The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
For Want of a Nail ...
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Los Angeles Times:

Boeing to limit N95 masks for workers as it reopens factories

By JULIE JOHNSSON BLOOMBERG
APRIL 17, 20204:16 PM

Boeing Co. faces a quandary as it reopens its Seattle-area factories: how to keep its employees safe while minimizing the use of protective gear that’s desperately needed for medical workers.

The plane maker plans to limit scarce N95 masks for plant workers, relying mainly on cloth face coverings. In an April 9 letter to Washington state officials, Boeing cited new U.S. government guidelines directing companies to reserve the respirators for hospital staff on the front lines of the coronavirus crisis.

Although fabric face coverings are federally approved, union officials worry they won’t adequately protect mechanics toiling shoulder to shoulder in tight spaces such as fuel tanks inside wings. And with testing and safety equipment still hard to get, it’s a preview of the tug of war between safety and societal interests that other companies will face when they begin summoning housebound employees back to work.

“We still have general concerns about how the company is able to keep the workplace safe when we go back,” said Jon Holden, president of IAM District 751, which represents about 32,000 Boeing machinists in the Puget Sound region. “That’s the million-dollar question: How do you keep someone safe in an environment like this? Will cloth masks be good enough to stop the spread of the virus?”

It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks, but is instead asking them to improvise their own cloth masks, which, for guys working with rotating machinery, sounds like tempting Isadora Duncan’s fate.

The U.S. Defense budget should subsidize a certain amount of personal protective equipment manufacturing within the 50 states. Say that, oh, 50% of the Pentagon’s and Veteran’s Administration needs for masks, gowns, gloves, etc. should be domestically sourced, and that domestic manufacturers, in return for this protection from cheap foreign goods, need to have approved plans for how they would, say, quintuple production within 3 months.

This general class of problem is hardly unique in the history of nations, so it’s stupid that we are still throttled by it.

 
Hide 279 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Machinists with direct acces to “rotary machinery” is mostly a thing of the past, at least in our civilized and regulated societies (although youtube videos out of China tells another story)
    A CNC machinist would be hard pressed – so to speak, to get involved (also so to speak) in an Isadora Duncan type of accident.

    • Agree: Louis Renault
    • Disagree: Kyle
    • Replies: @George
    "The mechanics toiling shoulder to shoulder in tight spaces such as fuel tanks inside wings."

    Mechanics are probably assembling and installing things like wire harnesses. I think they should hire teenagers to do it as they are the most invulnerable group. Maybe it is time to relax child labor laws as the 'they should be in school' argument has devolved into they should be self isolating watching some sort of online something or other.
  2. In the eighties, there were two manufacturers of schoelaces in my country, being kept alive by army contracts with the explicit aim to keep soldiers supplied with laces for their boots.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    They are kept alive by their votes, their boss's campaign contributions, and their representatives' "machination" in congress.

    You guys are trying to throw away the baby with the washing water. As if all the economic thinking are completely without merits, simply because of perceived troubles at the moment.
    , @obwandiyag
    Just in time manufacturing is the culprit. It was supposed to be good, but I was telling people it is bad long before the current emergency. Thank god for our financial and industrial geniuses in this can-do kind of country.

    The classic line is, "Just in time manufacturing means, just when you go looking for a product, they're all out."
  3. It’s almost like everyone involved in the saber-rattling against China is entirely dishonest and immoral.

    Masks for the imaginary state of ‘Israel’, though!

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Israel is not imaginary. The complaint of its detractors is that it is quite real and it thrives.
    , @Sean
    Ian Lipkin (advisor on the film Contagion) pointed out that on December 31st, researchers in China identified the Wuhan disease as a coronavirus but said, ‘It’s not highly transmissible’. The World Health Organisation parroted it, although the number of infections the Chinese were reporting ought to have made it obvious the Wuhan disease was spreading easily from person to person. Such a disconnect between the known d=facts and what the WHO accepted as an explanation amounts to conspiring with China. About the misleading information that China provided to him and other international experts Lipkin was quoted 'we will never find out what the Chinese knew and when'. Their assimilation was why on the 24th of January, Doctor Fauci gave a briefing for senators in which he said there was very little danger to the US from the Wuhan disease. Later that day he repeated that opinion at a press conference. During this time the Chinese were demanding that international flights from China be accepted by other countries but they had banned all internal flights from Wuhan.

    The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and went away in the summer only to come back with new and spectacular virulence especially men of military age (the W shape age graph). Obviously myriad soldiers in cramped unhygienic conditions created the environment for the extra virulence to evolve.What is currently happening may seem in retrospect to be a dress rehearsal for a big (second) wave in October out of Chinese detention camps as Professor Ewald has expressed concern about. It would be no huge surprise if COVID-19 came back in October as the 1918 flu did with specialised virulence for the ages of those in the Xinjiang detention camps, who are not elderly, and with a death rate of several percent. What does China say to these concerns?


    https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/china-says-theres-no-risk-of-a-covid-19-outbreak-in-xinjiang-camps-dont-believe-it/
    In December, China claimed to have released the more than 1 million Uyghurs and other persecuted peoples detained in “vocational training centers” as part of its campaign to “eradicate ideological viruses.” Shohrat Zakir, the chairman of the Uyghur region, told the press that everyone in the camps had “graduated” and were out and living “happy lives.”
     
    Lies.
  4. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    • Replies: @BB753
    "Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners AND PSYCHOPATHIC AMERICAN CEOs who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you (...)"

    There, fixed it for you!
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    China just dumped it all in the ocean or burned it in open pits, anyway.

    Five Asian Countries Dump More Plastic Into Oceans Than Anyone Else Combined: How You Can Help
    , @Anon
    You have a good point in general, but the recyclables example is not apt. The barges of trash sent to China were largely just being dumped into landfill. The Chinese government cracked down on the non-government bad actors doing this years ago. It turns out that most recycling isn't cost effective, whether done in China or the U.S. Cities that still collect separated trash tend to lose money, having to pay recyclers to take it. In some blue states it's politically hard to eliminate such programs.

    The New York Times covered some of these issues a year ago here:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/16/business/local-recycling-costs.html

    The green websites have also been covering it.
    , @mikeInThe716
    Most recycling is a waste - it's virtue signaling. The USA and North America have landfill space for thousands of years.

    Recent advances in metallic separation technology have allowed old scrap metal landfills to be economically "mined". The same will happen with plastics and re-usables. Smart, efficient robots will "mining" old landfills by next century.

    "Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade" by Adam Minter is a realistic view of this issue. It will trigger over-emotional enviro-snowflakes, however.
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    China started trimming back importation of recyclables quite some time before Covid19. It has been an open secret in my town that for over a year the curbside recyclable collection program (run by a private waste management contractor at considerable expense to municipal taxpayers) has been a charade of late, as all of this metal, glass, paper, plastic and cardboard-- lovingly and obediently separated, goes straight into the landfill with the regular garbage.
    , @Tor597
    Agree with your main point, but recyclables is a poor example.

    China does not want to take recyclables because it is not profitable and pollutes their own country. It is basically only something a third world country would take on and even then only one who can use low quality recycled goods.

    That is why no other country wanted to take up the lost business.
    , @eD
    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.
    , @Anon
    Tell you what. We’ll trade ye our soy beans for yer tea.
    , @prime noticer
    "While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago?"

    only recycling metals makes any sense right now. when you 'recycle', they send most of the stuff to a landfill anyway. all that plastic, glass, and paper ends up in the ground. not in a factory. they might take the cardboard.

    when it makes economic sense to recycle that stuff, they might start doing it. the raw materials to make new paper and glass are dirt cheap though, so it will be a LONG time before that ever makes sense. it will probably never make economic sense to recycle plastic. basically what you want to do is to collect all that stuff in one place, so even if it only ends up in a landfill, you know where it all is. so 'recycling' to a landfill is still good.
    , @AKAHorace
    But surely you are not suggesting that the government interfere with the free market ?

    That would be socialist and un-American. Don't you want to get the government off the
    back of the American people ?
    , @dr kill
    Is that you, Karen? Hows the quarantine going in Doylestown?
    , @Corvinus
    "I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism."

    Globalism got us nice things and allowed to build a better here over there.

    "The average American should understand why their life currently sucks."

    So do you speak for the average American?
    , @MBlanc46
    Indeed, the foreigners don’t give a damn about us. Alas, our elites don’t give a damn about us, either.
  5. That would fly in the face of free trade ideology. Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Adam Smith's first exception to free trade was national defense.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.
    , @Anonymous
    Boeing depends heavily on trade. There are only so many planes that can be sold domestically. And competition in foreign markets with Airbus and others is the only thing that keeps Boeing honest and on its toes. Domestically, it's very bloated and corrupt as a result of its easy US government contracts. Promoting Boeing products in foreign markets requires some amount of outsourcing of manufacturing to foreign buyers of Boeing products, because unless they're very oil rich, they won't have any money to buy them, and because they won't just want planes but also some investment in productive enterprise as well.
  6. Masks are very essential protection against Coronavirus. But we goofed, in spite of trillions of spending money, we cannot make enough masks.
    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
    Rigorous mask use allows more social closeness and opening of factories
    Unfortunately, no nation except Taiwan was able to set up a few dozen extra mask factories. They have about 32 million (?) Taiwanese inhabitants.

    https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3891193

    Taiwan sets up 60 face mask production lines in a month

    Daily production of face masks projected to reach 10 million by mid-March

    22216

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Sincerely, Hart, Shafter and Marx, the men's clothier switched over to making mask. Workers, material and machines already in place.
    , @Lugash

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
     
    We're not an industrialized nation anymore. We're a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don't understand manufacturing processes.

    https://twitter.com/LHSummers/status/1241329121768230912
  7. … their own cloth masks, which, for guys working with rotating machinery, sounds like tempting Isadora Duncan’s fate.

    This was a problem with Somaliwomen and other over-, if well-, dressed Moslem gals working around machinery in factories. You have to choose between job protection and life protection. Nobody wins. Nobody can.

    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    Maybe the medieval barbarians could choose between modern employment and 8th century headgear.
  8. The 1968 movie, Isadora, depicted Isadora Duncan’s end rather graphically, in the last scene. It’s on YouTube. Vanessa Redgrave was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the title role.

    • Replies: @vhrm

    The 1968 movie, Isadora, depicted Isadora Duncan’s end rather graphically, in the last scene.
     
    Is never heard of her before Steve's post here but how has nobody mentioned Edna Mode yet?
    No capes!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R2aW03pwL0
  9. • Replies: @Sean

    https://www.unz.com/efingleton/what-went-wrong-at-boeing-my-two-cents/
    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).

    Even more troubling, however, has been the long-term cost in weakening Boeing’s competitiveness. This is something I identified in “Boeing, Boeing….Gone,” a cover story for The American Conservative, as far back as 2005. The point is that among the things Boeing has outsourced have been the wings and the wing-box. These are by far the most technologically advanced elements of an airframe and they were outsourced to a Japanese consortium led by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Part of the deal was that much of Boeing’s secret wing-building know-how had to be transferred to Japan. The decision was highly controversial with Boeing workers who saw it as a direct threat to their jobs. Outraged at the prone position they were asked to adopt towards their information-gathering Japanese counterparts, they were quoted by author Karl Sabbagh as vulgarly referring to Boeing’s technology-transfer deal as the “open kimono” policy.
     
    , @indocon
    Honestly I don't see any need for new airframes by global aviation industry for next few years.
  10. @Anonymous (n)
    That would fly in the face of free trade ideology. Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow...you know...sinister.

    Adam Smith’s first exception to free trade was national defense.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    What does defense even mean anymore? Our war dept generally starts wars against whatever country israel doesn't like this week.

    Our ruling class hates Russia which has done us no harm but loves China which has nearly ruined the entire world. Hollywood stars would commit suicide rather than visit St. Petersburg but offer to travel to wuhan so they can clean the streets with their tongues.

    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Adam Smith's suggested first exception to free trade was national defense.

    http://moneyingreece.org/adam-smith-the-protectionist

    If any particular manufacture was necessary, indeed, for the defence of the society, it might not always be prudent to depend upon our neighbours for the supply; and if such manufacture could not otherwise be supported at home, it might not be unreasonable that all the other branches of industry should be taxed in order to support it. The bounties upon the exportation of British made sail-cloth, and British made gunpowder, may, perhaps, both be vindicated upon this principle.
     
    Notice that his clauses are all conditional: "might not always be," "might not be unreasonable," etc.

    Like all liberals, by the way, he was contradictory as all can be.
    , @Smithsonian_6

    Adam Smith’s first exception to free trade was national defense.
     
    Yup, we really need to expand the definition of what that encompasses.
  11. “throttled”- I like that word used in a slightly different context.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency. I’ve noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy. I’d potentially bring in immigrants from less represented parts of the world to prevent single ethnic groups from wielding outsized influence in this way. The intent is obviously to force a union between established populations and specific immigrant populations. Deep State doesn’t embrace true diversity nor does it place high value on democracy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency.
     
    Codependency helps to prevent another Holocaust.
    , @Anonymouse
    >I’ve noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy.

    Like Chinese laundries or Greeks from the Greek islands imported to dive for sponges in Florida back in the day or undocumented Mexicans doing the gardening. This is not a bug but a feature.
    , @Art Deco
    Deep State controls our economy


    John Brennan and Andrew McCabe know nothing of business and industry. (McCabe's wife probably understands in a broad way what their CFA is doing with their money).
    , @Neoconned
    Isn't it true 1 specific clan or tribe from India controls a huge portion of our hotel industry?
  12. It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists

    Perhaps large aircraft manufacturers are facing the prospect of shrinking considerably, and so are the salaries of their highly paid employees.

  13. I recall that Boeing announced the launch of in-house 3D printing of PPE gear for medical workers:
    https://aircargoeye.com/boeing-harnesses-3d-printing-mass-produce-face-masks/

    Did the union want to keep some? Did Washington state politicians pressure Boeing to not keep some for their own use? I thought that Democrats were at least still supposed to be pro-union.

    Maybe the workers need to jury rig some drop-down emergency oxygen masks and air supply from the parts bin to wear in close quarters on the assembly line.

    • Replies: @Russ
    Boeing is 3D-printing face SHIELDS, not masks. Perhaps too subtle a difference for aircargoeye.com (at least in its URL)

    From the LA Times article:


    The plane maker plans to limit scarce N95 masks for plant workers, relying mainly on cloth face coverings.
     
    The plane maker does not seem to understand that N95 masks protect you from them, while cloth masks protect them from you. Then again: Perhaps the Washington-state potheads fully understand, and are just introspective and softly amused by the difference.
  14. Maybe Boeing should ask the vendor of the HEPA filtration systems on their 787s if they can do something for them.

    https://donaldsonaerospace-defense.com/library/files/documents/pdfs/071727.pdf

  15. @Anonymous (n)
    That would fly in the face of free trade ideology. Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow...you know...sinister.

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.

    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering… a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost?
     
    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we'd better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports. Thanks for the clarification!
    , @miss marple
    Domestically produced tea costs about the same or even less. If Florida grows bananas? Would be inexpensive just maybe not available year round. I assume coffee can be/is grown in the same state as tea...
    , @anonymous
    "Critical" is the key word. Trade would exist.
    , @Anonymous
    Bananas dont do well outside the tropics.

    Cant have bananas rotting in the groves.
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Are you suggesting that domestically produced coffee, tea and bananas were ever a possibility (outside of Hawaii). Or perhaps that we annex Mesoamerica?
    , @Hibernian
    Tea is critical... ...to Starbucks.
    , @TomSchmidt
    Have you HAD Puerto Rican and Kona coffee? That sounds like a pretty good arrangement if we can encourage more of it. Robusta delenda est!
    , @dr kill
    Dont worry your pretty little head.
    TOP. KARENS. are deciding as we speak which industries to declare essential (and worthy of Fed price supports).
    TOP. MEN. are buying those companies now while they are wounded.
    See milk and sugar subsidies for an idea of how it works..
    , @Whiskey
    Coffee CAN be grown in the US, it just would have to be mechanized. Growers in Hawaii are already experimenting with planting and specialized harvest machines. Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen. So the answer is, quite a bit of coffee could and should be grown in the US. California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas are all excellent places to grow very high quality coffee. The same could be said for Chocolate cultivated not in Africa depending on cheap labor but Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and South Carolina.

    Tea is grown in the Himalayas, so it could be grown in many places in the US.

    We have millions of unemployed anyway as most service jobs are dead dead dead so there is plenty of labor to soak up and it would be an excellent idea. It would support specialized agricultural robotic harvesters which has enormous national security implications (repurposing for other uses as needed). As well as mechanics to fix them, etc. A nation of mechanics beats a nation of service workers.
    , @G. Poulin
    I once visited a tea plantation in South Carolina. They were fully automated. Had to be, since all the help ran off. No, just kidding about the last part.
  16. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost?

    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we’d better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports. Thanks for the clarification!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    I hate bell and other peppers, and Mexican food in general. I see highly elevated tariffs on these toxins fruits as harmless. Such crap doesn't belong on pizzas and hoagies.

    I'm guessing most here would disagree with me on this.

    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we’d better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports.
     
    As I've said elsewhere, I'd support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust. This could be taken further-- any Chinese-made products you own now would have to be turned in to the Feds to be destroyed as contraband. (Yes, like Australia's gun buyback.) Search warrants would be made easily available to facilitate enforcement.

    What device are you posting from?

    That would be tough, but all good deeds are. I still own a three-decade-old Minnesota-made Zeos monitor; I'm not sure where I could find a CPU to match. But they have to be around somewhere.

    As Lenin said, sometimes you have to take one step back to take two forward.
  17. Here in the UK domestic manufacturers quickly stepped up when China became toxic:

    https://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/first-batch-barbour-scrubs-gowns-18084417

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "domestic manufacturers quickly stepped up"

    But the UK still hasn't got enough. Probably not got enough domestic manufacturers.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/medical-staff-face-weeks-without-protective-gowns
  18. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    “Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners AND PSYCHOPATHIC AMERICAN CEOs who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you (…)”

    There, fixed it for you!

    • Replies: @Russ

    PSYCHOPATHIC AMERICAN CEOs
     
    who are only American in terms of where they fart.
  19. @but an humble craftsman
    In the eighties, there were two manufacturers of schoelaces in my country, being kept alive by army contracts with the explicit aim to keep soldiers supplied with laces for their boots.

    They are kept alive by their votes, their boss’s campaign contributions, and their representatives’ “machination” in congress.

    You guys are trying to throw away the baby with the washing water. As if all the economic thinking are completely without merits, simply because of perceived troubles at the moment.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    So you would have them close down thanks to the utterly corrupt "free market" so that the product is made by slave labor in some far-off country, the upshot being you can't get at it when your need it, as now. Fuck your baby and your bathwater, libertarian slime.
  20. @Redneck farmer
    Adam Smith's first exception to free trade was national defense.

    What does defense even mean anymore? Our war dept generally starts wars against whatever country israel doesn’t like this week.

    Our ruling class hates Russia which has done us no harm but loves China which has nearly ruined the entire world. Hollywood stars would commit suicide rather than visit St. Petersburg but offer to travel to wuhan so they can clean the streets with their tongues.

  21. Boeing cited new U.S. government guidelines directing companies to reserve the respirators for hospital staff on the front lines of the coronavirus crisis.

    Wait a second. What “companies”? Boeing? Or the U.S. companies that sell the masks?

    If the directed companies are the U.S. manufacturers / middlemen, what’s to stop Boeing from buying the masks directly from a supplier in China?

    The question is only semi-rhetorical. Because we now know that the U.S. government will attempt to economically crush any political or business entity that does not surrender completely to its diktats and demands.

  22. None of us really knows how this is going to unfold, as far as the summer, back into the Fall and then Winter (again), nor what potential mutations will occur, with this virus or any other for that matter, but I do wonder…if even a milder form of panic and anxiety remain in the general public…

    How are BJJ gyms/clubs going to remain viable? You cannot get a more intimate level of contact in any sport (even wrestling or judo) as you do in BJJ. Maybe tengo dancing, but that’s about it. It requires constant, and graphically close contact between rolling partners.

    My guess is, eventually people just take the “risk” (which still appears rather low) and go with it. But all this panic will hurt the business opportunities normally out there to entice your average joe to sign up for classes.

  23. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Domestically produced tea costs about the same or even less. If Florida grows bananas? Would be inexpensive just maybe not available year round. I assume coffee can be/is grown in the same state as tea…

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Good coffee requires altitude and rich volcanic soil.
    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    Bigelow Tea does have a tea plantation in South Carolina, and they sell their production domestically. I suspect that it is only available online, as I have never seen this beside their other lines in markets.
  24. Do you think you might have missed the story here? While fussing about silly masks, a great experiment in the awesome power of propaganda to destroy currencies and liberties played out before us.

  25. I knew a guy who worked in a generating station. Shortly after fall protection was made mandatory by Osha, he was working alongside a fellow wearing one of the new harnesses. He carelessly dropped the lanyard while he was standing next to a shaft that was rotating at some awful speed. Thankfully, the shaft had been painted, and the paint layer broke loose and acted like a bearing, allowing the lanyard to float instead of wrapping around the shaft and killing him. I’m sure it seemed like an eternity til they got it stopped. It made the company safety bulletin, so I believe it to be true.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Shortly after fall protection was made mandatory by Osha
     
    It took me a second before I figured out you meant OSHA, rather than some Japanese company.
  26. Publicly traded corporation C-suite people only care about the next options period. EPS feeds into that a little, but mostly they can raise the share price by announcing job cuts for American workers and off shoring those jobs to India and China, so they do.

    Next year can take care of itself, they made 10x their salary now.

  27. OT
    Corona-chan has passed a major milestone.

    It passed one-half the 2017-2018 influenza season dead on Thursday.

    Will it catch up? Will we finally be able to say “it’s just the flu, bro”?

    • Replies: @Frank the Prof

    It passed one-half the 2017-2018 influenza season dead on Thursday.
     
    Where's your source? Check out this one:

    https://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/not-like-the-flu-not-like-car-crashes-not-like

    Wuflu is running at 50x the rate of 2017-18 flu death rate in NY State. In the USA it now is greater than heart disease.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/chart-us-weekly-coronavirus-deaths-compared-heart-disease-cancer-flu-2020-4#covid-19-is-now-killing-more-americans-weekly-than-heart-disease-or-cancer-did-on-average-per-week-in-2018-1

  28. OT
    LOL at NYC retconning an extra 4,000 Corona deaths on 4/17.

    NYC Adds Nearly 4,000 People Who Never Tested Positive To Coronavirus Death Tolls

    This happens just as there is a trend of steady decline starting to happen. The numbers need a little shot in the arm, to mask this trend.

    2488, 2166, 2091+4302, 2017

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "LOL at NYC retconning an extra 4,000 Corona deaths on 4/17."

    Expect an explosion of retconned kungfluey deaths in the coming days as empty cash-strapped hospitals realize the CARES Act pays them a cool $13,000 per kungflu diagnosis, no verification required 💰💰💰

    We ❤ you CoronaHoax!
  29. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    China just dumped it all in the ocean or burned it in open pits, anyway.

    Five Asian Countries Dump More Plastic Into Oceans Than Anyone Else Combined: How You Can Help

  30. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:

    The irony here is that there has been a battle-tipping deus ex machina on the level of the taiphoon that wrecked the invasion fleet of Ghengis Khan’s grandson before it reached Japan. Wuflu is a boon for national self sufficiency and anti-immigration. It represents a chance to shut the borders to all countries too inept/low IQ to mount an effective elimination response.

    Yet there are protests of so-called conservatives against effective Wuflu fighting measures. SMDH.

  31. Boeing would find it more cost effective to build some mask producing machinery since 3m, the largest producer of n95 masks, already stated that most of their production capacity is in China. Is this story just the union’s positioning that they want another raise and maybe the company should move production to a nonunion plant down South or is this more Democratic leadership announcing further resistance to reopening the economy?

  32. Anonymous[208] • Disclaimer says:

    The U.S. Defense budget should subsidize a certain amount of personal protective equipment manufacturing within the 50 states.

    This general class of problem is hardly unique in the history of nations, so it’s stupid that we are still throttled by it.

    Cut the $5 billion+ annual subsidies to Israel and focus on manufacturing for domestic needs.

  33. @miss marple
    "throttled"- I like that word used in a slightly different context.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency. I've noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy. I'd potentially bring in immigrants from less represented parts of the world to prevent single ethnic groups from wielding outsized influence in this way. The intent is obviously to force a union between established populations and specific immigrant populations. Deep State doesn't embrace true diversity nor does it place high value on democracy.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency.

    Codependency helps to prevent another Holocaust.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Codependency helps to prevent another Holocaust."

    Habeas corpi. By 1944, Germany had so little oil that it could not fuel its tanks and planes, and was forced to invent costly biodiesel derived from coal. Fresh moist bodies require a lot of fuel to incinerate. Yet there are no mass graves interring the six gorillion bodies. It never happened.
  34. @Mr Mox
    Machinists with direct acces to "rotary machinery" is mostly a thing of the past, at least in our civilized and regulated societies (although youtube videos out of China tells another story)
    A CNC machinist would be hard pressed - so to speak, to get involved (also so to speak) in an Isadora Duncan type of accident.

    “The mechanics toiling shoulder to shoulder in tight spaces such as fuel tanks inside wings.”

    Mechanics are probably assembling and installing things like wire harnesses. I think they should hire teenagers to do it as they are the most invulnerable group. Maybe it is time to relax child labor laws as the ‘they should be in school’ argument has devolved into they should be self isolating watching some sort of online something or other.

  35. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    “Critical” is the key word. Trade would exist.

  36. @Mr McKenna
    Someone should let Boeing in on a little secret...

    https://i.ibb.co/GTwJvgQ/5e820ddc2ff83933d8482d4b-width-900-amp-format-jpeg-amp-auto-webp.png
    https://i.ibb.co/BgfYCG0/5e810c0214f18f6b11595ac5-width-900-amp-format-jpeg-amp-auto-webp.jpg
    https://i.ibb.co/2F8BFn0/5e810d841378e3718259a173-width-1200-format-jpeg.jpg


    https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-photos-airplanes-grounded-parked-runways-satellite-2020-3

    https://www.unz.com/efingleton/what-went-wrong-at-boeing-my-two-cents/
    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).

    Even more troubling, however, has been the long-term cost in weakening Boeing’s competitiveness. This is something I identified in “Boeing, Boeing….Gone,” a cover story for The American Conservative, as far back as 2005. The point is that among the things Boeing has outsourced have been the wings and the wing-box. These are by far the most technologically advanced elements of an airframe and they were outsourced to a Japanese consortium led by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Part of the deal was that much of Boeing’s secret wing-building know-how had to be transferred to Japan. The decision was highly controversial with Boeing workers who saw it as a direct threat to their jobs. Outraged at the prone position they were asked to adopt towards their information-gathering Japanese counterparts, they were quoted by author Karl Sabbagh as vulgarly referring to Boeing’s technology-transfer deal as the “open kimono” policy.

    • Replies: @Russ

    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).
     
    Okay, but the paradigm was set by Lockheed Martin and the F-35. Suppliers in fifty states and who knows how many countries. Program awarded in 2001 and just now reaching carrier decks (at far lower numbers than first planned). Biggest program in DoD history; biggest flop on DoD history -- 5th-generation fighter finally just now coming online, with the Pentagon now never shutting up about 6th-gen fighters. At least Northrop-Grumman stopped bidding on (overextending) new work once they were awarded the B-21. The 787 is hardly alone in such managerial malfeasance within the aerospace industry.
  37. Totally OT, but now that the legendary classic “Black Panther” is in occasional rotation on cable, I finally got to see about 30 minutes of it, in pieces here and there.

    I, I uh, I mean, um, you know….

    I simply could not believe how bad it was. Forget about my hating comic book movies in general and Blacketty-black movies on principle, this was just bad, sloppy film-making in general terms. Terrible casting, dreadful acting, retarded production design, sub-retarded editing and direction, I really sort of couldn’t believe it.

    Was kind of expecting respectable mediocrity, but… come on, guys, really.

    Things are worse than anybody has guessed.

    • Replies: @theMann
    Oh, come on it wasn't that .....bad. Wait a minute, it sucked.


    Two silver linings to come out of WuFlu/CoronaFraud:

    1. Hollywood is dead, financially dead, gone, buried, never coming back.

    2. $500/hour Hookers are now $1oo/hour Hookers.



    Btw, with just about 75 to 100 times as many deaths Attributed to Corona Virus as we have now, we will be approaching Hong Kong '68.
    , @Inquiring Mind
    I mean, how does Black Panther rate against a Blacksploitation classic such as Pam Grier in "Coffy."

    Cliche-ridden, ham acted with Ms. Grier displaying a heaving chest throughout all of her violent acts of revenge. So bad that it is good, in a certain cult movie sense. It is realistic in that the female Coffy character is not able to overpower the male bad guys, so she has to resort to guile and "fighting dirty." It is almost Sailer-esque in its treatment of the corruption exhibited by a do-gooder black politician.

    Does Black Panther rise to that level, or is it a dud in comparison?

  38. No doubt our nails along with facemasks are made in China and subject to Chinese bureaucratic delays and restrictions on export.

    https://www.presidentialprayerteam.org/2020/04/17/virus-supplies-for-u-s-stuck-in-china/

    Zerohedge links to very informative interview with Kyle Bass on our problem with The Hotel China.If we get tough with them they are very likely to just cut off our pharmaceutical supply chain.

    It wasn’t so long ago that the US government had strategic stockpiles of essential commodities and gave subsidies to US producers ( Remember Sam Donaldson’s ranch got a mohair subsidy). The left called these schemes ‘corporate welfare’ and they were mostly ended. Its also worth remembering that when the Battle of Britain began gas masks were issued to the people of London. I don’t think the UK had time to manufacture them but they probably did have warehouses full of them left over from WW1.

    • Replies: @anonymous

    Zerohedge links to very informative interview with Kyle Bass on our problem with The Hotel China.
     
    I can't imagine Kyle Bass is credible on China. Before corona, his investment fund was on track to closing down because of investor pull outs after heavy losses from bets against the Chinese economy. On Twitter it looks like he is dedicated to vengeance.
  39. On topic – Am I still banned Ron, for disagreeing with you?

  40. Every Globalist knows that when Globalism seems not to solve problems, you simply must double down on Globalism – outsource more factory work, bring in many more immigrants, give more affirmative action.

    The lives of billionaire cosmopolitans deserve at least that much trust and respect.

  41. OT

    Maryland County Health Department Suggests Shopping Days Based on Last Names

    Last name starting with A-C shop on dates ending with 0 and 5
    Last name starting with D-G shop on dates ending with 1 and 6
    Last name starting with H-L shop on dates ending with 2 and 7
    Last name starting with M-R shop on dates ending with 3 and 8
    Last name starting with S-Z shop on dates ending with 4 and 9

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    There are many couples, including married couples, in which the two partners have different last names.

    Supposing they shop together.

    On which day do they shop?

    And don’t say “the man’s last name” or “the woman’s last name” for obvious reasons.
  42. It’s important to remember that for whatever reasons N95 masks were never considered something that we would need large supplies of for the general public. They were for medical staff only. Getting everyone masked up was never part of anyone’s strategic thinking. If it was, why stop with flimsy cloth masks? Why not stockpile full gas masks?

    Anyway, looking forward to the isteve takes on lock-down culture. How’s everyone holding up? This is going to be a really weird shared cultural experience for us in a few decades. All of us are locked down and going through the same, or similar, experiences. I wonder how it’s going to look in the future…

    And what happened to Carole Baskin’s second husband? Drug dealer at the bottom of the gulf? Fancy Feast? Hiding out in Costa Rica? Will anyone remember this question in 3 months?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Nathan, my mother is 102 years old and still talks about the Great Depression,but that was a time of material want, what's lacking here is freedom. We have a new six week old grand daughter, can't visit her. My daughter has a new condo where we were going to celebrate Easter, never happened.I would really like to have a mindless job that I could do from home for twenty hours a week. Used to volunteer two days a week at a soup kitchen can't do that. Used to start my day with morning Mass, can't do that. Used to shop daily for our evening meal, not wise to do that. Can't swim, can't golf, can't lots of things. When the weather breaks I will plant a garden. My family is healthy. My wife and I are still healthy. I will count my blessings. I can do that. Stay safe.
    , @Neoconned
    I'm having serious issues with my neighbors. My wife and i are buying a trailer and moving out of our apartment.

    2 of my neighbors have told me they're suffering from serious mental health issues from being either out of work or locked down in their apartment.....

    I think substance abuse and suicide rates are about to shoot up.....

  43. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Bananas dont do well outside the tropics.

    Cant have bananas rotting in the groves.

    • Replies: @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    This isn’t true. Where there is a will there is a way. I personally have been to an indoor greenhouse of commercial bananas in Iceland. ICELAND! Plants grow anywhere you can engineer to be pleasing to them, and with enough gumption that’s anywhere
    , @danand

    “Can’t have bananas”
     
    https://youtu.be/GCS1frMC004
  44. @Redneck farmer
    Adam Smith's first exception to free trade was national defense.

    Adam Smith’s suggested first exception to free trade was national defense.

    http://moneyingreece.org/adam-smith-the-protectionist

    If any particular manufacture was necessary, indeed, for the defence of the society, it might not always be prudent to depend upon our neighbours for the supply; and if such manufacture could not otherwise be supported at home, it might not be unreasonable that all the other branches of industry should be taxed in order to support it. The bounties upon the exportation of British made sail-cloth, and British made gunpowder, may, perhaps, both be vindicated upon this principle.

    Notice that his clauses are all conditional: “might not always be,” “might not be unreasonable,” etc.

    Like all liberals, by the way, he was contradictory as all can be.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Like all liberals, by the way, he was contradictory as all can be.
     
    You mean like an economist.
  45. On the day she died, Duncan was a passenger in a brand-new convertible sportscar that she was learning to drive. As she leaned back in her seat to enjoy the sea breeze, her enormous red scarf (“which she had worn since she took up communism,” one newspaper reported) somehow blew into the well of the rear wheel on the passenger side. It wound around the axle, tightening around Duncan’s neck and dragging her from the car and onto the cobblestone street. She died instantly.

    A fitting end for a communist.

  46. Anon[791] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    You have a good point in general, but the recyclables example is not apt. The barges of trash sent to China were largely just being dumped into landfill. The Chinese government cracked down on the non-government bad actors doing this years ago. It turns out that most recycling isn’t cost effective, whether done in China or the U.S. Cities that still collect separated trash tend to lose money, having to pay recyclers to take it. In some blue states it’s politically hard to eliminate such programs.

    The New York Times covered some of these issues a year ago here:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/16/business/local-recycling-costs.html

    The green websites have also been covering it.

  47. Anonymous[419] • Disclaimer says:

    But, on the other hand, just *who* predicted or even hinted towards this present emergency of a killer airborne viral disease epidemic?

    The trouble is that face masks are too humble for their own good. Too humble to be noticed, or even cared about, and therefore just ripe for globalization.
    On a similar note, notice that virtually the entirety of the west’s shoes and footwear come from China, and the capacity to make them locally has disappeared, thus the west is more or less at the mercy of China for the ‘right’ not to get frost bitten feet.
    A shoe embargo is to be scoffed at and is ‘unthinkable’ of course ……..?

  48. Steve. when it comes to China specifically, a quite different problem is introduced, for retail manufactured goods we depend on, even though they ARE in good supply. Call it the “For Lack of a Descent Hammer” effect. The prevalent crappy quality of Chinese retail (at least) goods, seems almost DESIGNED to ruin American DIY human capital, as documented humorously in “Brilliant plan by Chinese Communist Party Cadres pans out well”.

    It goes like this:

    For want of a decent handle,
    the hammer head was lost.
    For want of a hammer head,
    the claw hammer was lost.
    For want of another hammer,
    a gallon of gas and a half hour was lost.
    For want of a non-minority customer-service girl,
    another 10 minutes was lost.
    For want of a receipt,
    eight-fifty was lost.
    In the meantime,
    there were plenty of cheap low-quality nails around.
    That’s not the problem, Steve.

    • Replies: @Alden
    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.
  49. I have been surprise that the paleocons have failed to use the lack of an industrial base in the U.S. as a reason to massively scale back the Department of Defense. It is obvious to everyone that there is no way that the U.S. can fight a war with China or with any country that China supports. The DoD is too dependent of medical supplies, computer parts, and manufactured items from China to every win a conflict with them. Image what would happend to Defense Health Systems if China cut off the U.S. from everything like surgical masks to pharmaceutical components.

    Why spend $700 billion a year of a standing military that is so fragil that it cannot possibly win a conflict with China?

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    Is this a joke? If we were fighting a war with China none of these save the boomer measures would be in existence. We’d be at herd immunity and any boomer who offered the slightest criticism would get thrown down a well. No one gives a shit what anyone over 60 thinks during a war unless they are the president of have more than 2 stars on their shoulders.
  50. “It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks, but is instead asking them to improvise their own cloth masks, which, for guys working with rotating machinery, sounds like tempting Isadora Duncan’s fate.”

    That’s capitalism, Mr. Sailer. Jeff Bezos has grown his vast fortune by another $24 billion so far during Covid-19…and is not providing enough protections for workers, nor offering paid sick time. And when a worker dared to cross Amazon, company executives sought to smear him.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/02/amazon-chris-smalls-smart-articulate-leaked-memo

    “The U.S. Defense budget should subsidize a certain amount of personal protective equipment manufacturing within the 50 states.”

    It would be nice if our own corporations were not profiting while our own people #DieForTheDow.

    https://theintercept.com/2020/04/01/coronavirus-medical-supplies-export

    It would be nice if Trump did not have the federal government compete with state governments for those limited domestic supplies.

    https://www.boston.com/news/politics/2020/03/26/charlie-baker-trump-administration-medical-supplies

  51. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    Most recycling is a waste – it’s virtue signaling. The USA and North America have landfill space for thousands of years.

    Recent advances in metallic separation technology have allowed old scrap metal landfills to be economically “mined”. The same will happen with plastics and re-usables. Smart, efficient robots will “mining” old landfills by next century.

    “Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade” by Adam Minter is a realistic view of this issue. It will trigger over-emotional enviro-snowflakes, however.

    • Agree: danand
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Absolutely right, Mike. The problem for cities is NIMBY for the landfills and the cost of trucking waste farther out to places that haven't been developed enough yet to have a NIMBY opposition. The price of collecting trash will just go up, but there's indeed plenty of space for landfills.

    The virtual signalers in the "greener" cities with the bigger green cans think that everything they put in that can is going to be turned back into something. Most of it will be sorted out at the transfer station back toward the landfill. However, the virtual signaling treehuggers don't want to hear about that or think about it. No, they absolutely do not want to take a field trip to the transfer station, thank you very much.

    There are only some types of material for which it is cost effective to recycle versus trucking out to the landfill. See "Toward Sustainable Stupidity". Another thing lots of the enviro-nuts don't think or talk about. Auto are about the most recycled things in America. Go to a modern junk-yard, now that the internet has gotten ahold of them. You can't find a damn part that hasn't been picked, sometimes, and the steel will get used another day.
  52. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    China started trimming back importation of recyclables quite some time before Covid19. It has been an open secret in my town that for over a year the curbside recyclable collection program (run by a private waste management contractor at considerable expense to municipal taxpayers) has been a charade of late, as all of this metal, glass, paper, plastic and cardboard– lovingly and obediently separated, goes straight into the landfill with the regular garbage.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Good old fashioned incineration is the best way to dispose of most trash. When I was younger we had a huge fireplace and burned a lot of newspapers and books (my mother had a used book store) in winter.
  53. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Are you suggesting that domestically produced coffee, tea and bananas were ever a possibility (outside of Hawaii). Or perhaps that we annex Mesoamerica?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Are you suggesting that domestically produced coffee, tea and bananas were ever a possibility (outside of Hawaii). Or perhaps that we annex Mesoamerica?
     
    And southern Florida, and outlying territories. But domestic sugar is fiercely protected, so why not bananas too? Same principle. The fellow attacked "free-trade ideologues", so I'm just questioning "fair-trade ideologues".

    Imagine senators from Florida and Hawaii demand 300% tariffs on bananas, and, thanks to vote-trading, get their wish. A pound of bananas once cost an hour of a man's wages. Now it's two or three minutes'. Why not go back? Growers in the 'Glades and on the Big Island would be ecstatic.

    So would many in Washington, California, Michigan, and upstate New York-- when Americans give up foreign banana splits for American apples, pears, and cherries.

    Elsewhere on this forum I have advocated a return to our old total embargo on Chinese products. No one else has seconded that so far. Since everything from that country is produced with torture, the principle behind this is more solid.
  54. Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house. Perhaps some of those machinists could be trained to work, uh, sewing machines.

    The masks might not match exactly N95 specifications, but all that is needed is something to stop people coughing into the air or onto surfaces, so they should be able to make something good enough for government work with materials on hand.

    Or if they can’t do it, they could contract it out to a sweatshop in Haiti. Now if they could just find a working plane somewhere they could borrow to bring them in to the US.

    If this whole thing were not so tragic, you would have to laugh.

    • Replies: @Anon

    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house. Perhaps some of those machinists could be trained to work, uh, sewing machines.
     
    Good idea, although non-homemade face masks do not involve sewing. Boeing could make the masks "N94" level so as technically not to violate the law.

    Of course, they would end up on Amazon and eBay, causing Boeing a PR nightmare.
    , @AnonAnon

    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house.
     
    A relative who works for Boeing tells me the Huntington Beach site is making masks for their Seattle co-workers.
  55. The Mask requirement is just Public Health theater to satisfy all the hysterics. As such any old thing that can plausibly called a mask will serve.

    • Agree: vhrm
  56. The Surgeon General himself shows in a 45-second video how to make your own cloth mask out of an old Megadeth T-shirt or whatever, so they must do some good — at least by leaving the truly effective masks for people who really need them.

    In other mask news, the series of daily Google Doodles saluting workaday heroes finally started using O’s instead of E’s, so the cute little cartoon figures now can wear their facemasks properly rather than on what appears to be their backsides.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=thank+you+coronavirus+helpers&oi=ddle&ct=153491078&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwiA4L3znvPoAhX9hHIEHUrHAAIQPQgB

  57. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Tea is critical… …to Starbucks.

  58. @Sincerity.net
    Masks are very essential protection against Coronavirus. But we goofed, in spite of trillions of spending money, we cannot make enough masks.
    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
    Rigorous mask use allows more social closeness and opening of factories
    Unfortunately, no nation except Taiwan was able to set up a few dozen extra mask factories. They have about 32 million (?) Taiwanese inhabitants.

    https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3891193

    Taiwan sets up 60 face mask production lines in a month

    Daily production of face masks projected to reach 10 million by mid-March

    22216

    Sincerely, Hart, Shafter and Marx, the men’s clothier switched over to making mask. Workers, material and machines already in place.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    Also, the My Pillow guy shifted his production to facemasks.

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/03/31/mypillow-founder-and-ceo-responds-to-media-critics-who-ridicule-his-faith-based-effort-to-manufacture-coronavirus-masks/

    Geez, didn't you hear about that in the MSM? Guess the militant atheists over there took umbrage, eh? /s
    , @Elli
    "Non-medical masks."

    https://www.licenseglobal.com/global-news/hart-schaffner-factory-commits-making-masks

    They are sewing fabric masks which is better than nothing.

    It is way short of N95s or surgical masks.

    N95s are made from non-woven melt-blown extrusion fabric and shaped on molds.

    Do we have ancient machinists who will come out of retirement and train apprentices?
    , @Known Fact
    I'll take one in a classic blazer look and another in a nice gray herringbone
  59. it’s stupid that we are still throttled by it

    Well it’s quite simple, Steve-a-rino.

    You know who else ramped up domestic production? Oh that’s right — HITLER!!!

    Checkmate, racists.

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
  60. The Want of a Nail (feat. Bobby Womack) (2006 Remaster)

  61. Write About What You Know

    I could sum someone up in a word,
    By availing myself of charactery:
    I’d characterize you as nerd.
    And what nerd ever worked in a factory?

    Please don’t think me a scold or a hector;
    No offense in a good-natured jape:
    Sing the joys of a pocket protector,
    And of fixing your glasses with tape.

  62. I managed to secure, through a contractor friend, two cartons plus two, 22 total, N-95 masks. I am looking at one right now. It is basically a pressed shape made of a dense fabric, a small metal strip you squeeze shape to the bridge of your nose and an plastic intake/exhaust nozzle and two elastic straps to secure around your head. Really don’t see how hard it would be to set up a stamping line to form the masks and an injection machine to make the plastic exhaust nozzle. Is there a licensing problem? Could you make the nozzles on a 3D printer?

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    We found we had 3 N95 masks. We sent one to my sister-in-law in NYC. After wearing it to the Whole Food$ grocery on Houston Street she tried to sanitize it in the oven and it melted. Oh well!

    Having worn it several times for outdoor excursions I find it has acquired a somewhat funky smell when worn. I realize that I'm smelling me. I'm considering washing out the smell. OTOH, it's a kind of calendar marker.
    , @Lugash
    You can skip the nozzle. It allows easier breathing out, which isn't good for others if you're infected.

    I think the issue with N95 masks is the mask material itself. As I understand it(could be wrong) it uses electrostatic discharge somehow to make the material porous. I'm sure the material is made overseas, all the existing supplier/manufacturer relationships are overseas and any supply for the next year at least is already bought.

    The other issue is probably the molds to form the masks at scale.
  63. So the Pentagon subsidizes US manufacturers to make personal protective equipment. Like all military procurement, the masks are subject to stringent rules on inspection, traceability, markings, (working in the industry, I’ve seen items be rejected because the part number was stenciled on in a shade of grey literally two shades away on the color scale from the specified shade, and yes, there are thousands of shades), sexual harassment training, woman/minority owned small business requirements, etc. etc. 3 months after the panic de jour died down, the NY Times would be running a huge expose about how simple masks cost $20 apiece, and we could be sourcing them from China for pennies. The company making them would be slapped with penalties, and quietly start sourcing them from China, while continuing to stamp the company name on the packaging.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    in a shade of grey literally two shades away on the color scale from the specified shade, and yes, there are thousands of shades
     
    I can think of at least 50.
  64. I’ve heard horror stories about people’s hands getting sucked into machinery and crushed. Here’s something I found on the osha website.

    Workers should not wear loose-fitting clothing, jewelry, or other items that could become entangled in machinery, and long hair should be worn under a cap or otherwise contained to prevent entanglement in moving machinery.

    https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3170/osha3170.html
    A long scarf goes against the common sense of these osha guidelines. I worry more about people getting bodily fluids on their hands and then touching things, other people, or things that other people touch often. Then other people getting that on their hands and transferring that to their mouth. Should we be masking up and gloving up?

    • Replies: @dr kill
    Got hitched in 78. Was farming at the time. Had read about a b ball playa losing a ring finger to a wedding ring dunk accident. Never worn it except on our wedding day. Jewelry is overrated.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Kyle, Years ago, thanks to a local WNY boy's injury while dunking a basketball, all dunking in scholastic games was banned. He wore his new HS ring, caught it on a hook that holds the net to the basketball rim and pulled his finger, tendons attached, from his hand. Remember seeing safety posters of a detached finger, tendons trailing alongside and the culprit ring. Best slogan..."No safety, Know pain, Know safety, No pain." Stay safe.
  65. Sad that Trump was fooled into order companies to produce costly ventilators , while doing little to produce masks (because the CDC informed him they are useless against CV) Clearly the CDC and the so-called health experts were lying to the public about masks.

    Trump finally invoked the Defense Production Act to prevent export of surgical masks and gloves in April and A Defense Department contract under the Defense Production Act will provide more than 40 million N95 respirator masks over the next 90 days. This is not enough.

    meanwhile Governor Cuomo has ordered all New Yorkers to wear a mask in public while Doctors are still banned from prescribing hydroxychoroquine to CV patients.

  66. Joe, the biggest hold up would be the molds, whether the procurement of them or their fabrications. They are the big sunk costs and the hurtle to overcome to get started injection molding or whatever. (I’m not saying cost is a factor in this case, but it’s the procurement.)

    3-D printers are way too slow to get millions of these things out the door.

    I hope you like your one, Joe. My wife did donate some extra masks she got from a friend to the grocery store. The customer service guy was appreciative, but I told her the manager might be constrained by CYA, bureaucratic rules on this and they would hopefully at least go home with the employees at least. I haven’t worn one yet…not agonna’ do it … too prudent.

    “Thanks FDA, for making American small business give up on lots of entrepreneurial manufacturing due to onerous rules and delays!” – Joe Chinaman

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Ach, I gave my masks to my family, but kudos to your wife. The 3D printer makes your proto type. A "me too" machine feels the proto type and make your master molds by replicating your model. It is that simple, but I guess maybe the fabric is a problem.
  67. @miss marple
    "throttled"- I like that word used in a slightly different context.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency. I've noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy. I'd potentially bring in immigrants from less represented parts of the world to prevent single ethnic groups from wielding outsized influence in this way. The intent is obviously to force a union between established populations and specific immigrant populations. Deep State doesn't embrace true diversity nor does it place high value on democracy.

    >I’ve noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy.

    Like Chinese laundries or Greeks from the Greek islands imported to dive for sponges in Florida back in the day or undocumented Mexicans doing the gardening. This is not a bug but a feature.

  68. @Buffalo Joe
    I managed to secure, through a contractor friend, two cartons plus two, 22 total, N-95 masks. I am looking at one right now. It is basically a pressed shape made of a dense fabric, a small metal strip you squeeze shape to the bridge of your nose and an plastic intake/exhaust nozzle and two elastic straps to secure around your head. Really don't see how hard it would be to set up a stamping line to form the masks and an injection machine to make the plastic exhaust nozzle. Is there a licensing problem? Could you make the nozzles on a 3D printer?

    We found we had 3 N95 masks. We sent one to my sister-in-law in NYC. After wearing it to the Whole Food$ grocery on Houston Street she tried to sanitize it in the oven and it melted. Oh well!

    Having worn it several times for outdoor excursions I find it has acquired a somewhat funky smell when worn. I realize that I’m smelling me. I’m considering washing out the smell. OTOH, it’s a kind of calendar marker.

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
    Do you remember what temperature?

    I had heard 140 degrees fahrenheit for 30 minutes was good enough.
    , @petit bourgeois
    Don't get your n95 wet. It has an electrostatic charge to trap particles. N95s are rendered useless after they get wet.

    To disinfect and reuse an n95 you can put it in a glass jar or gallon Ziploc bag and leave it out in the sun for a few hours.

    Alternatively, you can hang it from the oven rack and turn on the heat at 160F for thirty minutes.
  69. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    Agree with your main point, but recyclables is a poor example.

    China does not want to take recyclables because it is not profitable and pollutes their own country. It is basically only something a third world country would take on and even then only one who can use low quality recycled goods.

    That is why no other country wanted to take up the lost business.

  70. Anonymous[578] • Disclaimer says:

    Corporate ideology is a funny thing. I worked in an electronics plant that made one type of unit. To test them we had millions of dollars in first tier test equipment. One piece used a lot was originally $1500, but the manufacturer kept jacking the price until at one point it was selling for nearly $5000. People kept buying them because it was the best unit of its type for some functions (and today still is). When our main product line was in a down cycle and we had engineers painting the walls and assemblers doing clerical make work, I suggested we design and build our own version of this unit, adding an obvious feature or two and fixing its known quirks.

    Oh no. Heavens no. We were not in the test equipment business.

    The business they were in was soon to be obsoleted, and we all strongly suspected that even then. As it turned out, long term shutdown was actually baked into the cake, so to speak. The top executives had figured out a way to raid major corporate assets, most of which were in Canada and we knew nothing of. Our 400 employee plant in the American Midwest was a dead man walking, full of engineers and technicians and business types who had in many cases pulled up stakes to move to this insular and snotty little town only to out on their asses when the rug got pulled out from under them.

    I had quit and moved on about a year before the turd hit the carpet. One by one the foreign telecom contracts simply quit ordering product, then their only competitor (which also had been their single source supplier of several critical parts) introduced a far better product as a four or five rack unit box that replaced their entire full height rack for a third the price. The company sold the product line to a liquidator for pennies on the dollar and walked away from the newly renovated model plant, which became a call center for bill collection agencies.

  71. Anonymous[345] • Disclaimer says:

    Wheres the post?

    You lost. We won.

    What happened to this site being realist, data driven, etc.?

    You need to make the post: “Gregory Cochran and I have been utterly humiliated. We got it wrong. We are ashamed and we apologize.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    You need to make the post: “Gregory Cochran and I have been utterly humiliated. We got it wrong. We are ashamed and we apologize.”
     
    They were right though. Reduce transmission enough and eradication is possible. Take a look at Taiwan, South Korea, China, Hong Kong, Australia, NZ... on the way to success. You do have to implement all the interventions to succeed though.

    Apologize for nothing, Steve, and stick to your guns.
  72. @Sincerity.net
    Masks are very essential protection against Coronavirus. But we goofed, in spite of trillions of spending money, we cannot make enough masks.
    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
    Rigorous mask use allows more social closeness and opening of factories
    Unfortunately, no nation except Taiwan was able to set up a few dozen extra mask factories. They have about 32 million (?) Taiwanese inhabitants.

    https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3891193

    Taiwan sets up 60 face mask production lines in a month

    Daily production of face masks projected to reach 10 million by mid-March

    22216

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.

    We’re not an industrialized nation anymore. We’re a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don’t understand manufacturing processes.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    That choice of illustration was dagger-painful. Why indeed, Mr Summers. Not like it's your fault.
    , @Anon87
    Agreed. They all think we live in a "knowledge economy" of computers and marketing, and all that icky manufacturing stuff can just be outsourced or acquired through M&A. The same playbook from every executive MBA program.

    When the time comes to, you know, actually make something......they have no idea. They would probably be lucky to effectively run a lemonade stand, let alone a major operation.

    But they are fabulously wealthy and safe at home and you aren't, so jokes on us.
    , @ThreeCranes
    Thorstein Veblen warned us about this.

    He said that a manufacturing economy made more than just stuff. As we make stuff, we also create consciousness; and the consciousness of a person endeavoring to make stuff is one of engagement with the real, tangible world of Nature. Engagement with Nature, which is another name for science, means confronting and understanding Natural Law. People who deal with Natural Law must learn to subordinate their subjectivity to the objectivity of the larger world around them. If they hope be effective they must engage with the world as it is.

    Our Service Economy, on the other hand, is mostly people to people activity. We need not ever learn about the outer world as it is. Instead we learn how to manipulate others into buying what we offer and how to offer what they will buy. It’s a world of subjective encounters.

    People whose consciousness developed in the latter world will be clueless when it comes to responding to some crisis in the objective, material world. They will be helpless. And so we are. Where are our inventors? Where is our Yankee ingenuity?

    So, contra Krugman and all the other Jewish economists, dismantling manufacturing in a Nation has implications and consequences that manifest and affect our lives beyond those of mere market place efficiency. They have missed important features of life and living. This is the problem with seeing the world through a particular lens.

    , @Neoconned
    Some argue we never were a country at all but merely an economy.....theres some variation of that quote thats popular.

    You could argue hatred of Indians then Germans(combined with Anglophilia) and then Russians kept the smorgasbord of white ethnicities united in this country.

    In a way we morally needed the Soviet Union or the Nazis "because theyre bad guys".....this is especially true of our image to foreigners. To foreigners true or not we were Reagan's "shining city on a hill."

    With the Soviets gone and the Russians merely trying to be a player in the global capitalist game and then the "communist" Chinese beating us bad at our own capitalist game......seriously......why exactly are we the good guys again? The neocons kicked the cans down the road "because 9/11" but no one cares about that any more.

    Truth is we aren't "the good guys" any more if we ever were. If anything we're a splintered atomised hot mess of a country 2 to 3 decades away from hot civil war.....

    Seriously if it wasn't for whats left of the Boomers and Gen X and the Asians and white ethnics keeping California in 1 political piece this "country" probably already wouldve balkanized.
  73. Mass shooting. In Canada. Very high level of planning, arson, impersonation of RCMP (national-level police) to include a fake RCMP car.
    Difficulty: they can’t kill him.
    Because then he’d win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don’t lie: gun control causes mass shootings.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Huh. I was thinking just yesterday how it's weird there haven't been any shooting incidents during this whole Corona-Chan thing.

    "driving what appears to be an RCMP vehicle and wearing what appears to be an RCMP uniform"

    Double "huh".
    , @Known Fact
    Here's a good roundup. Gotta be the craziest thing to hit Nova Scotia, at a time when to put it coldly we could all use some distraction

    https://heavy.com/news/2020/04/gabriel-wortman/

    Reminds me of the old 5-0 where the psycho has a fake cop car and uniform -- except there's enough here for a 13-week mini-series, with a denturist (not a dentist, mind you!) apparently killing almost 20 people

    , @adreadline

    Difficulty: they can’t kill him.
    Because then he’d win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don’t lie: gun control causes mass shootings.
     
    Put simply, it is diversity that causes mass shootings. ''Him''? Unnoticed was the identity of the shooters? Not one, but two black canadian ''empowered'' women for you. Killers, perpetrators of one of the deadliest shootings ever in canuckland. Especially impressive is that they could pull it off. Driving a fake police car is a new one.
  74. @Lugash

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
     
    We're not an industrialized nation anymore. We're a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don't understand manufacturing processes.

    https://twitter.com/LHSummers/status/1241329121768230912

    That choice of illustration was dagger-painful. Why indeed, Mr Summers. Not like it’s your fault.

  75. @Buffalo Joe
    I managed to secure, through a contractor friend, two cartons plus two, 22 total, N-95 masks. I am looking at one right now. It is basically a pressed shape made of a dense fabric, a small metal strip you squeeze shape to the bridge of your nose and an plastic intake/exhaust nozzle and two elastic straps to secure around your head. Really don't see how hard it would be to set up a stamping line to form the masks and an injection machine to make the plastic exhaust nozzle. Is there a licensing problem? Could you make the nozzles on a 3D printer?

    You can skip the nozzle. It allows easier breathing out, which isn’t good for others if you’re infected.

    I think the issue with N95 masks is the mask material itself. As I understand it(could be wrong) it uses electrostatic discharge somehow to make the material porous. I’m sure the material is made overseas, all the existing supplier/manufacturer relationships are overseas and any supply for the next year at least is already bought.

    The other issue is probably the molds to form the masks at scale.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Lugash, thank you for the reply. My daughter is in management for a local company that makes molds. They machine them from metal or plastic. You can make a shape on a 3D printer and then a "me too" cutting machine follows that model and machines your production molds. So, maybe it is the material. Stay safe.
    , @unit472
    Need FDA approval too. Some bandage tape can seal any gaps around a basic dust mask and prevent it from sliding around when talking, steaming up glasses or having the user pull it off to scratch an itch.

    That an aerospace manufacturer can't make its own PPE is a disgrace or an excuse. As Joe Biden might say, "Come on man, you make helmets for pilots flying at 55,000 feet and you can't give a factory worker an effective mask?
  76. I haven’t seen the video (so don’t complain to me) but the song is flawless and wierdly enough relevant to the post.

  77. @Redneck farmer
    Adam Smith's first exception to free trade was national defense.

    Adam Smith’s first exception to free trade was national defense.

    Yup, we really need to expand the definition of what that encompasses.

  78. There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Paleo, I hear your frustration and anger. I liked Trump because he wasn't a politician. I wish that he could refrain from answering every perceived slight or criticism with a sophmoric tweet. And truly, Joe Biden?
    , @Hail

    convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?
     
    "Our data suggests that COVID-19 has an infection fatality rate that is in the same ballpark as seasonal influenza." -- Dr. John Ioannidis, Stanford, April 17, 2020

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGUgrEfSgaU
    , @danand

    "What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?"
     
    Maybe it means we should vote for one of those Governors.

    The best thing I can say about Trump is that he both recognized, and took some action, to check China. This while most in and out of "his" party screamed and howled at him for doing so.

    My neighbor says voting for a old phone book is better than voting for Trump. I'd further that. Go with that old phone book over original Joe, at least I'm more sure what's left of that old phone book.
    , @Liberty Mike
    Leadership is shutting down the economy?

    Leadership is using a flu to moth ball the bill of rights?

    Leadership is inducing panic?

    Leadership is fear-mongering?

    Leadership is assuming dictatorial power?

    Leadership is genuflecting to feminized values?

    Leadership is stoking the fear hormones of the sheeple?

    Leadership is declaring abortions are essential but cancer and heart procedures are not?
    , @Ron Mexico
    "What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?" Taking the lead in doing what exactly? Oh, the old "Trump just watches TV and tweets"... Funny when Literal Hitler does not act like Real Hitler he is criticized for it. Federalism?? You people are a bunch of vaginas.
  79. @Lugash
    You can skip the nozzle. It allows easier breathing out, which isn't good for others if you're infected.

    I think the issue with N95 masks is the mask material itself. As I understand it(could be wrong) it uses electrostatic discharge somehow to make the material porous. I'm sure the material is made overseas, all the existing supplier/manufacturer relationships are overseas and any supply for the next year at least is already bought.

    The other issue is probably the molds to form the masks at scale.

    Lugash, thank you for the reply. My daughter is in management for a local company that makes molds. They machine them from metal or plastic. You can make a shape on a 3D printer and then a “me too” cutting machine follows that model and machines your production molds. So, maybe it is the material. Stay safe.

  80. @Mr McKenna
    Someone should let Boeing in on a little secret...

    https://i.ibb.co/GTwJvgQ/5e820ddc2ff83933d8482d4b-width-900-amp-format-jpeg-amp-auto-webp.png
    https://i.ibb.co/BgfYCG0/5e810c0214f18f6b11595ac5-width-900-amp-format-jpeg-amp-auto-webp.jpg
    https://i.ibb.co/2F8BFn0/5e810d841378e3718259a173-width-1200-format-jpeg.jpg


    https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-photos-airplanes-grounded-parked-runways-satellite-2020-3

    Honestly I don’t see any need for new airframes by global aviation industry for next few years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The government COULD buy them up at ten cents on the dollar, have them rebuilt so as to fly right under a separate contract and use them as tankers, transports or whatever else you use a 737 airframe for. The basic airframe is ok, it has a poorly engineered engine and nacelle installation that could be corrected, albeit at some cost.
  81. @Paleo Liberal
    There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    Paleo, I hear your frustration and anger. I liked Trump because he wasn’t a politician. I wish that he could refrain from answering every perceived slight or criticism with a sophmoric tweet. And truly, Joe Biden?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.
    , @Corvinus
    "I liked Trump because he wasn’t a politician."

    Except he wasn't ready to lead our nation. Neither was Shitlery. So I voted libertarian in 2016.

    "And truly, Joe Biden?"

    Not really a fan of him. Slightly better than Shitlery. Definitively better than Trump, who's a walking catastrophe.
  82. Even portable power tools can bite you. As an inexperienced seaman apprentice I managed to snatch up an “Irish Pennant” (thread) dangling from the crotch of my dungarees with a wire wheel equipped 7″ grinder, causing the wire wheel to quickly traverse my thigh as it spun down, carrying away a swath of dungaree and the skin below, and all too damned close for comfort to bits which I esteem rather highly.

    In other fashion accessories (possibly) a causing fatal accident news, may I present the Counts Zborowski:

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/18646828/count-louis-zborowski

  83. anon[371] • Disclaimer says:

    Boeing cited new U.S. government guidelines directing companies to reserve the respirators for hospital staff on the front lines of the coronavirus crisis.

    Boeing would be forced or pressured to give the masks to front line workers. So even if they could, they couldn’t. They are making 3D printed face shields. http://www.boeing.com/features/2020/03/boeing-to-3d-print-face-shields-offers-dreamlifter-for-pandemic-response.page

  84. @Paleo Liberal
    There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    “Our data suggests that COVID-19 has an infection fatality rate that is in the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis, Stanford, April 17, 2020

    • Thanks: danand
    • Replies: @Hail

    “COVID-19...the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis
     
    Speaking of sports metaphors, and therefore of sports:

    First came Johnny Unitas (1933–2002), football star, late 1950s to early 1970s;

    Then came Johnny Ioannidis (1965 – at least the 2060s, please; we need you).

    Both great in their own way.

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:


    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece. Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990
     
  85. Way back in the mid ’80’s my best friend from high school was tasked with restoring an Austin Healey 100 BN-2 by his mother. She fancied herself a bit of an Isadora Duncan, right down to her love of communism. It took him roughly six months start to finish, and looked fantastic; though the solenoid actuated overdrive remained finicky. His mother drove it a total of 3 outings. Could be she never came across a scarf with that flow she desired?

    • Replies: @captflee
    If the gearbox on the BN-1 is anything to go by, maybe she lost the hang of driving a stick. If it still exists and has been kept up I shudder to think what one could fetch for it at auction. Handsome brutes they were. Have not thought to inquire as to the effects of the CoronaCrash on the vintage car market.
  86. @Buffalo Joe
    Paleo, I hear your frustration and anger. I liked Trump because he wasn't a politician. I wish that he could refrain from answering every perceived slight or criticism with a sophmoric tweet. And truly, Joe Biden?

    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that’s been Democrats since Andy Jackson —

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, …

    I’ve generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan “The Last Romantic” — meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don’t see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    There is no leadership anymore. It's over. The strong paternal leadership model has been pushed aside for a mass of mediocrities.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson Three

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.
     
    So saith the scorpion.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Paleo, we need more comments like yours. An admitted Democrat saying that Republican presidents can and did achieve results or a Republican giving credit to a Democrat. Far too much animosity today in politics and a lot of it driven by a biased media. Stay safe.
    , @Whiskey
    A vote for Biden is a vote for hot civil war. Simply put.

    He is visibly senile, and his VP likely Stacey Abrams will be running things. So what would President Abrams do?

    How about mobilizing the military to kick in the door of every White person and drag the men off to reeducation camp and seize the belongings for "redistribution" and "reparations." As well as of course gun confiscation. The Boogaloo will start the moment Abrams/Biden is elected.

    More to the point, there are 25 million people unemployed. Likely 50 to 75 million by the end of the year. What is Biden's / Abram's / Democrats plans?

    As near as I can figure out, endless printing of money, UBI at a thousand a month, everyone put in shipping containers save big shot managers, everyone eats beans and bugs as the food distribution and processing network shuts down (save for bigshot managers). So Biden/Abrams etc. will force people from their homes into shipping containers and feed them beans and bugs and free streaming garbage and a pittance of UBI. Taking away their cars, trucks, etc. which Biden has promised to do; also their homes and freedom from being around non-Whites which drives most White behavior spoken of or not.

    Like I said, that's a recipe for HOT civil war. Most White men will fight to keep their pickup truck, dogs, and guns. The military is filled with mid level guys who can see their careers ending under Biden/Abrams and being forced into a just a nicer (if that) shipping container from their nice home that all those miserable deployments to miserable places paid for. Unsaid in all of this has been the ability of the elite to bribe Joe Average White guy with a pickup truck, beer, sportsball, barbecues, and general freedom and individuality in their own personal life outside of work. Replacing all that with a shipping container will have their WIVES ready to kill Oprah 2.0, out and proud edition, to keep their granite countertops and walk in closet.

    YEs Biden/Abrams are a slam dunk to win by judge mandated mail in vote fraud voting. But that just kicks off the Civil War that has been brewing since the 1950s between the managerial class who think their poop does not smell bad and ordinary White people who they hate for having nearly a good time as they do.

    [See the Charlize Theron beer commercial where she busts the balls of some joe averages just for their sin of being by themselves enjoying a good time.]
    , @Polynikes

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.
     
    Walter Mondale voter to vote for Biden. Stay tuned for astute political observations...
    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    Oh, come on now, you have more sense than to vote for "Biden". You know as well as I do that in actuality you would be voting for whatever horror would be installed as his vice presidential running mate, and that quick as a wink, said horror would be substituted for Biden via the 25th Amendment should "Biden" win. And that regime would be an extension, indeed an intensification of all of the policies to which you objected, but with the formal coming out party for autocratic rule as well.

    Hopefully, this strategery will be so glaringly obvious that it would either not be tried, or would be defeated by the voters.

    If it is foisted upon us, I would hope that you have enough self respect as a perceptive Democrat to either vote 3rd party, write in a favored alternative, or just not vote.

    Whatever, Paleoliberal, it's your choice, and if this transparent farago were to "work", do not expect it to go down at all smoothly.

    Democrats have been bitching that Trump's electoral victory was not acceptable since he didn't win the popular vote (a debateable contention given all of the likely vote fraud in CA, the state that delivered the supposed popular vote that "supports" that contention), but this is a Constitutional Republic and the one and only Constitutionally-mandated national election is for the President, whose victory is secured in the Electoral College. This is the black letter law of the Republic; that Hillary did not win the votes in the Electoral College is the reason she lost, not some skulduggery. Trump won legally, fair and square, and above board. That Hillary lost was a product of her unbridled arrogance, and her open hatred for citizens whose votes she needed for her winning the Electoral College.

    Now consider the ploy of using Biden as the Presidential candidate of record for the Democrat party, but who in actuality is being treated as a mere stalking horse for the choice of the apparatchniks, the vice presidential candidate, with the intent to have their choice assume the Presidency through torturing the intent and purpose of the 25th Amendment. The Vice President is designated to assume the Presidency upon genuine need, but not in this sort of dishonest scheme. It would be a fraud perpetrated on the citizens, would be seen that way, would be resisted by any means necessary, and justifiably so.

    The Democrats wouldn't accept a Constitutionally-prescribed, legal, and legitimate election. So why do they expect, in their arrogance, that one so transparent in its dishonest intent would be acceptable?
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan “The Last Romantic” — meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don’t see that sort of leadership in Trump.
     
    On any given standard, Trump will either be the polar opposite of Reagan, or his clone. Kind of like a checkerboard.

    Reagan's SDI ranks among the greatest government programs in our or any other country's history. It performed its job beautifully without ever being put into practice. How can you beat that record? Certainly not for cost savings.

    I'm still hoping for Trump's own SDI to come along. In his case, though, it will probably be by accident.

    Still, that's good enough for government work.
  87. Hail says: • Website
    @Hail

    convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?
     
    "Our data suggests that COVID-19 has an infection fatality rate that is in the same ballpark as seasonal influenza." -- Dr. John Ioannidis, Stanford, April 17, 2020

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGUgrEfSgaU

    “COVID-19…the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis

    Speaking of sports metaphors, and therefore of sports:

    First came Johnny Unitas (1933–2002), football star, late 1950s to early 1970s;

    Then came Johnny Ioannidis (1965 – at least the 2060s, please; we need you).

    Both great in their own way.

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:

    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece. Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:

    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece.

    Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990.
     

     
    How competitive are Greek colleges and med schools?
    , @Anonymous
    Apparently, 'Unitas' means 'WC toilet' in Russian.

    Interesting back story to this factoid.
    The porcelain WC bowl was, of course, invented in England, and to be precise mostly manufactured in the Staffordshire Potteries region.
    At first, great difficulty was had in moulding and firing the whole shebang in one unit, then finally, one firm cracked it, and called the new improved version the unitas, betokening its one piece design. The name unitas was proudly fired into the bowl.

    Huge numbers were exported to Russia still bearing the legend 'unitas', hence the Russians thought this the name of the appliance, and to this day is the common description of the same.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Both Unitas (Jonaitis) and Ioannidis mean "Johnson" in their languages. So, for that matter, does Yankovic.
  88. Can someone answer this question, or let me know if they’ve noticed the same thing:

    Where I live the homeless drug addicts who wander downtown all have medical-grade masks? Yet hospitals can’t get enough of them….

    Where are these homeless getting masks?

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
    I work in the medical field and I have seen and heard some things from other hospital/medical-field workers.

    My guess is that in the two or three weeks proceeding the lockdown, when Amazon and the local grocery stores were starting to have massive shortages of Purell and masks and the like, medical offices, or at least some of them, were overstocked on these items and they weren't locked up in store rooms, so employees took them home, or "stole them" is probably more appropriate.

    I heard in one case that it was "thousands" of certain items. Employees probably thought it was harmless like stealing paperclips or post-it notes.

    Then, what is an individual going to do with hundreds of masks? After they have supplied their family and friends. Probably a few decided to play Robin Hood and distribute the masks to the less fortunate.

    Most hospitals and medical offices had a box of masks inside the front door of the lobby or waiting room. I can't imagine how many of those boxes disappeared, the thief knowing they could sell them for $5 a pop on the street making it a $500 box. And the hospital would have been obligated to replace the box as soon as it was noticed missing.

  89. @Lugash

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
     
    We're not an industrialized nation anymore. We're a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don't understand manufacturing processes.

    https://twitter.com/LHSummers/status/1241329121768230912

    Agreed. They all think we live in a “knowledge economy” of computers and marketing, and all that icky manufacturing stuff can just be outsourced or acquired through M&A. The same playbook from every executive MBA program.

    When the time comes to, you know, actually make something……they have no idea. They would probably be lucky to effectively run a lemonade stand, let alone a major operation.

    But they are fabulously wealthy and safe at home and you aren’t, so jokes on us.

  90. moshe says:

    The lack of “Masks For Everybody!” may be a blessing.

    I happen to admire “germophobic” Trump for not putting on the mask (unless he did and I’m unaware of it).

    My view regarding this whole business is simple.

    WRT to actually dealing with the excess dangers that covid causes over other dangers we’ve been ignoring I have fairly simple views that I don’t care to spend time on because it’s tangential to the main point of what’s been going on. In short however, Those over 60 or 65 as well as those with pre-existing conditions should have been given the advisement, opportunity, and encouragement to quarantine with their carers. Furthermore anyone who sniffles or stops smelling sewage should quarantine for 3 weeks as well. All of the taxes collected from Everyone else working would surely have covered the expense (and with a saner monetary policy than the “just print green” policy we’ve had to enact because we out the whole entire country under marshall law. There’s more to be said, about studies and masks and herd immunities and likelihood of a vaccine, etc but, again, unless it’s my job to deal with resolving Covid, I’m dealing with Covid as the Gavrillo Princip of Quarantinism. Tens of millions of young men did not live in trenches just to die in them during WWI because some castrated archduke was assassinated. It was simply the straw that broke the camel’s back and therefore gained more fame than all of the other weighty straws.

    The same applies to the new Quarantinism Qraze.

    It is and always has been (as all of my writings and recordings and videos bear out from January) what this Covid thing was likely to be and that the huge bubble of terror was blown by the huddled masses of politicians, media marketers, Specialists and other interested group who were crouching behind a curtain with a boom mike.

    ———–

    I have this issue with every social movement/religion I encounter.

    Take Mormonsim for example. They claim that they live as they do because they believe what they do.

    Approaching it as an interested outsider I have more or less the same opinions of them that Matt and Trey have.

    It’s fun as hell to reub their very very very, but hilariously very, dumb “beliefs upon which they claim to build and lead their entire lives while simultaneously producing a Broadway Musical about how, overall, they are (as a generically chosen religion) goddamn effective at making the world a happier, less violent and more humane place.

    I view Quarantinism precisely the same way.

    Historians decades hence will have to mention the Covid business like they have to mention Princip or Grynszpan because every movement must have a name or an excuse or a fuse-lighter or all three. But Quarantinism is not happening because of Covid and to focus on that dumb catechism is as silly as trying to convince some medieval Bishop that transubstantiation was, if you think about it, kinna silly.

    We admire those people because of the dangers they faced but we don’t consider them to be geniuses for figuring out that the common madness of the day was mad. It’s pretty embarrassingly obvious to any unbiased party.

    So I think of Quarantinism holistically, and as a religion, and in that respect I find it interesting to look at its (non-covid) causes as well as its effects.

    And I would be greatly interested in hearing what others have to say about it as well. I’ve dropped a few thoughts here about the benefits of a biblical generational jubilee, or Time Out, as well as whether all of the weight gained will cost more young healthy years of life than elderly unhealthy ones that may have been lost, plus a few other ideas if you care to pick out the occasional kernel of wisdom in my recent posts. But I haven’t touched the surface of this movement ; it’s causes and effects ; at all.

    I would live to hear what other people think.

    I’ve heard way way WAY too much about The Loss To The Economy ® , which is fair because it’s kinna a big deal.

    But what else is there to see? What other causes are there for the populations of China, the US, Iran, Israel and everyone else more or less willingly to impose a level of marshall law on themselves never before seen in history in a country that hadn’t just lost a war and been occupied by foreign troops.

    And what effects will this have? Forget election talk puh-lease! even if what you have to say is insightful, it will instantly reroute the focused minds of everyone else into the gutter. Perhaps the left gutter or the right gutter, but a gutter with no gain, no fecundity and no good points made.

    I myself have always had a soft side for religions, old and new.

    Even as I happily laugh at their fundamental gods and his powers I give the people and their practice and the power and effectsof their belief, the benefit of the doubt until given reason to feel differently.

    My own bias therefore is to enjoy the shutdown as best I can (largely by flagrantly flouting it, but also by making more calls to friends and acquaintances abiding with their directives) and to look hopefully upon it as possibly being the harbinger of all sorts of good things.

    Of course there’s a timeline for all these things and other things CAN get in the way, be it Obama coming out as an Androgynoid and running for president again on the grounds that the Real Him with both sexual organs and married to the soul of MLK has never yet been president or Trump, in an Ambien daze or a particularly curious mood nuking the White House.

    So what caused billions of people to accept that they had lost the war of the worlds without even having heard about it on the radio and how are we changing, as people, due to this religion that we either like, oppose or have mixed feelings about.

    What are YOUR experiences and thoughts about it that make no mention of a cabal of plotters, of covid itself or of american elections.

    As historians from 2030 with more interest in the movement, its causes and its outcomes….what do we see?

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    That's a lot, but regarding the cultural/social/economic outcomes of this precipitating crisis:

    More oligarchy- small businesses go under and big ones get anointed as national champions/essential. Antitrust is done for now. Onshoring will happen but not to the degree needed.

    The authoritarian turn hastens. Both left and right call for more coercion- the left for international institutions and the right for traditional religions. Rome claims to have the answer for both.

    Meritocracy makes a bit of a comeback behind the scenes, but there will still be cultural hegemony of the woke narrative.

    The dollar takes a lasting hit due to the international realization that the US has real competence problems and that the Navy is overstretched.

    Many useful idiots venerate China as the new savior superpower. Others beat the drum for US military conflict with China, a foolish proposition.
  91. @miss marple
    "throttled"- I like that word used in a slightly different context.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency. I've noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy. I'd potentially bring in immigrants from less represented parts of the world to prevent single ethnic groups from wielding outsized influence in this way. The intent is obviously to force a union between established populations and specific immigrant populations. Deep State doesn't embrace true diversity nor does it place high value on democracy.

    Deep State controls our economy

    John Brennan and Andrew McCabe know nothing of business and industry. (McCabe’s wife probably understands in a broad way what their CFA is doing with their money).

  92. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.
     
    Nah, after being indoctrinated at how much their sacrifices in the fight against the Bug did to save the climate, people will be whipped up into overdrive to recycle. Do your part, Citizen.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMTz9nIUkGc
    , @Mr. Anon

    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.
     
    Plastic is a pretty useful commodity dervied from a wasting resource. The use of plastic for a lot of one-time use packaging is wasteful and short-sighted. A sensible country would figure out a way to recycle it or to price it out of the range of the packaging market. But then, we aren't a sensible country.
  93. @Buffalo Joe
    Sincerely, Hart, Shafter and Marx, the men's clothier switched over to making mask. Workers, material and machines already in place.

    Also, the My Pillow guy shifted his production to facemasks.

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/03/31/mypillow-founder-and-ceo-responds-to-media-critics-who-ridicule-his-faith-based-effort-to-manufacture-coronavirus-masks/

    Geez, didn’t you hear about that in the MSM? Guess the militant atheists over there took umbrage, eh? /s

  94. eD says:

    Here is the problem. You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks. Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that, but its a very narrow window to hit.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Here is the problem. You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     
    What are you referring to here? Are you equating COVID-19 with the seasonal flu?
    , @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

  95. “It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks”

    no, it’s ludicrous, not merely ridiculous. because they just got a billion dollar bailout.

    although machinists are exposed to much less danger today than they used to be. i’m guessing it’s been A LONG time since Steve watched any machine shop or factory videos on youtube. loggers and miners are in a lot more danger than machinists these days. maybe roofers.

  96. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    Tell you what. We’ll trade ye our soy beans for yer tea.

  97. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    There is no leadership anymore. It’s over. The strong paternal leadership model has been pushed aside for a mass of mediocrities.

  98. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house. Perhaps some of those machinists could be trained to work, uh, sewing machines.

    The masks might not match exactly N95 specifications, but all that is needed is something to stop people coughing into the air or onto surfaces, so they should be able to make something good enough for government work with materials on hand.

    Or if they can't do it, they could contract it out to a sweatshop in Haiti. Now if they could just find a working plane somewhere they could borrow to bring them in to the US.

    If this whole thing were not so tragic, you would have to laugh.

    https://sarahalexander.us/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/airplane-oxygen-mask-2.png

    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house. Perhaps some of those machinists could be trained to work, uh, sewing machines.

    Good idea, although non-homemade face masks do not involve sewing. Boeing could make the masks “N94” level so as technically not to violate the law.

    Of course, they would end up on Amazon and eBay, causing Boeing a PR nightmare.

  99. Paraphrasing Robert Reich: we don’t need to manufacture masks, we should concentrate on designing masks, that’s are future. Except, I have no doubt that over the past few weeks we have had thousands of amateur engineers designing the coolest, perfectly functional masks across the nation, yet not one of them knows how to operate a sewing machine.

  100. From Boeing’s SARS-CoV-2 employee release on restarting this week:

    “The 737 program will resume working toward restarting production of the 737 MAX.”

    Perhaps better to hold off on this, save the whole ship from going down. Find an angle to chalk this up/roll it in with this whole corona disaster.

    “Face coverings will be a requirement for employees at Boeing sites in Washington. Employees are strongly encouraged to bring in their own procedural mask or face covering; those who do not have a mask available will be provided with one.”

    This one’s still available:

    air safety

    In any event, Washington State’s maximum weekly unemployment benefit is $790 per week. Combine that with the $600 per kicked in by the fed; makes it a bit of a tossup for many of those Boeing workers.

    Frankly given the relatively generous benefits at the moment, I’m surprise the hashtag “#howdoIgetlaidoff” is not a thing. Especially for those still stuck working crummy, low paid, semi-transitory, and what they consider to be dangerous environment jobs. Personally I’m thankful/happy/grateful most would not choose that drop out path, just wondering.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Combine that with the $600 per kicked in by the fed...
     
    And the $600 is not means tested. You get it if you are unemployed even if you don't get the $1200 because you made too much money last year.
  101. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    So saith the scorpion.

    • Agree: Polynikes
  102. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    “While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago?”

    only recycling metals makes any sense right now. when you ‘recycle’, they send most of the stuff to a landfill anyway. all that plastic, glass, and paper ends up in the ground. not in a factory. they might take the cardboard.

    when it makes economic sense to recycle that stuff, they might start doing it. the raw materials to make new paper and glass are dirt cheap though, so it will be a LONG time before that ever makes sense. it will probably never make economic sense to recycle plastic. basically what you want to do is to collect all that stuff in one place, so even if it only ends up in a landfill, you know where it all is. so ‘recycling’ to a landfill is still good.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    I don't get why paper and card isn't burned as fuel for power generation. There is little point in recycling it. In fact it will rot down easily under the right conditions.

    One form of plastic recycling that seems to be making headway is its use for railroad ties (sleepers). They appear to be an all-up improvement over concrete and timber and are bulky, using up a lot of plastic waste. And there are millions of ties around the world that will need replacing sooner or later.

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/DSC_0852-696x461.jpg.webp

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/2020/01/ffestiniog-railway-use-milk-bottles-for-new-rail-sleepers.html

    https://www.lankhorstrail.com/en/railroad-ties

    http://multibriefs.com/briefs/MV-railroadseb/MV-RAILROADSEB102114.php

    , @Anonymous
    The weekly sorting and bagging ritual fulfills an important emotional need for middle class westerners.
  103. @eD
    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.

    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.

    Nah, after being indoctrinated at how much their sacrifices in the fight against the Bug did to save the climate, people will be whipped up into overdrive to recycle. Do your part, Citizen.

  104. The pandemic, and the needs, are growing exponentially faster than businesses systems, which have been very globally interconnected for a while, can respond. Sure you can suddenly incentivize domestic manufacturers to shift their lines to making masks and PPE, but it’s not easy, and it’s not going to be as affordable or as standardized quality as those which are made in China or other places. Unfortunately right now the entire global supply chain is broken and anything, including PPE and critical medical equipment and drugs, are finding it difficult to even get on planes and get flown over. Furthermore, in an attempt to actually meet the critical demand for PPE Especially masks, the FDA and customs are actually relaxing some regulations so they can fast track this process. It’s a complex system; it was never built for this kind of agility or speed needed… but it was built to (somewhat) protect US business interest while ensuring standard quality from overseas products

  105. @Lugash
    You can skip the nozzle. It allows easier breathing out, which isn't good for others if you're infected.

    I think the issue with N95 masks is the mask material itself. As I understand it(could be wrong) it uses electrostatic discharge somehow to make the material porous. I'm sure the material is made overseas, all the existing supplier/manufacturer relationships are overseas and any supply for the next year at least is already bought.

    The other issue is probably the molds to form the masks at scale.

    Need FDA approval too. Some bandage tape can seal any gaps around a basic dust mask and prevent it from sliding around when talking, steaming up glasses or having the user pull it off to scratch an itch.

    That an aerospace manufacturer can’t make its own PPE is a disgrace or an excuse. As Joe Biden might say, “Come on man, you make helmets for pilots flying at 55,000 feet and you can’t give a factory worker an effective mask?

  106. @danand
    From Boeing's SARS-CoV-2 employee release on restarting this week:

    "The 737 program will resume working toward restarting production of the 737 MAX."
     
    Perhaps better to hold off on this, save the whole ship from going down. Find an angle to chalk this up/roll it in with this whole corona disaster.

    "Face coverings will be a requirement for employees at Boeing sites in Washington. Employees are strongly encouraged to bring in their own procedural mask or face covering; those who do not have a mask available will be provided with one."
     
    This one's still available:

    https://flic.kr/p/2iS3Lgu

    In any event, Washington State's maximum weekly unemployment benefit is $790 per week. Combine that with the $600 per kicked in by the fed; makes it a bit of a tossup for many of those Boeing workers.

    Frankly given the relatively generous benefits at the moment, I'm surprise the hashtag "#howdoIgetlaidoff" is not a thing. Especially for those still stuck working crummy, low paid, semi-transitory, and what they consider to be dangerous environment jobs. Personally I'm thankful/happy/grateful most would not choose that drop out path, just wondering.

    Combine that with the $600 per kicked in by the fed…

    And the $600 is not means tested. You get it if you are unemployed even if you don’t get the $1200 because you made too much money last year.

  107. @Buffalo Joe
    Sincerely, Hart, Shafter and Marx, the men's clothier switched over to making mask. Workers, material and machines already in place.

    “Non-medical masks.”

    https://www.licenseglobal.com/global-news/hart-schaffner-factory-commits-making-masks

    They are sewing fabric masks which is better than nothing.

    It is way short of N95s or surgical masks.

    N95s are made from non-woven melt-blown extrusion fabric and shaped on molds.

    Do we have ancient machinists who will come out of retirement and train apprentices?

  108. Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards:

    dist

    Doesn’t do much to inspire confidence in government, at least this local one. These signs are all over the parks and waterfront of tourist areas in San Francisco.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    I have a close relative who works for a different defense contractor. He says they are permitted to wear a mask, so he made his own. Last time I talked to him he didn't wear it at work. I suggested he start doing so.

    My relative told me that since airplanes are so big, the workers were already at least 6 feet away from each other anyway. These days they are even further apart.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Doesn’t do much to inspire confidence in government, at least this local one. These signs are all over the parks and waterfront of tourist areas in San Francisco.

     

    The "City" may have many residents with high visuospacial abilities, but it's geometrically insane. The story is that investors out East saw the perfectly shaped peninsula and thought it ideal for a Manhattan-style street grid. They didn't take into account the topography.

    Thus you get Lombard Street:


    https://media.voltron.voanews.com/Drupal/01live-166/styles/sourced/s3/2019-06/70DF0357-99D9-49C1-9954-79BDFF89D0C1.jpg?itok=GR1UIMcN
  109. @eD
    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.

    One silver lining hopefully in shifting the governance model from fraud to force will be the termination of a number of globalist scams such as recycling.

    Plastic is a pretty useful commodity dervied from a wasting resource. The use of plastic for a lot of one-time use packaging is wasteful and short-sighted. A sensible country would figure out a way to recycle it or to price it out of the range of the packaging market. But then, we aren’t a sensible country.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  110. Anonymous[394] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    “COVID-19...the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis
     
    Speaking of sports metaphors, and therefore of sports:

    First came Johnny Unitas (1933–2002), football star, late 1950s to early 1970s;

    Then came Johnny Ioannidis (1965 – at least the 2060s, please; we need you).

    Both great in their own way.

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:


    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece. Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990
     

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:

    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece.

    Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990.

    How competitive are Greek colleges and med schools?

  111. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    Paleo, we need more comments like yours. An admitted Democrat saying that Republican presidents can and did achieve results or a Republican giving credit to a Democrat. Far too much animosity today in politics and a lot of it driven by a biased media. Stay safe.

    • Thanks: Paleo Liberal
    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Thanks. I greatly appreciate your comment, and that you see what I try to do.

    I am a Democrat, but I can understand the anger at the corrupted status quo that led to Trump's election. Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society. We have more in common than the dividers want us to believe. If we could unite, we could possible get our country back from the oligarchs.
  112. I used to be, years ago, in tbe textile business at the factory owner level. My rep in L.A. told me once that Cyprus had overnight developed the capacity to produce 35,000 dozen T-Shirts a week. If I recall correctly, that would be between 800-1000 fully trained workers. It takes months to get a T-shirt plant to that level of production, assuming that the labor supply is there to begin with. Tbe story was obviously false.

    What was really happening was someone was running a T-shirt re-labeling operation. The shirts came in, the label was cut off, and a new label was straight tacked on with a serger sewing machine. This was to mis-label the goods as being produced locally to get around quota restrictions.

    As soon as I saw the sample, it was obvious they were Chinese goods ( this was around 1987).

    Unless you have actually been in the manufacturing trenches, you really have no idea how much the U.S. was/is being abused by the rest of the world. We could easily make masks- but as soon as we gear up to do so, China will open the floodgates and our domestic manufacturers will be crushed, price wise. Tbe retailers need the extra margins to pay the rent, so it’s goodbye Charlie to Mr. Patriotic American manufacturer.

    The problem is now so ingrained in tbe entire manufacturing/distribution chain, that NOTHING will change it, except maybe a few million deaths from an epidemic/pandemic. It would take that level of anger in this country to effect meaningful change in the long run.

    This is the country that watched on live TV as we lost four airplanes, two towers, several other buildings, including the Pentagon damaged and nearly the White house, and 3,000 people, including live coverage of people leaping to their deaths to avoid being burned to death, all less than 20 years ago, all caused by ILLEGAL VISA OVERSTAYERS, AND WE STILL REFUSE TO CONTROL OUR GODDAMN BORDERS DUE TO THE GREED OF OUR CAPITALIST OVERLORDS.

    I am a capitalist, but what we have now has morphed from a sane capitalism, to a crony capitalism, to a legalized theft capitalism.

    Look at where tbe PPP money went.

    Let’s do nothing while 30% of Americans face eviction for non-payment of rent, 33% will likely face foreclosure within 60 days, and then wonder why people like Bernie Sanders or AOC are ascendant.

    It’s a mystery!!

    I have posted this before, several times over the years, but it’s worth posting again. Words of wisdom from a man sho understood the way the world really works.

    Steve, is it possible to purchase an archive of your old isteve.com site?

    • Agree: Raz, JMcG, Dissident
    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    Oh- One more thing. The majority of Muslims in this country have been allowed in SINCE 9/11.

    "Whom tbe Gods wish to destroy, they first make mad".

  113. Anonymous[394] • Disclaimer says:
    @eD
    Here is the problem. You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks. Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that, but its a very narrow window to hit.

    Here is the problem. You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.

    What are you referring to here? Are you equating COVID-19 with the seasonal flu?

  114. Hail says: • Website
    @eD
    Here is the problem. You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks. Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that, but its a very narrow window to hit.

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that

    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party ‘Hoax,’ in the sense that while the ‘new’ virus is real (there are always ‘new viruses’), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China’s actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross’ proposed theory would have it that the CCP’s sudden about-face on The New Virus — a literally overnight about-face from “not a big deal” to “shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits” — was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do “testing.”

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability (“so sorry! we didn’t have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes”) which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party’s calculation would have been, on that fateful ‘about-face’ evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China’s regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It’s hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained ‘about-face’ is real and needs explanation.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgVbMLoIGV4
    , @eD
    "J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party ‘Hoax,’ in the sense that while the ‘new’ virus is real (there are always ‘new viruses’), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China’s actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this."

    What is described above is a Batman Gambit:

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BatmanGambit

    However, the timeline supports an even more convoluted Batman Gambit. Western intelligence agencies release a bio-engineered (and not very lethal) virus in China, knowing that the Chinese Communist Party will respond with a crackdown, because they are Communists. The Chinese crackdown is then used as an excuse to convince Westerners that this virus must be very lethal, enabling the real goal of the exercise, the crackdown in western countries.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It’s hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained ‘about-face’ is real and needs explanation.
     
    Seems more likely, because it stretches the imagination to believe that China's political leaders are ineffably cunning devils, while our political leaders are naive simpletons. You cannot really say that Trump, Johnson, Bolsanaro, and other political leaders of democracies have distinguished themselves.

    A good political leader cannot do everything him(her) self. They are only as good as their ability to recruit and appoint wise men (women) to advise them on areas of specialist knowledge. It may be easier to act decisively in smaller, less diverse countries. New Zealand has done well in all this, but when your chief industry is sheep farming, you have probably learned to avoid the kind of woolly thinking that many democratically elected leaders go in for.

    From the national leader's Quick Set-Up Handbook.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKuqySkqhHw
    , @obwandiyag
    You are just one of those China Did It trolls cutting and pasting meaningless redundant generalization assertions too boring and repetitive to read. Life is too short to waste our time on your logorrhea.

    China is a good country. The US is a bad one. You can tell by how China finally rounded up those stinking CIA "democracy"-thumpers. My god, a country that actually has the strength to oppose the CIA. And jail them where they belong.
    , @Smithsonian_6

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally,
     
    If they knew that it came from one of their labs, which it probably did, then they may not have known precisely which of their ghastly diseases they were dealing with and so they assumed the worst.
    , @Whiskey
    Except that the early Chinese Communist Party response was a repeat of its response to SARS and MERS. Denial, then clampdown later. The Chinese Communist Party first denied the bad news, then clamped down hard. Likely the clampdown was in panic because at some point the Party leadership KNEW it had spread from their idiotically sited lab in Wuhan by most likely sheer incompetence and greed (poor safety procedures or selling bats done with testing in the wet markets for cash take your pick).

    The virus is new, probably rapidly mutating, erratic, and unpredictable. In any event the result has been even more nationalism, social media turning Africans against the Chinese as videos spread of diaspora Africans getting kicked out of McDonalds, etc. the Chinese have no money to pay off African leaders.

    There are riots in Wuhan over being locked down, the Chinese leadership itself is question as hundreds of millions of Chinese are out of work with the social safety net of Chinese communism: NOTHING.

    China's cities run on lots of illegal immigrants doing the scut work of the cities, its just their illegal immigrants come from the countryside and can never, EVER enter the elite or even middle class. They are one cult leader away from civil war. Since about 100 million illegal squatter immigrants who do all the dirty service work have no jobs, food, or money.
  115. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    “COVID-19...the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis
     
    Speaking of sports metaphors, and therefore of sports:

    First came Johnny Unitas (1933–2002), football star, late 1950s to early 1970s;

    Then came Johnny Ioannidis (1965 – at least the 2060s, please; we need you).

    Both great in their own way.

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:


    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece. Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990
     

    Apparently, ‘Unitas’ means ‘WC toilet’ in Russian.

    Interesting back story to this factoid.
    The porcelain WC bowl was, of course, invented in England, and to be precise mostly manufactured in the Staffordshire Potteries region.
    At first, great difficulty was had in moulding and firing the whole shebang in one unit, then finally, one firm cracked it, and called the new improved version the unitas, betokening its one piece design. The name unitas was proudly fired into the bowl.

    Huge numbers were exported to Russia still bearing the legend ‘unitas’, hence the Russians thought this the name of the appliance, and to this day is the common description of the same.

  116. @Paleo Liberal
    There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    “What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?”

    Maybe it means we should vote for one of those Governors.

    The best thing I can say about Trump is that he both recognized, and took some action, to check China. This while most in and out of “his” party screamed and howled at him for doing so.

    My neighbor says voting for a old phone book is better than voting for Trump. I’d further that. Go with that old phone book over original Joe, at least I’m more sure what’s left of that old phone book.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    I like that.

    Polls showed a Generic Democrat beating Trump, but most of the actual living, breathing Democrats losing to Trump.

    Joe Biden IS the Generic Democrat, and also the Geriatric Democrat.

    If I could choose any Democrat at this time, I think I would choose Jay Inslee, governor of Washington. I think he has done the best job of any major Democrat. He seems to be rather forward thinking as well. Cuomo gets the publicity, but Cuomo has some of the standard Cuomo family anger management issues, which are terrible.

    I used to truly despise Gavin Newsome, out of the corrupt SF Democrats. I have a lot more respect for him lately. A LOT more respect, since I used to despise him.

    Speaking of corrupt SF Democrats who have exceeded expectations, how about London Breed? Not ready for prime time, but a possible future president. How about Inslee/Breed 2024?
  117. @Buffalo Joe
    Paleo, we need more comments like yours. An admitted Democrat saying that Republican presidents can and did achieve results or a Republican giving credit to a Democrat. Far too much animosity today in politics and a lot of it driven by a biased media. Stay safe.

    Thanks. I greatly appreciate your comment, and that you see what I try to do.

    I am a Democrat, but I can understand the anger at the corrupted status quo that led to Trump’s election. Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society. We have more in common than the dividers want us to believe. If we could unite, we could possible get our country back from the oligarchs.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society.
     
    I voted for Obama first, and then Trump. On both occasions I voted against Hillary Clinton and voted for the person who I though would be a better president of the limited choice available.

    I thought Obama did a reasonable job, but I was very disappointed with his milquetoast health care plan that was just frying pan to fire and pandering to the insurance companies, and with his failure to pursue the Guantanamo torture gangs and those who facilitated them. His foreign policy also sucked.

    I voted for Trump for more radical health care reform and was disappointed when he quickly dropped his pre-election promises for affordable health insurance that would cover all.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/trump-obamacare-promises-236021

    I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought), and avoid wars of aggression overseas, and I agreed that a lot of what is reported is fake news--Colin Powell on weapons of mass destruction would be a good example.

    When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.

    Trump vs Biden in November is ridiculous. How can we Make America Great Again if we can only choose between two senile lunatics and prevaricators?

  118. @Charlesz Martel
    I used to be, years ago, in tbe textile business at the factory owner level. My rep in L.A. told me once that Cyprus had overnight developed the capacity to produce 35,000 dozen T-Shirts a week. If I recall correctly, that would be between 800-1000 fully trained workers. It takes months to get a T-shirt plant to that level of production, assuming that the labor supply is there to begin with. Tbe story was obviously false.

    What was really happening was someone was running a T-shirt re-labeling operation. The shirts came in, the label was cut off, and a new label was straight tacked on with a serger sewing machine. This was to mis-label the goods as being produced locally to get around quota restrictions.

    As soon as I saw the sample, it was obvious they were Chinese goods ( this was around 1987).

    Unless you have actually been in the manufacturing trenches, you really have no idea how much the U.S. was/is being abused by the rest of the world. We could easily make masks- but as soon as we gear up to do so, China will open the floodgates and our domestic manufacturers will be crushed, price wise. Tbe retailers need the extra margins to pay the rent, so it's goodbye Charlie to Mr. Patriotic American manufacturer.

    The problem is now so ingrained in tbe entire manufacturing/distribution chain, that NOTHING will change it, except maybe a few million deaths from an epidemic/pandemic. It would take that level of anger in this country to effect meaningful change in the long run.

    This is the country that watched on live TV as we lost four airplanes, two towers, several other buildings, including the Pentagon damaged and nearly the White house, and 3,000 people, including live coverage of people leaping to their deaths to avoid being burned to death, all less than 20 years ago, all caused by ILLEGAL VISA OVERSTAYERS, AND WE STILL REFUSE TO CONTROL OUR GODDAMN BORDERS DUE TO THE GREED OF OUR CAPITALIST OVERLORDS.

    I am a capitalist, but what we have now has morphed from a sane capitalism, to a crony capitalism, to a legalized theft capitalism.

    Look at where tbe PPP money went.

    Let's do nothing while 30% of Americans face eviction for non-payment of rent, 33% will likely face foreclosure within 60 days, and then wonder why people like Bernie Sanders or AOC are ascendant.

    It's a mystery!!

    I have posted this before, several times over the years, but it's worth posting again. Words of wisdom from a man sho understood the way the world really works.

    https://youtu.be/wwmOkaKh3-s

    Steve, is it possible to purchase an archive of your old isteve.com site?

    Oh- One more thing. The majority of Muslims in this country have been allowed in SINCE 9/11.

    “Whom tbe Gods wish to destroy, they first make mad”.

  119. anon[326] • Disclaimer says:

    Here it comes. Black people in some parts of the US have higher rates of sickness and death, it’s all YT’s fault. Jesse Jackson? Al Sharpton? Kerner commission?

    What if some investigation shows that being hugely obese and a Type II diabetic makes you sicker and dead sooner even without any SARS, how will that be YT’s fault?

    Because any time anything bad happens to an Person of Color, the nearest wypipo must be blamed. That’s why.

    https://apnews.com/8a3430dd37e7c44290c7621f5af96d6b

  120. @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

  121. @danand
    Way back in the mid '80's my best friend from high school was tasked with restoring an Austin Healey 100 BN-2 by his mother. She fancied herself a bit of an Isadora Duncan, right down to her love of communism. It took him roughly six months start to finish, and looked fantastic; though the solenoid actuated overdrive remained finicky. His mother drove it a total of 3 outings. Could be she never came across a scarf with that flow she desired?

    If the gearbox on the BN-1 is anything to go by, maybe she lost the hang of driving a stick. If it still exists and has been kept up I shudder to think what one could fetch for it at auction. Handsome brutes they were. Have not thought to inquire as to the effects of the CoronaCrash on the vintage car market.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The basic gearbox was clunky, then they grafted on the Laycock de Normanville overdrive. I’d do a swap for a Borg Warner or Toyota 5 or 6 speed and along with a GM alternator and a modern ignition the car will actually run reliably after that.
  122. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    But surely you are not suggesting that the government interfere with the free market ?

    That would be socialist and un-American. Don’t you want to get the government off the
    back of the American people ?

  123. @danand

    "What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?"
     
    Maybe it means we should vote for one of those Governors.

    The best thing I can say about Trump is that he both recognized, and took some action, to check China. This while most in and out of "his" party screamed and howled at him for doing so.

    My neighbor says voting for a old phone book is better than voting for Trump. I'd further that. Go with that old phone book over original Joe, at least I'm more sure what's left of that old phone book.

    I like that.

    Polls showed a Generic Democrat beating Trump, but most of the actual living, breathing Democrats losing to Trump.

    Joe Biden IS the Generic Democrat, and also the Geriatric Democrat.

    If I could choose any Democrat at this time, I think I would choose Jay Inslee, governor of Washington. I think he has done the best job of any major Democrat. He seems to be rather forward thinking as well. Cuomo gets the publicity, but Cuomo has some of the standard Cuomo family anger management issues, which are terrible.

    I used to truly despise Gavin Newsome, out of the corrupt SF Democrats. I have a lot more respect for him lately. A LOT more respect, since I used to despise him.

    Speaking of corrupt SF Democrats who have exceeded expectations, how about London Breed? Not ready for prime time, but a possible future president. How about Inslee/Breed 2024?

  124. @danand
    Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards:

    https://flic.kr/p/2iS52qL

    Doesn't do much to inspire confidence in government, at least this local one. These signs are all over the parks and waterfront of tourist areas in San Francisco.

    I have a close relative who works for a different defense contractor. He says they are permitted to wear a mask, so he made his own. Last time I talked to him he didn’t wear it at work. I suggested he start doing so.

    My relative told me that since airplanes are so big, the workers were already at least 6 feet away from each other anyway. These days they are even further apart.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.
     
    A lot of industrial workers are routinely exposed to smoke, dust (including abrasive dust), oil mists, and other things in the normal course of their work in normal times. They ought to wear masks all the time - it might well add years to their lives. And yet they usually don't. A lot of guys will tell you it doesn't matter because they smoke anyway. Although what that really means is that they should do it because they also smoke, as lung irritants can act additively.
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards"

    Maffs are hard, huh, Paleo Libderp?

    Danand was referring to the Pythagorean theorem and the innumeracy of whomever created the placards. But maybe you are a 9th-grade dropout.
    , @vhrm
    Something they might be able to achieve without big corporate hoopla is to make sure their areas are well ventilated. Maybe talk to their facilities guys to turn the fans up some and bias for more outside air

    And put some portable fans to set up a flow in enclosed areas / corners.

    (though, unless he's high risk or has high risk people in the house... it's prob not worth worrying about)

  125. “It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks”

    Then Boeing does still manufacture in the US? It hasn’t outsourced all of its work to China? Obviously Pat Buchanan could state it more succinctly, but regarding short supply in masks in the US in general, this is just one more example of free trade “benefits” coming home to roost. If the US were still making its own masks (not to mention making its own pharmaceutical ingredients) in the US, this wouldn’t seem like such a major problem. But of course there must be a reason why the US can’t produce its own face masks the way it used to.

  126. eD says:
    @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

    “J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party ‘Hoax,’ in the sense that while the ‘new’ virus is real (there are always ‘new viruses’), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China’s actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.”

    What is described above is a Batman Gambit:

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BatmanGambit

    However, the timeline supports an even more convoluted Batman Gambit. Western intelligence agencies release a bio-engineered (and not very lethal) virus in China, knowing that the Chinese Communist Party will respond with a crackdown, because they are Communists. The Chinese crackdown is then used as an excuse to convince Westerners that this virus must be very lethal, enabling the real goal of the exercise, the crackdown in western countries.

  127. eD says:

    As pointed out in earlier comments, Boeing was in serious trouble over the 737 Max alone, and the emergency afforded a relatively graceful way to walk away from the entire project without spooking investors. So I wonder why they haven’t done so. In fact this is a good time for other companies and organizations to quietly abandon some of their more ill-considered initiatives.

  128. @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It’s hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained ‘about-face’ is real and needs explanation.

    Seems more likely, because it stretches the imagination to believe that China’s political leaders are ineffably cunning devils, while our political leaders are naive simpletons. You cannot really say that Trump, Johnson, Bolsanaro, and other political leaders of democracies have distinguished themselves.

    A good political leader cannot do everything him(her) self. They are only as good as their ability to recruit and appoint wise men (women) to advise them on areas of specialist knowledge. It may be easier to act decisively in smaller, less diverse countries. New Zealand has done well in all this, but when your chief industry is sheep farming, you have probably learned to avoid the kind of woolly thinking that many democratically elected leaders go in for.

    From the national leader’s Quick Set-Up Handbook.

  129. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Have you HAD Puerto Rican and Kona coffee? That sounds like a pretty good arrangement if we can encourage more of it. Robusta delenda est!

  130. @Lockean Proviso
    I recall that Boeing announced the launch of in-house 3D printing of PPE gear for medical workers:
    https://aircargoeye.com/boeing-harnesses-3d-printing-mass-produce-face-masks/

    Did the union want to keep some? Did Washington state politicians pressure Boeing to not keep some for their own use? I thought that Democrats were at least still supposed to be pro-union.

    Maybe the workers need to jury rig some drop-down emergency oxygen masks and air supply from the parts bin to wear in close quarters on the assembly line.

    Boeing is 3D-printing face SHIELDS, not masks. Perhaps too subtle a difference for aircargoeye.com (at least in its URL)

    From the LA Times article:

    The plane maker plans to limit scarce N95 masks for plant workers, relying mainly on cloth face coverings.

    The plane maker does not seem to understand that N95 masks protect you from them, while cloth masks protect them from you. Then again: Perhaps the Washington-state potheads fully understand, and are just introspective and softly amused by the difference.

  131. @Lugash

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
     
    We're not an industrialized nation anymore. We're a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don't understand manufacturing processes.

    https://twitter.com/LHSummers/status/1241329121768230912

    Thorstein Veblen warned us about this.

    He said that a manufacturing economy made more than just stuff. As we make stuff, we also create consciousness; and the consciousness of a person endeavoring to make stuff is one of engagement with the real, tangible world of Nature. Engagement with Nature, which is another name for science, means confronting and understanding Natural Law. People who deal with Natural Law must learn to subordinate their subjectivity to the objectivity of the larger world around them. If they hope be effective they must engage with the world as it is.

    Our Service Economy, on the other hand, is mostly people to people activity. We need not ever learn about the outer world as it is. Instead we learn how to manipulate others into buying what we offer and how to offer what they will buy. It’s a world of subjective encounters.

    People whose consciousness developed in the latter world will be clueless when it comes to responding to some crisis in the objective, material world. They will be helpless. And so we are. Where are our inventors? Where is our Yankee ingenuity?

    So, contra Krugman and all the other Jewish economists, dismantling manufacturing in a Nation has implications and consequences that manifest and affect our lives beyond those of mere market place efficiency. They have missed important features of life and living. This is the problem with seeing the world through a particular lens.

  132. @Paleo Liberal
    There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    Leadership is shutting down the economy?

    Leadership is using a flu to moth ball the bill of rights?

    Leadership is inducing panic?

    Leadership is fear-mongering?

    Leadership is assuming dictatorial power?

    Leadership is genuflecting to feminized values?

    Leadership is stoking the fear hormones of the sheeple?

    Leadership is declaring abortions are essential but cancer and heart procedures are not?

  133. @J.Ross
    Mass shooting. In Canada. Very high level of planning, arson, impersonation of RCMP (national-level police) to include a fake RCMP car.
    Difficulty: they can't kill him.
    Because then he'd win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don't lie: gun control causes mass shootings.

    Huh. I was thinking just yesterday how it’s weird there haven’t been any shooting incidents during this whole Corona-Chan thing.

    “driving what appears to be an RCMP vehicle and wearing what appears to be an RCMP uniform”

    Double “huh”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Huh. I was thinking just yesterday how it’s weird there haven’t been any shooting incidents during this whole Corona-Chan thing.
     
    There is nobody out to be shot.

    “driving what appears to be an RCMP vehicle and wearing what appears to be an RCMP uniform”

    Double “huh”.
     
    There were also fatal attacks on multiple Mounties in New Brunswick in 2014 and Alberta in 2005.

    Who would want to kill Dudley Doright?
  134. @BB753
    "Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners AND PSYCHOPATHIC AMERICAN CEOs who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you (...)"

    There, fixed it for you!

    PSYCHOPATHIC AMERICAN CEOs

    who are only American in terms of where they fart.

    • Agree: BB753
  135. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Are you suggesting that domestically produced coffee, tea and bananas were ever a possibility (outside of Hawaii). Or perhaps that we annex Mesoamerica?

    Are you suggesting that domestically produced coffee, tea and bananas were ever a possibility (outside of Hawaii). Or perhaps that we annex Mesoamerica?

    And southern Florida, and outlying territories. But domestic sugar is fiercely protected, so why not bananas too? Same principle. The fellow attacked “free-trade ideologues”, so I’m just questioning “fair-trade ideologues”.

    Imagine senators from Florida and Hawaii demand 300% tariffs on bananas, and, thanks to vote-trading, get their wish. A pound of bananas once cost an hour of a man’s wages. Now it’s two or three minutes’. Why not go back? Growers in the ‘Glades and on the Big Island would be ecstatic.

    So would many in Washington, California, Michigan, and upstate New York– when Americans give up foreign banana splits for American apples, pears, and cherries.

    Elsewhere on this forum I have advocated a return to our old total embargo on Chinese products. No one else has seconded that so far. Since everything from that country is produced with torture, the principle behind this is more solid.

  136. OT: On the Swedish model. Sweden is having more deaths, or mor deaths per unit population, or more cases (it isn’t clear from the claims I’ve seen) than culturally similar Norway. I wonder if this has something to do with it:

    Stockholm Metro:
    Daily ridership‎: 1.2 million (2017)
    Number of lines‎: ‎7

    Oslo Metro:
    Daily ridership‎: 0.‎32 (2018)
    Number of lines‎: ‎5

    In both cases, the entire system is not below-ground. And this does not control for how long the system is, riders per km, etc. Still, it does seem that the Stockholm public transit system (and Stockholm is where the largest fraction of swedish cases are) is more heavily used than the Oslo system.

  137. @Paleo Liberal
    Thanks. I greatly appreciate your comment, and that you see what I try to do.

    I am a Democrat, but I can understand the anger at the corrupted status quo that led to Trump's election. Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society. We have more in common than the dividers want us to believe. If we could unite, we could possible get our country back from the oligarchs.

    Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society.

    I voted for Obama first, and then Trump. On both occasions I voted against Hillary Clinton and voted for the person who I though would be a better president of the limited choice available.

    I thought Obama did a reasonable job, but I was very disappointed with his milquetoast health care plan that was just frying pan to fire and pandering to the insurance companies, and with his failure to pursue the Guantanamo torture gangs and those who facilitated them. His foreign policy also sucked.

    I voted for Trump for more radical health care reform and was disappointed when he quickly dropped his pre-election promises for affordable health insurance that would cover all.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/trump-obamacare-promises-236021

    I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought), and avoid wars of aggression overseas, and I agreed that a lot of what is reported is fake news–Colin Powell on weapons of mass destruction would be a good example.

    When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.

    Trump vs Biden in November is ridiculous. How can we Make America Great Again if we can only choose between two senile lunatics and prevaricators?

    • Replies: @Peterike
    “ When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.”

    Ludicrously false.

    “ I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought)”

    You’re making that up is my guess.
  138. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Dont worry your pretty little head.
    TOP. KARENS. are deciding as we speak which industries to declare essential (and worthy of Fed price supports).
    TOP. MEN. are buying those companies now while they are wounded.
    See milk and sugar subsidies for an idea of how it works..

  139. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    Is that you, Karen? Hows the quarantine going in Doylestown?

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    Is the Mercer Museum open?
  140. @Sean

    https://www.unz.com/efingleton/what-went-wrong-at-boeing-my-two-cents/
    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).

    Even more troubling, however, has been the long-term cost in weakening Boeing’s competitiveness. This is something I identified in “Boeing, Boeing….Gone,” a cover story for The American Conservative, as far back as 2005. The point is that among the things Boeing has outsourced have been the wings and the wing-box. These are by far the most technologically advanced elements of an airframe and they were outsourced to a Japanese consortium led by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Part of the deal was that much of Boeing’s secret wing-building know-how had to be transferred to Japan. The decision was highly controversial with Boeing workers who saw it as a direct threat to their jobs. Outraged at the prone position they were asked to adopt towards their information-gathering Japanese counterparts, they were quoted by author Karl Sabbagh as vulgarly referring to Boeing’s technology-transfer deal as the “open kimono” policy.
     

    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).

    Okay, but the paradigm was set by Lockheed Martin and the F-35. Suppliers in fifty states and who knows how many countries. Program awarded in 2001 and just now reaching carrier decks (at far lower numbers than first planned). Biggest program in DoD history; biggest flop on DoD history — 5th-generation fighter finally just now coming online, with the Pentagon now never shutting up about 6th-gen fighters. At least Northrop-Grumman stopped bidding on (overextending) new work once they were awarded the B-21. The 787 is hardly alone in such managerial malfeasance within the aerospace industry.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But I presume that outsourcing Boeing 787 wing production to Japan was a way to get the Japanese to not enter the airliner business, which they no doubt would be pretty good at if they decided as a nation to be good at.
  141. @Paleo Liberal
    I have a close relative who works for a different defense contractor. He says they are permitted to wear a mask, so he made his own. Last time I talked to him he didn't wear it at work. I suggested he start doing so.

    My relative told me that since airplanes are so big, the workers were already at least 6 feet away from each other anyway. These days they are even further apart.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.

    A lot of industrial workers are routinely exposed to smoke, dust (including abrasive dust), oil mists, and other things in the normal course of their work in normal times. They ought to wear masks all the time – it might well add years to their lives. And yet they usually don’t. A lot of guys will tell you it doesn’t matter because they smoke anyway. Although what that really means is that they should do it because they also smoke, as lung irritants can act additively.

  142. @Anonymous

    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost?
     
    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we'd better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports. Thanks for the clarification!

    I hate bell and other peppers, and Mexican food in general. I see highly elevated tariffs on these toxins fruits as harmless. Such crap doesn’t belong on pizzas and hoagies.

    I’m guessing most here would disagree with me on this.

    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we’d better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports.

    As I’ve said elsewhere, I’d support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust. This could be taken further– any Chinese-made products you own now would have to be turned in to the Feds to be destroyed as contraband. (Yes, like Australia’s gun buyback.) Search warrants would be made easily available to facilitate enforcement.

    What device are you posting from?

    That would be tough, but all good deeds are. I still own a three-decade-old Minnesota-made Zeos monitor; I’m not sure where I could find a CPU to match. But they have to be around somewhere.

    As Lenin said, sometimes you have to take one step back to take two forward.

    • Replies: @miss marple
    Don't forget the original Gateway computers made in SD.

    You are a true radical, Reg. I nominate you Fearless General of the revolution to be made Fearless Leader after revolutionary forces prevail!
    , @Jonathan Mason

    As I’ve said elsewhere, I’d support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust.
     
    Could we make an exception for tea?
  143. @Kyle
    I’ve heard horror stories about people’s hands getting sucked into machinery and crushed. Here’s something I found on the osha website.

    Workers should not wear loose-fitting clothing, jewelry, or other items that could become entangled in machinery, and long hair should be worn under a cap or otherwise contained to prevent entanglement in moving machinery.
     
    https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3170/osha3170.html
    A long scarf goes against the common sense of these osha guidelines. I worry more about people getting bodily fluids on their hands and then touching things, other people, or things that other people touch often. Then other people getting that on their hands and transferring that to their mouth. Should we be masking up and gloving up?

    Got hitched in 78. Was farming at the time. Had read about a b ball playa losing a ring finger to a wedding ring dunk accident. Never worn it except on our wedding day. Jewelry is overrated.

  144. It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks

    How much would union-made American-sourced masks cost, compared to what’s available now?

    Don’t the “improvised” ones carry the union label by implication?

  145. @miss marple
    Domestically produced tea costs about the same or even less. If Florida grows bananas? Would be inexpensive just maybe not available year round. I assume coffee can be/is grown in the same state as tea...

    Good coffee requires altitude and rich volcanic soil.

  146. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Totally OT, but now that the legendary classic "Black Panther" is in occasional rotation on cable, I finally got to see about 30 minutes of it, in pieces here and there.

    I, I uh, I mean, um, you know....

    I simply could not believe how bad it was. Forget about my hating comic book movies in general and Blacketty-black movies on principle, this was just bad, sloppy film-making in general terms. Terrible casting, dreadful acting, retarded production design, sub-retarded editing and direction, I really sort of couldn't believe it.

    Was kind of expecting respectable mediocrity, but... come on, guys, really.

    Things are worse than anybody has guessed.

    Oh, come on it wasn’t that …..bad. Wait a minute, it sucked.

    Two silver linings to come out of WuFlu/CoronaFraud:

    1. Hollywood is dead, financially dead, gone, buried, never coming back.

    2. $500/hour Hookers are now $1oo/hour Hookers.

    Btw, with just about 75 to 100 times as many deaths Attributed to Corona Virus as we have now, we will be approaching Hong Kong ’68.

  147. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT


    Maryland County Health Department Suggests Shopping Days Based on Last Names

    Last name starting with A-C shop on dates ending with 0 and 5
    Last name starting with D-G shop on dates ending with 1 and 6
    Last name starting with H-L shop on dates ending with 2 and 7
    Last name starting with M-R shop on dates ending with 3 and 8
    Last name starting with S-Z shop on dates ending with 4 and 9

     

    There are many couples, including married couples, in which the two partners have different last names.

    Supposing they shop together.

    On which day do they shop?

    And don’t say “the man’s last name” or “the woman’s last name” for obvious reasons.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Shopping with your spouse isn't a right.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Supposing they shop together.
     
    Nobody is stopping them. Name scheme compliance is voluntary.
  148. @Johnny McMullen
    It's almost like everyone involved in the saber-rattling against China is entirely dishonest and immoral.

    Masks for the imaginary state of 'Israel', though!

    Israel is not imaginary. The complaint of its detractors is that it is quite real and it thrives.

  149. @Reg Cæsar
    I hate bell and other peppers, and Mexican food in general. I see highly elevated tariffs on these toxins fruits as harmless. Such crap doesn't belong on pizzas and hoagies.

    I'm guessing most here would disagree with me on this.

    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we’d better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports.
     
    As I've said elsewhere, I'd support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust. This could be taken further-- any Chinese-made products you own now would have to be turned in to the Feds to be destroyed as contraband. (Yes, like Australia's gun buyback.) Search warrants would be made easily available to facilitate enforcement.

    What device are you posting from?

    That would be tough, but all good deeds are. I still own a three-decade-old Minnesota-made Zeos monitor; I'm not sure where I could find a CPU to match. But they have to be around somewhere.

    As Lenin said, sometimes you have to take one step back to take two forward.

    Don’t forget the original Gateway computers made in SD.

    You are a true radical, Reg. I nominate you Fearless General of the revolution to be made Fearless Leader after revolutionary forces prevail!

  150. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous (n)
    That would fly in the face of free trade ideology. Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow...you know...sinister.

    Boeing depends heavily on trade. There are only so many planes that can be sold domestically. And competition in foreign markets with Airbus and others is the only thing that keeps Boeing honest and on its toes. Domestically, it’s very bloated and corrupt as a result of its easy US government contracts. Promoting Boeing products in foreign markets requires some amount of outsourcing of manufacturing to foreign buyers of Boeing products, because unless they’re very oil rich, they won’t have any money to buy them, and because they won’t just want planes but also some investment in productive enterprise as well.

    • Replies: @Anonymous (n)
    The United States runs trade deficits with just about every one of its major trading partners. These trading partners don't have a leg to stand on daring to demand industrial offsets on one of the few types of products they actually do buy from us even while running huge surpluses against us on aggregate. If our government wasn't a bunch of bought and paid for whores, they'd make quick work of such demands by quietly pointing out that the party demanding offsets on Boeing planes should instead consider buying Boeing planes as an offset to the United States for the huge trade surplus they run with us. It's a rare country out there that has less to lose in a trade conflict against us.
  151. @Reg Cæsar
    I hate bell and other peppers, and Mexican food in general. I see highly elevated tariffs on these toxins fruits as harmless. Such crap doesn't belong on pizzas and hoagies.

    I'm guessing most here would disagree with me on this.

    By George, I never thought of that! Looks like we’d better send all manufacturing capability overseas, stop educating engineers and scientists, and in general stop doing anything other than buying imports.
     
    As I've said elsewhere, I'd support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust. This could be taken further-- any Chinese-made products you own now would have to be turned in to the Feds to be destroyed as contraband. (Yes, like Australia's gun buyback.) Search warrants would be made easily available to facilitate enforcement.

    What device are you posting from?

    That would be tough, but all good deeds are. I still own a three-decade-old Minnesota-made Zeos monitor; I'm not sure where I could find a CPU to match. But they have to be around somewhere.

    As Lenin said, sometimes you have to take one step back to take two forward.

    As I’ve said elsewhere, I’d support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust.

    Could we make an exception for tea?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Could we make an exception for tea?
     
    You can take the Brit out of Britain...
  152. @but an humble craftsman
    In the eighties, there were two manufacturers of schoelaces in my country, being kept alive by army contracts with the explicit aim to keep soldiers supplied with laces for their boots.

    Just in time manufacturing is the culprit. It was supposed to be good, but I was telling people it is bad long before the current emergency. Thank god for our financial and industrial geniuses in this can-do kind of country.

    The classic line is, “Just in time manufacturing means, just when you go looking for a product, they’re all out.”

  153. @yakushimaru
    They are kept alive by their votes, their boss's campaign contributions, and their representatives' "machination" in congress.

    You guys are trying to throw away the baby with the washing water. As if all the economic thinking are completely without merits, simply because of perceived troubles at the moment.

    So you would have them close down thanks to the utterly corrupt “free market” so that the product is made by slave labor in some far-off country, the upshot being you can’t get at it when your need it, as now. Fuck your baby and your bathwater, libertarian slime.

  154. @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

    You are just one of those China Did It trolls cutting and pasting meaningless redundant generalization assertions too boring and repetitive to read. Life is too short to waste our time on your logorrhea.

    China is a good country. The US is a bad one. You can tell by how China finally rounded up those stinking CIA “democracy”-thumpers. My god, a country that actually has the strength to oppose the CIA. And jail them where they belong.

  155. @Nathan
    It's important to remember that for whatever reasons N95 masks were never considered something that we would need large supplies of for the general public. They were for medical staff only. Getting everyone masked up was never part of anyone's strategic thinking. If it was, why stop with flimsy cloth masks? Why not stockpile full gas masks?

    Anyway, looking forward to the isteve takes on lock-down culture. How's everyone holding up? This is going to be a really weird shared cultural experience for us in a few decades. All of us are locked down and going through the same, or similar, experiences. I wonder how it's going to look in the future...

    And what happened to Carole Baskin's second husband? Drug dealer at the bottom of the gulf? Fancy Feast? Hiding out in Costa Rica? Will anyone remember this question in 3 months?

    Nathan, my mother is 102 years old and still talks about the Great Depression,but that was a time of material want, what’s lacking here is freedom. We have a new six week old grand daughter, can’t visit her. My daughter has a new condo where we were going to celebrate Easter, never happened.I would really like to have a mindless job that I could do from home for twenty hours a week. Used to volunteer two days a week at a soup kitchen can’t do that. Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that. Used to shop daily for our evening meal, not wise to do that. Can’t swim, can’t golf, can’t lots of things. When the weather breaks I will plant a garden. My family is healthy. My wife and I are still healthy. I will count my blessings. I can do that. Stay safe.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that.
     
    YouTube has a plethora of Masses available, some live, most recorded within the previous 24 hours. I've "attended" Bishop Barron's from LA, as well as others cybercast from Toronto, Jamaica (N.Y.), Watertown, Mass (where my Puritan Whitney ancestors settled in 1635!), and even Darwin, Australia.

    I was taught as a child that at any given moment, Mass was being said somewhere in the world. Now it's being cybercast.

    They can range from 20 minutes to two hours. It's worth checking out just to see all the various altars.
  156. @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally,

    If they knew that it came from one of their labs, which it probably did, then they may not have known precisely which of their ghastly diseases they were dealing with and so they assumed the worst.

  157. @Kyle
    I’ve heard horror stories about people’s hands getting sucked into machinery and crushed. Here’s something I found on the osha website.

    Workers should not wear loose-fitting clothing, jewelry, or other items that could become entangled in machinery, and long hair should be worn under a cap or otherwise contained to prevent entanglement in moving machinery.
     
    https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3170/osha3170.html
    A long scarf goes against the common sense of these osha guidelines. I worry more about people getting bodily fluids on their hands and then touching things, other people, or things that other people touch often. Then other people getting that on their hands and transferring that to their mouth. Should we be masking up and gloving up?

    Kyle, Years ago, thanks to a local WNY boy’s injury while dunking a basketball, all dunking in scholastic games was banned. He wore his new HS ring, caught it on a hook that holds the net to the basketball rim and pulled his finger, tendons attached, from his hand. Remember seeing safety posters of a detached finger, tendons trailing alongside and the culprit ring. Best slogan…”No safety, Know pain, Know safety, No pain.” Stay safe.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Digital logic.
  158. @Achmed E. Newman
    Joe, the biggest hold up would be the molds, whether the procurement of them or their fabrications. They are the big sunk costs and the hurtle to overcome to get started injection molding or whatever. (I'm not saying cost is a factor in this case, but it's the procurement.)

    3-D printers are way too slow to get millions of these things out the door.

    I hope you like your one, Joe. My wife did donate some extra masks she got from a friend to the grocery store. The customer service guy was appreciative, but I told her the manager might be constrained by CYA, bureaucratic rules on this and they would hopefully at least go home with the employees at least. I haven't worn one yet...not agonna' do it ... too prudent.

    "Thanks FDA, for making American small business give up on lots of entrepreneurial manufacturing due to onerous rules and delays!" - Joe Chinaman

    Ach, I gave my masks to my family, but kudos to your wife. The 3D printer makes your proto type. A “me too” machine feels the proto type and make your master molds by replicating your model. It is that simple, but I guess maybe the fabric is a problem.

  159. @Buffalo Joe
    Nathan, my mother is 102 years old and still talks about the Great Depression,but that was a time of material want, what's lacking here is freedom. We have a new six week old grand daughter, can't visit her. My daughter has a new condo where we were going to celebrate Easter, never happened.I would really like to have a mindless job that I could do from home for twenty hours a week. Used to volunteer two days a week at a soup kitchen can't do that. Used to start my day with morning Mass, can't do that. Used to shop daily for our evening meal, not wise to do that. Can't swim, can't golf, can't lots of things. When the weather breaks I will plant a garden. My family is healthy. My wife and I are still healthy. I will count my blessings. I can do that. Stay safe.

    Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that.

    YouTube has a plethora of Masses available, some live, most recorded within the previous 24 hours. I’ve “attended” Bishop Barron’s from LA, as well as others cybercast from Toronto, Jamaica (N.Y.), Watertown, Mass (where my Puritan Whitney ancestors settled in 1635!), and even Darwin, Australia.

    I was taught as a child that at any given moment, Mass was being said somewhere in the world. Now it’s being cybercast.

    They can range from 20 minutes to two hours. It’s worth checking out just to see all the various altars.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    https://www.churchservices.tv/

    For Ireland (mostly) and the UK. Strange on Easter Sunday morning to see so many empty altars, as if a neutron bomb had removed the people but left the buildings.

    Back on topic, UK cargo-cultists disappointed as Great White Turkey Bird fails to make the appearance promised by the priests.

    But the priests have promised that when the Great White China Bird finally does arrive, which it definitely will as long as people have faith, its cargo will mean plenty for all.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/vital-ppe-equipment-including-400000-gowns-en-route-to-uk-delayed-nhs-coronavirus

    A vital shipment of protective medical equipment, including gowns, has been delayed en route from Turkey and will not arrive in the UK on Sunday as planned, despite government assurances that it would do.

    The 84-tonne consignment of personal protective equipment (PPE) was expected to include 400,000 gowns, which are in particular shortage now.

    It was understood that the shipment would not now arrive on Sunday, although it was not clear why. At the government’s daily coronavirus press conference on Saturday, Robert Jenrick, the housing, communities and local government secretary, said it was due to arrive in the next 24 hours.

    But speaking on Sunday, Michael Gove, the chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, declined to say he could guarantee sufficient continuing supplies of PPE.

    Asked whether he could, he told Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday show only that it was “the first priority of government” to do so.

    Gove added: “It is the case that there is a consignment of personal protection equipment that’s arriving from Turkey, which contains tens of thousands of gowns. It’s also the case that we have a deal with China in order to bring in, in due course, some 25m gowns over to the United Kingdom in order to make sure that people are kept safe.”

     

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Reg, thank you, but there is a sense of community at our morning Mass and you can actually take Communion. Stay safe my friend.
    , @Ron Mexico
    Fr. Mike Schmitz from UMinn Duluth has been good for my family. We went to our parish parking lot all nine days and prayed the Divine Mercy Chaplet. Other families joined us. Confessions are still available by app't. Life goes on. "Let not your heart be troubled." John 14: 1-3
  160. @jim jones
    Here in the UK domestic manufacturers quickly stepped up when China became toxic:

    https://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/first-batch-barbour-scrubs-gowns-18084417

    “domestic manufacturers quickly stepped up”

    But the UK still hasn’t got enough. Probably not got enough domestic manufacturers.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/medical-staff-face-weeks-without-protective-gowns

  161. @Jonathan Mason

    As I’ve said elsewhere, I’d support a total ban on the import of Chinese products, as we had after the 1949 holocaust.
     
    Could we make an exception for tea?

    Could we make an exception for tea?

    You can take the Brit out of Britain…

  162. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    Coffee CAN be grown in the US, it just would have to be mechanized. Growers in Hawaii are already experimenting with planting and specialized harvest machines. Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen. So the answer is, quite a bit of coffee could and should be grown in the US. California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas are all excellent places to grow very high quality coffee. The same could be said for Chocolate cultivated not in Africa depending on cheap labor but Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and South Carolina.

    Tea is grown in the Himalayas, so it could be grown in many places in the US.

    We have millions of unemployed anyway as most service jobs are dead dead dead so there is plenty of labor to soak up and it would be an excellent idea. It would support specialized agricultural robotic harvesters which has enormous national security implications (repurposing for other uses as needed). As well as mechanics to fix them, etc. A nation of mechanics beats a nation of service workers.

    • Replies: @Jack D

    Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen.
     
    As usual you are totally wrong. Coffee grows only in the tropics (areas which never experience frost - coffee trees are not frost tolerant) but coffee requires that it not be too hot either. So that limits it to growing on high (usually volcanic) mountains in tropical areas, where the daytime temp. is only in the 70s despite being near the equator. The best coffee grows above 5,000 ft. but it can be grown somewhat lower, such as in mountainous parts of Hawaii. In fact Hawaii (and Puerto Rico) are just about the only areas in the US suitable for coffee growing. But aside from issues of labor cost (which can be solved with mechanization to some extent, at the price of quality), the suitable area in the US is quite small and we could not hope to grow all of our coffee needs domestically even if we covered every suitable patch with coffee trees.

    Nor is there any need to do so. World trade has been going on at least since Roman times. There are some products where there is some national security need to grow them domestically, but if the Colombians are willing to sell us coffee in exchange for American wheat, which does not grow well in the tropics, then what is the harm?

  163. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT
    LOL at NYC retconning an extra 4,000 Corona deaths on 4/17.

    NYC Adds Nearly 4,000 People Who Never Tested Positive To Coronavirus Death Tolls

    This happens just as there is a trend of steady decline starting to happen. The numbers need a little shot in the arm, to mask this trend.

    2488, 2166, 2091+4302, 2017

    “LOL at NYC retconning an extra 4,000 Corona deaths on 4/17.”

    Expect an explosion of retconned kungfluey deaths in the coming days as empty cash-strapped hospitals realize the CARES Act pays them a cool $13,000 per kungflu diagnosis, no verification required 💰💰💰

    We ❤ you CoronaHoax!

  164. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    “I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism.”

    Globalism got us nice things and allowed to build a better here over there.

    “The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.”

    So do you speak for the average American?

  165. @Anonymous

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency.
     
    Codependency helps to prevent another Holocaust.

    “Codependency helps to prevent another Holocaust.”

    Habeas corpi. By 1944, Germany had so little oil that it could not fuel its tanks and planes, and was forced to invent costly biodiesel derived from coal. Fresh moist bodies require a lot of fuel to incinerate. Yet there are no mass graves interring the six gorillion bodies. It never happened.

  166. @Buffalo Joe
    Paleo, I hear your frustration and anger. I liked Trump because he wasn't a politician. I wish that he could refrain from answering every perceived slight or criticism with a sophmoric tweet. And truly, Joe Biden?

    “I liked Trump because he wasn’t a politician.”

    Except he wasn’t ready to lead our nation. Neither was Shitlery. So I voted libertarian in 2016.

    “And truly, Joe Biden?”

    Not really a fan of him. Slightly better than Shitlery. Definitively better than Trump, who’s a walking catastrophe.

    • Troll: Manfred Arcane
  167. @Hail

    You are asking for an elite that is incompetent enough to treat the annual flu season like the bubonic plague, and require everyone to wear masks, but is still competent enough to manufacture and distribute said masks.
     

    Granted the Chinese elites have managed to do that
     
    J.Ross has proposed in the comments elsewhere at iSteve that this whole thing may be a Chinese Communist Party 'Hoax,' in the sense that while the 'new' virus is real (there are always 'new viruses'), the reaction was at least 1000x what was necessary to deal with a bad flu strain and that China played it up to scare people, especially the US. China's actions (mass shutdown) triggered a series of events that scared everyone. But none of the data we have corroborate the Mass Killer Apocalypse Virus fears. So what was this.

    J.Ross' proposed theory would have it that the CCP's sudden about-face on The New Virus -- a literally overnight about-face from "not a big deal" to "shut down a region with 60 million people, cue the Virus Apocalypse Movie film reels and the hazmat suits" -- was a calculated bid to hurt the US and to hurt Western economies. By the time of the unexpected about-face, they had 100% certainty it had spread to the US and elsewhere, AND that these countries had the kind of media that would go into hysteria mode AND had the technological capacity to do "testing."

    This theory would attribute to the CCP a calculated bid to create a false virus panic with plausible deniability ("so sorry! we didn't have the data! it was early; we reacted the best we could; and hey even the highly-neutral WHO are calling us heroes") which would scare people and trigger a series of events that throw the US and its satellites in Western Europe into chaos, making the latter easier pickings for Belt & Road and Huawi colonization, etc.; countries dazed by a mass-hysteria-recession are suddenly beggars, not choosers.

    The Chinese Communist Party's calculation would have been, on that fateful 'about-face' evening, that the West was much less ready to handle a panic than Communist China would be. It was a risk to them but it worked.

    If this theory is right, in fact, the CCP succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. A case of the dog finally catching the car bumper; what the heck now? The results for China's regime itself are unclear, given that the cynical triggering of mass-hysteria-recessions in major trading partners equates to a drought that sinks all boats.

    The alternative, and many would say more plausible theory, is that the Chinese Communist Party panicked, too, and reacted highly irrationally, taking a sledgehammer to a handful of mosquitoes and then salting the earth where the flattened bodies of the mosquitoes landed. Or a synthesis of the two may be true. It's hard to disentangle motivations. But the unexplained 'about-face' is real and needs explanation.

    Except that the early Chinese Communist Party response was a repeat of its response to SARS and MERS. Denial, then clampdown later. The Chinese Communist Party first denied the bad news, then clamped down hard. Likely the clampdown was in panic because at some point the Party leadership KNEW it had spread from their idiotically sited lab in Wuhan by most likely sheer incompetence and greed (poor safety procedures or selling bats done with testing in the wet markets for cash take your pick).

    The virus is new, probably rapidly mutating, erratic, and unpredictable. In any event the result has been even more nationalism, social media turning Africans against the Chinese as videos spread of diaspora Africans getting kicked out of McDonalds, etc. the Chinese have no money to pay off African leaders.

    There are riots in Wuhan over being locked down, the Chinese leadership itself is question as hundreds of millions of Chinese are out of work with the social safety net of Chinese communism: NOTHING.

    China’s cities run on lots of illegal immigrants doing the scut work of the cities, its just their illegal immigrants come from the countryside and can never, EVER enter the elite or even middle class. They are one cult leader away from civil war. Since about 100 million illegal squatter immigrants who do all the dirty service work have no jobs, food, or money.

  168. @Paleo Liberal
    I have a close relative who works for a different defense contractor. He says they are permitted to wear a mask, so he made his own. Last time I talked to him he didn't wear it at work. I suggested he start doing so.

    My relative told me that since airplanes are so big, the workers were already at least 6 feet away from each other anyway. These days they are even further apart.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.

    “Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards”

    Maffs are hard, huh, Paleo Libderp?

    Danand was referring to the Pythagorean theorem and the innumeracy of whomever created the placards. But maybe you are a 9th-grade dropout.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    the

    innumeracy
     
    of whomever

    I'm a big proponent of keeping whom in the language, but am pretty sure whoever is correct in this instance. Perhaps it's a case where both are acceptable, as with than me/than I [am, do, etc.] Then whoever is smoother.

    Sorry to be pedantic, but you started it with the charge of "innumeracy". Glass houses...
  169. A 2015 study on bat Coronavirus in Nature when American where doing the research that went to China :

    Everything is already described

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.3985

  170. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    A vote for Biden is a vote for hot civil war. Simply put.

    He is visibly senile, and his VP likely Stacey Abrams will be running things. So what would President Abrams do?

    How about mobilizing the military to kick in the door of every White person and drag the men off to reeducation camp and seize the belongings for “redistribution” and “reparations.” As well as of course gun confiscation. The Boogaloo will start the moment Abrams/Biden is elected.

    More to the point, there are 25 million people unemployed. Likely 50 to 75 million by the end of the year. What is Biden’s / Abram’s / Democrats plans?

    As near as I can figure out, endless printing of money, UBI at a thousand a month, everyone put in shipping containers save big shot managers, everyone eats beans and bugs as the food distribution and processing network shuts down (save for bigshot managers). So Biden/Abrams etc. will force people from their homes into shipping containers and feed them beans and bugs and free streaming garbage and a pittance of UBI. Taking away their cars, trucks, etc. which Biden has promised to do; also their homes and freedom from being around non-Whites which drives most White behavior spoken of or not.

    Like I said, that’s a recipe for HOT civil war. Most White men will fight to keep their pickup truck, dogs, and guns. The military is filled with mid level guys who can see their careers ending under Biden/Abrams and being forced into a just a nicer (if that) shipping container from their nice home that all those miserable deployments to miserable places paid for. Unsaid in all of this has been the ability of the elite to bribe Joe Average White guy with a pickup truck, beer, sportsball, barbecues, and general freedom and individuality in their own personal life outside of work. Replacing all that with a shipping container will have their WIVES ready to kill Oprah 2.0, out and proud edition, to keep their granite countertops and walk in closet.

    YEs Biden/Abrams are a slam dunk to win by judge mandated mail in vote fraud voting. But that just kicks off the Civil War that has been brewing since the 1950s between the managerial class who think their poop does not smell bad and ordinary White people who they hate for having nearly a good time as they do.

    [See the Charlize Theron beer commercial where she busts the balls of some joe averages just for their sin of being by themselves enjoying a good time.]

  171. @Reg Cæsar

    Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that.
     
    YouTube has a plethora of Masses available, some live, most recorded within the previous 24 hours. I've "attended" Bishop Barron's from LA, as well as others cybercast from Toronto, Jamaica (N.Y.), Watertown, Mass (where my Puritan Whitney ancestors settled in 1635!), and even Darwin, Australia.

    I was taught as a child that at any given moment, Mass was being said somewhere in the world. Now it's being cybercast.

    They can range from 20 minutes to two hours. It's worth checking out just to see all the various altars.

    https://www.churchservices.tv/

    For Ireland (mostly) and the UK. Strange on Easter Sunday morning to see so many empty altars, as if a neutron bomb had removed the people but left the buildings.

    Back on topic, UK cargo-cultists disappointed as Great White Turkey Bird fails to make the appearance promised by the priests.

    But the priests have promised that when the Great White China Bird finally does arrive, which it definitely will as long as people have faith, its cargo will mean plenty for all.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/vital-ppe-equipment-including-400000-gowns-en-route-to-uk-delayed-nhs-coronavirus

    A vital shipment of protective medical equipment, including gowns, has been delayed en route from Turkey and will not arrive in the UK on Sunday as planned, despite government assurances that it would do.

    The 84-tonne consignment of personal protective equipment (PPE) was expected to include 400,000 gowns, which are in particular shortage now.

    It was understood that the shipment would not now arrive on Sunday, although it was not clear why. At the government’s daily coronavirus press conference on Saturday, Robert Jenrick, the housing, communities and local government secretary, said it was due to arrive in the next 24 hours.

    But speaking on Sunday, Michael Gove, the chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, declined to say he could guarantee sufficient continuing supplies of PPE.

    Asked whether he could, he told Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday show only that it was “the first priority of government” to do so.

    Gove added: “It is the case that there is a consignment of personal protection equipment that’s arriving from Turkey, which contains tens of thousands of gowns. It’s also the case that we have a deal with China in order to bring in, in due course, some 25m gowns over to the United Kingdom in order to make sure that people are kept safe.”

  172. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Wheres the post?

    You lost. We won.


    What happened to this site being realist, data driven, etc.?

    You need to make the post: "Gregory Cochran and I have been utterly humiliated. We got it wrong. We are ashamed and we apologize."

    You need to make the post: “Gregory Cochran and I have been utterly humiliated. We got it wrong. We are ashamed and we apologize.”

    They were right though. Reduce transmission enough and eradication is possible. Take a look at Taiwan, South Korea, China, Hong Kong, Australia, NZ… on the way to success. You do have to implement all the interventions to succeed though.

    Apologize for nothing, Steve, and stick to your guns.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    We all know the boomer will never apologize for anything.


    But still: Wheres the apology?
  173. @Anonymous
    Bananas dont do well outside the tropics.

    Cant have bananas rotting in the groves.

    This isn’t true. Where there is a will there is a way. I personally have been to an indoor greenhouse of commercial bananas in Iceland. ICELAND! Plants grow anywhere you can engineer to be pleasing to them, and with enough gumption that’s anywhere

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I personally have been to an indoor greenhouse of commercial bananas in Iceland. ICELAND!


    Confusingly, you will find Icehouse not in Greenland but in Australia. Go figure.

    https://youtu.be/B7g3pDRd3q4
  174. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    China started trimming back importation of recyclables quite some time before Covid19. It has been an open secret in my town that for over a year the curbside recyclable collection program (run by a private waste management contractor at considerable expense to municipal taxpayers) has been a charade of late, as all of this metal, glass, paper, plastic and cardboard-- lovingly and obediently separated, goes straight into the landfill with the regular garbage.

    Good old fashioned incineration is the best way to dispose of most trash. When I was younger we had a huge fireplace and burned a lot of newspapers and books (my mother had a used book store) in winter.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    When I was in the Kandahar Airfield the dump there had a very prominent hole in the ground that was filled with trash and constantly smouldering. The entire place felt like a gigantic sore on the face of the Earth. Photography was forbidden.

    The weirdest part was the local workers who appeared to just hang out in the trash piles. As in they sat around in lawn chairs amidst all the garbage. I had no idea how they could tolerate the smell.

  175. @Achmed E. Newman
    Steve. when it comes to China specifically, a quite different problem is introduced, for retail manufactured goods we depend on, even though they ARE in good supply. Call it the "For Lack of a Descent Hammer" effect. The prevalent crappy quality of Chinese retail (at least) goods, seems almost DESIGNED to ruin American DIY human capital, as documented humorously in "Brilliant plan by Chinese Communist Party Cadres pans out well".

    It goes like this:

    For want of a decent handle,
    the hammer head was lost.
    For want of a hammer head,
    the claw hammer was lost.
    For want of another hammer,
    a gallon of gas and a half hour was lost.
    For want of a non-minority customer-service girl,
    another 10 minutes was lost.
    For want of a receipt,
    eight-fifty was lost.
    In the meantime,
    there were plenty of cheap low-quality nails around.
    That's not the problem, Steve.

    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?
    , @Inquiring Mind
    My gripe is with Gree dehumidifiers, which is about the only kind you can buy at home product stores. They last 2-3 seasons at best before whatever they are still allowed to use as refrigerant leaks out and the unit just freezes over.

    And the City of Ulyanov requires payment of a special sticker to put it out on the curb and have it "recycled." As if we don't pay gobnormous amounts of property tax and as if we could change our behavior as consumers that these things don't break down. Owing to the Lord of the Ozone layer, no one will repair them.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    If the treehuggers won't even talk about massive immigration, I don't think it's all about the environment after all anyway, Alden,.. or they are just morons.

    That's funny - my fridge (the one I spent a lot of time on) used the freezer for all the cooling, and just sent cold air through a controlled opening into the fridge part. Those failures just seem kind of odd.

    When you start getting into kids toys, it gets ridiculous - if you've got 5 minutes, read about the purchase of a LED-lit-up foam glider, in "Cheap China-Made Crap - who's responsible?". Out of a sample of 2 units, both were defective, one with a bad switch, and the 2nd with no horizontal stabilizer. To be nice to the Pop of the Mom & Pop store, I was able to get one working glider out of the two.
    , @JMcG
    If the freezer still works, they just need a new fan to blow air into the refrigerator compartment. It happened to my Whirlpool too. I’m guessing it’s one of the armoire style refrigerators? I think the fan cost under 75.00. It took me less than an hour to change after watching a video on it. I understand your point though. Hope that helps them out.
  176. @Reg Cæsar

    ... their own cloth masks, which, for guys working with rotating machinery, sounds like tempting Isadora Duncan’s fate.
     
    This was a problem with Somaliwomen and other over-, if well-, dressed Moslem gals working around machinery in factories. You have to choose between job protection and life protection. Nobody wins. Nobody can.

    Maybe the medieval barbarians could choose between modern employment and 8th century headgear.

  177. @Anonymous
    Bananas dont do well outside the tropics.

    Cant have bananas rotting in the groves.

    “Can’t have bananas”

  178. @captflee
    If the gearbox on the BN-1 is anything to go by, maybe she lost the hang of driving a stick. If it still exists and has been kept up I shudder to think what one could fetch for it at auction. Handsome brutes they were. Have not thought to inquire as to the effects of the CoronaCrash on the vintage car market.

    The basic gearbox was clunky, then they grafted on the Laycock de Normanville overdrive. I’d do a swap for a Borg Warner or Toyota 5 or 6 speed and along with a GM alternator and a modern ignition the car will actually run reliably after that.

  179. @JMcG
    I knew a guy who worked in a generating station. Shortly after fall protection was made mandatory by Osha, he was working alongside a fellow wearing one of the new harnesses. He carelessly dropped the lanyard while he was standing next to a shaft that was rotating at some awful speed. Thankfully, the shaft had been painted, and the paint layer broke loose and acted like a bearing, allowing the lanyard to float instead of wrapping around the shaft and killing him. I’m sure it seemed like an eternity til they got it stopped. It made the company safety bulletin, so I believe it to be true.

    Shortly after fall protection was made mandatory by Osha

    It took me a second before I figured out you meant OSHA, rather than some Japanese company.

  180. @Paleo Liberal
    There are many couples, including married couples, in which the two partners have different last names.

    Supposing they shop together.

    On which day do they shop?

    And don’t say “the man’s last name” or “the woman’s last name” for obvious reasons.

    Shopping with your spouse isn’t a right.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox

    Shopping with your spouse isn’t a right.
     
    It shouldn't be a punishment either - but sometimes it feels that way...
  181. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Adam Smith's suggested first exception to free trade was national defense.

    http://moneyingreece.org/adam-smith-the-protectionist

    If any particular manufacture was necessary, indeed, for the defence of the society, it might not always be prudent to depend upon our neighbours for the supply; and if such manufacture could not otherwise be supported at home, it might not be unreasonable that all the other branches of industry should be taxed in order to support it. The bounties upon the exportation of British made sail-cloth, and British made gunpowder, may, perhaps, both be vindicated upon this principle.
     
    Notice that his clauses are all conditional: "might not always be," "might not be unreasonable," etc.

    Like all liberals, by the way, he was contradictory as all can be.

    Like all liberals, by the way, he was contradictory as all can be.

    You mean like an economist.

  182. @Paleo Liberal
    I have a close relative who works for a different defense contractor. He says they are permitted to wear a mask, so he made his own. Last time I talked to him he didn't wear it at work. I suggested he start doing so.

    My relative told me that since airplanes are so big, the workers were already at least 6 feet away from each other anyway. These days they are even further apart.

    But it would be nice if they were all assigned good masks and forced to wear them.

    Something they might be able to achieve without big corporate hoopla is to make sure their areas are well ventilated. Maybe talk to their facilities guys to turn the fans up some and bias for more outside air

    And put some portable fans to set up a flow in enclosed areas / corners.

    (though, unless he’s high risk or has high risk people in the house… it’s prob not worth worrying about)

  183. @Reg Cæsar

    Domestic manufacturing of critical products is somehow…you know…sinister.
     
    What would purely domestic coffee, tea, and bananas cost? Just wondering... a handful of Americans work producing those, and they have interests, too.

    I once visited a tea plantation in South Carolina. They were fully automated. Had to be, since all the help ran off. No, just kidding about the last part.

  184. @PiltdownMan
    The 1968 movie, Isadora, depicted Isadora Duncan's end rather graphically, in the last scene. It's on YouTube. Vanessa Redgrave was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the title role.

    The 1968 movie, Isadora, depicted Isadora Duncan’s end rather graphically, in the last scene.

    Is never heard of her before Steve’s post here but how has nobody mentioned Edna Mode yet?
    No capes!

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I['ve] never heard of her before Steve’s post here ...
     
    I was a kid when the movie came out in 1968, but I got the impression my mom and her friends knew about her the way you're supposed to know about a pop culture figure from the previous generation. Isadora Duncan was a big deal in their parents' era.
  185. @Johnny McMullen
    It's almost like everyone involved in the saber-rattling against China is entirely dishonest and immoral.

    Masks for the imaginary state of 'Israel', though!

    Ian Lipkin (advisor on the film Contagion) pointed out that on December 31st, researchers in China identified the Wuhan disease as a coronavirus but said, ‘It’s not highly transmissible’. The World Health Organisation parroted it, although the number of infections the Chinese were reporting ought to have made it obvious the Wuhan disease was spreading easily from person to person. Such a disconnect between the known d=facts and what the WHO accepted as an explanation amounts to conspiring with China. About the misleading information that China provided to him and other international experts Lipkin was quoted ‘we will never find out what the Chinese knew and when’. Their assimilation was why on the 24th of January, Doctor Fauci gave a briefing for senators in which he said there was very little danger to the US from the Wuhan disease. Later that day he repeated that opinion at a press conference. During this time the Chinese were demanding that international flights from China be accepted by other countries but they had banned all internal flights from Wuhan.

    The 1918 flu seems to have evolved in military camps and went away in the summer only to come back with new and spectacular virulence especially men of military age (the W shape age graph). Obviously myriad soldiers in cramped unhygienic conditions created the environment for the extra virulence to evolve.What is currently happening may seem in retrospect to be a dress rehearsal for a big (second) wave in October out of Chinese detention camps as Professor Ewald has expressed concern about. It would be no huge surprise if COVID-19 came back in October as the 1918 flu did with specialised virulence for the ages of those in the Xinjiang detention camps, who are not elderly, and with a death rate of several percent. What does China say to these concerns?

    https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/china-says-theres-no-risk-of-a-covid-19-outbreak-in-xinjiang-camps-dont-believe-it/
    In December, China claimed to have released the more than 1 million Uyghurs and other persecuted peoples detained in “vocational training centers” as part of its campaign to “eradicate ideological viruses.” Shohrat Zakir, the chairman of the Uyghur region, told the press that everyone in the camps had “graduated” and were out and living “happy lives.”

    Lies.

  186. @prime noticer
    "While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago?"

    only recycling metals makes any sense right now. when you 'recycle', they send most of the stuff to a landfill anyway. all that plastic, glass, and paper ends up in the ground. not in a factory. they might take the cardboard.

    when it makes economic sense to recycle that stuff, they might start doing it. the raw materials to make new paper and glass are dirt cheap though, so it will be a LONG time before that ever makes sense. it will probably never make economic sense to recycle plastic. basically what you want to do is to collect all that stuff in one place, so even if it only ends up in a landfill, you know where it all is. so 'recycling' to a landfill is still good.

    I don’t get why paper and card isn’t burned as fuel for power generation. There is little point in recycling it. In fact it will rot down easily under the right conditions.

    One form of plastic recycling that seems to be making headway is its use for railroad ties (sleepers). They appear to be an all-up improvement over concrete and timber and are bulky, using up a lot of plastic waste. And there are millions of ties around the world that will need replacing sooner or later.

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/DSC_0852-696×461.jpg.webp

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/2020/01/ffestiniog-railway-use-milk-bottles-for-new-rail-sleepers.html

    https://www.lankhorstrail.com/en/railroad-ties

    http://multibriefs.com/briefs/MV-railroadseb/MV-RAILROADSEB102114.php

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses. Coal and natural gas have a known BTU value, so you can control the heat output. Coal, for a coal boiler, is dried and then crushed to the consistency of talcum powder and blown into the boiler at all four corners. Paper and cardboard could be shredded but then you would have to stoke it into a boiler or have it travel through on a traveling bottom grate. They used to have wood chip boilers that operated this way. Inefficient, but if you were running a pulping mill the chips and bark were already there. They tried a waste to energy plant in Niagara Falls but garbage is garbage, often wet and non combustible. Weird concept to burn garbage for energy next to a great hydro source. Stay safe.
  187. @Alden
    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.

    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?
     
    Funny you should mention that. We spent extra to buy a Bosch electric fan, because, exactly as Alden pointed out, we wasted money on three cheap Chinese n0-brand fans that burned out, one after the other. The Bosch fan is as loud as a propeller-driven airplane, a year later. You can even hear a beat frequency in its hum. For all I know, most of the parts and design were sourced from China.
    , @anon
    As far as i am aware, the only 2 things that can stop a modern fridge working are loss of gas and the Defrost Timer malfunctioning. Switch the power off, Timer only has to be turned 90 degrees, wait 30 minutes, turn back on and the fridge will go another ten years.
    A $10 dollar thermometer is good enough for checking shelf temperatures.
    Noisy fridge means it's working, putting stuff on top of the fridge ensures it won't keep working.
  188. @Buffalo Joe
    Kyle, Years ago, thanks to a local WNY boy's injury while dunking a basketball, all dunking in scholastic games was banned. He wore his new HS ring, caught it on a hook that holds the net to the basketball rim and pulled his finger, tendons attached, from his hand. Remember seeing safety posters of a detached finger, tendons trailing alongside and the culprit ring. Best slogan..."No safety, Know pain, Know safety, No pain." Stay safe.

    Digital logic.

  189. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Totally OT, but now that the legendary classic "Black Panther" is in occasional rotation on cable, I finally got to see about 30 minutes of it, in pieces here and there.

    I, I uh, I mean, um, you know....

    I simply could not believe how bad it was. Forget about my hating comic book movies in general and Blacketty-black movies on principle, this was just bad, sloppy film-making in general terms. Terrible casting, dreadful acting, retarded production design, sub-retarded editing and direction, I really sort of couldn't believe it.

    Was kind of expecting respectable mediocrity, but... come on, guys, really.

    Things are worse than anybody has guessed.

    I mean, how does Black Panther rate against a Blacksploitation classic such as Pam Grier in “Coffy.”

    Cliche-ridden, ham acted with Ms. Grier displaying a heaving chest throughout all of her violent acts of revenge. So bad that it is good, in a certain cult movie sense. It is realistic in that the female Coffy character is not able to overpower the male bad guys, so she has to resort to guile and “fighting dirty.” It is almost Sailer-esque in its treatment of the corruption exhibited by a do-gooder black politician.

    Does Black Panther rise to that level, or is it a dud in comparison?

  190. @Russ

    My colleague Steve Denning’s commentary today on Boeing’s 787 problems is on the money in identifying a key managerial wrong turning a decade ago. Boeing decided at the outset to rely on outsourcing for 70 percent of the plane’s manufactured content. As Steve shows at length, this greatly increased the managerial complexity of the project and almost certainly helps explain why the project ended up three years late (with consequent damage not only to Boeing’s reputation but, thanks to contractual penalties, to its immediate bottom line).
     
    Okay, but the paradigm was set by Lockheed Martin and the F-35. Suppliers in fifty states and who knows how many countries. Program awarded in 2001 and just now reaching carrier decks (at far lower numbers than first planned). Biggest program in DoD history; biggest flop on DoD history -- 5th-generation fighter finally just now coming online, with the Pentagon now never shutting up about 6th-gen fighters. At least Northrop-Grumman stopped bidding on (overextending) new work once they were awarded the B-21. The 787 is hardly alone in such managerial malfeasance within the aerospace industry.

    But I presume that outsourcing Boeing 787 wing production to Japan was a way to get the Japanese to not enter the airliner business, which they no doubt would be pretty good at if they decided as a nation to be good at.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, my former neighbor went to Japan and Russia to install wing riveting machinery manufactured by a Buffalo company, Gemcor.
  191. @Alden
    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.

    My gripe is with Gree dehumidifiers, which is about the only kind you can buy at home product stores. They last 2-3 seasons at best before whatever they are still allowed to use as refrigerant leaks out and the unit just freezes over.

    And the City of Ulyanov requires payment of a special sticker to put it out on the curb and have it “recycled.” As if we don’t pay gobnormous amounts of property tax and as if we could change our behavior as consumers that these things don’t break down. Owing to the Lord of the Ozone layer, no one will repair them.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    If the refrigerant were leaking out how would the machine freeze over? It would be warm/hot all over.

    Sounds like some kind of sensor problem that runs the compressor too long so the water freezes instead of draining off the coils. Or a fan that's blowing too little air maybe? Basically anything OTHER than a failure of the cooling mechanism :-)
  192. @Dmon
    So the Pentagon subsidizes US manufacturers to make personal protective equipment. Like all military procurement, the masks are subject to stringent rules on inspection, traceability, markings, (working in the industry, I've seen items be rejected because the part number was stenciled on in a shade of grey literally two shades away on the color scale from the specified shade, and yes, there are thousands of shades), sexual harassment training, woman/minority owned small business requirements, etc. etc. 3 months after the panic de jour died down, the NY Times would be running a huge expose about how simple masks cost $20 apiece, and we could be sourcing them from China for pennies. The company making them would be slapped with penalties, and quietly start sourcing them from China, while continuing to stamp the company name on the packaging.

    in a shade of grey literally two shades away on the color scale from the specified shade, and yes, there are thousands of shades

    I can think of at least 50.

  193. @Anonymous
    Good old fashioned incineration is the best way to dispose of most trash. When I was younger we had a huge fireplace and burned a lot of newspapers and books (my mother had a used book store) in winter.

    When I was in the Kandahar Airfield the dump there had a very prominent hole in the ground that was filled with trash and constantly smouldering. The entire place felt like a gigantic sore on the face of the Earth. Photography was forbidden.

    The weirdest part was the local workers who appeared to just hang out in the trash piles. As in they sat around in lawn chairs amidst all the garbage. I had no idea how they could tolerate the smell.

  194. @Lugash

    Are industrialized nations really so dumb and incapable? There must be some dishonesty and deception, but I cannot figure it out.
     
    We're not an industrialized nation anymore. We're a fictionalized, err, financialized nation. Our leadership is largely(entirely?) drawn from guys who know how to push numbers around on a spreadsheet but don't understand manufacturing processes.

    https://twitter.com/LHSummers/status/1241329121768230912

    Some argue we never were a country at all but merely an economy…..theres some variation of that quote thats popular.

    You could argue hatred of Indians then Germans(combined with Anglophilia) and then Russians kept the smorgasbord of white ethnicities united in this country.

    In a way we morally needed the Soviet Union or the Nazis “because theyre bad guys”…..this is especially true of our image to foreigners. To foreigners true or not we were Reagan’s “shining city on a hill.”

    With the Soviets gone and the Russians merely trying to be a player in the global capitalist game and then the “communist” Chinese beating us bad at our own capitalist game……seriously……why exactly are we the good guys again? The neocons kicked the cans down the road “because 9/11” but no one cares about that any more.

    Truth is we aren’t “the good guys” any more if we ever were. If anything we’re a splintered atomised hot mess of a country 2 to 3 decades away from hot civil war…..

    Seriously if it wasn’t for whats left of the Boomers and Gen X and the Asians and white ethnics keeping California in 1 political piece this “country” probably already wouldve balkanized.

  195. @miss marple
    Domestically produced tea costs about the same or even less. If Florida grows bananas? Would be inexpensive just maybe not available year round. I assume coffee can be/is grown in the same state as tea...

    Bigelow Tea does have a tea plantation in South Carolina, and they sell their production domestically. I suspect that it is only available online, as I have never seen this beside their other lines in markets.

  196. This has really exposed what a paper tiger America is. If we can’t make something as simple as masks, what else can’t we make? If you’re a military rival, or potential rival, it’s never been more tempting to attack

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "it's never been more tempting to attack"

    Catch the heck up, for pete's sakes: we have been under devastating attack by our enemies, multiple enemies, for decades now. Would you like a list?

    Having refused to acknowledge the number and intensity of these attacks for this long, and having vehemently refused to respond to them in any way, it is not at all clear that this nation can survive them.
  197. @Paleo Liberal
    There is a question as to the quality of leadership on the national level.

    Who could possibly be more qualified in a leadership than the President’s son-in-law, who spent months successfully convincing the President that the whole thing was a librul hoax?

    What does it mean when polls show a plurality of voters trust the leadership of a senile old crank who spent decades selling out to oligarchs over the President of the United States in a time of crisis?

    What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?

    “What does it say when the nation’s governors are taking the lead while the President tweets insults at them?” Taking the lead in doing what exactly? Oh, the old “Trump just watches TV and tweets”… Funny when Literal Hitler does not act like Real Hitler he is criticized for it. Federalism?? You people are a bunch of vaginas.

    • Agree: Manfred Arcane
  198. @Reg Cæsar

    Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that.
     
    YouTube has a plethora of Masses available, some live, most recorded within the previous 24 hours. I've "attended" Bishop Barron's from LA, as well as others cybercast from Toronto, Jamaica (N.Y.), Watertown, Mass (where my Puritan Whitney ancestors settled in 1635!), and even Darwin, Australia.

    I was taught as a child that at any given moment, Mass was being said somewhere in the world. Now it's being cybercast.

    They can range from 20 minutes to two hours. It's worth checking out just to see all the various altars.

    Reg, thank you, but there is a sense of community at our morning Mass and you can actually take Communion. Stay safe my friend.

  199. @Reg Cæsar

    Used to start my day with morning Mass, can’t do that.
     
    YouTube has a plethora of Masses available, some live, most recorded within the previous 24 hours. I've "attended" Bishop Barron's from LA, as well as others cybercast from Toronto, Jamaica (N.Y.), Watertown, Mass (where my Puritan Whitney ancestors settled in 1635!), and even Darwin, Australia.

    I was taught as a child that at any given moment, Mass was being said somewhere in the world. Now it's being cybercast.

    They can range from 20 minutes to two hours. It's worth checking out just to see all the various altars.

    Fr. Mike Schmitz from UMinn Duluth has been good for my family. We went to our parish parking lot all nine days and prayed the Divine Mercy Chaplet. Other families joined us. Confessions are still available by app’t. Life goes on. “Let not your heart be troubled.” John 14: 1-3

  200. @Lurker
    I don't get why paper and card isn't burned as fuel for power generation. There is little point in recycling it. In fact it will rot down easily under the right conditions.

    One form of plastic recycling that seems to be making headway is its use for railroad ties (sleepers). They appear to be an all-up improvement over concrete and timber and are bulky, using up a lot of plastic waste. And there are millions of ties around the world that will need replacing sooner or later.

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/DSC_0852-696x461.jpg.webp

    https://www.railadvent.co.uk/2020/01/ffestiniog-railway-use-milk-bottles-for-new-rail-sleepers.html

    https://www.lankhorstrail.com/en/railroad-ties

    http://multibriefs.com/briefs/MV-railroadseb/MV-RAILROADSEB102114.php

    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses. Coal and natural gas have a known BTU value, so you can control the heat output. Coal, for a coal boiler, is dried and then crushed to the consistency of talcum powder and blown into the boiler at all four corners. Paper and cardboard could be shredded but then you would have to stoke it into a boiler or have it travel through on a traveling bottom grate. They used to have wood chip boilers that operated this way. Inefficient, but if you were running a pulping mill the chips and bark were already there. They tried a waste to energy plant in Niagara Falls but garbage is garbage, often wet and non combustible. Weird concept to burn garbage for energy next to a great hydro source. Stay safe.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Near where I live there is a "trash to steam" plant (steam used to generate electricity). It was erected a number of years ago when the US was in a panic that we were "running out of landfill space" which is ridiculous - the US will run out of many things but empty space is not one of them. The local municipalities are locked into a long term high cost contract to send their garbage there. Technologically the plant works just fine - there is almost no pollution and it does produce useful amounts of energy. But economically it's not feasible and continues to operate only because of the above market dumping fees that are built into their contract.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses.
     
    Stand by for a slew of Kardashian and Klum jokes...
  201. @Steve Sailer
    But I presume that outsourcing Boeing 787 wing production to Japan was a way to get the Japanese to not enter the airliner business, which they no doubt would be pretty good at if they decided as a nation to be good at.

    Steve, my former neighbor went to Japan and Russia to install wing riveting machinery manufactured by a Buffalo company, Gemcor.

  202. @Alden
    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.

    If the treehuggers won’t even talk about massive immigration, I don’t think it’s all about the environment after all anyway, Alden,.. or they are just morons.

    That’s funny – my fridge (the one I spent a lot of time on) used the freezer for all the cooling, and just sent cold air through a controlled opening into the fridge part. Those failures just seem kind of odd.

    When you start getting into kids toys, it gets ridiculous – if you’ve got 5 minutes, read about the purchase of a LED-lit-up foam glider, in “Cheap China-Made Crap – who’s responsible?”. Out of a sample of 2 units, both were defective, one with a bad switch, and the 2nd with no horizontal stabilizer. To be nice to the Pop of the Mom & Pop store, I was able to get one working glider out of the two.

  203. @S. Anonyia
    Can someone answer this question, or let me know if they've noticed the same thing:

    Where I live the homeless drug addicts who wander downtown all have medical-grade masks? Yet hospitals can't get enough of them....

    Where are these homeless getting masks?

    I work in the medical field and I have seen and heard some things from other hospital/medical-field workers.

    My guess is that in the two or three weeks proceeding the lockdown, when Amazon and the local grocery stores were starting to have massive shortages of Purell and masks and the like, medical offices, or at least some of them, were overstocked on these items and they weren’t locked up in store rooms, so employees took them home, or “stole them” is probably more appropriate.

    I heard in one case that it was “thousands” of certain items. Employees probably thought it was harmless like stealing paperclips or post-it notes.

    Then, what is an individual going to do with hundreds of masks? After they have supplied their family and friends. Probably a few decided to play Robin Hood and distribute the masks to the less fortunate.

    Most hospitals and medical offices had a box of masks inside the front door of the lobby or waiting room. I can’t imagine how many of those boxes disappeared, the thief knowing they could sell them for $5 a pop on the street making it a $500 box. And the hospital would have been obligated to replace the box as soon as it was noticed missing.

    • Thanks: vhrm
  204. @miss marple
    "throttled"- I like that word used in a slightly different context.

    I also agree with A186 on globalism. Deep State controls our economy and places high value on codependency. I've noticed this problem emerging within the US in the form of immigrant populations having near monopoly control over whole sectors of the economy. I'd potentially bring in immigrants from less represented parts of the world to prevent single ethnic groups from wielding outsized influence in this way. The intent is obviously to force a union between established populations and specific immigrant populations. Deep State doesn't embrace true diversity nor does it place high value on democracy.

    Isn’t it true 1 specific clan or tribe from India controls a huge portion of our hotel industry?

  205. @Anonymouse
    We found we had 3 N95 masks. We sent one to my sister-in-law in NYC. After wearing it to the Whole Food$ grocery on Houston Street she tried to sanitize it in the oven and it melted. Oh well!

    Having worn it several times for outdoor excursions I find it has acquired a somewhat funky smell when worn. I realize that I'm smelling me. I'm considering washing out the smell. OTOH, it's a kind of calendar marker.

    Do you remember what temperature?

    I had heard 140 degrees fahrenheit for 30 minutes was good enough.

    • Replies: @Mehen
    158 actually.

    But that was using a medical grade oven with precise temp control and no cool spots/hot spots.

    10 minutes in steam in a double boiler is an alternative method.
  206. @Anonymous
    While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago? Seems when Trump began applying tariffs, China responded by stopping the massive tons of recyclables we were shipping to them. Like our hospital mask problem, we no longer have the infrastructure to process a meaningful amount of our own recyclables. We relegated that responsibility to China and other countries. Since China was a major taker, were now dumping massive tons of recyclables into landfills.

    Anyway, it’s not a quick and easy job of creating infrastructure for recycling, or for mass produced high quality masks, starting from scratch. We slammed our act together for WWII because we had production infrastructure already in place. We didn’t have to start from scratch.

    I think both problems should be beat on like a drum in the media to underscore the stupidity of globalism. The average American should understand why their life currently sucks.

    Globalism is fear, pain, suffering, and death. It’s handing your destiny to foreigners who don’t care about you, and can’t care about you, anymore than you would care more about acquaintances who live down the block, than your own family, in your own home.

    Indeed, the foreigners don’t give a damn about us. Alas, our elites don’t give a damn about us, either.

  207. @Nathan
    It's important to remember that for whatever reasons N95 masks were never considered something that we would need large supplies of for the general public. They were for medical staff only. Getting everyone masked up was never part of anyone's strategic thinking. If it was, why stop with flimsy cloth masks? Why not stockpile full gas masks?

    Anyway, looking forward to the isteve takes on lock-down culture. How's everyone holding up? This is going to be a really weird shared cultural experience for us in a few decades. All of us are locked down and going through the same, or similar, experiences. I wonder how it's going to look in the future...

    And what happened to Carole Baskin's second husband? Drug dealer at the bottom of the gulf? Fancy Feast? Hiding out in Costa Rica? Will anyone remember this question in 3 months?

    I’m having serious issues with my neighbors. My wife and i are buying a trailer and moving out of our apartment.

    2 of my neighbors have told me they’re suffering from serious mental health issues from being either out of work or locked down in their apartment…..

    I think substance abuse and suicide rates are about to shoot up…..

  208. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @indocon
    Honestly I don't see any need for new airframes by global aviation industry for next few years.

    The government COULD buy them up at ten cents on the dollar, have them rebuilt so as to fly right under a separate contract and use them as tankers, transports or whatever else you use a 737 airframe for. The basic airframe is ok, it has a poorly engineered engine and nacelle installation that could be corrected, albeit at some cost.

  209. @Houston 1992
    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?

    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?

    Funny you should mention that. We spent extra to buy a Bosch electric fan, because, exactly as Alden pointed out, we wasted money on three cheap Chinese n0-brand fans that burned out, one after the other. The Bosch fan is as loud as a propeller-driven airplane, a year later. You can even hear a beat frequency in its hum. For all I know, most of the parts and design were sourced from China.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    You would have to tear my Bosch dishwasher from my cold, dead hands, but that’s my only Bosch appliance. We replaced our crappy front load washing machine with a top loading Maytag semi-commercial model and now our clothes actually smell clean again.
    Can’t speak to refrigerators, but there are forums filled with obsessive appliance owners you can check. That’s where I found out about the Maytag.
  210. @Paleo Liberal
    There are many couples, including married couples, in which the two partners have different last names.

    Supposing they shop together.

    On which day do they shop?

    And don’t say “the man’s last name” or “the woman’s last name” for obvious reasons.

    Supposing they shop together.

    Nobody is stopping them. Name scheme compliance is voluntary.

  211. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Walter Mondale voter to vote for Biden. Stay tuned for astute political observations…

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Walter Mondale voter to vote for Biden. Stay tuned for astute political observations…
     
    Mondale and Dukakis are still with us. Both are in better shape than Biden.

    I suspect Jonathan is more likely to have supported Michael Foot than Walter Mondale.

    https://www.devon247.co.uk/sites/default/files/styles/content_area_cover/public/field/image/michael-foot-4x386-606033_478x359.jpg?itok=Gw8R7Grj

    That's a Plymouth Argyle scarf, in case you're wondering. It features the Mayflower, which brought Jonathan over.


    https://thebeautifulhistory.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/plymouthargylenowp.jpg

  212. @mikeInThe716
    Most recycling is a waste - it's virtue signaling. The USA and North America have landfill space for thousands of years.

    Recent advances in metallic separation technology have allowed old scrap metal landfills to be economically "mined". The same will happen with plastics and re-usables. Smart, efficient robots will "mining" old landfills by next century.

    "Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade" by Adam Minter is a realistic view of this issue. It will trigger over-emotional enviro-snowflakes, however.

    Absolutely right, Mike. The problem for cities is NIMBY for the landfills and the cost of trucking waste farther out to places that haven’t been developed enough yet to have a NIMBY opposition. The price of collecting trash will just go up, but there’s indeed plenty of space for landfills.

    The virtual signalers in the “greener” cities with the bigger green cans think that everything they put in that can is going to be turned back into something. Most of it will be sorted out at the transfer station back toward the landfill. However, the virtual signaling treehuggers don’t want to hear about that or think about it. No, they absolutely do not want to take a field trip to the transfer station, thank you very much.

    There are only some types of material for which it is cost effective to recycle versus trucking out to the landfill. See “Toward Sustainable Stupidity”. Another thing lots of the enviro-nuts don’t think or talk about. Auto are about the most recycled things in America. Go to a modern junk-yard, now that the internet has gotten ahold of them. You can’t find a damn part that hasn’t been picked, sometimes, and the steel will get used another day.

  213. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT
    Corona-chan has passed a major milestone.

    It passed one-half the 2017-2018 influenza season dead on Thursday.

    Will it catch up? Will we finally be able to say "it's just the flu, bro"?

    It passed one-half the 2017-2018 influenza season dead on Thursday.

    Where’s your source? Check out this one:

    https://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/not-like-the-flu-not-like-car-crashes-not-like

    Wuflu is running at 50x the rate of 2017-18 flu death rate in NY State. In the USA it now is greater than heart disease.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/chart-us-weekly-coronavirus-deaths-compared-heart-disease-cancer-flu-2020-4#covid-19-is-now-killing-more-americans-weekly-than-heart-disease-or-cancer-did-on-average-per-week-in-2018-1

  214. Anon[324] • Disclaimer says:

    I suspect people arguing about whether Covid has an inherent RO that’s either 2.3 or >5.0 are barking up the wrong tree.

    If your mathematical model is based on New York City, and you’re looking at RO spread within a population in which most people take the subway, walk along crowded sidewalks, eat lunch at crowded restaurants, and enjoy night life at crowded clubs and bars, you’re inherently going to get a model that says, hey, this Covid-19 has a crazy high RO! It’s over 5!

    Now, if you used a model that was based on Wyoming, where a guy goes to work in his pickup, gets coffee at his local gas station, and goes back to work with the guys on his ranch, and made calculations that the RO was 2.3 among this population, what does that say?

    R0, in such cases, is inherently meaningless. Neither model reveals any truths about the inherent transmitability of the virus. All it says is that the virus spreads more easily among a population where you jam people closely. Any model from crowded China is going to have a high RO because all the places that have been infected are filled with people jammed close together.

  215. @vhrm

    The 1968 movie, Isadora, depicted Isadora Duncan’s end rather graphically, in the last scene.
     
    Is never heard of her before Steve's post here but how has nobody mentioned Edna Mode yet?
    No capes!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R2aW03pwL0

    I[‘ve] never heard of her before Steve’s post here …

    I was a kid when the movie came out in 1968, but I got the impression my mom and her friends knew about her the way you’re supposed to know about a pop culture figure from the previous generation. Isadora Duncan was a big deal in their parents’ era.

  216. @Jonathan Mason

    Instead of claiming that, for example, people who voted for Obama and then Trump were obviously white racists, I think it is better to try to engage. We are all Americans. We all want the best possible society.
     
    I voted for Obama first, and then Trump. On both occasions I voted against Hillary Clinton and voted for the person who I though would be a better president of the limited choice available.

    I thought Obama did a reasonable job, but I was very disappointed with his milquetoast health care plan that was just frying pan to fire and pandering to the insurance companies, and with his failure to pursue the Guantanamo torture gangs and those who facilitated them. His foreign policy also sucked.

    I voted for Trump for more radical health care reform and was disappointed when he quickly dropped his pre-election promises for affordable health insurance that would cover all.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/trump-obamacare-promises-236021

    I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought), and avoid wars of aggression overseas, and I agreed that a lot of what is reported is fake news--Colin Powell on weapons of mass destruction would be a good example.

    When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.

    Trump vs Biden in November is ridiculous. How can we Make America Great Again if we can only choose between two senile lunatics and prevaricators?

    “ When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.”

    Ludicrously false.

    “ I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought)”

    You’re making that up is my guess.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Ludicrously false.
     
    https://www.nationalmemo.com/trump-uttered-59-lies-about-the-pandemic-in-one-month?share_id=5474925&socialux=facebook
    , @Captain Tripps
    There is a core group of true believer lefty religious zealots like Mason; hard to tell what percentage of the Democratic Party they are, but they all have that same lunatic vibe, and keep repeating the same shibboleths, like picking a core group of 5-10 passages from the Bible to quote. It all has a feel like Judy Garland clicking her red ruby shoe heels together and chanting "There's no place like home" after Glenda told her, "But you had the power to make the Bad Orange Man go away all along!"
  217. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    This has really exposed what a paper tiger America is. If we can’t make something as simple as masks, what else can’t we make? If you’re a military rival, or potential rival, it’s never been more tempting to attack

    “it’s never been more tempting to attack”

    Catch the heck up, for pete’s sakes: we have been under devastating attack by our enemies, multiple enemies, for decades now. Would you like a list?

    Having refused to acknowledge the number and intensity of these attacks for this long, and having vehemently refused to respond to them in any way, it is not at all clear that this nation can survive them.

  218. @dr kill
    Is that you, Karen? Hows the quarantine going in Doylestown?

    Is the Mercer Museum open?

  219. @Anonymouse
    We found we had 3 N95 masks. We sent one to my sister-in-law in NYC. After wearing it to the Whole Food$ grocery on Houston Street she tried to sanitize it in the oven and it melted. Oh well!

    Having worn it several times for outdoor excursions I find it has acquired a somewhat funky smell when worn. I realize that I'm smelling me. I'm considering washing out the smell. OTOH, it's a kind of calendar marker.

    Don’t get your n95 wet. It has an electrostatic charge to trap particles. N95s are rendered useless after they get wet.

    To disinfect and reuse an n95 you can put it in a glass jar or gallon Ziploc bag and leave it out in the sun for a few hours.

    Alternatively, you can hang it from the oven rack and turn on the heat at 160F for thirty minutes.

  220. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    Oh, come on now, you have more sense than to vote for “Biden”. You know as well as I do that in actuality you would be voting for whatever horror would be installed as his vice presidential running mate, and that quick as a wink, said horror would be substituted for Biden via the 25th Amendment should “Biden” win. And that regime would be an extension, indeed an intensification of all of the policies to which you objected, but with the formal coming out party for autocratic rule as well.

    Hopefully, this strategery will be so glaringly obvious that it would either not be tried, or would be defeated by the voters.

    If it is foisted upon us, I would hope that you have enough self respect as a perceptive Democrat to either vote 3rd party, write in a favored alternative, or just not vote.

    Whatever, Paleoliberal, it’s your choice, and if this transparent farago were to “work”, do not expect it to go down at all smoothly.

    Democrats have been bitching that Trump’s electoral victory was not acceptable since he didn’t win the popular vote (a debateable contention given all of the likely vote fraud in CA, the state that delivered the supposed popular vote that “supports” that contention), but this is a Constitutional Republic and the one and only Constitutionally-mandated national election is for the President, whose victory is secured in the Electoral College. This is the black letter law of the Republic; that Hillary did not win the votes in the Electoral College is the reason she lost, not some skulduggery. Trump won legally, fair and square, and above board. That Hillary lost was a product of her unbridled arrogance, and her open hatred for citizens whose votes she needed for her winning the Electoral College.

    Now consider the ploy of using Biden as the Presidential candidate of record for the Democrat party, but who in actuality is being treated as a mere stalking horse for the choice of the apparatchniks, the vice presidential candidate, with the intent to have their choice assume the Presidency through torturing the intent and purpose of the 25th Amendment. The Vice President is designated to assume the Presidency upon genuine need, but not in this sort of dishonest scheme. It would be a fraud perpetrated on the citizens, would be seen that way, would be resisted by any means necessary, and justifiably so.

    The Democrats wouldn’t accept a Constitutionally-prescribed, legal, and legitimate election. So why do they expect, in their arrogance, that one so transparent in its dishonest intent would be acceptable?

    • Agree: petit bourgeois
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    Well, yeah, it all depends on who Biden or the party chooses as the vice presidential candidate. Biden has said it will definitely be a woman. So who is the Manchurian candidate and when will her name be announced? I think it will be a familiar name that is easy to remember.

    Here is a possible catchy campaign theme song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AWhTCIQdk4

  221. anonymous[259] • Disclaimer says:
    @unit472
    No doubt our nails along with facemasks are made in China and subject to Chinese bureaucratic delays and restrictions on export.

    https://www.presidentialprayerteam.org/2020/04/17/virus-supplies-for-u-s-stuck-in-china/

    Zerohedge links to very informative interview with Kyle Bass on our problem with The Hotel China.If we get tough with them they are very likely to just cut off our pharmaceutical supply chain.

    It wasn't so long ago that the US government had strategic stockpiles of essential commodities and gave subsidies to US producers ( Remember Sam Donaldson's ranch got a mohair subsidy). The left called these schemes 'corporate welfare' and they were mostly ended. Its also worth remembering that when the Battle of Britain began gas masks were issued to the people of London. I don't think the UK had time to manufacture them but they probably did have warehouses full of them left over from WW1.

    Zerohedge links to very informative interview with Kyle Bass on our problem with The Hotel China.

    I can’t imagine Kyle Bass is credible on China. Before corona, his investment fund was on track to closing down because of investor pull outs after heavy losses from bets against the Chinese economy. On Twitter it looks like he is dedicated to vengeance.

  222. The U.S. preposterously declared, Make masks, but you cannot “gouge.” This was the wrong end of the stick (if anyone still uses that expression). The correct approach would have been: Gouge away.

    As the old saying goes: 1. Good 2. fast 3. cheap…. pick any two.

    • Agree: danand
  223. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:

    Isadora Duncan’s autobiography is a trip. I suspect some here would enjoy it. She seems to genuinely aim to call it as she sees it. If you envision an artiste today, you think of virtue signalling, but… not her.

    Actually, this is one of the few books I remember physically BUYING… I picked it up browsing in one of the used bookstores on Telegraph Ave in Berkeley and thinking… yeah, I actually DO want to read this. Good call.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    If you were on Telegraph Avenue in the past 20 years in a used bookstore, we may have crossed paths. Going to Cal is no picnic and requires such diligence.

    Did you grab copies of the Sun people vs the Ice People literature prevalent in that neck of the woods?
  224. @Paleo Liberal
    Speaking as a Democrat from a family that's been Democrats since Andy Jackson --

    Biden was not my first choice.

    Nor was he my second, or third, or fourth, ...

    I've generally referred to him as Bankster Biden. For the past few decades, he has optimized everything I dislike about the Democratic Party.

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.

    Speaking first and foremost as an American, I want my presidents to show leadership in times of crisis, even if I dislike their party and their politics. Leadership, like the kind Eisenhower showed to end the Korean War, or Nixon showed to ease tensions between the US and USSR and China, or Reagan with nuclear arms talks with the Soviet Union.

    As for RR, I never voted for the guy, but even the Russians who negotiated with him were absolutely blown away by him. Here was a lifelong Commie hater who was looked on by the Soviets with fear and loathing. But RR completely won their trust, and negotiated a deal that was great for all parties, far beyond what anyone could have possibly imagined. I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan "The Last Romantic" -- meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don't see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    I recall a PBS show about the negotiations, and one of the Russians admiringly called Reagan “The Last Romantic” — meaning Reagan had a romantic view of a world at peace, and convinced the Russians it was possible.

    I don’t see that sort of leadership in Trump.

    On any given standard, Trump will either be the polar opposite of Reagan, or his clone. Kind of like a checkerboard.

    Reagan’s SDI ranks among the greatest government programs in our or any other country’s history. It performed its job beautifully without ever being put into practice. How can you beat that record? Certainly not for cost savings.

    I’m still hoping for Trump’s own SDI to come along. In his case, though, it will probably be by accident.

    Still, that’s good enough for government work.

  225. @Hail

    “COVID-19...the same ballpark as seasonal influenza.” — Dr. John Ioannidis
     
    Speaking of sports metaphors, and therefore of sports:

    First came Johnny Unitas (1933–2002), football star, late 1950s to early 1970s;

    Then came Johnny Ioannidis (1965 – at least the 2060s, please; we need you).

    Both great in their own way.

    As Unitas faded from view beginning in the 1980s, Ioannidis was rising fast:


    Born in New York City in 1965 and raised in Athens, Greece. Valedictorian (1984) at Athens College; National Award of the Greek Mathematical Society (1984); MD (top rank of medical school class) from the National University of Athens in 1990
     

    Both Unitas (Jonaitis) and Ioannidis mean “Johnson” in their languages. So, for that matter, does Yankovic.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    Please don't be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.

    https://youtu.be/N9qYF9DZPdw

    , @Hail
    Would it help Dr. John Ioannidis' cause to change the spelling of his name to Unitas and begin to ask people to call him by the diminutive form of his first name?
  226. @BenKenobi
    Huh. I was thinking just yesterday how it's weird there haven't been any shooting incidents during this whole Corona-Chan thing.

    "driving what appears to be an RCMP vehicle and wearing what appears to be an RCMP uniform"

    Double "huh".

    Huh. I was thinking just yesterday how it’s weird there haven’t been any shooting incidents during this whole Corona-Chan thing.

    There is nobody out to be shot.

    “driving what appears to be an RCMP vehicle and wearing what appears to be an RCMP uniform”

    Double “huh”.

    There were also fatal attacks on multiple Mounties in New Brunswick in 2014 and Alberta in 2005.

    Who would want to kill Dudley Doright?

    • LOL: SafeNow
  227. @ScarletNumber
    Shopping with your spouse isn't a right.

    Shopping with your spouse isn’t a right.

    It shouldn’t be a punishment either – but sometimes it feels that way…

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    In my neck of the woods gay people love to grocery shop together.
  228. @Anonymous
    Boeing depends heavily on trade. There are only so many planes that can be sold domestically. And competition in foreign markets with Airbus and others is the only thing that keeps Boeing honest and on its toes. Domestically, it's very bloated and corrupt as a result of its easy US government contracts. Promoting Boeing products in foreign markets requires some amount of outsourcing of manufacturing to foreign buyers of Boeing products, because unless they're very oil rich, they won't have any money to buy them, and because they won't just want planes but also some investment in productive enterprise as well.

    The United States runs trade deficits with just about every one of its major trading partners. These trading partners don’t have a leg to stand on daring to demand industrial offsets on one of the few types of products they actually do buy from us even while running huge surpluses against us on aggregate. If our government wasn’t a bunch of bought and paid for whores, they’d make quick work of such demands by quietly pointing out that the party demanding offsets on Boeing planes should instead consider buying Boeing planes as an offset to the United States for the huge trade surplus they run with us. It’s a rare country out there that has less to lose in a trade conflict against us.

  229. Anonymous[275] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    You need to make the post: “Gregory Cochran and I have been utterly humiliated. We got it wrong. We are ashamed and we apologize.”
     
    They were right though. Reduce transmission enough and eradication is possible. Take a look at Taiwan, South Korea, China, Hong Kong, Australia, NZ... on the way to success. You do have to implement all the interventions to succeed though.

    Apologize for nothing, Steve, and stick to your guns.

    We all know the boomer will never apologize for anything.

    But still: Wheres the apology?

  230. @guest007
    I have been surprise that the paleocons have failed to use the lack of an industrial base in the U.S. as a reason to massively scale back the Department of Defense. It is obvious to everyone that there is no way that the U.S. can fight a war with China or with any country that China supports. The DoD is too dependent of medical supplies, computer parts, and manufactured items from China to every win a conflict with them. Image what would happend to Defense Health Systems if China cut off the U.S. from everything like surgical masks to pharmaceutical components.

    Why spend $700 billion a year of a standing military that is so fragil that it cannot possibly win a conflict with China?

    Is this a joke? If we were fighting a war with China none of these save the boomer measures would be in existence. We’d be at herd immunity and any boomer who offered the slightest criticism would get thrown down a well. No one gives a shit what anyone over 60 thinks during a war unless they are the president of have more than 2 stars on their shoulders.

    • Replies: @guest007
    By point of view is not about the Covid-19 response but about the dependent of the DoD on products manufactured in China or near China.

    How many drugs would become unavailable to the DoD in a dispute with China. How many computer chips, rare earths, or IT products would become unavailable.

    If the DoD does not have repair parts, it cannot ever win a dispute with China. Yet, as the U.S. becomes even more dependent of items that are not manufactured in the U.S. why have a DoD at all? Why have a military that depends upon China to maintain its logistics system.

    This has nothing to do with boomers.
  231. @Anonymous
    Isadora Duncan's autobiography is a trip. I suspect some here would enjoy it. She seems to genuinely aim to call it as she sees it. If you envision an artiste today, you think of virtue signalling, but... not her.

    Actually, this is one of the few books I remember physically BUYING... I picked it up browsing in one of the used bookstores on Telegraph Ave in Berkeley and thinking... yeah, I actually DO want to read this. Good call.

    If you were on Telegraph Avenue in the past 20 years in a used bookstore, we may have crossed paths. Going to Cal is no picnic and requires such diligence.

    Did you grab copies of the Sun people vs the Ice People literature prevalent in that neck of the woods?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Don't think I picked that up on the street exactly there...
    Actually had no official affiliation with Cal (but went to many events)... lived there while thinking of going into the tech "elite"... what a mistake that would have been... I'd be an older James Damore who has to remain totally silent for fear of losing everything.. or else my soul would have rotted.
    Still.. I think Berkeley is a place that had some good and went bad...
  232. @Reg Cæsar
    Both Unitas (Jonaitis) and Ioannidis mean "Johnson" in their languages. So, for that matter, does Yankovic.

    Please don’t be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Please don’t be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.
     
    I didn't specify which Yankovic.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ez_hQdWN4Rg


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fmnhKU1tJD4


    The 1986 summit meeting:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VHed-OZNb-0
  233. @Alden
    I know 5 families who bought those huge $3,500 Samsung refrigerators. 4K with tax and delivery. The refrigerator part broke down within 3 years. The freezer part still works.

    Electric fans that last just one summer, alarm clocks that die after 2 years. The environmentalists should go after all that disposable junk in the landfills and container ships polluting Mother Earth.

    If the freezer still works, they just need a new fan to blow air into the refrigerator compartment. It happened to my Whirlpool too. I’m guessing it’s one of the armoire style refrigerators? I think the fan cost under 75.00. It took me less than an hour to change after watching a video on it. I understand your point though. Hope that helps them out.

  234. @Buffalo Joe
    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses. Coal and natural gas have a known BTU value, so you can control the heat output. Coal, for a coal boiler, is dried and then crushed to the consistency of talcum powder and blown into the boiler at all four corners. Paper and cardboard could be shredded but then you would have to stoke it into a boiler or have it travel through on a traveling bottom grate. They used to have wood chip boilers that operated this way. Inefficient, but if you were running a pulping mill the chips and bark were already there. They tried a waste to energy plant in Niagara Falls but garbage is garbage, often wet and non combustible. Weird concept to burn garbage for energy next to a great hydro source. Stay safe.

    Near where I live there is a “trash to steam” plant (steam used to generate electricity). It was erected a number of years ago when the US was in a panic that we were “running out of landfill space” which is ridiculous – the US will run out of many things but empty space is not one of them. The local municipalities are locked into a long term high cost contract to send their garbage there. Technologically the plant works just fine – there is almost no pollution and it does produce useful amounts of energy. But economically it’s not feasible and continues to operate only because of the above market dumping fees that are built into their contract.

  235. @PiltdownMan

    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?
     
    Funny you should mention that. We spent extra to buy a Bosch electric fan, because, exactly as Alden pointed out, we wasted money on three cheap Chinese n0-brand fans that burned out, one after the other. The Bosch fan is as loud as a propeller-driven airplane, a year later. You can even hear a beat frequency in its hum. For all I know, most of the parts and design were sourced from China.

    You would have to tear my Bosch dishwasher from my cold, dead hands, but that’s my only Bosch appliance. We replaced our crappy front load washing machine with a top loading Maytag semi-commercial model and now our clothes actually smell clean again.
    Can’t speak to refrigerators, but there are forums filled with obsessive appliance owners you can check. That’s where I found out about the Maytag.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Front load washing machines blow dead dogs. They don't use enough water and eventually the door seal fails.

    2) What's so great about Bosch dishwashers that justifies the price?

  236. anon[310] • Disclaimer says:
    @Houston 1992
    What brand should middle class people buy if we cannot afford Bosch ? Or should we sacrifice and just buy Bosch ?

    As far as i am aware, the only 2 things that can stop a modern fridge working are loss of gas and the Defrost Timer malfunctioning. Switch the power off, Timer only has to be turned 90 degrees, wait 30 minutes, turn back on and the fridge will go another ten years.
    A $10 dollar thermometer is good enough for checking shelf temperatures.
    Noisy fridge means it’s working, putting stuff on top of the fridge ensures it won’t keep working.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    I know someone who purchased a new Korean brand fridge and it puts out a horrible amount of Radio Frequency Interference. Apparently there are AC Variable Frequency Drives inside them. And the controller boards have plenty of electronics on them too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABK-BndqGz8
  237. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    This isn’t true. Where there is a will there is a way. I personally have been to an indoor greenhouse of commercial bananas in Iceland. ICELAND! Plants grow anywhere you can engineer to be pleasing to them, and with enough gumption that’s anywhere

    I personally have been to an indoor greenhouse of commercial bananas in Iceland. ICELAND!

    Confusingly, you will find Icehouse not in Greenland but in Australia. Go figure.

  238. @Johnny Rico
    Do you remember what temperature?

    I had heard 140 degrees fahrenheit for 30 minutes was good enough.

    158 actually.

    But that was using a medical grade oven with precise temp control and no cool spots/hot spots.

    10 minutes in steam in a double boiler is an alternative method.

  239. @Sam Haysom
    Is this a joke? If we were fighting a war with China none of these save the boomer measures would be in existence. We’d be at herd immunity and any boomer who offered the slightest criticism would get thrown down a well. No one gives a shit what anyone over 60 thinks during a war unless they are the president of have more than 2 stars on their shoulders.

    By point of view is not about the Covid-19 response but about the dependent of the DoD on products manufactured in China or near China.

    How many drugs would become unavailable to the DoD in a dispute with China. How many computer chips, rare earths, or IT products would become unavailable.

    If the DoD does not have repair parts, it cannot ever win a dispute with China. Yet, as the U.S. becomes even more dependent of items that are not manufactured in the U.S. why have a DoD at all? Why have a military that depends upon China to maintain its logistics system.

    This has nothing to do with boomers.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Wasn't the SR-71 built with titanium sourced, by stealth, from the USSR?
  240. @JerseyJeffersonian
    Oh, come on now, you have more sense than to vote for "Biden". You know as well as I do that in actuality you would be voting for whatever horror would be installed as his vice presidential running mate, and that quick as a wink, said horror would be substituted for Biden via the 25th Amendment should "Biden" win. And that regime would be an extension, indeed an intensification of all of the policies to which you objected, but with the formal coming out party for autocratic rule as well.

    Hopefully, this strategery will be so glaringly obvious that it would either not be tried, or would be defeated by the voters.

    If it is foisted upon us, I would hope that you have enough self respect as a perceptive Democrat to either vote 3rd party, write in a favored alternative, or just not vote.

    Whatever, Paleoliberal, it's your choice, and if this transparent farago were to "work", do not expect it to go down at all smoothly.

    Democrats have been bitching that Trump's electoral victory was not acceptable since he didn't win the popular vote (a debateable contention given all of the likely vote fraud in CA, the state that delivered the supposed popular vote that "supports" that contention), but this is a Constitutional Republic and the one and only Constitutionally-mandated national election is for the President, whose victory is secured in the Electoral College. This is the black letter law of the Republic; that Hillary did not win the votes in the Electoral College is the reason she lost, not some skulduggery. Trump won legally, fair and square, and above board. That Hillary lost was a product of her unbridled arrogance, and her open hatred for citizens whose votes she needed for her winning the Electoral College.

    Now consider the ploy of using Biden as the Presidential candidate of record for the Democrat party, but who in actuality is being treated as a mere stalking horse for the choice of the apparatchniks, the vice presidential candidate, with the intent to have their choice assume the Presidency through torturing the intent and purpose of the 25th Amendment. The Vice President is designated to assume the Presidency upon genuine need, but not in this sort of dishonest scheme. It would be a fraud perpetrated on the citizens, would be seen that way, would be resisted by any means necessary, and justifiably so.

    The Democrats wouldn't accept a Constitutionally-prescribed, legal, and legitimate election. So why do they expect, in their arrogance, that one so transparent in its dishonest intent would be acceptable?

    Well, yeah, it all depends on who Biden or the party chooses as the vice presidential candidate. Biden has said it will definitely be a woman. So who is the Manchurian candidate and when will her name be announced? I think it will be a familiar name that is easy to remember.

    Here is a possible catchy campaign theme song:

  241. @Peterike
    “ When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.”

    Ludicrously false.

    “ I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought)”

    You’re making that up is my guess.
  242. @Buffalo Joe
    Sincerely, Hart, Shafter and Marx, the men's clothier switched over to making mask. Workers, material and machines already in place.

    I’ll take one in a classic blazer look and another in a nice gray herringbone

  243. @Peterike
    “ When Trump arrived in the White House, he hit the ground staggering, got knocked on the head, started telling porkie pies from day one, and steadily went from bad to worse on a daily basis, and continues to do so. Even those who voted for him are now compelled to agree that he is completely nuts.”

    Ludicrously false.

    “ I was also quite happy that he was going to throw out all the illegal aliens (as I thought)”

    You’re making that up is my guess.

    There is a core group of true believer lefty religious zealots like Mason; hard to tell what percentage of the Democratic Party they are, but they all have that same lunatic vibe, and keep repeating the same shibboleths, like picking a core group of 5-10 passages from the Bible to quote. It all has a feel like Judy Garland clicking her red ruby shoe heels together and chanting “There’s no place like home” after Glenda told her, “But you had the power to make the Bad Orange Man go away all along!”

  244. There is a core group of true believer lefty religious zealots like Mason

    LOL! I am agnostic about both parties and would like to see a pragmatic bipartisan government. Also agnostic about religion for that matter.

    The thing is, I don’t really even think Trump knows he is lying. It is simply a case of 1) he does not understand the issues, so he bluffs and says whatever he thinks sounds best in the moment, and 2) he honestly does not remember today what he said yesterday.

    Traditionally political leaders have been careful about public pronouncements, because they don’t want to be ambiguous or to offer up uninformed opinions without considering issues from all sides and taking advice from subject matter experts. Trump does not even realize that this is a consideration. Of course, sometimes he says something that is right. After all, even a stopped clock is right two times a day.

    Would Biden be any better? No, but obviously he is just a Democratic Party stalking horse for the real candidate who will be cloaked as the vice-president.

  245. @petit bourgeois
    Please don't be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.

    https://youtu.be/N9qYF9DZPdw

    Please don’t be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.

    I didn’t specify which Yankovic.

    The 1986 summit meeting:

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Since the 1986 Grammies honor music released in 1985, that is the reason for the lag in the songs. For those wondering, Record of the Year was We Are The World, with the award going toQuincy Jones
  246. @J.Ross
    Mass shooting. In Canada. Very high level of planning, arson, impersonation of RCMP (national-level police) to include a fake RCMP car.
    Difficulty: they can't kill him.
    Because then he'd win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don't lie: gun control causes mass shootings.

    Here’s a good roundup. Gotta be the craziest thing to hit Nova Scotia, at a time when to put it coldly we could all use some distraction

    https://heavy.com/news/2020/04/gabriel-wortman/

    Reminds me of the old 5-0 where the psycho has a fake cop car and uniform — except there’s enough here for a 13-week mini-series, with a denturist (not a dentist, mind you!) apparently killing almost 20 people

  247. @Polynikes

    Still, I will most likely vote for Biden in November.
     
    Walter Mondale voter to vote for Biden. Stay tuned for astute political observations...

    Walter Mondale voter to vote for Biden. Stay tuned for astute political observations…

    Mondale and Dukakis are still with us. Both are in better shape than Biden.

    I suspect Jonathan is more likely to have supported Michael Foot than Walter Mondale.


    That’s a Plymouth Argyle scarf, in case you’re wondering. It features the Mayflower, which brought Jonathan over.

  248. @anon
    As far as i am aware, the only 2 things that can stop a modern fridge working are loss of gas and the Defrost Timer malfunctioning. Switch the power off, Timer only has to be turned 90 degrees, wait 30 minutes, turn back on and the fridge will go another ten years.
    A $10 dollar thermometer is good enough for checking shelf temperatures.
    Noisy fridge means it's working, putting stuff on top of the fridge ensures it won't keep working.

    I know someone who purchased a new Korean brand fridge and it puts out a horrible amount of Radio Frequency Interference. Apparently there are AC Variable Frequency Drives inside them. And the controller boards have plenty of electronics on them too.

  249. @Buffalo Joe
    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses. Coal and natural gas have a known BTU value, so you can control the heat output. Coal, for a coal boiler, is dried and then crushed to the consistency of talcum powder and blown into the boiler at all four corners. Paper and cardboard could be shredded but then you would have to stoke it into a boiler or have it travel through on a traveling bottom grate. They used to have wood chip boilers that operated this way. Inefficient, but if you were running a pulping mill the chips and bark were already there. They tried a waste to energy plant in Niagara Falls but garbage is garbage, often wet and non combustible. Weird concept to burn garbage for energy next to a great hydro source. Stay safe.

    Lurker, I have erected two coal burning power houses.

    Stand by for a slew of Kardashian and Klum jokes…

    • LOL: Lurker, Jim Don Bob
  250. @J.Ross
    Mass shooting. In Canada. Very high level of planning, arson, impersonation of RCMP (national-level police) to include a fake RCMP car.
    Difficulty: they can't kill him.
    Because then he'd win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don't lie: gun control causes mass shootings.

    Difficulty: they can’t kill him.
    Because then he’d win.
    https://globalnews.ca/news/6838880/rcmp-active-shooter-portapique-n-s/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    Numbers don’t lie: gun control causes mass shootings.

    Put simply, it is diversity that causes mass shootings. ”Him”? Unnoticed was the identity of the shooters? Not one, but two black canadian ”empowered” women for you. Killers, perpetrators of one of the deadliest shootings ever in canuckland. Especially impressive is that they could pull it off. Driving a fake police car is a new one.

  251. @guest007
    By point of view is not about the Covid-19 response but about the dependent of the DoD on products manufactured in China or near China.

    How many drugs would become unavailable to the DoD in a dispute with China. How many computer chips, rare earths, or IT products would become unavailable.

    If the DoD does not have repair parts, it cannot ever win a dispute with China. Yet, as the U.S. becomes even more dependent of items that are not manufactured in the U.S. why have a DoD at all? Why have a military that depends upon China to maintain its logistics system.

    This has nothing to do with boomers.

    Wasn’t the SR-71 built with titanium sourced, by stealth, from the USSR?

    • Replies: @guest007
    That was done while not having a military conflict with China. What would happen is the U.S. gets into a dispute with China now? China would cut off drugs to the rest of the world along with exports.

    The only thing the U.S. could do is cancel the debt it owes individuals and corporations in China.
  252. @Reg Cæsar
    Both Unitas (Jonaitis) and Ioannidis mean "Johnson" in their languages. So, for that matter, does Yankovic.

    Would it help Dr. John Ioannidis’ cause to change the spelling of his name to Unitas and begin to ask people to call him by the diminutive form of his first name?

  253. @Lurker
    Wasn't the SR-71 built with titanium sourced, by stealth, from the USSR?

    That was done while not having a military conflict with China. What would happen is the U.S. gets into a dispute with China now? China would cut off drugs to the rest of the world along with exports.

    The only thing the U.S. could do is cancel the debt it owes individuals and corporations in China.

    • Agree: Lurker
  254. Posted this picture of the San Francisco distancing placard earlier for the Boeing engineers, or really just for any other rocket scientists, amusement. These are all over in SF. Tends to erode confidence in government, at least this local government, at least a little:

    dist

    94822F96-E183-4D2B-B174-479685A032E3
    BE8DD112-FBFE-4CA3-9FD5-908CE13C849E

    • Replies: @res
    Good of you to add the explanation. I was wondering how many people would get your original comment.

    I wonder how many people saw that sign (between planning, approval, and creation) and didn't realize there was a problem.
    , @Jack D
    Stay 4.243 feet apart!
  255. @Inquiring Mind
    My gripe is with Gree dehumidifiers, which is about the only kind you can buy at home product stores. They last 2-3 seasons at best before whatever they are still allowed to use as refrigerant leaks out and the unit just freezes over.

    And the City of Ulyanov requires payment of a special sticker to put it out on the curb and have it "recycled." As if we don't pay gobnormous amounts of property tax and as if we could change our behavior as consumers that these things don't break down. Owing to the Lord of the Ozone layer, no one will repair them.

    If the refrigerant were leaking out how would the machine freeze over? It would be warm/hot all over.

    Sounds like some kind of sensor problem that runs the compressor too long so the water freezes instead of draining off the coils. Or a fan that’s blowing too little air maybe? Basically anything OTHER than a failure of the cooling mechanism 🙂

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Icing evaporator is a common symptom of low refrigerant (low refrigerant freeze coil - 3 million google hits) . Temperature and pressure are related. In a properly functioning dehumidifier, the refrigerant pressure is kept such that the evaporator coils will be just above freezing. If the refrigerant pressure is low, it will drive the temperature of the coils below freezing and it will ice up. IM is 100% correct.

    Modern day dehumidifiers are designed to be disposable. The refrigerant lines are soldered shut at the factory after the system is filled and there is no provision for adding refrigerant. Even if you could, the cost of a service call would be more than the thing is worth.



    My solution to both the need for frequent replacement and the problem of disposing of used appliances is to buy my dehumidifiers at Costco. Once it inevitably breaks, bring it back and they will refund your $ and take the carcass of your dead Chinese appliance.
  256. @Whiskey
    Coffee CAN be grown in the US, it just would have to be mechanized. Growers in Hawaii are already experimenting with planting and specialized harvest machines. Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen. So the answer is, quite a bit of coffee could and should be grown in the US. California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas are all excellent places to grow very high quality coffee. The same could be said for Chocolate cultivated not in Africa depending on cheap labor but Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and South Carolina.

    Tea is grown in the Himalayas, so it could be grown in many places in the US.

    We have millions of unemployed anyway as most service jobs are dead dead dead so there is plenty of labor to soak up and it would be an excellent idea. It would support specialized agricultural robotic harvesters which has enormous national security implications (repurposing for other uses as needed). As well as mechanics to fix them, etc. A nation of mechanics beats a nation of service workers.

    Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen.

    As usual you are totally wrong. Coffee grows only in the tropics (areas which never experience frost – coffee trees are not frost tolerant) but coffee requires that it not be too hot either. So that limits it to growing on high (usually volcanic) mountains in tropical areas, where the daytime temp. is only in the 70s despite being near the equator. The best coffee grows above 5,000 ft. but it can be grown somewhat lower, such as in mountainous parts of Hawaii. In fact Hawaii (and Puerto Rico) are just about the only areas in the US suitable for coffee growing. But aside from issues of labor cost (which can be solved with mechanization to some extent, at the price of quality), the suitable area in the US is quite small and we could not hope to grow all of our coffee needs domestically even if we covered every suitable patch with coffee trees.

    Nor is there any need to do so. World trade has been going on at least since Roman times. There are some products where there is some national security need to grow them domestically, but if the Colombians are willing to sell us coffee in exchange for American wheat, which does not grow well in the tropics, then what is the harm?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Swiss government tried to phase out their coffee stockpiling system last year, but the public made them keep it.
  257. @danand
    Posted this picture of the San Francisco distancing placard earlier for the Boeing engineers, or really just for any other rocket scientists, amusement. These are all over in SF. Tends to erode confidence in government, at least this local government, at least a little:

    https://flic.kr/p/2iS52qL

    https://flic.kr/p/2iSuR5F
    https://flic.kr/p/2iSzePp

    Good of you to add the explanation. I was wondering how many people would get your original comment.

    I wonder how many people saw that sign (between planning, approval, and creation) and didn’t realize there was a problem.

  258. @JMcG
    You would have to tear my Bosch dishwasher from my cold, dead hands, but that’s my only Bosch appliance. We replaced our crappy front load washing machine with a top loading Maytag semi-commercial model and now our clothes actually smell clean again.
    Can’t speak to refrigerators, but there are forums filled with obsessive appliance owners you can check. That’s where I found out about the Maytag.

    Front load washing machines blow dead dogs. They don’t use enough water and eventually the door seal fails.

    2) What’s so great about Bosch dishwashers that justifies the price?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    1. Agree completely.
    2. Supremely quiet, clean very well. In my experience, trouble free.
    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    Front loaders only blow dead dogs if they are crappy units to begin with. We have a top of the line washer/dryer pair from Maytag that have the same internal parts as their commercial grade units, and the washer most definitely doesn't blow dead dogs. Very good cleaning, even using cold water (generally our preferred option), and with full loads. Water extraction in spin cycles is quite good, cutting down on time in the dryer. As to any lingering smells, well, you do need to run a cleaning cycle at intervals. I toss in a big, honkin' tablet of Affresh into the empty washer, select for the cleaning cycle, and let 'er rip. Tablet bangs around a bit until it dissolves, but that's it. I do take out the dispenser drawer for detergent, softener, & bleach from time to time to give it, and the cavity into which it slides a good cleaning, as the Affresh doesn't do that job.

    As to other kitchen appliances, I selected a KitchenAid refrigerator with bottom freezer and French doors above. Chilled water dispenser inside on the frame instead of eating up storage on the door, icemaker bin in the bottom freezer. Works fine.

    Other units are from Thermador. Thermador is now a subsidiary of a major German appliance company, but they still seem to do their own thing. Proud history:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermador

    Have a top line Thermador dishwasher that works beautifully. Monthly cleaning is also indicated here; I use Glisten with an empty machine, full cycle, with excellent results.

    Picked out a three-unit Thermador stack: from the top, a microwave with oven capability (made some nice pies); next, at eye level, a full sized oven with full extension racks (superbly useful, plus safer), with convection; and on the bottom, a warming/proofing drawer for keeping dishes or food warm, and for raising yeasted breads (probably could make batch yogurt in there).

    The Thermador cooktop I chose is an induction unit. You must have cookware which is magnetically interactive with the hobs under the glass top (really easy to clean - gone are the days of scrubbing out wells under gas burners). We got a good set of All-Clad pots & pans and their kettle that were induction-compatible, but several old cast iron vessels work fine, too. You can get induction rings to make old favorite pots and pans that are not magnetically interactive useable. There are plenty of hobs, so cooking vessels don't need to be on top of designated locations, thus there is more flexibility in their placement. Touchscreen controls. Induction cooking is great. It directs the heating directly to the vessels without throwing off a lot of useless heat into the house. The cooktop is in an island with lighting above, so we equipped the cooktop with a three-speed downdraft that rises up behind the cooktop to reduce cooking smells and steam (a Thermador innovation), as a traditional hood is not viable.

    So, all of the appliances are US made, although Thermador is now German owned. I liked that this was so, and thus far, at three years of occupancy here, they are all going strong. I want to see engineering and manufacturing return in strength to the US.

    We renovated my childhood home for our domicile after my parents had passed. My dad designed the house back in 1957, although not being an architect, he had to get the design approved for code compliance, and structural integrity, which presented no problem. He was an excellent human factors engineer by profession, and set up the kitchen as a corridor type. Although we introduced new appliances, and cabinetry, the layout we took over pretty much as it had been since it already exhibited, as Homer might say, shining arete.

    The washer/dryer setup was also ahead of its time, being situated on the main floor right by the bedrooms and bathrooms from whence much laundry originates. That space had to be reconfigured to accomodate the deeper frontloaders, but with some ingenuity on the part of our contractor, electrician, & plumber this was accomplished. Thanks, dad.

  259. @vhrm
    If the refrigerant were leaking out how would the machine freeze over? It would be warm/hot all over.

    Sounds like some kind of sensor problem that runs the compressor too long so the water freezes instead of draining off the coils. Or a fan that's blowing too little air maybe? Basically anything OTHER than a failure of the cooling mechanism :-)

    Icing evaporator is a common symptom of low refrigerant (low refrigerant freeze coil – 3 million google hits) . Temperature and pressure are related. In a properly functioning dehumidifier, the refrigerant pressure is kept such that the evaporator coils will be just above freezing. If the refrigerant pressure is low, it will drive the temperature of the coils below freezing and it will ice up. IM is 100% correct.

    Modern day dehumidifiers are designed to be disposable. The refrigerant lines are soldered shut at the factory after the system is filled and there is no provision for adding refrigerant. Even if you could, the cost of a service call would be more than the thing is worth.

    My solution to both the need for frequent replacement and the problem of disposing of used appliances is to buy my dehumidifiers at Costco. Once it inevitably breaks, bring it back and they will refund your $ and take the carcass of your dead Chinese appliance.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Costco is pretty amazing about refunding your money even after a few years of use. E.g., I bought a water hose reel for my yard. After about 18 months, one cheap part wore out. So I took it back to Costco and they gave me my money back without any guff. You have to wait in line about a half hour usually, though.
    , @vhrm
    TIL, thanks.

    The webs are definitely in agreement that new ones of the typical consumer price range don't last, regardless of brand.

    Seems to be some combination of genuine issues with corrosion, wanting to achieve a low price point and planned obsolescence.
    i wonder what the deal is...
  260. @danand
    Posted this picture of the San Francisco distancing placard earlier for the Boeing engineers, or really just for any other rocket scientists, amusement. These are all over in SF. Tends to erode confidence in government, at least this local government, at least a little:

    https://flic.kr/p/2iS52qL

    https://flic.kr/p/2iSuR5F
    https://flic.kr/p/2iSzePp

    Stay 4.243 feet apart!

  261. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards"

    Maffs are hard, huh, Paleo Libderp?

    Danand was referring to the Pythagorean theorem and the innumeracy of whomever created the placards. But maybe you are a 9th-grade dropout.

    the

    innumeracy

    of whomever

    I’m a big proponent of keeping whom in the language, but am pretty sure whoever is correct in this instance. Perhaps it’s a case where both are acceptable, as with than me/than I [am, do, etc.] Then whoever is smoother.

    Sorry to be pedantic, but you started it with the charge of “innumeracy”. Glass houses…

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "I'm a big proponent of keeping whom in the language, but am pretty sure whoever is correct in this instance."

    Yes, 'whoever' is correct. Thanks.
  262. @Jim Don Bob
    Front load washing machines blow dead dogs. They don't use enough water and eventually the door seal fails.

    2) What's so great about Bosch dishwashers that justifies the price?

    1. Agree completely.
    2. Supremely quiet, clean very well. In my experience, trouble free.

    • Thanks: Jim Don Bob
  263. @Jack D
    Icing evaporator is a common symptom of low refrigerant (low refrigerant freeze coil - 3 million google hits) . Temperature and pressure are related. In a properly functioning dehumidifier, the refrigerant pressure is kept such that the evaporator coils will be just above freezing. If the refrigerant pressure is low, it will drive the temperature of the coils below freezing and it will ice up. IM is 100% correct.

    Modern day dehumidifiers are designed to be disposable. The refrigerant lines are soldered shut at the factory after the system is filled and there is no provision for adding refrigerant. Even if you could, the cost of a service call would be more than the thing is worth.



    My solution to both the need for frequent replacement and the problem of disposing of used appliances is to buy my dehumidifiers at Costco. Once it inevitably breaks, bring it back and they will refund your $ and take the carcass of your dead Chinese appliance.

    Costco is pretty amazing about refunding your money even after a few years of use. E.g., I bought a water hose reel for my yard. After about 18 months, one cheap part wore out. So I took it back to Costco and they gave me my money back without any guff. You have to wait in line about a half hour usually, though.

  264. @Jack D

    Much of the Southwest of the US has a climate approaching that of Ethiopia and Yemen.
     
    As usual you are totally wrong. Coffee grows only in the tropics (areas which never experience frost - coffee trees are not frost tolerant) but coffee requires that it not be too hot either. So that limits it to growing on high (usually volcanic) mountains in tropical areas, where the daytime temp. is only in the 70s despite being near the equator. The best coffee grows above 5,000 ft. but it can be grown somewhat lower, such as in mountainous parts of Hawaii. In fact Hawaii (and Puerto Rico) are just about the only areas in the US suitable for coffee growing. But aside from issues of labor cost (which can be solved with mechanization to some extent, at the price of quality), the suitable area in the US is quite small and we could not hope to grow all of our coffee needs domestically even if we covered every suitable patch with coffee trees.

    Nor is there any need to do so. World trade has been going on at least since Roman times. There are some products where there is some national security need to grow them domestically, but if the Colombians are willing to sell us coffee in exchange for American wheat, which does not grow well in the tropics, then what is the harm?

    The Swiss government tried to phase out their coffee stockpiling system last year, but the public made them keep it.

  265. @Reg Cæsar
    the

    innumeracy
     
    of whomever

    I'm a big proponent of keeping whom in the language, but am pretty sure whoever is correct in this instance. Perhaps it's a case where both are acceptable, as with than me/than I [am, do, etc.] Then whoever is smoother.

    Sorry to be pedantic, but you started it with the charge of "innumeracy". Glass houses...

    “I’m a big proponent of keeping whom in the language, but am pretty sure whoever is correct in this instance.”

    Yes, ‘whoever’ is correct. Thanks.

  266. @danand
    Hopefully Boeing did not spec out these 6 foot social distancing placards:

    https://flic.kr/p/2iS52qL

    Doesn't do much to inspire confidence in government, at least this local one. These signs are all over the parks and waterfront of tourist areas in San Francisco.

    Doesn’t do much to inspire confidence in government, at least this local one. These signs are all over the parks and waterfront of tourist areas in San Francisco.

    The “City” may have many residents with high visuospacial abilities, but it’s geometrically insane. The story is that investors out East saw the perfectly shaped peninsula and thought it ideal for a Manhattan-style street grid. They didn’t take into account the topography.

    Thus you get Lombard Street:

  267. @Reg Cæsar

    Please don’t be invoking Alfred Yankovic in this discussion. He is the equivalent of the holy savior in these situations.
     
    I didn't specify which Yankovic.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ez_hQdWN4Rg


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fmnhKU1tJD4


    The 1986 summit meeting:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VHed-OZNb-0

    Since the 1986 Grammies honor music released in 1985, that is the reason for the lag in the songs. For those wondering, Record of the Year was We Are The World, with the award going to

    [MORE]
    Quincy Jones

  268. @Mr Mox

    Shopping with your spouse isn’t a right.
     
    It shouldn't be a punishment either - but sometimes it feels that way...

    In my neck of the woods gay people love to grocery shop together.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    Because grocery shopping is an excellent opportunity for some Grindr action if one goes alone.
  269. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @petit bourgeois
    If you were on Telegraph Avenue in the past 20 years in a used bookstore, we may have crossed paths. Going to Cal is no picnic and requires such diligence.

    Did you grab copies of the Sun people vs the Ice People literature prevalent in that neck of the woods?

    Don’t think I picked that up on the street exactly there…
    Actually had no official affiliation with Cal (but went to many events)… lived there while thinking of going into the tech “elite”… what a mistake that would have been… I’d be an older James Damore who has to remain totally silent for fear of losing everything.. or else my soul would have rotted.
    Still.. I think Berkeley is a place that had some good and went bad…

  270. @moshe
    The lack of "Masks For Everybody!" may be a blessing.

    I happen to admire "germophobic" Trump for not putting on the mask (unless he did and I'm unaware of it).

    My view regarding this whole business is simple.

    WRT to actually dealing with the excess dangers that covid causes over other dangers we've been ignoring I have fairly simple views that I don't care to spend time on because it's tangential to the main point of what's been going on. In short however, Those over 60 or 65 as well as those with pre-existing conditions should have been given the advisement, opportunity, and encouragement to quarantine with their carers. Furthermore anyone who sniffles or stops smelling sewage should quarantine for 3 weeks as well. All of the taxes collected from Everyone else working would surely have covered the expense (and with a saner monetary policy than the "just print green" policy we've had to enact because we out the whole entire country under marshall law. There's more to be said, about studies and masks and herd immunities and likelihood of a vaccine, etc but, again, unless it's my job to deal with resolving Covid, I'm dealing with Covid as the Gavrillo Princip of Quarantinism. Tens of millions of young men did not live in trenches just to die in them during WWI because some castrated archduke was assassinated. It was simply the straw that broke the camel's back and therefore gained more fame than all of the other weighty straws.

    The same applies to the new Quarantinism Qraze.

    It is and always has been (as all of my writings and recordings and videos bear out from January) what this Covid thing was likely to be and that the huge bubble of terror was blown by the huddled masses of politicians, media marketers, Specialists and other interested group who were crouching behind a curtain with a boom mike.

    -----------

    I have this issue with every social movement/religion I encounter.

    Take Mormonsim for example. They claim that they live as they do because they believe what they do.

    Approaching it as an interested outsider I have more or less the same opinions of them that Matt and Trey have.

    It's fun as hell to reub their very very very, but hilariously very, dumb "beliefs upon which they claim to build and lead their entire lives while simultaneously producing a Broadway Musical about how, overall, they are (as a generically chosen religion) goddamn effective at making the world a happier, less violent and more humane place.

    I view Quarantinism precisely the same way.

    Historians decades hence will have to mention the Covid business like they have to mention Princip or Grynszpan because every movement must have a name or an excuse or a fuse-lighter or all three. But Quarantinism is not happening because of Covid and to focus on that dumb catechism is as silly as trying to convince some medieval Bishop that transubstantiation was, if you think about it, kinna silly.

    We admire those people because of the dangers they faced but we don't consider them to be geniuses for figuring out that the common madness of the day was mad. It's pretty embarrassingly obvious to any unbiased party.

    So I think of Quarantinism holistically, and as a religion, and in that respect I find it interesting to look at its (non-covid) causes as well as its effects.

    And I would be greatly interested in hearing what others have to say about it as well. I've dropped a few thoughts here about the benefits of a biblical generational jubilee, or Time Out, as well as whether all of the weight gained will cost more young healthy years of life than elderly unhealthy ones that may have been lost, plus a few other ideas if you care to pick out the occasional kernel of wisdom in my recent posts. But I haven't touched the surface of this movement ; it's causes and effects ; at all.

    I would live to hear what other people think.

    I've heard way way WAY too much about The Loss To The Economy ® , which is fair because it's kinna a big deal.

    But what else is there to see? What other causes are there for the populations of China, the US, Iran, Israel and everyone else more or less willingly to impose a level of marshall law on themselves never before seen in history in a country that hadn't just lost a war and been occupied by foreign troops.

    And what effects will this have? Forget election talk puh-lease! even if what you have to say is insightful, it will instantly reroute the focused minds of everyone else into the gutter. Perhaps the left gutter or the right gutter, but a gutter with no gain, no fecundity and no good points made.


    I myself have always had a soft side for religions, old and new.

    Even as I happily laugh at their fundamental gods and his powers I give the people and their practice and the power and effectsof their belief, the benefit of the doubt until given reason to feel differently.

    My own bias therefore is to enjoy the shutdown as best I can (largely by flagrantly flouting it, but also by making more calls to friends and acquaintances abiding with their directives) and to look hopefully upon it as possibly being the harbinger of all sorts of good things.

    Of course there's a timeline for all these things and other things CAN get in the way, be it Obama coming out as an Androgynoid and running for president again on the grounds that the Real Him with both sexual organs and married to the soul of MLK has never yet been president or Trump, in an Ambien daze or a particularly curious mood nuking the White House.

    So what caused billions of people to accept that they had lost the war of the worlds without even having heard about it on the radio and how are we changing, as people, due to this religion that we either like, oppose or have mixed feelings about.

    What are YOUR experiences and thoughts about it that make no mention of a cabal of plotters, of covid itself or of american elections.

    As historians from 2030 with more interest in the movement, its causes and its outcomes....what do we see?

    That’s a lot, but regarding the cultural/social/economic outcomes of this precipitating crisis:

    More oligarchy- small businesses go under and big ones get anointed as national champions/essential. Antitrust is done for now. Onshoring will happen but not to the degree needed.

    The authoritarian turn hastens. Both left and right call for more coercion- the left for international institutions and the right for traditional religions. Rome claims to have the answer for both.

    Meritocracy makes a bit of a comeback behind the scenes, but there will still be cultural hegemony of the woke narrative.

    The dollar takes a lasting hit due to the international realization that the US has real competence problems and that the Navy is overstretched.

    Many useful idiots venerate China as the new savior superpower. Others beat the drum for US military conflict with China, a foolish proposition.

  271. @ScarletNumber
    In my neck of the woods gay people love to grocery shop together.

    Because grocery shopping is an excellent opportunity for some Grindr action if one goes alone.

  272. @Jim Don Bob
    Front load washing machines blow dead dogs. They don't use enough water and eventually the door seal fails.

    2) What's so great about Bosch dishwashers that justifies the price?

    Front loaders only blow dead dogs if they are crappy units to begin with. We have a top of the line washer/dryer pair from Maytag that have the same internal parts as their commercial grade units, and the washer most definitely doesn’t blow dead dogs. Very good cleaning, even using cold water (generally our preferred option), and with full loads. Water extraction in spin cycles is quite good, cutting down on time in the dryer. As to any lingering smells, well, you do need to run a cleaning cycle at intervals. I toss in a big, honkin’ tablet of Affresh into the empty washer, select for the cleaning cycle, and let ‘er rip. Tablet bangs around a bit until it dissolves, but that’s it. I do take out the dispenser drawer for detergent, softener, & bleach from time to time to give it, and the cavity into which it slides a good cleaning, as the Affresh doesn’t do that job.

    As to other kitchen appliances, I selected a KitchenAid refrigerator with bottom freezer and French doors above. Chilled water dispenser inside on the frame instead of eating up storage on the door, icemaker bin in the bottom freezer. Works fine.

    Other units are from Thermador. Thermador is now a subsidiary of a major German appliance company, but they still seem to do their own thing. Proud history:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermador

    Have a top line Thermador dishwasher that works beautifully. Monthly cleaning is also indicated here; I use Glisten with an empty machine, full cycle, with excellent results.

    Picked out a three-unit Thermador stack: from the top, a microwave with oven capability (made some nice pies); next, at eye level, a full sized oven with full extension racks (superbly useful, plus safer), with convection; and on the bottom, a warming/proofing drawer for keeping dishes or food warm, and for raising yeasted breads (probably could make batch yogurt in there).

    The Thermador cooktop I chose is an induction unit. You must have cookware which is magnetically interactive with the hobs under the glass top (really easy to clean – gone are the days of scrubbing out wells under gas burners). We got a good set of All-Clad pots & pans and their kettle that were induction-compatible, but several old cast iron vessels work fine, too. You can get induction rings to make old favorite pots and pans that are not magnetically interactive useable. There are plenty of hobs, so cooking vessels don’t need to be on top of designated locations, thus there is more flexibility in their placement. Touchscreen controls. Induction cooking is great. It directs the heating directly to the vessels without throwing off a lot of useless heat into the house. The cooktop is in an island with lighting above, so we equipped the cooktop with a three-speed downdraft that rises up behind the cooktop to reduce cooking smells and steam (a Thermador innovation), as a traditional hood is not viable.

    So, all of the appliances are US made, although Thermador is now German owned. I liked that this was so, and thus far, at three years of occupancy here, they are all going strong. I want to see engineering and manufacturing return in strength to the US.

    We renovated my childhood home for our domicile after my parents had passed. My dad designed the house back in 1957, although not being an architect, he had to get the design approved for code compliance, and structural integrity, which presented no problem. He was an excellent human factors engineer by profession, and set up the kitchen as a corridor type. Although we introduced new appliances, and cabinetry, the layout we took over pretty much as it had been since it already exhibited, as Homer might say, shining arete.

    The washer/dryer setup was also ahead of its time, being situated on the main floor right by the bedrooms and bathrooms from whence much laundry originates. That space had to be reconfigured to accomodate the deeper frontloaders, but with some ingenuity on the part of our contractor, electrician, & plumber this was accomplished. Thanks, dad.

    • Thanks: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The old commercial frontloaders such as Dexter/Bendix, Milnor, Norge, and newer Wascomats are great but most are not suitable for household use, sadly. The US never went for front loaders except for the fifties washer/dryer combo craze. The best of the bunch were from what I understand the Norge. They are now so rare even the laundry collectors at automaticwasher.org never seem to have any.

    Most of the Euro household units were quite small. I gather the old German, Scandi, and British ones were decent. Of the machines now on offer I have no idea which is which. I have late eighties Maytag top loaders and dread the day when something not replaceable goes out on them. I got them from an estate sale and rebuilt them in the early 200os when Maytag was still in Iowa.


    I'm told the only good top loader any more is some commercial models of Speed Queen.
  273. @Jack D
    Icing evaporator is a common symptom of low refrigerant (low refrigerant freeze coil - 3 million google hits) . Temperature and pressure are related. In a properly functioning dehumidifier, the refrigerant pressure is kept such that the evaporator coils will be just above freezing. If the refrigerant pressure is low, it will drive the temperature of the coils below freezing and it will ice up. IM is 100% correct.

    Modern day dehumidifiers are designed to be disposable. The refrigerant lines are soldered shut at the factory after the system is filled and there is no provision for adding refrigerant. Even if you could, the cost of a service call would be more than the thing is worth.



    My solution to both the need for frequent replacement and the problem of disposing of used appliances is to buy my dehumidifiers at Costco. Once it inevitably breaks, bring it back and they will refund your $ and take the carcass of your dead Chinese appliance.

    TIL, thanks.

    The webs are definitely in agreement that new ones of the typical consumer price range don’t last, regardless of brand.

    Seems to be some combination of genuine issues with corrosion, wanting to achieve a low price point and planned obsolescence.
    i wonder what the deal is…

  274. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian
    Front loaders only blow dead dogs if they are crappy units to begin with. We have a top of the line washer/dryer pair from Maytag that have the same internal parts as their commercial grade units, and the washer most definitely doesn't blow dead dogs. Very good cleaning, even using cold water (generally our preferred option), and with full loads. Water extraction in spin cycles is quite good, cutting down on time in the dryer. As to any lingering smells, well, you do need to run a cleaning cycle at intervals. I toss in a big, honkin' tablet of Affresh into the empty washer, select for the cleaning cycle, and let 'er rip. Tablet bangs around a bit until it dissolves, but that's it. I do take out the dispenser drawer for detergent, softener, & bleach from time to time to give it, and the cavity into which it slides a good cleaning, as the Affresh doesn't do that job.

    As to other kitchen appliances, I selected a KitchenAid refrigerator with bottom freezer and French doors above. Chilled water dispenser inside on the frame instead of eating up storage on the door, icemaker bin in the bottom freezer. Works fine.

    Other units are from Thermador. Thermador is now a subsidiary of a major German appliance company, but they still seem to do their own thing. Proud history:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermador

    Have a top line Thermador dishwasher that works beautifully. Monthly cleaning is also indicated here; I use Glisten with an empty machine, full cycle, with excellent results.

    Picked out a three-unit Thermador stack: from the top, a microwave with oven capability (made some nice pies); next, at eye level, a full sized oven with full extension racks (superbly useful, plus safer), with convection; and on the bottom, a warming/proofing drawer for keeping dishes or food warm, and for raising yeasted breads (probably could make batch yogurt in there).

    The Thermador cooktop I chose is an induction unit. You must have cookware which is magnetically interactive with the hobs under the glass top (really easy to clean - gone are the days of scrubbing out wells under gas burners). We got a good set of All-Clad pots & pans and their kettle that were induction-compatible, but several old cast iron vessels work fine, too. You can get induction rings to make old favorite pots and pans that are not magnetically interactive useable. There are plenty of hobs, so cooking vessels don't need to be on top of designated locations, thus there is more flexibility in their placement. Touchscreen controls. Induction cooking is great. It directs the heating directly to the vessels without throwing off a lot of useless heat into the house. The cooktop is in an island with lighting above, so we equipped the cooktop with a three-speed downdraft that rises up behind the cooktop to reduce cooking smells and steam (a Thermador innovation), as a traditional hood is not viable.

    So, all of the appliances are US made, although Thermador is now German owned. I liked that this was so, and thus far, at three years of occupancy here, they are all going strong. I want to see engineering and manufacturing return in strength to the US.

    We renovated my childhood home for our domicile after my parents had passed. My dad designed the house back in 1957, although not being an architect, he had to get the design approved for code compliance, and structural integrity, which presented no problem. He was an excellent human factors engineer by profession, and set up the kitchen as a corridor type. Although we introduced new appliances, and cabinetry, the layout we took over pretty much as it had been since it already exhibited, as Homer might say, shining arete.

    The washer/dryer setup was also ahead of its time, being situated on the main floor right by the bedrooms and bathrooms from whence much laundry originates. That space had to be reconfigured to accomodate the deeper frontloaders, but with some ingenuity on the part of our contractor, electrician, & plumber this was accomplished. Thanks, dad.

    The old commercial frontloaders such as Dexter/Bendix, Milnor, Norge, and newer Wascomats are great but most are not suitable for household use, sadly. The US never went for front loaders except for the fifties washer/dryer combo craze. The best of the bunch were from what I understand the Norge. They are now so rare even the laundry collectors at automaticwasher.org never seem to have any.

    Most of the Euro household units were quite small. I gather the old German, Scandi, and British ones were decent. Of the machines now on offer I have no idea which is which. I have late eighties Maytag top loaders and dread the day when something not replaceable goes out on them. I got them from an estate sale and rebuilt them in the early 200os when Maytag was still in Iowa.

    I’m told the only good top loader any more is some commercial models of Speed Queen.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    I bought a Maytag because the lunatics in the laundry forums were castigating Speed Queen for ruining their excellent design in 2017 or so. It was, of course, in response to some ridiculous federal regulation. My wife has been very happy with the Maytag. I believe it was built in the US.
  275. @Jonathan Mason
    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house. Perhaps some of those machinists could be trained to work, uh, sewing machines.

    The masks might not match exactly N95 specifications, but all that is needed is something to stop people coughing into the air or onto surfaces, so they should be able to make something good enough for government work with materials on hand.

    Or if they can't do it, they could contract it out to a sweatshop in Haiti. Now if they could just find a working plane somewhere they could borrow to bring them in to the US.

    If this whole thing were not so tragic, you would have to laugh.

    https://sarahalexander.us/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/airplane-oxygen-mask-2.png

    Boeing is a big enough company to set up its own workshop to manufacture face masks in house.

    A relative who works for Boeing tells me the Huntington Beach site is making masks for their Seattle co-workers.

  276. @Anonymous
    The old commercial frontloaders such as Dexter/Bendix, Milnor, Norge, and newer Wascomats are great but most are not suitable for household use, sadly. The US never went for front loaders except for the fifties washer/dryer combo craze. The best of the bunch were from what I understand the Norge. They are now so rare even the laundry collectors at automaticwasher.org never seem to have any.

    Most of the Euro household units were quite small. I gather the old German, Scandi, and British ones were decent. Of the machines now on offer I have no idea which is which. I have late eighties Maytag top loaders and dread the day when something not replaceable goes out on them. I got them from an estate sale and rebuilt them in the early 200os when Maytag was still in Iowa.


    I'm told the only good top loader any more is some commercial models of Speed Queen.

    I bought a Maytag because the lunatics in the laundry forums were castigating Speed Queen for ruining their excellent design in 2017 or so. It was, of course, in response to some ridiculous federal regulation. My wife has been very happy with the Maytag. I believe it was built in the US.

  277. It’s ridiculous that our largest aircraft manufacturer can’t provide its highly paid machinists with disposable masks, but is instead asking them to improvise their own cloth masks,

    It is ridiculous that they cannot make mask-making machinery or adapt some machines they have already, to making masks. Unlike their airplanes, they should have no problem selling any they make that are surplus to their own requirements! Might be a new and profitable line!

  278. The U.S. Defense budget should subsidize a certain amount of personal protective equipment manufacturing within the 50 states. Say that, oh, 50% of the Pentagon’s and Veteran’s Administration needs for masks, gowns, gloves, etc. should be domestically sourced, and that domestic manufacturers, in return for this protection from cheap foreign goods, need to have approved plans for how they would, say, quintuple production within 3 months.

    After saying, since 1942, that they “had to do research into germ-warfare, because they had to be prepared for a biological attack”, the fact that there are not, e.g., subsidized mask manufacturers such as you suggest here, proves that the research was intended to produce biological weapons, not defense! Talk about “caught with their pants down”!

  279. Anonymous[248] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer
    "While we’re at it, has anyone noticed all the recyclables kiosks shutting down a few months ago?"

    only recycling metals makes any sense right now. when you 'recycle', they send most of the stuff to a landfill anyway. all that plastic, glass, and paper ends up in the ground. not in a factory. they might take the cardboard.

    when it makes economic sense to recycle that stuff, they might start doing it. the raw materials to make new paper and glass are dirt cheap though, so it will be a LONG time before that ever makes sense. it will probably never make economic sense to recycle plastic. basically what you want to do is to collect all that stuff in one place, so even if it only ends up in a landfill, you know where it all is. so 'recycling' to a landfill is still good.

    The weekly sorting and bagging ritual fulfills an important emotional need for middle class westerners.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
How a Young Syndicate Lawyer from Chicago Earned a Fortune Looting the Property of the Japanese-Americans, then Lived...
Becker update V1.3.2