The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Fighting Climate Change vs. Equity
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Fighting climate change via green energy is the most important thing in the world, except, of course, for hiring more black women to climb up hundreds of feet in the air to repair windmill turbines in the name of equity.

C’mon, people, priorities!

From USA Today:

As clean energy jobs grow, women and Black workers are at risk of being left behind

Charisse Jones, USA TODAY
Sat, September 11, 2021, 10:52 AM·5 min read

Women and Black workers are vastly underrepresented in the clean energy workforce, an industry that pays higher-than-average wages and is the fastest-growing source of jobs in the U.S., according to a new report by a coalition of energy organizations.

Clean energy jobs, which range from creating electric cars to making buildings more energy efficient, are transforming the nation’s economy, but they are predominantly filled by white men, with Latino workers mostly stuck in entry-level positions and women and Black workers underrepresented in the industry overall, according to the report by a coalition of organizations including the Alliance to Save Energy and the American Association of Blacks in Energy.

… “So far it’s been white workers, particularly white men, who’ve benefited from this tremendous opportunity.” …

Meanwhile, Black workers have the biggest gap of any racial group between their representation in clean energy jobs and their numbers in the broader U.S. workforce, the report says. They make up roughly 8% of clean energy employees, though they are about 13% of U.S. workers overall.

Latino employees make up almost 17% of clean energy workers, just slightly below the 18% of jobs they hold in the broader U.S. workforce. But they tend to be concentrated in entry-level construction positions, “jobs that are some of the first to get cut when things get bad,” Keefe says. …

“What we’re seeing in clean energy is not a lot different from what we saw in the tech industry that is still overwhelmingly run and populated by men,” Keefe says. …

In a case study, the diversity report released Thursday focused on the role of technicians who install and fix wind turbines, the key component to generating energy with wind.

Install and fix wind turbines presumably means that a job requirement is lack of disabling fear of heights.

With more than 60,000 turbines in 41 states and two territories, wind power is a surging part of the economy, and senior technicians earn almost \$40 an hour. But Black employees and women each comprise just 5% of that workforce, according to the report. Seven in 10 turbine technicians are white, and 2 in 10 are Latino.

Blacks and women and, likely, especially black women tend to not like the risk of death by falling and thus shy away from jobs involving climbing up poles to fix things.

Presumably, the wind turbine industry will eventually stumble upon the ideal solution: don’t hire black women to repair turbines, instead hire them to manage the white and Latino and American Indian men who actually repair the turbines. The black women can stand around on the ground at the bottom of the windmills and tell the men to climb.

Or, ideally, the black women can sit around indoors at the main office and tell the men to climb via Slack.

Stereotypes about fear of heights have not always gone against nonwhites. For example, during the 1920s skyscraper boom in Manhattan, the most admired ethnicity for high iron jobs were Mohawk Indians from upstate. They were often said to lack the instinct to fear falling.

But, eventually, old Mohawk iron workers revealed that they really were scared of dying by falling off I-beams hundreds of feet high just like everybody else.

But, because they really liked getting these high-paid, high-prestige jobs, they just didn’t tell anybody about their fears.

 
Hide 97 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Eric416 says:

    I have heard more than one black guy state, ” I don’t go up any higher than I can jump.” Although that was generally heard more frequently before the woke revolution.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  2. Anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:

    Time to get those big, bold Cardi B’s wannabee’s up on a pole that matters!

    Not the same as squatting tour overweight behind for a ghetto
    Victoria’s Secret ad, is it Miss Thang?

    You think your black azz is tired now? Gitchazz up dat pole, girl! At 10 feet up, you’ll be begging to let white folks touch your hair! Even your weave!

    • LOL: Polistra
    • Replies: @Gamecock
    , @vinteuil
    , @El Dato
  3. But, eventually, old Mohawk iron workers revealed that they really were scared of dying by falling off I-beams hundreds of feet just like everybody else…

    Its a Mohawk thing.

    Joe Walsh said it in his own way:

    I’ll let you all in on a little secret
    If I could share with you a thing or two
    If you just act like you know what you’re doing
    Everybody thinks that you do

  4. Spot on Steve, the company I used to work for had 2 affirmative action hires; black women. Neither knew how to do a darn thing, and were physically incapable of doing the job at hand. So naturally they got promoted to a job in the office, and “oversaw” operations…

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  5. Cortes says:

    The Fire Service in Scotland has been rebranded to Fire and Rescue recently, in part at least due to the high number of callouts to extricate technicians from the interior of the huge wind turbine towers. According to my source, who was involved in training teams to work safely at height, plenty of the firefighters who applied to join the “rope rescue” units (a special rate was paid) couldn’t cope with the work and dropped out or failed the training which I presume was comprehensive. How thoroughly are the utilities companies vetting applicants and training their technical staff to work at height?

    • Replies: @Cortes
  6. Presumably, the wind turbine industry will eventually stumble upon the ideal solution: don’t hire black women to repair turbines, instead hire them to manage the white and Latino and American Indian men who actually repair the turbines. The black women can stand around on the ground at the bottom of the windmills and tell the men to climb.

    Or, ideally, the black women can sit around indoors at the main office and tell the men to climb via Slack.

    Come on, man! This job is ideally suited for WFH. We can hire legions of the woke to sit at home and bark out orders on their headsets to people who actually work. And in the interest of equity and reparative justice we can pay the WFH woke contingent 5x what the actual workers make.

    The WFH people can collect the extra child tax credits too, and post stuff to Twitter about their emotional labor

  7. Jack D says:

    As clean energy jobs grow, women and Black workers are at risk of being left behind

    If you are a reporter with a deadline, a handy all purpose headline in the Current Year is

    As [ X happens], women and Blacks are at risk of being left behind.

    This is a guaranteed not to fail story template.

    There is also the variant,

    [X happens], women and Blacks hit hardest.

    As in the famous headline,

    World Ends, Women and Blacks Hit Hardest

    • Agree: bomag, Arclight
  8. Travis says:

    Even most progressives realize that “climate change” is a scam. They use it as an excuse increase taxes and increase their power over us.

    The Earth was warmer during the Medieval warm period (MWP), also called the little climatic optimum, brief climatic interval that occurred from approximately 900 to 1300 AD, despite lower levels of CO2

    Another period of warmer temperatures occurred 2,100 years ago. The Roman Climatic Optimum, was a period of unusually-warm weather that ran from approximately 250 BC to AD 400.

    Notice that during these warmer periods Humans thrived. CO2 levels were also less than half of what they are today. There is no evidence that CO2 controls the climate and no evidence that a warmer planet would be bad for humans.

  9. MEH 0910 says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohawk_people#Mohawk_ironworkers_in_New_York

    High Steel

    This short documentary offers a dizzying view of the Mohawk of Kahnawake who work in Manhattan erecting the steel frames of skyscrapers. Famed for their skill in working with steel, the Mohawks demonstrate their nimble abilities in the sky. As a counterbalance, the viewer is also allowed a peek at their quieter community life on the Kahnawake Reserve, in Quebec.

    Directed by Don Owen – 1965 | 14 min

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_Bridge#First_design_and_collapse_of_August_29,_1907

  10. “the white and Latino and American Indian men who actually repair the turbines”

    Don’t Asian men do these jobs? No?

    • Replies: @Alden
  11. usNthem says:

    I guess big “clean energy” better start developing those make work jobs that blacks excel in.

    • Replies: @Forbes
  12. Cortes says:
    @Cortes

    A quick search for “Inside a Wind Turbine” threw up videos of different types of interiors. Here’s a company promo from 2010 showing the high-spec interior with two man lift:

    Other designs involve more daunting methods of ascent and descent.

  13. Alfa158 says:
    @Travis

    When we visited the ancient Roman resort of Herculaneum that was buried in the eruption, I noticed the formerly beachfront buildings are now half a mile from the coast. Similarly the original part of Ostia, the seaport for the city of Rome is now underwater.
    Although I haven’t been there, I understand that the beach in Britain where Julius Caesar landed is now a small hike inland.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    , @Cortes
  14. Rob says:

    I don’t want to sound racist, but aren’t most wind turbines in the fairly empty midwest, in rural areas? There aren’t a ton of black people in the Styx, are there? Is it a very good job for blacks, like physically? They surely lose body heat better than whites, and it is windy up there and cold a good chunk of the year. They may only do emergency repairs in February, but lots of the upper midwest is cold through a lot of the year.

    Culturally, I imagine that there are some culture clashes trying to move city folk black people into white working class, frequently “redneck” crews. Like they travel a lot, right? Are on the road a lot? It’s one thing to do a 9-5 with people of a different culture and class. It is quite another to spend a week in motels with the same guys every night. I could be totally wrong, but windmills are infrastructure, as in actual infrastructure, not daycare. They don’t take as much to maintain as they do to build. I’m guessing work crews travel all over, rather than the company having a crew in each cluster of turbines.

    Black culture is more parochial than white culture. By that, I mean blacks from place A cannot go to black bars in place B and get along just fine. He doesn’t have any friends. And the black guy looking to roll him has been friends with his boys since they were five. Blacks don’t move around as much as whites do. Sure, the Great Migration, but that was a long time ago, and they’ve been in place since.

    Probably a lot of the work is seasonal? Blacks tend not to be as careful with money as whites and are frequently better served by a steady paycheck. Certainly, they have more ne’er do well (and legitimately hard up) relatives than whites tend to. It’d be hard to say no to cousins you’ve known your whole life, who just need a few grand to get their hustle going or post bail when you are flush with cash, but looking at 3-4 months of no income.

    Also, affirmative action pulls blacks to where they’re not competent, but HR and your boss can’t fudge your review – you forget to buckle that one safety strap that one time, and that’s your last time. Now the company probably has to pay off someone to avoid a lawsuit. Pretty much every black person capable of reliably doing the work is AAed into an office. Also, at matched IQ, the white person has a lower verbal and higher performance IQ, and vice versa for the black. The black deficit with tools and intuitive physics hurts for blue-collar occupation.

    All that said, I have known black rednecks. Not in Thomas Sowell’s sense of blame every problem on lower-class whites who have no representation in media, so they can’t fight back, nor do they have any verbally-adept champions, because those all moved up the class ladder. I mean black rednecks who grew up in Craig county with all the white redneck kids. They are rednecks to the bone: dress like them, sound like them, have similar behavior… they aren’t LARPING (though I did know one through a LARP) it’s their culture from birth. Assuming they aren’t scared of heights, they’d have s good time on a windmill-maintenance crew, especially if it paid well.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  15. Dr. X says:

    Fighting climate change via green energy is the most important thing in the world, except, of course, for hiring more black women to climb up hundreds of feet in the air to repair windmill turbines

  16. Ano says:

    Dear Mr Sailer,

    Keep up with the times Racist!

    We already proudly employ Strong Black Women to make cowardly white guys climb up the pole to fix our wind turbines!

    See how Diversity Commissar Rihanna Ceros jabs away with a sharp implement to make scaredy-pants whitey go up!

    Yours,

    Di(ver)s(ity)ney Corporation

  17. Is the wind turbine industry something that’s good for the environment, or is it just an idiotic waste of resources that illustrates how dysfunctional America is?

    I’ve long suspected it was the latter, but you have to know more than most people do about energy generation in America to have a well founded opinion.

    Here’s an article supporting my suspicion.

    Perspective: Are wind farms better in theory than they are in practice?

    https://www.agdaily.com/technology/perspective-wind-farms-better-in-theory/

    QUOTE:
    Warren Buffett, whose companies build and operate wind farms, has said, “We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the reason we build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit.”

    Presently there are 4714 wind turbines installed in the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, with a nameplate capacity of 8281 megawatts. These overwhelm the grid at times, but when they are most needed — late summer, fall, foggy and cold winters — they often stand silent. Too much power when we don’t need it; no help when water supplies run low. In my opinion we should stop installing them and shift subsidies to grid improvements and power storage projects.

  18. eded says:

    Here is a great short documentary film from 1965 made by the National Film Board of Canada about Mohawk ironworkers. They commuted back and forth between NYC and Kahnawake in Quebec.

    https://www.nfb.ca/film/high_steel/

  19. I didn’t expect to enjoy the video much because I imagine there are 20 guys that do this same thing that have told the same story and didn’t get to. However, once she told us of her background, I was very impressed with her. Of course, at just under 4 minutes in, she shed a small tear – got to keep the woman audience.

    Though I’ve done some rock climbing (5.7 – 5.8 or so), I don’t like heights like that. Not only would you hardly ever find a black woman this brave, but there’s the caring factor. As much as I agree with Travis above regarding the Global Climate Stupidity, this young lady has dedicated her work life to a cause outside herself (whether valid or not) with no selfish reason other than, yeah, she could do climbing elsewhere but would be living in a van.*

    I just don’t think you’d see the selflessness in but a minuscule number of black women. Sure, they might be working for a cause, that that cause would be blackety-black-black (TM-J. Derbyshire).

    .

    * She came so close to “… down by the river”, also, but… the Millennials – don’t know nuthin’ bout nuthin.

  20. “Blacks and women and, likely, especially black women tend to not like the risk of death by falling and thus shy away from jobs involving climbing up poles to fix things.”

    So way way wait. Thought that blacks can do just about everything. On the ground there’s no one faster (track, marathons), they can jump higher and shoot better (NBA), and hit really really far HRs (MLB).

    So they’re actually afraid of heights? Wow. So, aside from not being the best swimmers in water, they also aren’t good with heights. Can understand the falling thing, but how come blacks aren’t the best swimmers in the world? Afraid of drowning? Excuses, excuses.

    Speaking of heights, wonder if blacks comprise a significant minority of commercial airline pilots? Or constitute a significant part of the US Air Force?

    Actually afraid of heights. Wonders never cease.

    At a time like this, actually stating this kind of thing, it does make one wonder…what would Malcolm Gladwell have to say? Perhaps if blacks were to get about 10k hrs of painting practice outside of tall buildings. Start at 1,300-ft. above ground on the top ledge of the Sears (Willis) Tower in Chicago. Swig stage painting should be up their alley. From there its a cinch. After all, if they can paint the Sears Tower from the outside 1,300 ft off the ground then they can do just about anything.

    • Replies: @acementhead
  21. Gamecock says:

    Could be worse:

    I was a dam builder
    Across a river deep and wide
    Where steel and water did collide
    A place called Boulder, on the wild Colorado
    I slipped and fell into the wet concrete below
    They buried me in that great tomb that knows no sound

  22. Gamecock says:
    @Anonymous

    Something doesn’t add up, [374]. Yeah, this thing is out there on duh web to see.

    But I was told 30 years ago that 1,000 feet was the max for a free climb tower; any taller, an elevator was needed. The problem being that, by the time you climbed 1,000 feet, it would be time to start climbing down, leaving no time for any actual work at the top.

    Betcha a helicopter deposited him at the top.

    • Thanks: Alden
  23. @Rob

    I used to live near turbines and they are pretty low maintenance. Most of the pay goes to the land owners. The light bulb changers are contractors and technological advances will eliminate those jobs entirely.

    There really aren’t many jobs from wind or solar. It’s more liberal wishful thinking than anything.

    I’m all for investing in clean energy but they don’t produce a fraction of the jobs as coal or natural gas.

    Liberals are really not numbers people. They have a hard time thinking about economics and want to live in some fantasy world where race doesn’t exist and everyone has a job at the local green energy company. They are really children in adult bodies that aren’t capable of solving serious problems.

    • Agree: Dr. X
    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @Rob
    , @Anonymous
  24. SafeNow says:

    The “grand bargain” of affirmative action has always been to accept a perfunctory job, but then not be feisty by trying to overreach your perfunctoriness. This worked in all occupations. But this has been breaking down during the last few years, as AA recipients have become more feisty. Also, in some fields, such as this one, there is no role for a perfunctory skillset.

    Disclosure: Even whites are limited at some skillsets. For example, the US cannot make computer chips. So Taiwan does it for the US. As some wag said, making computer chips is not rocket science – -it’s harder.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    , @epebble
  25. Ed says:

    Given a choice between white, Hispanic or black male labor, managers in the trades vastly prefer white or Hispanics.

    • Replies: @Arclight
  26. I did a spit-take when I ran across that story on Saturday.

    These idiots don’t understand that “CLEAN ENERGY JOBS” are essentially what most people would recognize as CONSTRUCTION jobs.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @El Dato
  27. @MEH 0910

    How many millions of dollars in OSHA fines did you see if this film was from today?

  28. Blacks been employed in infrastructure a long while.

  29. vinteuil says:
    @Anonymous

    For hundreds of years, high status jobs like these have been reserved for people who identify as male.

    The only way to correct this injustice is to reserve them for all volunteers who identify as female…until they’re all dead.

  30. bomag says:

    Any word on Asians in clean energy jobs?

  31. @Eric416

    I have heard more than one black guy state, ” I don’t go up any higher than I can jump.” Although that was generally heard more frequently before the woke revolution.

    I guess this is why step ladders have never caught on in the NBA.

  32. .. hiring more black women to climb up hundreds of feet in the air

    My bolical rayciss mind read this as

    .. hiring more fat, black women to climb up hundreds of feet in the air…,

    I feel a board game coming on.

  33. Arclight says:
    @Alfa158

    Observed the same thing at Herculaneum, which our guide helpfully pointed out meant the world was a lot warmer then. This was 2010 or so.

  34. Arclight says:
    @Ed

    Yes – I work with a lot of construction subcontractors and have had this conversation with many of them. Latinos are the hardest working, complain the least, and are definitely cheaper than whites. Blacks are the least reliable and complain the most (generally speaking). I’ve heard this out of the mouths of white and black managers.

    That said, my go-to guy for projects around my house is a self-employed black guy with a small Latino crew. He has reasonable prices and never sends me an invoice until he is sure I am totally happy with the quality of the work.

  35. Peterike says:

    “Climate change” proved you could fool some of the people all of the time, for decades on end. Hence, Covid.

    They really can do whatever the hell they want.

  36. Mike Tre says:

    “Fighting Climate Change vs. Equity”

    This is the kind of fight in which the only thing I root for are injuries. Kind of like when the Packers would play the Lions back when I cared about football.

  37. JMcG says:
    @SafeNow

    I’m sure the pilots are black.

    • Replies: @bomag
  38. As I’ve mentioned before, the Mohawks have an early (low) steel bridge on their reservation that the young men play on, so they get early, low-stakes experience “walking on iron”.

  39. Not totally off-topic: it seems that this year’s US Open women’s tennis tournament saw a changing of the guard at the top, i.e. from temperamental black SlayQueenzz to the two half-Asian girls in the final who seemed generally quite cheerful, and who even occasionally smiled and looked, oddly enough, happy about finding themselves at the pinnacle of their sport, as they are lauded as the new darlings of pop culture.

    But don’t worry; Serena and Naomi are still finding ways to deal constructively with their respective career problems, i.e. the ravages of age for the former, and the overwhelming desire to keep a low public profile because of anxiety over being looked at too much for the latter.

    Here they are, after the more tag, at their latest outing, i.e. the annual Met Gala:

    [MORE]

  40. Cortes says:
    @Alfa158

    For the shoreline changes in the Bay of Naples, see for example the observations in paragraph three of

    http://www.lyellcentre.ac.uk/sir-charles-lyell.html

    regarding inflation and deflation of a magma chamber.

  41. Anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @Fred C Dobbs

    These idiots don’t understand that “CLEAN ENERGY JOBS” are essentially what most people would recognize as CONSTRUCTION jobs.

    When have you ever seen an all black construction crew working on building some aspect of a house?

    Most of the readership here hasn’t.

    Why?

    Building inspectors insist construction work conform to white-established building codes, and that means competence requirements that are discriminatory for some, but not all minority groups! Note that Hispanic construction crews can pass the inspections, or fool the inspector into passing it, many times. Not so with other minorities, and y’all know who I’m thinking of!

    That’s right. Simple math shows that building safety codes are racist against blacks, as well as Down’s persons. Blacks tend not to complain because construction work is difficult, and requires thinking three-dimensionally. Improvisation is frowned upon by building inspectors when doing, say, electrical or plumbing work. Downs people don’t complain because they enjoy cheese.

    Now you know how it goes!

  42. @Arclight

    “Latinos are the hardest working, complain the least, and are definitely cheaper than whites.”

    Au contraire, mon frere. In the long-term aggregate, from the point of view of social, political, and demographic capital, Cheap Brown Labor is the most expensive labor there is.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Alden
  43. Seth says:

    Wind turbines tend to be in flat, rural areas, right? That’s not where a lot of blacks tend to live.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  44. @Rooster111

    Like the “job” Michelle Obama had then? The one the hospital abolished after her husband became POTUS.

  45. These things are scary enough at ground level:

    …the American Association of Blacks in Energy.

    What this cause really needs is an American Association of Energy in Blacks.

    It might be a little hard to clamber up 100+’ in this:

    But Atelier Versace has the solution:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @fish
  46. CCZ says:

    “…hiring more black women to climb up hundreds of feet in the air….”

    Not a wind turbine, but tall nonetheless, by about 1,000 feet.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
  47. @SafeNow

    “… For example, the US cannot make computer chips. ..”

    The US can make them but maybe not at a competitive price.

  48. The DEMs will demand (and push bond measures for) green schools. The GOPs will demand standardized testing for school carbon footprints.

    But there’s NO constituency for the 3Rs.

  49. fish says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I always wondered who they stuffed into the C3PO costume.

  50. epebble says:
    @SafeNow

    the US cannot make computer chips.

    Stupid comment. I live close to Hillsboro, Oregon where the leading processes for the next generation are invented. Additional Production Fabs are in Chandler, Arizona and Rio Rancho, New Mexico. Intel has over 80% market share in Computer CPUs. Taiwan may have some process edge recently. But it may vaporize any moment China decides.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_semiconductor_fabrication_plants

  51. Rob says:
    @John Johnson

    I’m rather fond of liberals, but they do not lean mathematical, it is true. I wish capital ownership were flatter – I would really like it if the rising tide would automatically lift all boats. Then increasing returns to capital would not be as destabilizing as it is.

    I also wish it were easier for people to be effectively re-trained. Centrist and corporate-owned Democrats are big on retraining and workforce education, but the recipients are less sanguine. Mostly from the hard experience of their socio-economic class.

    [MORE]

    Even if retraining were effective, actually getting a job in the new field usually requires relocating, and relocating is harder for people lower on the class ladder and higher on the age ladder. The lower down, the more culture is parochial. I think sports fandom is uninteresting, but people put a lot of identity in being a cheesehead, and going to someplace full of lousy cheddarheads is rough. They’ve got kids and wife, often with a job of her own. Sometimes she loses it at the same time.

    In West Virginia, moving out would be rough. They’ve all lived there for generations. Everyone else makes fun of them. Discriminates against them, so I’ve heard, Cost of living is higher just about everywhere. Where it is not, crime is incomprehensively more common. Especially against newcomers with no friends. Not to mention that West Virginians who wanted to leave did, for generations. Because of the stigma of West Virginity, relatives out of state are probably leery of taking in relatives. Life is different anywhere else, so they’ve probably lost touch.

    My dad and his siblings left Mississippi, and Mississippi jokes aside, white people from Mississippi are better off than West Virginians. White Misses are the oppressors, but White West Virginians continue to be exploited and polluted by absentee capitalists and landlords. A thought that might give us pause as we consider capitalists decamping for, well, have they chosen a country? In this age of globalism, do they just flit from Southampton to Aspen in seasons, and go to some spring and fall destinations of which I am unaware? Manhatten? Are Aspen and Southampton (Go Mariners!) not even where seriously rich people go these days?

    That all said, according to economics replacing jobs with machines is good – labor is a scarce resource, like everything else in economics, so freeing some while getting the equivalent output from less is a net benefit. In reality, it takes people a generation to recover, if not longer. What happened to the Rust Belt could happen to, well, all of us.

    I hope biotech, IT, ag, and Hollywood can keep us from falling off a cliff. I wish Primary Candidate Trump had been President. “Goy, Bye!” day was the worst day in history. Worse than the day Ray-Gun signed his amnesty. No, the day Ray-Gun normalized deficit spending was probably the day the death of America was sealed.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  52. @Rob

    Are Aspen and Southampton (Go Mariners!) not even where seriously rich people go these days?

    I’m sure they have their equivalent of the Hong Kongers’ Vancouver.

  53. Anonymous[502] • Disclaimer says:

    For example, during the 1920s skyscraper boom in Manhattan, the most admired ethnicity for high iron jobs were Mohawk Indians from upstate. They were often said to lack the instinct to fear falling.

    But, eventually, old Mohawk iron workers revealed that they really were scared of dying by falling off I-beams hundreds of feet high just like everybody else.

    A more genetically satisfying conclusion to that story would be if all the Mohawks workers had eventually been killed by falls due to actually having no fear of heights.

  54. Anonymous[502] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson

    I’m all for investing in clean energy but they don’t produce a fraction of the jobs as coal or natural gas.

    The purpose of the energy industry is to produce energy, not jobs.

  55. El Dato says:

    “What we’re seeing in clean energy is not a lot different from what we saw in the tech industry that is still overwhelmingly run and populated by men,” Keefe says. …

    Clean Energy Cultural Taxation!

    After the Y2K Crisis, the Software Engineering Crisis, the ongoing Software Safety&Security Crisis, The JavaScript Crisis, the Linus Torvalds Cussword Crisis and the Project Management Crisis we now have the Diversity Crisis in Software Development which crept up on us unseen, like a fresh virus from a beaker that Apu the intern dropped down the stairs in a lab, from whence we get fresh vocabulary:

    Cultural Taxation, Intersectionality, and Imposter Syndrome

    While diversity describes the variety of representations that exist within a group, inclusion refers to whether or not participants with different backgrounds are invited into a group, given full membership, and have a positive experience. Thus, the question is, “What are some of the core barriers for increasing diversity within software development?” [this is akin to “increasing GDP”: it sounds good] While individuals might experience multiple impediments to software development education and professions, we would like to point to three important challenges to inclusion, namely, cultural taxation, intersectionality, and imposter syndrome.

    Cultural taxation was introduced by Amado Padilla [not to be confused with José Padilla aka Abdullah al-Muhajir, the “Dirty Bomber” engineered by the FBI] in 1994, and refers to the “extra work and effort” forced upon ethnically diverse academics; however, the term is applicable to all types of diversity characteristics. Cultural taxation is defined by Padilla as “the obligation to show good citizenship toward the institution by serving its needs for ethnic representation on committees, or to demonstrate knowledge and commitment to a cultural group, which may even bring accolades to the institution but which is not usually rewarded by the institution on whose behalf the service was performed” (see Padilla p. 26). What is important here is that if we want to promote inclusion in software development, we must acknowledge the cost that minority practitioners pay in time and effort and remember to value their work by using more than mainstream metrics for promotion.

    Thus, you need have a “diversity tax rebate”.

    However, it is not just developers who may experience this challenge. Scholars who conduct research in a “diversity area” related to their personal experiences (e.g., gender research in computer science) and who are dedicated to fostering change often end up having dual research careers. As formulated by Padilla, the choice between conducting “ethnic research” or “mainstream research” frequently includes concerns about how “ethnic research” might be viewed on a tenure application. Cultural taxation—sometimes called the minority tax—exists for all types of diversity dimensions that are relevant to software development (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, and disabilities).

    So there are various taxes along all dimensions, and when you hit maximum dimensions, you should get maximum tax rebate. Plus actual monies from the government of course. .

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
  56. El Dato says:
    @Fred C Dobbs

    Well, this phrase already…

    Clean energy jobs, which range from creating electric cars to making buildings more energy efficient, are transforming the nation’s economy

    No. The nation’s economy reflects the fact that certain jobs, often created by legislation and sustained by fresh money injection or taxation carrot & stick schemes rather than demand or meaningful planning, are becoming more prevalent.

    This will lead to bad investments and all manner of stupid decisions, but let’s not dwell on this.

    “Clean energy jobs” fit right into this kind of (made-up by Borges) scheme:

    https://multicians.org/thvv/borges-animals.html

    In “The Analytical Language of John Wilkins,” Borges describes ‘a certain Chinese Encyclopedia,’ the Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge, in which it is written that animals are divided into:

    those that belong to the Emperor,
    embalmed ones,
    those that are trained,
    suckling pigs,
    mermaids,
    fabulous ones,
    stray dogs,
    those included in the present classification,
    those that tremble as if they were mad,
    innumerable ones,
    those drawn with a very fine camelhair brush,
    others,
    those that have just broken a flower vase,
    those that from a long way off look like flies.

  57. El Dato says:
    @Anonymous

    Man that music rankles.

    Here is the correct one that goes with.

  58. Pericles says:
    @Travis

    Geologically speaking, we are currently in an interglacial of the Quaternary Glaciation. Indeed, we are just 10,000 years out of the most recent glaciation, which lasted 100,000 years.

    Apparently glaciations are unusual, and the planet has mostly been in a ‘greenhouse’ state (est. 85%). So things have certainly been warmer before, like no permanent ice anywhere on the planet, and this has happened repeatedly without any civilization or even any humans at all.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quaternary_glaciation

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenhouse_and_icehouse_Earth

    (The current interglacial period is predicted to last another 50,000 years, by the way, after which time I suppose the white walls will march down from the north to destroy all our works. “Bah! Again!” says Conan.)

    • Replies: @El Dato
  59. El Dato says:

    OT, but why is there a need to raise taxes if one can just print money? Or these just two streams of disparate income?

    Democrats Try To Hide a \$3 Trillion Tax Increase From Voters

    Explaining a newly leaked House Ways and Means Committee plan to raise taxes by \$3,000,000,000,000, a Wall Street Journal news article reports, “Rep. Richard Neal (D., Mass.), the committee chairman, has said that detailing tax-increase plans too soon can give too much time for opposition to build.”

    It’s like one day you wake up and the US has invaded Iran or something. Wouldn’t want to discuss that too much now would you?

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  60. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Speaking of heights, wonder if blacks comprise a significant minority of commercial airline pilots? Or constitute a significant part of the US Air Force?

    The USAF has 2% black pilots, same in the Navy. This was quite a few years ago, but they were trying hard to get as many black pilots as they could and had been for at least twenty years. Most unlikely that the proportion has increased. In flying you can’t fake it. You aren’t working in an environment where other people can carry you.

    https://www.stripes.com/living/lifestyle/despite-recruitment-efforts-few-black-pilots-land-in-air-force-navy-cockpits-1.11138

  61. Here’s a BBC fluff piece on the growth of green jobs:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-58549135

    I’m sure they tried but they couldn’t find a black face, so a white girl had to do.

    The only way to reallly create a boom in green employment is to return to the technologies of the 18th century.

  62. El Dato says:
    @Pericles

    Well, the sun is getting more luminous continually, so you better get off this planet before the next 100 million years or so.

    Wouldn’t want to be the last bipoc-dolphin to switch off the light.

    The bottom line is that in less time than it has taken higher life forms to evolve into land creatures, the Earth’s biosphere may be changed by the inevitable course of the evolution of our Sun. In 300 million years or less, it may become very inhospitable for life to continue to exist on the land, and if we leave it alone, evolution may encourage life to return to the sea where the climate will be a bit more moderate.

    https://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/venus/q79.html

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  63. Dan Smith says:

    If you look at the number of black lesbians who have summitted an 8000 meter peak you’ll realize how non-diverse mountaineering is.

  64. @El Dato

    300 million!

    OK, I first thought you said 3 million. I was already on Expedia to book a sex tour in Thailand before the end. Quit freaking me out like that!

    As for 300 million years from now, that sounds pretty nice…

    • Replies: @El Dato
  65. I’m not any kind of a physicist or engineer, nor do I play one on TV.

    That said, I think a far better approach to cleaner energy is to focus on improved nuclear energy as a way to meet out electrical power needs.

    More advanced reactor designs exist that produce power more efficiently, can’t melt down, take up less space, don’t produce weapons grade elements or high levels of toxic waste, etc. Among them are thorium, molten salt, and “pebble bed” reactors.

    Those would be a far better bet than unreliable wind and solar energy.

    • Replies: @epebble
  66. The best solution would be to stop building wind turbines and remove the ones already there.

  67. Ralph L says:
    @CCZ

    I’m more impressed by the guy who took the photo.

    (yes, I know it’s a drone)

  68. Alden says:
    @stillCARealist

    Like women, their hands are too small and fingers too short for some jobs. And their eyes are dark brown and their hair is black.

    3 stereotypes in one sentence. Rant and rave liberals. It’s true.

  69. Jack D says:
    @Seth

    Rural areas, yes. Flat, no. The top of a mountain ridge line is a good place to put a row of wind turbines. If you’ve every been on top of a mountain, it tends to be windy up there. Also mountains are not good for much else so you’re not displacing other uses.

    This wind farm is in W. Virginia:

    Regarding fear of high places, blacks seem to avoid mountainous states. Originally, these places were not conducive to plantation agriculture but even after the Great Migration blacks tended to go to places that were pretty flat. But maybe this is because mountainous places are also not good for building steel mills and car factories, etc. to which the blacks migrated.

    • Replies: @Bernard
  70. Alden says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Cheap brown labor is only possible because the men’s basic living expenses are supported by their women and children’s welfare.

    The union movement began because 150 years ago there was no welfare. Widows moved in with family and the kids went to orphanages and off to work at 10 or 12.

    The married men with kids couldn’t support wives and kids on the meager wages. And if they complained, there was always a fresh boat or trainload of desperate workers arriving from Europe. So unions and 1920s immigration restrictions.

    The problem was solved. The capitalists get cheap labor. Because the welfare supports the women and childrenThe men live off the women and children. . The wages are spending money for cars toys etc as living expenses are paid by the taxpayers. And many of the kids live back in Central America and Mexico while the mothers collect welfare. They do have to make a short trip to America every August to enroll in school to satisfy the welfare department.

    Dad and moms cash wages, the welfare and the parents send \$50 – \$100 a month to the grandma in Honduras. Between the section 8 food card and cash benefits the parents make about a \$700 profit a month through the kids welfare while the kids live with grandma in Honduras or Mexico.

    Also a major cause of homelessness Because all the government and cheap private sector housing goes to illegal alien women and kids. Who provide housing for their men.

    Capitalist republicans and anti White democrats cooperated on this arrangement 60 years ago. It’s succeeded

  71. Forbes says:
    @MEH 0910

    I grew up in Upstate NY and remember a deep appreciation and awe-inspired respect for Mohawk iron workers walking the I-beams while erecting high rises.

  72. Forbes says:
    @usNthem

    Didn’t Obama already try that out in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009??

    \$27.2 billion for “green” energy; another \$4.25 billion at HUD for “green” energy projects; \$2 billion for energy research at DOE; \$13 billion to extend renewable energy tax credits; \$4.3 billion for home energy tax credit… And if it’s under \$100 million it doesn’t qualify to be mentioned.

    Not to mention Solyndra and other government guaranteed loans that went bust.

  73. epebble says:
    @Mr. Deplorable

    Disposal of spent waste is an intractable problem. Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository was conceived in 1987, approved in 2002 and terminated in 2011. There is no plan to dispose highly radioactive spent waste now.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_Mountain_nuclear_waste_repository

    On the weapons side, Hanford site has been working on processing spent waste from 1945. They may need another 50 or 100 years or more to finish the task. More than \$100 Billion has been spent. Trillions more may be needed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanford_Site

  74. Anon[196] • Disclaimer says:

    Two points:

    1. Blacks make up 5.8 percent of the population of California. Nationwide they make up 12.7 percent, but the Hispanic presence in California, among other things, means they are fewer than elsewhere. So whenever blacks complain there are “only 5 percent blacks” in some job, that is the equity level of proportional representation in California. No need to hire more. In reality it means that a lot of dumb blacks were hired under affirmative action.

    2. Clean energy jobs account for more fatalities per year than nuclear power during its entire existence. Those wind turbines account for a decent chunk of that. The U.S. should be building at least two or three of the latest generation nuclear power plants somewhere. Give it a shot.

  75. El Dato says:
    @epebble

    If it’s “highly radioactive” it won’t be that for long. Bury in subduction zone. End of story.

    Christ we have much bigger problems. Forever chemicals. It’s raining plastics. Trash heaps and dig sites that can be easily seen from space. Global warming. COVID and other viruses.

    All this “muh radioactive trash” is Green Panic transplanted from the 80s. It’s embarrassing. Enough.

    Plus you can build reactors that eat the stuff: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_fluid_reactor though of course the design-to-production phase has become exceedingly long in any such venture.

    Hanford is a military clusterfuck site on the level of military “burn pits” and to a lesser degree practically all “bases” which a chemical superfund sites. Military projects are full of retardation of an inhuman degree covered up by “secrecy” that the taxpayer can bail out later. Noit a reference.

  76. El Dato says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You know how it goes. You are busy, 10 million pass, you keep busy, another 10 million pass. Then suddenly you are at 300 million and you can only reflect on where all the time has gone to?

    This reminds me of an old Larry Niven story, “At the Core”, which ends like this (When you realize upon re-reading that Pierson Puppeteers somewhat Chinesey while Beowulf Shaeffer, the narrator, is Whitey Individualist)

    [MORE]

    The Core was a lovely multicolored jewel when it disappeared below the lens of the galaxy. I’d have liked to visit it someday, but there aren’t any time machines.

    I’d penetrated nearly to the Core in something like a month. I took my time coming home, going straight up along galactic north and flying above the lens where there were no stars to bother me, and still made it in two. All the way I wondered why the puppeteer had tried to cheat me at the last. Long Shot’s publicity would have been better than ever; yet the regional president had been willing to throw it away just to leave me broke. I couldn’t ask why, because nobody was answering my hyperphone. Nothing I knew about puppeteers could tell me. I felt persecuted.

    My come-hither brought me down at the base in the Farside End. Nobody was there. I took the transfer booth back to Sirius Mater, Jinx’s biggest city, figuring to contact General Products, turn over the ship, and pick up my pay.

    More surprises awaited me.

    1) General Products had paid one hundred and fifty thousand stars into my account in the Bank of Jinx. A personal note stated that whether or not I wrote my article was solely up to me.

    2) General Products has disappeared. They are selling no more spacecraft hulls. Companies with contracts have had their penalty clauses paid off. It all happened two months ago, simultaneously on all known worlds.

    3) The bar I’m in is on the roof of the tallest building in Sirius Mater, more than a mile above the streets. Even from here I can hear the stock market crashing. It started with the collapse of spacecraft companies with no hulls to build ships. Hundreds of others have followed. It takes a long time for an interstellar market to come apart at the seams, but, as with the Core novas, I don’t see anything that can stop the chain
    reaction.

    4) The secret of the indestructible General Products hull is being advertised for sale. General Products’ human representatives will collect bids for one year, no bid to be less than one trillion stars. Get in on the ground floor, folks.

    5) Nobody knows anything. That’s what’s causing most of the panic. It’s been a month since a puppeteer was seen on any known world. Why did they drop so suddenly out of interstellar affairs?

    I know.

    In twenty thousand years a flood of radiation will wash over this region of space.

    Thirty thousand light-years may seem a long, safe distance, but it isn’t, not with this big an explosion. I’ve asked. The Core explosion will make this galaxy uninhabitable to any known form of life. Twenty thousand years is a long time. It’s four times as long as human written history. We’ll all be less than dust before things get dangerous, and I for one am not going to worry about it. But the puppeteers are different. They’re scared. They’re getting out right now. Paying off their penalty clauses and buying motors and other equipment to put in their indestructible hulls will take so much money that even confiscating my puny salary would have been a step to the good.

    Interstellar business can go to hell; from now on, the puppeteers will have no time for anything but running. Where will they go? Well, the galaxy is surrounded by a halo of small globular clusters. The ones near the rim might be safe. Or the puppeteers may even go as far as Andromeda. They have the Long Shot for exploring if they come back for it, and they can build more. Outside the galaxy is space empty enough even for a puppeteer pilot, if he thinks his species is threatened.

    It’s a pity. This galaxy will be dull without puppeteers. Those two-headed monsters were not only the most dependable faction in interstellar business; they were like water in a wasteland of more-or-less humanoids. It’s too bad they aren’t brave, like us.

    But is it?

    I never heard of a puppeteer refusing to face a problem. He may merely be deciding how fast to run, but he’ll never pretend the problem isn’t there. Sometime within the next twenty millennia we humans will have to move a population that already numbers forty-three billion. How? To where? When should we start thinking about this? When the glow of the Core begins to shine through the dust clouds?

    Maybe men are the cowards — at the core.

  77. Bernard says:
    @Jack D

    Rural areas, yes. Flat, no. The top of a mountain ridge line is a good place to put a row of wind turbines. If you’ve every been on top of a mountain, it tends to be windy up there. Also mountains are not good for much else so you’re not displacing other uses.

    This wind farm is in W. Virginia:

    But absolutely hideous to look at. Environmentalist who speak of wanting nature in its most “pristine” state should find these wildly objectionable. Wind power is a farce. The resources required to build and maintain these structures far exceed the sporadic power they produce. Nuclear power was objected to by the same bunch, which would you prefer?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  78. Fun aside, a basic point:

    Minoritarianism and especially immigrationism/open-borderism is completely at odds with any sort of environmental concern.

    If you want a decent environment you want “ownership”–“stewardship”. People in every nation invested in taking care of their patch, for their posterity. (Akin to how living in a neighborhood of home owners–personally invested in maintaining their property–is better than a neighborhood of renters.)

    And, of course, if you want environmental protection it is critical to maintain a high IQ and highly conscientious population, that both has the productivity to generate the wealth to afford the extra cost of protecting the environment and the desire to do so.

    Suffice it to say, minoritarianism works against all the elements of environmental protection–maintaining your highly-capable/conscientious population and its ownership/stewardish of the nation.

    • Replies: @mulga mumblebrain
  79. @MEH 0910

    They should do a documentary on the Hispanic palm tree trimmers of LA.

  80. @El Dato

    I think it’s based on the fact that if you can’t raise all that tax money, nobody will believe the printed money is worth anything. The US is fortunate that we have all this historical equity built up in the nation such that the whole world is willing to buy in on our phony wealth.

    In the long run, I suppose we’ll no longer get away with all that inflating and people here and abroad will demand to see the actual value behind all that cash. But nobody knows how long that long run is. And the rest of the world is no better about spending within their means.

  81. @epebble

    “Disposal of spent waste is an intractable problem. ..”

    It’s an intractable political problem. Technically it is easy enough to come with plans that are reasonably safe. It is of course impossible to come up with plans that are perfectly safe.

  82. If anyone actually thought human induced part of global warming is an existential crisis, the program is pretty obvious and simple:

    — stop immigration (which entirely powers growth in the 1st world)

    — push population control especially where fertility is far above replacement–i.e. Africa

    — push nuclear power, in the 1st world while electrifying transportation; (solar and wind and methanol can definitely play a role, but you need nuclear for non-CO2 base load right now)

    Anyone see any evidence of that? From “the left”? The globo-establishment?

  83. @epebble

    Every four years Nevada mindlessly awards its (now) six electoral votes to whichever party’s figurehead candidate wins the state’s popular vote. This only benefits the two, old, big government parties.

    Instead, its electors should bargain for a commitment, from the highest bidding candidate (party), to:

    • open Yucca,
    • sell off in-state federal lands,
    • de-contaminate NTS,

    and so forth.

  84. Jack D says:
    @Bernard

    Environmentalist who speak of wanting nature in its most “pristine” state should find these wildly objectionable.

    Many of them do. They sure do disturb the view.

    The resources required to build and maintain these structures far exceed the sporadic power they produce.

    That part is false. Wind turbine prices have been falling (thanks to China) and once they are built they generate free electricity with low maintenance costs, so they are now cheaper than coal in many cases.

    In terms of resource (energy not dollar) payback, a wind turbine produces more energy that it takes to build one in as little as 5 months but has a useful life of 20 years:

    https://www.treehugger.com/energy-paypack-megawatt-wind-turbine-lasts-over-years-months-4858396

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @Bernard
  85. @Jack D

    That part is false. Wind turbine prices have been falling (thanks to China) and once they are built they generate free electricity with low maintenance costs, so they are now cheaper than coal in many cases.

    If that’s true, why are German power prices almost 3.5x higher than in the US?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_in_Germany#Electricity_prices
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_of_the_United_States#Tariffs_and_affordability

    My impression about tree hugger websites is that their calculations of cost are to the green power companies after subsidies are deducted. Consumers pay for these subsidies through higher electric rates.

    • Agree: Bernard
    • Replies: @mulga mumblebrain
  86. Bernard says:
    @Jack D

    Yeah sorry Jack, I’m not buying this source.

    Karl R. Haapala; Preedanood Prempreeda. Comparative life cycle assessment of 2.0 MW wind turbines. International Journal of Sustainable Manufacturing, 2014 DOI: 10.1504/IJSM.2014.062496

    Second, if it were the case that these mega eyesores were such a terrific return on investment, energy producers would be clamoring to put them up without government coercion and subsidies.

  87. @Travis

    I do admire really, really, pig ignorant Rightists so overcome with greed that they would rather see billions die than pay a little more tax. Evil doesn’t do it justice.

  88. @Johann Ricke

    Another Rightist more worried about its hip pocket than the fate of humanity. At least this final catastrophe has nicely illuminated just how insane and Evil the Right are, and have always been.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  89. @AnotherDad

    Ownership is the opposite of stewardship. The steward is totally concerned with preserving that which he has the duty, in his/her lifetime, to protect, then pass on to the next generation of stewards. The owner sees that entity as property, an investment, to be disposed of as he desires, whether preserved or clear-felled, mined or otherwise destroyed.

  90. bomag says:
    @JMcG

    Or the air traffic controllers.

  91. I’ve actually climbed up the interior ladder into the nacelle (the big boxy thing behind the blades that houses the gearbox, generator, etc.) on a production wind turbine, which was about 300 feet high. I was offered the opportunity to do a hub jump — where you more or less rappel down the front, through the blades and over nose cone — but it was way too terrifying for me. This is something that is done pretty routinely to do certain kinds of repairs. Of course, you want to make really, really sure there will not be enough wind to turn the blades while you are doing it.

    Two simple observations about the job:

    1. It would be tough to do it if you were out of shape, even if you had no fear of heights. You spend a lot of time time climbing 300 feet up ladders, then sometimes rappelling (though most uptower work is done inside the nacelle), then climbing back down 300 feet on a ladder. All carrying a decent amount of pretty heavy equipment, and generally with pretty heavy clothes. There are definitely women who can do this (I’ve met more than one), but a relatively lower percentage of them than men can do it, and a vastly lower percentage would want to do it

    2. The guys who do this work are generally total cowboys. Their prior jobs were much more likely to be in an oil field than at natural foods store. I’m pretty much the opposite of a cowboy, but loved these guys.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @JMcG
  92. @Recently Based

    Wait. They can’t lock the whole rotor for maintenance?

    Thanks for the interesting comment, too.

    • Replies: @Recently Based
  93. @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks.

    Yes, they can, but it creates a lot of wear and tear on the mechanism if you’re actually braking against serious wind, so you always try to schedule that kind of maintenance when there is little to no wind, etc.

  94. JMcG says:
    @Recently Based

    I’ve done some scary stuff, but rappelling from the top of Devil’s Tower was right up there. Trusting your existence to a bit of nylon rope, some aircraft cable, and a couple of epoxied bolts while perched over 900 feet of air definitely concentrated the mind.
    That was a really interesting comment, thank-you.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
$
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Commenting Disabled While in Translation Mode
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS