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Fortune: Varietals Are Rotting on the Vine!
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It’s September, so it’s time for the X Is Rotting in the Y headlines that growers’ PR firms and lobbyists have saved as Word macros. From Fortune:

California Vineyards Struggle Amid Farmworker Shortage

By CHRIS MORRIS September 4, 2018

The ongoing battle over immigration could hit wine lovers in the wallet as many California vineyards are struggling to find seasonal workers to assist with harvesting the 2018 crop.

Wine makers face a perfect storm of problems regarding the issue: The ongoing battle about U.S. immigration policies and competition from other higher-paying, local industries, such as construction, which are helping the area recover from last year’s wildfires. …

Vineyards hoping to bring in migrant workers from Mexico must use a federal program known as the H-2A Visa, which requires, among other things, that they provide seasonal housing and transportation from Mexico. Not every winery is equipped to house that additional staff.

To make the jobs more attractive to both locals and seasonal workers who are being wooed by construction companies, which can offer year-round pay, vineyards are increasing their wages during harvest to as much as $30 per hour. (Pay rates for the rest of the year have gone up as well.) …

Changing immigration policies have caused farmer angst throughout California for more than a year. In 2017, crops were left rotting on the vine as a shortage of migrant workers impacted the year’s vegetable harvest.

Which set off the Cabernet Sauvignon Famine of 2017-18 that left millions starving, or at least might eventually force some to switch to drinking … Merlot when the vintage begins to mature in the 2020s.

 
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  1. Oh my God! Open the borders!!!

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Anonymous IV

    Can't rape the willing

  2. We’ll know its a real shortage when Steve is impressed into a work gang.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Anon

    At a meeting at work, it was announced there would be extra pay if you recruited someone. I asked if pressganging was allowed. No one knew what it was.

    Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager

  3. Vineyards hoping to bring in migrant workers from Mexico must use a federal program known as the H-2A Visa, which requires, among other things, that they provide seasonal housing and transportation from Mexico. Not every winery is equipped to house that additional staff.

    I thought that’s what “muh socialism” was for. The poor vineyard owners are counting on muh socialism to provide… let’s see, health care at emergency rooms, Section 8 for housing, WIC for the kiddies, bilingual teachers. It’s Socialism, man! The government pays for EVERYTHING!

  4. OK, OK, I’ll quit ragging on the Socialists for a bit. Steve, your Cabernet Sauvignon Famine line was damnably funny.

    Now, seriously, my boy and I used to watch youtube vids a few years back that had full episodes of a Canadian-produced 1990’s – ’08 TV show called Mighty Machines. We watched the episode with the grape-harvesting machines at least 10 X – you know how kids are. I’m telling you this was at least 10, but probably 15 years old, and those mighty machines could get through that vineyard without hurting 1 in 100 grapes. Kudos to the mech/aggies!

  5. Is it possible that this Chris Morris doesn’t get youtube? It’s free, Chris!

    This one starts with tomatoes, but the grape-vine machine section starts at 12:25. The intro song brings back good memories.

    “Mighty machines, big and mighty machines,
    working so hard doin’ mighty things they’re
    (clap, clap) mighty machines.”

  6. istevefan says:

    I have no doubt there are some crops rotting in the fields. Governments also from time to time order farmers to destroy crops to raise the market price.

    But rather than debate about whether crops are rotting or being deliberately destroyed, why don’t we do what an economist would and look at what the consumer has to pay since this is the best indicator about whether or not there is a shortage.

    For the agricultural products I buy the only one that seems to have risen appreciably over the past year is avocados. I read this is because of the limits of production where trees produce crops every other year coupled with the increase in demand from China.

    Other than that I have not noticed any indication of a shortage of produce at my grocery store. So either the American market is suppling us with enough crop (rotting crops notwithstanding), imports are filling the void, or both. But there is no problem because if there were it would be reflected in the prices the consumer pays.

    • Replies: @anon
    @istevefan

    Grain is massively overproduced globally and corn/wheat is $5 bushel. Paying $30 hour for labor sounds like a shortage and exactly what should be done. Mechanize it or pay up for hand labor. They could get the legal H2As if it is that urgent. $30 hour (3x minimum wage) is what construction used to pay and reasonable for difficult outdoor labor before open borders.

    Replies: @Fred Boynton, @Anon87

    , @BenKenobi
    @istevefan

    I'm currently paying $2 for an avocado in Vancouver. Is that a lot?

    Also, my kingdom for a ripe avocado! Damn things are either bright green and rock-hard or mud-coloured mush.

    Replies: @istevefan, @Dan Bagrov

    , @27 year old
    @istevefan

    Grocery prices have gone up

    These increases have been hidden from consumers by shrinking the size of a unit while keeping the price the same

    64 oz cans of juice are now 52 ounce cans of juice. But they're still priced at $1.99 per can

    Someone came up with the incredibly gay term "shrinkflation" to describe this

    No connection to the anti-American "crops rotting in the fields" trope though, this is just typical excel spreadsheet MBA fuckboy behavior.

    Replies: @istevefan

  7. Another white male Democrat bites the dust

    • Replies: @Lot
    @t

    Purge the Democrats of whitey! Sure he was by all accounts an able representative, but his pale wang disqualified him. His wife's maiden name was Teabaggy (really), seems suspect. His WOC replacement looks about as bright as Ocasio having dropped out of two community colleges.

    This is a safe Dem district, but it will be interesting to see if the GOP overperforms in November.

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    Replies: @Flip, @Bubba, @Whiskey

    , @AnotherDad
    @t


    Another white male Democrat bites the dust
     
    Excellent!

    Really having a penis--that hasn't been clipped, or wasn't surgically constructed, ought to be disqualifying for the Democrats.

    But a full on PPP? C'mon--that's unacceptable.
  8. Another old white male democrat bites the dust:

    • Replies: @indocon
    @t

    The circular firing squad in action.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @t


    Another old white male democrat bites the dust:
     
    66 in a white Democrat is a spring chicken.
  9. As usual agricultural areas in California and Arizona have America’s highest unemployment rates.

    https://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laummtrk.htm

  10. Not to mention the collapse of both the Argentine Peso and the SA Rand versus the mighty Trump dollar. Of course, I am sure free marketers would point out that wine imports to the US are just the market’s way of healing itself.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @George

    The "wine mom" phenomenon has fueled a secular increase in wine consumption, the industry won't be griping as much about imported wines for now.

    https://ei.marketwatch.com/Multimedia/2013/01/10/Photos/MG/MW-AY121_wine_2_20130110140412_MG.jpg

  11. Fortunately, this won’t seemingly affect the brothers’ ability to get a room temp Boone’s Farm or MD 20/20 on a Tuesday night/Wednesday morning from the coewna sto.

  12. @t
    Another white male Democrat bites the dust

    https://twitter.com/kelleratlarge/status/1037143857824194560

    Replies: @Lot, @AnotherDad

    Purge the Democrats of whitey! Sure he was by all accounts an able representative, but his pale wang disqualified him. His wife’s maiden name was Teabaggy (really), seems suspect. His WOC replacement looks about as bright as Ocasio having dropped out of two community colleges.

    This is a safe Dem district, but it will be interesting to see if the GOP overperforms in November.

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Lot


    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.
     
    Yeah, I am pulling for all the crazy Bernie types to do well. They are easier to oppose and won't be able to get anything done if they do get in.
    , @Bubba
    @Lot


    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.
     
    I would love to see Fredo Cuomo crushed politically and live in penury for the rest of his life with the threat of jail time hanging over him until his last breath, but that ain't ever gonna happen.

    However, I think that his wildly corrupt background coupled with his creepy demeanor and loutish speaking skills should be a boon for Republicans when he runs for President in 2020.
    , @Whiskey
    @Lot

    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave. Certainly Dems feel every White woman and non White will vote Dem. Pussy hat wearers are endemic at my work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot

  13. anon[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @istevefan
    I have no doubt there are some crops rotting in the fields. Governments also from time to time order farmers to destroy crops to raise the market price.

    But rather than debate about whether crops are rotting or being deliberately destroyed, why don't we do what an economist would and look at what the consumer has to pay since this is the best indicator about whether or not there is a shortage.

    For the agricultural products I buy the only one that seems to have risen appreciably over the past year is avocados. I read this is because of the limits of production where trees produce crops every other year coupled with the increase in demand from China.

    Other than that I have not noticed any indication of a shortage of produce at my grocery store. So either the American market is suppling us with enough crop (rotting crops notwithstanding), imports are filling the void, or both. But there is no problem because if there were it would be reflected in the prices the consumer pays.

    Replies: @anon, @BenKenobi, @27 year old

    Grain is massively overproduced globally and corn/wheat is $5 bushel. Paying $30 hour for labor sounds like a shortage and exactly what should be done. Mechanize it or pay up for hand labor. They could get the legal H2As if it is that urgent. $30 hour (3x minimum wage) is what construction used to pay and reasonable for difficult outdoor labor before open borders.

    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
    @anon

    The two main reasons grains (corn, wheat and soybeans) are overproduced in U.S, and globally are that grains are easy to harvest and grains are easy to store/preserve. Grains are easy to harvest and store because the end product in all these cases becomes hard when it is ripe. The kernel of corn, the kernel of wheat and the soybean all become hard when they are ripe and that makes mechanized harvest relatively easy (no need to worry about bruising or damaging your end product). It also makes storing and preserving your end product much easier as well (as long as you keep the grain dry it will preserve much longer than any fruits or vegetables will even when f and v are frozen).

    One more thing about grains: when grains ripen they usually all ripen at the same time (field by field depending on when planted and weather during growing season) and do not need to be harvested immediately when ripened. This is not true of fruits and vegetables, which is another reason for popularity of growing grains.

    Farm subsidies originally came about to help farmers pay for this mechanized equipment. Since the mechanized equipment was being paid for it made sense to use it and grow grains exclusively in much of the country/world. This led to the massive overproduction you see in the U.S. and globally which meant that not only the equipment needed to be subsidized but the grain itself needed to be subsidized with both direct and indirect payments to farmers. Since food conglomerates like General Mills, Cargill, Hormel, and generic meat and dairy producers, etc. like cheap grains, they lobby for the subsidies to go to grain farmers.

    This is just a little rundown about why grains are so popular with farmers and why if mechanized harvest equipment does come to at least some fruits and vegetables, the taxpayers will end up subsidizing it. Just to note, if it comes down to immigrants or mechanized equipment, I am firmly with equipment even though I will be unwillingly subsidizing that equipment and the equipment will likely make some f and v over-produced and some under-produced.

    , @Anon87
    @anon

    What I want to know is what is the hourly wage of the guys building the mechanized farm equipment? How soon before we hear the complaints about "bolts rusting on the assembly line" and we need immigrant labor?

  14. @istevefan
    I have no doubt there are some crops rotting in the fields. Governments also from time to time order farmers to destroy crops to raise the market price.

    But rather than debate about whether crops are rotting or being deliberately destroyed, why don't we do what an economist would and look at what the consumer has to pay since this is the best indicator about whether or not there is a shortage.

    For the agricultural products I buy the only one that seems to have risen appreciably over the past year is avocados. I read this is because of the limits of production where trees produce crops every other year coupled with the increase in demand from China.

    Other than that I have not noticed any indication of a shortage of produce at my grocery store. So either the American market is suppling us with enough crop (rotting crops notwithstanding), imports are filling the void, or both. But there is no problem because if there were it would be reflected in the prices the consumer pays.

    Replies: @anon, @BenKenobi, @27 year old

    I’m currently paying $2 for an avocado in Vancouver. Is that a lot?

    Also, my kingdom for a ripe avocado! Damn things are either bright green and rock-hard or mud-coloured mush.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    @BenKenobi

    If you are paying two Canadian dollars that is not bad. That's about $1.50 US. My local grocer charges about $2 per avocado.

    However, about a year ago I could get a bag of 5 avocados from Sam's Club for around $5.

    , @Dan Bagrov
    @BenKenobi

    Indeed on all points. $2 is rather pricey, more like $1 or $1.5 in NM. I too have horrible luck. If I ripen them at home they get all nasty. What I do is wait for a Mexican to rummage through the pile at the store and then go over and try to mimick them, pick ones that looked like ones the Mexican took.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  15. @t
    Another old white male democrat bites the dust:

    https://twitter.com/kelleratlarge/status/1037143857824194560

    Replies: @indocon, @Reg Cæsar

    The circular firing squad in action.

  16. Raise your wages, or buy machines. You can get all the people you need if you provide sufficient incentives. And if you cannot, your business model is defective.

  17. @Lot
    @t

    Purge the Democrats of whitey! Sure he was by all accounts an able representative, but his pale wang disqualified him. His wife's maiden name was Teabaggy (really), seems suspect. His WOC replacement looks about as bright as Ocasio having dropped out of two community colleges.

    This is a safe Dem district, but it will be interesting to see if the GOP overperforms in November.

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    Replies: @Flip, @Bubba, @Whiskey

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    Yeah, I am pulling for all the crazy Bernie types to do well. They are easier to oppose and won’t be able to get anything done if they do get in.

  18. Isn’t California majority Mexican with quite a few illegals already? And they’re complaining they still don’t have anyone to pick their crops?

    Who are you going to import to do jobs Mexican illegal farm workers won’t do? This whole idea of abusing illegal labor for the first couple years they are here is such an unsustainable ponzi scheme.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Lars Porsena

    Stoop farm labor is an extremely bad job, so it's not exactly a surprise that when Mexico sends they're people, they're not sending their best. Emmanuel Lubezki didn't come to America to pick strawberries and then got into cinematography; he was a wealthy TV commercial cinematographer in Mexico City before he started lensing Hollywood features.

    It's kind of like if the NFL paid only $11.50 per hour to special teams players and they were constantly running out of guys to break up the wedge on kickoffs because nobody can last for more than a few seasons on the job, so the NFL owners demanded that Congress import lots more extremely poor and extremely violent foreigners to break up the wedge for a few seasons for $11.50 per hour.

    Picking grapes is less stoop labor than picking strawberries, fortunately. Strawberries are just the worst crop for our society. Trump should negotiate a deal with Mexico that Mexico can have all the strawberry farms south of the border and they can ship us strawberries duty free.

    Replies: @Anon, @NickG

  19. @Lot
    @t

    Purge the Democrats of whitey! Sure he was by all accounts an able representative, but his pale wang disqualified him. His wife's maiden name was Teabaggy (really), seems suspect. His WOC replacement looks about as bright as Ocasio having dropped out of two community colleges.

    This is a safe Dem district, but it will be interesting to see if the GOP overperforms in November.

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    Replies: @Flip, @Bubba, @Whiskey

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    I would love to see Fredo Cuomo crushed politically and live in penury for the rest of his life with the threat of jail time hanging over him until his last breath, but that ain’t ever gonna happen.

    However, I think that his wildly corrupt background coupled with his creepy demeanor and loutish speaking skills should be a boon for Republicans when he runs for President in 2020.

  20. @Lot
    @t

    Purge the Democrats of whitey! Sure he was by all accounts an able representative, but his pale wang disqualified him. His wife's maiden name was Teabaggy (really), seems suspect. His WOC replacement looks about as bright as Ocasio having dropped out of two community colleges.

    This is a safe Dem district, but it will be interesting to see if the GOP overperforms in November.

    Now we just need Cuomo to go down.

    Replies: @Flip, @Bubba, @Whiskey

    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave. Certainly Dems feel every White woman and non White will vote Dem. Pussy hat wearers are endemic at my work.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Whiskey


    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave.
     
    Literal tidal waves are uneventful, by definition. You answer them with a tsunami.
    , @Lot
    @Whiskey

    "Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal"

    Last I checked the generic ballot polls were 11, 11, 13, 14. So it would be a blue wave if the election were today. The roll the Dems are on in open GOP Wisconsin leg seats looks very bad too.

    On the bright side, all those Republican Congressmen going down in CA and the NE will doom open borders Kevin McCarthy from leading the House GOP as Ryan and the Kochs wish.

    Replies: @Polynikes

  21. @istevefan
    I have no doubt there are some crops rotting in the fields. Governments also from time to time order farmers to destroy crops to raise the market price.

    But rather than debate about whether crops are rotting or being deliberately destroyed, why don't we do what an economist would and look at what the consumer has to pay since this is the best indicator about whether or not there is a shortage.

    For the agricultural products I buy the only one that seems to have risen appreciably over the past year is avocados. I read this is because of the limits of production where trees produce crops every other year coupled with the increase in demand from China.

    Other than that I have not noticed any indication of a shortage of produce at my grocery store. So either the American market is suppling us with enough crop (rotting crops notwithstanding), imports are filling the void, or both. But there is no problem because if there were it would be reflected in the prices the consumer pays.

    Replies: @anon, @BenKenobi, @27 year old

    Grocery prices have gone up

    These increases have been hidden from consumers by shrinking the size of a unit while keeping the price the same

    64 oz cans of juice are now 52 ounce cans of juice. But they’re still priced at $1.99 per can

    Someone came up with the incredibly gay term “shrinkflation” to describe this

    No connection to the anti-American “crops rotting in the fields” trope though, this is just typical excel spreadsheet MBA fuckboy behavior.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    @27 year old

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago when ice cream no longer came in half gallon sizes. Instead of 64 oz. they started selling similar shaped packages that were 56 oz and even smaller.

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Alarmist, @Stan Adams

  22. @George
    Not to mention the collapse of both the Argentine Peso and the SA Rand versus the mighty Trump dollar. Of course, I am sure free marketers would point out that wine imports to the US are just the market's way of healing itself.

    Replies: @Anon

    The “wine mom” phenomenon has fueled a secular increase in wine consumption, the industry won’t be griping as much about imported wines for now.

  23. @Lars Porsena
    Isn't California majority Mexican with quite a few illegals already? And they're complaining they still don't have anyone to pick their crops?

    Who are you going to import to do jobs Mexican illegal farm workers won't do? This whole idea of abusing illegal labor for the first couple years they are here is such an unsustainable ponzi scheme.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Stoop farm labor is an extremely bad job, so it’s not exactly a surprise that when Mexico sends they’re people, they’re not sending their best. Emmanuel Lubezki didn’t come to America to pick strawberries and then got into cinematography; he was a wealthy TV commercial cinematographer in Mexico City before he started lensing Hollywood features.

    It’s kind of like if the NFL paid only $11.50 per hour to special teams players and they were constantly running out of guys to break up the wedge on kickoffs because nobody can last for more than a few seasons on the job, so the NFL owners demanded that Congress import lots more extremely poor and extremely violent foreigners to break up the wedge for a few seasons for $11.50 per hour.

    Picking grapes is less stoop labor than picking strawberries, fortunately. Strawberries are just the worst crop for our society. Trump should negotiate a deal with Mexico that Mexico can have all the strawberry farms south of the border and they can ship us strawberries duty free.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Immigrant builds robot to take jobs from immigrants

    https://newatlas.com/brexit-robotic-strawberry-pickers/56106/


    Britain is facing a strawberry labor shortage that only threatens to get worse as Brexit approaches, so roboticists at the University of Essex are working in conjunction with jam makers Wilkin & Sons of Tiptree to develop robots to take up the slack. Led by Vishuu Mohan, from the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, the team's goal is to build a robot that can work in field conditions alongside human pickers.
     
    , @NickG
    @Steve Sailer

    I pick strawberries for fun and home consumption at a pick your own place 3 or 4 times every summer in the UK. They are grown on waist high trestles - which makes them easy to pick - from grow bags under a plastic sheeting greenhouse roof and are irrigated by a micro irrigation system. The strawberries are wonderful.

    Gone are the days of doing it on your hands and knees, which was awful.

    To do it commercially it's best to get machines up to snuff.

  24. Let’s say you hire rent-a-cops who rail against criminals. Yet, despite their posturing, criminals keep coming by and committing crimes. Wouldn’t that seem to indicate the rent-a-cops aren’t competent at their stated jobs?

    Now, think about this: despite those with megaphones railing against these bogus tales, the bogus tales continue. Doesn’t that indicate that those doing the railing aren’t competent at their stated jobs?

    Railing against the bogus tales isn’t enough. They have to actually do something for once, such as challenging those who push the bogus tales to prove their claims. Use the conceit of those pushing the tales – that they’re real journalists – against them. Do you see any of those who have the megaphone to undercut such tales doing that?

    P.S. To make the fail even worse, watch as Sailer fans smear me for trying to undercut those who push “crops” tales, enabling Sailer and others who only posture but never actually do anything.

    • LOL: 27 year old
  25. @t
    Another old white male democrat bites the dust:

    https://twitter.com/kelleratlarge/status/1037143857824194560

    Replies: @indocon, @Reg Cæsar

    Another old white male democrat bites the dust:

    66 in a white Democrat is a spring chicken.

  26. @t
    Another white male Democrat bites the dust

    https://twitter.com/kelleratlarge/status/1037143857824194560

    Replies: @Lot, @AnotherDad

    Another white male Democrat bites the dust

    Excellent!

    Really having a penis–that hasn’t been clipped, or wasn’t surgically constructed, ought to be disqualifying for the Democrats.

    But a full on PPP? C’mon–that’s unacceptable.

  27. @Whiskey
    @Lot

    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave. Certainly Dems feel every White woman and non White will vote Dem. Pussy hat wearers are endemic at my work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot

    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave.

    Literal tidal waves are uneventful, by definition. You answer them with a tsunami.

  28. @27 year old
    @istevefan

    Grocery prices have gone up

    These increases have been hidden from consumers by shrinking the size of a unit while keeping the price the same

    64 oz cans of juice are now 52 ounce cans of juice. But they're still priced at $1.99 per can

    Someone came up with the incredibly gay term "shrinkflation" to describe this

    No connection to the anti-American "crops rotting in the fields" trope though, this is just typical excel spreadsheet MBA fuckboy behavior.

    Replies: @istevefan

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago when ice cream no longer came in half gallon sizes. Instead of 64 oz. they started selling similar shaped packages that were 56 oz and even smaller.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @istevefan


    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago
     
    thx 4 sharing
    , @The Alarmist
    @istevefan

    You've clearly spent too much time standing in the freezer section if you are experiencing noticeable shrinkage.

    , @Stan Adams
    @istevefan

    Not to apologize for those cheap corporate bastards, but many if not most Americans could stand to lose a little weight.

    Whenever I feel inclined to complain about the high cost of food, I watch some clips from My 600-lb Life:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64yAzs5ywlc

  29. @BenKenobi
    @istevefan

    I'm currently paying $2 for an avocado in Vancouver. Is that a lot?

    Also, my kingdom for a ripe avocado! Damn things are either bright green and rock-hard or mud-coloured mush.

    Replies: @istevefan, @Dan Bagrov

    If you are paying two Canadian dollars that is not bad. That’s about $1.50 US. My local grocer charges about $2 per avocado.

    However, about a year ago I could get a bag of 5 avocados from Sam’s Club for around $5.

  30. • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I know somebody who really liked Paul Giamatti's soliloquy in "Sideways" about why Pinot Noir is good and Merlot is bad, but she couldn't remember which one Giamatti's character, endorsed so she developed a taste for Merlot and has been drinking it happily ever since.

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Dan S
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I was looking to see if someone linked this. Awesome!

  31. The sixties and seventies are an ever more distant country…….

    Started picking when I was 12, generally managed the whole summer rotation of strawberries, cherries, beans, blackberries, apples, damn, school started again. Bought a Sony DD turntable with a $100 diamond stylus, and Yamaha receiver and speakers when I was 14. A $500 system back when gas was 50 cents a gallon. (And got my first car, a 69 Fairlane 500 with a 302 engine and 4 barrel carb for $600. A fair sum in the early ’70’s.) Pretty tough for kids to do that now, although many States still exempt people from child labor laws. And….. lots of little wetback kids are doing the picking,you know, the labor Americans won’t do.

    Bullshit on steroids….. I imagine a whole lot of 14 year olds would kill for the opportunity to get out during the summer and make some money.

    In point of fact, all this labor is being or will be mechanized entirely by 2020 at the latest. Including the picking of grapes. Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later. Mechanical strawberry picking is upon us, and all of the tree fruits have long since been mechanically harvested. So I guess native born 14 year olds will have to go with paper routes, no wait, bagging groceries, no wait, lawn mowing and trimming, no wait……

    How is a 14 year old supposed to make some decent money nowadays? Bad enough that kids aren’t learning work responsibilities, but we compound it with importing the worst the 3rd world has to offer to do that labor?

    And the last time crops rotted in the field I am pretty sure it was in the Soviet Union. I am even more sure the next places will be South Africa and Brazil. In the meantime, well, I don’t want to call the author of the article a flat out liar, but the fact is that anything goes unpicked in California it is due to the ridiculous labor laws there, which practically force farmers there to use illegal labor. Anyway, $30/hour to pick grapes? Are you kidding me, entry level IT work doesn’t pay that much, and I am pretty sure it has a bit more of a learning curve. Are you kidding me, $30/hour for an entry level job with no background needed at all (ok, maybe enough hand\eye coordination to handle the shears) and the work is going begging? BS on steroids.

    BTW, blackberries were a serious $#^# to pick, although I believe they they now have a lot of hybridized thornless varieties. Raspberries were a real pain too. But blackberries were a real #^&*.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later.

    Perhaps the first Harvard Business School Case study I read at UCLA MBA school in 1980-82 was about the Robert Mondavi experiment with mechanizing picking of wine grapes. It was a big success with the vintage winning lots of taste test awards.

    Replies: @Fred Boynton

    , @anon
    @theMann

    Beans are sometimes machine harvested from trellises in Australia, the problem is machine beans only last 2 days in the fridge, versus more than a week for hand picked.
    The hand picking record in Queensland is 682 pounds in a day. The variety was Jade, a string bean not often planted anymore.
    Can any Mexicans match that?

    Replies: @anon

  32. Chamber of Commerce types keep telling us wages are falling because technological improvements reduce the demand for labor. Then they tell us we have a labor shortage. I wonder which one it actually is…

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Wilkey

    Technology increases productivity, which should increase wages on paper. But since the crisis of the 1970s (fiat money, end of Bretton Woods, Oil Shocks, stagflation, immigration, deregulation, deunionization) this has ceased. Most gains appear to go into "shareholder value".


    The labor market has a "shortage" in that there are lots of people that could have some use for coolies paid at a starvation level. Household servants became too expensive after the Downton Abbey era, but the World's Most Important Graph could allow many more people to have the kind of lifestyle an evil South African businessman of the 1970s had. But nationalists want to prevent joyful neoliberals like Noah Smith from spreading the benefits of diversity, and want to ensure that the average worker doesn't get regressed to eating Tyler Cowen chalupas.


    The more serious version of this is "labor market monopsony", where low wage employers would like to get more employees, but can't raise wages because that means everyone's wage must increase. It's an implicit demand for price discrimination, or failing that a demand for unlimited sums of both immigration and gov't funded higher education.

  33. @theMann
    The sixties and seventies are an ever more distant country.......


    Started picking when I was 12, generally managed the whole summer rotation of strawberries, cherries, beans, blackberries, apples, damn, school started again. Bought a Sony DD turntable with a $100 diamond stylus, and Yamaha receiver and speakers when I was 14. A $500 system back when gas was 50 cents a gallon. (And got my first car, a 69 Fairlane 500 with a 302 engine and 4 barrel carb for $600. A fair sum in the early '70's.) Pretty tough for kids to do that now, although many States still exempt people from child labor laws. And..... lots of little wetback kids are doing the picking,you know, the labor Americans won't do.

    Bullshit on steroids..... I imagine a whole lot of 14 year olds would kill for the opportunity to get out during the summer and make some money.

    In point of fact, all this labor is being or will be mechanized entirely by 2020 at the latest. Including the picking of grapes. Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later. Mechanical strawberry picking is upon us, and all of the tree fruits have long since been mechanically harvested. So I guess native born 14 year olds will have to go with paper routes, no wait, bagging groceries, no wait, lawn mowing and trimming, no wait......


    How is a 14 year old supposed to make some decent money nowadays? Bad enough that kids aren't learning work responsibilities, but we compound it with importing the worst the 3rd world has to offer to do that labor?

    And the last time crops rotted in the field I am pretty sure it was in the Soviet Union. I am even more sure the next places will be South Africa and Brazil. In the meantime, well, I don't want to call the author of the article a flat out liar, but the fact is that anything goes unpicked in California it is due to the ridiculous labor laws there, which practically force farmers there to use illegal labor. Anyway, $30/hour to pick grapes? Are you kidding me, entry level IT work doesn't pay that much, and I am pretty sure it has a bit more of a learning curve. Are you kidding me, $30/hour for an entry level job with no background needed at all (ok, maybe enough hand\eye coordination to handle the shears) and the work is going begging? BS on steroids.

    BTW, blackberries were a serious $#^# to pick, although I believe they they now have a lot of hybridized thornless varieties. Raspberries were a real pain too. But blackberries were a real #^&*.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon

    Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later.

    Perhaps the first Harvard Business School Case study I read at UCLA MBA school in 1980-82 was about the Robert Mondavi experiment with mechanizing picking of wine grapes. It was a big success with the vintage winning lots of taste test awards.

    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
    @Steve Sailer

    I look forward to the scandals that will break out when wineries brag about handpicking their grapes and being able to charge more for handpicked and other wineries call them out for using mechanized pickers.

    On a more serious note, I was under the impression that bunches of grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines, i.e. you can't just go along and pick all the grape bunches at the same time, some can be picked and others need to be left to ripen. Does anyone know if that's true or not?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

  34. @BenKenobi
    @istevefan

    I'm currently paying $2 for an avocado in Vancouver. Is that a lot?

    Also, my kingdom for a ripe avocado! Damn things are either bright green and rock-hard or mud-coloured mush.

    Replies: @istevefan, @Dan Bagrov

    Indeed on all points. $2 is rather pricey, more like $1 or $1.5 in NM. I too have horrible luck. If I ripen them at home they get all nasty. What I do is wait for a Mexican to rummage through the pile at the store and then go over and try to mimick them, pick ones that looked like ones the Mexican took.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Dan Bagrov

    'What I do is wait for a Mexican to rummage through the pile at the store and then go over and try to mimick them, pick ones that looked like ones the Mexican took.'

    I'm reluctant to ask -- but what's the procedure with watermelons?

  35. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Lars Porsena

    Stoop farm labor is an extremely bad job, so it's not exactly a surprise that when Mexico sends they're people, they're not sending their best. Emmanuel Lubezki didn't come to America to pick strawberries and then got into cinematography; he was a wealthy TV commercial cinematographer in Mexico City before he started lensing Hollywood features.

    It's kind of like if the NFL paid only $11.50 per hour to special teams players and they were constantly running out of guys to break up the wedge on kickoffs because nobody can last for more than a few seasons on the job, so the NFL owners demanded that Congress import lots more extremely poor and extremely violent foreigners to break up the wedge for a few seasons for $11.50 per hour.

    Picking grapes is less stoop labor than picking strawberries, fortunately. Strawberries are just the worst crop for our society. Trump should negotiate a deal with Mexico that Mexico can have all the strawberry farms south of the border and they can ship us strawberries duty free.

    Replies: @Anon, @NickG

    Immigrant builds robot to take jobs from immigrants

    https://newatlas.com/brexit-robotic-strawberry-pickers/56106/

    Britain is facing a strawberry labor shortage that only threatens to get worse as Brexit approaches, so roboticists at the University of Essex are working in conjunction with jam makers Wilkin & Sons of Tiptree to develop robots to take up the slack. Led by Vishuu Mohan, from the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, the team’s goal is to build a robot that can work in field conditions alongside human pickers.

  36. @Buzz Mohawk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXXDC5FarhE

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dan S

    I know somebody who really liked Paul Giamatti’s soliloquy in “Sideways” about why Pinot Noir is good and Merlot is bad, but she couldn’t remember which one Giamatti’s character, endorsed so she developed a taste for Merlot and has been drinking it happily ever since.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    People who continue to pretend that MSM entertainment/propaganda isn't influential need to look at what happened to merlot sales after that stupid movie came out.

    Sheep.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  37. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    Chamber of Commerce types keep telling us wages are falling because technological improvements reduce the demand for labor. Then they tell us we have a labor shortage. I wonder which one it actually is...

    Replies: @Anon

    Technology increases productivity, which should increase wages on paper. But since the crisis of the 1970s (fiat money, end of Bretton Woods, Oil Shocks, stagflation, immigration, deregulation, deunionization) this has ceased. Most gains appear to go into “shareholder value”.

    The labor market has a “shortage” in that there are lots of people that could have some use for coolies paid at a starvation level. Household servants became too expensive after the Downton Abbey era, but the World’s Most Important Graph could allow many more people to have the kind of lifestyle an evil South African businessman of the 1970s had. But nationalists want to prevent joyful neoliberals like Noah Smith from spreading the benefits of diversity, and want to ensure that the average worker doesn’t get regressed to eating Tyler Cowen chalupas.

    The more serious version of this is “labor market monopsony”, where low wage employers would like to get more employees, but can’t raise wages because that means everyone’s wage must increase. It’s an implicit demand for price discrimination, or failing that a demand for unlimited sums of both immigration and gov’t funded higher education.

  38. @Dan Bagrov
    @BenKenobi

    Indeed on all points. $2 is rather pricey, more like $1 or $1.5 in NM. I too have horrible luck. If I ripen them at home they get all nasty. What I do is wait for a Mexican to rummage through the pile at the store and then go over and try to mimick them, pick ones that looked like ones the Mexican took.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘What I do is wait for a Mexican to rummage through the pile at the store and then go over and try to mimick them, pick ones that looked like ones the Mexican took.’

    I’m reluctant to ask — but what’s the procedure with watermelons?

  39. I think that $30 US an hour claim is BS. That’s a lot of money for unskilled seasonal labour in a country where there isn’t even an official minimum wage. Probably what they mean is a few freakishly fast pickers are making $30 an hour on piece rate, while most are making much less. I can’t imagine a farmer paying that kind of money to all their seasonal workers.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @unpc downunder

    Agreed. Here's website for jobs:

    https://www.indeed.com/q-Harvest-l-California-jobs.html

    Notice that many harvesting jobs are wanted for the cannabis industry. I suspect many of the former fruit pickers have gone into the pot jobs which are paying more, both legally and illegally grown.

    https://www.indeed.com/q-Cannabis-l-California-jobs.html#

    I have a relative working in Lake County right now on a pot farm. She's doing it because she loves to be stoned all the time, but plenty of the other workers are doing it for the $.

  40. a Martian anthropologist who only read the MSM would be forced to conclude that France never produced wine and Canada’s yards were never landscaped.

    After all, it’s impossible to achieve that level of civilization without Mayan/Aztec slave labor.

  41. Crops fermenting in the fields! Seriously …

    To make the jobs more attractive to both locals and seasonal workers who are being wooed by construction companies, which can offer year-round pay, vineyards are increasing their wages during harvest to as much as $30 per hour. (Pay rates for the rest of the year have gone up as well.)

    Wait a minute: do you mean to tell us that restricting immigration actually does raise wages? Was César Chávez right after all? In that case we should try restricting immigration on a bigger scale, so that it will have an impact on wages in other sectors as well.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Digital Samizdat

    I think the immigration restriction law of 1924 ultimately led to the growth of the broad middle class, which is being eviscerated post 1965,

    Replies: @Anonymous

  42. @Whiskey
    @Lot

    Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal wave. Certainly Dems feel every White woman and non White will vote Dem. Pussy hat wearers are endemic at my work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Lot

    “Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal”

    Last I checked the generic ballot polls were 11, 11, 13, 14. So it would be a blue wave if the election were today. The roll the Dems are on in open GOP Wisconsin leg seats looks very bad too.

    On the bright side, all those Republican Congressmen going down in CA and the NE will doom open borders Kevin McCarthy from leading the House GOP as Ryan and the Kochs wish.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Lot


    The roll the Dems are on in open GOP Wisconsin leg seats looks very bad too.
     
    It might look bad, but a little closer analysis would show that it's mostly candidate driven. There were three seats that were up--2 senate seats and one assembly.

    The two Senate seats were lost in Republican lean areas. One of those was due to an awful candidate. The other (back in January) could be chalked up to the "blue wave," although it was won by a rural, moderate female democrat.

    In contrast, the Assembly seat was this summer and in a stone cold 50/50 seat just outside of liberal Madison. The Republican candidate won easily.

    The lesson for the fall should be: candidates matter. Not only that, but districts matter. Trump Republicans won't fare well in suburban areas due to the "nice white ladies." Paul Ryan/Open border Republicans won't due well in the "new" Trump Republican areas. The Dems will get there normal swing the power out of party gets in an off year, 1st presidential term election. That's it.
  43. @Anonymous IV
    Oh my God! Open the borders!!!

    Replies: @anonymous

    Can’t rape the willing

  44. @istevefan
    @27 year old

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago when ice cream no longer came in half gallon sizes. Instead of 64 oz. they started selling similar shaped packages that were 56 oz and even smaller.

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Alarmist, @Stan Adams

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago

    thx 4 sharing

  45. @Steve Sailer
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I know somebody who really liked Paul Giamatti's soliloquy in "Sideways" about why Pinot Noir is good and Merlot is bad, but she couldn't remember which one Giamatti's character, endorsed so she developed a taste for Merlot and has been drinking it happily ever since.

    Replies: @anonymous

    People who continue to pretend that MSM entertainment/propaganda isn’t influential need to look at what happened to merlot sales after that stupid movie came out.

    Sheep.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    What happened to merlot sales?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  46. anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @theMann
    The sixties and seventies are an ever more distant country.......


    Started picking when I was 12, generally managed the whole summer rotation of strawberries, cherries, beans, blackberries, apples, damn, school started again. Bought a Sony DD turntable with a $100 diamond stylus, and Yamaha receiver and speakers when I was 14. A $500 system back when gas was 50 cents a gallon. (And got my first car, a 69 Fairlane 500 with a 302 engine and 4 barrel carb for $600. A fair sum in the early '70's.) Pretty tough for kids to do that now, although many States still exempt people from child labor laws. And..... lots of little wetback kids are doing the picking,you know, the labor Americans won't do.

    Bullshit on steroids..... I imagine a whole lot of 14 year olds would kill for the opportunity to get out during the summer and make some money.

    In point of fact, all this labor is being or will be mechanized entirely by 2020 at the latest. Including the picking of grapes. Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later. Mechanical strawberry picking is upon us, and all of the tree fruits have long since been mechanically harvested. So I guess native born 14 year olds will have to go with paper routes, no wait, bagging groceries, no wait, lawn mowing and trimming, no wait......


    How is a 14 year old supposed to make some decent money nowadays? Bad enough that kids aren't learning work responsibilities, but we compound it with importing the worst the 3rd world has to offer to do that labor?

    And the last time crops rotted in the field I am pretty sure it was in the Soviet Union. I am even more sure the next places will be South Africa and Brazil. In the meantime, well, I don't want to call the author of the article a flat out liar, but the fact is that anything goes unpicked in California it is due to the ridiculous labor laws there, which practically force farmers there to use illegal labor. Anyway, $30/hour to pick grapes? Are you kidding me, entry level IT work doesn't pay that much, and I am pretty sure it has a bit more of a learning curve. Are you kidding me, $30/hour for an entry level job with no background needed at all (ok, maybe enough hand\eye coordination to handle the shears) and the work is going begging? BS on steroids.

    BTW, blackberries were a serious $#^# to pick, although I believe they they now have a lot of hybridized thornless varieties. Raspberries were a real pain too. But blackberries were a real #^&*.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon

    Beans are sometimes machine harvested from trellises in Australia, the problem is machine beans only last 2 days in the fridge, versus more than a week for hand picked.
    The hand picking record in Queensland is 682 pounds in a day. The variety was Jade, a string bean not often planted anymore.
    Can any Mexicans match that?

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon


    The hand picking record in Queensland is 682 pounds in a day.
     
    Correction: 682 Kilograms. [1500 pounds].
    That's a lotta beans.
  47. @Anon
    We'll know its a real shortage when Steve is impressed into a work gang.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    At a meeting at work, it was announced there would be extra pay if you recruited someone. I asked if pressganging was allowed. No one knew what it was.

    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
    @Redneck farmer

    "You know, to shanghai someone? How can you not know this?"

  48. @anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    People who continue to pretend that MSM entertainment/propaganda isn't influential need to look at what happened to merlot sales after that stupid movie came out.

    Sheep.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    What happened to merlot sales?

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.decanter.com/wine-news/sideways-effect-confirmed-76585/

    Pinot Noir is the filet mignon of wines - incredibly overrated.

    That said, South American malbecs are the real stars of the red wine scene these days.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  49. @Redneck farmer
    @Anon

    At a meeting at work, it was announced there would be extra pay if you recruited someone. I asked if pressganging was allowed. No one knew what it was.

    Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager

    “You know, to shanghai someone? How can you not know this?”

  50. “Varietals” sounds hella gay.

  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXXDC5FarhE

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dan S

    I was looking to see if someone linked this. Awesome!

  52. @Lot
    @Whiskey

    "Instapundit has a link predicting a blue tidal"

    Last I checked the generic ballot polls were 11, 11, 13, 14. So it would be a blue wave if the election were today. The roll the Dems are on in open GOP Wisconsin leg seats looks very bad too.

    On the bright side, all those Republican Congressmen going down in CA and the NE will doom open borders Kevin McCarthy from leading the House GOP as Ryan and the Kochs wish.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    The roll the Dems are on in open GOP Wisconsin leg seats looks very bad too.

    It might look bad, but a little closer analysis would show that it’s mostly candidate driven. There were three seats that were up–2 senate seats and one assembly.

    The two Senate seats were lost in Republican lean areas. One of those was due to an awful candidate. The other (back in January) could be chalked up to the “blue wave,” although it was won by a rural, moderate female democrat.

    In contrast, the Assembly seat was this summer and in a stone cold 50/50 seat just outside of liberal Madison. The Republican candidate won easily.

    The lesson for the fall should be: candidates matter. Not only that, but districts matter. Trump Republicans won’t fare well in suburban areas due to the “nice white ladies.” Paul Ryan/Open border Republicans won’t due well in the “new” Trump Republican areas. The Dems will get there normal swing the power out of party gets in an off year, 1st presidential term election. That’s it.

  53. So tell them they can get some great, higher-valued dessert wine out of it.

  54. @istevefan
    @27 year old

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago when ice cream no longer came in half gallon sizes. Instead of 64 oz. they started selling similar shaped packages that were 56 oz and even smaller.

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Alarmist, @Stan Adams

    You’ve clearly spent too much time standing in the freezer section if you are experiencing noticeable shrinkage.

  55. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymous

    What happened to merlot sales?

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    https://www.decanter.com/wine-news/sideways-effect-confirmed-76585/

    Pinot Noir is the filet mignon of wines – incredibly overrated.

    That said, South American malbecs are the real stars of the red wine scene these days.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/[email protected]@._V1_UY268_CR4,0,182,268_AL_.jpg

  56. @Digital Samizdat
    Crops fermenting in the fields! Seriously ...

    To make the jobs more attractive to both locals and seasonal workers who are being wooed by construction companies, which can offer year-round pay, vineyards are increasing their wages during harvest to as much as $30 per hour. (Pay rates for the rest of the year have gone up as well.)
     
    Wait a minute: do you mean to tell us that restricting immigration actually does raise wages? Was César Chávez right after all? In that case we should try restricting immigration on a bigger scale, so that it will have an impact on wages in other sectors as well.

    Replies: @Flip

    I think the immigration restriction law of 1924 ultimately led to the growth of the broad middle class, which is being eviscerated post 1965,

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Flip

    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That's all gone.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Reg Cæsar

  57. @unpc downunder
    I think that $30 US an hour claim is BS. That's a lot of money for unskilled seasonal labour in a country where there isn't even an official minimum wage. Probably what they mean is a few freakishly fast pickers are making $30 an hour on piece rate, while most are making much less. I can't imagine a farmer paying that kind of money to all their seasonal workers.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    Agreed. Here’s website for jobs:

    https://www.indeed.com/q-Harvest-l-California-jobs.html

    Notice that many harvesting jobs are wanted for the cannabis industry. I suspect many of the former fruit pickers have gone into the pot jobs which are paying more, both legally and illegally grown.

    https://www.indeed.com/q-Cannabis-l-California-jobs.html#

    I have a relative working in Lake County right now on a pot farm. She’s doing it because she loves to be stoned all the time, but plenty of the other workers are doing it for the $.

  58. “What happened to merlot sales?”

    https://www.winesandvines.com/features/article/61265/The-Sideways-Effect

    Lower sales than Pinot Noir. It wasn’t as big a difference, but it happened.

  59. As the great Paul Giammatti says in Sideways, “No F#$&@* Merlot!”

  60. @Steve Sailer
    @Lars Porsena

    Stoop farm labor is an extremely bad job, so it's not exactly a surprise that when Mexico sends they're people, they're not sending their best. Emmanuel Lubezki didn't come to America to pick strawberries and then got into cinematography; he was a wealthy TV commercial cinematographer in Mexico City before he started lensing Hollywood features.

    It's kind of like if the NFL paid only $11.50 per hour to special teams players and they were constantly running out of guys to break up the wedge on kickoffs because nobody can last for more than a few seasons on the job, so the NFL owners demanded that Congress import lots more extremely poor and extremely violent foreigners to break up the wedge for a few seasons for $11.50 per hour.

    Picking grapes is less stoop labor than picking strawberries, fortunately. Strawberries are just the worst crop for our society. Trump should negotiate a deal with Mexico that Mexico can have all the strawberry farms south of the border and they can ship us strawberries duty free.

    Replies: @Anon, @NickG

    I pick strawberries for fun and home consumption at a pick your own place 3 or 4 times every summer in the UK. They are grown on waist high trestles – which makes them easy to pick – from grow bags under a plastic sheeting greenhouse roof and are irrigated by a micro irrigation system. The strawberries are wonderful.

    Gone are the days of doing it on your hands and knees, which was awful.

    To do it commercially it’s best to get machines up to snuff.

  61. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.decanter.com/wine-news/sideways-effect-confirmed-76585/

    Pinot Noir is the filet mignon of wines - incredibly overrated.

    That said, South American malbecs are the real stars of the red wine scene these days.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  62. @anon
    @istevefan

    Grain is massively overproduced globally and corn/wheat is $5 bushel. Paying $30 hour for labor sounds like a shortage and exactly what should be done. Mechanize it or pay up for hand labor. They could get the legal H2As if it is that urgent. $30 hour (3x minimum wage) is what construction used to pay and reasonable for difficult outdoor labor before open borders.

    Replies: @Fred Boynton, @Anon87

    The two main reasons grains (corn, wheat and soybeans) are overproduced in U.S, and globally are that grains are easy to harvest and grains are easy to store/preserve. Grains are easy to harvest and store because the end product in all these cases becomes hard when it is ripe. The kernel of corn, the kernel of wheat and the soybean all become hard when they are ripe and that makes mechanized harvest relatively easy (no need to worry about bruising or damaging your end product). It also makes storing and preserving your end product much easier as well (as long as you keep the grain dry it will preserve much longer than any fruits or vegetables will even when f and v are frozen).

    One more thing about grains: when grains ripen they usually all ripen at the same time (field by field depending on when planted and weather during growing season) and do not need to be harvested immediately when ripened. This is not true of fruits and vegetables, which is another reason for popularity of growing grains.

    Farm subsidies originally came about to help farmers pay for this mechanized equipment. Since the mechanized equipment was being paid for it made sense to use it and grow grains exclusively in much of the country/world. This led to the massive overproduction you see in the U.S. and globally which meant that not only the equipment needed to be subsidized but the grain itself needed to be subsidized with both direct and indirect payments to farmers. Since food conglomerates like General Mills, Cargill, Hormel, and generic meat and dairy producers, etc. like cheap grains, they lobby for the subsidies to go to grain farmers.

    This is just a little rundown about why grains are so popular with farmers and why if mechanized harvest equipment does come to at least some fruits and vegetables, the taxpayers will end up subsidizing it. Just to note, if it comes down to immigrants or mechanized equipment, I am firmly with equipment even though I will be unwillingly subsidizing that equipment and the equipment will likely make some f and v over-produced and some under-produced.

  63. @Flip
    @Digital Samizdat

    I think the immigration restriction law of 1924 ultimately led to the growth of the broad middle class, which is being eviscerated post 1965,

    Replies: @Anonymous

    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That’s all gone.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Anonymous

    Fake Left doing work.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That’s all gone.
     
    Because the Chinese don't strike.
  64. @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Right now a lot of wineries still want to pick traditionally, but it is or will be so much cheaper to use machines that it will happen sooner or later.

    Perhaps the first Harvard Business School Case study I read at UCLA MBA school in 1980-82 was about the Robert Mondavi experiment with mechanizing picking of wine grapes. It was a big success with the vintage winning lots of taste test awards.

    Replies: @Fred Boynton

    I look forward to the scandals that will break out when wineries brag about handpicking their grapes and being able to charge more for handpicked and other wineries call them out for using mechanized pickers.

    On a more serious note, I was under the impression that bunches of grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines, i.e. you can’t just go along and pick all the grape bunches at the same time, some can be picked and others need to be left to ripen. Does anyone know if that’s true or not?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Fred Boynton


    grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines
     
    Really the only difference is sugar content, so all you have to do to machine-harvested grapes is add the appropriate amount of high fructose corn syrup, and everything's fine.
    , @anon
    @Fred Boynton

    It is with table grapes, the picker will return a few times, and the final pick will be the big money pick.
    Tomatoes are similar, and machine beans get smashed around by the machine, that's why they don't keep very long.

  65. @Fred Boynton
    @Steve Sailer

    I look forward to the scandals that will break out when wineries brag about handpicking their grapes and being able to charge more for handpicked and other wineries call them out for using mechanized pickers.

    On a more serious note, I was under the impression that bunches of grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines, i.e. you can't just go along and pick all the grape bunches at the same time, some can be picked and others need to be left to ripen. Does anyone know if that's true or not?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

    grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines

    Really the only difference is sugar content, so all you have to do to machine-harvested grapes is add the appropriate amount of high fructose corn syrup, and everything’s fine.

  66. @istevefan
    @27 year old

    I first noticed shrinkage about 15 years ago when ice cream no longer came in half gallon sizes. Instead of 64 oz. they started selling similar shaped packages that were 56 oz and even smaller.

    Replies: @anonymous, @The Alarmist, @Stan Adams

    Not to apologize for those cheap corporate bastards, but many if not most Americans could stand to lose a little weight.

    Whenever I feel inclined to complain about the high cost of food, I watch some clips from My 600-lb Life:

  67. @Anonymous
    @Flip

    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That's all gone.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Reg Cæsar

    Fake Left doing work.

  68. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    Manufactured consent for Trudeau’s push to double immigration levels.

    http://www.thetelegram.com/business/labour-shortage-is-the-new-norm-that-will-last-a-decade-bdc-economist-says-238730/

    TORONTO — Canada’s small and mid-sized companies must find ways to adapt to a “new norm” of worker shortages that will likely persist for a decade, says Pierre Cleroux, chief economist for the Business Development Bank of Canada.
    “They represent about 50 per cent of the Canadian economy. So they are very important. Also, they are very important in smaller communities,” Cleroux said in an interview ahead of a report issued Wednesday by the federal Crown corporation.

    One never hears an economist say “allow responsible middle class families to afford more children” as a solution to labor shortages.

  69. @Anonymous
    @Flip

    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That's all gone.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Reg Cæsar

    You never hear about labor disputes anymore. Reading old newspapers from the 60s and 70s you see lots of stories about strikes and industrial unrest. That’s all gone.

    Because the Chinese don’t strike.

  70. @anon
    @istevefan

    Grain is massively overproduced globally and corn/wheat is $5 bushel. Paying $30 hour for labor sounds like a shortage and exactly what should be done. Mechanize it or pay up for hand labor. They could get the legal H2As if it is that urgent. $30 hour (3x minimum wage) is what construction used to pay and reasonable for difficult outdoor labor before open borders.

    Replies: @Fred Boynton, @Anon87

    What I want to know is what is the hourly wage of the guys building the mechanized farm equipment? How soon before we hear the complaints about “bolts rusting on the assembly line” and we need immigrant labor?

  71. “To make the jobs more attractive to both locals and seasonal workers who are being wooed by construction companies, which can offer year-round pay. . . .”

    Are you really a “seasonal worker” if you’re getting “year-round pay”?

  72. How about imbibing Chilean wine? That way these guys can support legally employed Latin American workers in their home country.

  73. @anon
    @theMann

    Beans are sometimes machine harvested from trellises in Australia, the problem is machine beans only last 2 days in the fridge, versus more than a week for hand picked.
    The hand picking record in Queensland is 682 pounds in a day. The variety was Jade, a string bean not often planted anymore.
    Can any Mexicans match that?

    Replies: @anon

    The hand picking record in Queensland is 682 pounds in a day.

    Correction: 682 Kilograms. [1500 pounds].
    That’s a lotta beans.

  74. @Fred Boynton
    @Steve Sailer

    I look forward to the scandals that will break out when wineries brag about handpicking their grapes and being able to charge more for handpicked and other wineries call them out for using mechanized pickers.

    On a more serious note, I was under the impression that bunches of grapes or at least wine grapes tended to ripen at different rates even on the same vines, i.e. you can't just go along and pick all the grape bunches at the same time, some can be picked and others need to be left to ripen. Does anyone know if that's true or not?

    Replies: @Anon, @anon

    It is with table grapes, the picker will return a few times, and the final pick will be the big money pick.
    Tomatoes are similar, and machine beans get smashed around by the machine, that’s why they don’t keep very long.

  75. There is, of course, no mention of the millions of small farms put out of business over the course of the last 70 years, nor of the devastation of the small towns they lived around. Agri-businesses with immigrant stoop labor are so much more efficient than small farms.

    It is no coincidence that Eisenhower’s “operation wetback” can no longer be contemplated.

    We have become one vast interconnected system, more fragile than most people comprehend, fed by expanding credit.

    The day will come when TPTB face the fact that millions of unproductive people are a drag on the system that has evolved. That day will arrive not too many years after they face the fact that credit cannot expand forever.

    A system under stress reacts in a direction to relieve the stress. Prepare accordingly.

  76. Want a business? Run it yourself or pay a fair wage and offer similar benefits to what you give yourself.

  77. You’re stupid. Farmers all across the country suffer, and crops rot in the field, and food prices go up, because Central American farm workers are not left in.

    A tomato farmer around here way way away from the Mexican border, has tomatoes rotting. “How much do you pay?” they asked him. “$16 an hour.” “Can’t you get Americans to do it?” “No,” he said. “They are too weak.” “You mean they don’t want to,” said the interviewer, mouthing the usual lying meme. “No. I mean they are too weak. I have tried to use Americans. Again and again. I bus them out, give them a good breakfast. None lasts more than 4 hours. I have never had an American who can pick tomatoes for a whole day. They are too weak. Picking tomatoes is very hard.”

    Grow up, ignoramuses.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @obwandiyag

    The benefit is cheap labor and lower prices. The cost is a permanent brown underclass that uses more government benefits and is far less productive than native Whites. Going off government data, the average Mexican ("American") costs the US govt approximately $7,000 because they earn far less and use more benefits (compare to the average White +$2K and the average Black -$10K). It's not really cheap labor; it's subsidized labor. We don't pay the real cost of the tomato, which includes all the benefits (welfare, education) provided to immigrants. Never mind loss of social capital and other intangible costs.

    While the first generation generally works hard and has lower crime rates, subsequent generations - four generations and counting - achieve less and make the US worse off by nearly every objective criteria. They essentially reverse assimilate.

    They're far different from the European wave of immigrants that arrived at the turn of the century. Those immigrants were sent home if they didn't make it (often as much as 50% of certain demographic subsets). Those that stayed reached economic parity in a single generation.

    Meanwhile, the most common working class occupation - driver - is about to be replaced. Driverless cars are already up and running. Our own working class is on disability and opioids. We don't need anymore low-skilled, 93 IQ workers.

    Immigration, like any public policy, is a cost-benefit analysis. Praising cheap produce is like France praising their World Cup win. Was it worth it?

    I'm just old enough to remember when our country was roughly 85% White, 5% miscellaneous other, and 10% Black. Now we've added a 20%+ Brown underclass. They score abysmally on every standardized test (SAT, PISA, you name it) and after the first generation have far higher rates of government dependency. Because if having a Black underclass wasn't problematic enough, now we have an even larger Black AND Brown underclass. Oh, but we get cheap produce and Summer Olympic gold medals in return. Is it worth it? Are you stupid?

    What would happen if all the Mexicans disappeared? Whites can and will pick tomatoes, but to get the level of native-born worker that will last 8 to 10-hour days would be very expensive. At least $25 an hour. You'd need to invest more in automation, etc. (I would pick tomatoes for 10-hour days myself, but the cost of my labor in the free market is even higher still).

    If you look at White America in isolation - wealth production, crime rates, PISA scores etc. - it looks like Northern Europe before the migrant crisis. Would I rather live in a country like that, without a Brown and Black underclass and all of their problems, and in return have to pay a significantly greater amount for all of my food and suck at the Summer Olympics? Hell yeah.

    , @obwandiyag
    @obwandiyag

    Notice how the response is damned lies. I mean, "statistics." Total nonsense. I give true facts from real life and he gives lies and statistics.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @obwandiyag

  78. @obwandiyag
    You're stupid. Farmers all across the country suffer, and crops rot in the field, and food prices go up, because Central American farm workers are not left in.

    A tomato farmer around here way way away from the Mexican border, has tomatoes rotting. "How much do you pay?" they asked him. "$16 an hour." "Can't you get Americans to do it?" "No," he said. "They are too weak." "You mean they don't want to," said the interviewer, mouthing the usual lying meme. "No. I mean they are too weak. I have tried to use Americans. Again and again. I bus them out, give them a good breakfast. None lasts more than 4 hours. I have never had an American who can pick tomatoes for a whole day. They are too weak. Picking tomatoes is very hard."

    Grow up, ignoramuses.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @obwandiyag

    The benefit is cheap labor and lower prices. The cost is a permanent brown underclass that uses more government benefits and is far less productive than native Whites. Going off government data, the average Mexican (“American”) costs the US govt approximately $7,000 because they earn far less and use more benefits (compare to the average White +$2K and the average Black -$10K). It’s not really cheap labor; it’s subsidized labor. We don’t pay the real cost of the tomato, which includes all the benefits (welfare, education) provided to immigrants. Never mind loss of social capital and other intangible costs.

    While the first generation generally works hard and has lower crime rates, subsequent generations – four generations and counting – achieve less and make the US worse off by nearly every objective criteria. They essentially reverse assimilate.

    They’re far different from the European wave of immigrants that arrived at the turn of the century. Those immigrants were sent home if they didn’t make it (often as much as 50% of certain demographic subsets). Those that stayed reached economic parity in a single generation.

    Meanwhile, the most common working class occupation – driver – is about to be replaced. Driverless cars are already up and running. Our own working class is on disability and opioids. We don’t need anymore low-skilled, 93 IQ workers.

    Immigration, like any public policy, is a cost-benefit analysis. Praising cheap produce is like France praising their World Cup win. Was it worth it?

    I’m just old enough to remember when our country was roughly 85% White, 5% miscellaneous other, and 10% Black. Now we’ve added a 20%+ Brown underclass. They score abysmally on every standardized test (SAT, PISA, you name it) and after the first generation have far higher rates of government dependency. Because if having a Black underclass wasn’t problematic enough, now we have an even larger Black AND Brown underclass. Oh, but we get cheap produce and Summer Olympic gold medals in return. Is it worth it? Are you stupid?

    What would happen if all the Mexicans disappeared? Whites can and will pick tomatoes, but to get the level of native-born worker that will last 8 to 10-hour days would be very expensive. At least $25 an hour. You’d need to invest more in automation, etc. (I would pick tomatoes for 10-hour days myself, but the cost of my labor in the free market is even higher still).

    If you look at White America in isolation – wealth production, crime rates, PISA scores etc. – it looks like Northern Europe before the migrant crisis. Would I rather live in a country like that, without a Brown and Black underclass and all of their problems, and in return have to pay a significantly greater amount for all of my food and suck at the Summer Olympics? Hell yeah.

  79. @obwandiyag
    You're stupid. Farmers all across the country suffer, and crops rot in the field, and food prices go up, because Central American farm workers are not left in.

    A tomato farmer around here way way away from the Mexican border, has tomatoes rotting. "How much do you pay?" they asked him. "$16 an hour." "Can't you get Americans to do it?" "No," he said. "They are too weak." "You mean they don't want to," said the interviewer, mouthing the usual lying meme. "No. I mean they are too weak. I have tried to use Americans. Again and again. I bus them out, give them a good breakfast. None lasts more than 4 hours. I have never had an American who can pick tomatoes for a whole day. They are too weak. Picking tomatoes is very hard."

    Grow up, ignoramuses.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @obwandiyag

    Notice how the response is damned lies. I mean, “statistics.” Total nonsense. I give true facts from real life and he gives lies and statistics.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @obwandiyag

    True facts from real life? The average Mestizo struggles academically. I grew up attending racially diverse schools in a large American city. I have several family members that are teachers, and I've discussed this with them at length. Everywhere you go, throughout this country's 13,000+ school districts you see the same results: Mestizos underperform, Blacks are abysmal (and violent), and NE Asians excel. Go look up the racial breakdowns of any standardized test you want. Throw a dart at a map and see how these three racial groups are doing in the local school system.

    Is it racism? Brown East Indians are a shade darker than Mexicans and are currently the highest performing group academically. (This has to do with selection: Mexico is dumping its Indio underclass on us, while our E. Indian immigrants tend to come from the top 2% or so).

    Any healthy person - given proper motivation - can dig a ditch or install drywall. But not everyone can do the intellectual heavy lifting needed to build and maintain a first-world economy.

    Mexico has cheap tomatoes. I beat they have cheaper tomatoes than Northern Europe. Where would you rather live. Of course, Northern Europe is also going down the drain thanks to its own migrant crisis. At least our Mexicans don't blow things up (yet).

    , @obwandiyag
    @obwandiyag

    Now the genius changes the subject. Typical.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

  80. @obwandiyag
    @obwandiyag

    Notice how the response is damned lies. I mean, "statistics." Total nonsense. I give true facts from real life and he gives lies and statistics.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @obwandiyag

    True facts from real life? The average Mestizo struggles academically. I grew up attending racially diverse schools in a large American city. I have several family members that are teachers, and I’ve discussed this with them at length. Everywhere you go, throughout this country’s 13,000+ school districts you see the same results: Mestizos underperform, Blacks are abysmal (and violent), and NE Asians excel. Go look up the racial breakdowns of any standardized test you want. Throw a dart at a map and see how these three racial groups are doing in the local school system.

    Is it racism? Brown East Indians are a shade darker than Mexicans and are currently the highest performing group academically. (This has to do with selection: Mexico is dumping its Indio underclass on us, while our E. Indian immigrants tend to come from the top 2% or so).

    Any healthy person – given proper motivation – can dig a ditch or install drywall. But not everyone can do the intellectual heavy lifting needed to build and maintain a first-world economy.

    Mexico has cheap tomatoes. I beat they have cheaper tomatoes than Northern Europe. Where would you rather live. Of course, Northern Europe is also going down the drain thanks to its own migrant crisis. At least our Mexicans don’t blow things up (yet).

  81. @obwandiyag
    @obwandiyag

    Notice how the response is damned lies. I mean, "statistics." Total nonsense. I give true facts from real life and he gives lies and statistics.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @obwandiyag

    Now the genius changes the subject. Typical.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @obwandiyag

    How? We can talk about Mestizo dysfunction generally or specifically. So just let me know what particular aspect of their dysfunction you would like to discuss, and use the "REPLY" feature.

  82. @obwandiyag
    @obwandiyag

    Now the genius changes the subject. Typical.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    How? We can talk about Mestizo dysfunction generally or specifically. So just let me know what particular aspect of their dysfunction you would like to discuss, and use the “REPLY” feature.

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