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  1. neutral says:

    America is run by foreigners, that is not my opinion this is an absolute fact easily verified.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  2. just waiting for the next step up the escalatory ladder.

    right now (12:49 AM PST) it’s mid-day in Iran, and it’ll take the Pentagram a few hours to coordinate the preliminary electronic attack (EMP burst to knock out Iranian command/control) with naval ops and airstrikes. And these things usually are done at night: cf. Iraq War II “Shock and Awe”. Once all Iranian anti-missile and anti-aircraft capability have been thus destroyed, the attacks will be around the clock, against all military, governmental, and economic targets. “Collateral damage” will not be an issue. Objective: total destruction of Iran as a functional nation.

    when you look at it from the Zionist viewpoint, it’s actually quite brilliant:

    the ZOG got its War of Choice…by killing the opposition’s best military leader

    with the first shot.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  3. LondonBob says:

    I remember Jesse Ventura interviewing Trump many years ago and Ventura saying that what he admired Reagan for most was his withdrawal of US forces from Beirut after the Marines were bombed, hope Trump follows Reagan’s example. Supposedly British forces are being withdrawn from Iraq.

    Thankfully this was more of a pyrotechnics show, like Trump’s cruise missile attack on Syria. The Iranians have made clear that next time they won’t seek to limit casualties. The US will have to swallow its pride and accept that a foreign power has openly confronted them.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Desiderius
    , @GW
  4. Boethiuss says:

    I’m not a big fan of Trump necessarily but I think he got this one right, at least as it pertains to killing Soleimani. The Iranians bombed, or tried to bomb, a couple of Iraqi bases where some Americans are stationed, trying to save face and call it a day. From here, it looks like the US can book a small win if it wants. And there’s good reason to think it should do that, because Trump surely hasn’t thought it through strategically enough to try to press an advantage.

    But if he does try, there is an opening there. My guess is, Trump sensed that there’s a hole to be exploited, between taking out various bad guys and taking other actions against Iran’s interest, and committing to a mass land invasion. I for one don’t think those two things are the same at all.

    And now at least, the United States is a strong nation and Iran is weak.

    In the bigger picture, I wonder what we’re supposed to think about foreign policy and why. For a decade or so at least, there’s been the idea that we need to take care of business at home, we shouldn’t be supporting neocons or “invade the world, invite the world” etc. And I agree with this, but only to a point.

    And in that context, I really gotta wonder where we should be drawing the line, especially as it relates to Islamophile and Russophile parts of unz. Because there’s a lot I see there that I cannot get behind, at all.

    “Ignorant Uncle Shmuel and his evil paymasters at the ZOG, are the most wicked, duplicitous empire in world affairs since Nero. We cannot allow them to continue their rabid hostility against honorable warriors like Vladimir Putin and Qassem Soleimani without consequence. Fortunately though, its implosion will come soon enough when its blood-soaked Monopoly money will no longer finance the armaments of its death machine. Blah blah….”

    There’s a tendency here among a lot of us to think this is totes cool, it just means they don’t like Max Boot, Hillary Clinton and obnoxious trannies any more than we do. I’m not buying it. It seems to me that they are simply plain hostile to us, and definitely don’t have our best intentions in mind.

    • Agree: Old Prude, XYZ (no Mr.), Lot
    • Disagree: PhysicistDave, neutral
    • LOL: fnn
  5. Lance says:

    You know Trump has done some blunder when Steve has a post like this.

    • Replies: @Cucksworth
    , @Corvinus
    , @J.Ross
  6. An airliner on fire and falling from the sky is not a good look. An accidental missile from Iran is more likely than a US strike. Everyone will want to pretend it’s mechanical failure. The Iranians obviously. But perhaps also the US because they will be seen as responsible for initiating the conflict. Ukrainians will bow down to US pressure. All the dead Swedes on the plane will be ignored by Stockholm in order to maintain their self-image as peacemakers.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  7. Tony Tea says:

    Affairs are fair when they’re foreign.

  8. Johnny789 says:

    Just expose Iran as a buncha pussies that use a buncha ass holes to fuck people’s shit up. Knee them in the balls and send them home crying to their Mom.

    • Replies: @Arthur Pierce
  9. Once again, we are failing to avoid foreign entanglements.

    There appears to be an implicit foreign policy consensus that powers whom we view as “adversaries” must be allowed no influence at all in their near abroad-Russia in Eastern Ukraine and Iran in Shia Southern Iraq, at present.

    It would be wiser, perhaps, to leave these places to achieve their natural power equilibrium, rather than for us to try and bottle up the pressures, in order to validate our own power and hegemony.

    That’s a round about way of saying that we should leave these places to their own devices, and not the risk the lives of Americans in foolish foreign adventures.

    The two world wars really went to our head; we really can’t operate the levers of the world’s politics and power for the best possible outcome, but we think we can. We really should enjoy our secure lives over here, than jumping into every neighborhood scrap over there.

  10. A lot of inertia drives foreign policy. A certain wariness of Russia is fine, but it’s not the Cold War, despite how some act. We’ll need to be involved in the Middle East. Backing the Gulf States and Saudi Arabia is cheaper than occupying Iraq and Syria. Apparently the Establishment has changed its mind about China and realized it can create problems for us. Whether or not they can keep China from overwhelmingly the neighboring countries without a war remains to be seen.

  11. fnn says:

    All the terror attacks against Americans and Europeans have been by Sunnis, but the PermanentGov wants you to side with Sunnis against Shia. This is the same bunch that launched Cold War 2.0 against Russia for some reason no one can understand.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  12. After adequate provocation:
    1. Bunker buster bomb onto uranium enrichment facility
    2. Guided missile into cyberwarfare center
    3 Fully withdraw from Iraq, Afghanistan
    4 Total moratorium on immigration from mid east; encourage those already here to emigrate
    5 Law to deport all family members of those committing terrorist acts

    No war

    MAGA

  13. Virtually all of Trump’s appointments were terrible but he really surrounded himself with utterly crazy and incompetent foreign policy and military people. Even if, to Trump’s credit, he did actually campaign on the terrible idea of backing out of the Iran deal (unlike many of his other bone headed moves that involved breaking promies made at virtuall every rally), this whole thing has really made me turn on him for good.

    I can see all this working out. I can even see him doing the same thing having surrounded himself with good people. But the very fact that I’m so worried by the whole thing means he’s lost my trust. I’ll support any democrat president and a republican congress in 2020. Trump has officially utterly failed to purge (or even reduce) the brainless militarism that’s been endemic to american conservatism since the 1960s. Ditto on immigration. Ditto on trade. Ditto on general administrative/political/deal-making/just-being-able-to-stop-running-his-mouth competence. Hopefully Sanders gets the nomination and wins.

  14. IHTG says:

    Targeted assassinations followed up by face-saving rocket attacks that cause no casualties? Iran is just the Gaza Strip writ large. Boring, everyday stuff in the Middle East. Don’t take anybody seriously who overreacted to this.

  15. @Boethiuss

    Boethiuss wrote:

    And in that context, I really gotta wonder where we should be drawing the line, especially as it relates to Islamophile and Russophile parts of unz. Because there’s a lot I see there that I cannot get behind, at all.

    So? Some people who oppose our idiotic “foreign policy” are themselves idiots. That does not change the fact that our foreign policy is deeply idiotic.

    Tucker had a great show tonight: He emphasized, with one guest after another., that the question should be: How does this proposed foreign policy action affect the average, ordinary American?

    Not: How does it serve our “national interest”? Not: How does it satisfy our allies? Not: What are the views of sophisticated “experts”?

    Just, what will this do for John Doe on Main Street?

    There is a real hubris in that those of us who have for decades known the difference between Kurds and Arabs or between Hindi-speaking and Dravidian-speaking Indians or between Sunni or Shi’i Muslims or Druze feel that we can demonstrate our superiority by sagely parsing the most arcane and Byzantine details of our foreign policy. We understand “nuance”: we understand that “simplistic” solutions do not acknowledge the deep complexities of the world we live in.

    So people die so we can feel sophisticated.

    Sometimes, complex problems do have simple solutions:

    Entangling alliances with none!
    Go not forth in search of monsters to destroy!
    Bring our boys (and, horribly today, girls) home!

  16. @PiltdownMan

    Increased Iranian influence on Iraq was baked into the cake of overthrowing minority sunni despotism.

    I agree we should be focusing more on domestic issues but the idea that the military has much of a role to play there is nonsense. The solution to illegal immigration is regulating businesses that attract and profit off of illegal immigrants (their employers, landlords, and bankers). It has nothing to do with redeploying the military.

    But the US does need to address global issues, principally global warming (boo! hiss! argh!) and sub saharan african population growth/emigration, we just don’t need more middle east wars. And we need to force our allies to step up and contribute.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    , @landlord
  17. 22pp22 says:

    Robert Maxwell is buried on the Mount of Olives next to Ben Gurion. Several former Mossad chiefs attended his funeral and during the eulogies it was said that they could not all reveal all the services he had performed for Israel. His favourite daughter is the girlfriend of Epstein, who became super-rich by digging up dirt on powerful people. You do not need to be a conspiracy nut to see connections. She pimped children to influential people. We have the pictures.

    Epstein knew too much and ‘commits suicide’ in a facility that has seen two suicides among forty thousand prisoners.

    The Russians have nothing on Trump. But the Israelis have something on just about everybody.

    If they want something badly enough, they can scare just about anyone into submission.

    And they really want a war between the US and Iran. Trump doesn’t, but that’s his problem.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  18. Johnny789 says:

    Where/whom do the Iranians get their military equipment from exactly? Seems like they’re buying from the Mr. Haney of arms dealers if you’re asking me.

  19. All the panicky comments, from the MSM, to the woke, to the red or whatever-color-pilled, are embarrassing and a discredit to them.

    It’s just business in the Middle East. Not WWIII, or the end of the evil United States, or proof that Trump is an Israeli succubus, or some other favorite apocalyptic tale.

    Jeez… It’s not even the fog of war. Just everyone playing Chicken Little. People need to calm down.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    , @moshe
  20. eugyppius says:
    @Boethiuss

    it looks like the US can book a small win

    That’s not how you spell “own goal”.

    1) The Soleimani hit inspired Iraq to finally vote the Americans out, which means America out of Syria too. With ca. 6k soldiers on the ground they can’t hold on against the will of the country. Who wants to reoccupy Iraq with 150k soldiers beyond silly internet warmongers?

    2) Hitting Soleimani has caused Iran to abandon the last vestiges of the 2015 agreement, so if like everyone on the anti-Iran side you don’t want Iran enriching uranium you are back at square 1.

    3) And finally, Iran has attacked two bases, which they wouldn’t have attacked were it not for the Soleimani hit. Even if in the Iranian restraint there is an olive branch to be found, this means that everything we have been told about establishing deterrence is total garbage. Iran is not deterred.

    And now at least, the United States is a strong nation and Iran is weak.

    The US didn’t need to assassinate Soleimani to be strong, and everyone already knew that Iran was weak. But killing Soleimani has made it deeply clear to many people that the US is their greatest problem, and it has made Iran seem wronged, and it will also do absolutely nothing to deter Iran’s further cultivation of proxies in the region.

    It seems to me that they are simply plain hostile to us, and definitely don’t have our best intentions in mind.

    One thing that you could do, that would help, is explain how killing Soleimani advances American interests in any way whatsoever. In truth there is no explanation, which is why we keep getting garbage reasons. Garbage reasons like “He killed precisely 604 soldiers”: When Americans invade and occupy foreign countries they become legitimate military targets and they face resistance from many, many people. In this respect, Soleimani is one of a crowd; and he is also someone who gave intelligence to the US during its earliest campaigns against the Taliban, and someone who cultivated proxies and leveraged them to the detriment of ISIS (though increasingly it looks like that was his real crime). Or garbage reasons like “He was planning an imminent attack on American interests in the region”, which is manifest unproven propaganda not even supported by all of the government statements to the press. Or garbage reasons like “he attacked our embassy”, when in fact PMU militants protested the embassy after Amerians bombed their anti-ISIS positions on the Syrian border.

    How is any of this — being in Iraq, being in Syria, squeezing Iran — in the interests of Americans at all? When you have developed a coherent answer to that question you can complain that opponents of these catastrophic policies don’t have your best interests in mind.

  21. @Boethiuss

    Well as a foreign observer and admirer of American-Americans I must say that I think that much of what Sailer commentariat deplores are inevitable consequencies of the drive of the American ruling class to transform America from a Nation in to a Market and the building-block of the World Government.

    The role of the Right-Wing of the establishment being only allow the public to catch-up with the system and ocasionally harness nationalist feeling to put it to the service of globalist policies, like the wish to overthrow the mullahs and integrate Iran in the american sphere.

    The only way to stop this process is taking advantage of a crisis to overthrow the ruling class and replace it by another dedicated to the Preservation of the national culture instead of attempting to rule the rest of the world, so count me in the ranks of those who root for the implosion of the system.

    On the matter of General Soleimani if he had been killed by a clandestine operation it would have been fighting fire with fire and I would have accepted it, what is totally unacceptable is American military forces openly killing a high officer from a foreign country travellingly legally in a third country, Uncle Sam is pretty much claiming the right to kill foreign officials at will and it must not be allowed to stand.

    I celebrated Trump s election because he promised to stop acting as World Sheriff and now see he as instead became the World Gangster so I would like to see the Iranians grab him by the balls and
    squeeze!

    • Agree: Hail
  22. Altai says:

    It looks like Iran copied Trump’s bit of firing a load of cruise missiles at airbases but set them to fall outside the bases. American personnel were able to get to shelters and there were no casualties. You get some nice camera phone footage of a big explosion in the distance and anti-air fire to create a climate of political crisis and a sense of taking a strong stand. The US/Trump has seemingly accepted this and backed off.

    So they successfully managed to respond, firing live weapons into Iraq at essentially US airbases but didn’t escalate things beyond control. The public in Iran is placated, the leadership feel as if they didn’t let a popular figure fade away, they threatened all out war in his memory.

    Ultimately a war with Iran would FUBAR any admin who tried it, rapidly deepen/accelerate the Sino-Russian strategic military alliance and only blackmail of something worse could get a president (Other than maybe John ‘I ain’t a coward!’ McCain) to go along with it. The fear is Trump might be ignorant enough to be suceptable to the influence of advisors to think he was doing something that wouldn’t lead to uncontrollable escalation but which would.

    An interesting point to note in all this is that Tulsi, who has been the only serious candidate to speak out quite a bit about war with Iran, hasn’t shown up on the MSM. The Tulsi/Bernie purge continues. Even as Bernie climbs the polls and sits just above Warren and second only to Biden. (Who just keeps going like one of those Japanese soldiers in the jungle)

    What’s harder to make sense of is the plane crash. It wasn’t an Iranian plane but would still have to be occasionally serviced in Iran. Did the US embargo on Boeing exporting spare parts lead to a situation where Iran-side maintenance was of a lower quality leading to a mechanical failure?

    The passengers were almost all Iranian (The 63 ‘Canadians’ seem to be paper Canadians doing the standard ‘asylum seeker’ holiday in the old country that they needed to flee for their very lives. Or maybe using false passports?) as the Iranian officials suggest.

    The possible scenarios are the plane was accidentally shot down by Iranian SAMs (In a kind of inverse USS Vincennes incident) or was sabotaged on the ground by either Iranian or other agents. It’s hard to believe it was an Iranian agent since even though the airplane was Ukrainian and though the current government there was installed by the Kagans, it’s hardly a prime nation to target and almost everyone onboard was Iranian. Was it a Western or Israeli agent trying to stir things up?

    Very weird. Maybe all just a coincidence but an amazing one.

  23. I voted for Trump because he promised to get us out of the insanely belligerent, counterproductive, illegal, and immoral policies that the USA’s traitorous, Zionist/neocon fifth column imposed on my nation. Unfortunately, the past several years have proved that Trump is just another tool of that fifth column. No matter who Trump’s opponents may be in the next presidential election I’ll vote against him, just as I held my nose and voted for Trump in the last. The difference is that now I’ve given up hope that this country can peacefully rid itself of the pernicious Zionist influences which are currently governing it.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
  24. @IHTG

    > Don’t take anybody seriously who overreacted to this.

    Sadly, that seems to be nearly everyone. I suppose cooler heads are refraining from commenting much.

    On the other hand, it’s a chance to save some time, and reappraise our information sources. For a few days after an event like this, we can be sure that an even higher proportion than usual of what we read, from pretty much all sources, is garbage. A good time to go on a media diet, read a book, or get some work done!

  25. eugyppius says:
    @Johnny789

    For reference, Johnny789’s view of the correct approach is at comment 8:

    Just expose Iran as a buncha pussies that use a buncha ass holes to fuck people’s shit up. Knee them in the balls and send them home crying to their Mom.

    In other words, the Iranians are vaginas attacking people with anuses who need to be kneed in the testicles. Probably that is an attempt at humor.

    • Replies: @Johnny789
  26. Johnny789 says:
    @eugyppius

    You. Are. Pissed. At. Me.

    • LOL: eugyppius
  27. theMann says:
    @portuguese_reader

    “Uncle Sam is pretty much claiming the right to kill foreign officials at will”

    I am certain that is exactly the message the USA wants to be sending the world: If you offend the, to put it bluntly, Jewish Bolshevik filth in Washington, no matter who you are, where you are, we can reach out and burn you AND deal with any consequences.

    So, all of you who voted for Trump and Got Stalin on the Potomac, how is that working out?

    In the meantime, our real foreign policy crisis, the continuing invasion of our Southern Border by every Third World barbarian from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego goes on, with permanently devastating results.

    Oh wait a minute, didn’t everybody vote for Stalin on the Potomac to do something about that too?

    No government EVER undoes a problem that it created. The goons in Washington created our Debt Crisis, created our wars of choice, and created Mass Immigration and that Government will NEVER do anything to stop those problems.

  28. Dan Smith says:

    In golf terms, Trump hit a hole in one, Iran drove the ball out of bounds. Re-tee, playing three.

    • Replies: @Cucksworth
  29. @Guy De Champlagne

    Virtually all of Trump’s appointments were terrible but he really surrounded himself with utterly crazy and incompetent foreign policy and military people.

    Quite so. Hardly anyone now doubts that Trump is increasingly falling into the pit of dementia and is unable to make any kind of rational decisions at all, but what is worse is that it seems that many of those around him have fallen into what psychiatrists call folie en famille, or family madness, in which the psychotic individual transmits his delusions to others who surround him.

    Based on his media statements, you certainly have to question the sanity of Pompeo, who has now withdrawn from his putative run at the Senate, and of the person at the Pentagon who placed the killing of Suleimani on Trump’s to do list knowing that he was mentally incapable of understanding the possible implications. That person should be handed over to the Iranians as a human sacrifice.

    I’ll support any democrat president and a republican congress in 2020. Trump has officially utterly failed to purge (or even reduce) the brainless militarism that’s been endemic to american conservatism since the 1960s.

    The only question now is whether Trump will have long coat tails and how many Republicans are willing to lose their seats in Congress as voters punish them for supporting him.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
  30. Take out anything that looks like a nuclear site, declare victory and leave.

  31. @eugyppius

    When Americans invade and occupy foreign countries they become legitimate military targets and they face resistance from many, many people. In this respect, Soleimani is one of a crowd

    Exactly. When Trump says “they are allowed to kill our people with roadside bombs, but we are not allowed to hit their cultural targets. It doesn’t work like that…” all I can say is this is not true.

    Two days ago I was driving on US 301 in Florida at 60 mph when I heard a loud noise as if a helicopter was overhead and about to land on top of my car. The noise became deafening. I stopped the car and found that one of my rear tires had blown out.

    I did not think for one moment that I had been hit by an Iranian IED, because I have never heard of that happening except in foreign countries where there are invading US troops who have illegally invaded a sovereign country based on false intelligence about weapons of mass destruction such as germ warfare and poison gas.

    Bit of a difference between trying to kill invading soldiers of a foreign power in your own country and sending people to blow up motorists in the US, but possibly Trump in the fog of his dementia does not know the difference and actually believes that various Shiite factions in Iraq are attacking “our people” at random.

  32. Dumbo says:

    The bottom line is that if you ask an average person in the United States he’d probably say that the billions spent on such wars could be better spent at home. Iran is no threat to America or to anyone, even to Israel or Saudi Arabia who can take care of themselves. The murder of Soleimani, like the even more shameful murder of Qadaffi, serves no purpose whatsoever except for fomenting conflict and creating instability in the region, high oil prices and lots of rapefugees. Something that may or may not help some “other people” in the region, but certainly not the United States, not Europe, not Americans, not white people.

    • Agree: Dtbb
    • Replies: @Hail
    , @J.Ross
  33. @neutral

    Ahem…..opinions only, please. Whaddaya tryin’ to do over there, hijack the thread? 😉

  34. Whatever the scale of any potential conflict, either Iran-Iraq War-level or full-blown regime change, it would be a cluster*** due to the shaky nature of both leadership’s of the main belligerents.

    This would be the first time ever that a president got the US into a shooting war with a power during an election season AND AN ONGOING IMPEACHMENT. Even LBJ assured the American people in 1964 after the Gulf of Tonkin incident that escalation in Vietnam would be a short, not-significant thing and was aided in the election by the uncompetitiveness of his opponent.

    Meanwhile the Iranian Ayatollah is a senile eighty-year old at odds with a more moderate legislature!

  35. Hail says: • Website

    Tweetman fails utterly on Invade Invite.

    Claims to have been so outraged by the death of a single “American contractor” in some ambiguous event no one would otherwise distinguish from the thousands of other deaths there, so outraged that he had no choice!, but to issue the insane order to assassinate a foreign leader in peace time.

    The dead contractor’s name was Nawres Hamid, an Iraqi Arab.

    Mr. Hamid may have been awarded a cheap-citizenship for services rendered to the empire, but an American he was not.

    Contractor whose death Trump cites was a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Iraq (Wash. Post; Jan. 7, 2019, 11pm EST)

    An American [sic] defense contractor whose death late last month was cited by President Trump amid escalating violence with Iran was identified Tuesday as an interpreter who was born in Iraq and lived in Sacramento.

    Nawres Hamid, 33, became a naturalized citizen in 2017, according to his widow. […]

    Nawres Hamid was Invade-Invite personified

    All known aspects of this affair mean Tweetman earns a failing grade at Invade-Invite.

    Compare his own words in Nov. 2019, in which he endorsed Steve Sailer’s Invade-Invite, almost to the word:

    [MORE]

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-america-needs-to-solve-congos-problems-by-relocating-congolese-to-missoula/#comment-3535576

    Trump: Our policy of never-ending war, regime change, and nation building, is being replaced by the clear-eyed pursuit of American interest. [Man in audience audibly shouts, “There you go!”]. It is the job of our military to protect our security, not to be the policeman of the world.

    Trump: We don’t have to defend the borders between Turkey and Syria.

    Trump: Past leaders’ foolish military adventures turned far-away nations into very, very dangerous war zones. Then they demanded that American citizens accept unlimited migration! — from those terror-afflicted nations and regions. [Mild booing from audience]. I don’t think so; I don’t think so. We did not fight them over there only to invite them over here. [Vigorous audience cheers]. We don’t want to do that. [Sustained audience cheers and applause].

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  36. @Guy De Champlagne

    ” I’ll support any democrat president and a republican congress in 2020.”

    That was once a good thing to hope for if the hope was for reduced government action, but with the merger of the “two” parties, it has lost its charm for me. Now it has become the case of a demopublican president allied with a republicrat Congress. No hope there.

  37. @Guy De Champlagne

    -It has nothing to do with redeploying the military.-

    Of necessity to the rulers of the USA, even a tourist failing to clean up after his dog on the Mall of the Americas has everything to do with the redeployment of the military.

  38. Ian Smith says:

    Killing Soleimani was stupid, criminal, chicken sh*t, and evil. Trump is no longer the lesser evil for 2020.

    • Agree: Hail
    • Replies: @Flip
    , @Desiderius
  39. The roads I drive on every day to go.to work look like they were used as an artillery range they are so filled with potholes. In the winter, the plows used to be out before a predicted snowfall and the roads would be cleared immediately. Now it is lucky if they get to it within two days. We are fighting other peoples wars when we cannot provide basic services to our own citizens.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Yngvar
  40. Times of Israel has at least 3 interesting articles/opinions on general Soleimani. Wouldn’t comment for now…. Soleimani was, evidently, someone who can be, in different cultural context, described as a sincere Crusader.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/soleimani-penned-note-asking-god-to-accept-him-shortly-before-death-report/

    Soleimani reportedly penned note asking God to ‘accept’ him shortly before death

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/the-rise-unrivaled-reach-and-inevitable-fiery-death-of-qassam-soleimani/

    The rise, unrivaled reach and inevitable fiery death of Qassam Soleimani

    https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/a-death-well-spent-soleimani-dies-for-confrontation/

    A death well spent: Soleimani dies for confrontation

    • Replies: @Jack D
  41. @PiltdownMan

    I agree wholeheartedly, PM, with one small exception. I don’t think it was the World Wars that went to the heads of Americans in power. I think it was the end of the Cold War. We were THE superpower in 1990, BY FAR. Not only that, but we had a whole lot of goodwill built up within most of the world that we had protected from Communism for over 40 years.

    Then, the Neocons, over only 3 decades, have squandered all of that goodwill, along with a couple of handfuls of trillions of dollars, playing beat cop or hit man for Israel (sometimes one, and sometimes the other, IMO).

    #Shameful

  42. Thirdtwin says:

    This, too, shall pass. It seems like just yesterday that Trump was igniting a fresh ME conflagration by moving a few US troops back to more defensible positions in Syria.

  43. @PhysicistDave

    Used up my rolling-8-hour limit, so:

    AGREE!

    • Replies: @Hail
  44. In 1979, the was a concert of “The Who” in Cincinnati where 11 people were trampled to death stampeding for stadium seating. Americans being what we are, someone soon put out a t-shirt reading, “I’d Walk Over You to See The Who.”

    At the funeral for the recently deceased Iranian general, there was a stampede in which at least 56 people were trampled to death. I think an Iranian could make some quick dough with a t-shirt that says, “I’d Walk Over Granny to Mourn Soleimani.”

  45. @theMann

    Oh no, an OBAMA administration designated terrorist who killed hundreds (not just Americans) is dead. How horrible now he can’t go on planning massive terrorist attacks. So awful. Just shocking how many traitors there are out there.

  46. Iran makes a face-saving impotent missile strike, and Trump responds by saying he will be the bigger person and not escalate or respond. He invites Iran to try diplomacy.

    “Winning bigly!”

  47. From the moment the current regime in Iran came to power, it has tortured and killed more liberals and leftists than any other regime in my lifetime. Yet, liberals and leftists ignore all of that and act as though it is their ally. They must have some sort of death wish.

  48. Moses says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Great comment Dave. Agree with you totally.

    George Washington and the isolationists of the Revolution up to the first half of the 20th century were right on.

    I was humbled mightily by the Iraq war mother-of-disasters, which I am sad to say I supported.

    I’m now like a smoker who has quit and become an anti-smoking zealot. I’m an anti-search-and-destroy-monsters zealot now.

    No more nation-building, no more adventures, no more sending young Americans to get limbs blown off by IEDs in G-dforsaken sh*tholes half a world away for no reason at all.

    The American military should be about protecting American citizens and territory. That’s it.

    US needs to get the hell out of:
    – Korea
    – Japan
    – Germany

    ^These are rich countries more than able to defend themselves if they have the will. And if they don’t have the will nothing we do will defend them anyway.

    It is idiocy personified that the US admitted into NATO pipsqueaks like Latvia and is on track to admit pipsqueaks like Georgia.

    These are ALL LIABILITY, ZERO ASSET idiotic moves. These countries add ZERO to American security, yet hugely increase risk of confrontation with Russia.

    Guaranteeing Latvia et al against Russia risks millions of American lives.

    For what? Nothing at all. I couldn’t care less if Russia takes over those countries. Russia controlled them for 50 years, it didn’t change the price of bread in Des Moines.

    There is nothing in it for rank-and-file Americans to guarantee foreigners’ territorial integrity with American blood.

    US out of Syria.
    US out of Iraq.
    US out of mideast shi*tholes.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  49. Trump must get the vibe that his base isn’t up for a war with Iran, notwithstanding the more extreme cheerleading MAGAheads. A war would be really, really depressing. Nobody has any illusions about changing the Middle East.

    So, maybe some hits back and forth, but hopefully that’s about it. But no WWIII.

  50. Anonymous[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    What do the mourners at Soleimani’s funeral and crabs, lobsters and shrimp have in common?

    – They are all Crustaceans, (crushed Asians).

    Sorry.

  51. Invade the World, Invite the World © ® resembles the baseball epithet Jim Bouton reported in one of his books: An alligator mouth, and a hummingbird ass.

    • Replies: @Hail
  52. Mr. Anon says:
    @Boethiuss

    I’m not a big fan of Trump necessarily but I think he got this one right, at least as it pertains to killing Soleimani.

    What a load of disingenuous drivel. Translation: “I despise Trump, but like him when he pursues the kind of foreign policy he ran against.”

    The Iranians bombed, or tried to bomb, a couple of Iraqi bases where some Americans are stationed, trying to save face and call it a day. From here, it looks like the US can book a small win if it wants.

    What people like you don’t understand is this: Leaving the region IS a win. Getting out IS a win. Not continuing the idiotic policies of the last thirty years (at least, if not more) IS a win. A win for the actual American people, not for the “National Interest”. When the talking heads (most of them) talk about “The National Interest” what they really mean are the interests of the foreign policy/defense/intelligence/think-tank crowd and the Billionaires, Military Industrial Complex, and Foreign Governments that yank their leash.

    In the bigger picture, I wonder what we’re supposed to think about foreign policy and why.

    I don’t care what we’re “supposed to think”. The problem is that for too long we’ve believed the people who told us what we are “supposed to think”. I know what I do think. The Foreign Policy we have now doesn’t work – for us, I mean. It is not intended to be good for us; it is intended to be good for them.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
  53. @Lance

    Steve admits when things are out of his expertise. And the Jews want to blame this on Trump so bad. Most Americans have a world view that comes out of a television set (like you).

    If you have sat with Orthodox Jews you would understand who controls foreign policy. And I don’t blame the Jews, since so many Americans are easily tricked and led (like you).

    • LOL: AndrewR
  54. Hail says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Invade the World, Invite the World © ®

    Was Tweetman’s rendering of it better than its coiner’s, or worse?

    “We did not fight them over there only to invite them over here.” (See also fuller context)

    Problems with Trump version: Is in the past tense (vs. present-tense, forever policy in the Sailer version); implies focus narrowly on the resettlement of “terrorist ethnicities.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  55. @Dan Smith

    A typical American’s understanding of foreign policy, ladies and gentlemen.

  56. @PhysicistDave

    “But, is it good for US?”
    Sensible question.

  57. @Altai

    Agree: @Buzz Mohawk

    Yours is a good comment that expresses my thoughts. Since I clear my browser regularly and haven’t posted here recently enough, I can’t click it, but I will just create my own Agree button and say I Agree .

    And I don’t even have an H1-B visa to type in brainless code.

    Nor am I a super genius with a self-reported IQ above 200 (impossible to measure) who pocketed millions of dollars selling software during the 1990s market heyday. All I did was sell mutual funds and make hundreds of thousands that I equally don’t deserve.

    Sorry, I know this comment is worthless, because it is less than 7,000 words.

    Oh, and utu, it contains information from personal experience, so it is even less than worthless. It can’t be believed and is written by a fool who might be confabulating.

  58. Jack D says:
    @LondonBob

    The US will have to swallow its pride and accept that a foreign power has openly confronted them.

    Yes, Trump will go on TV and say that he has submitted to Islam and asked Khamenei to henceforth be his imam. He is already down with the no alcohol and multiple wives part.

  59. Solar power is now viable as a source of energy. The USA has large areas of desert and semi-desert that would be ideal for solar power stations. America no longer needs foreign oil.

    Beyond the limited goal of defending its stake in Saudi Aramco, why should America care about the Persian Gulf? As long as the Russians or Chinese do not try to dominate the region, why not let its countries rule themselves, and let them fight among themselves whenever their thousand-year-old enmities boil over. If oil consumers in Europe and the Far East need greater “stability” in the region, let them be the ones to supply it.

  60. Anon[391] • Disclaimer says:

    Carlos Ghosn’s live trilingual press conference. Wow. I heard him fluently answer questions in English, French, and Arabic. And Americans can’t order a taco in Spanish.

    Nice touch how he kept the Japanese journalists out in the street: “You had a couple of years to show some interest in my side of the story, and never did. Why the sudden interest?”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  61. @LondonBob

    Good lord. Didn’t think the takes could get any worse.

    I think this comment section has been so egregiously clueless that it colors our credibility on other matters. If you paint restraint in these colors you’ll get the opposite – whether from Trump or whoever replaces him.

  62. @Harry Baldwin

    Are joke tshirts a thing, though, in Iran? I might invest in your idea if you sold joke rugs instead.

  63. Jack D says:
    @TelfoedJohn

    The US didn’t shoot down that airliner and is not responsible if Iranian anti-aircraft defenders are trigger happy and can’t identify civilian aircraft. Flying civilian aircraft in conflict zones is not a good idea for this very reason. If I had been in Tehran yesterday, there is no damn way I would have gotten on a plane. I would have walked out of Iran before getting on a plane at such a tense time and place. But the US has no reason to soft pedal this. Boeing has enough problems without more “mechanical failures” that weren’t.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  64. JMcG says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    I don’t think anything like this is on the plate. Iran is currently wetting it’s bed. They fired rockets at the middle of nowhere, accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner, and their spokeswoman is currently begging for no more escalation on television.
    I don’t think the Israelis are getting their war just yet.
    If it were me, everyone of those speedboats they use to harass our ships would be sunk. That’s about it.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
  65. Lugash says:
    @European-American

    Our pundit class got Iran’s response completely wrong. Until Iran started launching missiles they expected Iran to use terrorism, cyber attacks and proxies. Nope, Iran did the unexpected and went with a conventional military response.

    Trump got rolled by the ‘they’ll great us as liberators’ bullshit.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  66. Jack D says:
    @fnn

    That’s a lie:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMIA_bombing

    Iran has sponsored plenty of terror in the West. We don’t have to favor Sunni against Shia – a pox on both their houses.

    • Replies: @Istevefan
    , @fnn
  67. JMcG says:
    @Mr Realist

    Sink their navy, then go straight to your number 3. Let someone else handle their nuke program. Not our job.

  68. What’s your opinion?

    About Foreign Affairs?

    Like a lot of things–some good, some bad. Definitely have a negative view of this eat, pray, love sluttery. But i’m sure sometimes “international relations” are beneficial.

    But i don’t think any bastard spawn should have a free pass to come here. Same sort of health, IQ, cultural and religious fit–willingness to integrate to traditional American republican norms–that should apply to any immigrant.

    For Americans, American labor–that’s your best option.

  69. anon[330] • Disclaimer says:

    Lol @ all the black pilling going on. People have no memory of stuff even two years back.

    Remember when Trump ordered a cruise missile strike on Syria? What happened next? Did the 82nd drop into Damascus? Did the warmongers like Hillary! get their global war against Russia? Huh?

    Look here. The Iranian missile strikes hit pretty much nothing. No surprise, they are shooting some of their SCUD missiles, maybe older ones. SCUD is just a mildly improved version of the V2 rocket from WW II. Plus the Iraqis now have grounds to demand the US go home. Might give Trump political cover to get more of our people out of that sandpit, but with “hey, they want us out, whattaya gonna do?” cover for domestic politics.

    Where’s the catastrophe? Is it 1980-whatever all over again, or is it 2020?

    Trump’s gonna say something in about 30 minutes from now. We’ll see what that is.

    One thing for sure, there’s a lot of commercially available surveillance out there that may have been involved in this. Facial recognition is standard at a lot of borders and airports. Ordinary spies are “made” as soon as they hit the ground someplace like Singapore.

    https://news.yahoo.com/shattered-inside-the-secret-battle-to-save-americas-undercover-spies-in-the-digital-age-100029026.html?guccounter=1

    Maybe Qasem Soleimani just talked about his upcoming trip too close to a device, was overheard by Alexa.

  70. @portuguese_reader

    World police/Pax Americana is baked into the cake for now. What you get with Trump is an end to nation-building/regime change nonsense and the spewing of trillions that goes with it.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @fish
  71. @Lugash

    What liberators?

    Why is everybody hallucinating an invasion?

    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  72. @Desiderius

    What you get with Trump is an end to nation-building/regime change nonsense and the spewing of trillions that goes with it.

    What you THINK you get, or HOPE you get. This jury is still out.

    Mother Nature might have to find a new man.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  73. @PhysicistDave

    Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or
    shall be unfurled, there will her heart, her benedictions and
    her prayers be. But she goes not abroad in search of monsters
    to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence
    of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.
    – John Quincy Adams July 4, 1821

  74. Gabe Ruth says:
    @eugyppius

    Very informative comment, thank you.

    I’m afraid I’ve been tuning out of Middle Eastern affairs for some time, but the name of the Iranian general rang a bell as in I’d heard of him in the past, and him driving the embassy attack sounded plausible.

    I wasn’t happy about the hit, but it didn’t seem heinous given what is going on. Didn’t know the grievance of the PMU, which indeed seems to be based on some shitty Uncle Sam actions. Our best hope is that Trump grasps that a real escalation will end any chance of him getting reelected.

    • Replies: @eugyppius
  75. JimB says:
    @Boethiuss

    Wasn’t Steve pointing out recently that Islamic supremacy movements require strong singular leaders like Soleimani, unlike Mexican gangs in LA which are more like cancers which regrow if you excise only the main lesion? So killing Soleimani stirred up the Shi’ite beehive but in the end it will probably return to a less threatening state without King Quds.

  76. @Hail

    Nawres Hamid was Invade-Invite personified.

    On top of that he was probably pulling in $150-200k/year with the first $100k tax-exempt for a make-work job like stacking boxes so his spouse could crank out new Americans in style.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  77. anonymous[102] • Disclaimer says:

    We really need electric cars everywhere so that the Middle East can begin to matter a lot less.

  78. @Desiderius

    1) Wish fulfillment. It would prove all their brilliant, caustic observations about Trump true. Many here will be as disappointed, or more so, than the woke left when war does not occur, American forces are protected, and our fine president is reelected.

    2) If American, they hate Jews more than they love America. Iran is the big adversary to Israel, so let’s give Iran some love. And thank them for purposely missing our bases.

    3) If Russian, being whiny bitches. A country at the economic level of Mexico — though with many, many more whites — not sure how that HBD thing is working out for them — who can’t even stop or mitigate American interactions with their allies Syria or Iran. That must indeed be frustrating.

    • Replies: @European-American
  79. 1. Bring home all US military personnel currently stationed outside the continental United States.
    2. End all foreign aid, including aid to Israel.
    3. End all economic sanctions, including sanctions against Iran.
    4. Cash and Carry for all weapons exports.
    5. Complete and total independence for all tropical islands, including Hawaii.
    6. No treaties of alliance with non-white or non-Christian nations, especially not Turkey.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Fidelios Automata
  80. BB753 says:

    It’s a show. Khamenei wanted to get rid of Soleimani and the US was happy to oblige but will pull out from Iraq eventually. Nobody’s going to war over a dead general. Also, Russia and China wouldn’t approve. Nor Turkey, presumably.

  81. @Buzz Mohawk

    I’ve been hoping throughout his term. Nothing yet has disproven it, several events confirm it, especially last night’s snub of Hannity.

    Mother Nature might have to find a new man.

    Heh. Five offspring by three mothers? No, Master Trump is right down her alley.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  82. Istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    I had forgotten about that, but are there other recent examples?

    Seems like most of our recent trouble with shias occurs in their backyard. While sunnis appear to be hitting us in our nations. From the ’93 WTC car bomb to 9-11 to London, Madrid and Paris, the sunnis are the ones doing it in the West.

    Add to this that the great majority of muslim immivaders are sunni and their mosques, which are sponsored by Saudi Arabia and other sunni states, are popping up all over, leads me to believe sunnis are the greater threat.

    • Replies: @John Gruskos
  83. fnn says:
    @Jack D

    Two Iran-linked attacks in Argentina. But nothing in Europe and North America as far as I know. There was that bus attack in Bulgaria a few years ago but I can’t recall who was said to responsible for that and I can’t be bothered to look it up right now.

  84. Istevefan says:

    Why is everybody hallucinating an invasion?

    I think it is because we got sleepwalked into invading and occupying Afghanistan and Iraq, and people want to be sure we don’t repeat that mistake again.

    According to CNBC as of November 2018, we had spent almost $6 trillion on our post 9-11 military actions.

    Given that our total national debt is about $24 trillion, this suggests about 1/4 of our debt is the result this action.

    I’d rather have people being overly concerned about repeating our mistakes again in Iran and communicating that message to the decision makers instead of quietly sitting by and allowing those same folks to walk us into another mistake.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  85. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Well, I wasn’t quite right about our intrepid contractor:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/us-military-contractor-whose-death-lead-soleimani-strike-finally-identified

    So, he was a, “linguist/translator.”

    In that region and role he was pulling $200-250k/year easy.

    • Replies: @Hail
  86. @Istevefan

    There was no sleep walking, period. It took 6 months to build up the invasion force in Kuwait. The build up was very, very, very public.

    A lot of commenters here aren’t overly concerned. It’s just histrionic bullshit.

  87. Everyone (now*) wants to de-escalate.

    * – that Trump got rid of the turds in the punchbowl who didn’t (¡Jeb!, Hillary, McMaster, Bolton, and Soleimani)

    • Agree: Lot
  88. fish says:
    @Desiderius

    What you get with Trump is an end to nation-building/regime change nonsense and the spewing of trillions that goes with it.

    From your lips to gods ear…….

  89. @Mr Realist

    1. Whether or not Iran enriches uranium is really nothing to do with me, my family, my friends, my country (that’s America), or anything else I might be remotely interested in. The only reason Iran is a “threat” is because our rulers keep doing their best to provoke it.

  90. Globalists (finally) re-evaluating:

  91. @PiltdownMan

    Who’s this “we” you keep talking about? Are you part of the U.S. ruling class? Because if you’re not, saying “we” is wishful thinking at best, utter surrender to people who hate you at worst.

  92. @theMann

    They’re not exactly Bolsheviks. More like neo-Trotskyists. That’s worse, if anything.

  93. Unless Trump changes course at least somewhat and shows willingness for genuine negotiations with Iran and removal of some sanctions, there’ll be no chance for deescalation and there will continue to be Iranian provocations. Eventually Iran will miscalculate or Trump will order another grotesquely disproportionate response like with Soleimani’s killing, which forces Iran to react…and once Americans have been killed, you’ve got a war on your hands with no way of turning back.
    Trump has been very lucky so far that Iran has acted comparatively restrained (which is disturbing enough btw, the leadership of the alleged “martyr state” is acting more rationally than Trump and his circle of deranged advisors). But if that changes, there’ll be a slide to irreversible escalation. So better hope that Macron or someone else manages to talk some sense into Trump before it’s too late.

    • Replies: @Hail
  94. @Istevefan

    Here is the only other example I am aware of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_Burgas_bus_bombing

    Every other deadly Islamist terror attack in Europe, the Americas and Oceania has been Sunnis, not Shiites.

    Every single deadly Muslim terror attack on the American homeland, as far as I am aware, was Sunni Islamists – not Shiites, and not secular Arab nationalists. (Sirhan Sirhan was Christian, and he was a lone wolf.)

    And even in the 1994 Argentina and 2012 Bulgaria instances, the target was Israelis rather than locals.

  95. Hail says: • Website
    @German_reader

    the leadership of the alleged “martyr state” is acting more rationally than Trump and his circle of deranged advisors

    Sad but true.

    Are there any states on Earth today that have (carry out) a state policy of assassination of foreign leaders in peacetime?

    North Korea targeted senior South Korean officials in a Burma bombing in 1983 (the complication to the “peacetime” qualification in that case being that the Koreas are legally at war, 1950 to present); more recently, North Korea might do ‘assassinations’ against some of their own internal rivals (the Malaysia killing in 2018), and they do regularly detain small-fry foreigners for who-knows-what-reason, one of whom died in captivity (Warmbier of Ohio), but I know of NO cases of even North Korea carrying out ‘hits’ against foreign political or military leaders. And they probably have the capability.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  96. @JimB

    So killing Soleimani stirred up the Shi’ite beehive but in the end it will probably return to a less threatening state without King Quds.

    That didn’t even work with a group like Hamas, every Hamas leader the Israelis have killed was easily replaced by another (sometimes even more extreme than his predecessor). It’s absurd to think such tactics could have a better effect on genuine state entities like Iran’s Revolutionary Guards.

  97. peterike says:

    Trump just cancelled WWIII. Everybody back to work!

  98. Hail says: • Website
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    What is a Muslim/Middle East functional equivalent of “Winning the Ghetto Lottery”?

    A Sailerism waiting to be coined.

  99. Corvinus says:
    @Lance

    “You know that Trump has done some blunder when Steve has a post like this.”

    Thank you for NOTICING. Me. Sailer prefers to be cagey on Trump. That way his opinion on him can not be distinctly pointed out and force him to justify his position.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  100. @Altai

    “Was it a Western or Israeli agent trying to stir things up?”

    The plane was apparently on fire when it came down, which tends to suggest foul play, but I’d have thought Israeli agents would be saved for stuff like murdering nuclear scientists – unless there were a whole bunch of important people or nuclear scientists on that plane, or someone thinks it’ll push Iran over the retaliatory edge and spark that long-desired war.

    Difficult to guess though. Margaret Thatcher’s administration was one of the most pro-Jewish in UK history before Blair (IIRC one of her Cabinets was 20% Jewish), but that didn’t stop Israel helping Argentina in the Falklands War on the grounds that the Brits hung some of Begin’s terrorist comrades in the 1940s.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/uk-opens-files-on-israeli-arms-sales-to-argentina-during-falklands-war/

    According to the book, Begin authorized the deal by saying, “Is this going to be used to kill the English? Kadima (go ahead). Dov from up there is going to be happy with the decision.”

    Dov Gruner was a close friend of Begin who was captured and hanged by the British in April 1947.

    “Obviously, it must be all done perfectly,” the Israeli prime minister reportedly added.

    The testimony was provided by Israel Lotersztain, a salesman for Isrex, an Israeli defense company in Argentina.

    “What Israel did was all within legal channels, but was a support to Argentina during the Falklands War that was only shown by a few countries in the world, such as Libya and Peru,” Dobry told JTA.

    Israel armed Argentina’s military dictatorship with air-to-air missiles, fuel tanks for fighter bombers, gas masks and missile radar alert systems, as well as warm dubon parka jackets, according to the book.

    “If the United States hadn’t turned a blind eye, it would have been impossible for Israel to send such a large amount of weapons,” Dobry told JTA. “Many components were American, and there is a law that prohibits the sale of any military component to third parties without the authorization of the White House.”

  101. Flip says:
    @Ian Smith

    Killing Soleimani was stupid, criminal, chicken sh*t, and evil. Trump is no longer the lesser evil for 2020.

    Yep

  102. Precious says:

    That missile strike didn’t just kill Soleimani, it also blew open a hole giving Trump an exit strategy from Iraq. The war the media was clamoring for is already over. Most likely Trump will withdraw some troops from Iraq as part of keeping one of his campaign promises. Trump also managed to goad Iran into admitting all those militias fighting around the Middle East are their proxies, which gives the GCC an excuse to engage directly with Iran if it chooses.

    Saudi Arabia and the GCC will be making the decisions of what to do next, with Trump providing support and keeping the international media focused on him.

  103. Dumbo says:

    The other day there was a tweet by Bush, oops, I mean Trump, accusing Soleimani of “millions” of murders. Pat Buchanan said his killing was “just”. Look, I was previously almost unaware of the existence of this guy, but the fact is that American leaders keep on accusing other people of being “evil” with no evidences, sometimes even after making overtures of peace (like with Qadaffi) and then just killing them.

    If I was Iran, I would order a hit on Madeleine Albright. She’s likely responsible for the murder of millions, in Iraq and in the former Yugoslavia. Certainly a worse character than Soleinami. If someone can be called “evil”, it is her.

  104. @Ian Smith

    If you want Robert Mugabe in charge of your country, listen to this clown.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
  105. nebulafox says:

    1) The fundamental security interests of the United States and Iran do not conflict. Israel and Saudi Arabia are not the 51st and 52nd states, no matter how much people on Capitol Hill think they are. Allowing them to dictate our policies toward Iran is an objectively dangerous situation.

    2) Much like Ukraine with Russia, Iraq is always going to be in their natural sphere of influence, barring artificial entanglements in the country that are objectively not worth the blood and treasure the US will have to spend. Piltdownman is right: we’re fundamentally trying to prevent the natural geopolitical state, and that’s always going to be a tough battle even when it is objectively worth it. And here it isn’t, not by a long shot.

    3) No, I do not feel bad about the death of Qassem Soleimani. Anybody who kills American citizens is game for being killed. The Iranians got cocky, failed to understand how this erratic White House would respond to the usual from Quds, and probably dropped their guard some when it came to Soleimani’s travels. They are not suicidal and have opted for the minimum possible response that they can get away with domestically: words and a cruise show. So, no, war is not imminent.

    4) But that doesn’t mean those bases in Iraq should exist in the first place. Can we even afford further Middle Eastern adventures down the line, from a raw fiscal perspective? The US simply does not have the resources or power or coherence that it did 20 years ago, and it is time to wake up and adjust to that reality while we still have some cards to play.

    As one example, how much of our national debt is due to Iraq and Afghanistan and Syria and Libya? Probably a damned big chunk.

    • Replies: @GW
  106. • Replies: @Hail
  107. Hail says: • Website
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Used up my rolling-8-hour limit

    It was quietly changed to three Reactions per 12-hour window in late (?) December.

    I think the limit ought to be higher but not sure what combination of total Reactions per what time window is best.

  108. JUSA says:

    America’s foreign policy is entirely run by (((deep state))). That’s our #1 problem.

    Until we are rid of this cancer, we will be stuck in endless wars and endless immigration until we completely disintegrate.

  109. GW says:
    @LondonBob

    You have this absolutely backwards.

    Imagine if the US had lost its very powerful, best military mind at the hands of a direct precision attack from its sworn enemy, and then responded by meekly lobbing some missiles that killed no one.

    Also lol at citing Jesse Ventura positively. Sit this one out, old chap.

  110. Anonymous[334] • Disclaimer says:

    A suddenly large amount of TDS from – supposed – Trump supporters. Why is everyone acting like Trump has started a war with Iran? Iran itself does not want a war…

    There is a reason no Americans were killed in the missile strikes. Not even an IRAQI(!!!) was killed! HELLO? They missed on purpose. NO ONE wants war (except the people around Trump, not Trump himself)

    Hope beyond hope that Iraq demands the US withdraw all troops from their shithole country. Will wonder then if these supposed ex-Trump voters still think he somehow did the wrong thing killing Soleimani

    @Corvinus
    you have an unhealthy obsession with Sailer

  111. GW says:
    @nebulafox

    I’m generally a non-interventionist, but let’s use some common sense. The US has had military bases in Germany and Japan since WWII and last I checked there hasn’t been much German or Japanese terrorism since. The whole “we create terrorists” idea is not really even a half-truth, and fails to account for historic anomalies (I.e. the Cold War) in which interventionism might be beneficial (obviously not in long, drawn out wars like Vietnam).

  112. landlord says:
    @Guy De Champlagne

    The solution to illegal immigration is regulating businesses that attract and profit off of illegal immigrants (their employers, landlords, and bankers).

    I’m a landlord in Southern California, and I know of a few other property owners who cater exclusively to illegal immigrants as part of their investment strategy. One fellow I know owns around ten properties, made up of apartment houses and triplexes. He only rents via word of mouth to illegal immigrants. He likes them because they’re too afraid to complain about day-to-day problems regular tenants would be hassling him about, and will fix household problems themselves. So he doesn’t need to hire property managers, or deal with calls at one in the morning to take care of this or that problem. He always charges below market rents to ensure none of his tenants give him a hard time. In return, he doesn’t give them a hard time about 10 people living in a one bedroom apartment, or having stragglers living in tenants garages.

    About three years ago, police arrived at another property owners apartment with a paddy wagon, and took away a group of illegals living in the building. The property owner had become so bold, vans were arriving in front of the apartment with illegals fresh from Mexico stepping out, and moving into his illegal alien nest. This happened to be in a nice middle-class neighborhood. The owner had acquired the property in foreclosure, and didn’t bother to get a read on the surrounding property owners. Someone with some pull complained to his city councilman, and a raid was staged. The property went into foreclosure, again, and the rest of the illegals were evicted, and a property that used to be a neighborhood pain in the ass is back to being quiet. When it was an illegal alien nest, the neighborhood had gone crazy with Mexican villagers doing what they knew, while upsetting everyone around them.

    Anyway, there’s most certainly a “shadow industry” of landlords catering specifically to housing illegal aliens, which keeps a number of rental properties off the open market, which drives up surrounding rents, and disrupts neighborhoods. You can’t establish community trust when your neighbor is some middle-aged burn-out heralding from some poor Mexican village who doesn’t speak a lick of English, and has no intention of learning. Even the quiet ones who keep to themselves doesn’t bode well for community trust. They don’t contribute anything except not being a demonstrative neighborhood pain in the ass. You won’t meet them at the neighborhood church, because they go to small churches in which the pastor delivers his sermon in Spanish only.

    Forcing landlords to be accountable for determining that tenants are legally here would be a huge deterrent to illegals attempting to gain a foothold in Southern California, far more than building miles of fences. There are plenty of relatively simple, and far more economical strategies to entice illegals to self-deport.

    It really is true that those with “luxury opinions” of the illegal immigration problem have no clue on how much the realization of their opinions subtly yet dramatically undermines the middle-class lifestyle that Americans used to strive for. Then they stand around scratching their heads, wondering how the hell Trump was elected, and why we’re laughing so hard, every single day.

  113. nebulafox says:
    @JimB

    Quds is far too embedded in the Iranian state for that to happen. My guess is that they’ll be temporarily distracted with the command change, because Soleimani really was as close to irreplaceable as Iran (or any state-the man was good at what he did) had, but things will be back to normal within a year or two. Trump should use the current opportunity, therefore, as a chance to disengage from Iraq and do what he was ELECTED TO DO.

    It might just be that the Iranians are a lot more rational and calculating than the US political class wants to believe, know they’ve got time on their side, and know the only way to screw up their goals is to pick a fight that they can’t win. Natural Iranian dominance of Iraq was the inevitable result of Dubya deposing Saddam Hussein. If the Forever War crowd wants to blame someone for that, they should blame him.

    • Replies: @JimB
  114. @Hail

    We need to stop Reacting so much, and increase the number of words in our Reactions. 7,000 Or more preferred. Words count, and the more the better.

    We also should eliminate humor, verbal and visual, and be as dry and intellectual as possible. We also need to refrain from recounting anything from personal experience — because only naive people do that and they might be confabulating.

    If you write “Santa Claus eats elves for breakfast with his scrambled eggs,” and then cite somebody else who wrote that, then you have something people here might pay attention to. However, if you just write “I saw Santa Claus eating elves for breakfast with his scrambled eggs,” then you are recounting your own experience, and you are therefore a rube and probably confabulating.

    Let’s get these things straight so we can engage in the freedom of the dialectic here, okay?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  115. Jack D says:
    @John Gruskos

    Complete and total independence for all tropical islands, including Hawaii.

    Does that include the Florida Keys?

    Why stop at tropical islands? What about Manhattan Island?

    • Replies: @John Gruskos
  116. @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, as much as I’d like to LOL, I feel I’d better not, without some hard data contained within a 400 word essay.

    So:

    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL
    LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL

    Please, please, Massa Unz, may I stop now?!

  117. nebulafox says:
    @PhysicistDave

    >There is a real hubris in that those of us who have for decades known the difference between Kurds and Arabs or between Hindi-speaking and Dravidian-speaking Indians or between Sunni or Shi’i Muslims or Druze feel that we can demonstrate our superiority by sagely parsing the most arcane and Byzantine details of our foreign policy. We understand “nuance”: we understand that “simplistic” solutions do not acknowledge the deep complexities of the world we live in.

    Well said. I have been guilty of this hubris myself in the past. It’s a fun game… as long as you abstract away the real human lives you are talking about.

    Repeating the words of JQA is always a good first step to realizing the solution behind the Gordian Knot created by The Empire.

  118. @Hail

    Well, the software still tells me 8-hours, so … I’ll, like… sue or something…

    Really, this limit is OK, but maybe the time should be 4 or 6 hours. That’ll still limit MOST people who just want to do the thumbs-up/thumbs-down thing.

  119. @Harry Baldwin

    I am still SO PISSED at myself for not producing x-dot, x-double-dot, and dX/dt shirts back when those Malcolm X hats were big in style. I’d have made killing and a point, with respect to time. Great idea though. The proposed Iranian entrepreneur would probably need to make out a will and/or have an escape plan to one of the Guiana’s (nobody comes looking for you there, people leave there to immigrate to shitholes, on purpose!)

  120. @Desiderius

    I hope you are right. My wife loves him, calls him her boyfriend. She’s like Melania, same age, same part of the world. I tell her I’m on Team Melania, she’s MY girlfriend, and then she quiets down. These women are insanely jealous.

    Hey, if Trump were a Democrat or just a member of the Deep State Elite club approved by the powers that be, Melania would have been on the cover of every women’s magazine and website — as Michelle Obama was and every previous First Lady.

    Sorry for another comment less than 7,000 words that doesn’t cite strangers. Since this is probably the limit for this thread, I will say “goodbye and good luck.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  121. J.Ross says:

    The Iranian incidents were not just a distraction from the Virginian situation, but Virginia is still far more important and dangerous. Today is the day Virgininian Bolsheviki vote to erase all government legitimacy despite uniquely widespread protests warning them not to. That hasn’t happened yet. The new Democratic State House, being sworn in and beginning their legislative session, has apparently ignored several procedures and rules. A Republican representative pointed this out, so they tried to interrupt him three times without asking if he yields, then declared a recess while he was in mid-sentence. These people are completely illegitimate, they’re drunk on power, they’re violating rules that don’t even make sense to violate, and this will end in violence because these idiots have less sense than Iran.

    • Replies: @anon
  122. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    You forgot Brazilian Portuguese. I think he also speaks or at least understands some Japanese though not to the level of fluency in those other languages.

    He did let the Japanese into the press conference.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  123. J.Ross says:
    @Lance

    Steve is consistently and admittedly not a foreign policy guy. LOL at anyone trying to claim that today’s announcement of no casualties and no further action was anything short of beautiful and smile-bringing.

  124. @Jack D

    I read the name “Carlos Ghosn” numerous times for years when I read car magazines. Since I gave up that habit years ago, I haven’t heard of him since until now. He’s just another member of a high club, CEOs, like university presidents and so forth. Possessed of specialized, high-level experience and moving around in an overpaid club.

    No sympathy for him, whoever he really is, but glad he escaped. That’s what I would have done.

    Sorry this comment isn’t 7,000 words and doesn’t cite other people’s writing.

    • Replies: @Anon
  125. Polynikes says:
    @Guy De Champlagne

    It’sa good concern troll, except for the fact that we’d have to believe you ever supported Trump in the first place.

  126. Hail says: • Website
    @Desiderius

    Strange New Respect is back.

    Tweetman, the inveterate approval-seeker and professional celebrity since the 1980s, knows how to rack up the Strange New Respect points, and it is to embrace (1) Israel (which he does, loudly and often), and (2) the empire.

  127. JMcG says:
    @Mike zwick

    Same here, but it is the feckless state of Pennsylvania to blame, not the feds.

  128. eugyppius says:
    @Gabe Ruth

    I think when Trump comes under attack he likes to create chaos and use the confusion to his advantage. In this case he decided to carry out a hit for the Israelis, which could have led to war (and still might), and was the worst decision of his presidency even if nothing more comes of it. (And if this is truly the end of this storm in a teacup it is down to the Iranians being careful.) I don’t think Soleimani organized the PMU mob at the embassy, but I could also be brought to appreciate that Soleimani was a victim of his own tactics. The affiliated proxy militias give Iran plausible deniability, but for their independent actions Soleimani and Iran inevitably also come to bear plausible culpability.

  129. JimB says:
    @nebulafox

    I miss Saddam Hussein. Even for a megalomaniac he was just so rational and tolerant compared to Western politicians like Hillary Clinton, Chuck Schumer, and Jeremy Corbyn.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  130. moshe says:
    @European-American

    Dude, your nom holds the implication (at least to readers’ subconscious) that you yourself are an immigrant from Europe but this sensible post clarifies that this is not the case. Europeans tend to be rather insensible about American Presidents thinking that, as with their ACTUAL democracies, our presidents can become actual fhurers or saviors or whatever. Only a sensible American can be calm about something involving Trump and an actual military confrontation with a non Latin-American country. There aren’t too many Americans sane on the subject but Europeans who can be calm about it are even fewer.

  131. moshe says:
    @theMann

    Woe. You are a really f’d up dude. Get out if the house. Turn off the internet. Enjoy a bagguette. Have a conversation outdoors with someone. anyone.

    Hey, don’t get me wrong, I am of course that zionist filth you’re referrinf to and life is good for me but I’m genuinely not trying to just shut you up, why would I? Why would I care? I’m just saying that you need a breather because you are WAY unhappy and kind of going off the edge.

    Be good. And Love Israel.

    Or at least visit Vegas or Negril.

  132. Hail says: • Website
    @Dumbo

    The murder of Soleimani, like the even more shameful murder of Qadaffi, serves no purpose whatsoever except for fomenting conflict and creating instability in the region

    Is it too cynical suggest that DJT agreed to go with this mafia-like assassination / escalation (recently reported to have been orchestrated by a Richard Goldberg* of the National Security Council; I kid you not) as a ploy to win in Nov. 2020?

    ______________

    * A below-the-radar figure until now, this is what I find on Richard Goldberg, reportedly chief orchestrater of the Israel-like assassination of the Iranian general this week:

    RICHARD GOLDBERG

    – born ca.1982?, Illinois?;
    2001: Graduates from Ida Crown Jewish Academy, a private high school in Skokie, Illinois;
    Fall 2001: Enters Northwestern University; while there, becomes member of Jewish fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi (and in which he remains active thru the 2010s; listed on host committee for a big-money Sept. 2019 gala);
    2004: earns BA, Journalism, Northwestern; during his time at Northwestern, both 9/11 and the Iraq War occur; the Neocon Ascendancy is at its peak;
    2004 to 2014: works as Capitol Hill staffer; rises to “senior foreign policy adviser to former Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) of Illinois;”
    2015? to 2017: Works for Governor Bruce Rauner (Illinois), rising to Chief of Staff (appt. June 2016);
    2017: Earns MA, Public Policy, Northwestern;
    2017: Becomes Senior Adviser at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), a notorious Neocon think tank in Washington, one seemingly financed entirely by several wealthy Jewish donors, and led by primarily by Jews;
    early 2019: Appointed to the National Security Council.

    After Goldberg joined FDD in 2017, he quickly established himself as an outspoken advocate of military action against Iran. In February 2018, for instance, he urged the Trump administration to attack Iranian targets after Israel shot down an Iranian drone […]

    [Goldberg] “urged Trump to wage war on Iran in Syria and to sanction U.S. allies complying with the Iran nuclear deal. He also worked behind the scenes to sabotage Trump administration officials who didn’t want the president to kill the Iran deal.

    The above quotes, and some of the info in this summarized profile, are from a panicked profile the Militarist Monitor did of Richard Goldberg in Jan. 2019, upon his elevation to a position of “whisperer into the president’s ear;” they were right to be worried.

    As for whether Richard Goldberg identifies with any particular strain of ethnoreligious identity, we find him in the news at college in 2003, in connection with a (possible/likely?) hate hoax; he was seemingly calling, at the time, for the creation of a Jewish ‘patrol’ on campus to defend Jews against their vicious tormentors:

    Forum’s debates offer no answers
    Adam Williams | Daily Northwestern
    February 25, 2003

    [… Monday night’s forum at Norris University Center was the first time in years that all parts of the Northwestern community converged to discuss issues of diversity.

    Everyone in attendance expressed unity in denouncing the eight written acts of vandalism reported in the past two weeks. […]

    Multicultural advocates are handing out “Not in My Home” posters, which students have begun placing on dorm-room doors. Richard Goldberg — a Jewish student and friend of two students whose whiteboard was marked with a swastika — is trying to gather students to begin patrolling Bobb and McCulloch halls.

    • Thanks: Dumbo, MikeatMikedotMike
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Shmendrix
    , @Desiderius
  133. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:

    None, I don’t know anything. We’re not going to war though.

  134. @Jack D

    “the US didn’t shoot down that airliner”

    They did.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_Air_Flight_655

    “can’t identify civilian aircraft”

    See above.

  135. Realist says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Tucker had a great show tonight: He emphasized, with one guest after another., that the question should be: How does this proposed foreign policy action affect the average, ordinary American?

    Yes, but, as so many in the media do, Tucker felt he had to interject pejoratives when talking about Russia, China, Iran, Syria or the leaders of said countries. He fears going balls out (probably justly) when talking about what an asshole country the US has turned into over the last 75 years.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  136. J.Ross says:
    @Hail

    More preventable anti-Semitism is coming: several major players in the out of control Virginia State House are Broflofskians, including the new and autocratic Speaker, and the rule-ignoring first day of the session saw a swearing-in by a rabbi instead of a minister. Then there’s the fact that their efforts are not based on popular support but on the wealth of one man, who happens to also be Jewish. How does this not result in anti-Semitism?

  137. J.Ross says:
    @Dumbo

    I am completely on this side, and still want to see William Kristol made to pay for his crimes, but Soleimani was on our property and attacking us, and had attacked us recently before. This was a completely different situation from Bush Terror War ally Qadhafy getting taken out with all the legality and morality of Stalin taking out Kirov.

    • Replies: @Portuguese_reader
  138. @theMann

    “So, all of you who voted for Trump and Got Stalin on the Potomac, how is that working out?”

    Two words: Not Hillery.

    That’s how it’s working out.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  139. Yawrate says:

    Sending troops to protect the embassy is only prudent. And even if Trump hits Iran again (or even multiple times) the option still exists to withdraw. I’m not sure what that means for the embassy in Bhagdad but de-escalation will still be possible.

    Iran is very weak. Yes, they can cause us grief but a measured response, which we have seen so far, leaves many options open.

  140. AndrewR says:
    @Jack D

    I had the same thought. If you were in Tehran and learned Iran had just launched missiles at a US base in Iraq, why on Earth would you get on an airplane?

  141. Jack D says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    It was Soleimani’s destiny and highest ambition to die as a martyr. He’s enjoying his 72 virgins right now. So the US was only doing him a favor – Iran should be thanking us. Those who think that he was “murdered” like Tessa Majors are trying to deprive him of his martyrdom. He died honorably as a soldier for Allah. He was a real professional. It would understand that it was nothing personal, just business.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Bardon Kaldian
  142. This is what I wrote on AE’s blog, if I may be permitted to re-post it here.

    Whether or not Iran retaliates is not the most important consequence here. What is important is how we are perceived by the rest of the world. We sucker-punched Iran in a very illegal manner and in doing so we’ve flushed the last shreds of our credibility and our moral authority down the toilet. We will never be trusted again; we will never be welcomed again; even our allies have had enough of us. And despite what some Boomercons choose to believe, we cannot take on the entire world at once.

    This will accelerate the collapse of the empire. China and Russia will continue to de-dollarize and offer the world alternative economic and geostrategic partnerships. America will be isolated, impoverished, and painfully fragmented at home. I just hope the punishment comes while the Boomers are still alive to feel some of it, because the young, who did none of this, are going to be disproportionately screwed.

  143. @Buzz Mohawk

    Well said. I have been guilty of this hubris myself in the past. It’s a fun game… as long as you abstract away the real human lives you are talking about.

    Likewise. Trump seems like the closest thing to making amends, and the vets who bore the brunt are in his corner.

    I hope you are right. My wife loves him, calls him her boyfriend.

    Not really about being right? And I don’t love him. I worship the One who keeps a tight pimp hand on Mother Nature’s whoring ass. In the land of the blind though.

    Morality
    By Matthew Arnold
    We cannot kindle when we will
    The fire which in the heart resides;
    The spirit bloweth and is still,
    In mystery our soul abides.
    But tasks in hours of insight will’d
    Can be through hours of gloom fulfill’d.

    With aching hands and bleeding feet
    We dig and heap, lay stone on stone;
    We bear the burden and the heat
    Of the long day, and wish ’twere done.
    Not till the hours of light return,
    All we have built do we discern.

    Then, when the clouds are off the soul,
    When thou dost bask in Nature’s eye,
    Ask, how she view’d thy self-control,
    Thy struggling, task’d morality—
    Nature, whose free, light, cheerful air,
    Oft made thee, in thy gloom, despair.

    And she, whose censure thou dost dread,
    Whose eye thou wast afraid to seek,
    See, on her face a glow is spread,
    A strong emotion on her cheek!
    “Ah, child!” she cries, “that strife divine,
    Whence was it, for it is not mine?

    “There is no effort on my brow—
    I do not strive, I do not weep;
    I rush with the swift spheres and glow
    In joy, and when I will, I sleep.
    Yet that severe, that earnest air,
    I saw, I felt it once—but where?

    “I knew not yet the gauge of time,
    Nor wore the manacles of space;
    I felt it in some other clime,
    I saw it in some other place.
    ‘Twas when the heavenly house I trod,
    And lay upon the breast of God.”

  144. Danindc says:
    @Jack D

    So many ppl thought it could have been mechanical problems. It’s amazing how dumb the twitterati is

    • Replies: @Jack D
  145. JimDandy says:

    I could be wrong, but I’m guessing that if Iran really wanted to kill American soldiers with their most recent attack, they would have. It reminds me a bit of Trump’s mini-bombing of the Syrian airstrip, before which he basically sent word where and when the missiles would land?

    None of it is good, and though I think it’s an excellent time for people to be getting vocally hysterical about how terrible and wrong and evil full-on all-out war with Iran would be, I’ve still got my chips on it not happening. But, I will end by referring you to my first sentence, because I have to admit it is the absolutely perfect time for a false-flag strike by the masters we serve as a vassal state.

  146. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    If he had to go, that’s how he’d have wanted it.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  147. Shmendrix says:
    @Hail

    “Recently reported” eh? Where? By whom? You included plenty of links, but not the one that would actually lend credence to your statement. Your entire post consisted of nothing more than “Here’s a Jew who did some things. Have at it, Jewhaters.”

  148. Anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:

    Trump, like a lot of smart entrepreneurs, really, really dislikes being taunted, and told he can’t do something. It’s a loss of face if he doesn’t respond, a challenge, and a challenge of his resourcefulness. Trump also finds it useful to appear crazier than he actually is.

    When Khamenei told Trump “You can’t do anything.” it was like a red rag to a bull. Khamenei was fortunate that only his geneneral ended up dying, and not Khamanei himself. Hence the reply of K’s didn’t kill anyone of note. All it was was an attempt to save face for himself while not escalating things.

    https://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2020/01/02/irans-khamenei-taunted-trump-before-soleimani-strike-you-cant-do-anything/

    See also the video that crystalized Trump’s vague desire into a run for president.

    Attempt to humiliate Trump at your peril.

    I don’t think we will see a war with Iran under Trump’s watch. But I do wonder if geopolitically, starving China of oil is on the cards as it was for Japan in WW2. That’s where China gets their oil from, at least in part.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  149. Boethiuss says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Tucker had a great show tonight: He emphasized, with one guest after another., that the question should be: How does this proposed foreign policy action affect the average, ordinary American?

    Not: How does it serve our “national interest”? Not: How does it satisfy our allies? Not: What are the views of sophisticated “experts”?

    I like Tucker for the most part but I think he’s gone off the rails with this one. This sort of thing sounds good if you have a certain mindset but the world doesn’t work that way. It’s not in the interest of John Doe on Main Street that random terror yahoos attack our embassies and we don’t do anything about it.

    Just like some smartass on campus can staple a flyer to a phone pole that says it’s okay to be white, in a much more consequential way we show the world for everyone who’s watching that it’s ok to be American.

    That’s in all of our interest, including or especially John Doe on Main St.

  150. @Hail

    Already purged:

    U.S. Official Central to Hawkish Iran Policies Departs NSC

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-03/u-s-official-central-to-hawkish-iran-policies-departs-nsc

    Get your Jewdar out for this:

    • Replies: @Hail
  151. @Jack D

    He was evidently a holy warrior. That kind of people can be found among all religions & world-views (which can be atheistic- you just have a dedication to the cause & you’re ready to die for it).

    I just find a bit disconcerting that in the 21st C highly intelligent, dedicated & passionate people are ready to die for old Mid Eastern stories no even half-modern mind could take seriously:

    Slain Iranian general Qassem Soleimani reportedly penned a note shortly before his death in which he asked God to accept him and stay by him.

    Soleimani left the paper in his room in Damascus on Thursday before flying to Baghdad, the country’s semi-official Mehr news agency reported.

    According to the Mehr translation, the handwritten script reads:

    “O God!
    Don’t leave me alone
    O God! Accept me
    O God! I love meeting You
    The same meeting which made Moses unable to stand and breathe
    O God! Accept me
    All the praises and thanks be to God who is the Lord of the universe
    O God! Accept me purified.”

    I don’t have anything against willingness to die for a cause. Just, it is atrociously anticlimactic to sacrifice your life, your imagination being fired by sometimes charming, sometimes odious archaic stories about a bunch of guys like Abraham, Joseph, Moses,… who in all likelihood existed as did Achilles or Beowulf.

    OT (and NT as well) is basically a soap, a penny dreadful that survived & continues to inspire huge groups who are willing to be burned for the fulfillment of their destiny, a super-abundant posthumous life these figures embody.

    Moses, Achilles, Beowulf…these guys, if they existed at all, were Elvises of their times.

    Any potential martyr for future companionship with the deified Elvis in ethereal spheres?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Desiderius
  152. Boethiuss says:
    @eugyppius

    The US didn’t need to assassinate Soleimani to be strong, and everyone already knew that Iran was weak. But killing Soleimani has made it deeply clear to many people that the US is their greatest problem,….

    The hell it does. Any wannabe terrorist or third world generalissimo who wants to get the US off their back can start by not fcuking with our embassies. That’s simply legitimate foreign affairs for any country.

    ….and it has made Iran seem wronged, and it will also do absolutely nothing to deter Iran’s further cultivation of proxies in the region.

    Sure it does. We’ve immediately diminished their capacity to act because Soleimani is dead and Iran’s capability to organize proxy terrorists went through him.

    • Agree: XYZ (no Mr.)
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @eugyppius
  153. anonymous[288] • Disclaimer says:

    The supposed peace negotiation that he was to attend may have been just a ruse to lure him in for an ambush, a mafia style assassination. Since there are others next in line this does nothing to change things. That being the case the purpose was what, to carry out a high profile killing for some sort of demonstration effect? The Iranians are somewhat boxed in with this, forcing them to respond in some manner to placate the masses angered by this. We’re in uncharted territory with this. Probably the US presence in Iraq will become untenable and Americans throughout the region will get stalked so all those not under guard will be unsafe.

  154. @AndrewR

    To get out of town?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  155. @YetAnotherAnon

    The WSJ Editorial Page was busy concocting complicated explanations for why it was the Iranians fault that the US Navy show down that Iranian airliner in 1988, but then Reagan informally apologized for it a few days later.

    I think the US proved very recalcitrant about a formal apology, but Reagan defused most of the conspiracy theorizing about how the Iranians had intentionally tricked us with Persian wiles within a few days.

  156. @AndrewR

    If you had a nonrefundable ticket.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  157. @istevefan

    Nah, more like Moses at the cusp of (conquering) the Promised Land (of Quds). However much some people are wishing for a martyrdom big enough to get that done, it’s not happening. Maybe if Hannity or Hillary were in the White House. They’re not.

  158. Boethiuss says:
    @portuguese_reader

    The only way to stop this process is taking advantage of a crisis to overthrow the ruling class and replace it by another dedicated to the Preservation of the national culture instead of attempting to rule the rest of the world, so count me in the ranks of those who root for the implosion of the system.

    Yeah, yeah. In order to make an omelette you have a break a few eggs, right?

    I think we’ve seen enough omelette-makers over the years to keep score well enough of the number of eggs they break, and the answer isn’t very good.

  159. Good God, Boethiuss has grown some balls.

    What can’t Trump do?

  160. @Hail

    “We did not fight them over there only to invite them over here.”

    Shades of “Fighting Fascism abroad to impose it at home.” Which I’m sure the Trump family of Queens County would have heard quite a bit in the years before Donald’s arrival:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1944_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York#Results_by_county

  161. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Trump, like a lot of smart entrepreneurs, really, really dislikes being taunted,

    Right, that’s why he sucks up to Jewish Power that taunted him and impeached him. Tough guy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  162. @JimB

    I miss Saddam Hussein.

    He certainly understood his fellow Arabs. That’s why he ruled the way he did, and got 100% of their vote.

    That beats even FDR in South Carolina in ’36.

  163. @Bardon Kaldian

    I just find a bit disconcerting that in the 21st C highly intelligent, dedicated & passionate people are ready to die for old Mid Eastern stories no even half-modern mind could take seriously:

    I agree, but apart from the “prepared to die” bit you could say similar things about Pence, Pompeo and all the other Christian Zionists (unless they’re just cynics who pretend to believe all that stuff for political gain).

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  164. @Boethiuss

    Any wannabe terrorist or third world generalissimo who wants to get the US off their back can start by not fcuking with our embassies. That’s simply legitimate foreign affairs for any country.

    I’m all for dress codes as well, but there should be reasonable limits on how to enforce them.

  165. Boethiuss says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I don’t care what we’re “supposed to think”. The problem is that for too long we’ve believed the people who told us what we are “supposed to think”. I know what I do think. The Foreign Policy we have now doesn’t work – for us, I mean. It is not intended to be good for us; it is intended to be good for them.

    Well yeah, that’s the point. When you say that we can’t kill a terrorist who’s directly trying to invade our own embassies, because that’s the same as invade the world, invite the world to make the world safe for democracy, it doesn’t mean that you’re changing fifty years of Middle East policy for the better. It just says that you’re no better than they are.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  166. J.Ross says:
    @22pp22

    Right with you up to a point: how do you read Netanyahu’s consistent response here (ie, we want nothing to do with this, plus being okay with everybody calming down)? Also consider what the one victim’s lawyer said about Trump as an Epstein acquaintance: Trump was the one guy on the list who not only did not just slam down the phone, but who fully cooperated, and seemed sincerely interested in helping. I totally buy an Israeli photo gallery of Satanically evil idiot politicians, but I don’t think Trump is in there, and I don’t think this was anything but what Trump said it was.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @22pp22
  167. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    They shot down that one but not this one.

  168. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Your money is no good in hell or heaven or wherever those 170 people are now.

  169. Iran vs The USA in 13 minutes:

  170. @J.Ross

    It isn’t your property, it’s the property of the Iraqi Government and the Iraqi Government had allowed him there, so you had no business claiming a legal right to killing him while he was there unless he was actually taking arms against you!
    For the record I wouldn’t object if he had been killed by a covert operation, it’s to America’s claim of having legal authority to kill foreign officials simply by designing them as terrorists that I find outrageous and a dangerous precedent.

    As to Qadhafi, America’s error was attacking him after having made peace with him, but for what it matters the actual killing was the work of a local lynch mob, so it’s an internal affair of the Lybians.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  171. Everybody gets to save face, and the US gets cover to finally GTFO of Iraq.

    …And when the neocons and their supporters realize there’s not going to be WWIII, they will freak out hilariously and charge Trump with yet more “felony antisemitism”, while Trump proceeds to further praise Israel publicly while privately mashing things up it’s ass (by pulling the US out of the ME, letting Israel to manage it’s foreign policy w/o it’s giant, deadly golem).

    Soleimani was likely not killed, or offered up as a compromise (b/c of Benghazi, many likely & understandably wouldn’t want him walking away from that, even if peace breaks out).

  172. Anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    It would be a different story if Trump were omnipotent, but he’s not. He knows the pecking order. His kids married Jews, he knows where the real power lies. Obama is just a puppet, while Trump is a mostly self-made billionaire with a much better understanding of the public than say, Bloomberg. It doesn’t happen very often where POTUS can insult someone who then goes on to become a likely two term POTUS himself, in part just to spite him.

    Khamenei is a powerful guy within Iran but he doesn’t have a CBG sitting a few hundred miles away from Trump or anywhere in the US for that matter. Trump the president is still pretty powerful provided the people who piss him off are fair game. But for the grace of Trump, there would be a war with Iran now. In that way he is actually defying Zionism, which is pretty ballsy.

    In life it helps to understand relative power dynamics, and pick your battles.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  173. Anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Trump is sharp enough to see through a lot of cons, I always remember the SBC one that Steve posted.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  174. Boethiuss says:
    @JimB

    Wasn’t Steve pointing out recently that Islamic supremacy movements require strong singular leaders like Soleimani, unlike Mexican gangs in LA which are more like cancers which regrow if you excise only the main lesion? So killing Soleimani stirred up the Shi’ite beehive but in the end it will probably return to a less threatening state without King Quds.

    I’m not really sure tbh, but I think we can legitimately hope so.

    The point of people like Soleimani and things like the Quds Force, is to marry as much as possible the operational advantages of nation-states with non-state terror groups. Part of the advantage of killing Soleimani is to prevent that from happening. Exactly how much or how little of that transpires we’ll have to see.

  175. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Coulter knows too.

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/01/08/ann-coulter-cnn-and-fox-news-report-on-the-rise-of-hitler/

    She calls out on the mott-and-bail but doesn’t say WHO control the media and are doing it.

    The reasons why the world media was so alarmed by Germany in the 30s and so anxious about Middle East in the present are the same. Nazi Germany was a threat to Jewish lives, and Iran/Russia are threats to Jewish Supremacism and hegemony. Both are Judeo-Centric.

    Coulter is right about threats from Mexico, but speaking of killing Americans with drugs, what about the Sackler family. They were not Sacklerez. And speaking of all those dead US soldiers, they were sent to fight Wars for Israel. So, Neocons are responsible. Also, Jewish Power seeks to turn her race into a minority because it fears that Coulter who talks about Mexicans now might talk about Jews later.

    Why on Earth are our media –- and our president –- consumed with “Whither Iran?” when hundreds of Americans are dying every day at the hands of the country sitting right next door?

    Mexico is sitting next door, but who is sitting above? If she won’t name the elites, all this ragging about Mexicans is more cowardice than courage.

  176. anon[148] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of the original title, one is reminded of Lord Peter Whimsey, who was advised by his maternal uncle to conduct his affairs in the more permissive atmosphere of France.

    Foreign affairs!

  177. 22pp22 says:
    @J.Ross

    Why would Israel want to dirty its hands if the US can take full responsibility?

    Israel is located in the Middle East and with Turkey becoming more Islamic, the last thing Israel needs is more trouble in its backyard.

    For all its military might, it is a very small place and one atom bomb is all it would take to eliminate it.

    The Israelis are already involved in the Sunni-Shiite conflict as de facto allies of the Saudis. Why create more problems than they need to?

    Also, Trump treated Epstein with the contempt he deserved, but I doubt Epstein was the only one digging up dirt. The New York real estate business is full of Jews and some of them will be more loyal to Israel than the US. No one on the planet gets to the age of seventy without a little dirt sticking to them ( and certainly not in his line of work) and the Israelis are in a perfect position to find that dirt and use it.

    Trump repeatedly said America needs out of the Middle East. Something caused him to change his tune.

    I don’t hold this against the Israelis. If I were Israeli I would do the same thing. But Israel is not America. It is a different country with different priorities and facing different challenges.

  178. Jack D says:
    @Danindc

    People act dumb because they don’t want to have to deal with the truth. There are pictures of the wreckage with holes in it – the kind of holes that come from being shot down. It will be interesting to see if these pieces of wreckage are disappeared by the mullahs.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  179. @Bardon Kaldian

    Don’t you have a mensa meeting to get to?

  180. @Realist

    Yawn. You are just the mirror image of affluent arm chair boomer warriors. Life was a disappointment doesn’t change the fact that America has on balance been a force for good. The US defeating communism isn’t why your wife started fucking some other guy.

  181. @Anonymous

    That was a good example of how surprisingly sharp and even profound trump can be. His answer to SBC’s troll question what’s the most popular thing in the world? “Music” was a really good answer.

  182. MBlanc46 says:

    Victor Davis Hanson writes that in his view President Trump is “backing out firing”. If he is correct, everything will be okay before long. If not, things could get very unpleasant.

  183. @Portuguese_reader

    It’s our property just like Mozambique was your property to you got run out of there like the 2nd world incompetents you are.

    • Replies: @Portuguese_reader
  184. Anon[391] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Ghosn is really an impressive guy. It’s hard to say whether guys like him are overpaid. I think it’s clear that there are very few guys in the world who can walk into a big, complex organization, figure out how it works and what’s really going on, and within the limits of labor law, politics, and internal power plays, wrench the organization from the red to the black, and all without cutting it to shreds and destroying its culture as a vulture capitalist would do. In terms of what Nissan and Renault got in exchange for moneys received by Ghosn, I don’t think they can complain.

    On the other hand, there are some, like AOC, who think that morality dictates an upper limit on pay, no matter how much value is delivered. In Japan CEOs don’t get a big multiple of average company salary, so they can’t hire a Ghosn unless they get creative in compensation. This is what allowed the prosecutors to go after him. Companies like Apple are really worried. The laws are so vague they can always get you if they want. All it took were a few disgruntled Japanese managers going to the prosecutors.

  185. @XYZ (no Mr.)

    I agree with the wish fulfillment part.

    But mostly I blame panicking. People are hysterical, and social networks magnify the effect.

    > 2) If American, they hate Jews more than they love America

    Woah. I doubt that very much. More likely, if American, they doubt official narratives. Iran being the big bad terrorist nation… that’s always been a hard sell, reminding us of the hard sell that Saddam was a terrorist mastermind. Anyone with a brain knows there are a lot of agents in the Middle East that support terrorism and destruction, including Saudi Arabia, Qatar/UAE, and, yes, the US and Israel. So calling Iran the biggest force of evil… it just gets old. That’s why people who question narratives may have sympathy for Iran’s side of the story, not because they hate Jews or the US or themselves, or love mollahs or stonings.

    > 3) [Russia] a country at the economic level of Mexico

    Nah.

    https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=Russia%2C+Mexico+GDP+PPP+per+capita

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  186. Major mistake. I don’t believe Ziomedia’s allegations about Soleimani being behind the embassy attacks. He did help take down ISIS, however, which makes him a hero in my book.
    BTW, self-defense against Israeli aggression is not terrorism!

  187. eugyppius says:
    @Boethiuss

    So like everybody else with your views, you have no explanation of how being in Iraq, being in Syria, or squeezing Iran is in American interests.

    I get that American news must have this narrative on drip-feed, but this had nothing to do with the embassy. Soleimani’s assassination has been contemplated since at least 2015, a year after he organized the PMU forces against ISIS. Reportedly there was an Israeli attempt just a few months ago. Iraqis, including many PMU militants, mobbed the embassy after the US killed a few dozen of them in unwarranted air attacks against their border positions. So Americans attack the Iraqi army in Iraqi or Syrian territory, the Iraqi army riots, Americans kill the head of the Iranian Quds forces, and you think this makes America strong because yeah don’t mess with American embassies!

    Soleimani was far from being solely responsible for Iran’s proxy strategy. This is a major arm of Iran’s foreign policy and it is not down to one man and it will not go away. Esmail Ghaani, Soleimani’s deputy and now successor as head of the Quds force, has been doing this work for years. If anything the US assassination has made Iran more committed to this policy than ever, which it will now use explicitly to drive America out of Iraq and Syria.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
  188. Mr. Anon says:
    @Boethiuss

    Well yeah, that’s the point. When you say that we can’t kill a terrorist who’s directly trying to invade our own embassies, because that’s the same as invade the world, invite the world to make the world safe for democracy, it doesn’t mean that you’re changing fifty years of Middle East policy for the better. It just says that you’re no better than they are.

    Your point is stupid. Terrorist, Schmerrorist. Your terrorist is their freedom-fighter is his paramilitary irregular. And people have been rioting in front of our embassies for years. Should we have killed them all? The temerity of those Iraqis – rioting in their own country at our embassy because we killed a bunch of Iraqis in Iraq.

    The thing you idiots can’t get through your head is that the way to avoid shit-hole country behavior is to not get involved in shit-hole countries in the firstplace.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
    , @Boethiuss
  189. Yngvar says:

    As a Norwegian I don’t really care about US domestic policies, but on the foreign one President Trump is doing at top notch job. More than we allied could ask for.

    In the 80’ies Norway built large halls in the mountains to store everything needed to equip and was required for a Marine Division. All the soldiers had to do was to jump on a plane and all their kit was here.
    During the Iraq entanglement the caves was emptied. We faced no immediate threat, but it was unnerving none the less. President Trump have stocked them caves up again. Great.

    President Dubya invited Israel to join the International Whaling Commission, to get another vote against the Norwegian sustainable whale harvesting. This is not how you behave against a loyal ally. President Trump have made no such moves. Great.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  190. @European-American

    2) If so, absolutely poor reasoning. It doesn’t matter if Iran isn’t the worst or only terrorist country on earth. It certainly matters if Iran is engaged in active support of militia groups destabilizing Iraq, while the American military is in the country and engaged in stabilization operations. That’s actually what Americans care about — American troops staying alive and getting out of Iraq as soon as possible. And in that scenario Iranian military personnel assisting the militias are enemy combatants, and can be treated as such.

    3) PPP isn’t some miracle measurement.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(nominal)_per_capita

    • Replies: @European-American
  191. Boethiuss says:
    @eugyppius

    I get that American news must have this narrative on drip-feed, but this had nothing to do with the embassy. Soleimani’s assassination has been contemplated since at least 2015, a year after he organized the PMU forces against ISIS.

    What does this supposed to mean? I have been contemplating having sex with Claudia Schiffer since 1990, but the actual killing of Soleimani occurred as a response to the embassy attack _last week_.

    And it had to be that way, not just as a coincidence, but as a crucial cog in the self-justification of the Trump Administration relating to domestic politics. Ie, Trump can say, truthfully, that whereas Mrs Clinton hung the Benghazi consulate out to dry while she was Secretary of State, in the Trump Administration not only the Americans inside the embassy repulse the attack, they also killed the Iranian proxy terrorist in charge of it.

    Soleimani was far from being solely responsible for Iran’s proxy strategy. This is a major arm of Iran’s foreign policy and it is not down to one man and it will not go away. Esmail Ghaani, Soleimani’s deputy and now successor as head of the Quds force, has been doing this work for years.

    Well yeah, they can put somebody else in the same place on the org chart as Mr Soleimani was, that doesn’t mean they’ll get the same results as Mr Soleimani did. Certainly it didn’t work out that way for Apple Computer, who thought that you put a soda company CEO in place of Steve Jobs.

    • Replies: @eugyppius
    , @Anonymous
  192. @Mr. Anon

    And your point is absolutely stupid — seriously. If already in a shit-hole country, don’t let the neighboring shit-hole country make matters worse. It’s not God damned rocket science.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  193. Boethiuss says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Your point is stupid. Terrorist, Schmerrorist. Your terrorist is their freedom-fighter is his paramilitary irregular. And people have been rioting in front of our embassies for years. Should we have killed them all? The temerity of those Iraqis – rioting in their own country at our embassy because we killed a bunch of Iraqis in Iraq.

    You’re either playing dumb, or you are dumb. The Iraqis can riot in front of our embassy if they want to (except Baghdad, where they weren’t supposed to be anyway), but if they attack our embassy we have the right to defend ourselves, and it. We did. It’s not difficult.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Yngvar
  194. @German_reader

    These guys (P & P) would not be ready to sacrifice their lives. Not even their property, for that matter….

  195. @Sam Haysom

    No , its their property, they got legal title to it when you recognized them as a sovereign state, but if you want to cancel that an run the place as an overseas territory good luck with that. Enjoy your victory for now and see if it solves any of your internal problems, my guess it’s after this you can stick a fork in America, it’s done, so enjoy the decline!!

  196. eugyppius says:
    @Boethiuss

    but the actual killing of Soleimani occurred as a response to the embassy attack _last week_.

    The embassy was part of the escalation but it was not why Soleimani was hit. The Soleimani strike was presented as an option to Trump three days before the embassy was mobbed, on 28 December. This was a day after the rocket attack on Kirkuk that killed the “American contractor”. Trump opted instead to attack Kataeb Hezbollah with airstrikes. The hit at PMU positions 400km or more away from Kirkuk resulted in more than two dozen dead, only 9 of them Kataeb Hezbollah militants. PMU/KH then mobbed the embassy after the funeral for the fallen on 31 December. News footage is held to have enraged Trump. In the following days Trump was briefed about imminent plots by Soleimani in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon, apparently based on Soleimani’s recent visits (around 30 Dec.?) to all three countries. Faced with this intelligence Trump, still enraged over the embassy, authorized the assassination.

    After Soleimani’s death, the DOD and others released statements mentioning Soleimani’s murderous career, a series of attacks including the 27 Dec. rocket incident, and the embassy. But the timeline gives you two options as the proximate cause:

    1) the 27 December rocket attack
    2) Soleimani’s imminent plans in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon

    Given that 1) is such weak tea and 2) remains to this point painfully undemonstrated and in some cases contradicted by admin officials, the assassination can only be an old plan they had sitting around. And we know there was such a plan, dating back to 2015 at least. Recent events were just the excuse.

    And still there is no explanation of how being in Iraq, being in Syria, or squeezing Iran is in American interests.

  197. @Yngvar

    I’ve heard that some northern Norwegian roads are built specifically wider to accommodate the possible landing of American transport planes is that true?

    • Replies: @Yngvar
  198. @Jack D

    The Florida Keys are north of the Tropic of Cancer.

  199. Mr. Anon says:
    @Boethiuss

    They threw molotov cocktails at the walls of a fortress (which is what the US Embassy in Baghdad is). Calling in a rocket attack on what amounts to a foreign dignitary (as far as Iraq is concerned) is a disproportionate response.

    You’re a nitwit.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss
  200. Mr. Anon says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    No, your point is assinine. You guys are all the same. Yeah, we need to get out of the Middle East, but not right now, the time is not right, yada, yada, yada. The time was right ten years ago. The time was right fifteen years ago. The way to leave is to just leave.

  201. Yngvar says:
    @Boethiuss

    but if they attack our embassy we have the right to defend ourselves

    Was a pro-Palestinian demo some years hind, in Berlin, the revelers broke thru the perimeter defense of the Israel embassy. Two was shot to death by embassy security. After receiving the bodies the German government took no further action. This is how it works.

  202. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack D

    People act dumb because they don’t want to have to deal with the truth. There are pictures of the wreckage with holes in it – the kind of holes that come from being shot down. It will be interesting to see if these pieces of wreckage are disappeared by the mullahs.

    An engine disintegrating and shooting out bits of turbine-blade can put holes in a fuselage too. I’m not saying it wasn’t the result of foul-play, or itchy persian trigger-fingers – it might have been – but you can’t say that based on the pictures released, at least not the ones I’ve seen.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  203. Yngvar says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Yes, inexplicably straight stretches of road are in fact made after NATO requirements.
    But there is more! Every bridge in North-Norway have pockets made ready for explosives in case those darn Soviets was ever coming.

    Getting you over here was always a concern. The Norwegian government responded to this challenge by subsidizing large ships, to have them at the ready for troop transport. But the Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line had to do something meanwhile, and the cruise was born. We are still subsidizing them, and in case of war, some of your boys might come traveling in on one them.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  204. Hail says: • Website
    @Desiderius

    purged

    I would say not.

    Returning, one-year stint completed (mission accomplished; lobbying to turn the US into an Israel-style thug-state that murders its rivals outright via traps and lies), right back to his original position of influence at the well-funded position at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), the notorious Jewish-neocon think tank close to power, means Richard Goldbger is staying right where he is. Close to power.

    “Purged” would mean he is out of a job, that no one respectable is going to hire him. But you know, or I am I going to assume you do.

    • Replies: @Hail
  205. Hail says: • Website
    @Hail

    Edit window mysteriously failed; was going to add:

    ‘Purged’ would be Jason Richwine (“Richwined”).

    Richard Goldberg is/will be still close to power and with great influence, as long as the holders of the reins of Tweetman’s foreign policy are in charge, or similar people.

    Power and influence are not somehow concentrated in one single body. A high position at a place like FDD is at least equal, maybe better, than many comparable positions in formal government. And anyway it’s all a revolving-door and diffuse, the permanent foreign policy apparatus.

    So I predict we haven’t heard the last from Richard Goldberg. Goldberg will be lurking somewhere around for years. (Needless to say, this is problematic because he puts the interests of Israel first.)

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  206. Ian Smith says:
    @Desiderius

    So you support the murder of Soleimani?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  207. @Hail

    Lol.

    Judenrein situation room (no Kushner) and you clowns are still on the prowl.

    Dork Right LARPing, grownups in charge.

    Works for me.

  208. Another Norman Vincent Peale sighting. Want to understand Trump, study Peale. Trump was raised on it.*

    * – I was too, as a negative example. That was mostly a mistake.

  209. @Mr. Anon

    Lol this is why people correctly point out that you are completely devoid of tribal loyalty to the american people. If this plane had been taking off from LAX you would b on here linking to every Democracy Now story you could find trying to blame it on the US military. I don’t particularily like Israel either but I’m not dishonorable enough to shill for the Iranians.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  210. @Yngvar

    Very interesting I’ll have to read up on this.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  211. Boethiuss says:
    @Mr. Anon

    They threw molotov cocktails at the walls of a fortress (which is what the US Embassy in Baghdad is). Calling in a rocket attack on what amounts to a foreign dignitary (as far as Iraq is concerned) is a disproportionate response.

    A foreign dignitary who was personally organizing the attack on the embassy. No, not disproportionate at all. Like when the Russians poisoned the Skripals in Salisbury. Did the UK bomb the Russian embassy in London? Of course not. They PNG’ed 100 or so embassy staff. That’s how it works.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  212. @Ian Smith

    Seriously, you want Mugabe world keep pushing this bullshit. Aid and comfort to the same clowns who brought you Mugabe.

    Not a murder, not close.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
  213. @Jonathan Mason

    Hardly anyone now doubts that Trump is increasingly falling into the pit of dementia….

    Interesting if true. Last I checked his approval is in the high forties.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  214. anon[120] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Today is the day Virgininian Bolsheviki vote to erase all government legitimacy despite uniquely widespread protests warning them not to.

    Bolsheviki? Tut tut! They are liberals. Neo-liberals. Liberals in a hurry, it’s true, but liberals nevertheless.

    Liberals.

  215. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Lol this is why people correctly point out that you are completely devoid of tribal loyalty to the american people. If this plane had been taking off from LAX you would b on here linking to every Democracy Now story you could find trying to blame it on the US military.

    No, and no. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything you’ve written here to suggest that you are anything other than a rather crude and stupid asshole.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  216. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Very interesting I’ll have to read up on this.

    You’ll have to learn how to read first.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  217. Mr. Anon says:
    @Boethiuss

    A foreign dignitary who was personally organizing the attack on the embassy.

    Their “attack” consisted of nothing that antifa hasn’t done in Berkeley. Actually, it was quite a bit less violent than that – no embassy personnel were assaulted with bike-locks. You idiots make it sound like the Benghazi incident. It wasn’t. You’re a retard.

  218. @Mr. Anon

    Lol boomer big mad.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  219. @Mr. Anon

    Imagine thinking anyone would be insulted by this. You are a bitter fifth columnist loser with too much time and not enough money. I’d be mortified if you liked my comments. Boomer bitchiness has my ribs hurting from laughter.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  220. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Haysom

    You’re a tiresome cretin, who thinks he’s smart. You’re not. I probably make more money than you do to, Gen-Zilcher, or whatever you are.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  221. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Lol boomer big mad.

    Nothing says “I’m stupid” more than starting every sentence with “LOL”.

    Idiot.

  222. Mr. Anon says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    Last I checked his approval is in the high forties.

    His approval ratings have always been in the high forties. They don’t move at all. It’s funny how Drudge would run headlines about how Trump’s approval numbers were up to 48% (or some such) a few months after running a headline about how his numbers were up to………..48%. I don’t believe they will ever change. He may win a second term, but he won’t get any more people to like him.

  223. Anonymous[292] • Disclaimer says:
    @Boethiuss

    Inasfar as she was a devout old style Catholic from all accounts, Schiffer’s quiffer was famously off limits.

    Copperfield apparently took advantage of this in employing her as a beard. It’s not prostitution if there’s no sex, right?

  224. @Mr. Anon

    Lol princeton then Wharton. I doubt it. Those institutions seemed to think I was pretty smart. And dad is HBS so I wasn’t even a legacy.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  225. @JMcG

    Obviously the topic is stale and the predictions moot, but I posit anyone from Bush the elder previously (excluding, probably, Carter) would (rightly) have gone ahead and sunk Iran’s entire fleet again just to do the needful, in the style of Operation Praying Mantis. Those were bygone days when Americans ruled America and our presidents had testicles, though.

    (The great thing about destroying naval vessels is the capacity to virtually eliminate collateral damage and civilian casualties, with the added bonus that American naval power is nonpareil.)

  226. I’ll just add I reckon the deployment of the 82nd Airborne put paid to any delusions of grandeur the Iranian government may have had about how this would end for them.

    (I do NOT endorse belligerence against Iran. I do not even endorse the recent assassination based upon the public facts. I am only making an assessment of the relative capabilities of the Iranian and American militaries.)

  227. @YetAnotherAnon

    …that airliner…

    I hate to be “that guy” but you do realise you are citing a different (though horrific and inexcusable) event from three decades ago, right?

    If a nuclear bomb is dropped on Nagasaki tomorrow, the U.S.A. will certainly not have done it. (I realise that’s an example of an intentional attack, but my point stands.)

  228. Ian Smith says:
    @Desiderius

    I’m not the one to blame for Mugabe. Certainly not the one to blame for South Africa:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/20/nelson-mandela-weapons-training-mossad-agents

  229. Mr. Anon says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Those institutions seemed to think I was pretty smart.

    And yet you are not. Princeton thinks that Peter Singer is an “ethicist”.

    You are still a cretin.

  230. @XYZ (no Mr.)

    2) you are right, Iran forces must often be treated as enemy combatants. I still think saying Americans who oppose war with Iran “hate the Jews more than they love America” is an utterly bizarre take on a sizable share of opinion about our ME involvement.

    3) Here’s a decent case for why PPP must be taken into account:

    Nominal GDP method contains several grave errors. There’s a huge calculation bias in favor of the countries possessing the dominant world currencies, that is, the Western countries. Thanks to the dominant currencies, their GDPs tend to be inflated in value as compared with the countries with currencies that are not widely used globally.

    Russia’s nominal GDP in 2016 was $1.28 trillion and it is expected to reach $1.47 trillion by 2017. That’s a 14.5% growth, I point out, and then I ask them to explain how Russia has reached this absolutely spectacular growth. “That’s not real growth, it’s just the exchange rate difference when the ruble appreciated,” they frown. – Exactly, that’s what it is. That’s what the Nominal GDP is, an illusion based on fluctuating and biased exchange rates.
    https://www.awaragroup.com/blog/despite-sanctions-russias-gdp-shoots-over-4-trillion/

    Russia = Mexico is absurd, even though Mexico’s standard of living does benefit from proximity to the world’s richest country.

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