dollars are spent for a building that’s an eyesore and which people will be pushing to tear down in 50 years–in this case paid for by a non-profit, but you see this with public projects as well.

    The issue here isn’t really with Frank Gehry or Goldberg or whatever his name really is.

    What’s “wrong” here isn’t some asswipe “artist” has come up with something stupid and ugly. The issue is that the officials–the people in charge–don’t have the personal, socio-cultural cojones to say “That’s utter bullcrap, we aren’t doing that.”

    Again echoes of that through all of American officialdom’s dealing with issues–race, sex, crime, homos, trannies and of course immigration. America’s elites simply do not do their job of calling “bullshit” and keeping America as a sane, high functioning nation.

  58. @Steve Sailer
    In defense of Frank Gehry, he did something sensible recently that might save Los Angeles a lot of trouble.

    Environmentalists have been demanding for decades that the ugly concrete ditch Los Angeles River be restored to its original natural state. That would be nice, except that the LA River is, about once every few decades a massive flood threat. For example, up to 1825 it flowed from downtown LA west to Marina Del Rey, but in a giant flood shifted to its current course from downtown south to the Harbor.

    So Mayor Garcetti bought himself some time by announcing to the environmentalists that he was having Los Angeles's resident architectural genius Frank Gehry look into what to do about the LA River.

    After a few years, Gehry recently announced his big plan: rather than attempt to restore the river to its wild state, because that would be too dangerous in terms of LA being wiped out in a 100 year flood, he'd come up with plans to put a lid over the concrete ditch river in the most crowded Mexican slum of South-Central LA and build a nice park on top for kids soccer and family picnics. The environmentalists were mad, but Gehry presented his modest proposal with a lot of Racial Reckoning rhetoric that left the white environmentalists stumped about how to protest.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Buzz Mohawk, @AnotherDad, @TWS

    Do you want morlocks? Because that’s how you get morlocks.

  59. The issue here isn’t really with Frank Gehry or Goldberg or whatever his name really is.

    What’s “wrong” here isn’t some 🧻 “artist” has come up with something stupid and ugly.

    Imagine what Rube Goldberg could have come up with:

    Rather than “gherkins” and “shards”, the London skyline could feature the work of native son Heath Robinson:

    • Troll: RichardTaylor
  60. @Mike Tre
    Perhaps Gehry retrieved a crumpled up piece of acid paper from Salvador Dali’s trash can?

    Replies: @J1234

    LOL! Seriously, though, the architects, administrators and health professionals employed by this place have to be smart enough to see the inherent derisive humor invited by using such a design for a “brain health” center, right? Or wrong? Is creating our new opposite-world that important to them?

  61. One thing might comfort the inmates, er, patients in Gehry’s building. They will be completely safe from terror attacks. Why should terrorists waste explosives on a pre-exploded building?

  62. crumpled-up pieces of paper from the bottom of his wastebasket

    Peter Eisenmann made that comment almost verbatim at Columbia in Fall 1997. Bilbao was brand-new then, but just how much more of this junk can people take?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @tomv

    The Simpsons did that joke about a decade ago.

  63. @Guest29048
    There's a Gehry building on the campus of M.I.T. too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stata_Center

    I always wondered what theoreticians and engineers who work and study the orderly patterns of nature make of having this big thumb jammed into their eye socket. Maybe they even enjoy it.

    More likely--it's a way of learning/performing an elite antinomian aesthetic. Cf. Bourdieu, Distinction.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    There’s a Gehry building on the campus of M.I.T. too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stata_Center

    I always wondered what theoreticians and engineers who work and study the orderly patterns of nature make of having this big thumb jammed into their eye socket. Maybe they even enjoy it.

    I know of absolutely no one who “uses” the Stata center who likes it. In large part because these people were not consulted about it, and when they were, like Tom Knight who needed a a sloping floor and drain, were ignored after being consulted. And as implied in a previous comment, it leaks.

  64. I would absolutely love to see the structural steel blue prints for that job. And the fabrication prints too.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    It astounds me that a steel fabricator would bid on something like this, or that they could find a detailer willing to take it on. I know I would pass.

    Gehry's "designs" (trash heaps as "architecture") seem to me to be characterized by a surfeit of non-functional elements and an egregious disregard for the principle of form following function. His designs, it seems to me, disrespect both nature and humanity, and embody a profoundly negative view of this world. I would call that degenerate.

    In stark contrast, the great Santiago Calatrava
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava
    as both engineer and architect, understands and respects the laws of nature, and celebrates human existence with his marvelous designs.

    Jedem das Seine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe, @Insouciant

  65. @anon
    Frank Gehry, birth name Frank Owen Goldberg. Thanks Wiki for confirming the "Every. Single. Time" angle.

    Thats a brain health building huh? It looks like a migrane-headache come-t0-life. I wonder if Goldberg designed it like H.H.Holmes infamous murder castle on the inside with floors marked wrong, doors that opened to brick walls, sound-and-air-proofed rooms with two-way mirrors (so Holmes could watch vicitims suffocate), and a few trap doors over quick-lime pits in the cellar. It looks like it ought to have at least one hidden room. I'd expect nothing less from a mind warped enough with hate to inflict a building like this on Nevada. One would think architects w0uld want to inspire, not depress..........that is unless he hated the people in the area.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Frank Gehry, birth name Frank Owen Goldberg. Thanks Wiki for confirming the “Every. Single. Time” angle.

    Jerry Seinfeld specifically mentioned this during his interview on Norm Macdonald Live.

  66. Architecture in general is nothing but publicity stunts.

  67. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Gehry's peak designs 20 years ago - Bilbao and the Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. - look fairly elegant rather than like wadded-up silver duct tape. The Disney invokes sailboats, which everybody likes to look at.

    But he got so successful off those buildings that he descended into self-parody.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Barnard, @Chrisnonymous

    Maybe Gehry’s designs depend on how much he gets paid. A la, “nice architectural contract ya got here. Be a shame if somebody completed it as a joke.”

  68. Welcome to the Frank Gehry Institute for Passive Aggression.

  69. @Buffalo Joe
    I would absolutely love to see the structural steel blue prints for that job. And the fabrication prints too.

    Replies: @turtle

    It astounds me that a steel fabricator would bid on something like this, or that they could find a detailer willing to take it on. I know I would pass.

    Gehry’s “designs” (trash heaps as “architecture”) seem to me to be characterized by a surfeit of non-functional elements and an egregious disregard for the principle of form following function. His designs, it seems to me, disrespect both nature and humanity, and embody a profoundly negative view of this world. I would call that degenerate.

    In stark contrast, the great Santiago Calatrava
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava
    as both engineer and architect, understands and respects the laws of nature, and celebrates human existence with his marvelous designs.

    Jedem das Seine.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    My impression of Gehry's Disney Concert Hall is that underneath it's a functional box-shaped building, but it has been encased in a giant decorative sculpture. It is a "decorated shed" as Robert Venturi would say, rather than a "duck" (a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods, with the decoration wholly obscuring the shed. But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics, lots of seats close to the stage, and, so far, no disastrous leaks.

    And the decoration is based on sailboat-shapes, which are nice.

    Replies: @turtle

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @turtle

    turtle, great reply and for those who don't know, the "detailer' is the one who designs the connections where the structural steel bolts or welds together. I have been on jobs where the detailer did not leave enough room for you to get your hand in and insert a bolt, or see to weld. That leads to delays and extra charges. Thanks for the link.

    Replies: @turtle

    , @Insouciant
    @turtle

    Thanks for the introduction to Santiago Calatrava

    his Oculus Building, NYC

    https://i.postimg.cc/TYFgrprp/Oculus-building-Santiago-Calatrava-Valls.png


    Makes the spirit want to soar
    or makes you think you can fly
    maybe not a good idea for a center for people with mental issues

  70. @The real Buddy Stevenson
    For patients with warped minds. I like it. Deconstructivism is the rat rod of architecture.

    Replies: @Buck Ransom

    This building is convincing proof that Mr. Gehry is the exact opposite of anally retentive.

  71. @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    It astounds me that a steel fabricator would bid on something like this, or that they could find a detailer willing to take it on. I know I would pass.

    Gehry's "designs" (trash heaps as "architecture") seem to me to be characterized by a surfeit of non-functional elements and an egregious disregard for the principle of form following function. His designs, it seems to me, disrespect both nature and humanity, and embody a profoundly negative view of this world. I would call that degenerate.

    In stark contrast, the great Santiago Calatrava
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava
    as both engineer and architect, understands and respects the laws of nature, and celebrates human existence with his marvelous designs.

    Jedem das Seine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe, @Insouciant

    My impression of Gehry’s Disney Concert Hall is that underneath it’s a functional box-shaped building, but it has been encased in a giant decorative sculpture. It is a “decorated shed” as Robert Venturi would say, rather than a “duck” (a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods, with the decoration wholly obscuring the shed. But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics, lots of seats close to the stage, and, so far, no disastrous leaks.

    And the decoration is based on sailboat-shapes, which are nice.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @Steve Sailer


    But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics,
     
    I would agree. I have only driven by it, not attended any concert there, but a friend who has confirms the excellent acoustics. So, there is that...
    Bilbao was certainly spectacular and unique. A cynic might say Gehry has been attempting to ride his own Bilbao coattails for far too long.

    Then again, art "appreciation" is largely a matter of taste, and my own inclination tends towards the more traditional. I like the Getty Center, for example.
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/GettyCenterGarden031903.jpg/330px-GettyCenterGarden031903.jpg

    a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods,
     
    Now there is a SoCal tradition. :)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  72. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/HIASrefugees/status/1367862549178376194

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    What the hell is that?

    Johnny, use the “More” tag with a “not safe after eating” warning.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  73. Even building 7 wasn’t that damaged.

  74. @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    My impression of Gehry's Disney Concert Hall is that underneath it's a functional box-shaped building, but it has been encased in a giant decorative sculpture. It is a "decorated shed" as Robert Venturi would say, rather than a "duck" (a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods, with the decoration wholly obscuring the shed. But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics, lots of seats close to the stage, and, so far, no disastrous leaks.

    And the decoration is based on sailboat-shapes, which are nice.

    Replies: @turtle

    But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics,

    I would agree. I have only driven by it, not attended any concert there, but a friend who has confirms the excellent acoustics. So, there is that…
    Bilbao was certainly spectacular and unique. A cynic might say Gehry has been attempting to ride his own Bilbao coattails for far too long.

    Then again, art “appreciation” is largely a matter of taste, and my own inclination tends towards the more traditional. I like the Getty Center, for example.

    a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods,

    Now there is a SoCal tradition. 🙂

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @turtle, @anon, @Buzz Mohawk

  75. @turtle
    @Steve Sailer


    But that has been one of his more successful buildings, with good acoustics,
     
    I would agree. I have only driven by it, not attended any concert there, but a friend who has confirms the excellent acoustics. So, there is that...
    Bilbao was certainly spectacular and unique. A cynic might say Gehry has been attempting to ride his own Bilbao coattails for far too long.

    Then again, art "appreciation" is largely a matter of taste, and my own inclination tends towards the more traditional. I like the Getty Center, for example.
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/GettyCenterGarden031903.jpg/330px-GettyCenterGarden031903.jpg

    a building that looks like a duck to get across the message that it sells duck-related goods,
     
    Now there is a SoCal tradition. :)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    "I used to demand..." is one of those constructions that doesn't work very well in English. It seems like it ought to mean that you finally gave up, but many English speakers use it to mean something like "I habitually made a person do something". I assume you finally got to visit the giant donut.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @turtle
    @Steve Sailer

    Ah, yes.
    Randy's Donuts
    805 W Manchester Blvd, Inglewood, California, 90301
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/93/Randy%27s_donuts1_edit1.jpg/728px-Randy%27s_donuts1_edit1.jpg
    I know it well. :)
    I believe there is an "official" term for this type of architecture, but I do not know it.
    Perhaps someone else here does...

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer


    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.


    I wonder, did Bill Griffith go there, too?



    http://zippythepinhead.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/2009/images/081109.gif

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    I used to ride my bike to this giant hot dog in Colorado:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7e/fa/9d/7efa9dce046eca44bd9d05feb646e93d.jpg

    You know how you say we imprint on the landscape at a certain time in life?

  76. @tomv

    crumpled-up pieces of paper from the bottom of his wastebasket
     
    Peter Eisenmann made that comment almost verbatim at Columbia in Fall 1997. Bilbao was brand-new then, but just how much more of this junk can people take?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Simpsons did that joke about a decade ago.

  77. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been looking for other photos and a definitive floor plan, which are hard to come by, but I’m beginning to get the feeling that the photo is a massive troll by Gehry. The melting building seems to be some sort of Potemkin village/Hollywood sign/backyard thing (the windows are not windows) and the front of the building is on the other side, and seems downright neoclassical. I think there’s an attempt at a right side of the brain/left side of the brain or schizophrenia joke in the design.

    However, an idea occurred to me: Some architect should sell the same design to different clients, varying only the amount of melting. One client could get the normal building, another the slightly listing-over version, and another the full Dali treatment. Same building, but different stages of destruction.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Right, the front of the building where doctors see patients is made of rectangular boxes like a normal building. The Salvador Dali Melting Watches back part of the building is an empty space for renting out for corporate cocktail parties and the like. And much of the swoopy stuff isn't even the outside wall of the rental space. It's just decoration attached to actual structure (which is pretty weird in itself, but not as much as the impression from the outside).

  78. @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @turtle, @anon, @Buzz Mohawk

    “I used to demand…” is one of those constructions that doesn’t work very well in English. It seems like it ought to mean that you finally gave up, but many English speakers use it to mean something like “I habitually made a person do something”. I assume you finally got to visit the giant donut.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Chrisnonymous

    “I used to demand…” is one of those constructions that doesn’t work very well in English.

    Huh. What do you mean, that this expression works well in another language? - That would be interesting.

  79. @Anon
    I've been looking for other photos and a definitive floor plan, which are hard to come by, but I'm beginning to get the feeling that the photo is a massive troll by Gehry. The melting building seems to be some sort of Potemkin village/Hollywood sign/backyard thing (the windows are not windows) and the front of the building is on the other side, and seems downright neoclassical. I think there's an attempt at a right side of the brain/left side of the brain or schizophrenia joke in the design.

    However, an idea occurred to me: Some architect should sell the same design to different clients, varying only the amount of melting. One client could get the normal building, another the slightly listing-over version, and another the full Dali treatment. Same building, but different stages of destruction.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right, the front of the building where doctors see patients is made of rectangular boxes like a normal building. The Salvador Dali Melting Watches back part of the building is an empty space for renting out for corporate cocktail parties and the like. And much of the swoopy stuff isn’t even the outside wall of the rental space. It’s just decoration attached to actual structure (which is pretty weird in itself, but not as much as the impression from the outside).

  80. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    "I used to demand..." is one of those constructions that doesn't work very well in English. It seems like it ought to mean that you finally gave up, but many English speakers use it to mean something like "I habitually made a person do something". I assume you finally got to visit the giant donut.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    “I used to demand…” is one of those constructions that doesn’t work very well in English.

    Huh. What do you mean, that this expression works well in another language? – That would be interesting.

  81. @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    It astounds me that a steel fabricator would bid on something like this, or that they could find a detailer willing to take it on. I know I would pass.

    Gehry's "designs" (trash heaps as "architecture") seem to me to be characterized by a surfeit of non-functional elements and an egregious disregard for the principle of form following function. His designs, it seems to me, disrespect both nature and humanity, and embody a profoundly negative view of this world. I would call that degenerate.

    In stark contrast, the great Santiago Calatrava
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava
    as both engineer and architect, understands and respects the laws of nature, and celebrates human existence with his marvelous designs.

    Jedem das Seine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe, @Insouciant

    turtle, great reply and for those who don’t know, the “detailer’ is the one who designs the connections where the structural steel bolts or welds together. I have been on jobs where the detailer did not leave enough room for you to get your hand in and insert a bolt, or see to weld. That leads to delays and extra charges. Thanks for the link.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    Yes, (again, for those who do not know) the steel detailer translates "design intent" of the construction documents provided by the project architect and the structural engineer of record into the actual shop and erection drawings from which the structure is fabricated and erected. Detailers are the "last link in the chain," (a.k.a. the "missing link") from concept to shop floor and jobsite.

    As such, we "share the pain" with the SER, who is tasked with making the (sometimes apparently hallucinogenic) dreams of the architect into a buildable concept.

    When I was in engineering school, back in the 1980s, one of our most respected professors liked to stress that, in addition to the canonical three Ss, namely Strength, Stiffness, and Stability, there are also the two Cs, namely Constructability and Cost, which are prerequisite to a successful project.

    @ Buffalo Joe:
    With the advent of computer modeling, things are somewhat better now than in the more distant past, but it is still possible, unfortunately, for even highly experienced engineers and detailers to "screw the pooch." I've had my share, as have nearly all my friends and colleagues.

    These days, paper drawings are more likely, but not entirely, to be used only for quality control by the more automated shops, with at least some actual fabrication being taken over by CNC ,machinery.

    For example,
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpBuy7nZmPo
    and:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pRMtXTTdiQ

    But, it still requires brave and skilled ironworkers to erect the structures.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  82. S says:
    @Joe Stalin
    @Paul Mendez


    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,
     
    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycXEgIRWGqs
    [29:04]

    Replies: @S

    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,

    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:

    Neat about the Cheyenne prototypes, it seemed revolutionary. Too bad they canceled the project. [That dud TOW missile fired at the public demonstration sure didn’t help.]

    The navy studied TOS Star Trek bridge for use on its ships, but didn’t adopt the design.

    It seems the swivel chair, which looks great as a hypothesis, doesn’t ever seem to get much past the prototype when it comes to the military.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @S

    When my father saw my photos of the bridge of the USS Intrepid aircraft carrier (permanently docked as a museum in New York City) he told me it looked just like the bridge of the destroyer he served on as the engineer. Apparently, the bridge design was standard across US Navy ships, no matter how big or small.

  83. I hear they’re also going to use one of Gehry’s designs for the Joe Biden Presidential Library.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @JohnnyD


    I hear they’re also going to use one of Gehry’s designs for the Joe Biden Presidential Library.
     
    Extra large shelves for those large print books?
  84. @Buffalo Joe
    @turtle

    turtle, great reply and for those who don't know, the "detailer' is the one who designs the connections where the structural steel bolts or welds together. I have been on jobs where the detailer did not leave enough room for you to get your hand in and insert a bolt, or see to weld. That leads to delays and extra charges. Thanks for the link.

    Replies: @turtle

    Yes, (again, for those who do not know) the steel detailer translates “design intent” of the construction documents provided by the project architect and the structural engineer of record into the actual shop and erection drawings from which the structure is fabricated and erected. Detailers are the “last link in the chain,” (a.k.a. the “missing link”) from concept to shop floor and jobsite.

    As such, we “share the pain” with the SER, who is tasked with making the (sometimes apparently hallucinogenic) dreams of the architect into a buildable concept.

    When I was in engineering school, back in the 1980s, one of our most respected professors liked to stress that, in addition to the canonical three Ss, namely Strength, Stiffness, and Stability, there are also the two Cs, namely Constructability and Cost, which are prerequisite to a successful project.

    @ Buffalo Joe:
    With the advent of computer modeling, things are somewhat better now than in the more distant past, but it is still possible, unfortunately, for even highly experienced engineers and detailers to “screw the pooch.” I’ve had my share, as have nearly all my friends and colleagues.

    These days, paper drawings are more likely, but not entirely, to be used only for quality control by the more automated shops, with at least some actual fabrication being taken over by CNC ,machinery.

    [MORE]

    For example,

    and:

    But, it still requires brave and skilled ironworkers to erect the structures.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @turtle

    turtle, well said and this old ironworker dubs thee Sir Terrapin.

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @turtle, @anon, @Buzz Mohawk

    Ah, yes.
    Randy’s Donuts
    805 W Manchester Blvd, Inglewood, California, 90301

    I know it well. 🙂
    I believe there is an “official” term for this type of architecture, but I do not know it.
    Perhaps someone else here does…

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @turtle

    Wiki calls it "whimsical architecture" (but this includes things from centuries ago like Victorian follies). I remember a book about the specific early/mid-20th century craze of restaurants using poured concrete forms for advertising and structure, but I don't remember the categoric term. It apparently finished in the fifties with abstract amoeba-like shapes, in pastel colors, suspended over the heads of the trusting public by crooked stanchions. In the sixties folks wanted stuff to look futuistic, airplanish, serious, sleek, and glossy, so whimsy and amoebas were out. Like anything else there is a minor subculture devoted to this, but I think it peaked in the boomer retro thing in the 80s, when a lot of these were still around and could be used in movies. There is sort of an overlap with the concrete dinosaur craze.

    Replies: @turtle, @mena

  86. @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @turtle, @anon, @Buzz Mohawk


    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    I wonder, did Bill Griffith go there, too?

  87. @Steve Sailer
    @turtle

    I used to demand that my mother take me to the giant donut-shaped donut stand in L.A.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @turtle, @anon, @Buzz Mohawk

    I used to ride my bike to this giant hot dog in Colorado:

    You know how you say we imprint on the landscape at a certain time in life?

  88. @S
    @Joe Stalin



    In addition to the Italian fighter with two noses and a swiveling seat so the pilot could change sides in the middle of a mission,
     
    The USA built an attack helicopter in the 1960s where the gunner sat in a swiveling seat:
     
    Neat about the Cheyenne prototypes, it seemed revolutionary. Too bad they canceled the project. [That dud TOW missile fired at the public demonstration sure didn't help.]

    The navy studied TOS Star Trek bridge for use on its ships, but didn't adopt the design.

    It seems the swivel chair, which looks great as a hypothesis, doesn't ever seem to get much past the prototype when it comes to the military.

    https://boundingintocomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Kirk_in_Enterprise_command_chair-768x614.jpg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    When my father saw my photos of the bridge of the USS Intrepid aircraft carrier (permanently docked as a museum in New York City) he told me it looked just like the bridge of the destroyer he served on as the engineer. Apparently, the bridge design was standard across US Navy ships, no matter how big or small.

    • Thanks: S
  89. @JohnnyD
    I hear they're also going to use one of Gehry's designs for the Joe Biden Presidential Library.

    Replies: @Muggles

    I hear they’re also going to use one of Gehry’s designs for the Joe Biden Presidential Library.

    Extra large shelves for those large print books?

  90. @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    Yes, (again, for those who do not know) the steel detailer translates "design intent" of the construction documents provided by the project architect and the structural engineer of record into the actual shop and erection drawings from which the structure is fabricated and erected. Detailers are the "last link in the chain," (a.k.a. the "missing link") from concept to shop floor and jobsite.

    As such, we "share the pain" with the SER, who is tasked with making the (sometimes apparently hallucinogenic) dreams of the architect into a buildable concept.

    When I was in engineering school, back in the 1980s, one of our most respected professors liked to stress that, in addition to the canonical three Ss, namely Strength, Stiffness, and Stability, there are also the two Cs, namely Constructability and Cost, which are prerequisite to a successful project.

    @ Buffalo Joe:
    With the advent of computer modeling, things are somewhat better now than in the more distant past, but it is still possible, unfortunately, for even highly experienced engineers and detailers to "screw the pooch." I've had my share, as have nearly all my friends and colleagues.

    These days, paper drawings are more likely, but not entirely, to be used only for quality control by the more automated shops, with at least some actual fabrication being taken over by CNC ,machinery.

    For example,
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpBuy7nZmPo
    and:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pRMtXTTdiQ

    But, it still requires brave and skilled ironworkers to erect the structures.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    turtle, well said and this old ironworker dubs thee Sir Terrapin.

    • Thanks: turtle
  91. @turtle
    @Steve Sailer

    Ah, yes.
    Randy's Donuts
    805 W Manchester Blvd, Inglewood, California, 90301
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/93/Randy%27s_donuts1_edit1.jpg/728px-Randy%27s_donuts1_edit1.jpg
    I know it well. :)
    I believe there is an "official" term for this type of architecture, but I do not know it.
    Perhaps someone else here does...

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Wiki calls it “whimsical architecture” (but this includes things from centuries ago like Victorian follies). I remember a book about the specific early/mid-20th century craze of restaurants using poured concrete forms for advertising and structure, but I don’t remember the categoric term. It apparently finished in the fifties with abstract amoeba-like shapes, in pastel colors, suspended over the heads of the trusting public by crooked stanchions. In the sixties folks wanted stuff to look futuistic, airplanish, serious, sleek, and glossy, so whimsy and amoebas were out. Like anything else there is a minor subculture devoted to this, but I think it peaked in the boomer retro thing in the 80s, when a lot of these were still around and could be used in movies. There is sort of an overlap with the concrete dinosaur craze.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @J.Ross


    futuistic, airplanish
     
    Tail fins, baby.
    1961 T-bird:
    http://davidsclassiccars.com/ford/432923-1961-ford-thunderbird-convertible.html
    and houses that looked like spaceships:
    https://worldarchitecture.org/architecture-news/cgchv/matti_suuronen_s_historic_spaceship_futuro_house_on_the_market_for_130_000.html

    concrete dinosaur craze
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabazon_Dinosaurs
    (cue Firesign Theater) :)
    , @mena
    @J.Ross

    Vernacular architechture.Stucco coffee pots and teepees and so on. Often homemade and of questionable structural soundness, hence, increasingly rare.

  92. @Wilkey
    I want to visit the Frank Gehry-designed Center for Liver Health. He will probably design it with an open bar.

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative. Adhering to the rules and yet creating something that is unique but beautiful is creative. There is a reason why far more people are still reading poetry by Wordsworth than almost any poetry written in the last 50 years. Wordsworth stuck to the rules, yet still managed to write poems which were both beautiful and profound.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar, @The Last Real Calvinist

    The real insanity of our age is that we mistake weirdness for creativity. Being weird isn’t necessarily creative.

    Yes, and it goes even deeper. What’s valued isn’t just ‘harmless eccentric’ weird — it’s destructive, hate-fueled weirdness.

    • Agree: Cato
  93. @Anon
    Not only does Mr-Only-Pays-Attention-To-Form-And-Has-No-Clue-About-Function keep making buildings that leak, he's only copying the incompetence of Frank Lloyd Wright, whose buildings are also notorious for leaking.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara, @Kibernetika

    Seems that some California based architects are now fleeing for points east. Instinctively some in SoCal want to bug out of Cali, but they are terrified of travelling through the US by car. What monsters lurk there in the heartland? It’s fascinating, really. They seem surprised that I’m still alive.

  94. @Anonymous
    E. Michael Jones would say it’s the Jewish response to Bauhaus architecture.

    “Enron shares Mr. Gehry's ongoing search for ‘the moment of truth’—the moment when the functional approach to a problem becomes infused with the artistry that produces a truly innovative solution. This is the search Enron embarks on every day, by questioning the conventional to change business paradigms and create new markets that will shape the New Economy. It is the shared sense of challenge that we admire most in Frank Gehry, and we hope that this exhibition will bring you as much inspiration as it has brought us.”
    Jeff Skilling on Frank Gehry


    “My buildings look as if they are just thrown together. We work very hard to achieve this.”
    Frank Gehry on Frank Gehry


    From: The Logos of Architecture and Its Opponents by E. Michael Jones (Fidelity Press, 2012)
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “My buildings look as if they are just thrown together. We work very hard to achieve this.”

    Frank Gehry on Frank Gehry

    • LOL: turtle
  95. @J.Ross
    @turtle

    Wiki calls it "whimsical architecture" (but this includes things from centuries ago like Victorian follies). I remember a book about the specific early/mid-20th century craze of restaurants using poured concrete forms for advertising and structure, but I don't remember the categoric term. It apparently finished in the fifties with abstract amoeba-like shapes, in pastel colors, suspended over the heads of the trusting public by crooked stanchions. In the sixties folks wanted stuff to look futuistic, airplanish, serious, sleek, and glossy, so whimsy and amoebas were out. Like anything else there is a minor subculture devoted to this, but I think it peaked in the boomer retro thing in the 80s, when a lot of these were still around and could be used in movies. There is sort of an overlap with the concrete dinosaur craze.

    Replies: @turtle, @mena

  96. @J.Ross
    @turtle

    Wiki calls it "whimsical architecture" (but this includes things from centuries ago like Victorian follies). I remember a book about the specific early/mid-20th century craze of restaurants using poured concrete forms for advertising and structure, but I don't remember the categoric term. It apparently finished in the fifties with abstract amoeba-like shapes, in pastel colors, suspended over the heads of the trusting public by crooked stanchions. In the sixties folks wanted stuff to look futuistic, airplanish, serious, sleek, and glossy, so whimsy and amoebas were out. Like anything else there is a minor subculture devoted to this, but I think it peaked in the boomer retro thing in the 80s, when a lot of these were still around and could be used in movies. There is sort of an overlap with the concrete dinosaur craze.

    Replies: @turtle, @mena

    Vernacular architechture.Stucco coffee pots and teepees and so on. Often homemade and of questionable structural soundness, hence, increasingly rare.

  97. @turtle
    @Buffalo Joe

    It astounds me that a steel fabricator would bid on something like this, or that they could find a detailer willing to take it on. I know I would pass.

    Gehry's "designs" (trash heaps as "architecture") seem to me to be characterized by a surfeit of non-functional elements and an egregious disregard for the principle of form following function. His designs, it seems to me, disrespect both nature and humanity, and embody a profoundly negative view of this world. I would call that degenerate.

    In stark contrast, the great Santiago Calatrava
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava
    as both engineer and architect, understands and respects the laws of nature, and celebrates human existence with his marvelous designs.

    Jedem das Seine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe, @Insouciant

    Thanks for the introduction to Santiago Calatrava

    his Oculus Building, NYC

    Makes the spirit want to soar
    or makes you think you can fly
    maybe not a good idea for a center for people with mental issues

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Becker update V1.3.2
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement