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Does America have the world’s most protracted electoral process? Do we get much from the enormous amount of time we spend on it?

So, what’s going to happen in the Democratic primaries?

Does Bloomberg actually have a strategy besides spending a huge amount of money on ads? What primary is he intending to win?

Has Bernie broken through with Hispanics?

Is Obama going to endorse Biden?

As a Baby Boomer, I’m particularly struck by the persistence of pre-Boomers (whatever they are called: I don’t pay much attention to generational terminology). The three Bs of the Democrats are all in their late 70s and were born several years before the Baby Boom. Sanders, for example, is less of a 1960s New Leftist than a 1950s Old Leftist of the Norman Thomas ilk. Probably the favorite band at Woodstock of Biden, Bernie, and Bloomberg was Sha-Na-Na:

 
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  1. AaronNYC says:

    I know it might be an advanced concept for many, but perhaps the whole country could just vote on a single day like everyone else does?

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @kihowi
    , @Autochthon
  2. IHTG says:

    Another powerful pre-boomer: Mitch McConnell.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  3. In before the Gabbard fapping.

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Troll: Thulean Friend
  4. Speaking of Sha-Na-Na, the former lead singer “Bowser” has an interesting twitter feed. When I was a kid I assumed he was just some real NY italian. I didn’t realize he was playing a variation on Borat.

  5. To go by Strauss & Howe (Generations, The Fourth Turning) terminology, Steve, the pre-boomers would be of the “Silent Generation”, who came after the “GI Generation”. If you want all this generational terminology wrapped up nicely, Strauss and Howe are your go-to guys.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  6. @Achmed E. Newman

    So Biden, Bernie, and Bloomberg are “Silent”?

  7. Bill P says:

    Bloomberg is a finance guy. I don’t know why he thinks he has snowball’s chance in hell of winning the democratic nomination, let alone the presidency.

    Of course Sanders is going to have a breakthrough with Hispanics. Socialism has long been popular among Latin Americans, and for better or worse we’ve successfully imported this political tradition.

    I think barring DNC meddling Sanders is going to win the nomination, and he has a good chance of winning the presidency. Boomers, with their inflated pensions, stock portfolios and paid-off houses seriously underestimate the resentment out there. It might not happen this election cycle, but just as Tucker Carlson has been warning a reckoning is coming.

    • Agree: Kronos
  8. In glancing at the title, I was hoping this thread would be about the great college wrestling dual meet between Iowa and Penn State, in which the Iowa Hawkeyes finally beat the long-dominant Nittany Lions.

    It was a great meet. Wrestling remains one of the few sports, incidentally, that is largely competed by – ahem – “heritage Americans.” And it hasn’t been commercialized as badly as that pozzed Super Bowl baloney I used to watch years ago.

    But, no, this thread is just about some “politics.”

    • Replies: @frankie p
    , @frankie p
    , @ia
  9. anon[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The whole generational thing is irrelevant, may as well be talking star-signs…
    No, the only one’s silent here are not talking about Bloomberg’s ineligibility for the office! That being the press because of all that glorious money he’s spending with them.
    He was knighted by the queen for God’s sake!

    On October 6, 2014, Queen Elizabeth II awarded Bloomberg as Honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his “prodigious entrepreneurial and philanthropic endeavors, and the many ways in which they have benefited the United Kingdom and the U.K.-U.S. special relationship.” As Bloomberg is not a citizen of the United Kingdom, he cannot use the title “Sir”, but may, at his own discretion, use the post-nominal letters “KBE”.

    Is Trump holding this back in case he really wants the job? Why won’t Bernie, Joe & Liz bring up his disqualification.

    • LOL: bomag
  10. Kennyko says:

    1. I don’t understand how Harris didn’t have a better showing. She was everything a democrat candidate should be.

    2. Ultimately Warren will be the next president

    • LOL: Charles
  11. Art Deco says:

    Candidates who’ve avoided the earliest contests and sought to establish themselves in somewhat later contests (e.g. the Florida primary) have not in the past performed well. See, for example, Rudolph Giuliani, who was leading in national polls in December 2007. The Giuliani plan was to make a splash in Florida. The comment of one of his staff was ‘we’re either the smartest guys in the room or the dumbest guys in the room’. I don’t think he won a single delegate.

    Bloomberg is performing respectably in national polls, but he’s hardly detectable in the first half-dozen states which will be voting (NB, even Steyer has a significant bloc of respondents in one of these states). His problems are compounded in Iowa, where good performance has in the past been contingent on having boots on the ground; ads don’t cut it. (See John Glenn’s performance in 1984; he was running 2d in national polls but placed 6th in Iowa as he didn’t organize). Bloomberg has a constituency and would be a grave danger to Trump in a general election, but the process being what it is the smart money says he gets lost in the shuffle.

  12. In this country, we tend to focus too much on the president and to talk endlessly about politics as a sport — especially as it relates to the president.

    Witness this blog entry and comment thread.

    A few minutes observing any so-called “news” medium” confirms this, while there is so much damage being done by the legislature and the courts.

    This is just our version of having a king or a royal family to speculate about, write plays about, and complain about.

    It is simple-minded, even when practiced by those of us who think we are so smart.

  13. Kirt says:

    The Guardian has an article on how the Iowa caucuses are excluding hundreds of thousands of people, mostly felons and people with disabilities. Translation: Bernie is favored to win.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  14. @Buzz Mohawk

    Good points.

    Sadly, I came here looking for reactions to the Super Bowl… Even more simple-minded! panem et circenses FTW

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  15. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    In the Howe / Strauss taxonomy, which identifies ‘Boomers’ and the birth cohorts running from 1943 to 1960. The thing is, if you sort people by common behavior patterns in given cohorts (e.g. propensity to divorce, prevalence of drug use, prevalence of military service, perpetration of street crime, consumer tastes), the divisory line (if there is one) is a few cohorts earlier. The notable candidates on the other side of that divisory line were Ron Paul, John McCain, Michael Dukakis, Paul Simon, Gary Hart, Walter Mondale, and Ted Kennedy. Pat Buchanan and Jerry Brown are located right on the border.

    Gary Hart, Jerry Brown, and Pat Buchanan make interesting case studies because of biographical curios. Hart was something of a perpetual student, in school for ten years. He married young, but didn’t have any children for the first seven years of his marriage. He had his wife over a period of 10 years abandoned the fundamentalist subculture in which they’d been raised (and in which his father-in-law was quite prominent) and his personal decadence thereafter was quite pronounced. Buchanan married somewhat late in life (at 33, I think) and he and his wife were infertile; he’s unusual in that his father had very pronounced and explicit views on religion, on politics, and on the conduct of mundane life and successfully imparted them to his children. Jerry Brown was another perpetual student who produced no children and never married until he was retirement age. NB, atypical in their cohorts, these three never had any military service (Brown and Hart had a series of graduate school deferments not available later and Buchanan was medically disqualified). The other seven men listed were all married with children in 1965 and all had a done a tour in the service.

  16. Kronos says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I doubt it, all three are “War Babies.” They have more in common with the Boomers than the Silent Generation.

    They didn’t grow up during the Great Depression. The War Babies were the biggest ringleaders of the 1960s Counterculture, often in-bodying the role of Peter Pan leading the Lost Boys. For the last 50 years they’ve politically surfed on the big wave which are the Baby Boomers.

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @HammerJack
  17. Thea says:

    I really believe Bernie will win but Wall Street will engage in some shenanigans like they did to him last time to prevent his nomination.

    Bloomberg wouldn’t be the worst president ever but he hasn’t got a shot.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  18. Anonymous[150] • Disclaimer says:

    Slightly OT.

    For whatever reason, the British journalistic class, and editors, most especially the BBC, have an absolute obsession with the US political cycle – devoting an inordinate amount of air time to it – often half a news program. In fact they are more interested in American politics than UK politics.
    Of the internal politics of EU nations, the BBC, and the rest, have very very little to say, bordering on a complete black out. Thus, when Britain was in the EU, ordinary Britons knew next to nothing about their EU partners, and cared even less.

    And this is the same biased BBC that has been bleating blue murder about Brexit for the past four years.

    • Agree: LondonBob
  19. bomag says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    …while there is so much damage being done by the legislature and the courts.

    Indeed.

    But we spend a fair amount of time on legislative races; the presidency is a proxy for judgeships.

    This reflects the large and growing importance of government in our lives.

  20. Hibernian says:
    @IHTG

    Not to mention Nancy Pelosi.

  21. Ano says:

    If you can remember the 60’s, Mr Sailer you weren’t really there, but me, man…

    …I remember Bernie yelling at some kid called Robert (Bob?) at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival and pulling out the plug of his electric guitar.

    Cat, I remember going to Biden’s office for help and him giving me the brush-off- some malarkey about ‘I’d like to help you son, but you’re too young to vote’. Blue Cheer!

    Bloomberg? I didn’t know Andy Williams was still alive- and had changed his name..

    Yours,
    Mr Brown-Acid

    • Agree: Desiderius
  22. bomag says:
    @Kronos

    Was Tulsi in there somewhere?

    • Replies: @Kronos
  23. @Art Deco

    Someone give this commenter a star! 🙂

    • Agree: keypusher
    • Replies: @res
  24. Does America have the world’s most protracted electoral process? Do we get much from the enormous amount of time we spend on it?

    Imagine if the only elections in America were for city council, and positions above that were selected at random from holders of the position below (excluding anyone who had been removed from office due to crime). Would we be worse off?

    • Replies: @Nodwink
    , @Bill
    , @kaganovitch
  25. Probably the favorite band at Woodstock of Biden, Bernie, and Bloomberg was Sha-Na-Na:

    I was too young in the late ’60s to understand why, and I still don’t, but I pretty clearly remember that my older brothers (born ’47 and ’50) related to all the cutting edge late ’60s rock music played by early 1940s babies such as Hendrix, but my older male cousins, who were born between 1938 and 1944, just didn’t seem to relate to all that innovative hard acid-head stuff being composed by their contemporaries.

    I checked with PiltdownBrother1 and he confirms my childhood recollection.

    It’s been remarked before over here by Mr. Sailer that Woodstock was an audience of late teens and young twentysomethings listening to their older siblings on stage.

    I wonder why that was.

  26. bomag says:
    @Art Deco

    Noteworthy that politicians have birth year clusters; a coming-of-age in a time when politics is seen as a Thing, I suppose.

    Clinton; W Bush; Trump, all born 1946. Romney and Hillary: 1947. Dennis Kucinich: 1946.

    Carter and HW Bush: 1924. Bob Dole: 1923. McGovern: 1922.

    Ford, Nixon: 1913. Reagan, Humphrey: 1911.

    P. Buchanan, J. Brown: “38. G. Hart, McCain: “36. Ron Paul: “35.

    Paul Simon, Walter Mondale: “28.

  27. peterike says:

    Doesn’t matter Steve. A “black” quarterback just won the Super Bowl, so God’s in his heaven and all’s right with the world.

    Mahomes even laid out the reality for everyone in this quote: “For me, being a black quarterback — having a black dad and white mom — it just shows that it doesn’t matter where you come from.”

    Indeed.

    • Replies: @Abe
  28. Semi-Hemi says:
    @Kennyko

    I wonder when the big surprise video or tape of President Trump doing something really bad will be released. You know they have something to spring on us, but when? The obvious answer is when it will do the most damage, but when is that?

    • Replies: @John Cunningham
  29. BB753 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    They are “Silent” but just won’t shut up or retire gracefully.

  30. neutral says:

    By now it should be obvious that whoever is voted US president has no real power, it is essentially a ceremonial position (like the queen of England) where all meaningful decisions are blocked by an unelected blob. This being the case vote for the most outrageous candidate, at least one gets some entertainment out of that.

  31. The Z Blog says: • Website

    The long process is all part of the endless stream of propaganda needed to keep the secular religion of democracy going.

    As far as what will happen, it looks like Sanders will win Iowa. The focus is then on how the rest of the field shakes out. Biden collapsing in the polls probably eliminates him from the race after New Hampshire. Warren finishing fourth or fifth ends her campaign most likely.

    The amusing thing shaping up is the process will have an old Jewish socialist as the favorite to win the nomination. The party will then turn to one of the two Jewish billionaires to stop him. It’s getting harder and harder to not notice what’s happening in American politics.

  32. black sea says:

    Our protracted electoral process twice gave HRC the time she needed to thwart her handlers, gurus, and script-writers and and self-sabotage all over the national stage.

    For that alone I am thankful.

    • Replies: @Abe
  33. @Malcolm X-Lax

    From a grand tradition of Jewish actors playing Italian characters, generally making them seem repulsive. Jay Greenspan as George Costanza in Seinfeld, Henry Winkler as Arthur Fonzarella in Happy Days, Judah Friedlander as Frank Rossitano in 30 Rock. I’m sure there are many more.

  34. @anon

    Easy there 205… Only wrongthinkers would accuse Bloomberg of dual loyalty.

    No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

    If America took the prohibition of titles of nobility seriously there would be no esquires in “government.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  35. @Bill P

    Bloomberg is running mainly because he despises Donald Trump, and is jealous of him as well. If the coronavirus sparks a worldwide recession (or anything close) the election will go to the Dems no matter whom they nominate. Might anyway.

    • Disagree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Jack Henson
  36. Jack D says:
    @anon

    1. He could renounce his foreign title.

    2. Congress could grant its consent for him to keep it.

    3. Not clear this is a title of nobility to begin with.

    This is like Trump with the emoluments clause (same clause actually) – not really an obstacle, just a gotcha.

  37. @Kronos

    Along with many of my peers, I get called a boomer even though all of us were born after 1964. I think the epithet is just a way of trying to shut up older people because you don’t like what they’re saying.

    An additional irony is that a lot of this name calling is happening online where people have no idea what you look like, much less how old you are.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  38. Sha Na Na rocked, they schooled the hippies at Woodstock!

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Replies: @keypusher
  39. @PiltdownMan

    I think it is because we all feel more comfortable looking up to someone than worshipping someone your own age or younger.

    For example, I was way more into following football 10 years ago then I am now….Mainly for the reading that it’s a bit awkward for me to go gaga over players who are my age

  40. Altai says:

    OT: The WaPo journo who got suspended for reminding everyone that Kobe most definitely did rape that 19 year old, quite severely, (They claim it was actually because she may have intentionally or accidentally doxed one of the Kobe fanboys attacking her on Twitter) has set the MeToo cat among the Jewish men born in New York between 1940-1960 powers that be at the Post.

  41. @Jack D

    It’s not a title of nobility — for one thing, because it doesn’t come with lands. And also, Bloomie is not a Brit, and everybody knows about the famous American objections to the very notion of nobility… on paper anyway.

    Nobody would take this as a serious objection, it’s just a decorative honor, a kind of international politeness, and anybody with a sense of humor knows that.

    For instance, en France, Patti Smith is a “Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres,” but she doesn’t actually command anybody, except me.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  42. Nodwink says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Sortition! Yes!

    This form of government had drifted out of my memory, until I read a story about a bloke who was going to suicide bomb DC.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/new-york-man-wanted-blow-himself-national-mall-election-day-n918771

  43. Bill says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    That’s a pretty interesting thought experiment. You definitely can’t analyze it by looking at people who currently are on city councils. Parties & interest groups would have to spend their time and resources recruiting and electing a bazillion different councilmen, and this is how they would spend their time and resources. So the pool of city councilmen would change a lot.

    It would be harder to fine-tune national politicians. You couldn’t really groom them. It would be harder to have kompromat on them. Presumably, even after all the effort by the swamp to select them, they would be more like the people they represent.

    Of course, cheating on the random assignment would be massively incentivized, so maybe that’s where all the interest group effort would be spent.

  44. A big story surrounding the Iowa caucus is the hilarious suppression of the Des Moines Register pre caucus final poll.

    This is the first time this has _ever_ happened since the Des Moines Register started polling caucus-goers, and the mass media excuses are hilarious.

    The “official establishment” version: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/481115-iowa-poll-snafu-leaves-democrats-guessing-on-eve-of-caucuses

    The conspiracy theory version: https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2020/02/bernie-mania-update.php

    If the conspiracy theorists are correct and Biden finishes fourth, this will be one of the biggest upsets in American political history.

  45. Lugash says:
    @PiltdownMan

    I was too young in the late ’60s to understand why, and I still don’t, but I pretty clearly remember that my older brothers (born ’47 and ’50) related to all the cutting edge late ’60s rock music played by early 1940s babies such as Hendrix, but my older male cousins, who were born between 1938 and 1944, just didn’t seem to relate to all that innovative hard acid-head stuff being composed by their contemporaries.

    I’ve noticed the same, but most of the early Boomers I know didn’t take to the late 60s psychedelic rock.

    In my experience pre Boomers or War Babies have a much, much better grasp of how society has changed, don’t fall for the narrative and grasp why post Boomer generations aren’t happy with the current generation.

    • Replies: @sayless
    , @Bleuteaux
  46. Ian Smith says:

    I like Jim Goad’s take on taking ‘generations’ too seriously. The Strauss and Howe thing seems unfalsifiable to me.

    https://www.takimag.com/article/generational-astrology-for-dummies/

  47. Lot says:

    At the Hop (1958) was 11 years old at Woodstock but sounds completely like it’s from another era.

    Meanwhile the current garbage pop music of 2020 sounds identical to music from 1995-2005. Popular music innovation has been dead for at least 20 years.

    Even more disgusting about our fallen age, there’s an awful trend of rerecording 1965-1990 hits with cheap pop-synth beat and extreme auto-tuned female vocal. Sometimes a black guy raps a little during what is supposed to be the bridge. Random example I was subjected to yesterday: Selena Gomez doing “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of These)”

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  48. sayless says:
    @Jack D

    I think it’s analogous to Giuliani being made a Son of Italy by the Italian government after 9/11.

  49. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:

    Everyone I have ever talked to who was actually at Woodstock says that Sha-Na-Na were absolutely ignored by one and all. It was as if Perry Como, Up With People, or a military band were up there. They went over like a klezmer band at a National Alliance convention.

  50. Warner says:

    OT:

    Can we come up with a name for this style of journalism:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/03/opinion/goop-gwyneth-paltrow-netflix.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    i.e., Here’s something we all openly mocked. But suddenly out of nowhere, we acknowledge that not only is mocking it wrong, but the mocking is patriarchical tool that goes back through all of human history and causes WOMEN to BE MURDERED!

    The unexpected reversal of an opinion no one cared much about either way that is done with such magnitude that the previous position now amounts to not just bigotry but accessory to murder.

    Quoted sentences in particular:

    Yes, the rich, willowy blonde at Goop’s helm is an easy target…. The tsunami of Goop hatred is best understood within a context that is much older and runs much deeper than Twitter, streaming platforms, consumerism or capitalism. Throughout history, women in particular have been mocked, reviled, and MURDERED for maintaining knowledge and practices that frightened, confused, and confounded “the authorities.”

    (EMPHASIS mine)

    …So, you start with the headline, thinking, oh the conventional wisdom that Goop is kind of a joke for women with too much money to spend… and by the fourth paragraph, you see that you’ve been convicted of being accomplice to centuries of murdering the innocent, their anguished cries echoing through the timeless caves of the underworld each time you smirk while walking past a Goop pop-up shop.

  51. Morris L says:

    @SteveSailer

    OT but interesting. Is this peak ‘white liberal woman’? Quite a good income for the hustlers too. It beggars belief that people would pay 2 and a half grand to be lectured on how racist they are.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/03/race-to-dinner-party-racism-women

  52. @Jack D

    I agree with #3.

    This is an honorary title, not a real title. It probably doesn’t count. Sort of the way Churchill was granted honorary US citizenship, but could still continue as U.K. PM.

    • Replies: @RickinJax
  53. sayless says:
    @Lugash

    Boomers born in the late fifties and afterward don’t remember the fifties. They remember the political assassinations, Vietnam and the protests, race riots and Chicago ‘68, the beginning of the divorce epidemic, Mom needs to get a real job, all that.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  54. res says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Good point and question. In general, I think it is good to remember that the transitions we are ascribing to generations are not instantaneous. You would expect a few early adopters to influence a greater number of followers. So perhaps exponential growth (with what kind of doubling time?). I think this would look a lot like what you describe. It is worth noting that exponential growth tends to look like nothing is happening for a long time then everything changes all of a sudden.
    http://jonathanbecher.com/2016/01/31/lily-pads-and-exponential-thinking/

    Looking at how presence/absence of older and younger siblings affected someone’s experience of generational transitions would make an interesting study. Not the only influence by far (consider parents/peers/community/church, rural vs. urban, as well as individual characteristics–particularly openness to new experiences), but probably important.

    I wonder how much this generations phenomenon coincides with the introduction of radio and TV (especially national). I think those would substantially reduce the doubling time.

    P.S. It is hard to describe the Silent Generation as persistent with respect to the presidency given that they have never had a president from their ranks. This election is probably their last chance.

  55. @Dave Pinsen

    Imagine if the only elections in America were for city council, and positions above that were selected at random from holders of the position below (excluding anyone who had been removed from office due to crime). Would we be worse off?

    No, but Karl Rove, John Podesta and thousands of other swamp creatures would be worse off, and that’s what’s important.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @Dutch Boy
  56. As a Baby Boomer, I’m particularly struck by the persistence of pre-Boomers (whatever they are called: I don’t pay much attention to generational terminology).

    If you don’t pay much attention to it, then why don’t you just call them “old people,” since that’s obviously what you mean.

    The generational construct that has been promoted to the heavens is pretty laughable, so there is good reason not to accord it any analytical value, but interesting that you are still impelled to preface your remarks with a “boomer” self-identification.

    Note how “the Silent Generation” is itself a sort of moral indictment and meant to be contrasted with the “boomers” on whose watch the culture was overturned and social justice was supposedly achieved.

    The TV series Mad Men is all about promoting the notion of a bad, conformist “Silent Generation” being overthrown and supplanted by progressive, justice-seeking “boomers.”

    It is comical in a distasteful sort of way that Matthew Weiner, who created Mad Men to show that the 1950s were all about misogyny, etc, was subsequently accused of telling Kater Gordon that she owed it to him to see her naked.

  57. How we needed up with such a ridiculously drawn out process is a mystery, although I have a guess (below).

    It’s sort of like how our current national pastime sport, tackle football (NFL, NCAA), has been rendered nearly unwatchable by endless commercials and minimal action. Is it a fluke or by design that the rules of the sport are conducive to never-ending interruptions? Compare our “football” to what rest of the world calls football: For all of its corruption and idiocy (anti-racism campaigns, etc) at least when you tune in to watch a match, you actually see, you know, an athletic contest, as opposed to “We’ll be right back” 867 times.

    My understanding is that the rest of the world, even countries with equally corrupt political systems, has election campaigns of a month and then it’s (mercifully over).

    What gives? I suspect having a Federal system where each and every state wants their say is a big part of it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  58. Tulsi got eliminated by a massive co-ordinated attack by the DNC elite. Warren’s foreign policy team got unveiled a few days ago and it really is Hillary Redux. Yang has an intriguing domestic platform but he bent the knee on foreign policy as well, showing he is spineless. Bernie has softened his message a lot compared to 2016. He even (shamefully) supported the coup in Venezuela. So he isn’t nearly as radical as he used to be, which is why he’s been getting somewhat better coverage. They still don’t trust him fully and would prefer a pliant puppet like Biden who can scarcely hide his Alzheimer anymore. Warren or Buttplug is the backup plan. Bloomberg trying to buy the nomination won’t work.

    The latest poll out of South Carolina showed that Bernie is now just 5 percentage points behind Biden, and this in a state where the black primary population is huge. I’ve always maintained that as everyone obsessed over blacks, a white+hispanic alliance could easily best it. It’s the democratic version of the sailer strategy.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  59. @Kennyko

    I don’t understand how Harris didn’t have a better showing.

    I thought she was going places, too. As the person who checked all the boxes. But whenever she opened her mouth she seemingly had the mind of a 14 year-old.

    I think Harris failed when, like Warren, she tried to trim her sails and tack center after having success being a radical socialist. The lefties sniffed them both out as inauthentic and dumped them.

    The Lefties want a true believer this cycle. Not a corporate poseur. That’s why Sanders is their man.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Anon
    , @Desiderius
  60. anon[296] • Disclaimer says:

    Protracted Presidential elections are a feature. The Founders were not all that interested in efficiency at the national level, but more caution. We don’t elect the entire Senate in one day. The Electoral College gives states some pull in the Presidential elections. Change happens slowly by design. Liberteenies and radicals can moan all they want, rapid change in government has a lot of bad side effects.

    The primary system has evolved as a kind of filter, it is very imperfect but it sorta works. Alternatives such as “letting a dozen party big shots pick all the candidates for a slate” have not worked out well either. The primary system is a vestige of Federalism and like someone said it gives borderline candidates time to show off their true nature. It’s a big country, and it’s not a big country like China is, either. So the process is cumbersome but less bad than alternatives.

    It is probably the last national election that will feature credible candidates born before or during WWII, so enjoy the pageantry of history as it passes by. Bernie will probably do well in Iowa unless the Party screws around with the process to favor Biden; if that happens then it will have repercussions down the line.

  61. Thomas says:

    Does Bloomberg actually have a strategy besides spending a huge amount of money on ads? What primary is he intending to win?

    Doubt it. I keep seeing Bloomberg ads on Facebook saying that “Mike Bloomberg is the gun lobby’s worst nightmare.” I don’t know if it’s just that he’s shoveling so much money in that there’s no need to target a particular audience, but, at least to me and the people I know, that demonstrates bad mis-targeting through a platform that’s entirely designed to reach very discretely-selected target markets. That suggests to me he’s doing what you might expect a very rich and very out-of-touch person to do: just pour money into things without noticing actual results (or accounting for the fact that some of the results can be counterproductive). Based on some of the things I’ve been reading about his campaign, I’m guessing the pigs from the consultant class are definitely already feeding greedily at the trough. My following of the gun issue state by state suggests that Bloomberg gets a pretty low rate of return for all the money he spends, but he just tries to make it up in massive volume. For all the payola though, Trump may have punched him hardest this weekend by defining him as short.

    I don’t see a path to victory in the general for Bernie and am straining to see one in the primary. Suburban, boomer types, Democrats and Republicans both, are repulsed by him, even if the kids they have living in their basements love him. Any hardcore socialist would be the best chance of pushing disaffected Republicans back into the Trump fold as well. Elizabeth Warren seemed to be the favorite among the gentry liberal Democrats I know but has the burden of any specific appeal she has being split with at least one other candidate (to socialists with Bernie, to feminists with Klobuchar, etc.) as well as the burden of being Elizabeth Warren. Blacks won’t give Bootygay the time of day. It’s an amazingly weak slate of candidates for the Democrats this year, perhaps one that provides a snapshot of a Democratic Party still in the middle of its post-2016, post-Obama and post-Hillary identity crisis. If it weren’t for Trump as a unifying enemy, I struggle to see what they’d have going for them.

    My guess for a final result will be a Biden-Klobuchar ticket.

    • Agree: Muggles
  62. RickinJax says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Pretty sure Churchill was only granted US citizenship a few months before he died in 1964.
    He hadn’t been PM since 1955.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  63. Barnard says:
    @kaganovitch

    It is easy to understand why the cockroaches who run the campaigns want the country to be in eternal campaigning mode, but why do the politicians? Could it be that the quality of person attracted to politics now is much more interested in campaigning than actually doing the work required of elected office? I would say that is true for both Obama and Trump and most of the Democrats who ran this cycle.

  64. istevefan says:
    @Bill P

    I think barring DNC meddling Sanders is going to win the nomination, and he has a good chance of winning the presidency. Boomers, with their inflated pensions, stock portfolios and paid-off houses seriously underestimate the resentment out there.

    Anyone the Democrats nominate has at least a 50/50 shot of winning. The increasing proportion of non-white voters has seen to that.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  65. carol says:
    @PiltdownMan

    They were the Big Kids. We always followed them around. They knew what was what, and didn’t lecture us. Until they did.

  66. Dutch Boy says:

    The standard theory is that Bloomberg is the fallback should Biden falter or if no one shows up at the convention with a delegate lock (to prevent a Bernie nomination).

  67. Dutch Boy says:
    @kaganovitch

    That would be something like the old Athenian model of choosing executive officers by lot (i.e., something like real democracy rather than the pseudo-democracy we have now).

  68. Michael W says:
    @Art Deco

    Maybe Bloomberg has the right idea. He reminds me of that Jeopardy champion who shook things up by working from the bottom of the board (high ticket clues) instead of from the top down like everyone else. Why bother with little states like Iowa and New Hampshire when you can make a killing on Super Tuesday?

    Now that California has a super Tuesday primary, the delegate math is different from previous years. With his deep pockets Bloomberg might pull it off – he’s already saturating the airwaves here in Illinois, and our primary is 6 weeks away.

  69. Anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    “Bloomberg is a finance guy.”

    More accurately, he sells shit to finance guys.

    But he’s also the ex mayor of New York City, which if it were a state would have a population and economy placing it as number [do your own Wikipedia lookup, I’m not your research assistant] and if it were a country, would have a GDP placing it as number [ditto].

    If Trump were to lose, dear God, don’t give us a woke president. Bloomberg is one of the few unwoke candidates. Biden seems under remote control of his woke staff. Pocahontas has completely flipped out. Sanders seems like he’s starting down the Biden remote control path. Is Kerry woke? Maybe. Yang? He’s showing signs of “I’ll do anything to Win.”

    • Replies: @Daniel H
  70. From a 31 Jan 20 Pew poll as cited in Ha’aretz:

    In the Pew poll, Sanders came in dead last among the four front-runners for the nomination among Jewish Democrats. Biden was the clear favorite, with 31 percent of those polled favoring his candidacy, followed by 20 percent supporting Senator Elizabeth Warren and 13 percent for former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Only 11 percent backed Sanders, who came in ahead of the other Jewish candidate in the race, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg – a latecomer who polled at 8 percent.

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium-pro-israel-u-s-jews-worry-as-sanders-surges-toward-monday-s-iowa-primary-1.8478838?=&ts=_1580746471225

    Well, well–where’s the tribe’s love for their prodigal grandpa, Bernie? Just because 42% of American Jews in another Pew poll last year claimed to feel that Trump was too supportive of Israel doesn’t mean that they will vote for someone who, you know, actually criticizes Bibi.

    Psst–I’ve heard that the Bernie Bros are not only misogynistic but anti-semitic too. Pass it on.

  71. istevefan says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    I thought she was going places, too. As the person who checked all the boxes. But whenever she opened her mouth she seemingly had the mind of a 14 year-old.

    The US primary system is tough. People often complain that our elections take too long. People complain that some states have caucuses, others primaries, and that the elections don’t take place at the same time.

    But the result of this is that whoever survives should be temperamentally prepared to become the president. People who aren’t up to the job are weeded out. That Harris bailed out well before the first vote shows how unsuited for the job she really was.

    Thankfully we have such a system, and Harris was not foisted upon us with her undeserved hype.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    , @Barnard
  72. Dutch Boy says:
    @Art Deco

    Buchanan had an ROTC college scholarship which he lost after suffering heart valve damage from rheumatic fever. Years later, he had the damaged valve replaced. His career would likely have been much different had he become an army officer.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
  73. @Art Deco

    Traditionally, the Silent Generation is for those born between the years 1928 through 1945. The Baby Boom has always been listed as those born between 1946 through 1964. Bernie, Bloomberg, and Biden are all of the Silent Generation, while Warren is a Baby Boomer.

  74. Anon[151] • Disclaimer says:

    The old guys are Silent Generation. They’re all too old to be president in any functional sense. The problem is, leftwing Boomers have daddy issues, and they want someone to be their daddy so they can continue to feel babied and spoiled, and so they can goof off and not have to be responsible. So they keep trying to back someone who’s older than they are. Because leftwing Boomers are still mentally children, they vote for impractical, pie-in-the sky political and social policies and they want Daddy-President to give it to them and make everything all right.

    Leftwing Boomers tried electing a magic negro to wave his wand over the USA and make everything bloom for them, and he failed to deliver. That cured them of ever voting for a black again. Harris flamed out badly, and Booker’s support is laughable. Boomers want their own bountiful, tribal Daddy back to make everything all right. The hostility to Sanders and Bloomberg on the part of many Boomer Democrats is because they sense these two are from the wrong tribe. Liberal WASPs realize they won’t represent WASP interests, and most liberal voters are still WASPS.

    Boomers, at heart, don’t trust themselves to run things right, and they’re correct about that. They’ve made an appalling mess of our institutions.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  75. Anon[151] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Harris was the opposite. She was more a moderate in her previous actions, but she tried to talk hardcore lefty when campaigning, and the real leftists didn’t trust her. She kept getting caught in lies about her positions.

  76. res says:
    @European-American

    Art Deco has been writing some especially good comments recently.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @HammerJack
  77. Bleuteaux says:
    @Lugash

    My experience is the exact opposite. Early Boomers, those born 1955 or earlier, many of which have managed to get out of the work force with intact pensions, enormous 401ks, cottages and Audis, are oblivious to what has happened. We had a nuclear bomb drop on the industrial economy the last 25 years but it hasn’t affected them.

    It’s the Boomers in their late 50s now who seem to sense that nothing is going right. Those with a few years left in the economy, terrified it will collapse.

    • Replies: @BB753
  78. Polymath says:
    @Justvisiting

    I’m an election pollster. Ann Selzer who runs the Iowa Poll is universally respected as the best in the business and her integrity is unquestioned. There is zero chance any kind of political motivations factored in to her decision.

    My best guess (based on info I’d rather not go into detail about) is that her call center, which she had previously been satisfied with, ran out of callers and subcontracted to another call center who lacked the same quality standards, without telling Selzer, and after it blew up she just couldn’t be confident that there weren’t other lapses and compromises arising from this or how widespread the problem was.

    These leaked numbers don’t surprise me but she was right to kill the poll.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Servant of Gla'aki
  79. @Steve Sailer

    Late LOL here, Steve. Good one. Just got back on.

    Actually Bernie is pretty damn old, right? Maybe he’s at the ass-end of the G.I.-tract …

    … generation.

  80. J1234 says:

    My older brother bought the Woodstock album in maybe 1970, and I’m pretty sure Sha-Na-Na had some of their music on it (it was a long time ago.) As a twelve year old who had no recollection of anything before the Beatles, I thought it was pretty cool. More masculine than the hippie stuff. Now, however, I’m amazed at how much their Woodstock performance looks like something out of a gay musical.

  81. Unless Tom Steyer manages to buy the nomination, and win, the 1950s will again be shut out for producing a president. (This assumes Trump isn’t removed; Pence was born in 1959.)

    The only other decades with no native presidents (can you be a native of a time rather than a place?) since Washington’s birth are the 1810s and the 1930s– and Dukakis, Hart, Paul, Buchanan, and Liz Dole are still with us. (Hell, so are Carter, Mondale, and Bob Dole from the ’20s!) And, of course, the 1970s and 1980s, but they have plenty of time.

    Here’s a scary thought– someone born in January 1990 will be eligible next time around.

    Yes, it’s an oxymoron, but here is a highly relevant trivia question:

    What do Steyer and Pence have in common with all the female candidates, but none of the other men? Hint: they share this with Steve, and Scott Adams.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
    , @HammerJack
  82. From CBS News:

    “An Iowa poll, long considered the most credible in the state and closely watched by political campaigns, will not be released Saturday night as planned. The poll from the Des Moines Register, CNN and Selzer & Co was set to be one of the final Iowa polls ahead of the state’s caucus on Monday.”

    Is this more Democratic Party skullduggery?

    The Dems are clearly out to do whatever they can to stop Sanders. Would this poll have shown him ahead and therefore, in the Dem mind, threaten to promote a Bernie-is-the-victor aura going into the poll, perhaps ultimately magnifying his margin based on a band-wagoning effect?

    I find the whole thing very suspicious, especially in the context of all the whining about how “unrepresentative” Iowa is.

    It’s fascinating to see how parallel the the DNC efforts to stop Sanders are with the RNC’s failed attempts to derail Trump in 2016.

    The voters are failing the government! We need a new electorate!

  83. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    RIP Mad Mike Hoare

    • Replies: @captflee
  84. @European-American

    Sadly, I came here looking for reactions to the Super Bowl…

    We watched the show this time.

    Half-time had been billed as a show of empowerment for women. Two Latinxes! Well, it was a stripper show of butts and c*nts, so it was an honest display of female empowerment.

    There was a football game, and some commercials too. We ate more fried food than we do in a year (which isn’t much.)

    I’m not complaining.

  85. @Steve Sailer

    Compared to Trump?

    You betcha.

  86. @res

    He’s only bad when he’s wrong, which isn’t often.

    Mere facts are gold in this medium.

  87. El Dato says:

    Forget the sixth extinction.

    This is the sixth election since the “hanging chads” super-fiasco and its onramp to the New American Century.

    What a rollercoaster ride it has been. Far surpassing any Ghost Train extravaganza.

    We weren’t happy with Bill Clinton productions and the Freeh/Reno surveillance/shoot-the-civvie FBI. We didn’t know what would happen. Plus, the Internet has taken a turn for the worse.

  88. El Dato says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Tits & ass & sultry glances? The sort of fempowerment I like.

    But how do we know they aren’t trans?

    Meanwhile Clown World Observer RT.com reports:

    Drag queens ‘make history’ in Super Bowl advert as Corporate America toes the line on virtue-signaling

    This week, the US marked yet another ‘cultural milestone’ as cross-dressing males were featured in an advert during Super Bowl LIV. Why are companies pandering to radical liberal agendas that risk alienating their consumer base?

    This week I stumbled headlong into one of those jarring headlines, courtesy of The Washington Post, that was impossible to walk away from without medical attention: ‘Drag queens will make Super Bowl history in a hummus commercial.’ It’s these sorts of stories that make me remember exactly how long I’ve been away from home.

    Someone out there can make a Jewish joke out of that, I’m sure.

  89. @Patrick in SC

    How we needed up with such a ridiculously drawn out process is a mystery, although I have a guess (below).

    Are you on a Kindle, too?

    My understanding is that the rest of the world, even countries with equally corrupt political systems, has election campaigns of a month and then it’s (mercifully over).

    I was taught that the UK’s parliamentary system was essentially a permanent campaign. Polls were constantly being taken, and when the government (i.e., administration) was doing particularly well, it would vote “no confidence” in itself and call an election. The opposition, and often the government itself, is perpetually in primary mode.

    If you’re sick of constant politics, parliamentarianism is not where to go for relief.

  90. @Bill

    Trump and Bloomberg are both weird exceptions to the rule.

    The problem with American politics is a sociological one. Given the way our system works, you have to decide at a rather inappropriately young age that you are “leadership class,” and then you have to get into the game of promoting yourself as a leader, before you’ve had any time at all to do anything noteworthy, to build any kind of character outside your resume-building gig of climbing the ladder, to engage or involve yourself in any meaningful way with the lives of the people you seek to rule. Or even to seriously study philosophy, political theory and the history of religion or the history of science, in order to be in a position to speak with any sort of authority about what is good, what is knowable, what is not knowable, what is noble and what, maybe, is true.

    Look at a guy like Pete Buttplug. He’s checked every single box that it’s possible to check, and yet he says and promotes ideas and things which are obviously false on their face. A teenage Mexican garage mechanic knows more home truths about American life than Mr. Buttplug.

    Or look at the positively hateful shrike Hillary Clinton. This woman (?) has devoted her entire life to being a walking resume, and she has literally failed at every single thing she has ever put her hand to; and yet this perpetually wrong failure as a woman, as a wife, as a mother, as a fake assistant president, as a senator, as a Secretary of State, as a two-time loser presidential candidate, this absolute utter failure, this bitter alcoholic train-wreck of a human being, somehow still thinks we should listen to her opinions.

    Go back to a Student Council, Pete and Hillary. The rest of us have a country to try and live in.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  91. Bill says:
    @Bill

    Continuing to think out loud, how about term limits? Are the people chosen in for life? Are they in for two or four years? If the former, then they become part of the swamp, de facto. If the latter, they will have no power at all—the unelected bureaucracy will rule. So, I guess the answer is somewhere in between.

  92. @Hypnotoad666

    the mind of a 14 year-old

    That’s when the female brain reaches maturity. We (wise women included) are finaly coming around to that realization after 50 years (at least) of folly. Can anyone name a female candidate who does better?

    • Disagree: Rob
    • Replies: @danand
  93. Pericles says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    They look a bit long in the tooth though. (Shakira (43); Hennifer (50).)

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  94. @Malcolm X-Lax

    Cultural appropriation is acceptable when (((they))) do it.

    • Replies: @peterike
  95. @Semi-Hemi

    The time would be 4 or 5 days before the general election.

  96. SC Rebel says:

    This election is going to come down to turnout.

    If Bernie gets screwed out of the nomination like he was in 16, his voters will most likely stay home. In 16, some stayed home but some voted Trump. I don’t think you will see as many Bernie supporters cross that line this time around.

    Bernie is really Trump’s worst nightmare because of his populist stances, which overlap with Trump’s, at least Trump 16. Bernie will hammer him on his broken promises. Some Trump voters, particularly in the rust belt would come back to the Dems.

    If Bernie survives and is the nominee, he becomes Trump 16. Upset special.

  97. @Art Deco

    The Giuliani plan was to make a splash in Florida…I don’t think he won a single delegate.

    Not only did he fail to win a single delegate, his total percentage of the 2008 Republican Presidential primary vote, came to 2.8 percent.

  98. keypusher says:
    @istevefan

    But the result of this is that whoever survives should be temperamentally prepared to become the president.

    I assume this is satire?

  99. danand says:

    “Is Obama going to endorse Biden?”

    No, but Obama will finally help Biden pick out a pair of sunglasses that best conceal early onset Alzheimer’s:

    I don’t think it can be overstated just how much damage the Senates televised Trump impeachment proceedings have done to Biden. Joe is toast, Obama knows that. Hunter on the other hand, now has pretty good name recognition, and everybody loves a redemption story; maybe 2032 post gender reassignment?

    FWIW, I’m really not too keen on making light of Alzheimer’s in general, and don’t have a visceral hate for poor Joe, but president for him is way beyond what principle, or is that ……pal, even Peter would consider advisable.

  100. keypusher says:
    @HunInTheSun

    How the hell did they get a slot? They even had a TV show later, briefly. There ought to be a conspiracy theory about this.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  101. @Thea

    It’s said that NY pols “don’t play well west of the Hudson” — and Bloomie doesn’t even play well west of the Hamptons. He is such a whiny gun-grabbing little wet blanket that “making it” to the debates might be the end for him, not the beginning.

    To be fair, he does have successful real-world experience — very rare among this Dem field — and was not a bad mayor. He might not be too bad if the US had a city-manager form of government, with Bloomie as manager while we get to keep a strong personality like Trump as Prez.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
  102. @HammerJack

    If Coronavirus is serious enough that it causes a collapse in the economy because it’s that fatal, Boomers will likely put aside their second concern (muh 401k) for their first concern (never having to face their mortality).

    They ain’t going to be pulling the lever for the party that insists America’s highest priority is More Sick Immigrants.

  103. I want everyone who insisted Kamala Harris was a deadly threat to Trump to self identify this election cycle so we can all know the quality of your opinions TIA.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @MEH 0910
  104. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @istevefan
    , @bomag
  105. @Steve Sailer

    To go by Strauss & Howe (Generations, The Fourth Turning) terminology, Steve, the pre-boomers would be of the “Silent Generation”,

    So Biden, Bernie, and Bloomberg are “Silent”?

    Oh no, this does not mean they are silent, it only means they were silent, back in the day. Now they’ve grown up – and speak their minds. So – everything’s just smooth ‘n’ rolling’ with these guys. Relax. Take it easy: Sha – Na – Na-na!

  106. Anonymous[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Adam Smith

    Well it’s a damn good place to start. Just mildly discounting the very fact Bloomberg took a foreign title is enough for me. This isn’t birther-light, it’s a glaring example of what we must point out and not accept as Americans.

    The left are losing their minds, calling President Trump; “Royalty”, or “A King”. “He’s abusing his Article 2 powers!” or “The president (sic) is a monarch now” etc.

    Do you think Bloomberg could get a majority of the Congress to consent? Cortez? Tlaib? Sheila Jackson Lee or any of the other garden variety commies? I doubt it.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
  107. @MEH 0910

    Wow! If this will not work (and it won’t) – nothing will (and it will!).

    • LOL: JMcG
  108. danand says:
    @Desiderius

    “Can anyone name a female candidate who does better?”

    Desiderius, why yes, yes I can. London Breed, current mayor of San Francisco. Breed knows what is most important. That’s right, you guessed it, a shiny new basketball stadium:

    London has the requisite bonafides to become the 1st SJW, POC, women president. She was raised by her grandmother. Her sister died of an overdose in 2006. Her brother, Napoleon Brown, was convicted of murder and is currently serving out a 44-year sentence (originally 42 years, but two years were added after Brown was caught doing heroin in prison).

    • Thanks: bomag
    • LOL: HammerJack
  109. @HammerJack

    At least the Italians got a little revenge in Barton Fink (compliments of the Cohen Bros, of course).

  110. lysias says:
    @Bill

    The Athenians avoided corruption in sortition by having a machine, a kleroterion, that randomly chose tokens representing people, and doing it publicly. Sort of the way our draft lottery worked.

    Aristotle describes the process in his “Constitution of the Athenians”.

  111. Barnard says:
    @istevefan

    Most of the time, dropping out has to do with poll numbers and running out of money. The candidates who drop out before the voting starts are the ones who have trouble sustaining fundraising. The Democrats in this cycle had debate participation criteria related to getting a large number of suckers to give you money.

    Scott Walker spent tons of money in the summer of 2015 because consultants were pushing him to do it and then couldn’t keep up with fundraising after the first debate and ended up dropping out. Meanwhile, Jeb still had plenty of cash when he dropped out after embarrassing showings in the vote New Hampshire and South Carolina. Based on the construction of the current system, donors play a large role in determining how long a candidate can go. It doesn’t have much to do with temperament.

  112. Does America have the world’s most protracted electoral process?

    Yes.

    Do we get much from the enormous amount of time we spend on it?

    We? No, but the media and political consultants get beaucoup bucks. This is why they are so Anti-Trump; he deprived the US election industry of a couple billion dollars in 2016.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  113. JimB says:

    Bloomberg will run on gun control and open borders, both loser issues with most of the flyover electorate. He seems to be proposing a do-over of the Hillary campaign against Trump, without the kind of fanatical backing Hillary could count on to energize the left. Moreover, he is not a credible populist so he won’t get the Hillbilly elegy vote either. I think at this point Sanders is poised to win the nomination, and the old democrat guard will rally around him. If Sanders adopts a pro-US labor point of view, threatens the SiV league (Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Alphabet, and Intel), and promises immigration reduction, he will be our next president.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
  114. J.Ross says:

    Nightmare out-of-touch “okay boomer” piece about two suicidal cultists. In Birmingham, England, but totally applies here.
    £6k = $7,893
    £220,000 = $289,404
    Just think, by becoming homeless and carless transients who must leech off their friends despite round the clock wageslaving, you too can go deeply into permanent debt in a ghetto!
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7943991/Couple-reveal-bought-home-complete-master-bedroom-aged-19-20.html
    But however for honest real talk though, why are young people unhappy?

  115. anon[296] • Disclaimer says:

    OT but not OT

    Women’s event disrupted by protestors. Must be Deplorables for sure?
    Nope. Antifa!

    The young Seattle Left attempting to disrupt a bunch of Boomer feminists over the issue of TERF’s and trans.

    The Dem national convention might be pretty LIT!

    • Replies: @Muggles
  116. @Justvisiting

    If the conspiracy theorists are correct and Biden finishes fourth, this will be one of the biggest upsets in American political history.

    The Klobe is surging, so Biden could actually come in 5th, LOL!

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
  117. @Thulean Friend

    Poor Bernie, trying to get some black votes. What was he supposed to do when those fat black women grabbed his microphone?

    Maybe body slam them and yell “outta my way, you fat black bitches”?? OK, unlikely but fun to picture.

    • LOL: Dan Hayes
  118. kihowi says:
    @AaronNYC

    Doesn’t everybody here secretly enjoy what a circus it is?

  119. @Malcolm X-Lax

    Speaking of Sha-Na-Na, the former lead singer “Bowser” has an interesting twitter feed. When I was a kid I assumed he was just some real NY Italian.

    Like Steven Tyler?

    From Bowzer’s Wikipedia page: “His nephew is Eric C. Bauman, chairman of the California Democratic Party."

    The fakest thing about Sha Na Na is its name. In the period they were recreating, no group would have used a singular mass noun like that. It was always the Thisses or the Thats. Or the Joe Blow Combo.

    The Kingston Trio or the Association was okay, as those are inherently plural, as are a Spoonful or a Cyrkle or Every Mother's Son more-or-less so. Various "Fives"– Dave Clark, We, The Count. But as late as 1966, the Who was pretty radically named.

    https://www.musicoutfitters.com/topsongs/1965.htm

    Within a year or two, you had Jefferson Airplane, Strawberry Alarm Clock, Buffalo Springfield, It's a Beautiful Day, Procol Harum

    Around that time, the Hunt family revived one of the worst practices in sports– the singular team name. The Dallas Tornado was formed in 1967, and they had to correct reporters all the time. Names like that had apparently died out with the Providence Steam Roller of the leather-helmeted NFL. The Crimson Tide was grandfathered in.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  120. @istevefan

    Democrats wouldn’t be competitive today without diversity

    On the national stage, without Hart-Celler the Democratic party wouldn’t even exist today.

  121. Abe says:
    @peterike

    A “black” quarterback just won the Super Bowl, so God’s in his heaven and all’s right with the world.

    Mahomes even laid out the reality for everyone in this quote: “For me, being a black quarterback — having a black dad and white mom — it just shows that it doesn’t matter where you come from.”

    Not as simple as you think. I read an article last week about Mahomes being “controversial” because of some pro-law enforcement, pro-George Zimmerman (yes, THAT George Zimmerman) social media posts he made several years back.

    Personally, since everything is going to get you cancelled no matter what (the only question is whether NOT celebrating gay pride month or Ta’Nieshi Coates half-birthday on Twitter gets you deplatformed this year, or in 2023) I’m going to recommend my my sons become social media outrage deflectors. Meaning, when some big shot has the Internet screaming for their heads, that’s the moment for them to do something completely legal yet way problematic and post it to Instagram, like shooting 3 lions on safari and then asking Twitter which 2 pelts least match the color scheme of his bonus room and should be tossed in a dumpster. “The name’s Abe Jr., social media deflector to the stars!”

    • LOL: Polynikes
    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Jack D
  122. Dtbb says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    They didn’t have to register for the draft.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  123. @Reg Cæsar

    What do Steyer and Pence have in common with all the female candidates, but none of the other men? Hint: they share this with Steve, and Scott Adams.

    Penises?

  124. Abe says:
    @black sea

    Our protracted electoral process twice gave HRC the time she needed to thwart her handlers, gurus, and script-writers and and self-sabotage all over the national stage.

    For that alone I am thankful.

    What I really need to know before rocking the vote is whether a candidate has ever fat-shamed someone, but especially if that someone is in the professional entertainment industry and so is most at-risk.

  125. istevefan says:
    @MEH 0910

    If you watch that Bernie video, at the 6 second point, Trump is shown giving a speech at a podium and then suddenly jumping in panic as though Bernie is behind him. In real life that footage was taken from a real rally in 2016 when Thomas DiMassimo, probably a Bernie Bro, tried to race the stage to attack Trump.

    For those who forgot about this event in 2016, here is a quick news @J.Ross

  • Anon[615] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    I think Sanders would lose big in the general like Corbyn did, barring some major economic and stock market collapse in the next several months.

    Sanders’ support, like Corbyn’s, is disproportionately young and non-white, who don’t turn out to vote as much as older and whiter voters.

    Trump is still very popular among his base and Republicans in general.

    Republicans and conservatives tend to be team players who support and follow their leaders and stick by them even when things aren’t great. This can be a good or bad trait. It’s the trait that, for example, made support George W. Bush and his military adventurism even if they probably should have known better regarding interventionism. In the context of the upcoming election, it means sticking by and supporting Trump simply because he’s “their guy”.

    “Socialism” has been an unpopular and scary brand in the US for the past century. Most Americans, especially older more likely voters, are fearful of it, even if they can’t explain what it means.

    • Replies: @Oscar Peterson
  • Abe says:
    @HammerJack

    From a grand tradition of Jewish actors playing Italian characters

    Andrew Dice Clay….

  • J.Ross says:
    @istevefan


    Remember that these people want you dead and they think it’s funny.

  • Jack D says:
    @Abe

    Mahomes is interesting in that he has a chocolate brown but an ultrablond mother (shockingly the parents are divorced – who ever heard of a black father leaving?) and he came out pretty close to white in skin tone (but with “bad” hair). He could pass for Puerto Rican.

  • @Reg Cæsar

    The Miami Heat? The Oklahoma City Thunder?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Reg Cæsar
  • J.Ross says:

    re Jewish actors playing Italians
    Bearded man attempts to enter girl’s room at park, is stopped by a guy who seriously hopes bearded man doesn’t do that, they fight, serious hope guy is now in legal trouble because bearded man says that he is a little girl and the government believes him. The Aristocrats. Bonus: serious hope guy is named Costanza.
    https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2019/09/09/trans-woman-lauren-jackson-anti-trans-attack-oregon/

  • @Servant of Gla'aki

    If we call the Senator for Minnesota by one name, I think it should be Char. You know, like Cher, only her name is Char.

  • @The Alarmist

    We? No, but the media and political consultants get beaucoup bucks.

    Like Tim Mynett, who got paid over $500k by Ilhan Omar and managed to become her boytoy:

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/02/02/report-ilhan-omar-paid-over-500000-to-alleged-lovers-firm/

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  • The Everly Brothers — a _real_ “Sha Na Na” — grew up about 2 miles from where I am preparing to attend the Iowa caucus. They got their start with one of the earliest radio stations, KMA. “KMA Land”, as it is still called by some “pre-Boomers”, elected Steve King before Iowa lost a Congressional seat due to demographics. Now KMA Land’s voice is drowned in Des Moines’s inclusion in its Congressional district. Before redistricting, the Republican representative, Young, was so “Libertarian” that he was able to raise campaign financing by appealing to the Trumpesque call for “More Legal Immigration” — to do agricultural jobs that “Americans won’t do”. I confronted him directly on this during the 2016 caucus when he showed up, predicting he’d never hold office again due to his stand on immigration. He won’t.

    We’ll be holding the caucus in an empty high school building — no longer needed as its small town is dying the same death as The Nation of Settlers.

    This year, I won’t be repeating the warning about the impending loss of elections due to treason by Republican “leadership”.

    I’ll be looking for volunteers to prepare for collapse by instituting Property Money, hence quasi autarky, at the county level. The State level is toast now that Gov. Reynolds has put out the call that more “refugees” be sent to Iowa.

  • J.Ross says:

    What the, it’s a real news story with thick documentation:
    https://nypost.com/2020/02/03/florida-prosecutors-release-trove-of-jeffrey-epstein-files/amp/
    OV,IAS!!
    https://nypost.com/2020/01/21/power-publicist-peggy-siegal-compares-coverage-of-her-epstein-ties-to-the-holocaust/amp/

    The case file includes three videos of a walk-through of Epstein’s Palm Beach estate, audio recordings of interviews with suspects and other internal documents related to the office’s investigation.

    http://www.sa15.state.fl.us/stateattorney/NewsRoom/indexPREpstein.htm

  • Hibernian says:
    @Jack D

    As I read this clause, there’s no problem if you already have the title before you go into Federal Government service. Bloomberg’s entire career so far has been private sector or municipal.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  • @Dutch Boy

    I think that PJB would have inevitably migrated to politics. He may have left the military after his 4-years as a commissioned ROTC officer was up. Or , as a dutiful Cold War warrior stayed in the military to assist in Vietnam. Buchanan was and is impressive and he likely would have impressed his superiors and those outside regardless. If he had not landed with Nixon he might have gone to work in Cal with Reagan, and his elective office political career may have started sooner and more successfully.

  • Daniel H says:
    @Anon

    If Trump were to lose, dear God, don’t give us a woke president. Bloomberg is one of the few unwoke candidates.

    Are you out of your flipping mind? Bloomberg is the absolute WORST candidate for President of the United States. Bloomberg is “woke” to an exponential degree in the matter that is most ominous and threating to us: race replacement. And his is smart, calculating and competent, and he hates you to boot. If Bloomberg were to win, the gleeful Cucks would join in with Bloomberg and the left-tards and bring about immediate and permanent open borders. Bernie Sanders is a heaven sent angel in comparison.

    Your type is almost as bad as a Cuck. Apathetic, indifferent, trusting, a believer in American exceptionalism. Listen dude, when you go to the voting booth, don’t think. Just do as instructed by those more aware and learned over here. Jeeesh.

  • Jack D says:
    @Hibernian

    So Prince Harry could run for Senate once he moves to LA and becomes an American citizen and still be Prince Harry?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  • @The Wild Geese Howard

    OMG, it would take a lot more for me to do that.

  • MEH 0910 says:
    @Kennyko

    2. Ultimately Warren will be the next president

  • @SC Rebel

    Nah.

    Bernie cannot square the circle of “we are going to tax you more and pay for more gimmedats for illegals” with Rust Belters. He’s memed himself into another coastal candidate without the support of neoliberal globohomo.

    He can’t explain how he’s going to pay for what he’s proposing, except to demand to know how the interviewer knows it’s going to cost so much.

    Trump is BERNIE’S worst nightmare – the man is not afraid to go to the mat and play the culture war card that would have a Mitt Romney sniffing disdainfully about.

    Let me tell you what the general is going to look like with Bernie: A bunch of astroturf groups from Soros et al with names like “Blacks/Latinos/Trans for Justice and Rights” charging the podium and making it about their personal pet issue and Bernie nodding along like a blinkered fish looking incredibly weak. Remember black tranny screaming about “murder epidemics” during the first or second Dem debates? That’s gonna be every Bernie rally : some fringe weirdo demanding their pet issue be a center point of the campaign. I expect Trump to pick up more states this time.

  • Muggles says:
    @anon

    >>Women’s event disrupted by protestors. Must be Deplorables for sure?
    Nope. Antifa!<<

    Re: this disruption by Antifa in Seattle. A few weeks ago a supposed ultra left grouplet (Progressive Communists or something equally insane) crashed a local campaign event for some local Dem progressive candidate for a state legislative office. Chased people away, wrecked stuff, wore masks and later posted their rationale that these kind of Dems were only play acting at revolution.

    Since these outfits are sometimes run by, or staffed with cops/FBI, hard to say how authentic this was. Strange for Texas (only in Austin!) to see that. Too many armed people around. Of course these silly progs hate guns, so the violent lefties took advantage of that.

    I think there is jealousy on the tiny hard Left about all the publicity these progs are getting. Of course the "true communists" don't have a political party since that requires years of grunt work and money. Just ask any Libertarian Party member. So these Red Guards (as the Austinites style themselves) can only make a splash by vandalizing Bernie Bros and similar. That will work until the Woke wake up and start shooting/beating up these crazies. I think the police informants may try to head this off, but who knows? Better dead than Red.

  • @Polymath

    I’m an election pollster. Ann Selzer who runs the Iowa Poll is universally respected as the best in the business and her integrity is unquestioned. There is zero chance any kind of political motivations factored in to her decision.

    I’m willing to take all that on faith.

    But is it not still possible that Ms. Selzer could be overruled?

  • @Bill P

    I think if Sanders gets the nomination , he can certainly win many White blue collar voters whom Trump won in 2016 , but has since neglected and disappointed. But Trump may still win by winning the (Bill) Clinton suburban liberals

    Many suburban liberals are Clintonian liberals and prefer 2% liberalism versus Sanders “whole” liberalism. They don’t want to dilute their health plans by sharing into a single payer system. The suburban liberal at the heart of the “coalition of the fringes “ does not wasn’t to share their “fringe” benefits won by their union or monopolistic employer. They don’t want the stock market to crash. Trump can at least suppress their inclination to vote Bernie.
    This incoherence of White working class voters backing Bernie whilst Trump wins over some of the comfortable smug suburban lefties exemplifies that political identity is up for grabs as we near our “end of empire “ era.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    , @Jack D
  • JohnnyD says:

    I think Sanders started off as an old-school leftist, but he’s had to adopt some of the New Left’s views on immigration, race, and LGBT stuff. The old-left was too white and masculine for today’s left.

  • @Anon

    Sanders’ support, like Corbyn’s, is disproportionately young and non-white,

    That’s true of the entire Democratic Party and, and his non-white support is not as great as Biden or Warren or Hilary.

    Yet, they’re all scared of him. Another anti-Bernie meme–here being propagated by today’s Politico:

    Bernie Sanders once compared poor white Vermonters to black South Africans suffering under apartheid. At other times, he likened the plight of some working people as well as imported foreign laborers to slavery.

    Now that Sanders is rising in the polls and expected by many to win Iowa, rival Democrats are bringing to light his decades-old comments in an effort to question the senator’s stances on race and to underscore the challenges he has had with black voters.

    • Replies: @lysias
  • Kronos says:
    @bomag

    Naw, she got wiped out by the Clinton establishment.

  • Bernie Sanders is a Sidney Lumet Aardvark Talking Jew who got the phuck out of New York City when the Lumet type meltdown in New York City was getting extra crispy crazy man. Vermont is lovely, dark green and deep — in the summer — and you must go miles towards the population centers to see Blacks or non-Whites that go beep beep beep.

    Bernie Sanders loves to live around the English and French and Irish and Germans and other NORTHERN EUROPEAN WHITEY in Vermont. Bernie Sanders moved to Vermont to avoid having to live around Blacks and other non-Whites in New York City.

    Hillary Clinton moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York, in order to avoid having to live around Blacks or other non-Whites.

    Hark!

    Bernie Sanders be the one who broke our heart. Bernie once declaimed the powerful truth that borders that yet be open were a Koch Boy plot to lower wages and attack American workers.

    Bernie recanted his pro-worker and patriotic immigration restrictionist curses against the Koch Boys under the spell of coalitional pressure of the watery deep of presidential politics.

  • JMcG says:
    @Houston 1992

    I’m blue collar. I hunt up and down the east coast with other mostly blue collar guys. I interact with lots of blue collar guys in duck blinds and in their local bars. Now, that’s not exhaustive by any means at all; but I have never, ever met a Bernie Sanders supporter in any of those places. Trump is more popular with his base than he has ever been. I just don’t see where blue collar support for Bernie is coming from? Municipal workers?

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
  • @Anonymous

    But Sha-Na-Na would in a weird way fit in better with the punk and rockabilly aesthetics of a decade later. What was lame in 1969 would be the height of cool circa 1979, albeit with heavier chords and a few more tattoos.

  • Jack D says:
    @Justvisiting

    If the conspiracy theorists are correct and Biden finishes fourth, this will be one of the biggest upsets in American political history.

    No it won’t. Biden is the preferred candidate of low information, low involvement voters (in English this is pronounced “black”). Iowa rewards the opposite so naturally he is not going to do well there.

    I saw an interview with former DNC chairman Ed Rendell yesterday. He posed the following Socratic question : How much does the vote of a highly committed [Bernie Bro] voter count? 1 vote. And how much does the vote of an apathetic [black] voter count if she shows up to vote? Also 1 vote.

    We don’t weight votes according to how excited you are about your candidate (except in Iowa).

  • Kronos says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It seems like general fear of an re-emergent “Old Left.” Many War Babies/Boomer Leftists celebrated (Bernie wasn’t invited) the cashing in of workers rights/jobs for bigger stock portfolios. Both Tony Blair and Bill Clinton were the embodiment of the New Labor/New Democrat Wing.

    This is a excerpt from Philip Roth’s “The Human Stain.” One that details the fictional free market economist Arthur Sussman.

    His model, as she interprets it for him, is based on a notion of radical personal liberty that, in his thinking, is reduced to a radical sovereignty in the market. The surplus and Social Security—those are the two issues that are bugging him, and they talk about them all the time. He seems to hate Clinton most for proposing the Democratic version of everything he wanted. “Good thing,” he tells her, “that little squirt Bob Reich is out of there. He’d have Clinton spending billions of dollars retraining people for jobs they could never occupy. Good thing he left the cabinet. At least they have Bob Rubin there, at least they have one sane guy who knows where the bodies are buried. At least he and Alan kept the interest rates where they had to be. At least he and Alan kept this recovery going . . .”

    The problem now for neoliberal Democrats is they moved too fast and placed too much reliance on the Baby Boomers.

  • Jack D says:
    @Houston 1992

    The suburban liberal at the heart of the “coalition of the fringes “ does not wasn’t to share their “fringe” benefits won by their union or monopolistic employer.

    What % of suburban liberals work nowadays in unionized workplaces? Outside the government sector, nil. Inside the government sector, these people trust government and are not opposed to government health care.

    Suburban liberal white ladies hate Trump with a passion. All those ladies at the Pussy Hat rally are not going to vote for Trump even if he sends the Dow to 60,000. They would burn down their own house if they thought that would defeat Trump.

    This is part of the culture wars. The suburbs have turned decisively left and are not coming back. What would it take to get Dr. Professor Christine Blasey Ford to vote for Trump?

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
  • @Jack Henson

    Kamala Harris was seen as effectively running to be Biden’s VP.

    She probably blew it by attacking Biden then crashing and burning.

    She endorsed Biden after she dropped out of the race. Apparently she thinks she still has a chance at the VP slot.

    A certain lady from Georgia is also vying for the VP slot, and says she will be president by 2040. I won’t mention her name to avoid triggering some of you. You can figure it out. Hint: she’s not the governor.

  • MEH 0910 says:
    @Jack Henson

    I want everyone who insisted Kamala Harris was a deadly threat to Trump to self identify this election cycle so we can all know the quality of your opinions TIA.

    I’ll identify Tiny Duck:

    Tiny Duck says:
    July 5, 2019 at 6:11 pm GMT

    Kamala Harris will win the erection

    The majority of People support “wokeness” and are committed to taking down white men

    Tiny Duck says:
    August 9, 2019 at 3:10 am GMT

    Just another mediocre white ma’am

    This is why Kamala Harris will be the next president

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  • George says:

    “The three Bs of the Democrats are all in their late 70s ”

    Kind of like the Soviet Union in the 1980s just before the fall.

    Leonid Brezhnev was 74 in 1980 (General Sec of the USSR in 1964) died in office
    Yuri Andropov took office at the age 68 died in office
    Konstantin Chernenko took office at the age of 73 died in office
    Mikhail Gorbachev was 54 when he took office in 1985 and was the last Soviet leader.

    Bernie and Biden look awful to the point of being comical, Warren and Trump seem ok given their age. Gabbard is the only candidate that I trust to go up a few flights of stairs. What’s crazy is these old people are pretending they are in their 50s or younger.

    Back in the day candidates mostly just stayed home, and gave interviews from there, and we have the internet today. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_porch_campaign

  • @Paleo Liberal

    This is not the same as the people who were insisting Harris was going to be the 2020 nominee and give Trump a run for his money.

    iSteve’s commentariat is good about esoteric subjects, 23andMes of dead people, and golf course architecture. 2020 is going to be a repeat of 2016 with commenters bungling from pronouncement to pronouncement being deathly wrong each time.

  • @MEH 0910

    Hold Kamala Harris closer, Tiny Ducky. Count the White Flighters out in Chappaqua.

  • @Jack D

    Jack
    Union is limited to public sector and teacher unions but that is a large number of people with platinum plated benefit packages. And they don’t want to share those benefits —just as they believe in male -female equality , but don’t want their daughters to have to register for the draft because their sense of equality does not include equal burden sharing.
    We will have to disagree about whether most of those Neo-Clintonian suburban liberals will embrace a socialism that comes out of their pockets.

  • BB753 says:
    @Bleuteaux

    Boomer is too broad a definition. IMHO, the generation that were 16 to 26 years old in 1965 and 18 to 29 years old in 1970 are the real hippie Boomers. Thus people born between 1941 to 1952. Of couse, here Boomer is to be understood as a generation with a common culture and who lived the late sixties fully.
    All those people are now retired or dead or in politics now.

  • frankie p says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Excellent dual meet, and props to T&T Brands for Iowa’s victory. The match that you posted, Kemerer defeating Mark Hall, was the pivotal match. I guess it should be mentioned that Kemerer and many of Iowa’s hammers are from Pa., the powerhouse of high school wrestling in the US. I should also mention that PSU already had their dual meet winning streak ended earlier this season against Arizona State. Finally, to coaches and teams, the real deal is the big dance in March, the NCAA tournament. Cael has a magic way of getting his wrestlers to peak during March for the tournament, and although Iowa will be favored, it should still be a great team race.

    Frankie P

  • frankie p says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    I forgot to agree with you completely about the sport of wrestling, a heritage American sport for sure, not caught up in the greed and celebrity game, still instilling real American values in the participants, values like hard work, persistence, humility, and sportsmanship. I love everything about wrestling, both folkstyle and freestyle (not such a big fan of greco). I guess it’s also no big surprise that countries like Iran, Russia, Azerbaijan, eastern Europe, China, Japan and India, all traditional nationalistic countries that would never be described as “woke”, excel in the sport.

  • @JMcG

    Bernie can plausibly win those Blue Collar Whites who voted for Obama twice. Trump seemed to care and he promised , but what has he delivered to those folks ?
    Some will also think that if the system is going to crash then they may as well get some freebies while the getting is good. When folks at the bottom note that there is no fiscal discipline at the top then they become as cynical and embrace a boondoggle program—they reason that it will be better than any Republican alternative

  • MEH 0910 says:
    @Kennyko

    2. Ultimately Warren will be the next president

    saira rao Retweeted:

    Agree: Tiny Duck Kennyko

  • @Pericles

    We weren’t looking at their teeth

  • bomag says:
    @MEH 0910

    Interesting that he paints Trump; the Dems; and the Swamp as the Establishment to be defeated.

    Echoes of what Trump did in 2016. At least Bernie or a staffer learned something.

    I’m wondering if the shambling old man thing hurts or helps: it’s partly a comfort to vote for the reliable old uncle; but there’s no pizzazz in his looks.

  • @SC Rebel

    Strongly agree. I think Bernie and Trump both send powerful signals-eff the status quo.
    I know-personally-a dozen Sanders turned Trump voters. And I’m sure I know many more but they are afraid to divulge that they *soto voce* voted trump

  • Coemgen says:
    @Known Fact

    If only Bloomberg would run as the other anti-Globalism candidate.

    If only.

  • @Malcolm X-Lax

    I think Adam Sandler was the one who blew the whistle on Bowser.

    Of course, I remember him as the host of the Hollywood Squares on the Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour in 1983-84.

  • lysias says:
    @Oscar Peterson

    Sanders took part in Martin Luther King’s March on Washington. As an undergraduate, he helped to integrate the University of Chicago.

    • Replies: @keypusher
  • @Art Deco

    Candidates who’ve avoided the earliest contests and sought to establish themselves in somewhat later contests (e.g. the Florida primary) have not in the past performed well. See, for example, Rudolph Giuliani, who was leading in national polls in December 2007. The Giuliani plan was to make a splash in Florida. The comment of one of his staff was ‘we’re either the smartest guys in the room or the dumbest guys in the room’. I don’t think he won a single delegate.

    Candidates have traditionally needed to place well in IA and NH because that’s how they kept the fundraising spigots open. Bloomberg doesn’t need anybody else’s money. That’s why he has a shot at the title. His ads are literally unavoidable, if you watch any TV station or streaming channel that runs ads. And then there’s the 1000-man campaign staff he’s put on the payroll. He is hiring serious talent:

    $375,000 salaries, furnished housing and a lot of sushi: Inside Bloomberg’s spending spree

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/01/31/michael-bloomberg-fec-spending-spree-110144

    • Replies: @lysias
  • @RickinJax

    Pretty sure Churchill was only granted US citizenship a few months before he died in 1964.
    He hadn’t been PM since 1955.

    Churchill’s mother, Jennie Jerome, was American, so he could likely have claimed U.S. citizenship “by transmission” at any point in his life, if he had chosen to do so. The law governing the right is complex, and the rules kept changing over his lifetime, so it’s possible he couldn’t have.

    https://hk.usconsulate.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/266/2017/04/transmission_tables.pdf

  • @Abe

    Excellent example. Clay is a highly ethnocentric self-identifying Jew outside of his “Dice” character.

  • ia says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    in which the Iowa Hawkeyes finally beat the long-dominant Nittany Lions.

    LOL.

    Ever heard of Dan Gable?

    “From 1976 to 1997, Gable was the head wrestling coach at the University of Iowa. Gable’s teams compiled a dual meet record of 355–21–5. He coached 152 all-Americans, 45 national champions, 106 Big Ten Champions and 12 Olympians, including eight medalists.

    His teams won 21 Big Ten Conference championships, and 15 NCAA Division I titles.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Gable

    • Replies: @frankie p
  • @Art Deco

    Candidates who’ve avoided the earliest contests and sought to establish themselves in somewhat later contests (e.g. the Florida primary) have not in the past performed well. See, for example, Rudolph Giuliani, who was leading in national polls in December 2007. The Giuliani plan was to make a splash in Florida. The comment of one of his staff was ‘we’re either the smartest guys in the room or the dumbest guys in the room’. I don’t think he won a single delegate.

    Bloomberg is gunning for Biden’s slot. He’s got the dough to make himself a household name among Democratic voters. Sanders and Warren, at #2 and #3 respectively, have got the socialist vote divided up. When Biden runs out of cash and crashes out, Bloomberg, currently at #4, will be waiting to pick up his voters.

    https://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2020/president/us/2020_democratic_presidential_nomination-6730.html

  • Ian Smith says:
    @HammerJack

    I rather liked the Fonz, and generally find Winkler likable even when he plays morally ambiguous characters (ex. the acting coach in Barry.)

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  • lysias says:
    @Johann Ricke

    Who still watches television? I have yet to see a Bloomberg ad.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  • Probably the favorite band at Woodstock of Biden, Bernie, and Bloomberg was Sha-Na-Na.

    Nah! It would have been Country Joe Biden and the Israelites. Trump probably dug Melanie.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  • @Paleo Liberal

    A good candidate for VP would be Val Demings, the Congresswoman from Orlando. She is one of the impeachment managers from the House, and was a former Orlando chief of police.

    She is very down to earth and a good speaker, is ideal for attacking Trump, and might conceivably help to deliver the key marginal state of Florida. Being black she is well place to get a good black turnout, which might tip the balance in the general. Being a former cop she will be good for the law-and-order crowd. Being married with children is another bonus.

    Certainly a much sounder choice than Sarah Palin ever was.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  • peterike says:
    @Neo-Socratic

    Cultural appropriation is acceptable when (((they))) do it.

    Yup. Just ask Ralph Lauren (Lifshitz), the uber WASP stylist.

  • frankie p says:
    @ia

    Cael ain’t done yet, and he has what, 7 titles in 8 years? Nobody doubts or challenges the fact that Dan Gable is the best and most dominant NCAA coach in history; I think that John Burns is referring to more recent history.

  • Hibernian says:
    @Jack D

    No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

    “Holding,” and “accept,” are both present tense. Therefore, it appears to only apply to accepting the title while holding Federal office. I’d say the answer to your question is “yes.” Also I wouldn’t put it past California to not mind having a “Senator Prince Harry,” or a “Prince Senator Harry,” whichever you’d like to call him.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  • @AaronNYC

    Everyone does “just vote on a single day” in federal elections. It’s called “Election Day” and it is statutorily set as “the Tuesday next after the first Monday in the month of November” every even-numbered year (e.g., 1992, 1994…2020….).

    In my experience, most states arrange their own elections to coincide with the day of the federal elections to the greatest feasible extent for efficiency’s sake.

    However do you have it in your head that “the whole country” does not “just vote on a single day?” Are you daft? Do you perhaps not understand partisan, primary nominations are not proper elections? If you are arguing against political parties and their primary nominations and all their other bullshit, I entirely agree they should be done away with, root and branch.

    But please don’t write goofy things like you did; readers may infer you are … touched.

  • @Dave Pinsen

    Where my parents met. Go Herd!

    My aunt was supposed to be on the plane.

  • @Jonathan Mason

    Being dressed in coats two sizes too large will gwt her the votes of pop-stars and children.

  • MBlanc46 says:

    I’ll take Danny and the Juniors.

  • Welcome to the team, Chuck.

    We will win.

  • Anonymous[333] • Disclaimer says:

    Iowa, 2020:

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  • Whiskey says: • Website
    @JimB

    Thats not the campaign Sanders is running. He’s running racial socialism. Open borders, get Whitey, all Black crime is legal ala the Purge movies.

    Thats why he is surging. Sandernista. Hispanics love the message your stuff White man Belongs to them.

    Likely the favorite over Trump if Dems don’t sabotage him. it’s a White minority nation now. Dems know Sanders can win. They fear a general Purge of non-white elites under him.

    • Replies: @JimB
  • @Dave Pinsen

    The Miami Heat? The Oklahoma City Thunder?

    They’d have fit right in at the World Football League. With the Sun, the Fire, the Express, the Bell, the Storm, and another Thunder. People in the sports biz thought this was “cool”. Always a bad sign.

  • @Anonymous

    Everyone I have ever talked to who was actually at Woodstock …

    Did you verify their tickets?

    Attendance figures always seem to increase with inflation after these events.

  • @Anonymous

    Frank Zappa loved doo-wop music.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  • @lysias

    Who still watches television? I have yet to see a Bloomberg ad.

    The $500m spent on Superbowl ads (including $11m million by Trump) suggests that there remains a fairly TV big audience. Or maybe the big brands don’t understand their market and could stand to save big money on advertising expense.

  • Jack D says:

    As of 11:30 PM EST:

    Democratic campaign: “It’s clear that something has gone wrong”
    From CNN’s Jeff Zeleny

    Iowa Democratic Party officials are hunkered down in their war room tonight, with presidential campaigns in the dark over the delay in the reporting of caucus results.

    Officials from two Democratic campaigns tell CNN they were told the app to tabulate results had crashed. They said they had not been given any other information.

    Representatives of presidential campaigns are not invited into the state party’s war room, which is standard practice. But as the night wore on without word, “It’s clear that something has gone wrong.”

    Rooshians? Joe Biden fixing the vote? Indian H1-B programmers? Welcome to Clown World!

    • Replies: @captflee
  • @res

    Even I have to agree with this. And I don’t agree with anything! He has raised his game lately. And people are sitting up and taking notice!!! 😉

  • @Anonymous

    1,000 proof AWFL

    Nemesis with an elbow off the top rope

  • Looks like all the competent people in the state have gone over to Trump already.

  • @Ian Smith

    Yeah the Fonz is why I put “generally” in that sentence. He was a hero, of a kind. Though personally I found him annoying.

  • @Johann Ricke

    Advertising budgets are like Defense budgets.

  • @anon

    How come US Ambassadors (after a period of time) get to have a title for life?
    Does not this violate the Constitution as well?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  • @Dtbb

    They didn’t have to register for the draft.

    Exactly. I wondered who’d get it. We’re you born in those magic months?

    To hell with this “generation” analysis. The real dividing line (other than sex) is 1955. Those born before then faced an active draft.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  • captflee says:
    @Jack D

    Surely the devious work of the latter day Tsar, no? Maybe Boeing transferred some diverse code monkeys from their Augering In division to someone doing voting software ?

    Think I’ll go make some popcorn. Once again, my imagination is nowhere near good enough to make this crap up. What a time to be alive!

  • Dtbb says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I noted one of your earlier comments. I turned 18 during Reagan’s first term. I registered for the draft and for the Democrat party simultaneously.

  • Kirt says:

    Iowa Democratic caucuses – the Russians strike again! Well played, Vlad baby!

  • captflee says:
    @Anonymous

    Helluva life for the son of a Hooghly pilot. A Chartered Accountant, legendary merc, and a centenarian to boot! We shall not see his like again.

    Ave atque vale!

  • Jack D says:
    @Five Daarstens

    First of all, calling someone “Ambassador” when they are no longer an Ambassador is just a courtesy and not a rank conferred by the government.

    2nd , a “Title of Nobility” is , #1 hereditary – you can pass it on to your children and #2 confers certain lands or privileges and is not merely an honorific title. So “Kentucky Colonel” is not a title of nobility.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  • @Jack D

    My wife is a Kentucky Colonel. Alas our sons were born Buck Privates.

  • anon[343] • Disclaimer says:

    Iowa caucusing is seriously screwed up. CSPAN has camera crew in a West Des Moines caucus at a high school where the precinct captains will get to give their elevator speech, right now it’s a Boomer pencilneck for Biden. This is like high school StuGo on steroids.

    Clown world!

  • @HammerJack

    The Costanzas are supposed to be Italian Catholics; his father, for example, is a member of the Knights of Columbus. I suspect the family were crypto-Jews in the old country.

    Julia Louis-Dreyfus is of course a filthy rich Jewess, but her character, Elaine Benes, has the name of the Czech prime minister, and her father was played once by the ultra-macho Lawrence Tierney (pre Reservoir Dogs).

    Kramer seems Jewish in name and appearance (other than height) but Michael Richards is a Catholic and a Mason.

    I suspect there was a deliberate attempt to confuse the ethnicity of the characters (except for Jerry, of course).

    • Replies: @black sea
  • @Johann Ricke

    Wouldn’t be the first time clever big companies spent themselves into oblivion. Ask Detroit.

  • black sea says:
    @James J OMeara

    According to the Seinfeld cast, NBC didn’t want the show to be too Jewish. Larry David wound up writing for Jewish characters — what else could he write — but gave them thinly-conceived gentile backgrounds. One could say that, with the exception of David Putty, they didn’t try very hard.

  • @Buzz Mohawk

    I thought it was a very good half-time show, very professional, funny, and sassy. An amazing number and range of styles and songs and numbers in a short time. Shakira stole the show for me by playing the guitar, with a Led Zeppelin riff no less, and later playing the drums.

    It’s a bit silly to be happy about what wasn’t there, but I was grateful there was little or no politics, or else so subtle I missed it. Puerto Rican flag along with the American one, Born in the USA, Latin music and culture in Miami (also Arab and African), middle-aged women still sexy and fit and just a little bit shocking, working well together — this is all good stuff.

    Both well done and perfectly unremarkable, whew, something to be appreciated in this age of much ado about nothing.

    I had to watch it again to make sure it was fine, because, let’s face it, I wasn’t watching it all that closely when it came on, what with the drinking and snacking and bs-ing with friends during the whole game.

  • duncsbaby says:
    @keypusher

    How the hell did they get a slot? They even had a TV show later, briefly. There ought to be a conspiracy theory about this.

    That damn Sha-Na-Na show ran for four years. I seem to remember my local channel running it after SCTV was over on Friday nights. Which of course meant there was now absolutely nothing good to watch. I hated 50’s rock’n’roll at that age. Now I love it, especially doo-wop, but then all I wanted to hear was new wave and/or heavy metal depending on what teenage phase I was going through at the time.

    • Replies: @BB753
  • @Lot

    In UK university discos circa 1975/6 Danny and the Juniors “At The Hop” would absolutely hit the spot and cram the dancefloor towards the end of the night.

    Even though it was music “from a different era” pre-Beatles and rock, it was high-energy dance music for people who have drink taken. Around that time I saw both Bill Haley and Chuck Berry doing university shows, which was interesting as a load of scary Teds came out of the woodwork for the evening, we thought they’d died out in 1960 (this was before rockabilly existed).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teddy_Boy

    Later in the decade student DJs went further back and discovered stuff like Louis Jordan.

    On the primary, is it right that Robby Mook, Hillary’s data guru, did the software which is “apparently” causing problems? Maybe that poll rumour is right, Biden IS fourth and they are desperately fiddling the figures? After Hillary, who trusts the DNC to be fair?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  • keypusher says:
    @lysias

    No, he didn’t, because the University of Chicago was not segregated. It had segregated housing, which he protested against.

  • JimB says:
    @Whiskey

    Sander’s frail health and likely demise during a first year in office means his VP choice is critical to guaranteeing his socialist agenda actually gets implemented.

  • JMcG says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    That may be the worst thing anyone has ever said about our President. How dare you, sir!

  • @YetAnotherAnon

    Mook is only tangentially related.

    This has CIA Pete/Burn After Reading all over it.

    What luck to have Keystone Secret Kops.

  • Damore’s revenge:

    Heckuva job, IDPOLie!

  • Thatgirl says:

    I read once that the performance of Sha Na Na at Woodstock was actually the most transgressive of all the performances. With its energy, irony and anti-hippie ethos, it was the beginning of punk rock.

  • Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian

    It would be funnier than hell if Prince Harry wound up in the US House or Senate or a governor’s mansion while Big LMM wound up Lady Hynde of the House of Lords.

  • BB753 says:
    @duncsbaby

    Sha-na-na produced the best songs on the LP
    “Grease” (the film soundtrack) along with the Bee Gees.

  • Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    He liked authentic doo wop music, especially LA steezer doo wop, which was a thing. Cruising with Ruben and the Jets

    Cruising with Ruben & the Jets
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Cruising with Ruben & the Jets is the fourth studio album by the Mothers of Invention. Released on December 2, 1968, on Bizarre and Verve Records with distribution by MGM Records, it was subsequently remixed by Frank Zappa and reissued independently.

    As with the band’s previous three albums, it is a concept album, influenced by 1950s doo wop and rock and roll. The album’s concept deals with a fictitious Chicano doo wop band called Ruben & the Jets, represented by the cover illustration by Cal Schenkel, which depicts the Mothers of Invention as anthropomorphic dogs. It was conceived as part of a project called No Commercial Potential, which produced three other albums: Lumpy Gravy, We’re Only in It for the Money and Uncle Meat.

    The album and its singles received some radio success, due to its doo wop sound. The band Ruben and the Jets were named after this album.

    was his ‘tribute” to the genre.

    What he thought specifically about Sha-Na-Na I don’t know, but they were considered weak sauce even then by the diehard fans of the genre for the most part. And the kind of guys who still liked doo wop in 1969 weren’t too typical of Woodstock attendees.

    Most doo wop fans are the guys who grew up at the specific time it was big and stayed with it, and are dying off now.

    Tangentially, there is another Chuck Berry biopic coming out:

    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/chuck-berry-new-documentary-trailer-870443/

    Chuck Berry’s 60th birthday concert and the drama surrounding it were captured in Hail! Hail! Rock ‘n’ Roll, one of the greatest music films of all time. But Berry’s life has never been covered onscreen. That changes with Chuck Berry, a film directed and produced by Jon Brewer, which will premiere October 4th at the Nashville Film Festival.

    In a new trailer released today, several rock & roll legends reflect on what Berry meant to them: “He was the most important guitarist in rock history,” George Thorogood says. Nile Rodgers talks about how Berry “turned the guitar into a percussive instrument.” “You could almost say that Chuck Berry invented the teenager,” says Steven Van Zandt.

    In a statement, Jason Padgitt, the executive director of Nashville Film Festival, said, “Chuck Berry is an icon who uniquely combined his genius, style and attitude to inspire, diversify and excite the world while redefining modern popular music. In that spirit, we are thrilled to host the world premiere of Chuck Berry during the Nashville Film Festival’s 50th anniversary in Music City, where we proudly celebrate the best of film, music, and culture in one of the world’s longest running film festivals.”

    Berry is at turns a genuine cultural-musical genius and a TNB Negro, who was jailed numerous times for general n**acy, evaded jail on other beefs (like putting TV cameras in the ceilings of the women’s shitters at the old Southern Air restaurant outside St. Louis-I drove past it hundreds of time) and famously used to like to degrade white groupies by pissing, farting and shitting on them. He taped himself doing it, too, and it was actually one of the very first celebrity sex tape “leaks”: Al Goldstein sold video tapes of it along with the Go-Go’s baiting an English roadie and the Rob Lowe footage, all to the ten-year-old-who-just-found-out-about-sex play-by-play Goldstein talks over.

  • Dissident says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is just our version of having a king or a royal family to speculate about, write plays about, and complain about.

    Who is our Shakespeare?

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  • @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Patty Smith is gross. Now respond to this post and we will have exactly the same number. Of posts.

  • BB753 says:
    @Dissident

    “Who is our Shakespeare?”
    Maya Angelou or Toni Morrison? Lol!

  • @Dissident

    “Who is our Shakespeare?”
    Perhaps Hollywood and the mainstream media.

    This is not to say that all it produces is good,
    but simply that the screen, large or small, is our Globe Theatre.

    Where we watch actors in name and not,
    play endlessly at presidential dramas.

    Real and unreal,
    but mostly the latter.

  • @Anonymous

    One of the most divisive tricks played upon man is this idea that there is a “left” and a “right”.

    Possibly the greatest, most detrimental trick ever played upon the hearts and minds of man is this idea that “government” exists, when in fact and reality “government” or “the state” is a legal fiction, that does not exist.

    This is why statists are the most dangerous, violent people on earth. People who believe in imaginary things cannot be reasoned with. People who believe in the state will commit atrocities. They can not help it. It is in their nature. They are detached from objective reality.

    Statists are insane, dangerous, sweaty toothed madmen who can never be trusted.

    Otherwise I completely agree with your assessment and I appreciate your moxy.

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