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From the Washington Post news section, a story composed by artificial intelligence from the prompt “Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity:”

‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity, overrepresents men named Mike, scientists say

Researchers say Discovery’s programming overwhelmingly featured White men as experts while emphasizing negative messages about sharks

By Daniel Wu
December 5, 2022 at 9:32 p.m. EST

Lisa Whitenack loved sharks as a kid. She spent rainy days leafing through a guide to sharks in Reader’s Digest. Every summer, she would watch “Shark Week,” Discovery’s annual TV event that spotlights the ocean predator with seven days of dedicated programming.

But when the scientists appeared on her TV screen, she rarely saw any women she could look up to.

“Why would I know I could do that?” Whitenack said. “I don’t come from a family of scientists. I didn’t see very many people that looked like me on television.”

Whitenack, now a biology professor at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa., found her way into shark research anyway. When the pandemic lockdowns came in 2020, she saw an opportunity to study the source of her old misconceptions. Was “Shark Week” feeding audiences the wrong messages about sharks — and who studies them?

Whitenack led a team of researchers to examine hundreds of “Shark Week” episodes that aired between 1988 and 2020. In a study published last month by the Public Library of Science, their research claims that Discovery’s programming emphasized negative messages about sharks, lacked useful messaging about shark conservation and overwhelmingly featured White men as experts — including several with the same name.

The programming featured more White experts and commentators named “Mike” than women, said David Shiffman, a conservationist at Arizona State University who was a co-author of the study.

 
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  1. So, Lisa Whitenack is a fake, affirmative action “scientist.”

    • Agree: ArthurinCali, Rich
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Nicholas Stix

    And what's more, she's gonna need a bigger boat.

    , @Tiny Duck
    @Nicholas Stix

    Uh you do know this article was to trigger snowflake rubes like you dont you?

    I do think that diversity in media is a very serious issue. The one thing that angers me about this piece is that the Washington Post editors appear more interested in yanking peoples’ chains and getting reactions than truly showing concern or educating about the existential threats to our planet. Would it be possible to lead with the fact that most species of sharks are threatened, and then explain why Discovery’s outdated and narrow point of view is contributing to the problem?

    Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky, @Faraday's Bobcat, @TWS

  2. After some consideration, I decided you’re joking. This article was written by a human being.

    Did I guess right?

    • Replies: @seminumerical
    @Colin Wright

    It was clever :-)

    , @Herman Hetherington
    @Colin Wright

    Yeah Lisa Whitenack is a real person at Alleghany College. It is believable though.
    https://sites.allegheny.edu/bio/faculty/lisa-whitenack/

    , @dearieme
    @Colin Wright

    AI would be too intelligent to write that article so it must have been written by a human.

    Alternatively someone asked an AI program to write a parody of something that might be written by a rather stupid woke journalist.

    Or Mr Wu really is a human and wrote the parody himself because that's what he's paid to do. If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @ic1000
    @Colin Wright

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account). Do you vote for cub reporter Daniel Wu, or for the robot?

    Prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity"

    Output --

    Title: "Shark Week: Critics say popular TV event lacks diversity"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured sharks and the hosts of the popular TV event.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week consistently focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species, such as great whites and hammerheads. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Additionally, the hosts of Shark Week are almost exclusively white men, leading to accusations of exclusion and lack of representation. Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify both the sharks featured on the show and the hosts, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species.

    "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week showcases the full range of shark species and also includes diverse hosts and experts."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."

    Replies: @ic1000, @Driveby Commenter, @Russ

  3. You’re really hilarious. We Picts say not all ancient breeds are bad.

  4. @Colin Wright
    After some consideration, I decided you're joking. This article was written by a human being.

    Did I guess right?

    Replies: @seminumerical, @Herman Hetherington, @dearieme, @ic1000

    It was clever 🙂

  5. All the WhiteMikes didn’t stop Whitenack from studying sharks, so where’s the problem? Can’t the AI WaPooWu reporter notice the contradiction, or is he banging Lisa and/or David?

    • Agree: James N. Kennett
    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @Ralph L


    All the WhiteMikes didn’t stop Whitenack from studying sharks, so where’s the problem?
     
    Exactly. Lisa Whitenack and Daniel Wu are lucky enough to live in a country where anybody with sufficient aptitude and determination can get ahead, irrespective of whether they belong to the "right" tribe or gender. Nobody cares what they "look like". Yet they imagine they have the career limitations of a minority person living in Sudan or Waziristan.

    Can’t the AI WaPooWu reporter notice the contradiction, or is he banging Lisa and/or David?
     
    He is paid not to notice this contradiction, and many others.
  6. @Colin Wright
    After some consideration, I decided you're joking. This article was written by a human being.

    Did I guess right?

    Replies: @seminumerical, @Herman Hetherington, @dearieme, @ic1000

    Yeah Lisa Whitenack is a real person at Alleghany College. It is believable though.
    https://sites.allegheny.edu/bio/faculty/lisa-whitenack/

  7. Meanwhile in India.

    • Thanks: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dream

    It’s not like they have a lack of people over there.

    , @Barnard
    @Dream

    What is the reason for the termination? I can't imagine why a women would go through 33 weeks of pregnancy and then decide she doesn't want the baby. Also, what would be the justification for not calling this infanticide?

    , @Batman
    @Dream

    Indian feminists are truly despicable people.

    , @Spangel226
    @Dream

    Article claims that the 33 week fetus had significant medical abnormalities, but doesn’t specify what kind.

    I agree with the court who allows the abortion. If you don’t, please tell us the great benefit of forcing families to have significantly impaired children that they do not want. If the abnormality is bad enough the be seen in scans weeks before birth, it might just be pretty difficult and expensive to care for.

    But hey, in the US, the GOP is really on top of it when it comes to banning late term abortion, ensuring that the poor have lots more severely retarded children that they don’t even want to raise. Sounds like a great bonus for the nation. The same GOP was pretty spotty when it came to passing any useful law about immigration or the expansion of the definition of “refugee” so that included literally every illegal who entered the US that claims asylum. But whatever, what we need is more impoverished unwanted children with microcephaly and whatnot.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @DCThrowback

  8. @Colin Wright
    After some consideration, I decided you're joking. This article was written by a human being.

    Did I guess right?

    Replies: @seminumerical, @Herman Hetherington, @dearieme, @ic1000

    AI would be too intelligent to write that article so it must have been written by a human.

    Alternatively someone asked an AI program to write a parody of something that might be written by a rather stupid woke journalist.

    Or Mr Wu really is a human and wrote the parody himself because that’s what he’s paid to do. If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.

    • Agree: acementhead
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @dearieme


    If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.
     
    A timely question. From yesterday's NYT:

    Does ChatGPT Mean Robots Are Coming For the Skilled Jobs?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/06/opinion/chatgpt-ai-skilled-jobs-automation.html

    Krugman decides to let ChatGPT itself answer the question, which it evades like a skilled politician:

    It is difficult to predict exactly how A.I. will impact the demand for knowledge workers, as it will likely vary, depending on the industry and specific job tasks. However, it is possible that in some cases, A.I. and automation may be able to perform certain knowledge-based tasks more efficiently than humans, potentially reducing the need for some knowledge workers. This could include tasks such as data analysis, research and report writing. However, it is also worth noting that A.I. and automation may also create new job opportunities for knowledge workers, particularly in fields related to A.I. development and implementation.
     
    ChatGPT is lying - if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn't do it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Colin Wright, @Johann Ricke

  9. Anon[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Whitenack led a team of researchers to examine hundreds of “Shark Week” episodes that aired between 1988 and 2020. In a study published last month by the Public Library of Science

    Women who devote research time to biology are more likely to be taken seriously by other biologists.

    This reminds me of the black woman with a PhD in physics from Stanford, issued by the physics department of Stanford, not the education department, the subject of which was how to improve education of physics for minority students in high school. I wonder if she even passed calculus?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Jevonte insults Tyrone's new shoes which he had just acquired with a five finger discount. Tyrone busts a cap at Jevonte. The bullet has a mass of 20 grams and travels at a velocity of 400 m/s. Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte's shoulder.

    Replies: @Kinecto, @kaganovitch

    , @Eddie the swarthy rat cellar
    @Anon

    Kindergarten?

  10. If Whitenack wanted to see a woman swimming with a shark she could have watched the opening scene of Jaws. On the other hand, it is clear that White sharks get a disproportionate amount of attention compared to sharks of color.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Hypnotoad666

    I've never heard of a White shark that wasn't also Great. You might say it's in their genes.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  11. @Hypnotoad666
    If Whitenack wanted to see a woman swimming with a shark she could have watched the opening scene of Jaws. On the other hand, it is clear that White sharks get a disproportionate amount of attention compared to sharks of color.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    I’ve never heard of a White shark that wasn’t also Great. You might say it’s in their genes.

    • LOL: TWS
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Sollipsist


    I’ve never heard of a White shark that wasn’t also Great. You might say it’s in their genes.
     
    You're a White Shark Supremacist.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

  12. @Colin Wright
    After some consideration, I decided you're joking. This article was written by a human being.

    Did I guess right?

    Replies: @seminumerical, @Herman Hetherington, @dearieme, @ic1000

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account). Do you vote for cub reporter Daniel Wu, or for the robot?

    Prompt — “Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity”

    Output —

    Title: “Shark Week: Critics say popular TV event lacks diversity”

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured sharks and the hosts of the popular TV event.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world’s oceans, yet Shark Week consistently focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species, such as great whites and hammerheads. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Additionally, the hosts of Shark Week are almost exclusively white men, leading to accusations of exclusion and lack of representation. Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify both the sharks featured on the show and the hosts, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species.

    “Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation,” said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. “Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week showcases the full range of shark species and also includes diverse hosts and experts.”

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, “We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks.”

    • Thanks: Cato, ArthurinCali, bomag
    • LOL: Lockean Proviso
    • Replies: @ic1000
    @ic1000

    ChatGPT offers an iterative approach to replacing bothersome and union-friendly drone reporters.

    Revised prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity. Include a quote from marine biologist Lisa Whitenack about how the show features too few women experts, and too many White male experts named Mike."

    Output --


    Title: "Shark Week criticized for lack of diversity among featured experts"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured experts.

    Marine biologist Lisa Whitenack, who has been studying sharks for over 20 years, said that the show consistently features too few women and too many White male experts named Mike. "It's disappointing to see such a narrow representation of shark experts on a show that purports to educate viewers about these incredible animals," Whitenack said. "There are so many qualified women and experts of color in the field, and it's important for Shark Week to reflect that diversity."
     

    Below the fold, Wu's doppelganger continues, pretty much as before.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify the experts featured on Shark Week, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species. "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week includes diverse experts from a range of backgrounds and experiences."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D

    , @Driveby Commenter
    @ic1000

    "marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle"

    Finding Dr Earle is a good piece of research by ChatGPT. The first pictures of her that come up on the Web are very pleasing, but are apparently not recent - the lady is now 87 years of age. She would probably be too old and wise to offer such a piece of wokery to a reporter.

    , @Russ
    @ic1000


    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account).
     
    "Free" includes providing your smartphone number; draw the appropriate conclusions.
  13. Article behind a paywall, but it seems Lisa wants a gig for life as Discovery’s resident female shark expert.

  14. @ic1000
    @Colin Wright

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account). Do you vote for cub reporter Daniel Wu, or for the robot?

    Prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity"

    Output --

    Title: "Shark Week: Critics say popular TV event lacks diversity"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured sharks and the hosts of the popular TV event.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week consistently focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species, such as great whites and hammerheads. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Additionally, the hosts of Shark Week are almost exclusively white men, leading to accusations of exclusion and lack of representation. Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify both the sharks featured on the show and the hosts, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species.

    "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week showcases the full range of shark species and also includes diverse hosts and experts."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."

    Replies: @ic1000, @Driveby Commenter, @Russ

    ChatGPT offers an iterative approach to replacing bothersome and union-friendly drone reporters.

    Revised prompt — “Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity. Include a quote from marine biologist Lisa Whitenack about how the show features too few women experts, and too many White male experts named Mike.”

    Output —

    Title: “Shark Week criticized for lack of diversity among featured experts”

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured experts.

    Marine biologist Lisa Whitenack, who has been studying sharks for over 20 years, said that the show consistently features too few women and too many White male experts named Mike. “It’s disappointing to see such a narrow representation of shark experts on a show that purports to educate viewers about these incredible animals,” Whitenack said. “There are so many qualified women and experts of color in the field, and it’s important for Shark Week to reflect that diversity.”

    Below the fold, Wu’s doppelganger continues, pretty much as before.

    [MORE]

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world’s oceans, yet Shark Week focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify the experts featured on Shark Week, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species. “Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation,” said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. “Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week includes diverse experts from a range of backgrounds and experiences.”

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, “We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks.”

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @ic1000

    It's not entirely clear whether you're being facetious, so I'm going to go on record as swearing on my mother's grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by "journalists" in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down's Syndrome. "Journalists" "of color" will continue to collect their stipends despite not doing anything but making TikTok videos about all the expensive food they consume during their "work" days at prestigious corporate propaganda outlets.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @ic1000

    , @Jack D
    @ic1000

    Not only is Shark Week racist and sexist, it is specieist too. You are always hearing about Great White Sharks. First of all, they are not so great. They oppress the other species of shark. And what about the Really Great Black Sharks - you never hear about those. Did you know that a Black Shark invented canned tuna fish? I'll bet you didn't know that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  15. their research claims that Discovery’s programming emphasized negative messages about sharks, lacked useful messaging about shark conservation and overwhelmingly featured White men as experts

    We’re gonna need a n_ boat

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @TelfoedJohn

    I remember that line! I was like, "WTF, Spielberg?"

  16. This study is a clear candidate for an Ig-Nobel Prize.

  17. This stuff is fun to read. I enjoyed that greatly, I must admit.

    (Did I hang me now high up on the rusty lamp-post of zeitgeist in a cold & windy Western Avenue? – Just askin’ because it at times looks as if having fun would qualify as the first and gravest sin already…)

  18. I recall a group of computer scientist grad students running a theme party “More women than Daves”. Dave was the most common male name in that age cohort, with about 20% of that CS department grad student body. Women were 10-15% IIRC. They had a tote board to mark up if you were a woman or a Dave as you entered.

  19. Whitenack is apparently an Americanized version of a German surname meaning “White Knight”.

  20. A good question is what percent of marine biologist are female. I suspect it is more than 50%.

  21. @Anon

    Whitenack led a team of researchers to examine hundreds of “Shark Week” episodes that aired between 1988 and 2020. In a study published last month by the Public Library of Science
     
    Women who devote research time to biology are more likely to be taken seriously by other biologists.

    This reminds me of the black woman with a PhD in physics from Stanford, issued by the physics department of Stanford, not the education department, the subject of which was how to improve education of physics for minority students in high school. I wonder if she even passed calculus?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Eddie the swarthy rat cellar

    Jevonte insults Tyrone’s new shoes which he had just acquired with a five finger discount. Tyrone busts a cap at Jevonte. The bullet has a mass of 20 grams and travels at a velocity of 400 m/s. Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte’s shoulder.

    • Replies: @Kinecto
    @AndrewR

    Ke = 1/2 mvsquared.
    1600 Newtons.
    About 1180 ft lbs.
    44 mag territory.
    Ouch.

    , @kaganovitch
    @AndrewR

    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte’s shoulder.


    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters J̶a̶v̶o̶n̶t̶e̶’̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶o̶u̶l̶d̶e̶r̶ the shoulder of the woman standing 3 feet to the left of Javonte. FIFY

    Replies: @Kinecto

  22. My favorite part of Lisa Whitenack’s CV:

    Minorities in Shark Science (MISS) – Friend of MISS (non-minority member)

    Virtue signaling of the highest quality!

  23. @ic1000
    @ic1000

    ChatGPT offers an iterative approach to replacing bothersome and union-friendly drone reporters.

    Revised prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity. Include a quote from marine biologist Lisa Whitenack about how the show features too few women experts, and too many White male experts named Mike."

    Output --


    Title: "Shark Week criticized for lack of diversity among featured experts"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured experts.

    Marine biologist Lisa Whitenack, who has been studying sharks for over 20 years, said that the show consistently features too few women and too many White male experts named Mike. "It's disappointing to see such a narrow representation of shark experts on a show that purports to educate viewers about these incredible animals," Whitenack said. "There are so many qualified women and experts of color in the field, and it's important for Shark Week to reflect that diversity."
     

    Below the fold, Wu's doppelganger continues, pretty much as before.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify the experts featured on Shark Week, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species. "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week includes diverse experts from a range of backgrounds and experiences."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D

    It’s not entirely clear whether you’re being facetious, so I’m going to go on record as swearing on my mother’s grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by “journalists” in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down’s Syndrome. “Journalists” “of color” will continue to collect their stipends despite not doing anything but making TikTok videos about all the expensive food they consume during their “work” days at prestigious corporate propaganda outlets.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @AndrewR

    It’s not entirely clear whether you’re being facetious, so I’m going to go on record as swearing on my mother’s grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by “journalists” in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down’s Syndrome.

    Fwiw, I'm pretty sure that the vast majority of the "research" on financial sites like Benzinga, Simply Wall Street , etc is written by AI. If you read their analysis, there is something wooden and repetitive that's not written by humans.

    , @ic1000
    @AndrewR

    > It’s not entirely clear whether you’re being facetious

    I'm not sure what you mean. To be clear, I signed up for a ChatGPT account. Then, in each of my two upthread comments, I submitted the prompt as shown, and then copy-pasted the chat engine's output over to iSteve.

    So the body of each comment is not facetious, each is direct output from ChatGPT. They can be compared directly to Daniel Wu's Washington Post article, in terms of content, style, grammar, and the like. No need to believe me on this, try ChatGPT for yourself.

    I'd call it a tie.

    ChatGPT got a quote from a more prominent researcher, Sylvia Earle. On the other hand, best I can tell, her quote is fabricated, whereas Wu's recital of Whitenack's bons mots is surely genuine.

  24. OT: Suspects in robbery of a Martha’s Vineyard bank have been charged. The local tv “news” reported at least one of the suspects is a Jamaican national. It was an armed robbery with masked perpetrators (shades of Friends of Eddie Coyle).

    https://www.cbsnews.com/boston/news/marthas-vineyard-bank-robbery-burn-masks-walkie-talkies-miquel-antonio-jones-omar-odion-johnson-federal-charges/

  25. It’s a real, published Washington Post story. So is the reporter Daniel Wu for real, or a programmed woke zombie, putting all information through his programmed worldview? (“Must… complain… of… lack of diversity…”)
    He and the other wokebots certainly make the case for how easily humans can be brainwashed into whatever, no matter how limiting (and identity politics, in a multi-ethnic society, is a sure-fire recipe for disaster).
    Will it take deprogrammers to wake these woke, a national disaster, or will they one day wake up and suddenly see how simple-minded they’ve been? Or are we in for another 10 to 20 years of sanctimonious drivel, before our elite find a new stupid idea to beat on?

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @ytcarl

    It's probably going to get worse before it can get better. These ideas are so entrenched and reinforced by modern propaganda and social pressures of fellow fools that it will probably take a real shock to the system to dislodge mass delusion. I hope this is wrong and that it will erode organically. Maybe it will.

  26. Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere – a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    I did have a laugh at the mention of the number of Mikes on Shark Week. Most of the Mikes I know personally are pretty enterprising people, so not surprising that the type of person that is into sharks and wants to get out into nature to interact with them are white males, whereas the type who stays in an office and tallies up sins is Lisa.

    • Thanks: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Arclight


    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.
     
    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don't seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn't dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Twinkie, @AnotherDad

    , @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere – a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.
     
    I suspect a part of the story here is that there is some resentment on the part of mediocre female scientists such as Whitenack. They see male - mostly white and Asian - scientists who excel and think, "Hey, if I had parents who pushed science on me, I probably would be just as good as they are today." They don't think, "I'm clearly not as intelligent or hard-working as they are."

    The "not my fault" syndrome is very pronounced with the younger generation. People in it also have trouble accepting the fact that the vast majority of people won't be stars. Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment), and social media in particular, has been quite destructive in fostering this idea that everyone out there is being a star - this, of course, ends up engendering a lot of resentment when people who are not stars compare the perfectly curated social media presentations to their own lives and achievements. So, they then go after what they see as "systemic" reasons why they are not measuring up to these ideals.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Arclight

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Arclight

    Baby Boomers named Mike who got into sharks were perhaps influenced by "Sea Hunt's" Mike Nelson:

    "Sea Hunt is an American action adventure television series that aired in syndication from 1958 to 1961 and was popular for decades afterwards. The series originally aired for four seasons, with 155 episodes produced. It stars Lloyd Bridges as former Navy diver Mike Nelson,"

    , @mc23
    @Arclight

    There's an awful lot of pro-shark propaganda out there that has harmed men named Mike who have small children. Why doesn't she look into this dreck

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBbRXjXge-A

  27. @Dream
    Meanwhile in India.

    https://twitter.com/barandbench/status/1600003279190007808?t=2z52sbqfgv7m-TlbPY6KSA&s=19

    Replies: @SFG, @Barnard, @Batman, @Spangel226

    It’s not like they have a lack of people over there.

    • Agree: Renard
  28. Shame on those who block entrances to College Biology and Science departments, keeping out minorities from learning and attaining degrees in Marine Biology.

    The new Jim Clownfish.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @ArthurinCali

    "The sea be angry that day, my homies..."

  29. OT – writers incomes fall – women and minorities worst hit

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2022/dec/06/writers-earnings-have-plummeted-with-women-black-and-mixed-race-authors-worst-hit

    There are “serious questions about the sustainability of the writing profession in the UK” and “substantial inequalities between those who are being adequately rewarded for their writing, and those who are not”, new research has found.

    The report, commissioned by the UK Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) and carried out by the UK Copyright and Creative Economy Research Centre (CREATe) based at the University of Glasgow, found that professional authors are earning a median of just £7,000 a year.

    The report also found a gender pay gap of 41.4% between men and women, with women experiencing a 21% drop in income in real terms between 2017 and 2020, against 10% for men.

    This is the first year the survey has attempted to account for trans and non-binary gender identities. While it found that authors “who identify as trans appear to show real-term earnings growth of 378%”, this was based on an increase in earnings from just one respondent to the survey.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    So on average, being a writer doesn't pay the bills. Who knew?

  30. Whenever I saw ‘Shiffman’ I spotted what was going on.

  31. Input to ChatGPT: Write a story of sharks watching a tv show called human week

    Output: Once upon a time, a group of sharks were gathered around a TV, eagerly watching their favorite show: “Human Week.” The show was all about the strange and fascinating creatures known as humans.

    Each episode, the sharks would watch in awe as the humans went about their daily lives, performing all sorts of interesting activities and engaging in all sorts of bizarre behaviors. The sharks loved learning about the humans and their strange ways.

    One day, the sharks tuned in to watch an episode about human vacations. They saw humans lounging on sandy beaches, playing in the water, and having all sorts of fun. The sharks were envious of the humans and wished they could go on vacations too.

    But then, the show took a darker turn. The sharks watched as the humans went on dangerous adventures, such as climbing tall mountains and diving deep into the ocean. The sharks were horrified by the risks the humans took and couldn’t believe how reckless they were.

    The sharks decided to take a break from watching “Human Week” and instead spend their time enjoying the safety and comfort of their own underwater world. They were content with the way things were and didn’t need to take unnecessary risks like the humans did.

    And so, the sharks continued to live their peaceful lives, swimming and playing in the ocean, and occasionally tuning in to “Human Week” to learn more about the mysterious and sometimes dangerous world of humans.

  32. “Discovery’s programming emphasized negative messages about sharks, lacked useful messaging about shark conservation and overwhelmingly featured White men as experts”

    “Shark” is their word. You can’t use it. Also, the “r” is silent.

  33. @Anon

    Whitenack led a team of researchers to examine hundreds of “Shark Week” episodes that aired between 1988 and 2020. In a study published last month by the Public Library of Science
     
    Women who devote research time to biology are more likely to be taken seriously by other biologists.

    This reminds me of the black woman with a PhD in physics from Stanford, issued by the physics department of Stanford, not the education department, the subject of which was how to improve education of physics for minority students in high school. I wonder if she even passed calculus?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Eddie the swarthy rat cellar

    Kindergarten?

  34. @dearieme
    @Colin Wright

    AI would be too intelligent to write that article so it must have been written by a human.

    Alternatively someone asked an AI program to write a parody of something that might be written by a rather stupid woke journalist.

    Or Mr Wu really is a human and wrote the parody himself because that's what he's paid to do. If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.

    Replies: @Jack D

    If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.

    A timely question. From yesterday’s NYT:

    Does ChatGPT Mean Robots Are Coming For the Skilled Jobs?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/06/opinion/chatgpt-ai-skilled-jobs-automation.html

    Krugman decides to let ChatGPT itself answer the question, which it evades like a skilled politician:

    It is difficult to predict exactly how A.I. will impact the demand for knowledge workers, as it will likely vary, depending on the industry and specific job tasks. However, it is possible that in some cases, A.I. and automation may be able to perform certain knowledge-based tasks more efficiently than humans, potentially reducing the need for some knowledge workers. This could include tasks such as data analysis, research and report writing. However, it is also worth noting that A.I. and automation may also create new job opportunities for knowledge workers, particularly in fields related to A.I. development and implementation.

    ChatGPT is lying – if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn’t do it.

    • Agree: Rich
    • Replies: @QCIC
    @Jack D

    The widespread use of AI will create lots of new jobs for human workers. The "workers" I picture are like the ones shown in the post-apocalyptic wasteland in The Terminator, scrappy men shooting lasers and plasma rifles at near-unstoppable robots. Man, I sure am glad these [email protected]#$%^ morons wrote up AI programs.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Jack D

    'ChatGPT is lying – if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn’t do it.'

    This ignores the fact that as in the case of the original industrial revolution, the machines will permit a vast increase in output.

    That in the earlier case it was a matter of more and cheaper goodies such as textiles and turnstiles, while now it will lead to simply more useless blather is a distinction.

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    ChatGPT is lying – if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn’t do it.
     
    AI rendering of a photo:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FjWvldVUYAEN5vt.jpg
  35. OT — This is Senator Fetterman reminding you that Hershel Walker lost because he couldn’t form a coherent a coherent a coherent because the sentence because grammar is important.

  36. @Arclight
    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere - a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism - that if there isn't a person that looks just like you in a given field, it's so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    I did have a laugh at the mention of the number of Mikes on Shark Week. Most of the Mikes I know personally are pretty enterprising people, so not surprising that the type of person that is into sharks and wants to get out into nature to interact with them are white males, whereas the type who stays in an office and tallies up sins is Lisa.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Twinkie, @Steve Sailer, @mc23

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don’t seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn’t dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Arclight
    @Jack D

    It's the cult of loserdom that was developed around American blacks and now has enveloped the entire political left. People who cut their own path are despised, those that cry and insist others must be hobbled so they can get ahead are celebrated.

    In a way, it's an interesting tell of progressive thought - they have completely abandoned the idea that plucky members of various minority elements can independently navigate their way through society and life and have settled on a quota system in which "representation" is the sin qua non of any organization or system, not elevation of those who have demonstrated talent or determination as an example of non-white capability.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don’t seem to have any problem entering new academic fields
     
    That's because there are different rewards/incentive systems at work. Black females who engage in this behavior are rewarded. Asians who do so are not. Also, there is a large enough pool of cognitively advanced Asian females who can do the real work in science. The same is not true with black females.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don’t seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn’t dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.
     
    This "I never saw anyone like me ..." line of b.s. is mostly a girl thing. NAM/not doesn't have much to do with it.

    You can have a brand spanking new profession--say "astronaut"--you'll get a line of guys queued up thinking they can do it. Thirty years later, some gal will be blabbing how she never saw girl astronaut role models and how the guidance counselor didn't encourage her to pursue being an astronaut.

    The NAM issue with science is simply IQ and interest.
  37. @ic1000
    @ic1000

    ChatGPT offers an iterative approach to replacing bothersome and union-friendly drone reporters.

    Revised prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity. Include a quote from marine biologist Lisa Whitenack about how the show features too few women experts, and too many White male experts named Mike."

    Output --


    Title: "Shark Week criticized for lack of diversity among featured experts"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured experts.

    Marine biologist Lisa Whitenack, who has been studying sharks for over 20 years, said that the show consistently features too few women and too many White male experts named Mike. "It's disappointing to see such a narrow representation of shark experts on a show that purports to educate viewers about these incredible animals," Whitenack said. "There are so many qualified women and experts of color in the field, and it's important for Shark Week to reflect that diversity."
     

    Below the fold, Wu's doppelganger continues, pretty much as before.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify the experts featured on Shark Week, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species. "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week includes diverse experts from a range of backgrounds and experiences."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Jack D

    Not only is Shark Week racist and sexist, it is specieist too. You are always hearing about Great White Sharks. First of all, they are not so great. They oppress the other species of shark. And what about the Really Great Black Sharks – you never hear about those. Did you know that a Black Shark invented canned tuna fish? I’ll bet you didn’t know that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Whale sharks, the largest fish in the sea, are the true "gentle giants". They couldn't bite you if you tried. Here's how they shipped two of them to Atlanta from Taiwan:


    https://youtu.be/A2Kkj0dvZtw


    Sadly, they didn't last:



    https://youtu.be/ElahE9nuJd4

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  38. @Dream
    Meanwhile in India.

    https://twitter.com/barandbench/status/1600003279190007808?t=2z52sbqfgv7m-TlbPY6KSA&s=19

    Replies: @SFG, @Barnard, @Batman, @Spangel226

    What is the reason for the termination? I can’t imagine why a women would go through 33 weeks of pregnancy and then decide she doesn’t want the baby. Also, what would be the justification for not calling this infanticide?

  39. @Dream
    Meanwhile in India.

    https://twitter.com/barandbench/status/1600003279190007808?t=2z52sbqfgv7m-TlbPY6KSA&s=19

    Replies: @SFG, @Barnard, @Batman, @Spangel226

    Indian feminists are truly despicable people.

  40. Here is the direct link to the research report for those who enjoy perusing these items of idiocracy.

    ‘A content analysis of 32 years of Shark Week documentaries.’

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0256842

  41. @Dream
    Meanwhile in India.

    https://twitter.com/barandbench/status/1600003279190007808?t=2z52sbqfgv7m-TlbPY6KSA&s=19

    Replies: @SFG, @Barnard, @Batman, @Spangel226

    Article claims that the 33 week fetus had significant medical abnormalities, but doesn’t specify what kind.

    I agree with the court who allows the abortion. If you don’t, please tell us the great benefit of forcing families to have significantly impaired children that they do not want. If the abnormality is bad enough the be seen in scans weeks before birth, it might just be pretty difficult and expensive to care for.

    But hey, in the US, the GOP is really on top of it when it comes to banning late term abortion, ensuring that the poor have lots more severely retarded children that they don’t even want to raise. Sounds like a great bonus for the nation. The same GOP was pretty spotty when it came to passing any useful law about immigration or the expansion of the definition of “refugee” so that included literally every illegal who entered the US that claims asylum. But whatever, what we need is more impoverished unwanted children with microcephaly and whatnot.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Spangel226

    There is much to what you say, Spangel, but can you explain why the GOP, controlling the Senate and House, did not defund Planned Parenthood when PP got caught selling baby parts?

    That was the moment I realized the GOP was nothing but a foil for the Democrats.

    BTW, the GOP didn't end Roe V. Wade, the Supremes did because they knew it was a bad piece of jurisprudence. If it was up to the lily-livered GOP in Congress, they would have just kept mouthing meaningless platitudes and let the P.O.S. ruling stand for another 100 years.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @DCThrowback
    @Spangel226

    Reproductive freedom is a Jewish value.

  42. We can take comfort in the fact that history has proven that vapid nonsense has a limited shelf life: about 2,000 years (so far).

    • LOL: acementhead
  43. “‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity, overrepresents men named Mike, scientists say”

    is this thing stealing my observations?

    i believe my comment in the baby names thread from earlier this year was, every guy is named Mike now.

  44. @Jack D
    @dearieme


    If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.
     
    A timely question. From yesterday's NYT:

    Does ChatGPT Mean Robots Are Coming For the Skilled Jobs?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/06/opinion/chatgpt-ai-skilled-jobs-automation.html

    Krugman decides to let ChatGPT itself answer the question, which it evades like a skilled politician:

    It is difficult to predict exactly how A.I. will impact the demand for knowledge workers, as it will likely vary, depending on the industry and specific job tasks. However, it is possible that in some cases, A.I. and automation may be able to perform certain knowledge-based tasks more efficiently than humans, potentially reducing the need for some knowledge workers. This could include tasks such as data analysis, research and report writing. However, it is also worth noting that A.I. and automation may also create new job opportunities for knowledge workers, particularly in fields related to A.I. development and implementation.
     
    ChatGPT is lying - if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn't do it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Colin Wright, @Johann Ricke

    The widespread use of AI will create lots of new jobs for human workers. The “workers” I picture are like the ones shown in the post-apocalyptic wasteland in The Terminator, scrappy men shooting lasers and plasma rifles at near-unstoppable robots. Man, I sure am glad these [email protected]#$%^ morons wrote up AI programs.

  45. @Nicholas Stix
    So, Lisa Whitenack is a fake, affirmative action "scientist."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Tiny Duck

    And what’s more, she’s gonna need a bigger boat.

  46. @Jack D
    @dearieme


    If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.
     
    A timely question. From yesterday's NYT:

    Does ChatGPT Mean Robots Are Coming For the Skilled Jobs?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/06/opinion/chatgpt-ai-skilled-jobs-automation.html

    Krugman decides to let ChatGPT itself answer the question, which it evades like a skilled politician:

    It is difficult to predict exactly how A.I. will impact the demand for knowledge workers, as it will likely vary, depending on the industry and specific job tasks. However, it is possible that in some cases, A.I. and automation may be able to perform certain knowledge-based tasks more efficiently than humans, potentially reducing the need for some knowledge workers. This could include tasks such as data analysis, research and report writing. However, it is also worth noting that A.I. and automation may also create new job opportunities for knowledge workers, particularly in fields related to A.I. development and implementation.
     
    ChatGPT is lying - if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn't do it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Colin Wright, @Johann Ricke

    ‘ChatGPT is lying – if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn’t do it.’

    This ignores the fact that as in the case of the original industrial revolution, the machines will permit a vast increase in output.

    That in the earlier case it was a matter of more and cheaper goodies such as textiles and turnstiles, while now it will lead to simply more useless blather is a distinction.

  47. @Jack D
    @Arclight


    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.
     
    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don't seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn't dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Twinkie, @AnotherDad

    It’s the cult of loserdom that was developed around American blacks and now has enveloped the entire political left. People who cut their own path are despised, those that cry and insist others must be hobbled so they can get ahead are celebrated.

    In a way, it’s an interesting tell of progressive thought – they have completely abandoned the idea that plucky members of various minority elements can independently navigate their way through society and life and have settled on a quota system in which “representation” is the sin qua non of any organization or system, not elevation of those who have demonstrated talent or determination as an example of non-white capability.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Arclight

    Of course they have abandoned it because it's pretty clear that blacks are never going to cut the mustard in any field that requires intellectual HP (they do just fine in non g-loaded occupations such as athletics). So they only way you are going to achieve "representation" is thru quotas. If you allow market and academic competitive systems to operate freely the equilibrium level of representation is never going to equal the black % of the population in any g-loaded occupation.

    There is also the mathematical problem that overrepresentation by blacks and women in any field is not an issue, only underrepresentation. If, for example, as is true, female soldiers are 29% black then there is going to have to be some other occupations where black females are underrepresented. They want employment to be like Lake Woebegon, where all the children are above average. They want blacks to be "at least" equal to their population % in EVERY occupation - it's mathematically impossible for that to happen. If you told them that we were going to limit black females to 13% of female soldiers in order to free up some black females to be nuclear physicists, they would scream racism.

    Of course what they really want is for blacks to have cushy office jobs. I don't see black women angling to get jobs on garbage trucks.

    Replies: @Arclight

  48. @Nicholas Stix
    So, Lisa Whitenack is a fake, affirmative action "scientist."

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @Tiny Duck

    Uh you do know this article was to trigger snowflake rubes like you dont you?

    I do think that diversity in media is a very serious issue. The one thing that angers me about this piece is that the Washington Post editors appear more interested in yanking peoples’ chains and getting reactions than truly showing concern or educating about the existential threats to our planet. Would it be possible to lead with the fact that most species of sharks are threatened, and then explain why Discovery’s outdated and narrow point of view is contributing to the problem?

    • Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Tiny Duck

    Tiny Dick, you actually managed to convey a cogent argument (such as it is). You ok bro?

    Replies: @bomag

    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    @Tiny Duck

    ChatGPT:


    Fckin' tiny ducks, man. These shtbirds are the fckin' best, let me tell ya. First off, they're fckin' cute as sht. With their little legs and adorable quacks, you can't help but fckin' smile when you see 'em waddlin' around.

    But beyond their cuteness, these tiny fckers are also agile as fck. They may be small, but they can maneuver around obstacles and even fly short distances when they need to. This makes 'em great for gettin' around tight spaces and avoidin' danger.
     
    I don't know where this all ends. Is it going to be a fad, like when people used to say WASSUP!! around the time that Budweiser ad ran, or a year from now are we going to be sending ChatGPT text to each other while the world burns down?
    , @TWS
    @Tiny Duck

    Absolute top notch trolling! This is the mighty Duck. Utter obliviousness to your own long established habits, actual cogent assessment of the article itself, gentle remonstration of the respondent.

    All without a soupcon of acknowledged irony. It's one of your best yet. And it does not appear to have been typed with webbed feet, will wonders never cease?

    Good way to switch it up and keep it fresh. I fully expect the black supremacist triumphalism and the hilarious spelling and grammar in your next one, good Ducky.

  49. @Arclight
    @Jack D

    It's the cult of loserdom that was developed around American blacks and now has enveloped the entire political left. People who cut their own path are despised, those that cry and insist others must be hobbled so they can get ahead are celebrated.

    In a way, it's an interesting tell of progressive thought - they have completely abandoned the idea that plucky members of various minority elements can independently navigate their way through society and life and have settled on a quota system in which "representation" is the sin qua non of any organization or system, not elevation of those who have demonstrated talent or determination as an example of non-white capability.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Of course they have abandoned it because it’s pretty clear that blacks are never going to cut the mustard in any field that requires intellectual HP (they do just fine in non g-loaded occupations such as athletics). So they only way you are going to achieve “representation” is thru quotas. If you allow market and academic competitive systems to operate freely the equilibrium level of representation is never going to equal the black % of the population in any g-loaded occupation.

    There is also the mathematical problem that overrepresentation by blacks and women in any field is not an issue, only underrepresentation. If, for example, as is true, female soldiers are 29% black then there is going to have to be some other occupations where black females are underrepresented. They want employment to be like Lake Woebegon, where all the children are above average. They want blacks to be “at least” equal to their population % in EVERY occupation – it’s mathematically impossible for that to happen. If you told them that we were going to limit black females to 13% of female soldiers in order to free up some black females to be nuclear physicists, they would scream racism.

    Of course what they really want is for blacks to have cushy office jobs. I don’t see black women angling to get jobs on garbage trucks.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    @Jack D

    Your second point is a very good one - most people are effectively innumerate and don't grok that it's a zero sum game in which under representation in one field could only be remedied by steering people away from another. I pointed this out to a white liberal lady once and her response was essentially that yes, that's what should happen for blacks' own good and it was our job to make it so.

    Another thing that is often not taken into account is that the value various demographic groups give to a given occupation are not equal. Certain jobs or careers are traditional paths to in-group respectability and it would be hard to change that, particularly if your group has an outsized presence. Blacks are over represented in non-profits, local government, and clergy, and a lot of their political power is derived from this. Although in theory most blacks would answer more representation in other fields would be good, if the tradeoff were pointed out most probably wouldn't take it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  50. Well, Steve is too much of a gentleman to make the obvious comment that this story elicits.
    Allow me.

    Lisa Whitenack, as a presumably natural person is proof of the dire necessity of unnatural or artificial intelligence to fill her void.

  51. @ic1000
    @Colin Wright

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account). Do you vote for cub reporter Daniel Wu, or for the robot?

    Prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity"

    Output --

    Title: "Shark Week: Critics say popular TV event lacks diversity"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured sharks and the hosts of the popular TV event.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week consistently focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species, such as great whites and hammerheads. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Additionally, the hosts of Shark Week are almost exclusively white men, leading to accusations of exclusion and lack of representation. Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify both the sharks featured on the show and the hosts, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species.

    "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week showcases the full range of shark species and also includes diverse hosts and experts."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."

    Replies: @ic1000, @Driveby Commenter, @Russ

    “marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle”

    Finding Dr Earle is a good piece of research by ChatGPT. The first pictures of her that come up on the Web are very pleasing, but are apparently not recent – the lady is now 87 years of age. She would probably be too old and wise to offer such a piece of wokery to a reporter.

    • Agree: ic1000
  52. And in further Journalism news, the grift that keeps on giving.

    Elon Musk on Tuesday announced that former FBI attorney James Baker, who came to Twitter to serve as deputy general counsel, has been fired after ‘vetting’ recently released evidence of Twitter’s election interference unbeknownst to Musk.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/musk-fires-twitters-fbi-russiagate-twitter-lawyer-over-vetting-debacle

    The arrogance of the Feeb cocksuckers really knows no bounds.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @TWS
    @Bill Jones

    Don't worry, Steve is on top of this story.

  53. @Jack D
    @Arclight


    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.
     
    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don't seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn't dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Twinkie, @AnotherDad

    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don’t seem to have any problem entering new academic fields

    That’s because there are different rewards/incentive systems at work. Black females who engage in this behavior are rewarded. Asians who do so are not. Also, there is a large enough pool of cognitively advanced Asian females who can do the real work in science. The same is not true with black females.

  54. @Arclight
    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere - a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism - that if there isn't a person that looks just like you in a given field, it's so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    I did have a laugh at the mention of the number of Mikes on Shark Week. Most of the Mikes I know personally are pretty enterprising people, so not surprising that the type of person that is into sharks and wants to get out into nature to interact with them are white males, whereas the type who stays in an office and tallies up sins is Lisa.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Twinkie, @Steve Sailer, @mc23

    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere – a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    I suspect a part of the story here is that there is some resentment on the part of mediocre female scientists such as Whitenack. They see male – mostly white and Asian – scientists who excel and think, “Hey, if I had parents who pushed science on me, I probably would be just as good as they are today.” They don’t think, “I’m clearly not as intelligent or hard-working as they are.”

    The “not my fault” syndrome is very pronounced with the younger generation. People in it also have trouble accepting the fact that the vast majority of people won’t be stars. Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment), and social media in particular, has been quite destructive in fostering this idea that everyone out there is being a star – this, of course, ends up engendering a lot of resentment when people who are not stars compare the perfectly curated social media presentations to their own lives and achievements. So, they then go after what they see as “systemic” reasons why they are not measuring up to these ideals.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment)
     
    How much/many media are still in NYC? The place doesn't seem anywhere near as central as it did 50 years ago. If you follow any of their teams (other than the Yankees) from elsewhere in the country, you know what I mean.

    Okay, the Internet helps with sports, but that's a rising tide effect. And it's not based in New York, or anywhere else.
    , @Arclight
    @Twinkie

    Actually I think her resentment is that guys who are sometimes named Mike have the cojones to get out in the field with sharks, whereas she is applying her supposed expertise at an inland university hundreds of miles from any sharks at all. They are *doing* and she is critiquing from afar. Society finds the Mikes of the world interesting, mousy people at 3rd tier universities not so much.

  55. @ic1000
    @Colin Wright

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account). Do you vote for cub reporter Daniel Wu, or for the robot?

    Prompt -- "Make up a Washington Post article about how ‘Shark Week’ lacks diversity"

    Output --

    Title: "Shark Week: Critics say popular TV event lacks diversity"

    As millions tune in to watch Discovery Channel's annual Shark Week event, critics are speaking out about the lack of diversity among the featured sharks and the hosts of the popular TV event.

    According to a recent study by marine biologists, over 500 species of sharks can be found in the world's oceans, yet Shark Week consistently focuses on only a handful of the most well-known species, such as great whites and hammerheads. This narrow representation fails to showcase the incredible diversity of sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems.

    Additionally, the hosts of Shark Week are almost exclusively white men, leading to accusations of exclusion and lack of representation. Some have called on Discovery Channel to diversify both the sharks featured on the show and the hosts, in order to better reflect the global nature of the event and the diversity of shark species.

    "Shark Week has a unique opportunity to educate and entertain viewers about the incredible diversity of sharks, but it falls short when it comes to representation," said marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. "Discovery Channel should take steps to ensure that Shark Week showcases the full range of shark species and also includes diverse hosts and experts."

    In response to the criticism, a spokesperson for Discovery Channel said, "We are committed to showcasing the beauty and diversity of sharks, and we take these concerns seriously. We will continue to work towards more inclusive representation in future Shark Weeks."

    Replies: @ic1000, @Driveby Commenter, @Russ

    Here is actual ChatGPT output, from https://chat.openai.com/chat (for access, you have to create a free OpenAI account).

    “Free” includes providing your smartphone number; draw the appropriate conclusions.

    • Agree: ic1000
  56. But when the scientists appeared on her TV screen, she rarely saw any women she could look up to.

    “Why would I know I could do that?” Whitenack said. “I don’t come from a family of scientists. I didn’t see very many people that looked like me on television.”

    I’ve never understood this complaint–the notion that people on TV should look like me.

    For the teenager Whitenack, did she expect to see teenagers on TV playing at being scientists??

  57. @Jack D
    @Arclight

    Of course they have abandoned it because it's pretty clear that blacks are never going to cut the mustard in any field that requires intellectual HP (they do just fine in non g-loaded occupations such as athletics). So they only way you are going to achieve "representation" is thru quotas. If you allow market and academic competitive systems to operate freely the equilibrium level of representation is never going to equal the black % of the population in any g-loaded occupation.

    There is also the mathematical problem that overrepresentation by blacks and women in any field is not an issue, only underrepresentation. If, for example, as is true, female soldiers are 29% black then there is going to have to be some other occupations where black females are underrepresented. They want employment to be like Lake Woebegon, where all the children are above average. They want blacks to be "at least" equal to their population % in EVERY occupation - it's mathematically impossible for that to happen. If you told them that we were going to limit black females to 13% of female soldiers in order to free up some black females to be nuclear physicists, they would scream racism.

    Of course what they really want is for blacks to have cushy office jobs. I don't see black women angling to get jobs on garbage trucks.

    Replies: @Arclight

    Your second point is a very good one – most people are effectively innumerate and don’t grok that it’s a zero sum game in which under representation in one field could only be remedied by steering people away from another. I pointed this out to a white liberal lady once and her response was essentially that yes, that’s what should happen for blacks’ own good and it was our job to make it so.

    Another thing that is often not taken into account is that the value various demographic groups give to a given occupation are not equal. Certain jobs or careers are traditional paths to in-group respectability and it would be hard to change that, particularly if your group has an outsized presence. Blacks are over represented in non-profits, local government, and clergy, and a lot of their political power is derived from this. Although in theory most blacks would answer more representation in other fields would be good, if the tradeoff were pointed out most probably wouldn’t take it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Arclight



    They want blacks to be “at least” equal to their population % in EVERY occupation – it’s mathematically impossible for that to happen. If you told them that we were going to limit black females to 13% of female soldiers in order to free up some black females to be nuclear physicists, they would scream racism.
     
    Your second point is a very good one – most people are effectively innumerate and don’t grok that it’s a zero sum game in which under representation in one field could only be remedied by steering people away from another.
     
    If 19% of NBA players are white (that includes all Hispanics), 80% are black (counting all mixed-race as black), 27 majority owners are white and only one black... that would mean that it's 115 times as likely that a black plays for a white owner than vice versa. Is my math right?

    The figure for Jews and blacks is 7,500 times. There is only one Jew in the league, foreign-born. In the early '50s, there were at least two, Dolph Schayes, Sonny Hertzberg, and Max Zaslofsky. This is all highly suspicious-- unless various peoples [sic] are different.

    I pointed this out to a white liberal lady once...
     
    How would she recalibrate the NBA?


    The first non-white in the league was 5'7" Wat Misaka, a Utah-born nisei. How many of his people have followed in his steps? ("Wat" was for Wataru, not Walter.)
  58. @TelfoedJohn

    their research claims that Discovery’s programming emphasized negative messages about sharks, lacked useful messaging about shark conservation and overwhelmingly featured White men as experts

     

    We’re gonna need a n_ boat

    https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/azG3Xnmu6o69JMh2pvJhdC-650-80.jpg.webp

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    I remember that line! I was like, “WTF, Spielberg?”

  59. @Jack D
    @ic1000

    Not only is Shark Week racist and sexist, it is specieist too. You are always hearing about Great White Sharks. First of all, they are not so great. They oppress the other species of shark. And what about the Really Great Black Sharks - you never hear about those. Did you know that a Black Shark invented canned tuna fish? I'll bet you didn't know that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Whale sharks, the largest fish in the sea, are the true “gentle giants”. They couldn’t bite you if you tried. Here’s how they shipped two of them to Atlanta from Taiwan:

    Sadly, they didn’t last:

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Reg Cæsar

    2 of the goofs from the Jackass show went swimming with whale sharks with their shorts loaded with shrimp:

    https://youtu.be/oUVp-MOqxnY?t=84

  60. @Tiny Duck
    @Nicholas Stix

    Uh you do know this article was to trigger snowflake rubes like you dont you?

    I do think that diversity in media is a very serious issue. The one thing that angers me about this piece is that the Washington Post editors appear more interested in yanking peoples’ chains and getting reactions than truly showing concern or educating about the existential threats to our planet. Would it be possible to lead with the fact that most species of sharks are threatened, and then explain why Discovery’s outdated and narrow point of view is contributing to the problem?

    Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky, @Faraday's Bobcat, @TWS

    Tiny Dick, you actually managed to convey a cogent argument (such as it is). You ok bro?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    Back when I checked, anything cogent from TD was a cut and paste.

    Suspicion now is it has moved on to using a chatbot.

  61. The idea that there’s “Great Whites” strikes me as deeply offensive. They should be renamed colonizer sharks.

  62. @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere – a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.
     
    I suspect a part of the story here is that there is some resentment on the part of mediocre female scientists such as Whitenack. They see male - mostly white and Asian - scientists who excel and think, "Hey, if I had parents who pushed science on me, I probably would be just as good as they are today." They don't think, "I'm clearly not as intelligent or hard-working as they are."

    The "not my fault" syndrome is very pronounced with the younger generation. People in it also have trouble accepting the fact that the vast majority of people won't be stars. Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment), and social media in particular, has been quite destructive in fostering this idea that everyone out there is being a star - this, of course, ends up engendering a lot of resentment when people who are not stars compare the perfectly curated social media presentations to their own lives and achievements. So, they then go after what they see as "systemic" reasons why they are not measuring up to these ideals.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Arclight

    Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment)

    How much/many media are still in NYC? The place doesn’t seem anywhere near as central as it did 50 years ago. If you follow any of their teams (other than the Yankees) from elsewhere in the country, you know what I mean.

    Okay, the Internet helps with sports, but that’s a rising tide effect. And it’s not based in New York, or anywhere else.

  63. @Sollipsist
    @Hypnotoad666

    I've never heard of a White shark that wasn't also Great. You might say it's in their genes.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    I’ve never heard of a White shark that wasn’t also Great. You might say it’s in their genes.

    You’re a White Shark Supremacist.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Hypnotoad666

    There have been successful Orca... but few if any were ALL black.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orca_(1977_film)

  64. Guess the future of AI writing won’t help this issue either…

    ‘Writers’ earnings have plummeted – with women, Black and mixed race authors worst hit’

    ‘Research shows that the income of professional authors averages only £7,000 in the UK, making the profession ‘inaccessible and unsustainable’ to most’

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2022/dec/06/writers-earnings-have-plummeted-with-women-black-and-mixed-race-authors-worst-hit

    A future headline will go like this:

    “ASTEROID STRIKES EARTH. HALF OF HUMANITY WIPED OUT. MINORITIES AFFECTED THE WORST.

  65. @Jack D
    @dearieme


    If so the only question is whether it would be cheaper to fire Mr Wu and use AI in future.
     
    A timely question. From yesterday's NYT:

    Does ChatGPT Mean Robots Are Coming For the Skilled Jobs?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/06/opinion/chatgpt-ai-skilled-jobs-automation.html

    Krugman decides to let ChatGPT itself answer the question, which it evades like a skilled politician:

    It is difficult to predict exactly how A.I. will impact the demand for knowledge workers, as it will likely vary, depending on the industry and specific job tasks. However, it is possible that in some cases, A.I. and automation may be able to perform certain knowledge-based tasks more efficiently than humans, potentially reducing the need for some knowledge workers. This could include tasks such as data analysis, research and report writing. However, it is also worth noting that A.I. and automation may also create new job opportunities for knowledge workers, particularly in fields related to A.I. development and implementation.
     
    ChatGPT is lying - if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn't do it.

    Replies: @QCIC, @Colin Wright, @Johann Ricke

    ChatGPT is lying – if it required more AI developers to write the software than the # of jobs that could be saved by the employer (lost by the employees) then the employer wouldn’t do it.

    AI rendering of a photo:

  66. @Spangel226
    @Dream

    Article claims that the 33 week fetus had significant medical abnormalities, but doesn’t specify what kind.

    I agree with the court who allows the abortion. If you don’t, please tell us the great benefit of forcing families to have significantly impaired children that they do not want. If the abnormality is bad enough the be seen in scans weeks before birth, it might just be pretty difficult and expensive to care for.

    But hey, in the US, the GOP is really on top of it when it comes to banning late term abortion, ensuring that the poor have lots more severely retarded children that they don’t even want to raise. Sounds like a great bonus for the nation. The same GOP was pretty spotty when it came to passing any useful law about immigration or the expansion of the definition of “refugee” so that included literally every illegal who entered the US that claims asylum. But whatever, what we need is more impoverished unwanted children with microcephaly and whatnot.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @DCThrowback

    There is much to what you say, Spangel, but can you explain why the GOP, controlling the Senate and House, did not defund Planned Parenthood when PP got caught selling baby parts?

    That was the moment I realized the GOP was nothing but a foil for the Democrats.

    BTW, the GOP didn’t end Roe V. Wade, the Supremes did because they knew it was a bad piece of jurisprudence. If it was up to the lily-livered GOP in Congress, they would have just kept mouthing meaningless platitudes and let the P.O.S. ruling stand for another 100 years.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Old Prude

    Since you mentioned Roe, I saw this news and can't understand it. Can someone help?

    Vasectomies surge 34% in the Northwest in wake of Dobbs decision
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/policy/healthcare/vasectomies-surge-in-northwest-wake-of-dobbs-decision

    I have read variations of this news. But I don't remember seeing corresponding rise in tubal legations. The only reported response by women (and their advocates) seems to be a more efficient network for mifepristone distribution. So, Dobbs causes women to continue to be irresponsible, but men are induced to be careful. Fear of accidental child support maybe?

  67. @Hypnotoad666
    @Sollipsist


    I’ve never heard of a White shark that wasn’t also Great. You might say it’s in their genes.
     
    You're a White Shark Supremacist.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    There have been successful Orca… but few if any were ALL black.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orca_(1977_film)

  68. @Ralph L
    All the WhiteMikes didn't stop Whitenack from studying sharks, so where's the problem? Can't the AI WaPooWu reporter notice the contradiction, or is he banging Lisa and/or David?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    All the WhiteMikes didn’t stop Whitenack from studying sharks, so where’s the problem?

    Exactly. Lisa Whitenack and Daniel Wu are lucky enough to live in a country where anybody with sufficient aptitude and determination can get ahead, irrespective of whether they belong to the “right” tribe or gender. Nobody cares what they “look like”. Yet they imagine they have the career limitations of a minority person living in Sudan or Waziristan.

    Can’t the AI WaPooWu reporter notice the contradiction, or is he banging Lisa and/or David?

    He is paid not to notice this contradiction, and many others.

    • Agree: bomag
  69. @AndrewR
    @ic1000

    It's not entirely clear whether you're being facetious, so I'm going to go on record as swearing on my mother's grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by "journalists" in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down's Syndrome. "Journalists" "of color" will continue to collect their stipends despite not doing anything but making TikTok videos about all the expensive food they consume during their "work" days at prestigious corporate propaganda outlets.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @ic1000

    It’s not entirely clear whether you’re being facetious, so I’m going to go on record as swearing on my mother’s grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by “journalists” in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down’s Syndrome.

    Fwiw, I’m pretty sure that the vast majority of the “research” on financial sites like Benzinga, Simply Wall Street , etc is written by AI. If you read their analysis, there is something wooden and repetitive that’s not written by humans.

  70. @Spangel226
    @Dream

    Article claims that the 33 week fetus had significant medical abnormalities, but doesn’t specify what kind.

    I agree with the court who allows the abortion. If you don’t, please tell us the great benefit of forcing families to have significantly impaired children that they do not want. If the abnormality is bad enough the be seen in scans weeks before birth, it might just be pretty difficult and expensive to care for.

    But hey, in the US, the GOP is really on top of it when it comes to banning late term abortion, ensuring that the poor have lots more severely retarded children that they don’t even want to raise. Sounds like a great bonus for the nation. The same GOP was pretty spotty when it came to passing any useful law about immigration or the expansion of the definition of “refugee” so that included literally every illegal who entered the US that claims asylum. But whatever, what we need is more impoverished unwanted children with microcephaly and whatnot.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @DCThrowback

    Reproductive freedom is a Jewish value.

    • Thanks: Pierre de Craon
  71. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - writers incomes fall - women and minorities worst hit

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2022/dec/06/writers-earnings-have-plummeted-with-women-black-and-mixed-race-authors-worst-hit

    There are “serious questions about the sustainability of the writing profession in the UK” and “substantial inequalities between those who are being adequately rewarded for their writing, and those who are not”, new research has found.

    The report, commissioned by the UK Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) and carried out by the UK Copyright and Creative Economy Research Centre (CREATe) based at the University of Glasgow, found that professional authors are earning a median of just £7,000 a year.

    The report also found a gender pay gap of 41.4% between men and women, with women experiencing a 21% drop in income in real terms between 2017 and 2020, against 10% for men.

    This is the first year the survey has attempted to account for trans and non-binary gender identities. While it found that authors “who identify as trans appear to show real-term earnings growth of 378%”, this was based on an increase in earnings from just one respondent to the survey.
     

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    So on average, being a writer doesn’t pay the bills. Who knew?

  72. @ArthurinCali
    Shame on those who block entrances to College Biology and Science departments, keeping out minorities from learning and attaining degrees in Marine Biology.

    The new Jim Clownfish.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “The sea be angry that day, my homies…”

    • LOL: ArthurinCali
  73. @AndrewR
    @ic1000

    It's not entirely clear whether you're being facetious, so I'm going to go on record as swearing on my mother's grave that I believe that, in the near future, if not already, AI will be able to produce propaganda consistently equal to or superior to the propaganda spat out by "journalists" in the corporate media who literally all think the same and have no psychological capacity to allow themselves to think anything that dissents against the simplistic DIE agenda that is dumbed down to the level of a kindergartener with Down's Syndrome. "Journalists" "of color" will continue to collect their stipends despite not doing anything but making TikTok videos about all the expensive food they consume during their "work" days at prestigious corporate propaganda outlets.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @ic1000

    > It’s not entirely clear whether you’re being facetious

    I’m not sure what you mean. To be clear, I signed up for a ChatGPT account. Then, in each of my two upthread comments, I submitted the prompt as shown, and then copy-pasted the chat engine’s output over to iSteve.

    So the body of each comment is not facetious, each is direct output from ChatGPT. They can be compared directly to Daniel Wu’s Washington Post article, in terms of content, style, grammar, and the like. No need to believe me on this, try ChatGPT for yourself.

    I’d call it a tie.

    ChatGPT got a quote from a more prominent researcher, Sylvia Earle. On the other hand, best I can tell, her quote is fabricated, whereas Wu’s recital of Whitenack’s bons mots is surely genuine.

    • Thanks: bomag
  74. @Jack D
    @Arclight


    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism – that if there isn’t a person that looks just like you in a given field, it’s so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.
     
    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don't seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn't dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    Replies: @Arclight, @Twinkie, @AnotherDad

    Strangely, this phenomenon only applies to NAMs, especially black females. Asians don’t seem to have any problem entering new academic fields and Jews never had this problem either. When Einstein attended ETH Zurich, it didn’t dissuade him that all of his fellow math & physics majors had straight blond hair and blue eyes instead of curly black hair like him.

    This “I never saw anyone like me …” line of b.s. is mostly a girl thing. NAM/not doesn’t have much to do with it.

    You can have a brand spanking new profession–say “astronaut”–you’ll get a line of guys queued up thinking they can do it. Thirty years later, some gal will be blabbing how she never saw girl astronaut role models and how the guidance counselor didn’t encourage her to pursue being an astronaut.

    The NAM issue with science is simply IQ and interest.

  75. @ytcarl
    It's a real, published Washington Post story. So is the reporter Daniel Wu for real, or a programmed woke zombie, putting all information through his programmed worldview? ("Must... complain... of... lack of diversity...")
    He and the other wokebots certainly make the case for how easily humans can be brainwashed into whatever, no matter how limiting (and identity politics, in a multi-ethnic society, is a sure-fire recipe for disaster).
    Will it take deprogrammers to wake these woke, a national disaster, or will they one day wake up and suddenly see how simple-minded they've been? Or are we in for another 10 to 20 years of sanctimonious drivel, before our elite find a new stupid idea to beat on?

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    It’s probably going to get worse before it can get better. These ideas are so entrenched and reinforced by modern propaganda and social pressures of fellow fools that it will probably take a real shock to the system to dislodge mass delusion. I hope this is wrong and that it will erode organically. Maybe it will.

  76. @Arclight
    @Jack D

    Your second point is a very good one - most people are effectively innumerate and don't grok that it's a zero sum game in which under representation in one field could only be remedied by steering people away from another. I pointed this out to a white liberal lady once and her response was essentially that yes, that's what should happen for blacks' own good and it was our job to make it so.

    Another thing that is often not taken into account is that the value various demographic groups give to a given occupation are not equal. Certain jobs or careers are traditional paths to in-group respectability and it would be hard to change that, particularly if your group has an outsized presence. Blacks are over represented in non-profits, local government, and clergy, and a lot of their political power is derived from this. Although in theory most blacks would answer more representation in other fields would be good, if the tradeoff were pointed out most probably wouldn't take it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They want blacks to be “at least” equal to their population % in EVERY occupation – it’s mathematically impossible for that to happen. If you told them that we were going to limit black females to 13% of female soldiers in order to free up some black females to be nuclear physicists, they would scream racism.

    Your second point is a very good one – most people are effectively innumerate and don’t grok that it’s a zero sum game in which under representation in one field could only be remedied by steering people away from another.

    If 19% of NBA players are white (that includes all Hispanics), 80% are black (counting all mixed-race as black), 27 majority owners are white and only one black… that would mean that it’s 115 times as likely that a black plays for a white owner than vice versa. Is my math right?

    The figure for Jews and blacks is 7,500 times. There is only one Jew in the league, foreign-born. In the early ’50s, there were at least two, Dolph Schayes, Sonny Hertzberg, and Max Zaslofsky. This is all highly suspicious– unless various peoples [sic] are different.

    I pointed this out to a white liberal lady once…

    How would she recalibrate the NBA?

    The first non-white in the league was 5’7″ Wat Misaka, a Utah-born nisei. How many of his people have followed in his steps? (“Wat” was for Wataru, not Walter.)

  77. So we’ll now see a huge cohort of black girl babies named Mike.

  78. @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere – a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.
     
    I suspect a part of the story here is that there is some resentment on the part of mediocre female scientists such as Whitenack. They see male - mostly white and Asian - scientists who excel and think, "Hey, if I had parents who pushed science on me, I probably would be just as good as they are today." They don't think, "I'm clearly not as intelligent or hard-working as they are."

    The "not my fault" syndrome is very pronounced with the younger generation. People in it also have trouble accepting the fact that the vast majority of people won't be stars. Media in general (everyone in NYC lives in a gorgeous apartment), and social media in particular, has been quite destructive in fostering this idea that everyone out there is being a star - this, of course, ends up engendering a lot of resentment when people who are not stars compare the perfectly curated social media presentations to their own lives and achievements. So, they then go after what they see as "systemic" reasons why they are not measuring up to these ideals.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Arclight

    Actually I think her resentment is that guys who are sometimes named Mike have the cojones to get out in the field with sharks, whereas she is applying her supposed expertise at an inland university hundreds of miles from any sharks at all. They are *doing* and she is critiquing from afar. Society finds the Mikes of the world interesting, mousy people at 3rd tier universities not so much.

  79. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    Whale sharks, the largest fish in the sea, are the true "gentle giants". They couldn't bite you if you tried. Here's how they shipped two of them to Atlanta from Taiwan:


    https://youtu.be/A2Kkj0dvZtw


    Sadly, they didn't last:



    https://youtu.be/ElahE9nuJd4

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    2 of the goofs from the Jackass show went swimming with whale sharks with their shorts loaded with shrimp:

  80. @Tiny Duck
    @Nicholas Stix

    Uh you do know this article was to trigger snowflake rubes like you dont you?

    I do think that diversity in media is a very serious issue. The one thing that angers me about this piece is that the Washington Post editors appear more interested in yanking peoples’ chains and getting reactions than truly showing concern or educating about the existential threats to our planet. Would it be possible to lead with the fact that most species of sharks are threatened, and then explain why Discovery’s outdated and narrow point of view is contributing to the problem?

    Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky, @Faraday's Bobcat, @TWS

    ChatGPT:

    Fckin’ tiny ducks, man. These shtbirds are the fckin’ best, let me tell ya. First off, they’re fckin’ cute as sht. With their little legs and adorable quacks, you can’t help but fckin’ smile when you see ’em waddlin’ around.

    But beyond their cuteness, these tiny fckers are also agile as fck. They may be small, but they can maneuver around obstacles and even fly short distances when they need to. This makes ’em great for gettin’ around tight spaces and avoidin’ danger.

    I don’t know where this all ends. Is it going to be a fad, like when people used to say WASSUP!! around the time that Budweiser ad ran, or a year from now are we going to be sending ChatGPT text to each other while the world burns down?

  81. Yo Steve, these N-s don’t know they are now 2 years away from luxury hotels. They shoulda put 6 arrows in has azz and told the dudes on the boat to say that he died scuba’ing…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Truth

    Like they did with Michael Rockefeller?


    What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller




    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/native_river_boat_a_l.jpg

    Replies: @Truth

  82. Ctrl-F “Eugenie Clark” returns nothing…

  83. @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Jevonte insults Tyrone's new shoes which he had just acquired with a five finger discount. Tyrone busts a cap at Jevonte. The bullet has a mass of 20 grams and travels at a velocity of 400 m/s. Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte's shoulder.

    Replies: @Kinecto, @kaganovitch

    Ke = 1/2 mvsquared.
    1600 Newtons.
    About 1180 ft lbs.
    44 mag territory.
    Ouch.

  84. @Old Prude
    @Spangel226

    There is much to what you say, Spangel, but can you explain why the GOP, controlling the Senate and House, did not defund Planned Parenthood when PP got caught selling baby parts?

    That was the moment I realized the GOP was nothing but a foil for the Democrats.

    BTW, the GOP didn't end Roe V. Wade, the Supremes did because they knew it was a bad piece of jurisprudence. If it was up to the lily-livered GOP in Congress, they would have just kept mouthing meaningless platitudes and let the P.O.S. ruling stand for another 100 years.

    Replies: @epebble

    Since you mentioned Roe, I saw this news and can’t understand it. Can someone help?

    Vasectomies surge 34% in the Northwest in wake of Dobbs decision
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/policy/healthcare/vasectomies-surge-in-northwest-wake-of-dobbs-decision

    I have read variations of this news. But I don’t remember seeing corresponding rise in tubal legations. The only reported response by women (and their advocates) seems to be a more efficient network for mifepristone distribution. So, Dobbs causes women to continue to be irresponsible, but men are induced to be careful. Fear of accidental child support maybe?

  85. @AndrewR
    @Anon

    Jevonte insults Tyrone's new shoes which he had just acquired with a five finger discount. Tyrone busts a cap at Jevonte. The bullet has a mass of 20 grams and travels at a velocity of 400 m/s. Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte's shoulder.

    Replies: @Kinecto, @kaganovitch

    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte’s shoulder.

    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters J̶a̶v̶o̶n̶t̶e̶’̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶o̶u̶l̶d̶e̶r̶ the shoulder of the woman standing 3 feet to the left of Javonte. FIFY

    • LOL: TWS
    • Replies: @Kinecto
    @kaganovitch

    This reply is funnier than mine.
    I am more literally inclined and less amusing,

  86. @kaganovitch
    @AndrewR

    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters Javonte’s shoulder.


    Calculate the force in newtons when the bullet enters J̶a̶v̶o̶n̶t̶e̶’̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶o̶u̶l̶d̶e̶r̶ the shoulder of the woman standing 3 feet to the left of Javonte. FIFY

    Replies: @Kinecto

    This reply is funnier than mine.
    I am more literally inclined and less amusing,

  87. @Arclight
    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere - a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism - that if there isn't a person that looks just like you in a given field, it's so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    I did have a laugh at the mention of the number of Mikes on Shark Week. Most of the Mikes I know personally are pretty enterprising people, so not surprising that the type of person that is into sharks and wants to get out into nature to interact with them are white males, whereas the type who stays in an office and tallies up sins is Lisa.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Twinkie, @Steve Sailer, @mc23

    Baby Boomers named Mike who got into sharks were perhaps influenced by “Sea Hunt’s” Mike Nelson:

    “Sea Hunt is an American action adventure television series that aired in syndication from 1958 to 1961 and was popular for decades afterwards. The series originally aired for four seasons, with 155 episodes produced. It stars Lloyd Bridges as former Navy diver Mike Nelson,”

  88. @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Tiny Duck

    Tiny Dick, you actually managed to convey a cogent argument (such as it is). You ok bro?

    Replies: @bomag

    Back when I checked, anything cogent from TD was a cut and paste.

    Suspicion now is it has moved on to using a chatbot.

  89. @Tiny Duck
    @Nicholas Stix

    Uh you do know this article was to trigger snowflake rubes like you dont you?

    I do think that diversity in media is a very serious issue. The one thing that angers me about this piece is that the Washington Post editors appear more interested in yanking peoples’ chains and getting reactions than truly showing concern or educating about the existential threats to our planet. Would it be possible to lead with the fact that most species of sharks are threatened, and then explain why Discovery’s outdated and narrow point of view is contributing to the problem?

    Replies: @fredyetagain aka superhonky, @Faraday's Bobcat, @TWS

    Absolute top notch trolling! This is the mighty Duck. Utter obliviousness to your own long established habits, actual cogent assessment of the article itself, gentle remonstration of the respondent.

    All without a soupcon of acknowledged irony. It’s one of your best yet. And it does not appear to have been typed with webbed feet, will wonders never cease?

    Good way to switch it up and keep it fresh. I fully expect the black supremacist triumphalism and the hilarious spelling and grammar in your next one, good Ducky.

  90. @Bill Jones
    And in further Journalism news, the grift that keeps on giving.



    Elon Musk on Tuesday announced that former FBI attorney James Baker, who came to Twitter to serve as deputy general counsel, has been fired after 'vetting' recently released evidence of Twitter's election interference unbeknownst to Musk.
     
    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/musk-fires-twitters-fbi-russiagate-twitter-lawyer-over-vetting-debacle

    The arrogance of the Feeb cocksuckers really knows no bounds.

    Replies: @TWS

    Don’t worry, Steve is on top of this story.

  91. If you know anybody with a kid under 2 years of age you have probably heard this until your ear bled:

  92. @Truth
    Yo Steve, these N-s don't know they are now 2 years away from luxury hotels. They shoulda put 6 arrows in has azz and told the dudes on the boat to say that he died scuba'ing...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nD1NPvltDdY

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Like they did with Michael Rockefeller?

    What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Reg Cæsar

    LOL.

    Why yes of course!

    (That was either a blood sacrifice by one of his satanic family members or an insurance or inheritance killing 95:5%)

  93. @Reg Cæsar
    @Truth

    Like they did with Michael Rockefeller?


    What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller




    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/native_river_boat_a_l.jpg

    Replies: @Truth

    LOL.

    Why yes of course!

    (That was either a blood sacrifice by one of his satanic family members or an insurance or inheritance killing 95:5%)

  94. Trans Sharks! Who wants to do the firs operation?

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Rat City

    Sharks have two penises. There's like a world of options here.

  95. @Rat City
    Trans Sharks! Who wants to do the firs operation?

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    Sharks have two penises. There’s like a world of options here.

  96. @Arclight
    Ms. Whitenack is a good example of the type of person that is well-represented in academia, media, politics, and the non-profit sphere - a glorified hall monitor that gets up in the morning hoping to accuse someone of a social heresy, not to conduct meaningful work to improve the lives of others.

    This piece also highlights one of the popular and lazy tropes in current journalism - that if there isn't a person that looks just like you in a given field, it's so discouraging that flocks of otherwise capable people stay away from it.

    I did have a laugh at the mention of the number of Mikes on Shark Week. Most of the Mikes I know personally are pretty enterprising people, so not surprising that the type of person that is into sharks and wants to get out into nature to interact with them are white males, whereas the type who stays in an office and tallies up sins is Lisa.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Twinkie, @Steve Sailer, @mc23

    There’s an awful lot of pro-shark propaganda out there that has harmed men named Mike who have small children. Why doesn’t she look into this dreck

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